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  1. About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics What is Alzheimer's disease? What happens to ... with Alzheimer's disease? What is dementia? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain ...

  2. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is important for the brain to function well. Alzheimer's disease disrupts this intricate interplay. By compromising the ability ... of the brain changes that take place in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal structures called beta amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary ...

  3. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is important for the brain to function well. Alzheimer's disease disrupts this intricate interplay. By compromising the ... of the brain changes that take place in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal structures called beta amyloid plaques and ...

  4. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain changes that ... Alzheimer's disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the mystery of Alzheimer's ...

  5. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the mystery of Alzheimer's and related brain disorders As we learn more, researchers move ever ...

  6. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the next neuron. This cellular circuitry enables communication within the brain. Healthy neurotransmission is important for the brain to function well. Alzheimer's disease ...

  7. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely ...

  8. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more ...

  9. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's disease, but there is still much to learn. What other changes are taking place in the ... of Alzheimer's and related brain disorders As we learn more, researchers move ever closer to discovering ways ...

  10. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The human brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let ... of developing Alzheimer's disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the ...

  11. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain changes ... Alzheimer's disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the mystery of ...

  12. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the next neuron. This cellular circuitry enables communication within the brain. Healthy neurotransmission is important for ... diseases, genetics, and lifestyle factors have on the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease as the brain and ...

  13. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain changes that ... disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the mystery of Alzheimer's ...

  14. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... important for the brain to function well. Alzheimer's disease disrupts this intricate interplay. By compromising the ability of neurons to communicate with one another, the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific ...

  15. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changes that take place in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal structures called beta amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are ... is modified. In normal brain cells, tau stabilizes structures critical to the cell's internal transport system. Nutrients ...

  16. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tau separates from the microtubules, causing them to fall apart. Strands of this tau combine to form ... disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the mystery of Alzheimer's ...

  17. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Fujii, K.; Kakimi, S.; Mizutani, T.; Matsushima, H.; Ishikawa, A.

    1996-12-31

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer`s disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer`s disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si{sup 3+}) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si{sup 2+}) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using 5 MeV Si{sup 3+} microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer`s disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  18. Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that ... higher if a family member has had the disease. No treatment can stop the disease. However, some ...

  19. The rationale for deep brain stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Bari, Ausaf; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major worldwide health problem with no effective therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a useful therapy for certain movement disorders and is increasingly being investigated for treatment of other neural circuit disorders. Here we review the rationale for investigating DBS as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Phase I clinical trials of DBS targeting memory circuits in Alzheimer's disease patients have shown promising results in clinical assessments of cognitive function, neurophysiological tests of cortical glucose metabolism, and neuroanatomical volumetric measurements showing reduced rates of atrophy. These findings have been supported by animal studies, where electrical stimulation of multiple nodes within the memory circuit have shown neuroplasticity through stimulation-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and improved performance in memory tasks. The precise mechanisms by which DBS may enhance memory and cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients and the degree of its clinical efficacy continue to be examined in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:26443701

  20. Brain imaging of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhao Yin; Siou Li; Weina Zhao; Jiachun Feng

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease has the potential to create a major worldwide healthcare crisis. Structural MRI studies in patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are currently attracting considerable interest. It is extremely important to study early structural and metabolic changes, such as those in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and gray matter structures in the medial temporal lobe, to allow the early detection of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The microstructural integrity of white matter can be studied with diffusion tensor imaging. Increased mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy are found in subjects with white matter damage. Functional imaging studies with positron emission tomography tracer compounds enable detection of amyloid plaques in the living brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we will focus on key findings from brain imaging studies in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, including structural brain changes studied with MRI and white matter changes seen with diffusion tensor imaging, and other specific imaging methodologies will also be discussed.

  1. Neuroprotective Effect against Alzheimer's Disease of Porcine Brain Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wipawee Thukham-Mee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Despite the increasing importance of Alzheimer’s disease, no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Therefore, neuroprotective strategy is still required. Recent findings show that numerous substances possessing antioxidant can improve neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Based on the antioxidant effect and its reputation to serve as brain tonic in traditional folklore, we hypothesized that porcine brain extract could mitigate neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Therefore, this study was set up to determine the effect of porcine brain extract on memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease. Approach: Male Wistar rats (180-220 g had been orally given porcine brain extract at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg kg-1 BW for a period of 4 weeks before and 1 week after the induction of cognitive deficit condition as those found in early phase of Alzheimer’s disease via the intraventricular injection of AF64A, a cholinotoxin. Rats were assessed the spatial memory using Morris water maze test. Then, they were determined neuron density in hippocampus using histological techniques. Moreover, the assessment of acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and malondialdehyde (MDA level in hippocampus were also performed. Results: It was found that both doses of porcine brain extract could enhance memory, neuron and cholinergic neuron density in all subregions of hippocampus. In addition, the decreased AChE and MDA were also observed. Therefore, our results suggested that the possible underlying mechanism of the extract might occur partly via the decrease in oxidative stress marker, MDA and AChE. Conclusion: This study clearly demonstrates that porcine brain extract can protect against memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal model of Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, it should be serve as the potential food supplement or adjuvant therapy against Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related cognitive

  2. Brain Tocopherols Related to Alzheimer Disease Neuropathology in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Martha Clare; Schneider, Julie A.; LI Hong; Tangney, Christy C; Nag, Sukrit; Bennett, David A.; Honer, William G.; Barnes, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Randomized trials of α-tocopherol supplements on cognitive decline are negative whereas studies of dietary tocopherols show benefit. We investigated these inconsistencies by analyzing the relations of α- and γ-tocopherol brain concentrations to Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology among 115 deceased participants of the prospective Rush Memory and Aging Project. Associations of amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangle severity with brain tocopherol concentrations were examined in separate adju...

  3. Disrupted modular brain dynamics reflect cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, W; van der Flier, W M; Koene, T; Smits, L L; Scheltens, P; Stam, C J

    2012-02-15

    The relation between pathology and cognitive dysfunction in dementia is still poorly understood, although disturbed communication between different brain regions is almost certainly involved. In this study we combine magneto-encephalography (MEG) and network analysis to investigate the role of functional sub-networks (modules) in the brain with regard to cognitive failure in Alzheimer's disease. Whole-head resting-state (MEG) was performed in 18 Alzheimer patients (age 67 ± 9, 6 females, MMSE 23 ± 5) and 18 healthy controls (age 66 ± 9, 11 females, MMSE 29 ± 1). We constructed functional brain networks based on interregional synchronization measurements, and performed graph theoretical analysis with a focus on modular organization. The overall modular strength and the number of modules changed significantly in Alzheimer patients. The parietal cortex was the most highly connected network area, but showed the strongest intramodular losses. Nonetheless, weakening of intermodular connectivity was even more outspoken, and more strongly related to cognitive impairment. The results of this study demonstrate that particularly the loss of communication between different functional brain regions reflects cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. These findings imply the relevance of regarding dementia as a functional network disorder. PMID:22154957

  4. Brain ischemia with Alzheimer phenotype dysregulates Alzheimer's disease-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-06-01

    There are evidences for the influence of Alzheimer's proteins on postischemic brain injury. We present here an overview of the published evidence underpinning the relationships between β-amyloid peptide, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, presenilins, apolipoproteins, secretases and neuronal survival/death decisions after ischemia and development of postischemic dementia. The interactions of above molecules and their influence and contribution to final ischemic brain degeneration resulting in dementia of Alzheimer phenotype are reviewed. Generation and deposition of β-amyloid peptide and tau protein pathology are essential factors involved in Alzheimer's disease development as well as in postischemic brain dementia. Postischemic injuries demonstrate that ischemia may stimulate pathological amyloid precursor protein processing by upregulation of β- and γ-secretases and therefore are capable of establishing a vicious cycle. Functional postischemic brain recovery is always delayed and incomplete by an injury-related increase in the amount of the neurotoxic C-terminal of amyloid precursor protein and β-amyloid peptide. Finally, we present here the concept that Alzheimer's proteins can contribute to and/or precipitate postischemic brain neurodegeneration including dementia with Alzheimer's phenotype. PMID:26940197

  5. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  6. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... processes continue, the brain shrinks and loses function. We now know a great deal about changes that ... mystery of Alzheimer's and related brain disorders As we learn more, researchers move ever closer to discovering ...

  7. Immunohistological detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the Alzheimer's disease brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appelt Denah M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD appears to evolve from an interplay between genetic and environmental factors. One environmental factor that continues to be of great interest is that of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and its association with late-onset disease. Detection of this organism in clinical and autopsy samples has proved challenging using a variety of molecular and histological techniques. Our current investigation utilized immunohistochemistry with a battery of commercially available anti-C. pneumoniae antibodies to determine whether C. pneumoniae was present in areas typically associated with AD neuropathology from 5 AD and 5 non-AD control brains. Results Immunoreactivity for C. pneumoniae antigens was observed both intracellularly in neurons, neuroglia, endothelial cells, and peri-endothelial cells, and extracellularly in the frontal and temporal cortices of the AD brain with multiple C. pneumoniae-specific antibodies. This immunoreactivity was seen in regions of amyloid deposition as revealed by immunolabeling with two different anti-beta amyloid antibodies. Thioflavin S staining, overlaid with C. pneumoniae immunolabeling, demonstrated no direct co-localization of the organism and amyloid plaques. Further, the specificity of C. pneumoniae labeling of AD brain sections was demonstrated using C. pneumoniae antibodies pre-absorbed against amyloid β 1-40 and 1-42 peptides. Conclusions Anti-C. pneumoniae antibodies, obtained commercially, identified both typical intracellular and atypical extracellular C. pneumoniae antigens in frontal and temporal cortices of the AD brain. C. pneumoniae, amyloid deposits, and neurofibrillary tangles were present in the same regions of the brain in apposition to one another. Although additional studies are required to conclusively characterize the nature of Chlamydial immunoreactivity in the AD brain, these results further implicate C. pneumoniae infection with the

  8. Brain SPECT imaging of Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the early diagnostic and prognostic value of brain SPECT imaging in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Brain SPECT imaging and follow-up study were performed in 33 AD patients, 17 MCI patients and 12 cognitive normal subjects. Results: The typical feature of AD was bilateral temporoparietal hypoperfusion. Compared with MCI and normal group, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of temporal lobe, parietal lobe, frontal lobe, thalamus and cingulum decreased significantly (P< 0.05). MCI had a significant lower rCBF in temporal lobe only than that in normal group (P<0.05). Besides, the rCBF in cingulum of instable MCI was much lower than that in cingulum of stable MCI (P<0.05). Conclusion: Brain SPECT imaging can provide useful information for the early diagnosis of AD and MCI, and also for the prognosis of MCI. (authors)

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  10. Clearance systems in the brain-implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasoff-Conway, Jenna M; Carare, Roxana O; Osorio, Ricardo S; Glodzik, Lidia; Butler, Tracy; Fieremans, Els; Axel, Leon; Rusinek, Henry; Nicholson, Charles; Zlokovic, Berislav V; Frangione, Blas; Blennow, Kaj; Ménard, Joël; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wisniewski, Thomas; de Leon, Mony J

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation of toxic protein aggregates-amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau tangles-is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ accumulation has been hypothesized to result from an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance; indeed, Aβ clearance seems to be impaired in both early and late forms of AD. To develop efficient strategies to slow down or halt AD, it is critical to understand how Aβ is cleared from the brain. Extracellular Aβ deposits can be removed from the brain by various clearance systems, most importantly, transport across the blood-brain barrier. Findings from the past few years suggest that astroglial-mediated interstitial fluid (ISF) bulk flow, known as the glymphatic system, might contribute to a larger portion of extracellular Aβ (eAβ) clearance than previously thought. The meningeal lymphatic vessels, discovered in 2015, might provide another clearance route. Because these clearance systems act together to drive eAβ from the brain, any alteration to their function could contribute to AD. An understanding of Aβ clearance might provide strategies to reduce excess Aβ deposits and delay, or even prevent, disease onset. In this Review, we describe the clearance systems of the brain as they relate to proteins implicated in AD pathology, with the main focus on Aβ. PMID:26195256

  11. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer's disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer's disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si3+) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si2+) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease using 5 MeV Si3+ microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  12. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  13. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: ...

  14. Dyslipidemia and Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene L. Bowman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blood-brain barrier (BBB dysfunction may have a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Modifiable factors associated with BBB function may have therapeutic implication. This study tested the hypothesis that dyslipidemia is associated with BBB impairment in mild-to-moderate AD. Methods. Thirty-six subjects with AD were followed for 1 year. Fasting CSF and plasma were collected with clinical assessments at baseline and 12 months. BBB impairment was defined as CSF albumin index ≥9. Independent t-tests and linear regression assessed the relationship between plasma lipoproteins and BBB integrity. Results. Dyslipidemia was prevalent in 47% of the population, and in 75% of those with BBB impairment. Subjects with BBB impairment had significantly higher mean plasma triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol (TG, P=0.007; HDL, P=0.043. Plasma triglycerides explained 22% of the variance in BBB integrity and remained significant after controlling for age, gender, ApoE-4 genotype, blood pressure, and statin use. Conclusion. Dyslipidemia is more prevalent in AD subjects with BBB impairment. Plasma triglyceride and HDL cholesterol may have a role in maintaining BBB integrity in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Plasma biomarkers of brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Thambisetty

    Full Text Available Peripheral biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD reflecting early neuropathological change are critical to the development of treatments for this condition. The most widely used indicator of AD pathology in life at present is neuroimaging evidence of brain atrophy. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of plasma to derive biomarkers associated with brain atrophy in AD. Using gel based proteomics we previously identified seven plasma proteins that were significantly associated with hippocampal volume in a combined cohort of subjects with AD (N = 27 and MCI (N = 17. In the current report, we validated this finding in a large independent cohort of AD (N = 79, MCI (N = 88 and control (N = 95 subjects using alternative complementary methods-quantitative immunoassays for protein concentrations and estimation of pathology by whole brain volume. We confirmed that plasma concentrations of five proteins, together with age and sex, explained more than 35% of variance in whole brain volume in AD patients. These proteins are complement components C3 and C3a, complement factor-I, γ-fibrinogen and alpha-1-microglobulin. Our findings suggest that these plasma proteins are strong predictors of in vivo AD pathology. Moreover, these proteins are involved in complement activation and coagulation, providing further evidence for an intrinsic role of these pathways in AD pathogenesis.

  16. Alzheimer's disease: Is this a brain specific diabetic condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Vanita; Deshmukh, Rahul; Jaswal, Priya; Kumar, Puneet; Bariwal, Jitender

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are the two major health issues affecting millions of elderly people worldwide, with major impacts in the patient's daily life. Numerous studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared with healthy individuals. The principal biological mechanisms that associate with the progression of diabetes and AD are not completely understood. Impaired insulin signaling, uncontrolled glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, abnormal protein processing, and the stimulation of inflammatory pathways are common features to both AD and T2DM. In recent years brain specific abnormalities in insulin and insulin like growth factor (IGF) signaling considered as a major trigger involved in the etiopathogenesis of AD, showing T2DM like milieu. This review summarizes the pathways that might link diabetes and AD and the effect of diminished insulin. PMID:27235734

  17. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... proteins in the neuron's cell membrane are processed differently. Normally, an enzyme called alpha-secretase snips amyloid ... Alzheimer's disease, but there is still much to learn. What other changes are taking place in the ...

  18. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receive messages from each other as electrical charges travel down the axon to the end of the ... another place. These released fragments are thought to benefit neurons. In Alzheimer's disease, the first cut is ...

  19. Alzheimer's disease gene signature says: beware of brain viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianni Manuela

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings from a genome wide association investigation in a large cohort of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and non demented controls (CTR showed that a limited set of genes was in a strong association (p > l0-5 with the disease. Presentation of the hypothesis In this report we suggest that the polymorphism association in 8 of these genes is consistent with a non conventional interpretation of AD etiology. Nectin-2 (NC-2, apolipoprotein E (APOE, glycoprotein carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule- 16 (CEACAM-16, B-cell lymphoma-3 (Bcl-3, translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (T0MM-40, complement receptor-1 (CR-l, APOJ or clusterin and C-type lectin domain A family-16 member (CLEC-16A result in a genetic signature that might affect individual brain susceptibility to infection by herpes virus family during aging, leading to neuronal loss, inflammation and amyloid deposition. Implications of the hypothesis We hypothesized that such genetic trait may predispose to AD via complex and diverse mechanisms each contributing to an increase of individual susceptibility to brain viral infections

  20. Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Wardak, Mirwais

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique and powerful imaging technique that is used to visualize and quantify various biological processes in living subjects in health and disease. PET imaging can also provide biological information for the assessment of therapies. In this dissertation, we will cover three projects that utilize the quantitative capability of PET for studying two neurological disorders: Alzheimer's disease and brain tumors.One of the goals in PET imaging is to produce...

  1. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The human brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let ... the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain ...

  2. Neurogenesis in the adult brain: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Veronica; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-10-01

    The function of neurogenesis in the adult brain is still unknown. Interventions such as environmental enrichment and exercise impinge on neurogenesis, suggesting that the process is regulated by experience. Conversely, a role for neurogenesis in learning has been proposed through 'cellular plasticity', a process akin to synaptic plasticity but operating at the network level. Although neurogenesis is stimulated by acute injury, and possibly by neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it does not suffice to restore function. While the role and direction of change in the neurogenic response at different stages of AD is still a matter of debate, it is possible that a deficit in neurogenesis may contribute to AD pathogenesis since at least one of the two regions ostensibly neurogenic in the adult human brain (the subgranular zone of the dentage gyrus and the ventriculo-olfactory neurogenic system) support high-level functions affected in early AD (associative memory and olfaction respectively). The age of onset and the rate of progression of sporadic forms of AD are highly variable. Sporadic AD may have a component of insufficient neurogenic replacement or insufficient neurogenic stimulation that is correlated with traits of personal history; the rate of neurogenesis and the survival of replicating progenitors is strongly modified by behavioral interventions known to impinge on the rate of neurogenesis and the probability of survival of newly born neurons--exercise, enriched experience, and learning. This view is consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that higher education and increased participation in intellectual, social and physical aspects of daily life are associated with slower cognitive decline in healthy elderly ("cognitive reserve") and may reduce the risk of AD. Although neurogenesis can be modulated exogenously by growth factors, stimulation of neurogenesis as a mean to treat neurodegeneration is still for the most part

  3. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Tatjana; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga;

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD...

  4. Neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease (AD). What Can Proteomics Tell Us About the Alzheimer's Brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Alvarado, Guillermo; Gershoni-Emek, Noga; Perlson, Eran; Bronfman, Francisca C

    2016-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's diseases (AD), are becoming more prevalent as the population ages. However, the mechanisms that lead to synapse destabilization and neuron death remain elusive. The advent of proteomics has allowed for high-throughput screening methods to search for biomarkers that could lead to early diagnosis and treatment and to identify alterations in the cellular proteome that could provide insight into disease etiology and possible treatment avenues. In this review, we have concentrated mainly on the findings that are related to how and whether proteomics studies have contributed to two aspects of AD research, the development of biomarkers for clinical diagnostics, and the recognition of proteins that can help elucidate the pathways leading to AD brain pathology. As a result of these studies, several candidate cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers are now available for further validation in different AD cohorts. Studies in AD brain and AD transgenic models support the notion that oxidative damage results in the alterations of metabolic enzymes and that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to AD neuropathology. PMID:26657538

  5. Dependence of elemental concentrations in Alzheimer brain tissue on disease duration and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been recent interest in determining elemental concentrations of brain tissue affected by Alzheimer's disease and comparing these with concentrations in 'normal' brain tissue. Although age and sex influences on elemental concentrations are often allowed for, the duration for which a patient was suffering from Alzheimer's disease is a factor rarely considered. In the work presented the concentrations of sodium, potassium, chlorine and bromine in the frontal lobe of the Alzheimer brain are determined using the techniques of particle induced X ray emission (PIXE) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Concentrations of Na, Cl and Br were found to be high in Alzheimer brain tissue compared with 'normal' tissue, with concentrations lowest in brain tissue of long disease duration. Potassium, on the other hand, was found to have low concentrations in Alzheimer brain tissue but exhibited the highest concentrations in brain tissue of longest disease duration. The implication of this is that for concentrations from different sources to be compared, the disease duration is an important factor. (author)

  6. Data set of interactomes and metabolic pathways of proteins differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minjarez, Benito; Calderón-González, Karla Grisel; Valero Rustarazo, Ma Luz; Herrera-Aguirre, María Esther; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Rincon-Limas, Diego E; Sánchez Del Pino, Manuel M; Mena, Raul; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer׳s disease is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly and its frequency is on the rise worldwide. It is considered the result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, being many of them unknown. Therefore, there is a dire necessity for the identification of novel molecular players for the understanding of this disease. In this data article we determined the protein expression profiles of whole protein extracts from cortex regions of brains from patients with Alzheimer׳s disease in comparison to a normal brain. We identified 721 iTRAQ-labeled polypeptides with more than 95% in confidence. We analyzed all proteins that changed in their expression level and located them in the KEGG metabolic pathways, as well as in the mitochondrial complexes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase. In addition, we analyzed the over- and sub-expressed polypeptides through IPA software, specifically Core I and Biomarkers I modules. Data in this article is related to the research article "Identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer's disease using iTRAQ labeling and tandem mass spectrometry" (Minjarez et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27257613

  7. About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes Age-related changes in the brain Genetics Health, ... for the Causes of AD" NIA Information on Causes Alzheimer’s Disease in People with Down Syndrome Understanding ...

  8. Caloric restriction: beneficial effects on brain aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Vandendriessche, Charysse; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-08-01

    Dietary interventions such as caloric restriction (CR) extend lifespan and health span. Recent data from animal and human studies indicate that CR slows down the aging process, benefits general health, and improves memory performance. Caloric restriction also retards and slows down the progression of different age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the specific molecular basis of these effects remains unclear. A better understanding of the pathways underlying these effects could pave the way to novel preventive or therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms and effects of CR on aging and Alzheimer's disease. A potential alternative to CR as a lifestyle modification is the use of CR mimetics. These compounds mimic the biochemical and functional effects of CR without the need to reduce energy intake. We discuss the effect of two of the most investigated mimetics, resveratrol and rapamycin, on aging and their potential as Alzheimer's disease therapeutics. However, additional research will be needed to determine the safety, efficacy, and usability of CR and its mimetics before a general recommendation can be proposed to implement them. PMID:27240590

  9. About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment How is Alzheimer's disease treated? What ... being researched? What are clinical trials? How is Alzheimer's disease treated? Alzheimer's disease is complex, and it ...

  10. Brain interleukin 1 and S-100 immunoreactivity are elevated in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, W S; Stanley, L C; Ling, C; White, L.; MacLeod, V; Perrot, L J; White, C.L.; Araoz, C

    1989-01-01

    Interleukin 1, an immune response-generated cytokine that stimulates astrocyte proliferation and reactivity (astrogliosis), was present in up to 30 times as many glial cells in tissue sections of brain from patients with Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease compared with age-matched control subjects. Most interleukin 1-immunoreactive glia in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease were classified as microglia. The number of interleukin 1 immunoreactive neurons did not appear to differ in Down synd...

  11. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease, but there is still much to learn. What other changes are taking place in the aging brain and its cells and what influence do other diseases, genetics, and lifestyle factors ...

  12. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease disrupts this intricate interplay. By compromising the ability of neurons to communicate with one another, the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain changes that ...

  13. Brain region-specificity of palmitic acid-induced abnormalities associated with Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Melrose Joseph; Balu Deebika; Patil Sachin; Chan Christina

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease mostly affecting the basal forebrain, cortex and hippocampus whereas the cerebellum is relatively spared. The reason behind this region-specific brain damage in AD is not well understood. Here, we report our data suggesting "differential free fatty acid metabolism in the different brain areas" as a potentially important factor in causing the region-specific damage observed in AD brain. Findings The astrog...

  14. About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms Early signs and symptoms Mild Alzheimer's ... more about other early signs of Alzheimer's » Mild Alzheimer's disease As the disease progresses, people experience greater ...

  15. Brain interleukin 1 and S-100 immunoreactivity are elevated in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, W S; Stanley, L C; Ling, C; White, L; MacLeod, V; Perrot, L J; White, C L; Araoz, C

    1989-01-01

    Interleukin 1, an immune response-generated cytokine that stimulates astrocyte proliferation and reactivity (astrogliosis), was present in up to 30 times as many glial cells in tissue sections of brain from patients with Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease compared with age-matched control subjects. Most interleukin 1-immunoreactive glia in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease were classified as microglia. The number of interleukin 1 immunoreactive neurons did not appear to differ in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease compared with control brain. Numerous temporal lobe astrocytes in Alzheimer disease and postnatal Down syndrome were intensely interleukin 1-, S-100-, and glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive and had reactive structure. Interleukin 1 levels in Alzheimer disease temporal lobe homogenates were elevated, as were the levels of S-100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, two proteins reportedly elevated in reactive astrocytes. These data suggest that increased expression of S-100 in Down syndrome, resulting from duplication of the gene on chromosome 21 that encodes the beta subunit of S-100, may be augmented by elevation of interleukin 1. As a corollary, the astrogliosis in Alzheimer disease may be promoted by elevation of interleukin 1. Images PMID:2529544

  16. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a protein called tau is modified. In normal brain cells, tau stabilizes structures critical to the cell's internal ... other changes are taking place in the aging brain and its cells and what influence do other diseases, genetics, and ...

  17. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intricate interplay. By compromising the ability of neurons to communicate with one another, the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain changes that take ...

  18. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... another, the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the ... modified. In normal brain cells, tau stabilizes structures critical to the cell's internal transport system. Nutrients and ...

  19. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with one another, the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some ... disconnect from each other and eventually die, causing memory loss. As these processes continue, the brain shrinks ...

  20. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigg

  1. Brain region's relative proximity as marker for Alzheimer's disease based on structural MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark; Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, incurable neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia. It cannot be prevented, cured or drastically slowed, even though AD research has increased in the past 5-10 years. Instead of focusing on the brain volume or on the single...

  2. Elemental analysis of the frontal lobe of 'normal' brain tissue and that affected by Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Normal' brain tissue and brain tissue affected by Alzheimer's disease has been taken from the frontal lobe of both hemispheres and their elemental compositions in terms of major, minor and trace elements compared. Brain samples were obtained from the MRC Alzheimer's Disease Brain Bank, London. 25 samples were taken from 18 individuals (5 males and 13 females) of mean age 79.9 ± 7.3 years with pathologically confirmed Alzheimer's disease and 26 samples from 15 individuals (8 males and 7 females) of mean age 71.8 ± 13.0 years with no pathological sings of Alzheimer's disease ('normals'). The elemental concentration of the samples were determined by the techniques of Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analysis, particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Sc, Fe, Zn, Se, Br, Rb and Cs were detected by INAA and significant differences in concentrations were found between concentrations in normal and Alzheimer tissue for the elements. Na, Cl, K, Se, Br and Rb, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Zn and Cd were detected by PIXE analysis and significant differences found for the elements P, S, Cl, K and Ca. (author)

  3. Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159116.html Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage' Normally, blood-brain barrier ... HealthDay News) -- People in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease may have more "leaks" in the barrier ...

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160137.html Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's Although treatment seems safe, benefit isn't yet ... brain stimulation appears safe for people with early Alzheimer's disease -- and might even slow down memory loss ...

  5. Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159116.html Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage' Normally, blood-brain barrier ... HealthDay News) -- People in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease may have more "leaks" in the barrier ...

  6. Neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main purposes of neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease have been moved from diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's disease to diagnosis of very early Alzheimer's disease at a prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment, prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, and differential diagnosis from other diseases causing dementia. Structural MRI studies and functional studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and brain perfusion SPECT are widely used in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Outstanding progress in diagnostic accuracy of these neuroimaging modalities has been obtained using statistical analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis after spatial normalization of individual scans to a standardized brain-volume template instead of visual inspection or a conventional region of interest technique. In a very early stage of Alzheimer's disease, this statistical approach revealed gray matter loss in the entorhinal and hippocampal areas and hypometabolism or hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex. These two findings might be related in view of anatomical knowledge that the regions are linked through the circuit of Papez. This statistical approach also offers accurate evaluation of therapeutical effects on brain metabolism or perfusion. The latest development in functional imaging relates to the final pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease-amyloid plaques. Amyloid imaging might be an important surrogate marker for trials of disease-modifying agents. (author)

  7. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren P. Klosinski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical.

  8. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosinski, Lauren P; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N; Harrington, Michael G; Christensen, Trace A; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-12-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical. PMID:26844268

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Fact Sheet The Genetics of Disease ...

  10. Neuroimaging and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and addiction-related degenerative brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussotte, Florence F; Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we describe how multi-modal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear. PMID:24142306

  11. A protein homeostasis signature in healthy brains recapitulates tissue vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Rosie; Sormanni, Pietro; Vecchi, Giulia; Ciryam, Prajwal; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-08-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, aggregates of Aβ and tau in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread progressively across brain tissues following a characteristic pattern, implying a tissue-specific vulnerability to the disease. We report a transcriptional analysis of healthy brains and identify an expression signature that predicts-at ages well before the typical onset-the tissue-specific progression of the disease. We obtain this result by finding a quantitative correlation between the histopathological staging of the disease and the expression patterns of the proteins that coaggregate in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, together with those of the protein homeostasis components that regulate Aβ and tau. Because this expression signature is evident in healthy brains, our analysis provides an explanatory link between a tissue-specific environmental risk of protein aggregation and a corresponding vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27532054

  12. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El;

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and...... trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  13. Clock Drawing Performance and Brain Morphology in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, Philipp A.; Toro, Pablo; Santos, Vasco Dos; Essig, Marco; Schroder, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely used instrument in the neuropsychological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As CDT performance necessitates several cognitive functions (e.g., visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive functioning), an interaction of multiple brain regions is likely. Fifty-one subjects with mild cognitive…

  14. Microprobe PIXE analysis of aluminium in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, S.; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Kakimi, S.; Fujii, K.

    1996-04-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), we examined aluminium (Al) in the rat liver, and in the brains (hippocampus) of Alzheimer's disease patients using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobe and proton (2 MeV) microprobe PIXE analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si 2+) have several time's higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. (1) In the rat liver, Al was detected in the cell nuclei, where phosphorus (P) was most densely distributed. (2) We also demonstrated Al in the cell nuclei isolated from Alzheimer's disease brains using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobes. Al spectra were detected using 2 MeV proton microprobes in the isolated brain cell nuclei. Al could not be observed in areas where P was present in relatively small amounts, or was absent. Our results indicate that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells.

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Medications Fact Sheet Treatment for Mild to ...

  16. Understanding Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to Know Introduction Many ...

  17. Comparative Lipidomic Analysis of Mouse and Human Brain with Alzheimer Disease*

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Robin B.; Oliveira, Tiago Gil; Cortes, Etty P.; Honig, Lawrence S.; Duff, Karen E.; Small, Scott A.; Wenk, Markus R.; Shui, Guanghou; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    Lipids are key regulators of brain function and have been increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, a systems-based approach was employed to determine the lipidome of brain tissues affected by AD. Specifically, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to profile extracts from the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and cerebellum of late-onset AD (LOAD) patients, as well as the forebrain of three transgenic familial AD (FAD) mouse ...

  18. Patterns of regional brain hypometabolism associated with knowledge of semantic features and categories in alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahn, R.; Garrard, P.; Talazko, J.;

    2006-01-01

    The study of semantic memory in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has raised important questions about the representation of conceptual knowledge in the human brain. It is still unknown whether semantic memory impairments are caused by localized damage to specialized regions or by diffuse...... and nonliving concepts, as well as visual feature knowledge of living objects, and against distributed accounts of semantic memory that view visual and functional features of living and nonliving objects as distributed across a common set of brain areas....

  19. The effect of aging on brain barriers and the consequences for Alzheimer's disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlé, Nina; Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-08-01

    Life expectancy has increased in most developed countries, which has led to an increase in the proportion of elderly people in the world's population. However, this increase in life expectancy is not accompanied by a lengthening of the health span since aging is characterized with progressive deterioration in cellular and organ functions. The brain is particularly vulnerable to disease, and this is reflected in the onset of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Research shows that dysfunction of two barriers in the central nervous system (CNS), the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB), plays an important role in the progression of these neurodegenerative diseases. The BBB is formed by the endothelial cells of the blood capillaries, whereas the BCSFB is formed by the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), both of which are affected during aging. Here, we give an overview of how these barriers undergo changes during aging and in Alzheimer's disease, thereby disturbing brain homeostasis. Studying these changes is needed in order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of aging at the brain barriers, which might lead to the development of new therapies to lengthen the health span (including mental health) and reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27143113

  20. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The human brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let ... of the next neuron. This cellular circuitry enables communication within the brain. Healthy neurotransmission is important for ...

  1. Neuropathology of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer first pointed out that the disease which would later bear his name has a distinct and recognizable neuropathological substrate. Since then, much has been added to our understanding of the pathological lesions associated with the condition. The 2 primary cardinal lesions associated with Alzheimer's disease are the neurofibrillary tangle and the senile plaque. The neurofibrillary tangle consists of abnormal accumulations of abnormally phosphorylated tau within the perikaryal cytoplasm of certain neurons. The senile plaque consists of a central core of beta-amyloid, a 4-kD peptide, surrounded by abnormally configured neuronal processes or neurites. Other neuropathological lesions are encountered in cases of Alzheimer's disease, but the disease is defined and recognized by these 2 cardinal lesions. Other lesions include poorly understood changes such as granulovacuolar degeneration and eosinophilic rod-like bodies (Hirano bodies). The loss of synaptic components is a change that clearly has a significant impact on cognitive function and represents another important morphological alteration. It is important to recognize that distinguishing between Alzheimer's disease, especially in its early stages, and normal aging may be very difficult, particularly if one is examining the brains of patients who died at an advanced old age. It is also noted that instances of pure forms of Alzheimer's disease, in the absence of other coexistent brain disease processes, such as infarctions or Parkinson's disease–related lesions, are relatively uncommon, and this must be taken into account by researchers who employ postmortem brain tissues for research. PMID:20101720

  2. PIXE analysis of low concentration aluminum in brain tissues of an Alzheimer's disease patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An excess accumulation and presence of metal ions may significantly alter a brain cell's normal functions. There have been increasing efforts in recent years to measure and quantify the density and distribution of excessive accumulations of constituent elements (such as Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca) in the brain, as well as the presence and distribution of contaminating elements (such as Al). This is particularly important in cases of neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The aim of this paper was to measure the Al present in the temporal cortex of the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. The specimens were taken from an unfixed autopsy brain which has been preserved for a period of 4 years in the deep freezer at -80 degree sign C. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy was used for the measurement of Al concentration in this brain tissue. A tandem accelerator with 2 MeV of energy was also used. In order to increase the sensitivity of the signals in the low energy region of the spectra, the absorbers were removed. The results show that the peak height depends on the measurement site. However, in certain cases an extremely high concentration of Al was observed in the PIXE spectra, with an intensity higher than those in the other major elements of the brain's matrix element. Samples from tissues affected by the same disease were analyzed using the EDX analyzer. The results are quantitatively in very good agreement with those of the PIXE analysis

  3. Useful Information on...Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gene D.

    This brochure provides information on Alzheimer's disease by examining who gets Alzheimer's disease and what to expect when someone has Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal brain tissue findings are discussed and three clinical features of Alzheimer's disease are listed: dementia; insidious onset of symptoms; and exclusion of all other specific causes of…

  4. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25616451

  5. Radio electric asymmetric brain stimulation in the treatment of behavioral and psychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mannu P; Rinaldi S; Fontani V; Castagna A

    2011-01-01

    Piero Mannu1, Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna11Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Department of Neuro Psycho Physio Pathology, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, ItalyPurpose: Behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and disrupt the effective management of AD patients. The present study explores the use of radio electric asymmetric brain stimulation (REAC) i...

  6. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let us ... and eventually die, causing memory loss. As these processes continue, the brain shrinks and loses function. We ...

  7. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The human brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains ... from each other as electrical charges travel down the axon to the end of the neuron. The ...

  8. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... decisions. Inside a normal healthy brain, billions of cells called neurons constantly communicate with one another. They ... on the dendrites of the next neuron. This cellular circuitry enables communication within the brain. Healthy neurotransmission ...

  9. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let ... another. They receive messages from each other as electrical charges travel down the axon to the end ...

  10. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let us speak, move, see, remember, feel emotions and make decisions. Inside a normal healthy brain, ...

  11. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The human brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let us speak, move, see, remember, feel emotions and make decisions. Inside a ...

  12. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The human brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains ... end of the neuron. The electrical charges release chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. The transmitters move across microscopic ...

  13. Segmentation of brain parenchymal regions into gray matter and white matter with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very difficult and time consuming for neuroradiologists to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy based on the volume of cortical regions etc. Our purpose of this study was to develop an automated segmentation of the brain parenchyma into gray and white matter regions with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted MR images. Our proposed method consisted of extraction of a brain parenchymal region based on a brain model matching and segmentation of the brain parenchyma into gray and white matter regions based on a fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. We applied our proposed method to MR images of the whole brains obtained from 9 cases, including 4 clinically AD cases and 5 control cases. The mean volume percentage of a cortical region (41.7%) to a brain parenchymal region in AD patients was smaller than that (45.2%) in the control subjects (p=0.000462). (author)

  14. Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers The National Institute on Aging ... Repository for Alzheimer's Disease ADC Directory Arizona Arizona Alzheimer’s Disease Center/Sun Health Research Institute Eric Reiman, ...

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Information Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Alzheimer's Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related, ...

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD

  17. Disruption of brain zinc homeostasis promotes the pathophysiological progress of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Bo; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-06-01

    Zinc is abundant in the brain, where it plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and in learning; however, excessive zinc is toxic to neuronal cells, and dyshomeostasis of zinc in the brain is a contributing factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Deposition of zinc has been detected in senile plaques in the form of zinc-Aβ (β-amyloid) complexes. Recent studies have demonstrated that zinc exposure to the brain enhances β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, amyloidogenic APP cleavage and plaque burden. Furthermore, alterations in zinc transporters, which are responsible for zinc homeostasis, occur in AD human brain and transgenic mouse models. These suggest that abnormal brain zinc homeostasis is involved in the pathophysiological progress of AD. PMID:26883958

  18. Analysis of the Proteomic Profiling of Brain Tissue in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuji

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In proteome analysis, it is necessary to separate proteins as a first step prior to characterization. Thus, the overall performance of the analysis depends strongly on the separation tool, which is usually two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE. We have utilized 2DE to begin characterization of the complex pathologic processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. In the present study, we show how a reliable 2-DE database of brain proteins in Alzheimer's disease was created, improving reproducibility by using an immobilized pH gradient (IPG for the first dimension gel electrophoresis. The recent progress in this field, and future prospects in this area are also discussed. Preparation of brain proteins into a suitable solubilized state enabled us to separate over 1000 well-defined protein spots in each 2-DE. A comparison of the density of the spots identified on the reference map between the AD and control group, showed that 5 protein spots were significantly increased, 28 spots were significantly decreased and 7 spots were specifically detected in AD. Two spots among those significantly increased and one spot among those significantly decreased were identified as GFAP related. It is hoped that comparative studies to identify, quantitate, and characterize the proteins differentially expressed in normal brain versus diseased brain will give insight into the mechanisms of pathogenesis and allow the development of a strategy to control both the etiology and course of the diseases.

  19. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  20. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... decisions. Inside a normal healthy brain, billions of cells called neurons constantly communicate with one another. They ... Plaques form when specific proteins in the neuron's cell membrane are processed differently. Normally, an enzyme called ...

  1. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stabilizes structures critical to the cell's internal transport system. Nutrients and other cellular cargo are carried up ... form tangles inside the neuron, disabling the transport system and destroying the cell. Neurons in certain brain ...

  2. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a normal healthy brain, billions of cells called neurons constantly communicate with one another. They receive messages ... down the axon to the end of the neuron. The electrical charges release chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. ...

  3. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amyloid plaques. Neurofibrillary tangles are made when a protein called tau is modified. In normal brain cells, tau stabilizes structures critical to the cell's internal transport system. Nutrients ...

  4. Atrophy-specific MRI brain template for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonov, Vladimir; Coupe, Pierrick; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed;

    and MCI makes use of a single disease-specific template challenging. We propose a novel approach to generate a continuous four-dimensional template, where the 4th dimension is a surrogate measure of overall brain atrophy. Methods We used MRI scans obtained from the ADNI database (www......Background Rapid brain loss is characteristic for the patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) [1]. Increase of the lateral ventricular volume is strongly correlated with the progression of the disease. High variability in the degree of atrophy for subjects with AD.......loni.ucla.edu/ADNI). Automated methods to estimate intracranial capacity (ICC) and lateral ventricles volume (LVV) [2] was applied to all available datasets at base line. The ratio between LVV and ICC (RLVV) was used as a surrogate measure of overall brain atrophy with mean(standard deviation) value of 2.46(0.87)%. Subsets from...

  5. Novel phosphorylation sites in tau from Alzheimer brain support a role for casein kinase 1 in disease pathogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanger, D P; Byers, H. L.; Wray, S.; Leung, K. Y.; Saxton, M J; Seereeram, A.; Reynolds, C H; Ward, M A; Anderton, B H

    2007-01-01

    Tau in Alzheimer disease brain is highly phosphorylated and aggregated into paired helical filaments comprising characteristic neurofibrillary tangles. Here we have analyzed insoluble Tau (PHF-tau) extracted from Alzheimer brain by mass spectrometry and identified 11 novel phosphorylation sites, 10 of which were assigned unambiguously to specific amino acid residues. This brings the number of directly identified sites in PHF-tau to 39, with an additional six sites indicated by reactivity with...

  6. Prediabetes and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitra, V. R.; Rapaka, Deepthi; Akula, Annapurna

    2015-01-01

    Aging patients with diabetes are at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Emerging evidences demonstrate the role of brain insulin resistance, which is a key mediator in prediabetes and diabetes mellitus that may lead to Alzheimer's disease. Insulin and insulin-like growth factors regulate many biological processes such as axonal growth, protein synthesis, cell growth, gene expression, proliferation, differentiation, and development. Among these, the energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity are the major transduction processes regulated by insulin, which are the core objectives for learning and memory. It was also proposed that hyper insulinemia induced insulin resistance results in injury to the central nervous system by the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β which is the key ailment in the cognitive decline. Hence, the endogenous brain specific insulin impairments and signaling account for the majority of Alzheimer's abnormalities. PMID:26798163

  7. Prediabetes and alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Bitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging patients with diabetes are at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Emerging evidences demonstrate the role of brain insulin resistance, which is a key mediator in prediabetes and diabetes mellitus that may lead to Alzheimer's disease. Insulin and insulin-like growth factors regulate many biological processes such as axonal growth, protein synthesis, cell growth, gene expression, proliferation, differentiation, and development. Among these, the energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity are the major transduction processes regulated by insulin, which are the core objectives for learning and memory. It was also proposed that hyper insulinemia induced insulin resistance results in injury to the central nervous system by the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β which is the key ailment in the cognitive decline. Hence, the endogenous brain specific insulin impairments and signaling account for the majority of Alzheimer's abnormalities.

  8. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  9. A Structural Parametrization of the Brain Using Hidden Markov Models-Based Paths in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Murcia, Francisco J; Górriz, Juan M; Ramírez, Javier; Ortiz, Andres

    2016-11-01

    The usage of biomedical imaging in the diagnosis of dementia is increasingly widespread. A number of works explore the possibilities of computational techniques and algorithms in what is called computed aided diagnosis. Our work presents an automatic parametrization of the brain structure by means of a path generation algorithm based on hidden Markov models (HMMs). The path is traced using information of intensity and spatial orientation in each node, adapting to the structure of the brain. Each path is itself a useful way to characterize the distribution of the tissue inside the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image by, for example, extracting the intensity levels at each node or generating statistical information of the tissue distribution. Additionally, a further processing consisting of a modification of the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) can be used to characterize the textural changes that occur throughout the path, yielding more meaningful values that could be associated to Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as providing a significant feature reduction. This methodology achieves moderate performance, up to 80.3% of accuracy using a single path in differential diagnosis involving Alzheimer-affected subjects versus controls belonging to the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI). PMID:27354189

  10. Disruption of estrogen receptor beta in mice brain results in pathological alterations resembling Alzheimer disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-hong ZHANG; Yan-hong HUANG; Yu-zhen HU; Geng-ze WEI; Xue-feng HAN; Shun-yan LU; Yu-feng ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the pathological characteristics of the mice with estrogen receptor β (ERβ) disruption in brain.METHODS: Immunohistochemistry method was applied in the study. RESULTS: β-Amyloid peptide(Aβ42) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) immunoreactive substances were accumulated notably in cortex and limbic structures such as the hippocampus and amygdala in brain, resembling the pathological changes of human Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ formed cloudy-like deposits in parenchyma of brain, while apoE also deposited along or surrounding the blood vessels. CONCLUSIONS: ERβ is crucial to the development of neural degenerative disease, so modulation of Aβ metabolism via ERβ signal pathway might be beneficial for AD prevention or therapy.

  11. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... billions of cells called neurons constantly communicate with one another. They receive messages from each other as ... compromising the ability of neurons to communicate with one another, the disease over time destroys memory and ...

  12. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receive messages from each other as electrical charges travel down the axon to the end of the ... to communicate with one another, the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has ...

  13. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hallmarks of the disease. Plaques form when specific proteins in the neuron's cell membrane are processed differently. ... an enzyme called alpha-secretase snips amyloid precursor protein, or APP, releasing a fragment. A second enzyme, ...

  14. About Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnosis What should I do if I’ ... I'm worried about memory loss or possible Alzheimer's? If you are concerned about changes in memory ...

  15. Distribution of PSA-NCAM in normal, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Helen C; Low, Victoria F; Swanson, Molly E V; Dieriks, Birger V; Turner, Clinton; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A

    2016-08-25

    Polysialated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is a membrane bound glycoprotein widely expressed during nervous system development. While commonly described in the neurogenic niches of the adult human brain, there is limited evidence of its distribution in other brain regions. PSA-NCAM is an important regulator of cell-cell interactions and facilitates cell migration and plasticity. Recent evidence suggests these functions may be altered in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). This study provides a detailed description of the PSA-NCAM distribution throughout the human brain and quantitatively compares the staining load in cortical regions and sub-cortical structures between the control, AD and PD brain. Our results provide evidence of widespread, yet specific, PSA-NCAM expression throughout the human brain including regions devoid of PSA-NCAM in the rodent brain such as the caudate nucleus (CN) and cerebellum (CB). We also detected a significant reduction in PSA-NCAM load in the entorhinal cortex (EC) of cases that was inversely correlated with hyperphosphorylated tau load. These results demonstrate that PSA-NCAM-mediated structural plasticity may not be limited to neurogenic niches and is conserved in the aged brain. We also provide evidence that PSA-NCAM is reduced in the EC, a region severely affected by AD pathology. PMID:27282086

  16. Predicting Alzheimer's disease by classifying 3D-Brain MRI images using SVM and other well-defined classifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting seniors age 65 and over. When AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with behavioural assessments and cognitive tests, often followed by a brain scan. Advanced medical imaging and pattern recognition techniques are good tools to create a learning database in the first step and to predict the class label of incoming data in order to assess the development of the disease, i.e., the conversion from prodromal stages (mild cognitive impairment) to Alzheimer's disease, which is the most critical brain disease for the senior population. Advanced medical imaging such as the volumetric MRI can detect changes in the size of brain regions due to the loss of the brain tissues. Measuring regions that atrophy during the progress of Alzheimer's disease can help neurologists in detecting and staging the disease. In the present investigation, we present a pseudo-automatic scheme that reads volumetric MRI, extracts the middle slices of the brain region, performs segmentation in order to detect the region of brain's ventricle, generates a feature vector that characterizes this region, creates an SQL database that contains the generated data, and finally classifies the images based on the extracted features. For our results, we have used the MRI data sets from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database.

  17. Predicting Alzheimer's disease by classifying 3D-Brain MRI images using SVM and other well-defined classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoug, S.; Abdel-Dayem, A.; Passi, K.; Gross, W.; Alqarni, M.

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting seniors age 65 and over. When AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with behavioural assessments and cognitive tests, often followed by a brain scan. Advanced medical imaging and pattern recognition techniques are good tools to create a learning database in the first step and to predict the class label of incoming data in order to assess the development of the disease, i.e., the conversion from prodromal stages (mild cognitive impairment) to Alzheimer's disease, which is the most critical brain disease for the senior population. Advanced medical imaging such as the volumetric MRI can detect changes in the size of brain regions due to the loss of the brain tissues. Measuring regions that atrophy during the progress of Alzheimer's disease can help neurologists in detecting and staging the disease. In the present investigation, we present a pseudo-automatic scheme that reads volumetric MRI, extracts the middle slices of the brain region, performs segmentation in order to detect the region of brain's ventricle, generates a feature vector that characterizes this region, creates an SQL database that contains the generated data, and finally classifies the images based on the extracted features. For our results, we have used the MRI data sets from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database.

  18. The Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the corpus callosum (CC) area and brain volume among individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HC). To evaluate the relationship of CC area and brain volume in 111 subjects (M:F = 48:63; mean age, 56.9 years) without memory disturbance and 28 subjects (11:17; 66.7years) with memory disturbance. The 11 AD (3:8; 75.7 years), 17 MCI (8:9; 60.9 years) and 28 selected HC (11:17; 66.4 years) patients were investigated for comparison of their CC area and brain volume. A good positive linear correlation was found between CC area and brain volume in subjects without and with memory disturbance (r = 0.64 and 0.66, respectively, p 2, 715.4 ± 107 cm3) were significantly smaller than in MCI patients (595.9 ± 108, 844.1 ± 85) and the HCs (563.2 ± 75, 818.9 ± 109) (p < 0.05). The CC area and brain volume were not significantly different between MCI patients and the HCs. The CC area was significantly correlated with brain volume. Both CC area and brain volume were significantly smaller in the AD patients

  19. The immunotherapy of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Weksler Marc E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Only a small percentage of patients with Alzheimer's disease benefit from current drug therapy and for only a relatively short time. This is not surprising as the goal of these drugs is to enhance existing cerebral function in Alzheimer patients and not to block the progression of cognitive decline. In contrast, immunotherapy is directed at clearing the neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide from the brain that directly or indirectly leads to cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's d...

  20. The preliminary study of 18F-FDG brain PET in diagnosis of alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the imaging characteristics and diagnostic criteria of 18F-FDG brain PET in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: The sutdy included 12 normal subjects, 12 patients with AD and 11 patients with non-AD dementia. 40 min after intravenous administration of 18F-FDG, brain scan was performed using Siemens ECAT47 scanner. The transaxial, coronal and sagittal images were then reconstructed by computer. At the same time, semiquantitative analysis was also applied to help evaluation using the ratio of mean radioactivity of cerebral lobe to cerebellum (Rcl/cb). Results: In normal subjects PET scan showed clear images of cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum with symmetrical distribution of radioactivity. PET images from Alzheimer's disease patients were classified into 3 patterns: bilateral parietal hypometabolism in 5 cases, bilateral temporo-parietal hypometabolism in 4 cases and unilateral temporo-parietal hypometabolism in 3 cases. The Rcl/cb of AD patients in parietal and temporal lobe was significantly decreased than normal subjects (Pcl/cb was also reflecting thedementia degree. Compared with MRI imaging , 12 patients with AD had cerebral hypometabolism but only 10 had hippocampus atrophy. 10 patients with non-AD dementia had local structural foci seen in MRI, including old hemorrhage, infarction and encephalomalacia, but these lesions were not found in AD. Conclusions: Based on excluding cerebral structural lesions which are better detected by MRI, bilateral or unilateral parietal or temporo-parietal hypometabolism found in FDG PET can be considered indicative of Alzheimer's disease. Semiquantitative analysis of the images yielded can help to evaluate the dementia degree

  1. Alzheimer's disease is not "brain aging": neuropathological, genetic, and epidemiological human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Head, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Frederick A; Davis, Paulina R; Neltner, Janna H; Jicha, Gregory A; Abner, Erin L; Smith, Charles D; Van Eldik, Linda J; Kryscio, Richard J; Scheff, Stephen W

    2011-05-01

    Human studies are reviewed concerning whether "aging"-related mechanisms contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. AD is defined by specific neuropathology: neuritic amyloid plaques and neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. AD pathology is driven by genetic factors related not to aging per se, but instead to the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In contrast to genes involved in APP-related mechanisms, there is no firm connection between genes implicated in human "accelerated aging" diseases (progerias) and AD. The epidemiology of AD in advanced age is highly relevant but deceptively challenging to address given the low autopsy rates in most countries. In extreme old age, brain diseases other than AD approximate AD prevalence while the impact of AD pathology appears to peak by age 95 and decline thereafter. Many distinct brain diseases other than AD afflict older human brains and contribute to cognitive impairment. Additional prevalent pathologies include cerebrovascular disease and hippocampal sclerosis, both high-morbidity brain diseases that appear to peak in incidence later than AD chronologically. Because of these common brain diseases of extreme old age, the epidemiology differs between clinical "dementia" and the subset of dementia cases with AD pathology. Additional aging-associated mechanisms for cognitive decline such as diabetes and synapse loss have been linked to AD and these hypotheses are discussed. Criteria are proposed to define an "aging-linked" disease, and AD fails all of these criteria. In conclusion, it may be most fruitful to focus attention on specific pathways involved in AD rather than attributing it to an inevitable consequence of aging. PMID:21516511

  2. Brain region-specificity of palmitic acid-induced abnormalities associated with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melrose Joseph

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease mostly affecting the basal forebrain, cortex and hippocampus whereas the cerebellum is relatively spared. The reason behind this region-specific brain damage in AD is not well understood. Here, we report our data suggesting "differential free fatty acid metabolism in the different brain areas" as a potentially important factor in causing the region-specific damage observed in AD brain. Findings The astroglia from two different rat brain regions, cortex (region affected in AD and cerebellum (unaffected region, were treated with 0.2 mM of palmitic acid. The conditioned media were then transferred to the cortical neurons to study the possible effects on the two main, AD-associated protein abnormalities, viz. BACE1 upregulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau. The conditioned media from palmitic-acid treated cortical astroglia, but not the cerebellar astroglia, significantly elevated levels of phosphorylated tau and BACE1 in cortical neurons as compared to controls (47 ± 7% and 45 ± 4%, respectively. Conclusion The present data provide an experimental explanation for the region-specific damage observed in AD brain; higher fatty acid-metabolizing capacity of cortical astroglia as compared to cerebellar astroglia, may play a causal role in increasing vulnerability of cortex in AD, while sparing cerebellum.

  3. Disrupted small-world brain networks in moderate Alzheimer's disease: a resting-state FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Zhao

    Full Text Available The small-world organization has been hypothesized to reflect a balance between local processing and global integration in the human brain. Previous multimodal imaging studies have consistently demonstrated that the topological architecture of the brain network is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, these studies have reported inconsistent results regarding the topological properties of brain alterations in AD. One potential explanation for these inconsistent results lies with the diverse homogeneity and distinct progressive stages of the AD involved in these studies, which are thought to be critical factors that might affect the results. We investigated the topological properties of brain functional networks derived from resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of carefully selected moderate AD patients and normal controls (NCs. Our results showed that the topological properties were found to be disrupted in AD patients, which showing increased local efficiency but decreased global efficiency. We found that the altered brain regions are mainly located in the default mode network, the temporal lobe and certain subcortical regions that are closely associated with the neuropathological changes in AD. Of note, our exploratory study revealed that the ApoE genotype modulates brain network properties, especially in AD patients.

  4. Glucose Metabolic Brain Networks in Early-Onset vs. Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Eunjoo; Na, Duk L.; Jeong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EAD) shows distinct features from late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LAD). To explore the characteristics of EAD, clinical, neuropsychological, and functional imaging studies have been conducted. However, differences between EAD and LAD are not clear, especially in terms of brain connectivity and networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD by adopting graph theory measures. Methods: We analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images to investigate the distinct features of metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD. Using metabolic connectivity and graph theory analysis, metabolic network differences between LAD and EAD were explored. Results: Results showed the decreased connectivity centered in the cingulate gyri and occipital regions in EAD, whereas decreased connectivity in the occipital and temporal regions as well as increased connectivity in the supplementary motor area were observed in LAD when compared with age-matched control groups. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were decreased in EAD but not in LAD. EAD showed progressive network deterioration as a function of disease severity and clinical dementia rating (CDR) scores, mainly in terms of connectivity between the cingulate gyri and occipital regions. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were also decreased along with disease severity. Conclusion: These results indicate that EAD and LAD have distinguished features in terms of metabolic connectivity, with EAD demonstrating more extensive and progressive deterioration. PMID:27445800

  5. A biophysical model of brain deformation to simulate and analyze longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Khanal, Bishesh; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We propose a framework for developing a comprehensive biophysical model that could predict and simulate realistic longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The framework includes three major building blocks: i) Atrophy generation ii) Brain deformation iii) Realistic MRI generation. Within this framework, this paper focuses on a detailed implementation of the brain deformation block with a carefully designed biomechanics-based tissue loss model. For a given baseline brain MR...

  6. Correlation between disease severity and brain electric LORETA tomography in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lorena R R Gianotti; Künig, Gabriella; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L.; Roberto D Pascual-Marqui; Kochi, Kieko; Schreiter-Gasser, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    To compare EEG power spectra and LORETA-computed intracortical activity between Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy controls, and to correlate the results with cognitive performance in the AD group.; Nineteen channel resting EEG was recorded in 21 mild to moderate AD patients and in 23 controls. Power spectra and intracortical LORETA tomography were computed in seven frequency bands and compared between groups. In the AD patients, the EEG results were correlated with cognitive perfo...

  7. The Importance of Adipokines in Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Seyid Ahmet Ay; Ferhat Deniz; Kamil Baskoy; Arif Yonem

    2015-01-01

    Dementia and Alzheimers disease are characterized by disturbances in brain function and structure. Similarly, body mass index and obesity are associated with certain brain pathologies, including Alzheimers disease and dementia. In fact, there is mounting evidence linking metabolic dysfunction with dementia and Alzheimers disease. Major endocrine axes constitute links between brain and peripheral tissues, especially adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is metabolically very active and produces a var...

  8. Preliminary study of Alzheimer's Disease diagnosis based on brain electrical signals using wireless EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, N.; Akbar, Y.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.; Taruno, W. P.

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to study brain's electrical signals recorded using EEG as a basis for the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The subjects consisted of patients with AD, and normal subjects are used as the control. Brain signals are recorded for 3 minutes in a relaxed condition and with eyes closed. The data is processed using power spectral analysis, brain mapping and chaos test to observe the level of complexity of EEG's data. The results show a shift in the power spectral in the low frequency band (delta and theta) in AD patients. The increase of delta and theta occurs in lobus frontal area and lobus parietal respectively. However, there is a decrease of alpha activity in AD patients where in the case of normal subjects with relaxed condition, brain alpha wave dominates the posterior area. This is confirmed by the results of brain mapping. While the results of chaos analysis show that the average value of MMLE is lower in AD patients than in normal subjects. The level of chaos associated with neural complexity in AD patients with lower neural complexity is due to neuronal damage caused by the beta amyloid plaques and tau protein in neurons.

  9. A putative Alzheimer's disease risk allele in PCK1 influences brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqi Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction are neurodegenerative features of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. We used a candidate gene approach to address whether genetic variants implicated in susceptibility to late onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD influence brain volume and cognition in MS patients. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MS subjects were genotyped for five single nucleotide polymorphisms (snps associated with susceptibility to AD: PICALM, CR1, CLU, PCK1, and ZNF224. We assessed brain volume using Brain Parenchymal Fraction (BPF measurements obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI data and cognitive function using the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT. Genotypes were correlated with cross-sectional BPF and SDMT scores using linear regression after adjusting for sex, age at symptom onset, and disease duration. 722 MS patients with a mean (±SD age at enrollment of 41 (±10 years were followed for 44 (±28 months. The AD risk-associated allele of a non-synonymous SNP in the PCK1 locus (rs8192708G is associated with a smaller average brain volume (P=0.0047 at the baseline MRI, but it does not impact our baseline estimate of cognition. PCK1 is additionally associated with higher baseline T2-hyperintense lesion volume (P=0.0088. Finally, we provide technical validation of our observation in a subset of 641 subjects that have more than one MRI study, demonstrating the same association between PCK1 and smaller average brain volume (P=0.0089 at the last MRI visit. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides suggestive evidence for greater brain atrophy in MS patients bearing the PCK1 allele associated with AD-susceptibility, yielding new insights into potentially shared neurodegenerative process between MS and late onset AD.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery Preface Over the past ...

  11. Cerebral hemodynamics of the aging brain: risk of Alzheimer disease and benefit of aerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eTarumi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD and cerebrovascular disease often coexist with advanced age. Mounting evidence indicates that the presence of vascular disease and its risk factors increase the risk of AD, suggesting a potential overlap of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. In particular, atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and stiffening of central elastic arteries have been shown to associate with AD. Currently, there are no effective treatments for the cure and prevention of AD. Vascular risk factors are modifiable via either pharmacological or lifestyle intervention. In this regard, habitual aerobic exercise is increasingly recognized for its benefits on brain structure and cognitive function. Considering the well-established benefits of regular aerobic exercise on vascular health, exercise-related improvements in brain structure and cognitive function may be mediated by vascular adaptations. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the physiological mechanisms by which vascular health alters the structural and functional integrity of the aging brain and how improvements in vascular health, via regular aerobic exercise, potentially benefits cognitive function.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers of Neurodegeneration and Rates of Brain Atrophy in Early Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Head, Denise; Allison, Samantha; Buckles, Virginia; Fagan, Anne M.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Measures of neuronal loss are likely good surrogates for clinical and radiological disease progression in Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuronal injury or neurodegeneration may offer usefulness in predicting disease progression and guiding outcome assessments and prognostic decisions in clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. Visinin-like protein 1 (VILIP-1) has demonstrated potential usefulness as a marker of neuronal injury in AD. OBJECTIVE To investigate the usefulness of CSF VILIP-1, tau, p-tau181, and Aβ42 levels in predicting rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in early AD and cognitively normal control subjects over time. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy in participants with early AD and cognitively normal controls. Study participants had baseline CSF biomarker measurements and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging assessments for a mean follow-up period of 2 to 3 years. Mixed linear models assessed the ability of standardized baseline CSF biomarker measures to predict rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy over the follow-up period. The setting was The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. Participants (mean age, 72.6 years) were individuals with a clinical diagnosis of very mild AD (n = 23) and cognitively normal controls (n = 64) who were enrolled in longitudinal studies of healthy aging and dementia. The study dates were 2000 to 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Correlations between baseline CSF biomarker measures and rates of whole-brain or regional atrophy in the AD and control cohorts over the follow-up period. RESULTS Baseline CSF VILIP-1, tau, and p-tau181 levels (but not Aβ42 levels) predicted rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in AD over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1 levels predicted whole-brain (P = .006), hippocampal (P = .01), and

  13. Elevation of the level and activity of acid ceramidase in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2004-12-01

    Protein glycosylation modifies the processing of several key proteins involved in the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aberrant glycosylation of tau and down-regulation of sialyltransferase in AD brain suggest a possible dysregulation of protein glycosylation that may play a role in AD. We therefore isolated major glycoproteins from AD brain by using lectin-affinity chromatographies and ion-exchange chromatography and further separated them using SDS-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis of 11 isolated glycoproteins led to their identification as: neuronal cell adhesion molecule, beta-globin, IgM heavy chain VH1 region precursor, contactin precursor, dipeptidylpeptidase VI, CD81 partner 3, prenylcysteine lyase, adipocyte plasma-associated protein, acid ceramidase and two novel proteins. We found that the level and activity of acid ceramidase (AC), one of the major identified human brain glycoproteins, were significantly elevated in AD brain. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that AC was located mainly in the cell bodies of neurons and colocalized with neurofibrillary tangles. Our findings suggest that AC might play a role in controlling neuronal apoptosis and that AC-mediated signalling pathways might be involved in the molecular mechanism of AD. PMID:15610181

  14. Brain perfusion SPECT correlates with CSF biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habert, Marie-Odile [UMR-S 678, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, INSERM, Paris (France); CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Souza, Leonardo Cruz de; Dubois, Bruno; Sarazin, Marie [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Research and Resource Memory Centre and INSERM U610, Paris (France); Lamari, Foudil; Jardel, Claude [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Department of Metabolic Biochemistry, Paris (France); Daragon, Nelle; Desarnaud, Serge [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France)

    2010-03-15

    Our aim was to study the correlations between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker levels such as {beta}-amyloid 42 (A{beta}{sub 42}), total and phosphorylated tau protein (T-tau and P-tau) and brain perfusion SPECT in Alzheimer's disease (AD) using a voxel-based methodology. Patients (n = 31) with clinical features of AD (n = 25) or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) (n = 6) were retrospectively included. All subjects underwent the same clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging tests. They had a lumbar puncture and a brain perfusion ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) SPECT within a time interval of 10 ({+-}26) days. Correlations between CSF biomarker concentrations and perfusion were studied using SPM2 software. Individual normalised regional activity values were extracted from the eligible clusters for calculation of correlation coefficients. No significant correlation was found between A{beta}{sub 42} concentrations and brain perfusion. A significant correlation (p < 0.01, corrected) was found between T-tau or P-tau concentrations and perfusion in the left parietal cortex. Our results suggest a strong correlation between T-tau and P-tau levels and decreased brain perfusion in regions typically affected by neuropathological changes in AD. (orig.)

  15. [Theoretic basis on the same therapeutic program for different degenerative brain diseases in terms of the Governor Vessel: Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junyan; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Junlong

    2015-05-01

    Through the consultation of TCM ancient classical theory, the relationship of kidney essence, marrow and brain is analyzed. It is discovered that the degenerative brain diseases, represented by Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) share the same etiological basis as "kidney essence deficiency and brain marrow emptiness" and have the mutual pathological outcomes as yang qi declining. The Governor Vessel gathers yang qi of the whole body and maintains the normal functional activity of zangfu organs in the human body through the storage, regulation and invigoration of yang qi. It is viewed that the theory of the Governor Vessel is applied to treat the different degenerative brain diseases, which provides the theoretic support and practice guide for the thought of TCM as the same therapeutic program for the different diseases. As a result, the degenerative brain diseases can be retarded and the approach is provided to the effective prevention and treatment of degenerative diseases in central nerve system: PMID:26255528

  16. Whole-brain functional networks in cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hyun Seo

    Full Text Available The conceptual significance of understanding functional brain alterations and cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD process has been widely established. However, the whole-brain functional networks of AD and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, are not well clarified yet. In this study, we compared the characteristics of the whole-brain functional networks among cognitively normal (CN, MCI, and AD individuals by applying graph theoretical analyses to [(18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET data. Ninety-four CN elderly, 183 with MCI, and 216 with AD underwent clinical evaluation and FDG-PET scan. The overall small-world property as seen in the CN whole-brain network was preserved in MCI and AD. In contrast, individual parameters of the network were altered with the following patterns of changes: local clustering of networks was lower in both MCI and AD compared to CN, while path length was not different among the three groups. Then, MCI had a lower level of local clustering than AD. Subgroup analyses for AD also revealed that very mild AD had lower local clustering and shorter path length compared to mild AD. Regarding the local properties of the whole-brain networks, MCI and AD had significantly decreased normalized betweenness centrality in several hubs regionally associated with the default mode network compared to CN. Our results suggest that the functional integration in whole-brain network progressively declines due to the AD process. On the other hand, functional relatedness between neighboring brain regions may not gradually decrease, but be the most severely altered in MCI stage and gradually re-increase in clinical AD stages.

  17. Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Portfolio (IADRP) AMP-AD Detecting Cognitive Impairment Database ... is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, and eventually the ability to ...

  18. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents The ... Suncoast Gerontology Center, University of South Florida. How Alzheimer's Changes the Brain The only definite way to ...

  19. Sex differences in metabolic aging of the brain: insights into female susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Woody, Sarah K; Brinton, Roberta D

    2016-06-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of clinical aspects of sex differences in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms, for instance, how sex modifies AD risk and why the female brain is more susceptible to AD, are not clear. The purpose of this study is to elucidate sex disparities in brain aging profiles focusing on 2 major areas-energy and amyloid metabolism-that are most significantly affected in preclinical development of AD. Total RNA isolated from hippocampal tissues of both female and male 129/C57BL/6 mice at ages of 6, 9, 12, or 15 months were comparatively analyzed by custom-designed Taqman low-density arrays for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of a total of 182 genes involved in a broad spectrum of biological processes modulating energy production and amyloid homeostasis. Gene expression profiles revealed substantial differences in the trajectory of aging changes between female and male brains. In female brains, 44.2% of genes were significantly changed from 6 months to 9 months and two-thirds showed downregulation. In contrast, in male brains, only 5.4% of genes were significantly altered at this age transition. Subsequent changes in female brains were at a much smaller magnitude, including 10.9% from 9 months to 12 months and 6.1% from 12 months to 15 months. In male brains, most changes occurred from 12 months to 15 months and the majority were upregulated. Furthermore, gene network analysis revealed that clusterin appeared to serve as a link between the overall decreased bioenergetic metabolism and increased amyloid dyshomeostasis associated with the earliest transition in female brains. Together, results from this study indicate that: (1) female and male brains follow profoundly dissimilar trajectories as they age; (2) female brains undergo age-related changes much earlier than male brains; (3) early changes in female brains signal the onset of a hypometabolic phenotype at risk for AD. These

  20. Voxel-based comparison of whole brain gray matter of patients with mild Alzheimer's disease with normal aging volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect gray matter abnormalities of whole brain in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) by voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Methods: Thirteen patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and sixteen normal aging volunteers underwent 3D SPGR scanning. For every subject, data was transferred to PC to be normalized, segmented and smoothed using SPM99. Non-dependent samples T-tests were conducted to compare gray matter' density voxel to voxel between the two groups. Results Significant reductions in gray matter density were found in the bilateral hippocampi and nucleus amygdalae, bilateral insulae, bilateral medial thalami, bilateral rectus gyri, right superior temporal gyms, right caudate nucleus, fight prefrontal lobe, right basal forebrain and portions of right occipital lobe. Conclusion: VBM reveals significant gray matter' reductions of numeral cortices in mild Alzheimer's disease. It can be a useful method to evaluate the anatomical changes in the progress of the disease. (authors)

  1. [Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkentoft, Alexander Christian; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2016-01-18

    Passive anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has been shown to clear brain Aß deposits. Results from phase III clinical trials in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with two monoclonal antibodies bapineuzumab and solanezumab and intravenous immunoglobulin have been disappointing. Subsequent analysis of pooled data from both phase III trials with solanezumab showed a reduction in cognitive decline in patients with mild AD. Solanezumab and new monoclonal antibodies are being tested in patients with prodromal and preclinical AD in search for a disease-modifying treatment. PMID:26815584

  2. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF OMENTUM TRANSPOSITION TO BRAIN FOR TREATMENT OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Jun; WU Wei-lie; Harry Goldsmith

    2007-01-01

    Objective To learn the effect of omemtum transposition to the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Methods Ten consecutive patients, aged 58 - 81 years old, underwent graft of their elongated pedicled omentum onto their left frontal-temperal-parietal cerebral cortex. Those patients, who had more than five years of dementia with low mini mental-state examination (MMSE) scores of 2 -15, were diagnosed by a neurologist. All subjects underwent single photon evoked computer tomography (SPECT) pre- and post-operatively.SPECT results were analyzed semi-quantitatively by calculation of the left/right radioactivity counts symmetry index (Si). The patients were followed up to one year. The outcome was evaluated by the neurologist with a modified scale of activities of daily living (mADL) as well as the MMSE. Results Three months following the surgery,the Si of SPECT increased from ( 98. 7 ± 1.9) % to ( 103. 9 ± 2.3 ) % ( P = 0. 0307). The neurological and neuropsychological testing scores increased insignificantly during the follow-up period. By the one year, the MMSE score rose from 8. 7 ± 1.4 to 10. 7 ± 1.8 ( P > 0. 05 ), while the mADL from 13.3 ± 1.8 to 16. 9 ± 2. 0 ( P > 0. 05 ). One of the patients suffered a heart attack, two had epileptic episodes postoperatively. Conclusion We believe that omental transposition to the brain augments cerebral blood flow, which might be helpful to decelerate the processing of Alzheimer's disease. However, it is still a potentially risky procedure for the elderly.

  3. The immunotherapy of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weksler Marc E

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Only a small percentage of patients with Alzheimer's disease benefit from current drug therapy and for only a relatively short time. This is not surprising as the goal of these drugs is to enhance existing cerebral function in Alzheimer patients and not to block the progression of cognitive decline. In contrast, immunotherapy is directed at clearing the neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide from the brain that directly or indirectly leads to cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The single trial of active immunization with the amyloid beta peptide provided suggestive evidence of a reduction in cerebral amyloid plaques and of stabilization in cognitive function of half the patients who developed good antibody responses to the amyloid beta peptide. However, 6% of actively immunized Alzheimer patients developed sterile meningoencephalitis that forced the cessation of the clinical trial. Passive immunotherapy in animal models of Alzheimer's disease has provided similar benefits comparable to those seen with active immunotherapy and has the potential of being effective in the half of Alzheimer's disease patients who do not make a significant anti-amyloid beta peptide antibody response and without inducing T-cell-mediated encephalitis. Published studies of 5 patients with sporadic Alzheimer disease treated with intravenous immunoglobulin containing anti-amyloid beta peptide antibodies showed that amyloid beta peptide was mobilized from the brain and cognitive decline was interrupted. Further studies of passive immunotherapy are urgently required to confirm these observations.

  4. A spectral graph regression model for learning brain connectivity of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui Hu

    Full Text Available Understanding network features of brain pathology is essential to reveal underpinnings of neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we introduce a novel graph regression model (GRM for learning structural brain connectivity of Alzheimer's disease (AD measured by amyloid-β deposits. The proposed GRM regards 11C-labeled Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB positron emission tomography (PET imaging data as smooth signals defined on an unknown graph. This graph is then estimated through an optimization framework, which fits the graph to the data with an adjustable level of uniformity of the connection weights. Under the assumed data model, results based on simulated data illustrate that our approach can accurately reconstruct the underlying network, often with better reconstruction than those obtained by both sample correlation and ℓ1-regularized partial correlation estimation. Evaluations performed upon PiB-PET imaging data of 30 AD and 40 elderly normal control (NC subjects demonstrate that the connectivity patterns revealed by the GRM are easy to interpret and consistent with known pathology. Moreover, the hubs of the reconstructed networks match the cortical hubs given by functional MRI. The discriminative network features including both global connectivity measurements and degree statistics of specific nodes discovered from the AD and NC amyloid-beta networks provide new potential biomarkers for preclinical and clinical AD.

  5. Comparative lipidomic analysis of mouse and human brain with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Robin B; Oliveira, Tiago G; Cortes, Etty P; Honig, Lawrence S; Duff, Karen E; Small, Scott A; Wenk, Markus R; Shui, Guanghou; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2012-01-20

    Lipids are key regulators of brain function and have been increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, a systems-based approach was employed to determine the lipidome of brain tissues affected by AD. Specifically, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to profile extracts from the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and cerebellum of late-onset AD (LOAD) patients, as well as the forebrain of three transgenic familial AD (FAD) mouse models. Although the cerebellum lacked major alterations in lipid composition, we found an elevation of a signaling pool of diacylglycerol as well as sphingolipids in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, the diseased entorhinal cortex showed specific enrichment of lysobisphosphatidic acid, sphingomyelin, the ganglioside GM3, and cholesterol esters, all of which suggest common pathogenic mechanisms associated with endolysosomal storage disorders. Importantly, a significant increase in cholesterol esters and GM3 was recapitulated in the transgenic FAD models, suggesting that these mice are relevant tools to study aberrant lipid metabolism of endolysosomal dysfunction associated with AD. Finally, genetic ablation of phospholipase D(2), which rescues the synaptic and behavioral deficits of an FAD mouse model, fully normalizes GM3 levels. These data thus unmask a cross-talk between the metabolism of phosphatidic acid, the product of phospholipase D(2), and gangliosides, and point to a central role of ganglioside anomalies in AD pathogenesis. Overall, our study highlights the hypothesis generating potential of lipidomics and identifies novel region-specific lipid anomalies potentially linked to AD pathogenesis. PMID:22134919

  6. Brain mitochondrial dysfunction as a link between Alzheimer's disease and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Paula I.; Santos, Maria S.; Seiça, Raquel; oliveira, catarina r.

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that in late-onset Alzheimer's disease a disturbance in the control of neuronal glucose metabolism consequent to impaired insulin signalling strongly resembles the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in non-neural tissue. The fact that mitochondria are the major generators and direct targets of reactive oxygen species led several investigators to foster the idea that oxidative stress and damage in mitochondria are contributory factors to several disorders including Alzheimer...

  7. Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Astarita

    Full Text Available The molecular bases of Alzheimer's disease (AD remain unclear. We used a lipidomic approach to identify lipid abnormalities in the brains of subjects with AD (N = 37 compared to age-matched controls (N = 17. The analyses revealed statistically detectable elevations in levels of non-esterified monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs and mead acid (20:3n-9 in mid-frontal cortex, temporal cortex and hippocampus of AD patients. Further studies showed that brain mRNAs encoding for isoforms of the rate-limiting enzyme in MUFAs biosynthesis, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD-1, SCD-5a and SCD-5b, were elevated in subjects with AD. The monounsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio ('desaturation index'--displayed a strong negative correlation with measures of cognition: the Mini Mental State Examination test (r = -0.80; P = 0.0001 and the Boston Naming test (r = -0.57; P = 0.0071. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized role for the lipogenic enzyme SCD in AD.

  8. Morphological and pathological evolution of the brain microcirculation in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Hunter

    Full Text Available Key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD, including amyloid plaques, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA and neurofibrillary tangles do not completely account for cognitive impairment, therefore other factors such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathologies, may contribute to AD. In order to elucidate the microvascular changes that contribute to aging and disease, direct neuropathological staining and immunohistochemistry, were used to quantify the structural integrity of the microvasculature and its innervation in three oldest-old cohorts: 1 nonagenarians with AD and a high amyloid plaque load; 2 nonagenarians with no dementia and a high amyloid plaque load; 3 nonagenarians without dementia or amyloid plaques. In addition, a non-demented (ND group (average age 71 years with no amyloid plaques was included for comparison. While gray matter thickness and overall brain mass were reduced in AD compared to ND control groups, overall capillary density was not different. However, degenerated string capillaries were elevated in AD, potentially suggesting greater microvascular "dysfunction" compared to ND groups. Intriguingly, apolipoprotein ε4 carriers had significantly higher string vessel counts relative to non-ε4 carriers. Taken together, these data suggest a concomitant loss of functional capillaries and brain volume in AD subjects. We also demonstrated a trend of decreasing vesicular acetylcholine transporter staining, a marker of cortical cholinergic afferents that contribute to arteriolar vasoregulation, in AD compared to ND control groups, suggesting impaired control of vasodilation in AD subjects. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase, a marker of noradrenergic vascular innervation, was reduced which may also contribute to a loss of control of vasoconstriction. The data highlight the importance of the brain microcirculation in the pathogenesis and evolution of AD.

  9. Characterization and chromosomal localization of a cDNA encoding brain amyloid of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldgaber, D.; Lerman, M.I.; McBride, O.W.; Saffiotti, U.; Gajdusek, D.C.

    1987-02-20

    Four clones were isolated from an adult human brain complementary DNA library with an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to the first 20 amino acids of the ..beta.. peptide of brain amyloid from Alzheimer's disease. The open reading frame of the sequenced clone coded for 97 amino acids, including the known amino acid sequence of this polypeptide. The 3.5-kilobase messenger RNA was detected in mammalian brains and human thymus. The gene is highly conserved in evolution and has been mapped to human chromosome 21.

  10. Analysis of RNA from Alzheimer's Disease Post-mortem Brain Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Christian; Hill, James M; Dua, Prerna; Culicchia, Frank; Lukiw, Walter J

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a uniquely human, age-related central nervous system (CNS) disorder for which there is no adequate experimental model. While well over 100 transgenic murine models of AD (TgAD) have been developed that recapitulate many of the neuropathological features of AD, key pathological features of AD such as progressive neuronal atrophy, neuron cell loss, and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation have not been observed in any TgAD model to date. To more completely analyze and understand the neuropathology, altered neuro-inflammatory and innate-immune signaling pathways, and the complex molecular-genetics and epigenetics of AD, it is therefore necessary to rigorously examine short post-mortem interval (PMI) human brain tissues to gain a deeper and more thorough insight into the neuropathological mechanisms that characterize the AD process. This perspective-methods paper will highlight some important recent findings on the utilization of short PMI tissues in sporadic (idiopathic; of unknown origin) AD research with focus on the extraction and quantification of RNA, and in particular microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) and analytical strategies, drawing on the authors' combined 125 years of laboratory experience into this investigative research area. We sincerely hope that new investigators in the field of "gene expression analysis in neurological disease" will benefit from the observations presented here and incorporate these recent findings and observations into their future experimental planning and design. PMID:25631714

  11. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  12. Brain Region-Specific Monoaminergic Correlates of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Aerts, Tony; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are present during the disease course of nearly all AD patients and consist of psychosis, agitation/aggression, and depression, among others. Given their detrimental consequences regarding life expectancy, cognition, and socio-economic cost

  13. Exosomes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Tarja; Loppi, Sanna; Kanninen, Katja M

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles secreted by most cell types, are found everywhere in the body. The role of exosomes in cellular functions has in the past years developed from being considered little more than cellular trashcans, to being proven important intercellular messengers and notable contributors to both health and in disease. A vast number of studies have revealed the multiple, and somewhat controversial role of exosomes in Alzheimer's disease, the most common neurodegenerative disease. Exosomes have been shown to spread toxic amyloid-beta and hyperphosphorylated tau between cells, and they have been suspected of inducing apoptosis and thereby contributing to neuronal loss. On the other hand, exosomes seem to possess the ability to reduce brain amyloid-beta through microglial uptake, and they are known to transfer neuroprotective substances between cells. These features, among many others, make exosomes extremely interesting from the point of view of developing novel therapeutic approaches. The fact that exosomes derived from the central nervous system can be found in bodily fluids also makes them an appealing target for biomarker development, which is not limited only to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27131734

  14. Alzheimer disease: An interactome of many diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji S Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is an outcome as well as source of many diseases. Alzheimer is linked with many other diseases like Diabetes type 2, cholesterolemia, hypertension and many more. But how each of these diseases affecting other is still unknown to scientific community. Signaling Pathways of one disease is interlinked with other disease. But to what extent healthy brain is affected when any signaling in human body is disturbed is the question that matters. There is a need of Pathway analysis, Protein-Protein interaction (PPI and the conserved interactome study in AD and linked diseases. It will be helpful in finding the potent drug or vaccine target in conscious manner. In the present research the Protein-Protein interaction of all the proteins involved in Alzheimer Disease is analyzed using ViSANT and osprey tools and pathway analysis further reveals the significant genes/proteins linking AD with other diseases.

  15. Support vector machine-based classification of Alzheimer's disease from whole-brain anatomical MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present and evaluate a new automated method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification of whole-brain anatomical magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly control subjects. We studied 16 patients with AD [mean age ± standard deviation (SD)=74.1 ±5.2 years, mini-mental score examination (MMSE) = 23.1 ± 2.9] and 22 elderly controls (72.3±5.0 years, MMSE=28.5± 1.3). Three-dimensional T1-weighted MR images of each subject were automatically parcellated into regions of interest (ROIs). Based upon the characteristics of gray matter extracted from each ROI, we used an SVM algorithm to classify the subjects and statistical procedures based on bootstrap resampling to ensure the robustness of the results. We obtained 94.5% mean correct classification for AD and control subjects (mean specificity, 96.6%; mean sensitivity, 91.5%). Our method has the potential in distinguishing patients with AD from elderly controls and therefore may help in the early diagnosis of AD. (orig.)

  16. Cerebral imaging revealing Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral imaging is the only non-invasive means of examining the brain and is essential in studying Alzheimer's disease. As a tool for early diagnosis, evaluation and treatment monitoring, this technology is at the heart of the research being done to further improve its reliability and sensitivity. (authors)

  17. Altered Neuroinflammation and Behavior after Traumatic Brain Injury in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokiko-Cochran, Olga; Ransohoff, Lena; Veenstra, Mike; Lee, Sungho; Saber, Maha; Sikora, Matt; Teknipp, Ryan; Xu, Guixiang; Bemiller, Shane; Wilson, Gina; Crish, Samuel; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lee, Yu-Shang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has acute and chronic sequelae, including an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TBI-associated neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes; however, recent studies have implicated beta-amyloid as a major manipulator of the inflammatory response. To examine neuroinflammation after TBI and development of AD-like features, these studies examined the effects of TBI in the presence and absence of beta-amyloid. The R1.40 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis was used, with a focus on time points well before robust AD pathologies. Unexpectedly, in R1.40 mice, the acute neuroinflammatory response to TBI was strikingly muted, with reduced numbers of CNS myeloid cells acquiring a macrophage phenotype and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines. At chronic time points, macrophage activation substantially declined in non-Tg TBI mice; however, it was relatively unchanged in R1.40 TBI mice. The persistent inflammatory response coincided with significant tissue loss between 3 and 120 days post-injury in R1.40 TBI mice, which was not observed in non-Tg TBI mice. Surprisingly, inflammatory cytokine expression was enhanced in R1.40 mice compared with non-Tg mice, regardless of injury group. Although R1.40 TBI mice demonstrated task-specific deficits in cognition, overall functional recovery was similar to non-Tg TBI mice. These findings suggest that accumulating beta-amyloid leads to an altered post-injury macrophage response at acute and chronic time points. Together, these studies emphasize the role of post-injury neuroinflammation in regulating long-term sequelae after TBI and also support recent studies implicating beta-amyloid as an immunomodulator. PMID:26414955

  18. Frequency-specific Alterations of Large-scale Functional Brain Networks in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Qin; Ya-Peng Li; Shun Zhang; Ying Xiong; Lin-Ying Guo; Shi-Qi Yang; Yi-Hao Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background:Previous studies have indicated that the cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be due to topological deteriorations of the brain network.However,whether the selection of a specific frequency band could impact the topological properties is still not clear.Our hypothesis is that the topological properties of AD patients are also frequency-specific.Methods:Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from l0 right-handed moderate AD patients (mean age:64.3 years; mean mini mental state examination [MMSE]:18.0) and 10 age and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age:63.6 years; mean MMSE:28.2) were enrolled in this study.The global efficiency,the clustering coefficient (CC),the characteristic path length (CpL),and "small-world" property were calculated in a wide range of thresholds and averaged within each group,at three different frequency bands (0.01-0.06 Hz,0.06-0.11 Hz,and 0.11-0.25 Hz).Results:At lower-frequency bands (0.01-0.06 Hz,0.06-0.11 Hz),the global efficiency,the CC and the "small-world" properties of AD patients decreased compared to controls.While at higher-frequency bands (0.11-0.25 Hz),the CpL was much longer,and the "small-world" property was disrupted in AD,particularly at a higher threshold.The topological properties changed with different frequency bands,suggesting the existence of disrupted global and local functional organization associated with AD.Conclusions:This study demonstrates that the topological alterations of large-scale functional brain networks inAD patients are frequency dependent,thus providing fundamental support for optimal frequency selection in future related research.

  19. Extracellular space diffusion parameters in the brain of APP23 mice: an Alzheimer's disease model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazel, Tomáš; Antonova, Tatiana; Voříšek, Ivan; Meyer-Luehmann, M.; Staufenbiel, M.; Jucker, M.; Syková, Eva

    Praha, 2003. s. 99. ISBN 80-239-0887-1. [IBRO World Congress of Neuroscience /6./. 10.07.2003-15.07.2003, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  20. Brain Substrates of Learning and Retention in Mild Cognitive Impairment Diagnosis and Progression to Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Bondi, Mark W.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; McEvoy, Linda K.; Hagler, Donald J., Jr.; Jacobson, Mark W.; Dale, Anders M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the underlying qualitative features of memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can provide critical information for early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study sought to investigate the utility of both learning and retention measures in (a) the diagnosis of MCI, (b) predicting progression to AD, and (c)…

  1. Association of Alzheimer's disease GWAS loci with MRI markers of brain aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Chauhan (Ganesh); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); J.C. Bis (Joshua); G. Weinstein (Galit); L. Yu (Lei); A.M. Töglhofer (Anna Maria); G.D. Smith; S. van der Lee (Sven); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); R. Thomson (Russell); J. Wang (Jing); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); O.L. Lopez (Oscar); J.T. Becker (James); T.G. Phan (Thanh); R.J. Beare (Richard); K. Arfanakis (Konstantinos); D. Fleischman (Debra); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); V. Srikanth (Velandai); D.S. Knopman (David); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); P. Amouyel (Philippe); A. Hofman (Albert); C. DeCarli (Charles); C. Tzourio (Christophe); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia M.); D.A. Bennett (David); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); W.T. Longstreth Jr; T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); M. Fornage (Myriam); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S. Seshadri (Sudha); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); S. Debette (Stéphanie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhether novel risk variants of Alzheimer's disease (AD) identified through genome-wide association studies also influence magnetic resonance imaging-based intermediate phenotypes of AD in the general population is unclear. We studied association of 24 AD risk loci with intracranial volum

  2. The Importance of Adipokines in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyid Ahmet Ay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dementia and Alzheimers disease are characterized by disturbances in brain function and structure. Similarly, body mass index and obesity are associated with certain brain pathologies, including Alzheimers disease and dementia. In fact, there is mounting evidence linking metabolic dysfunction with dementia and Alzheimers disease. Major endocrine axes constitute links between brain and peripheral tissues, especially adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is metabolically very active and produces a variety of adipokines known to affect both peripheral and central nervous system processes. Experimental studies suggest that changes in adipokine function may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimers disease. Herein, we review the adipokines leptin and adiponectin which are associated with morbidities related to obesity as well as dementia and Alzheimers disease. [Dis Mol Med 2015; 3(2.000: 22-28

  3. Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta links lens and brain pathology in Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet A Moncaster

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans. In DS, triplication of chromosome 21 invariably includes the APP gene (21q21 encoding the Alzheimer's disease (AD amyloid precursor protein (APP. Triplication of the APP gene accelerates APP expression leading to cerebral accumulation of APP-derived amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta, early-onset AD neuropathology, and age-dependent cognitive sequelae. The DS phenotype complex also includes distinctive early-onset cerulean cataracts of unknown etiology. Previously, we reported increased Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and disease-linked supranuclear cataracts in the ocular lenses of subjects with AD. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that related AD-linked Abeta pathology underlies the distinctive lens phenotype associated with DS. Ophthalmological examinations of DS subjects were correlated with phenotypic, histochemical, and biochemical analyses of lenses obtained from DS, AD, and normal control subjects. Evaluation of DS lenses revealed a characteristic pattern of supranuclear opacification accompanied by accelerated supranuclear Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and fiber cell cytoplasmic Abeta aggregates (approximately 5 to 50 nm identical to the lens pathology identified in AD. Peptide sequencing, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA confirmed the identity and increased accumulation of Abeta in DS lenses. Incubation of synthetic Abeta with human lens protein promoted protein aggregation, amyloid formation, and light scattering that recapitulated the molecular pathology and clinical features observed in DS lenses. These results establish the genetic etiology of the distinctive lens phenotype in DS and identify the molecular origin and pathogenic mechanism by which lens pathology is expressed in this common chromosomal disorder. Moreover, these findings confirm increased Abeta

  4. Cation shifts as markers in neurodegenerative diseases: correlations with transmitter deficts in Alzheimer and Huntington disease and imaging of excitoxic brain damage

    OpenAIRE

    Gramsbergen, Jan Bert Paul

    1988-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of dementia is best defined as an - usually at advanced age - acquired global impairment of intellect, memory and personality, but without impairment of consciousness, prominent causes of dementia are certain intrinsic degenerative diseases of the brain. The most common of these diseases is Alzheimer's disease (AD) . The pathological hallmark of AD is the presence of large amounts of so called plaques extracellular structures which involve processes of different neurons ...

  5. Alzheimer's disease and stigmatization

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Kosmidis; Aggeliki Nousi; Stavros Τoulis; Antigoni Fountouki; Dimitrios Theofanidis

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The main objective of the study was to explore social bias experienced by patients with Alzheimer's disease and to investigate the knowledge of a sample of the general population regarding this particular disease. Method: The sample consisted of 91 individuals who were first degree relatives of members of three Centers of Open Protection for the Elderly, who did not suffer from dementia as they have recently undergone screening for Alzheimer's disease. A survey design was adopted using a...

  6. Micronutrients and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Hannes B

    2005-11-01

    The current high life expectancy is overshadowed by neurodegenerative illnesses that lead to dementia and dependence. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common of these conditions, and is considered to be a proteinopathy, with amyloid-beta42 as a key factor, leading via a cascade of events to neurodegeneration. Major factors involved are oxidative stress, perturbed Ca homeostasis and impaired energy metabolism. Protection against oxidative stress by micronutrients (including secondary bioactive substances) has been shown in transgenic Alzheimer model systems to delay AD. Epidemiological evidence is less conclusive, but the vast majority of the evidence supports a protective effect on cognitive functions in old age and AD. Thus, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables but also containing meat and fish is the most suitable to provide adequate micronutrients. The strong link between cardiovascular risk and AD may be explained by common pathogenetic mechanisms mediated, for example, by homocysteine and thus dependant on B-vitamins (folate and vitamins B(12) and B(6)). However, micronutrients may also be harmful. The high affinity of amyloid for metals (Fe, Al and Zn) favours the generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers an inflammatory response. Micronutrients in a balanced diet have a long-lasting, albeit low, protective impact on brain aging, hence prevention should be life long. PMID:16313699

  7. Radio electric asymmetric brain stimulation in the treatment of behavioral and psychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannu P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Piero Mannu1, Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna11Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Department of Neuro Psycho Physio Pathology, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, ItalyPurpose: Behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD are common in Alzheimer's disease (AD and disrupt the effective management of AD patients. The present study explores the use of radio electric asymmetric brain stimulation (REAC in patients who have had a poor response to pharmacological treatment.Patients and methods: Eight patients (five females and three males; mean [±standard deviation] age at study baseline: 69.9 ± 3.0 years diagnosed with AD according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria (mean onset age of AD: 65.4 ± 3.5 years were cognitively and psychometrically assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Activity of Daily Living (ADL, the Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI, prior to and after each of 2 REAC treatment cycles.Results: Scores on the MMSE and all subscales of the NPI (frequency, severity, and distress, the ADL, and the IADL were significantly improved following the initial REAC treatment. There was further significant improvement in all measurements (with a tendency for improvement in the IADL after the second REAC treatment cycle.Conclusion: The improvement of cognitive and behavioral/psychiatric functioning following REAC treatment suggests that this innovative approach may be an effective, safe, and tolerable alternative to pharmacological treatment of AD patients, especially in the area of BPSD. Elderly patients suffering from other types of dementia may also benefit from REAC treatment.Keywords: anxiety, depression, insomnia, behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD

  8. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity. PMID:24164734

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer's >> Home Text size: A A A 2016 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures download the full report: ... or even slowed. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers In 2015, 15.9 million family ...

  10. N-isopropyl I-123 p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) brain SPECT in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighteen patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 5 patients with Pick disease (PD), 6 patients with other types of degenerative dementia (O) and 12 age-matched normal control subjects (N) were studied using N-isopropyl p-[I-123]iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) with SPECT. Regional to cerebellar activity (R/CE) ratio and frontal to parietal (F/R) activity ratio were evaluated in each case. I-123 IMP-SPECT revealed focal abnormality in all cases in AD, PD, O group, while XCT and/or MRI were normal or showed cerebral atrophy without focal abnormal density or intensity. In AD group, R/CE ratio in all the regions except for bilateral Rolandic area and left primary visual cortex were significantly lower (p<0.05 or p<0.01) than that in N group, and F/P ratio were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in P and O group. In conclusion, I-123 IMP-SPECT is useful to detect focal perfusion abnormality in dementia and may be of value in differentiating Alzheimer's disease from dementia of non-Alzheimer type. (author)

  11. Can ketones compensate for deteriorating brain glucose uptake during aging? Implications for the risk and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; St-Pierre, Valérie; Vandenberghe, Camille; Pierotti, Tyler; Fortier, Mélanie; Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    Brain glucose uptake is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A key question is whether cognitive decline can be delayed if this brain energy defect is at least partly corrected or bypassed early in the disease. The principal ketones (also called ketone bodies), β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, are the brain's main physiological alternative fuel to glucose. Three studies in mild-to-moderate AD have shown that, unlike with glucose, brain ketone uptake is not different from that in healthy age-matched controls. Published clinical trials demonstrate that increasing ketone availability to the brain via moderate nutritional ketosis has a modest beneficial effect on cognitive outcomes in mild-to-moderate AD and in mild cognitive impairment. Nutritional ketosis can be safely achieved by a high-fat ketogenic diet, by supplements providing 20-70 g/day of medium-chain triglycerides containing the eight- and ten-carbon fatty acids octanoate and decanoate, or by ketone esters. Given the acute dependence of the brain on its energy supply, it seems reasonable that the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at AD mandates consideration of how the underlying problem of deteriorating brain fuel supply can be corrected or delayed. PMID:26766547

  12. Glycation in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Miranda, Hugo; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-06-01

    Glycation is a spontaneous age-dependent posttranslational modification that can impact the structure and function of several proteins. Interestingly, glycation can be detected at the periphery of Lewy bodies in the brain in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, α-synuclein can be glycated, at least under experimental conditions. In Alzheimer's disease, glycation of amyloid β peptide exacerbates its toxicity and contributes to neurodegeneration. Recent studies establish diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying this connection remain unclear. We hypothesize that hyperglycemia might play an important role in the development of these disorders, possibly by also inducing protein glycation and thereby dysfunction, aggregation, and deposition. Here, we explore protein glycation as a common player in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and propose it may constitute a novel target for the development of strategies for neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26946341

  13. The Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Seok; Kim, Kwang Ki; Yoon, Yup Yoon [Dongguk University Medical Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    To compare the corpus callosum (CC) area and brain volume among individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HC). To evaluate the relationship of CC area and brain volume in 111 subjects (M:F = 48:63; mean age, 56.9 years) without memory disturbance and 28 subjects (11:17; 66.7years) with memory disturbance. The 11 AD (3:8; 75.7 years), 17 MCI (8:9; 60.9 years) and 28 selected HC (11:17; 66.4 years) patients were investigated for comparison of their CC area and brain volume. A good positive linear correlation was found between CC area and brain volume in subjects without and with memory disturbance (r = 0.64 and 0.66, respectively, p < 0.01). The CC area and brain volume in AD patients (498.7 +- 72 mm{sup 2}, 715.4 +- 107 cm3) were significantly smaller than in MCI patients (595.9 +- 108, 844.1 +- 85) and the HCs (563.2 +- 75, 818.9 +- 109) (p < 0.05). The CC area and brain volume were not significantly different between MCI patients and the HCs. The CC area was significantly correlated with brain volume. Both CC area and brain volume were significantly smaller in the AD patients

  14. Alzheimer's disease and periodontitis - an elusive link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit N. Gurav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the preeminent cause and commonest form of dementia. It is clinically characterized by a progressive descent in the cognitive function, which commences with deterioration in memory. The exact etiology and pathophysiologic mechanism of Alzheimer's disease is still not fully understood. However it is hypothesized that, neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is marked by salient inflammatory features, characterized by microglial activation and escalation in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the affected regions. Studies have suggested a probable role of systemic infection conducing to inflammatory status of the central nervous system. Periodontitis is common oral infection affiliated with gram negative, anaerobic bacteria, capable of orchestrating localized and systemic infections in the subject. Periodontitis is known to elicit a "low grade systemic inflammation" by release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into systemic circulation. This review elucidates the possible role of periodontitis in exacerbating Alzheimer's disease. Periodontitis may bear the potential to affect the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Periodontitis shares the two important features of Alzheimer's disease namely oxidative damage and inflammation, which are exhibited in the brain pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Periodontitis can be treated and hence it is a modifiable risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Analysis of the brain tissues from a patient with Alzheimer's disease and effects of chelating treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease and ALS are among major neurodegenerative diseases. The cause of neurodegeneration is unknown, but there are indications that excessive accumulation of essential elements, and sometimes, incorporation of toxic foreign elements in neurons aggravate neurodegeneration. During the past decade, many researchers investigated the causative factors in degenerative diseases to specify genetic or environmental factor. PIXE analysis has been used for these studies because of the sample preparation is easy and detection limit is very low. However, the concentration of matrix elements and foreign elements are extremely low and difficult to detect and to quantify. In this study, specimens from patients with Alzheimer's disease with no chemical treatment, and those with chelating were analyzed. In all analyzed specimens, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ca, Ti, Vi, Cr, Fe and Cu were detected. Each specimen in this study consisted of cerebral cortex and substantia alba. From these experiments we can observe a clear tendency that the accumulation of the metal elements use different depending on the constituent tissues, and the method of sample preparation has a dominant role in the measurement results. (author)

  16. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle encapsulated tarenflurbil: A potential brain targeting strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntimadugu, Eameema; Dhommati, Raju; Jain, Anjali; Challa, Venu Gopala Swami; Shaheen, M; Khan, Wahid

    2016-09-20

    Poor brain penetration of tarenflurbil (TFB) was one of the major reasons for its failure in phase III clinical trials conducted on Alzheimer's patients. Thus there is a tremendous need of developing efficient delivery systems for TFB. This study was designed with the aim of improving drug delivery to brain through intranasally delivered nanocarriers. TFB was loaded into two different nanocarriers i.e., poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (TFB-NPs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (TFB-SLNs). Particle size of both the nanocarriers (TFB-SLNs (i.n.)>TFB solution (i.n.)>TFB suspension (oral). Brain targeting efficiency was determined in terms of %drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and drug transport percentage (DTP). The higher %DTE (287.24) and DTP (65.18) were observed for TFB-NPs followed by TFB-SLNs (%DTE: 183.15 and DTP: 45.41) among all other tested groups. These encouraging results proved that therapeutic concentrations of TFB could be transported directly to brain via olfactory pathway after intranasal administration of polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. PMID:27185298

  17. Alzheimer's Disease and Vitamin E

    OpenAIRE

    Empey, Matthew

    1998-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a form of dementia characterized by generalized and progressive cognitive dysfunction. Research has determined that an important pathological component of AD is neuronal damage and death in certain brain regions precipitated by oxidative damage. This paper reviews the pathology of AD, describes the biochemical processes pertaining to oxidative stress and antioxidant compounds, and reviews the evidence that one particular antioxidant, vitamin E, may be effective in ...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... interventions designed to lower the levels of Alzheimer's pathologies in the brain treatments for health issues that may be linked to Alzheimer's, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes cognitive training eating ...

  19. Alzheimer's disease: neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in human brain identified by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Lin-P'ing; Jackson, Michael; Halliday, William C.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1994-01-01

    The abnormal abundance of (beta) -amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Human central nervous system (CNS) grey matter was probed for characteristics arising from these pathological features. In AD but not normal grey matter, an IR band at 1615 cm-1 is seen, characteristic of a protein in an aggregated state. We speculate that this band arises from (beta) A4-amyloid protein. AD, and 18q- grey matter spectra show increased intensity of phosphate bands in accordance with known hyperphosphorylation of proteins found in neurofibrillary tangles. These spectral features may be useful in the diagnosis of AD.

  20. Semi-automatic ROI placement system for analysis of brain PET images based on elastic model. Application to diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a useful technique to image cerebral glucose metabolism and to detect patients with Alzheimer's disease in the early stage, in which characteristic temporoparietal hypometabolism is visualized. We have developed a new system, in which the standard brain ROI atlas made of networks of segments is elastically transformed to match the subject brain images, so that standard ROIs defined on the segments are placed on the individual brain images and are used to measure radioactivity over each brain region. We applied this methods to Alzheimer's disease. This method was applied to the images of 10 normal subjects (ages 55 +/- 12) and 21 patients clinically diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (age 61 +/- 10). The FDG uptake reflecting glucose metabolism was evaluated with SUV, i.e. decay corrected radioactivity divided by injected dose per body weight in (Bq/ml)/(Bq/g). The system worked all right in every subject including those with extensive hypometabolism. Alzheimer patients showed markedly lower in the parietal cortex (4.0-4.1). When the threshold value of FDG uptake in the parietal lobe was set as 5 (Bq/ml)/(Bq/g), we could discriminate the patients with Alzheimer's disease from the normal subjects. The sensitivity was 86% and the specificity was 90%. This system can assist diagnosis of FDG images and may be useful for treating data of a large number of subjects; e.g. when PET is applied to health screening. (author)

  1. Graded perturbations of metabolism in multiple regions of human brain in Alzheimer's disease: Snapshot of a pervasive metabolic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J.; Patassini, Stefano; Hollywood, Katherine A.; Jüllig, Mia; Curtis, Maurice A.; Waldvogel, Henry J.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Unwin, Richard D.; Cooper, Garth J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that displays pathological characteristics including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Metabolic defects are also present in AD-brain: for example, signs of deficient cerebral glucose uptake may occur decades before onset of cognitive dysfunction and tissue damage. There have been few systematic studies of the metabolite content of AD human brain, possibly due to scarcity of high-quality brain tissue and/or lack of reliable experimental methodologies. Here we sought to: 1) elucidate the molecular basis of metabolic defects in human AD-brain; and 2) identify endogenous metabolites that might guide new approaches for therapeutic intervention, diagnosis or monitoring of AD. Brains were obtained from nine cases with confirmed clinical/neuropathological AD and nine controls matched for age, sex and post-mortem delay. Metabolite levels were measured in post-mortem tissue from seven regions: three that undergo severe neuronal damage (hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and middle-temporal gyrus); three less severely affected (cingulate gyrus, sensory cortex and motor cortex); and one (cerebellum) that is relatively spared. We report a total of 55 metabolites that were altered in at least one AD-brain region, with different regions showing alterations in between 16 and 33 metabolites. Overall, we detected prominent global alterations in metabolites from several pathways involved in glucose clearance/utilization, the urea cycle, and amino-acid metabolism. The finding that potentially toxigenic molecular perturbations are widespread throughout all brain regions including the cerebellum is consistent with a global brain disease process rather than a localized effect of AD on regional brain metabolism. PMID:26957286

  2. Graded perturbations of metabolism in multiple regions of human brain in Alzheimer's disease: Snapshot of a pervasive metabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J; Patassini, Stefano; Hollywood, Katherine A; Jüllig, Mia; Curtis, Maurice A; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Unwin, Richard D; Cooper, Garth J S

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that displays pathological characteristics including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Metabolic defects are also present in AD-brain: for example, signs of deficient cerebral glucose uptake may occur decades before onset of cognitive dysfunction and tissue damage. There have been few systematic studies of the metabolite content of AD human brain, possibly due to scarcity of high-quality brain tissue and/or lack of reliable experimental methodologies. Here we sought to: 1) elucidate the molecular basis of metabolic defects in human AD-brain; and 2) identify endogenous metabolites that might guide new approaches for therapeutic intervention, diagnosis or monitoring of AD. Brains were obtained from nine cases with confirmed clinical/neuropathological AD and nine controls matched for age, sex and post-mortem delay. Metabolite levels were measured in post-mortem tissue from seven regions: three that undergo severe neuronal damage (hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and middle-temporal gyrus); three less severely affected (cingulate gyrus, sensory cortex and motor cortex); and one (cerebellum) that is relatively spared. We report a total of 55 metabolites that were altered in at least one AD-brain region, with different regions showing alterations in between 16 and 33 metabolites. Overall, we detected prominent global alterations in metabolites from several pathways involved in glucose clearance/utilization, the urea cycle, and amino-acid metabolism. The finding that potentially toxigenic molecular perturbations are widespread throughout all brain regions including the cerebellum is consistent with a global brain disease process rather than a localized effect of AD on regional brain metabolism. PMID:26957286

  3. Brain in situ hybridization maps as a source for reverse-engineering transcriptional regulatory networks: Alzheimer's disease insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George K; Taylor, Ronald C

    2016-07-15

    Microarray data have been a valuable resource for identifying transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes. As an example, brain region-specific transcriptional regulatory events have the potential of providing etiological insights into Alzheimer Disease (AD). However, there is often a paucity of suitable brain-region specific expression data obtained via microarrays or other high throughput means. The Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization (ISH) data sets (Jones et al., 2009) represent a potentially valuable alternative source of high-throughput brain region-specific gene expression data for such purposes. In this study, Allen Brain Atlas mouse ISH data in the hippocampal fields were extracted, focusing on 508 genes relevant to neurodegeneration. Transcriptional regulatory networks were learned using three high-performing network inference algorithms. Only 17% of regulatory edges from a network reverse-engineered based on brain region-specific ISH data were also found in a network constructed upon gene expression correlations in mouse whole brain microarrays, thus showing the specificity of gene expression within brain sub-regions. Furthermore, the ISH data-based networks were used to identify instructive transcriptional regulatory relationships. Ncor2, Sp3 and Usf2 form a unique three-party regulatory motif, potentially affecting memory formation pathways. Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 emerge among regulators of genes involved in AD (e.g. Dhcr24, Aplp2, Tia1, Pdrx1, Vdac1, and Syn2). Further, Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 are sensitive to dietary factors and could be among links between dietary influences and genes in the AD etiology. Thus, this approach of harnessing brain region-specific ISH data represents a rare opportunity for gleaning unique etiological insights for diseases such as AD. PMID:27050105

  4. Algebraic connectivity of brain networks shows patterns of segregation leading to reduced network robustness in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Nir, Talia M.; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Bernstein, Matthew A.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of network topology and connectivity aid the understanding of network breakdown as the brain degenerates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We analyzed 3-Tesla diffusion-weighted images from 202 patients scanned by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative – 50 healthy controls, 72 with early- and 38 with late-stage mild cognitive impairment (eMCI/lMCI) and 42 with AD. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural connectivity networks representing connections between pairs of cortical regions. We examined, for the first time in this context, the network's Laplacian matrix and its Fiedler value, describing the network's algebraic connectivity, and the Fiedler vector, used to partition a graph. We assessed algebraic connectivity and four additional supporting metrics, revealing a decrease in network robustness and increasing disarray among nodes as dementia progressed. Network components became more disconnected and segregated, and their modularity increased. These measures are sensitive to diagnostic group differences, and may help understand the complex changes in AD. PMID:26640830

  5. Trends in brain oxygenation during mental and physical exercise measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS): potential for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Monica S.; Allen, Jeffery W.; Mikkilineni, Shweta; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    Motivation: Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial because symptoms respond best to available treatments in the initial stages of the disease. Recent studies have shown that marked changes in brain oxygenation during mental and physical tasks can be used for noninvasive functional brain imaging to detect Alzheimer"s disease. The goal of our study is to explore the possibility of using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and mapping (NIRM) as a diagnostic tool for AD before the onset of significant morphological changes in the brain. Methods: A 16-channel NIRS brain imager was used to noninvasively measure spatial and temporal changes in cerebral hemodynamics induced during verbal fluency task and physical activity. The experiments involved healthy subjects (n = 10) in the age range of 25+/-5 years. The NIRS signals were taken from the subjects' prefrontal cortex during the activities. Results and Conclusion: Trends of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex of the brain were observed. During the mental stimulation, the subjects showed significant increase in oxygenated hemoglobin [HbO2] with a simultaneous decrease in deoxygenated hemoglobin [Hb]. However, physical exercise caused a rise in levels of HbO2 with small variations in Hb. This study basically demonstrates that NIRM taken from the prefrontal cortex of the human brain is sensitive to both mental and physical tasks and holds potential to serve as a diagnostic means for early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. What does the broken brain say to the neuroscientist? Oscillations and connectivity in schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, E; Schmiedt-Fehr, C; Mathes, B; Femir, B; Emek-Savaş, D D; Tülay, E; Tan, D; Düzgün, A; Güntekin, B; Özerdem, A; Yener, G; Başar-Eroğlu, C

    2016-05-01

    The application of the concept and methods of brain oscillations has been an important research area in neurosciences. In the last decades, besides the application in cognitive processes, the study of changes in brain oscillations in diseases has also become an important focal point of research. In the present paper, some remarkable examples in three different diseases are taken into consideration: 1) schizophrenia (SZ), 2) Alzheimer's disease (AD), 3) bipolar disorders (BD). In the current literature, decreased oscillations in cortical recordings are observed in most of the pathologies. For example, decrease of gamma activity in SZ, decrease of delta activity in almost all diseases, as well as frequency shifts in alpha and the lower frequencies were recorded. However, there are also paradoxical cases in which an increase of oscillatory activities is observed. In BD, whereas alpha activity is greatly decreased, a huge increase of beta activity is observed. Or, in SZ, a paradoxical increase of gamma activity can be observed during cognitive loading. We also observed paradoxical changes in the analysis of connectivity. In AD, we find that alpha, delta, and theta coherences between distant parts of the cortex are greatly decreased, whereas in the gamma band, event-related coherences attain very high values. The comparison of the results and paradoxical changes in diseases may lead to important conclusions related to the web of oscillations and neurotransmitters. In turn, we could gain new insights to approach "brain function", in general. PMID:25660302

  7. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TDP43-related Dementia 2013 Andrew Watt Characterisation of Tau Imaging Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias 2010 Marco Prado The Prion Protein as a Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease 2007 ...

  8. Ganglioside metabolism in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: expression of Chol-1α antigens in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Ariga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of Aβ (amyloid β-protein is one of the major pathological hallmarks in AD (Alzheimer's disease. Gangliosides, sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids enriched in the nervous system and frequently used as biomarkers associated with the biochemical pathology of neurological disorders, have been suggested to be involved in the initial aggregation of Aβ. In the present study, we have examined ganglioside metabolism in the brain of a double-Tg (transgenic mouse model of AD that co-expresses mouse/human chimaeric APP (amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish mutation and human presenilin-1 with a deletion of exon 9. Although accumulation of Aβ was confirmed in the double-Tg mouse brains and sera, no statistically significant change was detected in the concentration and composition of major ganglio-N-tetraosyl-series gangliosides in the double-Tg brain. Most interestingly, Chol-1α antigens (cholinergic neuron-specific gangliosides, such as GT1aα and GQ1bα, which are minor species in the brain, were found to be increased in the double-Tg mouse brain. We interpret that the occurrence of these gangliosides may represent evidence for generation of cholinergic neurons in the AD brain, as a result of compensatory neurogenesis activated by the presence of Aβ.

  9. Relationships between choline acetyl-transferase and muscarinic binding in aging rodent brain and in Alzheimers disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines how the relation between ChAT and muscarinic binding might be affected by aging in mouse and rat brains. Preliminary data are presented regarding this relation in postmortem cerebral cortex samples from human subjects who died with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and from age-matched controls. The effect of acetyl coenzme A (1- C 14-acetyl coenzyme A concentration on enzyme activity was determined by varying the concentration of the coenzyme in the assay medium. Assays of muscarinic binding were performed on tissue sonicates diluted with Tris-HC1 buffer using tritium-quinuclidinyl benzilate tritium-QNB as the ligand. For brain regions obtained from rats, significance of age differences were assessed by one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni t statistics. Differences in ChAT activity and binding site density from human postmortem samples between diagnostic groups were assessed separately by region using an analysis of covariance

  10. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Leuner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g. might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease (AD. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, these new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions.

  11. Nine-month follow-up of the insulin receptor signalling cascade in the brain of streptozotocin rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Osmanović Barilar, Jelena; Knezović, Ana; Grünblatt, Edna; Riederer, Peter; Šalković-Petrišić, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer disease (sAD) is associated with impairment of insulin receptor (IR) signalling in the brain. Rats used to model sAD develop insulin-resistant brain state following intracerebroventricular treatment with a betacytotoxic drug streptozotocin (STZ-icv). Brain IR signalling has been explored usually at only one time point in periods ≤3 months after the STZ-icv administration. We have investigated insulin signalling in the rat hippocampus at five time points in periods ≤9 months...

  12. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  13. 2014-2015 Alzheimer's Disease Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR 2014-2015 Alzheimer's Disease Progress Report: Advancing Research Toward a Cure ...

  14. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... throughout the brain and most areas of the brain have shrunk (above right). Understanding Alzheimer's–Free Videos Can Help The NIHSeniorHealth ... spinal fluid, to track subtle changes in the brain before symptoms appear ... NIA Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center at 1-800-438- ...

  15. Scientists Reduce Alzheimer's-Linked Brain Plaques in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jacksonville, Fla. The approach "can be explored for Alzheimer's disease prevention and therapy," he added. Clumps of beta-amyloid proteins, known as plaque, are believed to disrupt brain functioning in people with Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia. The ...

  16. Brain Metabolic Dysfunction in Capgras Delusion During Alzheimer's Disease: A Positron Emission Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedidi, H; Daury, N; Capa, R; Bahri, M A; Collette, F; Feyers, D; Bastin, C; Maquet, P; Salmon, E

    2015-11-01

    Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24-healthy elderly participants and 26 patients with AD without delusional syndrome. Comparing the healthy group with the AD group, the patient with AD had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In the light of current neural models of face perception, our patients with Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. PMID:23813791

  17. Advanced brain aging: relationship with epidemiologic and genetic risk factors, and overlap with Alzheimer disease atrophy patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, M; Janowitz, D; Erus, G; Toledo, J B; Resnick, S M; Doshi, J; Van der Auwera, S; Wittfeld, K; Hegenscheid, K; Hosten, N; Biffar, R; Homuth, G; Völzke, H; Grabe, H J; Hoffmann, W; Davatzikos, C

    2016-01-01

    We systematically compared structural imaging patterns of advanced brain aging (ABA) in the general-population, herein defined as significant deviation from typical BA to those found in Alzheimer disease (AD). The hypothesis that ABA would show different patterns of structural change compared with those found in AD was tested via advanced pattern analysis methods. In particular, magnetic resonance images of 2705 participants from the Study of Health in Pomerania (aged 20-90 years) were analyzed using an index that captures aging atrophy patterns (Spatial Pattern of Atrophy for Recognition of BA (SPARE-BA)), and an index previously shown to capture atrophy patterns found in clinical AD (Spatial Patterns of Abnormality for Recognition of Early Alzheimer's Disease (SPARE-AD)). We studied the association between these indices and risk factors, including an AD polygenic risk score. Finally, we compared the ABA-associated atrophy with typical AD-like patterns. We observed that SPARE-BA had significant association with: smoking (Ppatterns of atrophy were partially overlapping with, but notably deviating from those typically found in AD. Subjects with ABA had higher SPARE-AD values; largely due to the partial spatial overlap of associated patterns in temporal regions. The AD polygenic risk score was significantly associated with SPARE-AD but not with SPARE-BA. Our findings suggest that ABA is likely characterized by pathophysiologic mechanisms that are distinct from, or only partially overlapping with those of AD. PMID:27045845

  18. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy

  19. Alzheimer's disease: early diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, L W

    2012-06-01

    With ageing of populations, the worldwide population of persons with dementia will reach over 81 million by 2040, of which the most common cause is Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis, methods to diagnose it, and treatment. Magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and Pittsburgh compound B and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain can facilitate an accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in its early stage, and diagnose the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease. At present, only symptomatic but not disease-modifying drug treatments are available. Donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine are the currently approved cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer's disease. Overall, cholinesterase inhibitors show beneficial effects on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Memantine is another symptomatic treatment for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease patients. It has a small beneficial effect on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Vitamin E has antioxidant properties, and may be used in some Alzheimer's disease patients without vascular risk factors. Concurrent non-pharmacological and psychosocial management of patients and their caregivers have a very important role. Disease-modifying therapies are still under development, whilst immunotherapy may be a viable option in the near future. PMID:22665688

  20. Nutrient intake and brain biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in at-risk cognitively normal individuals: a cross-sectional neuroimaging pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Mosconi, Lisa; Murray, John; Davies, Michelle; Williams, Schantel; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Spector, Nicole; Tsui, Wai H; Li, Yi; Butler, Tracy; Osorio, Ricardo S.; Glodzik, Lidia; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; mcHugh, Pauline; Marmar, Charles R.; de Leon, Mony J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence to suggest that diet, one of the most important modifiable environmental factors, may play a role in preventing or delaying cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examines the relationship between dietary nutrients and brain biomarkers of AD in cognitively normal individuals (NL) with and without AD risk factors. Design As part of an ongoing brain imaging study, participants received clinical and laboratory examinations, a neurocognit...

  1. A biophysical model of brain deformation to simulate and analyze longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Bishesh; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We propose a framework for developing a comprehensive biophysical model that could predict and simulate realistic longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The framework includes three major building blocks: i) atrophy generation, ii) brain deformation, and iii) realistic MRI generation. Within this framework, this paper focuses on a detailed implementation of the brain deformation block with a carefully designed biomechanics-based tissue loss model. For a given baseline brain MRI, the model yields a deformation field imposing the desired atrophy at each voxel of the brain parenchyma while allowing the CSF to expand as required to globally compensate for the locally prescribed volume loss. Our approach is inspired by biomechanical principles and involves a system of equations similar to Stokes equations in fluid mechanics but with the presence of a non-zero mass source term. We use this model to simulate longitudinal MRIs by prescribing complex patterns of atrophy. We present experiments that provide an insight into the role of different biomechanical parameters in the model. The model allows simulating images with exactly the same tissue atrophy but with different underlying deformation fields in the image. We explore the influence of different spatial distributions of atrophy on the image appearance and on the measurements of atrophy reported by various global and local atrophy estimation algorithms. We also present a pipeline that allows evaluating atrophy estimation algorithms by simulating longitudinal MRIs from large number of real subject MRIs with complex subject-specific atrophy patterns. The proposed framework could help understand the implications of different model assumptions, regularization choices, and spatial priors for the detection and measurement of brain atrophy from longitudinal brain MRIs. PMID:27039699

  2. Genetics of Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bekris, Lynn M.; Yu, Chang-En; Bird, Thomas D.; Tsuang, Debby W.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common causes of neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly individuals. Clinically, patients initially present with short-term memory loss, subsequently followed by executive dysfunction, confusion, agitation, and behavioral disturbances. Three causative genes have been associated with autosomal dominant familial AD (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) and 1 genetic risk factor (APOEε4 allele). Identification of these genes has led to a number of animal models that have ...

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease is often diagnosed too late. Its etiology is still largely unknown and remains one of the big challenges in neurobiological fundamental research. Optimized early and differential diagnosis can be ensured by a dynamic concept of multidisciplinary diagnosis in cooperation between practitioners specializing in brain disorders, clinical psychogeriatric deprtments, and general practitioners. This, in turn, will enable individualized planning of further living conditions and care of Alzheimer patients and their relations as well as efficient and early pharmacotherapy and psychological intervention. (orig)

  4. Whole-brain patterns of (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L; Blamire, A M; Watson, R; He, J; Hayes, L; O'Brien, J T

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated metabolite changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB); however, their pattern and relationship to clinical symptoms is unclear. To determine whether the spatial patterns of brain-metabolite changes in AD and DLB are regional or diffused, and to examine whether the key metabolite levels are associated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms, we acquired whole-brain spatially resolved 3T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from subjects with AD (N=36), DLB (N=35) and similarly aged controls (N=35). Voxel-wise measurement of N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr), choline to Cr (Cho/Cr), myo-inositol to Cr (mI/Cr) as well as glutamate and glutamine to Cr (Glx/Cr) ratios were determined using MRSI. Compared with controls, AD and DLB groups showed a significant decrease in most brain metabolites, with NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr levels being reduced in posterior cingulate, thalamus, frontotemporal areas and basal ganglia. The Glx/Cr level was more widely decreased in DLB (posterior cingulate, hippocampus, temporal regions and caudate) than in AD (only in posterior cingulate). DLB was also associated with increased levels of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr and mI/Cr in occipital regions. Changes in metabolism in the brain were correlated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms in the DLB but not in the AD group. The different patterns between AD and DLB may have implications for improving diagnosis, better understanding disease-specific neurobiology and targeting therapeutics. In addition, the study raised important questions about the role of occipital neuroinflammation and glial activation as well as the glutamatergic treatment in DLB. PMID:27576166

  5. FDG-PET changes in brain glucose metabolism from normal cognition to pathologically verified Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first clinicopathological series of longitudinal FDG-PET scans in post-mortem (PM) verified cognitively normal elderly (NL) followed to the onset of Alzheimer's-type dementia (DAT), and in patients with mild DAT with progressive cognitive deterioration. Four NL subjects and three patients with mild DAT received longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and dynamic FDG-PET examinations with arterial input functions. NL subjects were followed for 13 ± 5 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 7 ± 2 years, and autopsy 6 ± 3 years after the last FDG-PET. Two NL declined to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and two developed probable DAT before death. DAT patients were followed for 9 ± 3 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 3 ± 2 years, and autopsy 7 ± 1 years after the last FDG-PET. Two DAT patients progressed to moderate-to-severe dementia and one developed vascular dementia. The two NL subjects who declined to DAT received a PM diagnosis of definite AD. Their FDG-PET scans indicated a progression of deficits in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) from the hippocampus to the parietotemporal and posterior cingulate cortices. One DAT patient showed AD with diffuse Lewy body disease (LBD) at PM, and her last in vivo PET was indicative of possible LBD for the presence of occipital as well as parietotemporal hypometabolism. Progressive CMRglc reductions on FDG-PET occur years in advance of clinical DAT symptoms in patients with pathologically verified disease. The FDG-PET profiles in life were consistent with the PM diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. A neuronal antigen in the brains of Alzheimer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolozin, B L; Pruchnicki, A; Dickson, D W; Davies, P

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody was prepared against pooled homogenates of brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. This antibody recognizes an antigen present in much higher concentration in certain brain regions of Alzheimer patients than in normal brain. The antigen appears to be a protein present in neurons involved in the formation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and in some morphologically normal neurons in sections from Alzheimer brains. Partial purification and Western blot analysis revealed the antigen from Alzheimer brain to be a single protein with a molecular weight of 68,000. Application of the same purification procedure to normal brain tissue results in the detection of small amounts of a protein of lower molecular weight. PMID:3083509

  7. Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease: a review and proposal for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, R.J.; Aisen, P.S.; De Strooper, B.; Fox, N C; Lemere, C. A.; Ringman, J.M.; Salloway, S; Sperling, R. A.; Windisch, M.; Xiong, C.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease has provided significant understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. The present review summarizes clinical, pathological, imaging, biochemical, and molecular studies of autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the similarities and differences between the dominantly inherited form of Alzheimer's disease and the more common sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease. Current developments in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease are...

  8. Raman spectroscopy of Alzheimer's diseased tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Krasner, Neville

    2004-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common forms of dementia, and causes steady memory loss and mental regression. It is also accompanied by severe atrophy of the brain. However, the pathological biomarkers of the disease can only be confirmed and examined upon the death of the patient. A commercial (Renishaw PLC, UK) Raman system with an 830 nm NIR diode laser was used to analyse brain samples, which were flash frozen at post-mortem. Ethical approval was sought for these samples. The Alzheimer's diseased samples contained a number of biomarkers, including neuritic plaques and tangles. The Raman spectra were examined by order to differentiate between normal and Alzheimer's diseased brain tissues. Preliminary results indicate that Alzheimer's diseased tissues can be differentiated from control tissues using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra differ in terms of peak intensity, and the presence of a stronger amide I band in the 1667 cm-1 region which occurs more prominently in the Alzheimer's diseased tissue. These preliminary results indicate that the beta-amyloid protein originating from neuritic plaques can be identified with Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Association of Alzheimer disease GWAS loci with MRI-markers of brain aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ganesh; Adams, Hieab H.H.; Bis, Joshua C; Weinstein, Galit; Yu, Lei; Töglhofer, Anna Maria; Smith, Albert Vernon; van der Lee, Sven; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Thomson, Russell; Wang, Jing; Yang, Qiong; Niessen, Wiro J.; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Phan, Thanh G; Beare, Richard J; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Fleischman, Debra; Vernooij, Meike W.; Mazoyer, Bernard; Schmidt, Helena; Srikanth, Velandai; Knopman, Dave S; Jack, Clifford R; Amouyel, Philippe; Hofman, Albert; DeCarli, Charlie; Tzourio, Christophe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Bennett, David A; Schmidt, Reinhold; Longstreth, William T; Mosley, Thomas H; Fornage, Myriam; Launer, Lenore J; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Debette, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Whether novel risk variants of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) also influence MRI-based intermediate phenotypes of AD in the general population is unclear. We studied association of 24 AD risk loci with intracranial volume (ICV), total brain volume (TBV), hippocampal volume (HV), white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden, and brain infarcts in a meta-analysis of genetic association studies from large population-based samples (N=8,175–11,550). In single-SNP based tests, AD risk allele of APOE (rs2075650) was associated with smaller HV (p=0.0054) and CD33 (rs3865444) with smaller ICV (p=0.0058) In gene-based tests, there was associations of HLA-DRB1 with TBV (p=0.0006) and BIN1 with HV (p=0.00089). A weighted AD genetic risk score was associated with smaller HV (beta±SE=−0.047±0.013, p=0.00041), even after excluding the APOE locus (p=0.029). However, only association of AD genetic risk score with HV, including APOE, was significant after multiple testing correction (including number of independent phenotypes tested). These results suggest that novel AD genetic risk variants may contribute to structural brain aging in non-demented older community persons. PMID:25670335

  10. Reduced brain perfusion in basal forebrain associated with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's diseases: a Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Reduction of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in various cerebral regions and decline of cognitive function have been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The aim of this study was to identify the brain areas showing correlation between longitudinal changes of rCBFs and decline of general mental function, measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in probable Alzheimer's disease patients. Materials and Methods: Nine probable AD patients according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria and DSM-IV were studied with Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT at an initial point and at the follow-up after a period of average 1.8 year. MMSE score was obtained in both occasions (average MMSE 16.4 at initial study; average MMSE = 8.1 at follow-up). Single SPECT was performed in 30 age-matched normal controls. Each SPECT image was normalized to the cerebellar activity. Using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99), correlation was analyzed between individual changes in rCBF of two SPECT scans and the MMSE scores at the time of each study in AD patients. In addition, the SPECT images of the initial study and the follow-up study were compared with SPECT images of the age-matched normal group respectively. Results: Significant correlation between longitudinal changes of rCBFs and MMSE scores was found in left basal forebrain region including substantia innominata (x, y, z = -24, 16, -23; P < .05, corrected). Within a short follow-up period of 1.8 years, cerebral hypoperfusion extended to various cortical regions from bilateral temporo-parietal to bilateral frontal regions and cingulate cortex, compared to normal controls. Conclusion: The decline of cognitive function in individual AD patients was correlated with rCBF reduction in left basal forebrain. This finding supports the cholinergic hypothesis of AD since hypoperfusion in basal forebrain region might indicate deterioration of cholinergic neurons in nucleus basalis of Meynert or substantia innominata

  11. Advanced brain aging: relationship with epidemiologic and genetic risk factors, and overlap with Alzheimer disease atrophy patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, M; Janowitz, D; Erus, G; Toledo, J B; Resnick, S M; Doshi, J; Van der Auwera, S; Wittfeld, K; Hegenscheid, K; Hosten, N; Biffar, R; Homuth, G; Völzke, H; Grabe, H J; Hoffmann, W; Davatzikos, C

    2016-01-01

    We systematically compared structural imaging patterns of advanced brain aging (ABA) in the general-population, herein defined as significant deviation from typical BA to those found in Alzheimer disease (AD). The hypothesis that ABA would show different patterns of structural change compared with those found in AD was tested via advanced pattern analysis methods. In particular, magnetic resonance images of 2705 participants from the Study of Health in Pomerania (aged 20–90 years) were analyzed using an index that captures aging atrophy patterns (Spatial Pattern of Atrophy for Recognition of BA (SPARE-BA)), and an index previously shown to capture atrophy patterns found in clinical AD (Spatial Patterns of Abnormality for Recognition of Early Alzheimer's Disease (SPARE-AD)). We studied the association between these indices and risk factors, including an AD polygenic risk score. Finally, we compared the ABA-associated atrophy with typical AD-like patterns. We observed that SPARE-BA had significant association with: smoking (P<0.05), anti-hypertensive (P<0.05), anti-diabetic drug use (men P<0.05, women P=0.06) and waist circumference for the male cohort (P<0.05), after adjusting for age. Subjects with ABA had spatially extensive gray matter loss in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes (false-discovery-rate-corrected q<0.001). ABA patterns of atrophy were partially overlapping with, but notably deviating from those typically found in AD. Subjects with ABA had higher SPARE-AD values; largely due to the partial spatial overlap of associated patterns in temporal regions. The AD polygenic risk score was significantly associated with SPARE-AD but not with SPARE-BA. Our findings suggest that ABA is likely characterized by pathophysiologic mechanisms that are distinct from, or only partially overlapping with those of AD. PMID:27045845

  12. Alzheimer's Disease: An Exacerbation of Senile Phenoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, N K; Stelmashook, E V; Genrikhs, E E; Oborina, M V; Kapkaeva, M R; Skulachev, V P

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline accompanied by degeneration of neuronal synapses, massive loss of neurons in the brain, eventually resulting in complete degradation of personality and death. Currently, the cause of the disease is not fully understood, but it is believed that the person's age is the major risk factor for development of Alzheimer's disease. People who have survived after cerebral stroke or traumatic brain injury have substantially increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Social exclusion, low social activity, physical inactivity, poor mental performance, and low level of education are among risk factors for development of this neurodegenerative disease, which is consistent with the concept of phenoptosis (Skulachev, V. P., et al. (1999) Biochemistry (Moscow), 64, 1418-1426; Skulachev, M. V., and Skulachev, V. P. (2014) Biochemistry (Moscow), 79, 977-993) stating that rate of aging is related to psychological and social aspects in human behavior. Here we assumed that Alzheimer's disease might be considered as an exacerbation of senile phenoptosis. If so, then development of this disease could be slowed using mitochondria-targeted antioxidants due to the accumulated data demonstrating a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress both with normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26638682

  13. Preventing Alzheimer's Disease: What Do We Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: What Do We Know? Introduction The news ...

  14. Alzheimer's Disease in People with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer’s Disease in People with Down Syndrome People with ...

  15. Caregiving for Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Caregiving for Person with Alzheimer's Disease or a related Dementia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of ...

  16. Immunity factor contributes to altered brain functional networks in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease: Neuroimaging-genetic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Shi, Yongmei; Yuan, Yonggui; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is recognized as a secreted protein that is related to the processes of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The effects of the risk variant of the C allele at the rs11136000 locus of the CLU gene are associated with variations in the brain structure and function. However, the relationship of the CLU-C allele to architectural disruptions in resting-state networks in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects (i.e., individuals with elevated risk of AD) remains relatively unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and an imaging genetic approach, this study investigated whether individual brain functional networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task-positive network, were modulated by the CLU-C allele (rs11136000) in 50 elderly participants, including 26 aMCI subjects and 24 healthy controls. CLU-by-aMCI interactions were associated with the information-bridging regions between resting-state networks rather than with the DMN itself, especially in cortical midline regions. Interestingly, the complex communications between resting-state networks were enhanced in aMCI subjects with the CLU rs11136000 CC genotype and were modulated by the degree of memory impairment, suggesting a reconstructed balance of the resting-state networks in these individuals with an elevated risk of AD. The neuroimaging-genetic evidence indicates that immunity factors may contribute to alterations in brain functional networks in aMCI. These findings add to the evidence that the CLU gene may represent a potential therapeutic target for slowing disease progression in AD. PMID:26899953

  17. Nuclear microscopy in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elemental composition of the two types of brain lesions which characterise Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been the subject of intense scrutiny over the last decade, ever since it was proposed that inorganic trace elements, particularly aluminium, might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. The major evidence for this involvement was the detection of aluminium in the characteristic lesions of the AD brain; neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Using the powerful combination of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM), it is possible to image and analyse structures in brain sections without recourse to chemical staining. Previous results on elemental composition of senile plaques indicated the absence of aluminium at the 15 parts per million level. We have more recently focused on the analysis of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), destructive structural defects within neurons. Imaging and analysis of neurons in brain tissue presented a greater challenge due to the small dimensional size compared with the plaques. We describe the methodology and the results of imaging and analysing neurons in brain tissue sections using Nuclear Microscopy. Our results show that aluminium is not present in either neurons or surrounding tissue in unstained sections at the 20 ppm level, but can be observed in stained sections. We also report elemental concentrations showing significant elevations of phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, iron and zinc

  18. Increased hippocampal neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Kunlin; Peel, Alyson L.; Mao, Xiao Ou; Xie, Lin; Cottrell, Barbara A.; Henshall, David C.; Greenberg, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Neurogenesis, which persists in the adult mammalian brain, may provide a basis for neuronal replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neurogenesis is increased in certain acute neurological disorders, such as ischemia and epilepsy, but the effect of more chronic neurodegenerations is uncertain, and some animal models of AD show impaired neurogenesis. To determine how neurogenesis is affected in the brains of patients with AD, we investigated the expressi...

  19. The pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisoni, G.B.; Henneman, W.J.; Weiner, M.W.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In North America, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has established a platform to track the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease. A pilot study has been carried out in Europe to test the feasibility of the adoption of the ADNI platform (pilot E-ADNI). METHODS: Seven...... academic sites of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC) enrolled 19 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 22 with AD, and 18 older healthy persons by using the ADNI clinical and neuropsychological battery. ADNI compliant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, cerebrospinal fluid, and...

  20. Neurogenesis and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, characterized in the brain by amyloid plaque deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. It is the most common form of dementia among older people. There is at present no cure for AD, and current treatments consist mainly in drug therapy. Potential therapies for AD involve gene and cellular therapy. The recent confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain and neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS)...

  1. APP processing in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yun-wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD is the presence of extracellular senile plaques in the brain. Senile plaques are composed of aggregations of small peptides called β-amyloid (Aβ. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that overproduction/aggregation of Aβ in the brain is a primary cause of AD and inhibition of Aβ generation has become a hot topic in AD research. Aβ is generated from β-amyloid precursor protein (APP through sequential cleavages first by β-secretase and then by γ-secretase complex. Alternatively, APP can be cleaved by α-secretase within the Aβ domain to release soluble APPα and preclude Aβ generation. Cleavage of APP by caspases may also contribute to AD pathologies. Therefore, understanding the metabolism/processing of APP is crucial for AD therapeutics. Here we review current knowledge of APP processing regulation as well as the patho/physiological functions of APP and its metabolites.

  2. Identical twins with Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kilpatrick, C; Burns, R; Blumbergs, P C

    1983-01-01

    Genetically proven identical twin sisters with Alzheimer's disease are reported. Both sisters at the age of fifty years developed a dementing illness. Their mother and maternal grandmother developed at the same age a similar illness. It is suggested that in some cases of familial Alzheimer's disease the condition is inherited by a single mutant gene.

  3. Why Do We Get Alzheimer's Disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, are among the major health concerns of the elderly in industrialized societies. The cause of AD is unknown and no disease-modifying treatments are available. The disease is characterized clinically by a progressive dementia and pathologically by the accumulation of protein aggregates in the brain and a profound loss of nerve cells. It has also become clear recently that local immune responses are activated in the AD brain and may have a role in the disease. Our laboratory uses genetic mouse models to understand the disease process and to identify potential therapeutic targets.

  4. In vivo changes in microglial activation and amyloid deposits in brain regions with hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokokura, Masamichi; Mori, Norio; Yoshihara, Yujiro; Wakuda, Tomoyasu; Takebayashi, Kiyokazu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hamamatsu (Japan); Yagi, Shunsuke; Ouchi, Yasuomi [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Laboratory of Human Imaging Research, Molecular Imaging Frontier Research Center, Hamamatsu (Japan); Yoshikawa, Etsuji [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu (Japan); Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Kanazawa University, Department of Psychiatry and Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Sugihara, Genichi; Suda, Shiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Suzuki, Katsuaki [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Research Center for Child Mental Development, Hamamatsu (Japan); Ueki, Takatoshi [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) is known as a pathological substance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is assumed to coexist with a degree of activated microglia in the brain. However, it remains unclear whether these two events occur in parallel with characteristic hypometabolism in AD in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the in vivo relationship between A{beta} accumulation and neuroinflammation in those specific brain regions in early AD. Eleven nootropic drug-naive AD patients underwent a series of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements with [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195, [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDG and a battery of cognitive tests within the same day. The binding potentials (BPs) of [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 were directly compared with those of [{sup 11}C]PIB in the brain regions with reduced glucose metabolism. BPs of [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 and [{sup 11}C]PIB were significantly higher in the parietotemporal regions of AD patients than in ten healthy controls. In AD patients, there was a negative correlation between dementia score and [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 BPs, but not [{sup 11}C]PIB, in the limbic, precuneus and prefrontal regions. Direct comparisons showed a significant negative correlation between [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 and [{sup 11}C]PIB BPs in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) (p < 0.05, corrected) that manifested the most severe reduction in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. A lack of coupling between microglial activation and amyloid deposits may indicate that A{beta} accumulation shown by [{sup 11}C]PIB is not always the primary cause of microglial activation, but rather the negative correlation present in the PCC suggests that microglia can show higher activation during the production of A{beta} in early AD. (orig.)

  5. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p -53) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease

  7. Alzheimer's disease and stigmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Kosmidis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objective of the study was to explore social bias experienced by patients with Alzheimer's disease and to investigate the knowledge of a sample of the general population regarding this particular disease. Method: The sample consisted of 91 individuals who were first degree relatives of members of three Centers of Open Protection for the Elderly, who did not suffer from dementia as they have recently undergone screening for Alzheimer's disease. A survey design was adopted using a face-to-face questionnaire which apart from the demographical data and two open-ended questions, was based on a 5-point lickert scale, looking at knowledge, attitudes and stigma towards the disease. Data was analyzed through SPSS software using descriptive statistics while results were regarded significant at p<0,05 level of significance Results: For the quantitave questions, cronbach's a was a=0,75 and the average discrete index 0,31. Stigma was explored through a series of direct and in-direct questions and while 70 (77% persons distinguish dementia from mental illness, 9(9,9% people did not answer these questions. The majority (62,6% did not stigmatize the patient as 57 persons said that the patient is not to blame for the disease. Conclusions: from the distribution of results it becomes evident that there is a need for education, training and multifaceted enlightenment of the general population on issues concerning mental health. Answers that implied tendencies of marginalization of patients with dementia emanated mainly came from individuals in the sample with limited knowledge of the illness and relatively low educational background.

  8. Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  9. Adapting Activities for People with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  10. Keeping the Person with Alzheimer's Disease Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  11. Beyond the Hypothesis of Serum Anticholinergic Activity in Alzheimer's Disease: Acetylcholine Neuronal Activity Modulates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Production and Inflammation in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisu, Mitsugu; Konishi, Kimiko; Hosoi, Misa; Tani, Masayuki; Tomioka, Hiroi; Inamoto, Atsuko; Minami, Sousuke; Izuno, Takuji; Umezawa, Kaori; Horiuchi, Kentaro; Hori, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is characterized by neurodegeneration, especially an acetylcholine (ACh) neuronal deficit with accumulation of β-amyloid protein, which leads to oxygen stress and inflammation. The active oxygen directly damages the neuron by increasing intracellular Ca(2+). The inflammation is due to activation of the microglia, thereby producing cytokines which inhibit the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). As the BDNF acts by neuronal protection, synaptogenesis and neurogenesis, the reduction of BDNF in the brain of AD patients worsens the symptoms of AD. On the other hand, treatment of AD patients with a cholinesterase inhibitor enhances ACh activity and inhibits inflammation. Then the expression of BDNF is restored and neuroprotection reestablished. However, there are several reports which showed controversial results concerning the relationship between BDNF and AD. We speculate that BDNF is related to some neurocognitive process and reflects neuronal activity in other neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders and that in the mild cognitive impairment stage, BDNF and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activities are hyperactivated because of a compensatory mechanism of AD pathology. In contrast, in the mild stage of AD, BDNF and ChAT activity are downregulated. PMID:26138497

  12. DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION IN MIDLINE THALAMIC REGION FACILITATES SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION AND SHORTTERM MEMORY IN A MOUSE MODEL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Pavlides, Constantine; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2010-09-01

    Based on evidence suggesting that deep brain stimulation (DBS) may promote certain cognitive processes, we have been interested in developing DBS as a means of mitigating memory and learning impairments in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we used an animal model of AD (TgCRND8 mice) to determine the effects of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) on non-amyloidogenic α-secretase activity and DBS in short-term memory. We tested our hypothesis using hippocampal slices (in vitro studies) from TgCRND8 mice to evaluate whether HFS increases α-secretase activity (non-amyloidogenic pathway) in the CA1 region. In a second set of experiments, we performed in vivo studies to evaluate whether DBS in midline thalamic region re-establishes hippocampal dependent short-term memory in TgCRND8 mice. The results showed that application of HFS to isolated hippocampal slices significantly increased synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region and promoted a 2-fold increase of non-amyloidogenic α-secretase activity, in comparison to low frequency stimulated controls from TgCRND8 mice. In the in vivo studies, DBS treatment facilitated acquisition of object recognition memory in TgCRND8 mice, in comparison to their own baseline before treatment. These results provide evidence that DBS could enhance short-term memory in the CA1 region of hippocampus in a mouse model of AD. PMID:23227306

  13. Support vector machine-based classification of Alzheimer's disease from whole-brain anatomical MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnin, Benoit [UMR-S 678, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mesrob, Lilia [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kinkingnehun, Serge [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[BRAIN, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Pelegrini-Issac, Melanie [UMR-S 678, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Colliot, Olivier [IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[UPR 640 LENA, CNRS, Paris (France); Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neurology, Paris (France); Lehericy, Stephane [UMR-S 610, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[UMPC Univ. Paris 06, Center for NeuroImaging Research-CENIR, Paris (France)]|[Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Benali, Habib [UMR-S 678, Inserm, Paris (France)]|[UMPC Univ Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[IFR 49, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[UNF/CRIUGM, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    We present and evaluate a new automated method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification of whole-brain anatomical magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly control subjects. We studied 16 patients with AD [mean age {+-} standard deviation (SD)=74.1 {+-}5.2 years, mini-mental score examination (MMSE) = 23.1 {+-} 2.9] and 22 elderly controls (72.3{+-}5.0 years, MMSE=28.5{+-} 1.3). Three-dimensional T1-weighted MR images of each subject were automatically parcellated into regions of interest (ROIs). Based upon the characteristics of gray matter extracted from each ROI, we used an SVM algorithm to classify the subjects and statistical procedures based on bootstrap resampling to ensure the robustness of the results. We obtained 94.5% mean correct classification for AD and control subjects (mean specificity, 96.6%; mean sensitivity, 91.5%). Our method has the potential in distinguishing patients with AD from elderly controls and therefore may help in the early diagnosis of AD. (orig.)

  14. Changes of biochemical indices in brain, liver tissue and serum in mice with Alzheimer disease after Chinese medicine treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangyang Wang; Lili Zhang; Haode Huang; Qiang Qin; Guimei Luo; Chaogan Li; Shuqiu Zhang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alzheimer disease is a main type of dementia, and the important clinical characteristic is the rapid declines of memory and cognitive ability.OBJECTIVE: To study changes of biochemical indices in brain, liver tissue and serum, as well as memory of mice with Alzheimer disease after Chinese medicine treatment. DESIGN: A comparative animal experimental observation. SETTING: Haierfu Research Center of Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities.MATERIALS: Forty-eight healthy Kunming mice (24 males and 24 females), 3 months old, were provided by the animal room of Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities. The animals were divided into four groups according to sex and body mass: control group, model group, Wuyuan Buxue treated group, Haierfu treated group, and 12 mice in each group. Wuyuan Buxue oral liquid was extracted from Polygonum multiflorum Thunb (red, radix) and longan meat (country medicine quasi- word B20020828). Haierfu oral liquid was extracted from Yinhua, poriacocos, licorice, etc (Q/452600RYYLC01-92). METHODS: The experiment was completed in Haierfu Research Center and Institute of Heavy Metal and Fluorosis-Arsenism of Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities from May 2006 to December 2006. ①All animals except those in the control group were given feed which was mixed with AlC3 (12 g/L), and they could freely drink 3 g/L Al(NO3)3. The mice in the control group were given normal feed. Wuyuan Buxue oral liquid and Haierfu oral liquid were distilled by distilled water for one time respectively. Five months after model establishment, mice in the Wuyuan Buxue treated group and Haierfu treated group were given intrapastric perfusion of Wuyuan Buxue oral liquid and Haierfu oral liquid respectively, and those in the model group and control group were given intrapastric perfusion of distilled water of the same volume. All the mice were treated for 45 days. ②The swimming time (s) and error times were determined with Y-shape water maze before and

  15. Role of physical exercise in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia; HUANG, WEN-JUAN

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of physical exercise on the brain and general wellness are well recognised, but not particularly well known to the general public. Understanding the importance of integrating active behavior for overall health is crucial at any age and particularly for the elderly who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease mainly affecting individuals aged >65 years. AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by extracellular senile plaques of amyloid-β, intracellular ...

  16. Are Blood-Based Protein Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease also Involved in Other Brain Disorders?:A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chiam, Justin Tao Wen; Dobson, Richard James Butler; Kiddle, Steven John; Sattlecker, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers are urgently needed for both early and accurate diagnosis and prediction of disease progression. Past research has studied blood-based proteins as potential AD biomarkers, revealing many candidate proteins. To date only limited effort has been made to investigate the disease specificity of AD candidate proteins and whether these proteins are also involved in other neurodegenerative or psychiatric conditions.Objective: This review seeks to determ...

  17. Amyloid β protein and Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Square, D

    1997-01-01

    Amyloid beta protein is predominant in senile plaques, the neuropathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. Researchers in Winnipeg have shown that this protein can overstimulate certain hydrolytic enzymes to break down the phospholipid building blocks of the brain-cell wall. They speculate that the abnormal destruction of phospholipids gradually drains the energy resources a neuron uses to rebuild its membrane. As neurons "burn out," the brain loses its ability to function normally. In view o...

  18. Time series changes of MR/PET image of brain glucose metabolism in healthy subjects and alzheimer disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination of morphological information by MRI and functional one by positron emission tomography (PET) was applied to quantitative evaluation of brain regional glucose metabolism in healthy subjects (HS) and Alzheimer disease patients (AD) and their individual aging changes were elucidated for ultimate purpose of computer-aided diagnosis. Subjects were: 5 AD patients (3M/2F, av. age 77.27 y), 14 ε4-carrying HS (EHS, 4M/10F, 71.3y) and 24 non-ε4-carrying HS (NEHS, 4M/20F, 70.21), where ε4 (apolipoprotein E type 4 gene allele)-carrying HS were reported to be prone to early AD and to tend to give increased brain atrophy incidence. Acquisitions of T1-weighted 3D MR and PET images were in 256 x 256 x(88-104) and x (90-100) voxels, respectively, with digitization level 16 bits, and were repeated 3 times in the time series of 21-38 months. Segmentation was performed with the MR imaging software SPM8 (Statistic Parametric Mapping: Metalab) to specify the regions of white/gray matters and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The binary MR and registered PET images were fused for comparison of glucose metabolism by SUVs (standardized uptake values) in gray matter of the three subject groups. Findings were: SUV in AD was markedly reduced; average time series changes per year were 0.11% in AD, -2.63% in EHS and 1.48% in NEHS; and statistical significance of the changes was between AD and NEHS, and between EHS and NEHS. Glucose metabolism by MR/PET can be thus used for a distinction of ε4-carrier and non-carrier in HS. (T.T.)

  19. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using brain perfusion SPECT and MR imaging: which modality achieves better diagnostic accuracy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of MR imaging and brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD). The transaxial section display of brain perfusion SPECT, three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) SPECT image sets, thin-section MR imaging of the hippocampus and perfusion MR imaging were evaluated in 66 subjects comprising 35 AD patients and 31 subjects without AD. SPECT and MR imaging were visually interpreted by two experts and two novices, and the diagnostic ability of each modality was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the experts' interpretations, there was no significant difference in the area under the ROC curve (Az) between 3D-SSP and thin-section MR imaging, whereas the Az of transaxial SPECT display was significantly lower than that of 3D-SSP (3D-SSP: 0.97, thin-section MR imaging: 0.96, transaxial SPECT: 0.91), and the Az of perfusion MR imaging was lowest (0.63). The sensitivity and specificity of each modality were, respectively, 80.0% and 96.8% for 3D-SSP, 77.1% and 96.8% for thin-section MR imaging, 60.0% and 93.5% for transaxial SPECT display and 34.3% and 100% for perfusion MR imaging. In the novices' interpretations, the Az, sensitivity and specificity of 3D-SSP were superior to those of thin-section MR imaging. Thin-section hippocampal MR imaging and 3D-SSP image sets had potentially equivalent value for the diagnosis of AD, and they were superior to transaxial SPECT display and perfusion MR imaging. For avoidance of the effect of interpreters' experience on image evaluation, 3D-SSP appears to be optimal. (orig.)

  20. Proteomic profiling of brain cortex tissues in a Tau transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Seong-Hun; Jung, In-Soo; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan-Wha, E-mail: cwkim@korea.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transgenic mouse model expressing NSE-htau23 was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D-gel electrophoresis to analyze the cortex proteins of transgenic mice was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1 and CAII were downregulated with the progression of AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCRN1 and ATP6VE1 were up regulated and down regulated differentially. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves regionalized neuronal death, synaptic loss, and an accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Although there have been numerous studies on tau proteins and AD in various stages of neurodegenerative disease pathology, the relationship between tau and AD is not yet fully understood. A transgenic mouse model expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE-htau23), which displays some of the typical Alzheimer-associated pathological features, was used to analyze the brain proteome associated with tau tangle deposition. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed to compare the cortex proteins of transgenic mice (6- and 12-month-old) with those of control mice. Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified with ESI-Q-TOF (electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, glutathione S-transferase P 1 (GSTP1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) were down-regulated with the progression of AD, and secerin-1 (SCRN1) and V-type proton ATPase subunit E 1 (ATP6VE1) were up-regulated only in the early stages, and down-regulated in the later stages of AD. The proteins, which were further confirmed by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and with western blotting at the protein level, are expected to be good candidates as drug targets for AD. The

  1. Can Ketones Help Rescue Brain Fuel Supply in Later Life? Implications for Cognitive Health during Aging and the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Vandenberghe, Camille; St-Pierre, Valérie; Fortier, Mélanie; Hennebelle, Marie; Croteau, Etienne; Bocti, Christian; Fulop, Tamas; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We propose that brain energy deficit is an important pre-symptomatic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that requires closer attention in the development of AD therapeutics. Our rationale is fourfold: (i) Glucose uptake is lower in the frontal cortex of people >65 years-old despite cognitive scores that are normal for age. (ii) The regional deficit in brain glucose uptake is present in adults energy deficit needs to be overcome in order to successfully develop more effective therapeutics for AD. At present, oral ketogenic supplements are the most promising means of achieving this goal. PMID:27458340

  2. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease

  3. Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Lessons from the Nun Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a woman who maintained high cognitive test scores until her death at 101 years of age despite anatomical evidence of Alzheimer's disease. The woman was part of a larger "Nun Study" in which 678 sisters donated their brains to teach others about the etiology of aging and Alzheimer's disease. Findings are discussed. (RJM)

  4. Providing Counseling for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granello, Paul F.; Fleming, Matthew S.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition that results in brain wasting and eventual death. With its increasing diagnosis rate, counselors will likely acquire clients with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers. Important background information and several practical counseling methods are provided that may assist counselors working with this…

  5. Mechanisms of Brain Aging Regulation by Insulin: Implications for Neurodegeneration in Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, Artur F.; Rieder, Carlos M.; Rizzi, Liara; Chaves, Márcia; Roriz-Cruz, Matheus

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and IGF seem to be important players in modulating brain aging. Neurons share more similarities with islet cells than any other human cell type. Insulin and insulin receptors are diffusely found in the brain, especially so in the hippocampus. Caloric restriction decreases insulin resistance, and it is the only proven mechanism to expand lifespan. Conversely, insulin resistance increases with age, obesity, and sedentarism, all of which have been shown to be risk factors for late-onset ...

  6. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  7. [Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kenji; Yamada, Masahito

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the deposition of amyloid-β-protein (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain parenchyma and phosphorylated-tau accumulation as neurofibrillary tangles in the neurons. Although details of the disease pathomechanisms remain unclear, Aβ likely acts as a key protein for AD initiation and progression, followed by abnormal tau phosphorylation and neuronal death (amyloid-cascade hypothesis). According to this hypothesis, Aβ immunization therapies are created to eliminate Aβ from the brain, and to prevent the neurons from damage by these pathogenic proteins. There are two methods for Aβ immunotherapies: active and passive immunization. Previous studies have shown Aβ removal and improved cognitive function in animal models of AD. Clinical trials on various drugs, including AN1792, bapineuzumab, and solanezumab, have been carried out; however, all trials have failed to demonstrate apparent clinical benefits. On the contrary, side effects emerged, such as meningoencephalitis, vasogenic edema, which are currently called amyloid related imaging abnormalities (ARIA)-E and microhemorrhage (ARIA-H). In neuropathological studies of immunized cases, Aβ was removed from the brain parenchyma and phosphorylated-tau was reduced in the neuronal processes. Moreover, deterioration of the cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and an increase of microhemorrhages and microinfarcts were described. Aβ is cleared from the brain mainly via the lymphatic drainage pathway. ARIA could stem from severe CAA due to dysfunction of the drainage pathway after immunotherapy. Aβ immunization has a potential of cure for AD patients, although the above-described problems must be overcome before applying this therapy in clinical treatment. PMID:23568994

  8. Computational approaches to the prediction of blood-brain barrier permeability: A comparative analysis of central nervous system drugs versus secretase inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishton, Gilbert M; LaBonte, Kristen; Williams, Antony J; Kassam, Karim; Kolovanov, Eduard

    2006-05-01

    This review summarizes progress made in the development of fully computational approaches to the prediction of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of small molecules, with a focus on rapid computational methods suitable for the analysis of large compound sets and virtual screening. A comparative analysis using the recently developed Advanced Chemistry Development (ACD/Labs) Inc BBB permeability algorithm for the calculation of logBB values for known Alzheimer's disease medicines, selected central nervous system drugs and new secretase inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease, is presented. The trends in logBB values and the associated physiochemical properties of these agents as they relate to the potential for BBB permeability are also discussed. PMID:16729726

  9. Intracerebral adeno-associated virus gene delivery of apolipoprotein E2 markedly reduces brain amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingzhi; Gottesdiener, Andrew J; Parmar, Mayur; Li, Mingjie; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Sondhi, Dolan; Sullivan, Patrick M; Holtzman, David M; Crystal, Ronald G; Paul, Steven M

    2016-08-01

    The common apolipoprotein E alleles (ε4, ε3, and ε2) are important genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer's disease, with the ε4 allele increasing risk and reducing the age of onset and the ε2 allele decreasing risk and markedly delaying the age of onset. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype also predicts the timing and amount of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and amyloid burden (ε4 >ε3 >ε2). Using several administration protocols, we now report that direct intracerebral adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of APOE2 markedly reduces brain soluble (including oligomeric) and insoluble Aβ levels as well as amyloid burden in 2 mouse models of brain amyloidosis whose pathology is dependent on either the expression of murine Apoe or more importantly on human APOE4. The efficacy of APOE2 to reduce brain Aβ burden in either model, however, was highly dependent on brain APOE2 levels and the amount of pre-existing Aβ and amyloid deposition. We further demonstrate that a widespread reduction of brain Aβ burden can be achieved through a single injection of vector via intrathalamic delivery of AAV expressing APOE2 gene. Our results demonstrate that AAV gene delivery of APOE2 using an AAV vector rescues the detrimental effects of APOE4 on brain amyloid pathology and may represent a viable therapeutic approach for treating or preventing Alzheimer's disease especially if sufficient brain APOE2 levels can be achieved early in the course of the disease. PMID:27318144

  10. [Vitamin E and Alzheimer's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Moeko; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, and the results of some epidemiological studies have suggested that high intake of vitamin E through food is inversely associated with the incidence of Alzheimer's disease. Randomized controlled studies have shown that treatment with vitamin E could delay functional decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. However, vitamin E had no cognitive benefits in patients with mild cognitive impairment or in generally healthy older women. Well-designed clinical trials or preventive interventions with vitamin E are necessary to establish its efficacy as therapeutic or preventive agents for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26618765

  11. About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention We can’t control some risk factors for ... Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: What Do We Know? Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery ... Factors and Prevention News Summit sets the path ahead for Alzheimer's ...

  12. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... How many people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5.1 million as ...

  13. Altered angiotensin-converting enzyme and its effects on the brain in a rat model of Alzheimer disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU De-ren; WANG Yan; ZHOU Lin; CHEN Kun; TIAN Yi; SONG Zhi; BAO Juan; YANG Qi-dong

    2008-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease related to aging.At present,its pathological mechanisms remain unclear.Family members of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) pray a role in neuronal plasticity,as well as formation of learning and memory,in this study,we explore the effects of altered angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE),and investigate the possible mechanisms of perindopril,an ACE inhibitor,on brain structure and function in a rat model of AD,as well as the role that ACE plays in AD.Methods Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided into 3 groups:control,AD,and perindopril.Each group consisted of 20 rats,with 10 rats for determining pathology,and the remaining 10 rats for quantifying ACE activity.The rat AD model was established by stereotactically injecting amyloid beta protein (A-beta) 1-42 into the right hippocampus.Learning and memory functions were tested using the Y-type electric maze.The number and morphology of abnormal neurons were determined by haematoxylin and eosin staining.Amyloid deposition was measured by Congo red staining.Finally,ACE activity was estimated by spectrophotometry.Results Compared with the control group,the number of times needed to escape electrical stimuli increased (23.70±3.13,P <0.001),the number of normal neurons in the CA1 region was reduced (density of 96.5±32.6/mm,Pgroup.In the perindopril group,the number of times needed to escape electrical stimuli decreased (18.50±3.66,P <0.001),the number of abnormal neurons increased (density of CA1 neurons was 180.8±28.5/mm,P <0.001),amyloid Conclusions ACE activity increased in the brains of AD rats.Perindopril improved learning and memory in AD rats,which correlated with decreased ACE activity and delayed AD pathogenesis.

  14. Imaging of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse brains with ToF-SIMS using immunoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlred, Louise; Vukojević, Vladana; Johansson, Björn; Schalling, Martin; Höök, Fredrik; Sjövall, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has been proven to successfully image different kinds of molecules, especially a variety of lipids, in biological samples. Proteins, however, are difficult to detect as specific entities with this method due to extensive fragmentation. To circumvent this issue, the authors present in this work a method developed for detection of proteins using antibody-conjugated liposomes, so called immunoliposomes, which are able to bind to the specific protein of interest. In combination with the capability of ToF-SIMS to detect native lipids in tissue samples, this method opens up the opportunity to analyze many different biomolecules, both lipids and proteins, at the same time, with high spatial resolution. The method has been applied to detect and image the distribution of amyloid-β (Aβ), a biologically relevant peptide in Alzheimer's disease (AD), in transgenic mouse brain tissue. To ensure specific binding, the immunoliposome binding was verified on a model surface using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The immunoliposome binding was also investigated on tissue sections with fluorescence microscopy, and compared with conventional immunohistochemistry using primary and secondary antibodies, demonstrating specific binding to Aβ. Using ToF-SIMS imaging, several endogenous lipids, such as cholesterol and sulfatides, were also detected in parallel with the immunoliposome-labeled Aβ deposits, which is an advantage compared to fluorescence microscopy. This method can thus potentially provide further information about lipid-protein interactions, which is important to understand the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26801213

  15. Brain local and regional neuroglial alterations in Alzheimer´s Disease: cell types, responses and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Adolfo; Álvarez, María-Isabel; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Merino, José-Joaquín; Rodríguez, José Julio

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death, neurons are dynamically accompanied by neuroglial cells in a very close morphological and functional relationship. Three families have been classically considered within the CNS: astroglia, oligodendroglia and microglia. Many types/subtypes (including NGR2+ cells), with a wide variety of physiological and pathological effects on neurons, have been described using morphological and immunocytochemical criteria. Glio-glial, glio-neuronal and neuro-glial cell signaling and gliotransmission are phenomena that are essential to support brain functions. Morphofunctional changes resulting from the plasticity of all the glial cell types parallel the plastic neuronal changes that optimize the functionality of neuronal circuits. Moreover, neuroglia possesses the ability to adopt a reactive status (gliosis) in which, generally, new functions arise to improve and restore if needed the neural functionality. All these features make neuroglial cells elements of paramount importance when attempting to explain any physiological or pathological processes in the CNS, because they are involved in both, neuroprotection/neurorepair and neurodegeneration. There exist diverse and profound, regional and local, neuroglial changes in all involutive processes (physiological and pathological aging; neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer ´s disease -AD-), but today, the exact meaning of such modifications (the modifications of the different neuroglial types, in time and place), is not well understood. In this review we consider the different neuroglial cells and their responses in order to understand the possible role they fulfill in pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment (preventive or palliative) of AD. The existence of differentiated and/or concurrent pathogenic and neuro-protective/neuro-restorative astroglial and microglial responses is highlighted. PMID:26567738

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics by Adaptation of 3D Convolutional Network

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini-Asl, Ehsan; Keynto, Robert; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis, playing an important role in preventing progress and treating the Alzheimer\\{'}s disease (AD), is based on classification of features extracted from brain images. The features have to accurately capture main AD-related variations of anatomical brain structures, such as, e.g., ventricles size, hippocampus shape, cortical thickness, and brain volume. This paper proposed to predict the AD with a deep 3D convolutional neural network (3D-CNN), which can learn generic features capt...

  17. The fitness for the Ageing Brain Study II (FABS II): protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating the effect of physical activity on cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ames David; Flicker Leon; Almeida Osvaldo P; Cox Kay L; Cyarto Elizabeth V; Byrne Gerard; Hill Keith D; Beer Christopher D; LoGiudice Dina; Appadurai Kana; Irish Muireann; Renehan Emma; Lautenschlager Nicola T

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Observational studies have documented a potential protective effect of physical exercise in older adults who are at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. The Fitness for the Ageing Brain II (FABS II) study is a multicentre randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) aiming to determine whether physical activity reduces the rate of cognitive decline among individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This paper describes the background, objectives of the study, and an overview of...

  18. A comparative evaluation of treatments with 17β-estradiol and its brain-selective prodrug in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschiffely, Anna E; Schuh, Rosemary A; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin; Prokai, Laszlo; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2016-07-01

    Estrogens are neuroprotective and, thus, potentially useful for the therapy of Alzheimer's disease; however, clinical use of hormone therapy remains controversial due to adverse peripheral effects. The goal of this study was to investigate the benefits of treatment with 10β,17β-dihydroxyestra-1,4-dien-3-one (DHED), a brain-selective prodrug of 17β-estradiol, in comparison with the parent hormone using APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice to model the pathology of the disease. Ovariectomized and intact females were continuously treated with vehicle, 17β-estradiol, or DHED via subcutaneous osmotic pumps from 6 to 8months of age. We confirmed that this prolonged treatment with DHED did not stimulate uterine tissue, whereas 17β-estradiol treatment increased uterine weight. Amyloid precursor protein decreased in both treatment groups of intact, but not in ovariectomized double transgenic females in which ovariectomy already decreased the expression of this protein significantly. However, reduced brain amyloid-β peptide levels could be observed for both treatments. Consequently, double-transgenic ovariectomized and intact mice had higher cognitive performance compared to untreated control animals in response to both estradiol and DHED administrations. Overall, the tested brain-selective 17β-estradiol prodrug proved to be an effective early-stage intervention in an Alzheimer's disease-relevant mouse model without showing systemic impact and, thus, warrants further evaluation as a potential therapeutic candidate. PMID:27210479

  19. Measurement of brain metabolites by 1H-MR spectroscopy in patients with alzheimer disease: a Meta analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To have a systemic review of the association between relative ratio in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: A search in Medline and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) was performed, and relevant English and Chinese-language articles about assessing AD with 1H-MRS were identified. The data of relative metabolic ratios (NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, mI/Cr) from different brain regions (hippocampus, posterior cingulate gyrus, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, frontal lobe, occipital lobe) were extracted from the articles. The quality of the articles was evaluated according to the standard recommended by Newcastle-Ottawa criteria. The Meta-analysis was done with the Review Manager 4.2 to calculate pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI), and linear correlation analysis between NAA/Cr ratio and mI/Cr ratio was done by SPSS 17.0. Results: Thirty six articles (27 English articles, 9 Chinese articles) were included. After heterogeneity test was done,fixed effects model or random effects model was selected. The meta-analysis showed that the NAA/Cr ratio in patients with AD was higher than that in controls (WMD:-0.14, 95% CI: -0.17 to -0.11). The mI/Cr ratio in patients with AD was lower than that in controls (WMD: 0.10, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.13). There were greatest changes in NAA/Cr ratio and mI/Cr ratio on the hippocampus (WMD of NAA/Cr: -0.27,95% CI: -0.36 to -0.19; WMD of mI/Cr: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.33). There were also no differences between patients with AD and controls with respect to the Cho/Cr ratio (WMD: 0.01, 95% CI:0.00 to 0.01, P>0.05). The NAA/Cr and mI/Cr changes are markedly correlated with each other in different brain regions (r=0.947, P=0.004). Conclusion: The hippocampus region is the first to present neuropathological changes in AD and the changes of NAA/Cr and MI/Cr might reflect the neurodegenerative process of AD. (authors)

  20. Synchronizing an aging brain: can entraining circadian clocks by food slow Alzheimer's Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne Alyssia Kent

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a global epidemic. Unfortunately, we are still without effective treatments or a cure for this disease, which is having devastating consequences for patients, their families, and societies around the world. Until effective treatments are developed, promoting overall health may hold potential for delaying the onset or preventing neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In particular, chronobiological concepts may provide a useful framework for identifying the earliest signs of age-related disease as well as inexpensive and noninvasive methods for promoting health. It is well reported that AD is associated with disrupted circadian functioning to a greater extent than normal aging. However, it is unclear if the central circadian clock (i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus is dysfunctioning, or whether the synchrony between the central and peripheral clocks that control behaviour and metabolic processes are becoming uncoupled. Desynchrony of rhythms can negatively affect health, increasing morbidity and mortality in both animal models and humans. If the uncoupling of rhythms is contributing to AD progression or exacerbating symptoms, then it may be possible to draw from the food-entrainment literature to identify mechanisms for re-synchronizing rhythms to improve overall health and reduce the severity of symptoms. The following review will briefly summarize the circadian system, its potential role in AD, and propose using a feeding-related neuropeptide, such as ghrelin, to synchronize uncoupled rhythms. Synchronizing rhythms may be an inexpensive way to promote healthy aging and delay the onset of neurodegenerative disease such as AD.

  1. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease

  2. [Music therapy and Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromeur, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy and Alzheimer's dementia. Dementia such as Alzheimer's leads to the deterioration of the patient's global capacities. The cognitive disorders associated with it are disabling and affect every area of the patient's life. Every therapy's session undertaken with and by patients can act as a mirror of the progress of their disease and help to feel better, as described in this article on music therapy. PMID:24908841

  3. Functional neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in the title is reviewed often referring to authors' investigations. The method eZIS developed by them is for automated diagnosis of brain perfusion SPECT, where voxel-based analysis can be done using a Z-score map calculable from patient's data and standard database with 3D-stereotactic surface projection. Decreases of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and of glucose metabolism detectable in specified brain regions by PET or SPECT in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), are found useful for predicting the stage progression of MCI to Alzheimer disease (AD) in future. Partial volume correction method, essentially the division of images of a gray matter SPECT by MR, has elevated the precision of cerebral image analysis. Differential diagnosis of AD and dementia with Lewy bodies, the second most common form of dementia, is possible by the difference of occipital perfusion or glucose metabolism. Evidences by rCBF SPECT as well as by symptomatic ones have been accumulated recently for the therapeutic effect of donepezil, an inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase used for AD treatment. PET and SPECT imaging for the assessment of rCBF and metabolism has thus played very important roles in AD diagnosis, staging, differentiation, prediction and drug effect assessment. Recent advance in voxel-based statistical analysis of PET and SPECT images has raised the value of neuroimaging in dementia. (T.I.)

  4. Hg sup 2+ induces GTP-tubulin interactions in rat brain similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhr, E.; Pendergrass, C.; Kasarskis, E.; Slevin, J.; Haley, B. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is unknown. Using SDS-PAGE and autoradiography the authors' laboratory has shown: (1) that the tubulin in AD brain is less photolabeled by ({sup 32}P)8N{sub 3}GTP than is tubulin from control brain and (2) that low {mu}M levels of preformed Hg{sup 2+}EDTA specifically blocked interactions of tubulin-({sup 32}P)8N{sub 3}GTP in control human brain homogenates giving a photolabeling profile identical to AD brain. Elevated levels of Hg{sup 2+} have been reported in AD brain by others. Earlier work using ({sup 32}P)8N{sub 3}GTP with Al{sup 3+} treated rat and rabbit brain showed no differences from control with regards to tubulin photolabeling. However, our latest data show that brain samples from Hg{sup 2+} fed rats display an abolished GTP-tubulin interaction similar to AD brain samples as determined by ({sup 32}P)8N{sub 3}GTP photolabeling profiles. Removal of Hg{sup 2+} from treated rats did not reverse the effect. These results suggest that certain complexed forms of Hg{sup 2+} must be considered as a potential source for the etiology of AD.

  5. Neurofibrillary pathology and aluminum in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, R. W.; Lee, V. M. Y; Trojanowski, J Q

    1995-01-01

    Since the first reports of aluminum-induced neurofibrillary degeneration in experimental animals, extensive studies have been performed to clarify the role played by aluminum in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additional evidence implicating aluminum in AD includes elevated levels of aluminum in the AD brain, epidemiological data linking aluminum exposure to AD, and interactions between aluminum and protein components in the pathological lesions o...

  6. [Language Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by progressive memory disturbance. Language symptoms are considered to be less disease specific and therefore did not attract many researchers, interest until recently. Typical patients with AD present amnesic aphasia in the early disease stage followed by transcortical sensory aphasia; however, their language symptoms are varied. Recently, the concept of logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) has been developed, which is reported to have Alzheimer's neuropathology. Clinicians should verify patients' language abilities, as language can be the key to reveal their true cognitive functions. PMID:27156508

  7. Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Living with Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... delay or prevent the disease. Free Guide for Alzheimer's Caregivers Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease ...

  8. Gender- and Age-Dependent γ-Secretase Activity in Mouse Brain and Its Implication in Sporadic Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Placanica, Lisa; Zhu, Lei; Li, Yue-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related disorder. Aging and female gender are two important risk factors associated with sporadic AD. However, the mechanism by which aging and gender contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic AD is unclear. It is well known that genetic mutations in γ-secretase result in rare forms of early onset AD due to the aberrant production of Aβ42 peptides, which are the major constituents of senile plaques. However, the effect of age and gender on γ-secretase has not...

  9. Gender- and Age-Dependent γ-Secretase Activity in Mouse Brain and Its Implication in Sporadic Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Placanica; Lei Zhu; Yue-Ming Li

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related disorder. Aging and female gender are two important risk factors associated with sporadic AD. However, the mechanism by which aging and gender contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic AD is unclear. It is well known that genetic mutations in gamma-secretase result in rare forms of early onset AD due to the aberrant production of Abeta42 peptides, which are the major constituents of senile plaques. However, the effect of age and gender on gamma-secret...

  10. Regional metabolism: associations with dyscalculia in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hirono, N.; Mori, E.; Ishii, K.; T. Imamura; Shimomura, T.; Tanimukai, S.; H. Kazui; Hashimoto, M; Yamashita, H; Sasaki, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The ability to calculate, which is an important aspect of social daily living, is commonly impaired in patients with Alzheimer's disease even early in the course of the disease. Dyscalculia is often accompanied by focal brain damage, and has been argued to be an independent sign localised around the left temporoparietal region. However, the region most responsible for dyscalculia in Alzheimer's disease has not been determined. The relation between calculation a...

  11. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tan; Yulin Deng; Hong Qing

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofi-brillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers in-volved in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  12. Effects of noninvasive brain stimulation on cognitive function in healthy aging and Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wan-Yu; Ku, Yixuan; Zanto, Theodore P; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-08-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation on cognitive function in healthy older adults and patients with Alzheimer's disease. A comprehensive literature search was performed on noninvasive stimulation studies published from January 1990 to November 2014 in Pubmed and Web of Science. Fourteen articles with a total of 331 participants were identified as studies with healthy older adults, and the mean effect size and 95% confidence interval were estimated. A significant effect size of 0.42 was found for the cognitive outcome. Further subgroup analyses demonstrated more prominent effects for studies delivering the stimulation before the execution of the task and studies applying multiple sessions of stimulation. To assess the effects of stimulation on Alzheimer's disease patients, 11 studies with a total of 200 patients were included in the analysis. A significant effect size of 1.35 was found for the cognitive outcomes. Subgroup analyses indicated more pronounced effects for studies applying the stimulation during the execution of the task compared with studies delivering the stimulation before the execution of the task. Noninvasive brain stimulation has a positive effect on cognitive function in physiological and pathological aging. PMID:26022770

  13. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  14. Multi-Family Psychoeducational Support Group Therapy for Families with a Member Afflicted with Irreversible Brain Syndrome (Alzheimer's Disease): Report of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Evelyn S.; And Others

    Alzheimers Disease (AD), an incurable disability which afflicts older adults, can have devastating emotional consequences for the victim and the family. In an attempt to determine the effectiveness of multifamily psychoeducational support, group therapy (MFPSGT), 22 persons (13 families) from the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders…

  15. Perception of Alzheimer Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifadini, Rostam; Tajadini, Haleh; Choopani, Rasool; Mehrabani, Mitra; Kamalinegad, Mohamad; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. In regards to the world’s aging population, control and treatment of AD will be one of the major concerns of global public health in the next century. Alzheimer disease was not mentioned with the same phrase or its equivalent in traditional medical texts. The main of present paper was to investigate symptoms and causes of alzheimer disease from the view point of Iranian traditional medicine. Evidence Acquisition: In this qualitative study, we searched reliable sources of Iranian traditional medicine such as Canon of Medicide by Avicenna (Al-Quanon fi- tibb), Aghili cure by Aghili’s (Molajat-E-aghili), Tib-E-Akbari, Exire -E-Aazam and Sharh-E-Asbab and some reliable resources of neurology were probed base on keywords to find a disease that had the most overlap in terms of symptoms with alzheimer disease. By taking from the relevant materials, the extracted texts were compared and analyzed. Results: Findings showed that alzheimer disease has the most overlap with Nesyan (fisad-e-zekr, fisad-e-fekr and fisad-e-takhayol) symptoms in Iranian traditional medicine. Although this is not a perfect overlap and there are causes, including coldness and dryness of the brain or coldness and wetness that could also lead to alzheimer disease according to Iranian traditional medicine. Conclusions: According to Iranian traditional medicine, The brain dystemperement is considered the main causes of alzheimer disease. By correcting the brain dystemperement, alzheimer can be well managed. This study helps to suggest a better strategy for preventing and treating alzheimer in the future. PMID:27247784

  16. Genetic heterogeneity and Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Bird, T.D. [Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    In some early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) families, inheritance is autosomal dominant. (Early-onset AD is arbitarily defined as onset at {le} 60 years.) Two loci have been identified which are causative for early-onset familial AD (FAD). One is the amyloid precursor protein gene in which specific mutation have been identified. The second is a locus at 14q24.3 (AD3) which has been localized by linkage analysis; the gene and specific mutations have not been identified. Linkage studies place this locus between D14S61 and D14S63. These 2 loci, however, do not account for all early-onset FAD. The Volga German (VG) kindreds are descendants of families which emigrated from Germany to the Volga river region of Russia and subsequently to the US; AD in these families is hypothesized to be the result of a common genetic founder. The average age-at-onset in these families is 57 years. Linkage analysis for this group has been negative for the APP gene and for chromosome 14 markers. Thus, there is at least 1 other early-onset FAD locus. Recently, the {epsilon}4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) was identified as a risk-factor for late-onset AD. In a series of 53 late-onset kindreds, a strong genetic association was observed between the ApoE {epsilon}4 allele and AD. However, when linkage analysis was performed using a highly polymorphic locus at the ApoCII gene, which is within 30 kb of ApoE, significant evidence for co-segregation was not observed. This and other data suggests that while ApoE is an age-at-onset modifying locus, another gene(s), located elsewhere, contribute(s) to late-onset AD. Thus, there is probably at least 1 other late-onset locus. Once the VG locus is identified, it will be possible to determine whether an allelic variant of this locus is responsible for late-onset FAD.

  17. Alzheimer's disease and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvargonzález, David

    2012-12-01

    Employing the tenets of philosophical materialism, this paper discusses the ethical debate surrounding assisted suicide for persons suffering end-stage Alzheimer's. It first presents a classification of the dissociative situations between "human individual" and "human person". It then moves on to discuss challenges to diagnosed persons and their caregivers in relation to the cardinal virtues of Spinozistic ethics--strength of character (fortitudo), firmness (animositas) and generosity (generositas). Finally, a number of ideas attached to the debate--"right of choice", "death with dignity", "quality of life" and "compassion in dying"--are discussed in order to clarify their foundations. PMID:22939533

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  19. Alzheimer's Disease: A Healthcare Burden of Epidemic Proportion

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmarajan, T.S.; Gunturu, Srinivas G.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and increases in prevalence exponentially with age, with trends in the United States likely to worsen in ensuing decades. The pathology in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by an increase in extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneural neurofibrillary tangles, with neuronal destruction in several areas of the brain, and biochemically by a deficiency in acetylcholine; clinical manifestations include progressive loss of memory, change...

  20. Functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Golden, Hannah L.; Jennifer L. Agustus; Johanna C. Goll; Downey, Laura E; Mummery, Catherine J.; Jonathan M Schott; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Jason D Warren

    2015-01-01

    Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Here we assessed the functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease using the well-known ‘cocktail party effect’ as a model paradigm whereby stored templates for auditory objects (e.g., hearing one's spoken name) are used to segregate auditory ‘foreground’ and ‘back...

  1. Immunotherapeutic Approaches to Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsonego, Alon; Weiner, Howard L.

    2003-10-01

    Although neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are not classically considered mediated by inflammation or the immune system, in some instances the immune system may play an important role in the degenerative process. Furthermore, it has become clear that the immune system itself may have beneficial effects in nervous system diseases considered neurodegenerative. Immunotherapeutic approaches designed to induce a humoral immune response have recently been developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. These studies have led to human trials that resulted in both beneficial and adverse effects. In animal models, it has also been shown that immunotherapy designed to induce a cellular immune response may be of benefit in central nervous system injury, although T cells may have either a beneficial or detrimental effect depending on the type of T cell response induced. These areas provide a new avenue for exploring immune system-based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and will be discussed here with a primary focus on Alzheimer's disease. We will also discuss how these approaches affect microglia activation, which plays a key role in therapy of such diseases.

  2. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  3. Aberrant brain-stem morphometry associated with sleep disturbance in drug-naïve subjects with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ji Han Lee,1 Won Sang Jung,2 Woo Hee Choi,3 Hyun Kook Lim4 1Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, 4Department of Psychiatry, Saint Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, South Korea Objective: Among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, sleep disturbances are common and serious noncognitive symptoms. Previous studies of AD patients have identified deformations in the brain stem, which may play an important role in the regulation of sleep. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between sleep disturbances and alterations in brain stem morphology in AD.Materials and methods: In 44 patients with AD and 40 healthy elderly controls, sleep disturbances were measured using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep subscale. We employed magnetic resonance imaging-based automated segmentation tools to examine the relationship between sleep disturbances and changes in brain stem morphology.Results: Analyses of the data from AD subjects revealed significant correlations between the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep-subscale scores and structural alterations in the left posterior lateral region of the brain stem, as well as normalized brain stem volumes. In addition, significant group differences in posterior brain stem morphology were observed between the AD group and the control group.Conclusion: This study is the first to analyze an association between sleep disturbances and brain stem morphology in AD. In line with previous findings, this study lends support to the possibility that brain stem structural abnormalities might be important neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances associated with AD. Further longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, sleep, brain stem, MRI, shape analysis

  4. Mitochondrial haplotypes associated with biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry G Ridge

    Full Text Available Various studies have suggested that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in late-onset Alzheimer's disease, although results are mixed. We used an endophenotype-based approach to further characterize mitochondrial genetic variation and its relationship to risk markers for Alzheimer's disease. We analyzed longitudinal data from non-demented, mild cognitive impairment, and late-onset Alzheimer's disease participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative with genetic, brain imaging, and behavioral data. We assessed the relationship of structural MRI and cognitive biomarkers with mitochondrial genome variation using TreeScanning, a haplotype-based approach that concentrates statistical power by analyzing evolutionarily meaningful groups (or clades of haplotypes together for association with a phenotype. Four clades were associated with three different endophenotypes: whole brain volume, percent change in temporal pole thickness, and left hippocampal atrophy over two years. This is the first study of its kind to identify mitochondrial variation associated with brain imaging endophenotypes of Alzheimer's disease. Our results provide additional evidence that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in risk for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Pituitary gland levels of mercury, selenium, iron, and zinc in an Alzheimer`s disease study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornett, C.R.; Markesbery, W.R.; Wekstein, D.R.; Ehmann, W.D. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Mercury, iron, selenium, and zinc imbalances have been observed in comparisons between Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and control subject brains. Analyses of the pituitary gland have demonstrated that this organ retains relatively high concentrations of trace elements, including mercury, iron, and zinc. Our previous work has shown that the pituitary glands of AD and control subjects are typically higher in these trace elements than brain samples from the same subject. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to compare the pituitary trace element levels of AD and control subjects. This study also describes the intrasubject relationships of brain trace element levels to those in the pituitary gland of AD and control subjects.

  6. Characterization of Brain-Penetrant Pyrimidine-Containing Molecules with Differential Microtubule-Stabilizing Activities Developed as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevich, Jane; Cornec, Anne-Sophie; Yao, Yuemang; James, Michael; Crowe, Alexander; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q; Smith, Amos B; Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R

    2016-05-01

    The microtubule (MT)-stabilizing protein tau disengages from MTs and forms intracellular inclusions known as neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Reduced tau binding to MTs in tauopathies may contribute to neuronal dysfunction through decreased MT stabilization and disrupted axonal transport. Thus, the introduction of brain-penetrant MT-stabilizing compounds might normalize MT dynamics and axonal deficits in these disorders. We previously described a number of phenylpyrimidines and triazolopyrimidines (TPDs) that induce tubulin post-translational modifications indicative of MT stabilization. We now further characterize the biologic properties of these small molecules, and our results reveal that these compounds can be divided into two general classes based on the cellular response they evoke. One group composed of the phenylpyrimidines and several TPD examples showed a bell-shaped concentration-response effect on markers of MT stabilization in cellular assays. Moreover, these compounds induced proteasome-dependent degradation of α- and β-tubulin and caused altered MT morphology in both dividing cells and neuron cultures. In contrast, a second group comprising a subset of TPD molecules (TPD+) increased markers of stable MTs in a concentration-dependent manner in dividing cells and in neurons without affecting total tubulin levels or disrupting MT architecture. Moreover, an example TPD+ compound was shown to increase MTs in a neuron culture model with induced tau hyperphosphorylation and associated MT deficits. Several TPD+ compounds were shown to be both brain penetrant and orally bioavailable, and a TPD+ example increased MT stabilization in the mouse brain, making these compounds potential candidate therapeutics for neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26980057

  7. Assessing neuronal networks: understanding Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bokde, Arun L W

    2012-02-01

    Findings derived from neuroimaging of the structural and functional organization of the human brain have led to the widely supported hypothesis that neuronal networks of temporally coordinated brain activity across different regional brain structures underpin cognitive function. Failure of integration within a network leads to cognitive dysfunction. The current discussion on Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) argues that it presents in part a disconnection syndrome. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and electroencephalography demonstrate that synchronicity of brain activity is altered in AD and correlates with cognitive deficits. Moreover, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging have made it possible to track axonal projections across the brain, revealing substantial regional impairment in fiber-tract integrity in AD. Accumulating evidence points towards a network breakdown reflecting disconnection at both the structural and functional system level. The exact relationship among these multiple mechanistic variables and their contribution to cognitive alterations and ultimately decline is yet unknown. Focused research efforts aimed at the integration of both function and structure hold great promise not only in improving our understanding of cognition but also of its characteristic progressive metamorphosis in complex chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as AD.

  8. Endocannabinoid signalling in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroof, Nazia; Pardon, Marie Christine; Kendall, David A

    2013-12-01

    The ECs (endocannabinoids) AEA (anandamide) and 2-AG (2-arachidonoylglycerol) and their lipid congeners OEA (N-oleoylethanolamide) and PEA (N-palmitoylethanolamide) are multifunctional lipophilic signalling molecules. The ECs, OEA and PEA have multiple physiological roles including involvement in learning and memory, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, neuroprotection and neurogenesis. They have also been implicated in the pathology of, or perhaps protective responses to, neurodegenerative diseases. This is particularly the case with Alzheimer's disease, the most common age-related dementia associated with impairments in learning and memory accompanied by neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. The present mini-review examines the evidence supporting the roles that ECs appear to play in Alzheimer's disease and the potential for beneficial therapeutic manipulation of the EC signalling system. PMID:24256258

  9. Research Sheds Light on Mechanism of Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) under the CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences have made significant progress in suggesting a possible mechanism for the accumulation of amyloid β-peptides (Aβs), which are believed to cause Alzheimer's disease. Aβs are fragments of a protein that is snipped from another protein called amyloid precursor protein (APP). In a healthy brain, these protein fragments would be broken down and eliminated. In Alzheimer's disease, unfortunately, the fragments accumulate to form hard, insoluble plaques, which are the characteristic lesions found in Alzheimer's patients and could dramatically inhibit several genes critical to memory and learning.

  10. T-cell brain infiltration and immature antigen-presenting cells in transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease-like cerebral amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, M T; Merlini, M; Späni, C; Gericke, C; Schweizer, N; Enzmann, G; Engelhardt, B; Kulic, L; Suter, T; Nitsch, R M

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral beta-amyloidosis, one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), elicits a well-characterised, microglia-mediated local innate immune response. In contrast, it is not clear whether cells of the adaptive immune system, in particular T-cells, react to cerebral amyloidosis in AD. Even though parenchymal T-cells have been described in post-mortem brains of AD patients, it is not known whether infiltrating T-cells are specifically recruited to the extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid, and whether they are locally activated into proliferating, effector cells upon interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). To address these issues we have analysed by confocal microscopy and flow-cytometry the localisation and activation status of both T-cells and APCs in transgenic (tg) mice models of AD-like cerebral amyloidosis. Increased numbers of infiltrating T-cells were found in amyloid-burdened brain regions of tg mice, with concomitant up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, compared to non-tg littermates. The infiltrating T-cells in tg brains did not co-localise with amyloid plaques, produced less interferon-gamma than those in controls and did not proliferate locally. Bona-fide dendritic cells were virtually absent from the brain parenchyma of both non-tg and tg mice, and APCs from tg brains showed an immature phenotype, with accumulation of MHC-II in intracellular compartments. These results indicate that cerebral amyloidosis promotes T-cell infiltration but interferes with local antigen presentation and T-cell activation. The inability of the brain immune surveillance to orchestrate a protective immune response to amyloid-beta peptide might contribute to the accumulation of amyloid in the progression of the disease. PMID:26872418

  11. Biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease therapeutic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Harald; Wilcock, Gordon; Andrieu, Sandrine; Aisen, Paul; Blennow, Kaj; Broich, K; Carrillo, Maria; Fox, Nick C; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Isaac, Maria; Lovestone, Simon; Nordberg, Agneta; Prvulovic, David; Sampaio, Christina; Scheltens, Philip; Weiner, Michael; Winblad, Bengt; Coley, Nicola; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-12-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease requires innovative trials with large numbers of subjects and long observation periods. The use of blood, cerebrospinal fluid or neuroimaging biomarkers is critical for the demonstration of disease-modifying therapy effects on the brain. Suitable biomarkers are those which reflect the progression of AD related molecular mechanisms and neuropathology, including amyloidogenic processing and aggregation, hyperphosphorylation, accumulation of tau and neurofibrillary tangles, progressive functional, metabolic and structural decline, leading to neurodegeneration, loss of brain tissue and cognitive symptoms. Biomarkers should be used throughout clinical trial phases I-III of AD drug development. They can be used to enhance inclusion and exclusion criteria, or as baseline predictors to increase the statistical power of trials. Validated and qualified biomarkers may be used as outcome measures to detect treatment effects in pivotal clinical trials. Finally, biomarkers can be used to identify adverse effects. Questions regarding which biomarkers should be used in clinical trials, and how, are currently far from resolved. The Oxford Task Force continues and expands the work of our previous international expert task forces on disease-modifying trials and on endpoints for Alzheimer's disease clinical trials. The aim of this initiative was to bring together a selected number of key international opinion leaders and experts from academia, regulatory agencies and industry to condense the current knowledge and state of the art regarding the best use of biological markers in Alzheimer's disease therapy trials and to propose practical recommendations for the planning of future AD trials. PMID:21130138

  12. Diminished glucose transport and phosphorylation in Alzheimer`s disease determined by dynamic FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piert, M.; Koeppe, R.A.; Giordani, B.; Berent, S.; Kuhl, D.E. [Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using dynamic [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and PET, kinetic rate constants that describe influx (K{sub 1}) and efflux (k{sub 2}) of FDG as well s phosphorylation (k{sub 3}) and dephosphorylation (k{sub 4}) were determined in patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease and similarly aged normal controls. The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMR{sub glu}) was calculated from individually fitted rate constants in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. Dynamic PET scans were obtained in normal controls (n = 10, mean age = 67) and Alzheimer`s disease patients (n = 8, mean age = 67) for 60 min following injection of 10 mCi of FDG. The Alzheimer`s disease group was characterized by decreases of the CMR{sub glu} ranging from 13.3% in the frontal to 40.9% in the parietal cortex, which achieved significance in all regions except the thalamus. K{sub 1} was significantly reduced in the parietal (p < 0.01) and temporal cortices (p < 0.005), temporal and occipital cortex, and in the putamen and cerebellum (p < 0.05). The rate constants k{sub 2} and k{sub 4} were unchanged in the Alzheimer`s disease group. These data suggest that hypometabolism in Alzheimer`s disease is related to reduced glucose phosphorylation activity as well as diminished glucose transport, particularly in the most metabolically affected areas of the brain, the parietal and temporal cortex. 60 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Role of P-glycoprotein in mediating rivastigmine effect on amyloid-β brain load and related pathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Loqman A; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-04-01

    Recently, we showed that rivastigmine decreased amyloid-β (Aβ) brain load in aged rats by enhancing its clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) via upregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). Here, we extend our previous work to clarify P-gp role in mediating rivastigmine effect on Aβ brain levels and neuroprotection in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that expresses different levels of P-gp. APPSWE mice were bred with mdr1a/b knockout mice to produce littermates that were divided into three groups; APP(+)/mdr1(+/+), APP(+)/mdr1(+/-) and APP(+)/mdr1(-/-). Animals received rivastigmine treatment (0.3mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 8weeks using Alzet osmotic mini-pumps. ELISA analysis of brain homogenates for Aβ showed rivastigmine treatment to significantly decrease Aβ brain load in APP(+)/mdr1(+/+) by 25% and in APP(+)/mdr1(+/-) mice by 21% compared to their vehicle treated littermates, but not in APP(+)/mdr1(-/-) mice. In addition, rivastigmine reduced GFAP immunostaining of astrocytes by 50% and IL-1β brain level by 43% in APP(+)/mdr1(+/+) mice, however its effect was less pronounced in P-gp knockout mice. Moreover, rivastigmine demonstrated a P-gp expression dependent neuroprotective effect that was highest in APP(+)/mdr1(+/+)>APP(+)/mdr1(+/-)>APP(+)/mdr1(-/-) as determined by expression of synaptic markers PSD-95 and SNAP-25 using Western blot analysis. Collectively, our results suggest that P-gp plays important role in mediating rivastigmine non-cholinergic beneficial effects, including Aβ brain load reduction, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects in the AD mouse models. PMID:26780497

  14. The PSEN1 I143T mutation in a Swedish family with Alzheimer disease: Clinical report and quantification of Aβ in different brain regions

    OpenAIRE

    Graff, Caroline; Keller, Lina; Welander, Hedvig; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Nennesmo, Inger; Wallin, Åsa K

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Early onset dominantly-inherited forms of Alzheimer disease are rare, but studies of such cases have revealed important information about the disease mechanisms. Importantly, mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2, alter the APP processing and lead to an increased amyloid ?-peptide (A?) 42/40 ratio. This, together with other studies on the pathogenic mechanisms, show that A?42 is a major player in the etiology of Alzheimer disease. Here we present a clinical and neuropathologic...

  15. Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with brain structure, cognition, and mood in a middle-aged cohort at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, Elizabeth A; Schultz, Stephanie A; Oh, Jennifer M; Larson, Jordan; Edwards, Dorothy; Cook, Dane; Koscik, Rebecca L; Dowling, Maritza N; Gallagher, Catherine L; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Rowley, Howard A; Bendlin, Barbara B; LaRue, Asenath; Asthana, Sanjay; Hermann, Bruce P; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Okonkwo, Ozioma C

    2015-09-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is an objective measure of habitual physical activity (PA), and has been linked to increased brain structure and cognition. The gold standard method for measuring CRF is graded exercise testing (GXT), but GXT is not feasible in many settings. The objective of this study was to examine whether a non-exercise estimate of CRF is related to gray matter (GM) volumes, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), cognition, objective and subjective memory function, and mood in a middle-aged cohort at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three hundred and fifteen cognitively healthy adults (mean age =58.58 years) enrolled in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention underwent structural MRI scanning, cognitive testing, anthropometric assessment, venipuncture for laboratory tests, and completed a self-reported PA questionnaire. A subset (n = 85) underwent maximal GXT. CRF was estimated using a previously validated equation incorporating sex, age, body-mass index, resting heart rate, and self-reported PA. Results indicated that the CRF estimate was significantly associated with GXT-derived peak oxygen consumption, validating its use as a non-exercise CRF measure in our sample. Support for this finding was seen in significant associations between the CRF estimate and several cardiovascular risk factors. Higher CRF was associated with greater GM volumes in several AD-relevant brain regions including the hippocampus, amygdala, precuneus, supramarginal gyrus, and rostral middle frontal gyrus. Increased CRF was also associated with lower WMH and better cognitive performance in Verbal Learning & Memory, Speed & Flexibility, and Visuospatial Ability. Lastly, CRF was negatively correlated with self- and informant-reported memory complaints, and depressive symptoms. Together, these findings suggest that habitual participation in physical activity may provide protection for brain structure and cognitive function, thereby decreasing future risk for AD

  16. Frontotemporal dementia to Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Silveri, Maria Caterina

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral manifestations may dominate the clinical picture of the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (fv-FTD) for a long time before the appearance of true cognitive deficits. On the other hand, a deficit in the episodic memory domain represents the main manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Many behavioral disorders have been described in the clinical course of both FTD and AD; however, apathy and personality changes characterize frontal dementias, while depression dominates in...

  17. Inflammatory process in Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    MARCO ANTONIO MERAZ RIOS; DANIRA TORAL-RIOS; DIANA FRANCO-BOCANEGRA; VICTORIA CAMPOS-PEÑA

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Histopathologically is characterized by the presence of two major hallmarks, the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and extracellular neuritic plaques (NPs) surrounded by activated astrocytes and microglia. NFTs consist of paired helical filaments of truncated tau protein that is abnormally hyperphosphorylated. The main component in the NP is the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), a small fragment of 4...

  18. Rehabilitating a brain with Alzheimer's: a proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Emiliano Aranda-Abreu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Gonzalo Emiliano Aranda-Abreu1,3, María Elena Hernández-Aguilar1,3, Jorge Manzo Denes1,4, Luis Isauro García Hernández1,4, Marisol Herrera Rivero21Programa de Neurobiología, 2Doctorado en Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz, México, 3Cuerpo Académico de Neuroquímica, 4Cuerpo Académico de Neurociencias.Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, originating sporadically in the population aged over 65 years, and advanced age is the principal risk factor leading to AD development. In spite of the large amount of research going on around the globe and all the information now available about AD, there is still no origin or triggering process known so far. Drugs approved for the treatment of AD include tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. These may delay or slow down the degenerative process for a while, but they can neither stop nor reverse its progression. Because that this might be due to a lack of effect of these drugs on degenerating neurons, even when they are able to potentiate the brain in nondegenerative conditions, we propose here an alternative therapy consisting of initial repair of neuronal membranes followed by conventional drug therapies. The rehabilitation of neurons in a degeneration process would enable the drugs to act more effectively on them and improve the effects of treatment in AD patients.Keywords: Alzheimer, Rehabilitation, Drugs

  19. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  20. Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) is increased in Alzheimer's disease and ROCK1 depletion reduces amyloid-β levels in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Benjamin W; Gentry, Erik G; Rush, Travis; Troncoso, Juan C; Thambisetty, Madhav; Montine, Thomas J; Herskowitz, Jeremy H

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and mitigating amyloid-β (Aβ) levels may serve as a rational therapeutic avenue to slow AD progression. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2) is proposed to curb Aβ levels, and mechanisms that underlie ROCK2's effects on Aβ production are defined. How ROCK1 affects Aβ generation remains a critical barrier. Here, we report that ROCK1 protein levels were elevated in mild cognitive impairment due to AD (MCI) and AD brains compared to controls. Aβ42 oligomers marginally increased ROCK1 and ROCK2 protein levels in neurons but strongly induced phosphorylation of Lim kinase 1 (LIMK1), suggesting that Aβ42 activates ROCKs. RNAi depletion of ROCK1 or ROCK2 suppressed endogenous Aβ40 production in neurons, and Aβ40 levels were reduced in brains of ROCK1 heterozygous knock-out mice compared to wild-type littermate controls. ROCK1 knockdown decreased amyloid precursor protein (APP), and treatment with bafilomycin accumulated APP levels in neurons depleted of ROCK1. These observations suggest that reduction of ROCK1 diminishes Aβ levels by enhancing APP protein degradation. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are therapeutic targets to combat Aβ production in AD. Mitigating amyloid-β (Aβ) levels is a rational strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment, however, therapeutic targets with clinically available drugs are lacking. We hypothesize that Aβ accumulation in mild cognitive impairment because of AD (MCI) and AD activates the RhoA/ROCK pathway which in turn fuels production of Aβ. Escalation of this cycle over the course of many years may contribute to the buildup of amyloid pathology in MCI and/or AD. PMID:27246255

  1. Streptozotocin Intracerebroventricular-Induced Neurotoxicity and Brain Insulin Resistance: a Therapeutic Intervention for Treatment of Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease (sAD)-Like Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kalani, Anuradha; Rai, Shivika; Tota, Santosh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Ahmad, Abdullah S

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is remarkably characterized by pathological hallmarks which include amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal loss, and progressive cognitive loss. Several well-known genetic mutations which are being used for the development of a transgenic model of AD lead to an early onset familial AD (fAD)-like condition. However, these settings are only reasons for a small percentage of the total AD cases. The large majorities of AD cases are considered as a sporadic in origin and are less influenced by a single mutation of a gene. The etiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD) remains unclear, but numerous risk factors have been identified that increase the chance of developing AD. Among these risk factors are insulin desensitization/resistance state, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, synapse dysfunction, tau hyperphosphorylation, and deposition of Aβ in the brain. Subsequently, these risk factors lead to development of sAD. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not so clear. Streptozotocin (STZ) produces similar characteristic pathology of sAD such as altered glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, synaptic dysfunction, protein kinases such as protein kinase B/C, glycogen synthase-3β (GSK-3β) activation, tau hyperphosphorylation, Aβ deposition, and neuronal apoptosis. Further, STZ also leads to inhibition of Akt/PKB, insulin receptor (IR) signaling molecule, and insulin resistance in brain. These alterations mediated by STZ can be used to explore the underlying molecular and pathophysiological mechanism of AD (especially sAD) and their therapeutic intervention for drug development against AD pathology. PMID:26298663

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modern challenge for neuroimaging techniques is to contribute to the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Early diagnosis includes recognition of pre-demented conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or having a high risk of developing AD. The role of neuroimaging therefore extends beyond its traditional role of excluding other conditions such as neurosurgical lesions. In addition, early diagnosis would allow early treatment using currently available therapies or new therapies in the future. Structural imaging can detect and follow the time course of subtle brain atrophy as a surrogate marker for pathological processes. New MR techniques and image analysis software can detect subtle brain microstructural, perfusion or metabolic changes that provide new tools to study the pathological processes and detect pre-demented conditions. This review focuses on markers of macro- and microstructural, perfusion, diffusion and metabolic MR imaging and spectroscopy in AD. (orig.)

  3. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. PMID:25459121

  4. Towards an All-Polymer Biosensor for Early Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Heegaard, Niels

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is quickly evolving into one of the biggest and most costly health issues in Europe and the United States. AD is a protein misfolding disease, caused by accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau protein in the brain. The build-up of protein is believed to...

  5. Neuroimaging Measures as Endophenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith N. Braskie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD is moderately to highly heritable. Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (APOE4 has been replicated consistently as an AD risk factor over many studies, and recently confirmed variants in other genes such as CLU, CR1, and PICALM each increase the lifetime risk of AD. However, much of the heritability of AD remains unexplained. AD is a complex disease that is diagnosed largely through neuropsychological testing, though neuroimaging measures may be more sensitive for detecting the incipient disease stages. Difficulties in early diagnosis and variable environmental contributions to the disease can obscure genetic relationships in traditional case-control genetic studies. Neuroimaging measures may be used as endophenotypes for AD, offering a reliable, objective tool to search for possible genetic risk factors. Imaging measures might also clarify the specific mechanisms by which proposed risk factors influence the brain.

  6. Aberrant accumulation of phospholipase C-delta in Alzheimer brains.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimohama, S.; Homma, Y.; Suenaga, T.; Fujimoto, S; Taniguchi, T; Araki, W.; Yamaoka, Y; Takenawa, T.; Kimura, J

    1991-01-01

    Since phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) is one of the key molecules in signal transduction, the authors assessed its involvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Immunostaining of a specific antibody against the PLC isozyme, PLC-delta, demonstrated that this enzyme was abnormally accumulated in neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), the neurites surrounding senile plaque (SP) cores, and neuropil threads in AD brains. Western blot analysis confirmed that PLC-delta was concentrated in the pai...

  7. Tanshinone IIA decreases the levels of inflammation induced by Aβ1-42 in brain tissues of Alzheimer's disease model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bei-Ling; Li, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Li, Wen-Wen; Wu, Heng-Fei

    2016-08-17

    To study the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and explore the possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of tanshinone IIA (TanIIA), we evaluated the quantity of neurons and the expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD11b, C1q, C3c, and C3d in brain tissues of AD rats treated with TanIIA. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: sham group, TanIIA treatment group, and Aβ1-42 group. Aβ1-42 treatment was performed by injecting Aβ into the hippocampus of rats and then tagged position. Brain tissue morphological structure has been observed with HE staining and the staining of exogenously injected Aβ1-42 was observed by immunohistochemistry, which confirms the success of the Aβ1-42 group. After TanIIA treatment, levels of IL-1β, IL-6, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD11b, C1q, C3c, and C3d were measured in paraffinized brain tissue sections from all groups by immunohistochemistry staining. The results showed that no 6E10 was detected in the control group, and the difference in the expression levels of 6E10 between the Aβ1-42 group and the TanIIA treatment group was not significant (P>0.05), suggesting that both the Aβ1-42 group and the TanIIA treatment group received the same amount of Aβ. The Aβ1-42 group showed a significant increase in the expression levels of inflammatory markers compared with the sham group (Pastrocytes and microglial cells, and induced a partial decrease in complement molecules in the brain of AD rats. These findings suggested that TanIIA may represent a potential therapeutic treatment in neurodegenerative diseases such as AD to support the survival of neurons by reducing expression levels of inflammatory factors. PMID:27348015

  8. FDG-PET changes in brain glucose metabolism from normal cognition to pathologically verified Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, Lisa [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL 400, New York, NY (United States); Mistur, Rachel; Switalski, Remigiusz; Glodzik, Lidia; Li, Yi; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; De Santi, Susan; Reisberg, Barry [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Tsui, Wai Hon; De Leon, Mony J. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Wisniewski, Thomas [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We report the first clinicopathological series of longitudinal FDG-PET scans in post-mortem (PM) verified cognitively normal elderly (NL) followed to the onset of Alzheimer's-type dementia (DAT), and in patients with mild DAT with progressive cognitive deterioration. Four NL subjects and three patients with mild DAT received longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and dynamic FDG-PET examinations with arterial input functions. NL subjects were followed for 13 {+-} 5 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 7 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 6 {+-} 3 years after the last FDG-PET. Two NL declined to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and two developed probable DAT before death. DAT patients were followed for 9 {+-} 3 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 3 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 7 {+-} 1 years after the last FDG-PET. Two DAT patients progressed to moderate-to-severe dementia and one developed vascular dementia. The two NL subjects who declined to DAT received a PM diagnosis of definite AD. Their FDG-PET scans indicated a progression of deficits in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) from the hippocampus to the parietotemporal and posterior cingulate cortices. One DAT patient showed AD with diffuse Lewy body disease (LBD) at PM, and her last in vivo PET was indicative of possible LBD for the presence of occipital as well as parietotemporal hypometabolism. Progressive CMRglc reductions on FDG-PET occur years in advance of clinical DAT symptoms in patients with pathologically verified disease. The FDG-PET profiles in life were consistent with the PM diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Neurotransmitter replacement therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, E; Mendis, T; Rusk, I N; Grimes, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The relative success of symptomatic attenuation of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease with dopaminomimetics has spurred interest in neurotransmitter replacement therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease. While cholinergic dysfunction has been linked to various clinical parameters in Alzheimer's disease, cholinergic replacement, including precursor therapy, administration of direct-acting agonists and inhibition of enzymatic degradation has had only very modest success. The inhibition of ...

  10. Brain catalase in the streptozotocin-rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease treated with the iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofic, E; Salkovic-Petrisic, M; Tahirovic, I; Sapcanin, A; Mandel, S; Youdim, M; Riederer, P

    2015-04-01

    Low intracerebroventricular (icv) doses of streptozotocin (STZ) produce regionally specific brain neurochemical changes in rats that are similar to those found in the brain of patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD). Since oxidative stress is thought to be one of the major pathologic processes in sAD, catalase (CAT) activity was estimated in the regional brain tissue of animals treated intracerebroventricularly with STZ and the multitarget iron chelator, antioxidant and MAO-inhibitor M30 [5-(N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline]. Five-day oral pre-treatment of adult male Wistar rats with 10 mg/kg/day M30 dose was followed by a single injection of STZ (1 mg/kg, icv). CAT activity was measured colorimetrically in the hippocampus (HPC), brain stem (BS) and cerebellum (CB) of the control, STZ-, M30- and STZ + M30-treated rats, respectively, 4 weeks after the STZ treatment. STZ-treated rats demonstrated significantly lower CAT activity in all three brain regions in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05 for BS and CB, p < 0.01 for HPC). M30 pre-treatment of the control rats did not influence the CAT activity in HPC and CB, but significantly increased it in BS (p < 0.05). M30 pre-treatment of STZ-treated rats significantly increased CAT activity in the HPC in comparison to the STZ treatment alone (p < 0.05) and normalized to the control values. These findings are in line with the assumption that reactive oxygen species contribute to the pathogenesis of STZ in a rat model of sAD and indicate that multifunctional iron chelators such as M30 might also have beneficial effects in this non-transgenic sAD model. PMID:25252744

  11. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  12. A novel p38α MAPK inhibitor suppresses brain proinflammatory cytokine up-regulation and attenuates synaptic dysfunction and behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNamara Laurie K

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An accumulating body of evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive or prolonged increases in proinflammatory cytokine production by activated glia is a contributor to the progression of pathophysiology that is causally linked to synaptic dysfunction and hippocampal behavior deficits in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. This raises the opportunity for the development of new classes of potentially disease-modifying therapeutics. A logical candidate CNS target is p38α MAPK, a well-established drug discovery molecular target for altering proinflammatory cytokine cascades in peripheral tissue disorders. Activated p38 MAPK is seen in human AD brain tissue and in AD-relevant animal models, and cell culture studies strongly implicate p38 MAPK in the increased production of proinflammatory cytokines by glia activated with human amyloid-beta (Aβ and other disease-relevant stressors. However, the vast majority of small molecule drugs do not have sufficient penetrance of the blood-brain barrier to allow their use as in vivo research tools or as therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that brain p38α MAPK is a potential in vivo target for orally bioavailable, small molecules capable of suppressing excessive cytokine production by activated glia back towards homeostasis, allowing an improvement in neurologic outcomes. Methods A novel synthetic small molecule based on a molecular scaffold used previously was designed, synthesized, and subjected to analyses to demonstrate its potential in vivo bioavailability, metabolic stability, safety and brain uptake. Testing for in vivo efficacy used an AD-relevant mouse model. Results A novel, CNS-penetrant, non-toxic, orally bioavailable, small molecule inhibitor of p38α MAPK (MW01-2-069A-SRM was developed. Oral administration of the compound at a low dose (2.5 mg/kg resulted in attenuation of

  13. Cardiovascular risk and hippocampal thickness in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donix, Markus; Scharf, Maria; Marschner, Kira; Werner, Annett; Sauer, Cathrin; Gerner, Antje; Nees, Josef A; Meyer, Shirin; Donix, Katharina L; Von Kummer, Rüdiger; Holthoff, Vjera A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this regional cortical thinning would be modulated by cardiovascular risk factors. We utilized high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and a cortical unfolding technique to determine the cortical thickness of medial temporal subregions in 30 patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using a sex-specific multivariable risk score. Greater cardiovascular risk was associated with cortical thinning in the hippocampus CA2/3/dentate gyrus area but not other hippocampal and medial temporal subregions. APOE genotype, a family history of Alzheimer's disease, and age did not influence cortical thickness. Alzheimer's disease-related atrophy could mask the influence of genetic risk factors or age on regional cortical thickness in medial temporal lobe regions, whereas the impact of vascular risk factors remains detectable. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24228185

  14. Friend or foe? Targeting microglia in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation is believed to be a component of a number of degenerative brain diseases including Alzheimer's disease. A recent article by Fu and colleagues (2016) demonstrated that the cytokine IL-33 can modulate microglia in an animal model of AD to become better scavengers of beta-amyloid and less pro-inflammatory. The findings have potential therapeutic implications for a number of brain conditions. PMID:27442003

  15. Monomeric C-reactive protein--a key molecule driving development of Alzheimer's disease associated with brain ischaemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slevin, M; Matou, S; Zeinolabediny, Y; Corpas, R; Weston, R; Liu, D; Boras, E; Di Napoli, M; Petcu, E; Sarroca, S; Popa-Wagner, A; Love, S; Font, M A; Potempa, L A; Al-Baradie, R; Sanfeliu, C; Revilla, S; Badimon, L; Krupinski, J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases dramatically in patients with ischaemic stroke. Monomeric C-reactive protein (mCRP) appears in the ECM of ischaemic tissue after stroke, associating with microvasculature, neurons and AD-plaques, Aβ, also, being able to dissociate native-CRP into inflammatory, mCRP in vivo. Here, mCRP injected into the hippocampal region of mice was retained within the retrosplenial tract of the dorsal 3rd ventrical and surrounding major vessels. Mice developed behavioural/cognitive deficits within 1 month, concomitant with mCRP staining within abnormal looking neurons expressing p-tau and in beta-amyloid 1-42-plaque positive regions. mCRP co-localised with CD105 in microvessels suggesting angiogenesis. Phospho-arrays/Western blotting identified signalling activation in endothelial cells and neurons through p-IRS-1, p-Tau and p-ERK1/2-which was blocked following pre-incubation with mCRP-antibody. mCRP increased vascular monolayer permeability and gap junctions, increased NCAM expression and produced haemorrhagic angiogenesis in mouse matrigel implants. mCRP induced tau244-372 aggregation and assembly in vitro. IHC study of human AD/stroke patients revealed co-localization of mCRP with Aβ plaques, tau-like fibrils and IRS-1/P-Tau positive neurons and high mCRP-levels spreading from infarcted core regions matched reduced expression of Aβ/Tau. mCRP may be responsible for promoting dementia after ischaemia and mCRP clearance could inform therapeutic avenues to reduce the risk of future dementia. PMID:26335098

  16. Maternal Transmission of Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heggeli, Kristin; Crook, Julia; Thomas, Colleen; Graff-Radford, Neill

    2012-01-01

    Some propose maternal Alzheimer disease (1) inheritance. We compared dementia family histories in AD cases and cognitively normal controls. We expected more mothers to have AD in both groups. If maternal risk was not only due to female longevity more AD cases’ than controls’ mothers should be demented. We matched 196 AD cases to 200 controls by gender and age. We obtained parent dementia status and age of death for 348 AD and 319 control parents. 24 (12%) controls’ fathers, 26 (13%) AD patien...

  17. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  18. Disruption of zinc homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic hypothesis being tested is that, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the delicate balance of brain Zn is disrupted and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration. Micro-PIXE measurements reveal a significant elevation of Zn in senile plaques (SP) in AD brain compared with adjacent neuropil and a significant increase in AD neuropil compared to control neuropil. The observation of elevated Zn in SP is of interest because the amyloid precursor protein contains a Zn binding site that may prevent normal cleavage leading to the generation of a toxic fragment of beta amyloid, the constituent of SP. The potential of using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a complimentary microprobe technique is also presented

  19. Neuronal histamine and cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Binder, Sonja; De Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Dere, Ekrem

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular amyloid plaque deposits, mainly composed of amyloid-beta peptide and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Amyloid-beta represents a neurotoxic proteolytic cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein. The progressive cognitive decline that is associated with Alzheimer's disease has been mainly attributed to a deficit in cholinergic neurotransmission due to the continuous degeneration of cholinergic neurons e.g. in the basal forebrain. There is evidence suggesting that other neurotransmitter systems including neuronal histamine also contribute to the development and maintenance of Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive deficits. Pathological changes in the neuronal histaminergic system of such patients are highly predictive of ensuing cognitive deficits. Furthermore, histamine-related drugs, including histamine 3 receptor antagonists, have been demonstrated to alleviate cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes findings from animal and clinical research on the relationship between the neuronal histaminergic system and cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer's disease. The significance of the neuronal histaminergic system as a promising target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of cognitive symptoms is discussed. Furthermore, the option to use histamine-related agents as neurogenesis-stimulating therapy that counteracts progressive brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease is considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26025658

  20. Evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Brodmann areas in Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease using automated 3-D voxel based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valotassiou, V.; Papatriantafyllou, J.; Sifakis, N.; Karageorgiou, C.; Tsougos, I.; Tzavara, C.; Zerva, C.; Georgoulias, P.

    2009-05-01

    Introduction. Brain perfusion studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been applied in demented patients to provide better discrimination between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aim. To assess the perfusion of specific Brodmann (Br) areas of the brain cortex in FTD and AD patients, using NeuroGam processing program to provide 3D voxel-by-voxel cerebral SPECT analysis. Material and methods. We studied 34 consecutive patients. We used the established criteria for the diagnosis of dementia and the specific established criteria for the diagnosis of FTD and AD. All the patients had a neuropsychological evaluation with a battery of tests including the mini-mental state examination (MMSE).Twenty-six patients (16 males, 10 females, mean age 68.76±6.51 years, education 11.81±4.25 years, MMSE 16.69±9.89) received the diagnosis of FTD and 8 patients (all females, mean age 71.25±10.48 years, education 10±4.6 years, MMSE 12.5±3.89) the diagnosis of AD. All the patients underwent a brain SPECT. We applied the NeuroGam Software for the evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Br areas in the left (L) and right (R) hemispheres. Results. Statistically significant hypoperfusion in FTD compared to AD patients, was found in the following Br areas: 11L (pbrain perfusion SPECT could result in enhanced accuracy for the differential diagnosis between AD and FTD patients.

  1. Antroquinonol Lowers Brain Amyloid-β Levels and Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Miles C; Cheng, Irene H

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The deposition of brain amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), which are cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines via activating the nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway, which is downregulated in AD. Therefore, we examined whether antroquinonol could improve AD-like pathological and behavioral deficits in the APP transgenic mouse model. We found that antroquinonol was able to cross the blood-brain barrier and had no adverse effects via oral intake. Two months of antroquinonol consumption improved learning and memory in the Morris water maze test, reduced hippocampal Aβ levels, and reduced the degree of astrogliosis. These effects may be mediated through the increase of Nrf2 and the decrease of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) levels. These findings suggest that antroquinonol could have beneficial effects on AD-like deficits in APP transgenic mouse. PMID:26469245

  2. Comparative value of brain perfusion SPECT and [123I]MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in distinguishing between dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both decreased occipital perfusion on brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and reduction in cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake are characteristic features of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and potentially support the clinical diagnosis of DLB. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of these two methods for differentiation of DLB from Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study population comprised 19 patients with probable DLB and 39 patients with probable AD who underwent both SPECT with N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine and MIBG myocardial scintigraphy. Objective and quantitative measurement of perfusion in the medial occipital lobe, including the cuneus and lingual gyrus, was performed by the use of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections. Medial occipital perfusion was significantly decreased in the DLB group compared with the AD group. The mean heart/mediastinum ratios of MIBG uptake were significantly lower in the DLB group than in the AD group. Although SPECT failed to demonstrate significant hypoperfusion in the medial occipital lobe in five patients with DLB, marked reduction of MIBG uptake was found in all patients with DLB. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that MIBG myocardial scintigraphy enabled more accurate discrimination between DLB and AD than was possible with perfusion SPECT. MIBG myocardial scintigraphy may improve the sensitivity in the detection of DLB. In particular, this method may provide a powerful differential diagnostic tool when it is difficult to distinguish cases of DLB from AD using brain perfusion SPECT. (orig.)

  3. EEG-directed connectivity from posterior brain regions is decreased in dementia with Lewy bodies: a comparison with Alzheimer's disease and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwan, Meenakshi; van Dellen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Lotte; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; de Waal, Hanneke; Lemstra, Afina W; Gouw, Alida A; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Sommer, Iris E; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-05-01

    Directed information flow between brain regions might be disrupted in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and relate to the clinical syndrome of DLB. To investigate this hypothesis, resting-state electroencephalography recordings were obtained in patients with probable DLB and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and controls (N = 66 per group, matched for age and gender). Phase transfer entropy was used to measure directed connectivity in the groups for the theta, alpha, and beta frequency band. A posterior-to-anterior phase transfer entropy gradient, with occipital channels driving the frontal channels, was found in controls in all frequency bands. This posterior-to-anterior gradient was largely lost in DLB in the alpha band (p < 0.05). In the beta band, posterior brain regions were less driving in information flow in AD than in DLB and controls. In conclusion, the common posterior-to-anterior pattern of directed connectivity in controls is disturbed in DLB patients in the alpha band, and in AD patients in the beta band. Disrupted alpha band-directed connectivity may underlie the clinical syndrome of DLB and differentiate between DLB and AD. PMID:27103525

  4. Neurodegenerative role of stress and glucocorticoid hormones trought Alzheimer's disease Tau protein : a proteomic link between stress and brain pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Joana Margarida Gonçalves Mota

    2012-01-01

    Compreender os mecanismos moleculares bem como o envolvimento dos factores de risco no desenvolvimento das doenças neurodegenerativas, como a doença de Alzheimer ou as Tauopatias, tem sido um dos grandes focos de interesse da comunidade científica, de forma a identificar as estratégias preventivas destas demências. Várias linhas de investigação científica têm vindo a identificar alguns factores que contribuem para o desenvolvimento da Doença de Alzheimer, tais como a idade, mut...

  5. Understanding Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  6. Alzheimer disease: presenilin springs a leak

    OpenAIRE

    Gandy, S; Doeven, M.K.; Poolman, B.

    2006-01-01

    Presenilins are thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease through a protein cleavage reaction that produces neurotoxic amyloid-beta peptides. A new function for presenilins now comes to light - controlling the leakage of calcium out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Is this a serious challenge to the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer disease?

  7. Individualized quantification of brain β-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as β-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([18F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel β-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched (≥ 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 μg. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain β-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be β-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa ≥ 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain β-amyloid load yielded the closest correlation with

  8. The S100B/RAGE Axis in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Leclerc

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that the small EF-hand calcium-binding protein S100B plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease. Among other evidences are the increased levels of both S100B and its receptor, the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGEs in the AD diseased brain. The regulation of RAGE signaling by S100B is complex and probably involves other ligands including the amyloid beta peptide (A, the Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs, or transtheyretin. In this paper we discuss the current literature regarding the role of S100B/RAGE activation in Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Towards an All-Polymer Biosensor for Early Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Heegaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is quickly evolving into one of the biggest and most costly health issues in Europe and the United States. AD is a protein misfolding disease, caused by accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau protein in the brain. The build-up of protein is believed to degenerate the brain tissue literally shrinking the brain. This slowly destroys function of these parts of the brain. It has been discovered that the concentration of A42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a b...

  10. The fitness for the Ageing Brain Study II (FABS II: protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating the effect of physical activity on cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ames David

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have documented a potential protective effect of physical exercise in older adults who are at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. The Fitness for the Ageing Brain II (FABS II study is a multicentre randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT aiming to determine whether physical activity reduces the rate of cognitive decline among individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This paper describes the background, objectives of the study, and an overview of the protocol including design, organization and data collection methods. Methods/Design The study will recruit 230 community-dwelling participants diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Participants will be randomly allocated to two treatment groups: usual care group or 24-week home-based program consisting of 150 minutes per week of tailored moderate physical activity. The primary outcome measure of the study is cognitive decline as measured by the change from baseline in the total score on the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive section. Secondary outcomes of interest include behavioral and psychological symptoms, quality of life, functional level, carer burden and physical function (strength, balance, endurance, physical activity. Primary endpoints will be measured at six and twelve months following the baseline assessment. Discussion This RCT will contribute evidence regarding the potential benefits of a systematic program of physical activity as an affordable and safe intervention for people with Alzheimer's disease. Further, if successful, physical activity in combination with usual care has the potential to alleviate the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and improve its management and the quality of life of patients and their carers. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000755235

  11. Memantine Attenuates Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology and Cognitive Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochuan Wang

    Full Text Available Deficiency of protein phosphatase-2A is a key event in Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase-2A, inhibitor-1, I1PP2A, which inhibits the phosphatase activity by interacting with its catalytic subunit protein phosphatase-2Ac, is known to be upregulated in Alzheimer's disease brain. In the present study, we overexpressed I1PP2A by intracerebroventricular injection with adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A in Wistar rats. The I1PP2A rats showed a decrease in brain protein phosphatase-2A activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, neurodegeneration, an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, enhanced expression of intraneuronal amyloid-beta and spatial reference memory deficit; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., adeno-associated virus vector-1-enhanced GFP, served as a control. Treatment with memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist which is an approved drug for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, rescued protein phosphatase-2A activity by decreasing its demethylation at Leu309 selectively and attenuated Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive impairment in adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A rats. These findings provide new clues into the possible mechanism of the beneficial therapeutic effect of memantine in Alzheimer's disease patients.

  12. Analysis of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Using 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Senile Dementia of Alzheimer Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT studies were performed in 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 7 patients with psychological depression and 12 normal controls. Changes of regional cerebral blood flow was semiquantitatively analyzed and the results were as follows. 1) In 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, significant reduction of regional cerebral blood flow was found In both temporoparietal areas. 2) Relative perfusion between cerebral hemispheres was rather symmetrical in patient with Alzheimer's disease. 3) All patients with depression showed normal SPECT findings. As for conclusion, 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT seemed to be a valuable method for clinical assessment and management of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Finding the Right Place for the Person with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  14. Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease: Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  15. Legal and Financial Planning for People with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  16. Understanding How Alzheimer's Disease Changes People: Challenges and Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  17. Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease: Natural Disaster Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  18. Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease: General Safety Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  19. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold;

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain, such as...

  20. Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Staehelin Jensen, Troels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic function has received little attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD pathology has an impact on brain regions which are important for central autonomic control, but it is unclear if AD is associated with disturbance of autonomic function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate autonomic...

  1. Facilitating Alzheimer disease research recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Joshua D; Galvin, James E

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) research faces challenges to successful enrollment, especially to clinical trials and biomarker studies. Failure to recruit the planned number of participants in a timely manner threatens the internal validity and success of clinical research, raising concerns about external validity and generalizability of results, and possibly leading to disparities in disease treatment. Methods to improve recruitment exist, but require varying levels of staff effort and financial resources, and evidence of effectiveness is often lacking or inconsistent. In this review, we summarize some of the available methods to improve AD research recruitment, the available literature to support or refute these strategies, and some of the experiences at the authors' AD Research Centers. We discuss the use of community-based participatory research principles and participant registries as a means to enhance research enrollment and increase diversity of research samples. PMID:24322484

  2. A new molecular model for Congo Red-β amyloid interaction: implications for diagnosis and inhibition of brain plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kristine A.; Li, Yat

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. One strong pathological indicator of AD is senile plaques, which are aggregates of fibrils formed from amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. Thus, detection and inhibition of Aβ aggregation are critical for the prevention and treatment of AD. Congo red (CR) is one of the most widely used dye molecules for probing as well as inhabiting Aβ aggregation. However, the nature of interaction between CR and Aβ is not well understood. In this research, we systematically studied the interaction between CR and Aβ using a combination of optical techniques, including electronic absorption, fluorescence, Raman scattering, and circular dichroism, to provide detailed information with molecular specificity and high sensitivity. Compared to CR alone, interaction of the dye with Aβ results in a new absorption peak near 540 nm and significantly enhanced photoluminescence as well as Raman signal. Our results led us to propose a new model suggesting that CR exists primarily in a micellar form, resembling H-aggregates, in water and dissociates into monomers upon interaction with Aβ. This model has significant implications for the development of new strategies to detect and inhibit brain plaques for treatment of neurological diseases like AD.

  3. Assessment of degradation of the selected projectile, commissural and association brain fibers in patients with Alzheimers disease on diffusion tensor MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Pathological examinations and the increasingly popular diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) show that in Alzheimers disease (AD), the pathology involves not only the cortical and hippocampal structures, but also the white matter of the brain. DTI is a well recognized technique for evaluation of the integrity of white matter fibers. The aim of this study was to assess with the use of DTI some selected brain tracts in patients with AD, as well as to analyze the severity and distribution of the identified changes. Material/Methods: Thirty-five patients with AD (mean age of 71.6 years, MMSE 17.6), and a control group of 15 healthy volunteers (mean age of 69.1 years, MMSE 29.8) were enrolled in the study. All patients were subjected to a thorough psychiatric examination and psychological tests. DTI examinations (TE 8500, TR 100) were performed using a 1.5 T MR scanner. Fractional anisotropy (FA) measurements in the selected areas of interest (ROI) of the white matter fibers were performed under the control of color FA maps. The following fibers were evaluated - the middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP), the inferior longitudinal fasciculi (ILF), inferior frontooccipital fasciculi (IFO), genu (GCC) and splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC), posterior limbs of internal capsules (PLIC), superior longitudinal fasciculi (SLF) and posterior cingula (CG). Results: There was a statistically significant decrease in FA in patients with AD, comparing to the control group. It was particularly strongly expressed in both CG (P < 0.0001), followed by both ILF, right IFO, and left SLF. Less pronounced changes were found in GCC, SCC, and left IFO. In both PLICs and MCPs and in the right SLF, there was no significant change of FA. Conclusions: In Alzheimers disease, there is a significant decrease in FA, which suggests degradation of the majority of the assessed white matter tracts. Distribution of these changes is not uniform. They involve the selected association fibers mainly and

  4. Astrocytes in physiological aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arellano, J J; Parpura, V; Zorec, R; Verkhratsky, A

    2016-05-26

    Astrocytes are fundamental for homoeostasis, defence and regeneration of the central nervous system. Loss of astroglial function and astroglial reactivity contributes to the aging of the brain and to neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in astroglia in aging and neurodegeneration are highly heterogeneous and region-specific. In animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) astrocytes undergo degeneration and atrophy at the early stages of pathological progression, which possibly may alter the homeostatic reserve of the brain and contribute to early cognitive deficits. At later stages of AD reactive astrocytes are associated with neurite plaques, the feature commonly found in animal models and in human diseased tissue. In animal models of the AD reactive astrogliosis develops in some (e.g. in the hippocampus) but not in all regions of the brain. For instance, in entorhinal and prefrontal cortices astrocytes do not mount gliotic response to emerging β-amyloid deposits. These deficits in reactivity coincide with higher vulnerability of these regions to AD-type pathology. Astroglial morphology and function can be regulated through environmental stimulation and/or medication suggesting that astrocytes can be regarded as a target for therapies aimed at the prevention and cure of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25595973

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer`s disease; Diagnostik und Therapie der Demenz vom Alzheimer-Typ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, H.; Padberg, F.; Koetter, H.U.; Teipel, S.J.; Ehrhardt, T.; Hegerl, U.; Stuebner, S.; Moeller, H.J. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1997-09-05

    Alzheimer`s disease is often diagnosed too late. Its etiology is still largely unknown and remains one of the big challenges in neurobiological fundamental research. Optimized early and differential diagnosis can be ensured by a dynamic concept of multidisciplinary diagnosis in cooperation between practitioners specializing in brain disorders, clinical psychogeriatric deprtments, and general practitioners. This, in turn, will enable individualized planning of further living conditions and care of Alzheimer patients and their relations as well as efficient and early pharmacotherapy and psychological intervention. (orig) [Deutsch] Die Alzheimer-Demenz kann heute mit grosser Sicherheit auch in der hausaerztlichen Praxis festgestellt werden. Dennoch werden Hirnleistungsstoerungen meist erst spaet im Krankheitsverlauf diagnostiziert. Oft bestehen dann bereits fortgeschrittene kognitive Beeintraechtigungen, die zu schweren psychosozialen und oekonomischen Belastungen innerhalb von Familie und Gesellschaft fuehren. Es sind mehr als 50 Erkrankungen beschrieben, die eine Demenz verursachen koennen. Die Alzheimer-Demenz macht davon den groessten Anteil aus und wirft durch ihre zunehmende Haeufigkeit erhebliche medizinische, pflegerische und soziooekonomische Probleme auf. Die weiterhin ungeklaerte Aetiologie ist eine der grossen Herausforderungen der neurobiologischen Grundlagenforschung. Aktuelle klinische Therapiestudien mit Acetylcholinesterase-Hemmern konnten ihre Wirksamkeit auf die kognitive Kernsymptomatik bei leichten und mittelgradig dementiellen Syndromen nachweisen. Durch ein dynamisches Konzept der multidisziplinaeren Diagnostik im Zusammenschluss zwischen spezialisierten Gedaechtnisambulanzen, klinisch-psychogeriatrischen Abteilungen und niedergelassenen Allgemein- und Fachaerzten kann eine optimierte Frueh- und Differentialdiagnostik bei Demenz-Patienten erfolgen. Dies erlaubt eine rechtzeitige individuelle Lebens- und Pflegeplanung fuer Alzheimer-Patienten und

  6. Toxoplasma gondii infection in the brain inhibits neuronal degeneration and learning and memory impairments in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Kwang Jung

    Full Text Available Immunosuppression is a characteristic feature of Toxoplasma gondii-infected murine hosts. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the immunosuppression induced by T. gondii infection on the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD in Tg2576 AD mice. Mice were infected with a cyst-forming strain (ME49 of T. gondii, and levels of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and nitric oxide, anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β, neuronal damage, and β-amyloid plaque deposition were examined in brain tissues and/or in BV-2 microglial cells. In addition, behavioral tests, including the water maze and Y-maze tests, were performed on T. gondii-infected and uninfected Tg2576 mice. Results revealed that whereas the level of IFN-γ was unchanged, the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in T. gondii-infected mice than in uninfected mice, and in BV-2 cells treated with T. gondii lysate antigen. Furthermore, nitrite production from primary cultured brain microglial cells and BV-2 cells was reduced by the addition of T. gondii lysate antigen (TLA, and β-amyloid plaque deposition in the cortex and hippocampus of Tg2576 mouse brains was remarkably lower in T. gondii-infected AD mice than in uninfected controls. In addition, water maze and Y-maze test results revealed retarded cognitive capacities in uninfected mice as compared with infected mice. These findings demonstrate the favorable effects of the immunosuppression induced by T. gondii infection on the pathogenesis and progression of AD in Tg2576 mice.

  7. Magnetic resonance tracking of transplanted microglia labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles in the brain of normal rat and Alzheimer's disease model rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the methods of labeling exogenous microglia with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles, and to monitor the labeled cells after transplantation into the normal rat and Alzheimer's disease (AD) model rat with MR scanning. Methods: Microglia was labeled with SPIO particles by using transfection agent, hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E). Then the microglias which were labeled with SPIO were injected into the internal carotid artery of normal rat (n5) and AD model rat (n=5). Three days after transplantation, follow-up serial T2*-weighted gradient-echo MR imaging was performed at 7.0T MRI system. MR images were correlated with histological findings. Results: In the brain of normal rat, the labeled microglias were demonstrated as several dotty signal intensity decrease on T2*-weighted MR images. The dotty spots were sporadic around the brain. Histological analysis showed that most prussian blue staining-positive cells were well correlated with the area where a signal intensity decrease was observed in MRI. MR could detect the signal intensity change caused by a few labeled cells. In the brain of AD model rat, MR scan showed a well-defined hypointensity area in the region of Aβ42 injection. Signal intensity decrease was not obvious in the region of saline injection. The number of iron-positive cells (454 ± 47)/mm2 at sites of Aβ42 injection was much higher than that (83 ± 13)/mm2 of saline injection (P<0.05). Conclusion: MR can be used as a non-invasive means of detecting transplanted labeled microglia in vivo, with the potential for future clinical application in cell therapy of AD. (authors)

  8. Longitudinal morphometric MRI study of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A longitudinal morphometric MRI study of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was conducted to determine the relationship between the progression of the symptoms and the progression of the brain atrophy. The Voxel-based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD), developed by Matsuda et al. was used as a method of morphometry to perform the statistical MR image analysis. Thirty-eight patients of AD patients were investigated with VSRAD. These patients were divided into two groups according to the progression of symptoms based on a clinical evaluation. One group was the progress group (20 patients), while the other group was the stable group (18 patients) for comparison. The relationship was investigated between the speed of the symptomatic progression and the change in each VSRAD indicator. Consequently, the entorhinal Z-score and the entorhinal atrophy rate showed a correlation with the speed of the symptomatic progression. The increase of the entorhinal Z-score in the follow-up was larger in the progress group than that in the stable group (0.65/1.28 years in the progress group and 0.05/1.26 years in the stable group.). These results suggest that a rapid symptomatic progression in an AD patient accompanies the rapid progression of atrophy in the entorhinal cortex. (author)

  9. The age factor in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia, and it is characterized by a decline in memory or other thinking skills. The greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease is advanced age. A recent genome-wide study identified a locus on chromosome 17 associated with the age at onset, and a specific variant in CCL11 is probably responsible for the association. The association of a protective haplotype with a 10-year delay in the onset of Alzheimer's disease and the identification of a CCL11 variant with possible functional roles in this association might allow the future development of immunomodulators with the potential to halve disease incidence. PMID:26482651

  10. Cerebral hemodynamic difference between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease by circumferential profile analysis with 123I-IMP brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted investigation to determine whether early- and late-onset Alzheimer's diseases differ pathophysiologically. Five patients with the early-onset (65 years and under) of the disease and 11 with the late-onset (65 years and over) of the disease were studied by single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP). Circumferential profile analysis (CPA) was performed to examine differences in the predominant hypoperfusion in the temporoparietal lobe, which is considered to be functionally damaged the most in Alzheimer's disease. The Xm values, calculated from gradients between the motorsensory or occipital cortices and temporoparietal cortex in the circumferential profile curve, were compared in both groups. The Xm values for patients with early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease were 6.81±2.10 (counts/degree) and 3.28±1.58, respectively, the difference being significant. Our results suggest that functional abnormalities in the temporoparietal area severer in early- than late-onset Alzheimer's disease and that the application of CPA to IMP SPECT is useful to elucidate the pathophysiological difference between each of the disease. (author)

  11. Differential induction and spread of tau pathology in young PS19 tau transgenic mice following intracerebral injections of pathological tau from Alzheimer's disease or corticobasal degeneration brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boluda, Susana; Iba, Michiyo; Zhang, Bin; Raible, Kevin M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous tau pathologies are hallmark lesions of several neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) which show cell type-specific and topographically distinct tau inclusions. Growing evidence supports templated transmission of tauopathies through functionally interconnected neuroanatomical pathways suggesting that different self-propagating strains of pathological tau could account for the diverse manifestations of neurodegenerative tauopathies. Here, we describe the rapid and distinct cell type-specific spread of pathological tau following intracerebral injections of CBD or AD brain extracts enriched in pathological tau (designated CBD-Tau and AD-Tau, respectively) in young human mutant P301S tau transgenic (Tg) mice (line PS19) ~6-9 months before they show onset of mutant tau transgene-induced tau pathology. At 1 month post-injection of CBD-Tau, tau inclusions developed predominantly in oligodendrocytes of the fimbria and white matter near the injection sites with infrequent intraneuronal tau aggregates. In contrast, injections of AD-Tau in young PS19 mice induced tau pathology predominantly in neuronal perikarya with little or no oligodendrocyte involvement 1 month post-injection. With longer post-injection survival intervals of up to 6 months, CBD-Tau- and AD-Tau-induced tau pathology spread to different brain regions distant from the injection sites while maintaining the cell type-specific pattern noted above. Finally, CA3 neuron loss was detected 3 months post-injection of AD-Tau but not CBD-Tau. Thus, AD-Tau and CBD-Tau represent specific pathological tau strains that spread differentially and may underlie distinct clinical and pathological features of these two tauopathies. Hence, these strains could become targets to develop disease-modifying therapies for CBD and AD. PMID:25534024

  12. Analysis of glutathione levels in the brain tissue samples from HIV-1-positive individuals and subject with Alzheimer's disease and its implication in the pathophysiology of the disease process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saing, Tommy; Lagman, Minette; Castrillon, Jeffery; Gutierrez, Eutiquio; Guilford, Frederick T; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 positive individuals are at high risk for susceptibility to both pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and extra-pulmonary TB, including TB meningitis (TBM) which is an extreme form of TB. The goals of this study are to determine the mechanisms responsible for compromised levels of glutathione (GSH) in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-infected individuals and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), investigate the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for GSH deficiency in these pathological conditions, and establish a link between GSH levels and pathophysiology of the disease processes. We demonstrated in the autopsied human brain tissues that the levels of total and reduced forms of GSH were significantly compromised in HIV-1 infected individuals compared to in healthy subjects and individuals with AD. Brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals had substantially higher levels of free radicals than that derived from healthy and AD individuals. Enzymes that are responsible for the de novo synthesis of GSH such as γ-glutamate cysteine-ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC-rate limiting step enzyme) and glutathione synthetase (GSS-enzyme involved in the second step reaction) were significantly decreased in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals with low CD4 + T-cells (HIV-1 infected individuals. Overall, our findings demonstrate causes for GSH deficiency in the brain tissue from HIV-1 infected individuals explaining the possible reasons for increased susceptibility to the most severe form of extra-pulmonary TB, TBM. PMID:27335804

  13. Sleep and Alzheimer disease pathology—a bidirectional relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Yo-El S.; Lucey, Brendan P.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Factors other than age and genetics may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer disease (AD). Accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain seems to initiate a cascade of key events in the pathogenesis of AD. Moreover, evidence is emerging that the sleep–wake cycle directly influences levels of Aβ in the brain. In experimental models, sleep deprivation increases the concentration of soluble Aβ and results in chronic accumulation of Aβ, whereas sleep extension has the opposite effe...

  14. Recent preclinical evidence advancing cell therapy for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes brain degeneration, primarily depleting cholinergic cells, and leading to cognitive and learning dysfunction. Logically, to augment the cholinergic cell loss, a viable treatment for AD has been via drugs boosting brain acetylcholine production. However, this is not a curative measure. To this end, nerve growth factor (NGF) has been examined as a possible preventative treatment against cholinergic neuronal death while enhancing memory capabilities; however, NGF ...

  15. The Role of Insulin, Insulin Growth Factor, and Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Brain Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Messier

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Most brain insulin comes from the pancreas and is taken up by the brain by what appears to be a receptor-based carrier. Type 2 diabetes animal models associated with insulin resistance show reduced insulin brain uptake and content. Recent data point to changes in the insulin receptor cascade in obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting that brain insulin receptors also become less sensitive to insulin, which could reduce synaptic plasticity. Insulin transport to the brain is reduced in aging and in some animal models of type 2 diabetes; brain insulin resistance may be present as well. Studies examining the effect of the hyperinsulinic clamp or intranasal insulin on cognitive function have found a small but consistent improvement in memory and changes in brain neuroelectric parameters in evoked brain potentials consistent with improved attention or memory processing. These effects appear to be due to raised brain insulin levels. Peripheral levels of Insulin Growth Factor-I (IGF-I are associated with glucose regulation and influence glucose disposal. There is some indication that reduced sensitivity to insulin or IGF-I in the brain, as observed in aging, obesity, and diabetes, decreases the clearance of Aβ amyloid. Such a decrease involves the insulin receptor cascade and can also increase amyloid toxicity. Insulin and IGF-I may modulate brain levels of insulin degrading enzyme, which would also lead to an accumulation of Aβ amyloid.

  16. 2008 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the seventh leading cause of all deaths in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans older than the age of 65 years. More than 5 million Americans are estimated to have Alzheimer's disease. Every 71 seconds someone in America develops Alzheimer's disease; by 2050 it is expected to occur every 33 seconds. During the coming decades, baby boomers are projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. By 2050, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million persons. Significant cost implications related to Alzheimer's disease and other dementias include an estimated $148 billion annually in direct (Medicare/Medicaid) and indirect (eg, caregiver lost wages and out-of-pocket expenses, decreased business productivity) costs. Not included in these figures are the estimated 10 million caregivers who annually provide $89 billion in unpaid services to individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, lifetime risks, costs, and impact on family caregivers. PMID:18631956

  17. Harmonized diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, J C; Blennow, K; Froelich, L;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two major sets of criteria for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) recently have been published, one from an International Working Group (IWG) and the other from working groups convened by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Alzheimer's Association (AA) in the...

  18. The Valsalva maneuver and Alzheimer's disease: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wostyn, Peter; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2009-02-01

    Recent research findings provide evidence for Alzheimer's disease-related changes in brain diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus and traumatic brain injury, and in glaucoma at the level of the retinal ganglion cells. This is a group of diseases that affect central nervous system tissue and are characterized by elevation of intracranial or intraocular pressure and/or local shear stress and strain. This strengthens the possibility that Alzheimer-type changes in these diseases may result at least in part from exposure of central nervous system tissue to elevated mechanical load. As activities or diseases with significant Valsalva effort can generate increased intracranial pressures, we hypothesize that individuals who frequently perform strong Valsalva maneuvers (e.g., long hours of repetitive heavy lifting, sequences of blows during the playing of a wind instrument, forceful and repetitive cough, bearing-down efforts during parturition) may be more susceptible to developing Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we discuss three hypotheses about the mechanisms by which extensive use of the Valsalva maneuver might contribute to the neuropathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: via mechanical stress-induced events in the hippocampus and/or via changes in the secretory process of the choroid plexus and/or via hemodynamic changes in cerebral blood flow. If confirmed, this hypothesis could have implications in clinical practice. PMID:19199876

  19. Near infrared Raman spectroscopy for Alzheimer's disease detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Mann, David

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, the use of Raman spectroscopy for the detection and diagnosis of disease has steadily grown within the research field. However, this research has primarily been restricted to oncology. This research expands the use of Raman spectroscopy as a potential tool for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, which is currently the most prevalent, and fastest growing type of dementia in the Western world. Using a commercial Raman spectrometer (Renishaw PLC ®, UK) flash frozen post-mortem ex vivo brain tissue sections were illuminated using a high power (20mW) 830 nm near infrared diode laser, and subsequently spectra were gained in the region of 2000-200 cm-1 from a 10 second accumulation time. Ethical approval was gained for the examination of 18 individual donors exhibiting varying states of Alzheimer's disease, Huntingdon's disease and their corresponding age-matched healthy controls. Following on from previous preliminary studies, the Raman spectra were found to be highly reproducible, and when examined further, the spectra showed differences relating to the content and structure of the proteins in the individual brain samples, in particular, the beta-amyloid protein structure found in Alzheimer's disease patients. Principle components analysis further determined these protein structural changes, with Alzheimer's disease and Huntingdon's disease samples being defined from the healthy controls, and from each other.

  20. Stem cell strategies for Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, K; Alvarez, A; Marutle, A; Kwak, Y D; Choumkina, E

    2006-06-01

    We have found much evidence that the brain is capable of regenerating neurons after maturation. In our previous study, human neural stem cells (HNSCs) transplanted into aged rat brains differentiated into neural cells and significantly improved the cognitive functions of the animals, indicating that HNSCs may be a promising candidate for cell-replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, ethical and practical issues associated with HNSCs compel us to explore alternative strategies. Here, we report novel technologies to differentiate adult human mesenchymal stem cells, a subset of stromal cells in the bone marrow, into neural cells by modifying DNA methylation or over expression of nanog, a homeobox gene expressed in embryonic stem cells. We also report peripheral administrations of a pyrimidine derivative that increases endogenous stem cell proliferation improves cognitive function of the aged animal. Although these results may promise a bright future for clinical applications used towards stem cell strategies in AD therapy, we must acknowledge the complexity of AD. We found that glial differentiation takes place in stem cells transplanted into amyloid-( precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We also found that over expression of APP gene or recombinant APP treatment causes glial differentiation of stem cells. Although further detailed mechanistic studies may be required, RNA interference of APP or reduction of APP levels in the brain can significantly reduced glial differentiation of stem cells and may be useful in promoting neurogenesis after stem cell transplantation. PMID:16953146

  1. Evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Brodmann areas in Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease using automated 3-D voxel based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. Brain perfusion studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been applied in demented patients to provide better discrimination between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aim. To assess the perfusion of specific Brodmann (Br) areas of the brain cortex in FTD and AD patients, using NeuroGam processing program to provide 3D voxel-by-voxel cerebral SPECT analysis. Material and methods. We studied 34 consecutive patients. We used the established criteria for the diagnosis of dementia and the specific established criteria for the diagnosis of FTD and AD. All the patients had a neuropsychological evaluation with a battery of tests including the mini-mental state examination (MMSE).Twenty-six patients (16 males, 10 females, mean age 68.76±6.51 years, education 11.81±4.25 years, MMSE 16.69±9.89) received the diagnosis of FTD and 8 patients (all females, mean age 71.25±10.48 years, education 10±4.6 years, MMSE 12.5±3.89) the diagnosis of AD. All the patients underwent a brain SPECT. We applied the NeuroGam Software for the evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Br areas in the left (L) and right (R) hemispheres. Results. Statistically significant hypoperfusion in FTD compared to AD patients, was found in the following Br areas: 11L (p<0.0001), 11R, 20L, 20R, 32L, 38L, 38R, 44L (p<0.001), 32R, 36L, 36R, 45L, 45R, 47R (p<0.01), 9L, 21L, 39R, 44R, 46R, 47L (p<0.05). On the contrary, AD patients presented significant (p<0.05) hypoperfusion in 7R and 39R Br areas. Conclusion. NeuroGam processing program of brain perfusion SPECT could result in enhanced accuracy for the differential diagnosis between AD and FTD patients.

  2. The genetics of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagyinszky E

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Eva Bagyinszky,1 Young Chul Youn,2 Seong Soo A An,1,* SangYun Kim3,*1Department of BioNano Technology Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, 2Department of Neurology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, 3Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Budang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a complex and heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder, classified as either early onset (under 65 years of age, or late onset (over 65 years of age. Three main genes are involved in early onset AD: amyloid precursor protein (APP, presenilin 1 (PSEN1, and presenilin 2 (PSEN2. The apolipoprotein E (APOE E4 allele has been found to be a main risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified several genes that might be potential risk factors for AD, including clusterin (CLU, complement receptor 1 (CR1, phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM, and sortilin-related receptor (SORL1. Recent studies have discovered additional novel genes that might be involved in late-onset AD, such as triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2 and cluster of differentiation 33 (CD33. Identification of new AD-related genes is important for better understanding of the pathomechanisms leading to neurodegeneration. Since the differential diagnoses of neurodegenerative disorders are difficult, especially in the early stages, genetic testing is essential for diagnostic processes. Next-generation sequencing studies have been successfully used for detecting mutations, monitoring the epigenetic changes, and analyzing transcriptomes. These studies may be a promising approach toward understanding the complete genetic mechanisms of diverse genetic disorders such as AD.Keywords: dementia, amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, presenilin 2, APOE, mutation, diagnosis, genetic testing

  3. 77 FR 11116 - Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease AGENCY: Office of the Assistant.... SUMMARY: HHS is soliciting public input on the draft National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease, which... Alzheimer's disease. Coordinate Alzheimer's disease research and services across all federal...

  4. Quantitative evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, S.; Frisoni, G. B.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a single, quantitative metric called the disease evaluation factor (DEF) and assess its efficiency at estimating disease burden in normal, control subjects (CTRL) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The study group consisted in 75 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD and 75 age-matched normal CTRL without neurological or neuropsychological deficit. We calculated a reference eigenspace of MRI appearance from reference data, in which our CTRL and probable AD subjects were projected. We then calculated the multi-dimensional hyperplane separating the CTRL and probable AD groups. The DEF was estimated via a multidimensional weighted distance of eigencoordinates for a given subject and the CTRL group mean, along salient principal components forming the separating hyperplane. We used quantile plots, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 tests to compare the DEF values and test that their distribution was normal. We used a linear discriminant test to separate CTRL from probable AD based on the DEF factor, and reached an accuracy of 87%. A quantitative biomarker in AD would act as an important surrogate marker of disease status and progression.

  5. Advances in the study of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angue Nkoghe Francoise; Yunman Li

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, and the only treatment currently available for the disease is acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease has suggested possible pharmacological interventions, including acetylcholineseterase inhibitors; secretase inhibitors; cholesterol lowering drugs; metal chelators and amyloid immunization. The objective of this paper is to review the main drugs possibly used for AD and their future therapeutic effects.

  6. Olive Oil and its Potential Effects on Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Shan; Zhang, G. P.

    Alzheimer's disease is a neuro-degenerative brain disease that is responsible for affecting the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. There has been no evidence to suggest a cure for the disease and the only existing treatments have very low rates of success in trial patients. This is largely due to the fact that the brain is one of the most undiscovered parts of the human body. Brain chemistry is highly complex and responds to its environment in random and radical ways. My research includes testing the reactionary outcomes of combining compounds of olive oil with the 20 basic amino acids. Regions around the world with olive oil based diets show a direct correlation to lower rates of Alzheimer's. Testing few compounds of olive oil with chemicals already found in the brain may yield to a better understanding as to why that is. I took the compounds tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, and oleocanthal, and combined them with the 20 basic amino acids and calculated the total energy of the new molecule. The molecules produced with acceptably low energy values will be the center of further research. These molecules could lead to truly understanding olive oil's effect on the brain, and ultimately, the cure or prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Long-term high-dose atorvastatin decreases brain oxidative and nitrosative stress in a preclinical model of Alzheimer disease: a novel mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Barone, Eugenio; Cenini, Giovanna; Di Domenico, Fabio; Martin, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Mancuso, Cesare; Murphy, Michael Paul; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, inability to perform the activities of daily living and personality changes. Unfortunately, drugs effective for this disease are limited to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that do not impact disease pathogenesis. Statins, which belong to the class of cholesterol-reducing drugs, were proposed as novel agents useful in AD therapy, but the mechanism underlying their neuroprotective effec...

  8. Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes the current knowledge on biochemical changes in Alzheimer's disease. Following a summary on post mortem findings, results from positron emission tomography will be focused on. This synopsis shows that patients with Alzheimer's disease show very consistently changes in the cholinergic transmission. In addition to this, changes of the dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic system are observed. It is possible, that clinical, pathological and functional differences in Alzheimer's disease between different patients reflect variations of a single disease process. It is also thinkable, that there are subclassifications in Alzheimer's disease which are reflected in the above described biochemical abnormalities. In this case it is important in therapeutical terms to investigate these subtypes. (orig.)

  9. Biological markers of Alzheimer?s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cruz de Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The challenges for establishing an early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD have created a need for biomarkers that reflect the core pathology of the disease. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of total Tau (T-tau, phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau and beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ42 reflect, respectively, neurofibrillary tangle and amyloid pathologies and are considered as surrogate markers of AD pathophysiology. The combination of low Aβ42 and high levels of T-tau and P-Tau can accurately identify patients with AD at early stages, even before the development of dementia. The combined analysis of the CSF biomarkers is also helpful for the differential diagnosis between AD and other degenerative dementias. The development of these CSF biomarkers has evolved to a novel diagnostic definition of the disease. The identification of a specific clinical phenotype combined with the in vivo evidence of pathophysiological markers offers the possibility to make a diagnosis of AD before the dementia stage with high specificity.

  10. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  11. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Harwood, John L

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  12. Extracellular space diffusion parameters are altered in the brain of the APP23 mouse model of Alzheimer´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazel, Tomáš; Antonova, Tatiana; Meyer-Lühmann, M.; Sturchler, C.; Staufenbiel, M.; Jucker, M.; Syková, Eva

    San Diego: organizer, 2001. s. -. [Annual Meeting in San Diego /31./. 10.11.2001-15.11.2001, San Diego] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0657; GA ČR GV309/97/K048 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  13. Acceleration of brain amyloidosis in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model by a folate, vitamin B6 and B12-deficient diet

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, Jia-Min; Praticò, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that elevated circulating level of homocysteine (Hcy) is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dietary deficiency of folate, vitamin B6 and B12 results in a significant increase of Hcy levels, a condition also known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy).

  14. Distribution of 210-Po and 210-Bi Radon Daughters in the Brain Proteins of a Subject who Suffered from Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer Disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of unknown origin that gradually robs the patient of cognitive function and eventually causes death. Recently, we showed that radon daughters selectively accrue in both the gray and white brain matter proteins in AD. There, we proposed that AD is the systemic disease of the brain cells involving the cell membrane protein structures of ion gates, pores and channels, with the consequent chlorine leaking into the cells and fall of the cell membrane gradient. The quoted studies were performed on the cortex and subcortex of the frontal and temporal human brain lobe and, therefore, the aim of this case report is to further investigate the distribution of radon daughters in the brain of an AD subject. The respective radioactivity of 210Po and 210Bi accumulated in the frontal and temporal lobe of this subject is in a close agreement with that of the group of subjects who suffered from AD and what we reported earlier. That fact allows us to assume with the great deal of certainty that the distribution of RAD in the other studied brain structures is reliable in this single subject case report. Hippocampus has been long considered to be an essential part of so called Papez circle involved in the memory process of the brain. Therefor, considering our previous report that RAD accumulate in the brain proteins in AD, their high accumulation in the hippocampus was somewhat anticipated. Hippocampus was shown to be the seat of generation of new brain cells, the type of specific nerve cells, which occur in the three out of six cell layers of the brain cortex. Interestingly enough, the RAD in Hippocampus are about two times higher than that in the brain cortext what indicates the intriguing possibility that these three common layers in these two different brain structures may have some identical features. Nucleus Amygdala, an anatomical structure close anterior and

  15. Microglial dysfunction connects depression and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luís Eduardo; Beckman, Danielle; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are highly prevalent neuropsychiatric conditions with intriguing epidemiological overlaps. Depressed patients are at increased risk of developing late-onset AD, and around one in four AD patients are co-diagnosed with MDD. Microglia are the main cellular effectors of innate immunity in the brain, and their activation is central to neuroinflammation - a ubiquitous process in brain pathology, thought to be a causal factor of both AD and MDD. Microglia serve several physiological functions, including roles in synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, which may be disrupted in neuroinflammation. Following early work on the 'sickness behavior' of humans and other animals, microglia-derived inflammatory cytokines have been shown to produce depressive-like symptoms when administered exogenously or released in response to infection. MDD patients consistently show increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and anti-inflammatory drugs show promise for treating depression. Activated microglia are abundant in the AD brain, and concentrate around senile plaques, hallmark lesions composed of aggregated amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). The Aβ burden in affected brains is regulated largely by microglial clearance, and the complex activation state of microglia may be crucial for AD progression. Intriguingly, recent reports have linked soluble Aβ oligomers, toxins that accumulate in AD brains and are thought to cause memory impairment, to increased brain cytokine production and depressive-like behavior in mice. Here, we review recent findings supporting the inflammatory hypotheses of AD and MDD, focusing on microglia as a common player and therapeutic target linking these devastating disorders. PMID:26612494

  16. Nine-month follow-up of the insulin receptor signalling cascade in the brain of streptozotocin rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilar, J Osmanovic; Knezovic, A; Grünblatt, E; Riederer, P; Salkovic-Petrisic, M

    2015-04-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer disease (sAD) is associated with impairment of insulin receptor (IR) signalling in the brain. Rats used to model sAD develop insulin-resistant brain state following intracerebroventricular treatment with a betacytotoxic drug streptozotocin (STZ-icv). Brain IR signalling has been explored usually at only one time point in periods ≤3 months after the STZ-icv administration. We have investigated insulin signalling in the rat hippocampus at five time points in periods ≤9 months after STZ-icv treatment. Male Wistar rats were given vehicle (control)- or STZ (3 mg/kg)-icv injection and killed 0.5, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months afterwards. Insulin-1 (Ins-1), IR, phospho- and total (p/t)-glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK-3β), p/t-tau and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) mRNA and/or protein were measured. Acute upregulation of tau and IR mRNA (p < 0.05) was followed by a pronounced downregulation of Ins-1, IR and IDE mRNA (p < 0.05) in the course of time. Acute decrement in p/t-tau and p/t-GSK-3β ratios (p < 0.05) was followed by increment in both ratios (3-6 months, p < 0.05) after which p/t-tau ratio demonstrated a steep rise and p/t-GSK-3β ratio a steep fall up to 9 months (p < 0.05). Acute decline in IDE and IR expression (p < 0.05) was followed by a slow progression of the former and a slow recovery of the latter in 3-9 months. Results indicate a biphasic pattern in time dependency of onset and progression of changes in brain insulin signalling of STZ-icv model (partly reversible acute toxicity and chronic AD-like changes) which should be considered when using this model as a tool in translational sAD research. PMID:25503661

  17. Aging process, cognitive decline and Alzheimer`s disease: can strength training modulate these responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Eduardo Matta Mello; Vasconcelos, Poliane Gomes Torres; Souza, Renata; Lattari, Eduardo; Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; Machado, Sergio; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz

    2015-01-01

    Some evidence shows that aerobic training can attenuate the aging effects on the brain structures and functions. However, the strength exercise effects are poorly discussed. Thus, in the present study, the effects of strength training on the brain in elderly people and Alzheimer`s disease (AD) patients were revised. Furthermore, it a biological explanation relating to strength training effects on the brain is proposed. Brain atrophy can be related to neurotransmission dysfunction, like oxidative stress, that generates mitochondrial damage and reduced brain metabolism. Another mechanism is related to amyloid deposition and amyloid tangles, that can be related to reductions on insulin-like growth factor I concentrations. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor also presents reduction during aging process and AD. These neuronal dysfunctions are also related to cerebral blood flow decline that influence brain metabolism. All of these alterations contribute to cognitive impairment and AD. After a long period of strength training, the oxidative stress can be reduced, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and insulin-like growth factor I serum concentrations enhance, and the cognitive performance improves. Considering these results, we can infer that strength training can be related to increased neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and, consequently, counteracts aging effects on the brain. The effect of strength training as an additional treatment of AD needs further investigation. PMID:26556087

  18. Dementia (Including Alzheimer Disease) (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient information: Tips for caregivers of people with Alzheimer disease (The Basics) Patient information: Mild cognitive impairment (The Basics) Patient information: Evaluating memory and thinking problems (The Basics) Patient information: Vitamin B12 deficiency and folate (folic acid) deficiency (The ...

  19. Neuroprotective peptides related to Alzheimer's disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slaninová, Jiřina; Borovičková, Lenka; Krejčová, G.; Patočka, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 10, S (2004), s. H33. ISSN 1075-2617. [Hellenic Forum on Bioactive Peptides /4./. 22.04.2004-24.04.2004, Patras-Hellas] Keywords : neuroprotective peptides * Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  20. Education and the risk for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letenneur, L; Launer, L J; Andersen, K;

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow......-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low ( or =12). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28...

  1. Lithium May Fend off Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helen Pilcher; 夏红

    2004-01-01

    @@ Lithium, a common treatment for manic depression, might also help to stave off②Alzheimer's disease. Patients who take the drug to stabilize their mood disorder are less likely to succumb to dementia③, a study reveals.

  2. Alzheimer's Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Alzheimer's Disease URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/alzheimersdisease.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  3. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  4. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation. PMID:26963387

  5. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ide

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  6. Microglia in Alzheimer's disease: A multifaceted relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAli, Ayman; Rivest, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting elderly people worldwide, which is mainly characterized by cerebral amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaque deposition and neurofibrillary tangle formation. The interest in microglia arose from the overwhelming experimental evidence that outlined a key role of neuroinflammation in AD pathology. Microglia constitute the powerhouse of the innate immune system in the brain. It is now widely accepted that microglia are myeloid-derived cells that infiltrate the developing brain at the early embryonic stages, and acquire a highly ramified phenotype postnatally. Microglia use these dynamic ramifications as sentinels to sense and detect any occurring alteration in brain homeostasis. Once a danger signal is detected, microglia get activated by acquiring a less ramified phenotype, and mount adequate responses that range from phagocyting cell debris to secreting inflammatory and trophic factors. Earlier reports have demonstrated, unequivocally, that microglia surround Aβ plaques and internalize Aβ microaggregates. However, the implication of these observations in AD pathology, and consequently treatment, is still a matter of debate. Nonetheless, targeting the activity of these cells constituted a convergent point in this debate. Unfortunately, the conflicting experimental findings obtained following the modulation of microglial activity in AD, further fueled the debate. This review aims at providing an overview regarding what we know about the implication of microglia in AD pathology, and treatment. The emerging role of monocytes is also discussed. PMID:26254232

  7. Quantitative longitudinal interrelationships between brain metabolism and amyloid deposition during a 2-year follow-up in patients with early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar regional anatomical distributions were reported for fibrillary amyloid deposition [measured by 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET)] and brain hypometabolism [measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET] in numerous Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies evaluating the interrelationships of these two different pathological markers in the same AD population. Our most recent AD study suggested that the longitudinal pattern of hypometabolism anatomically follows the pattern of amyloid deposition with temporal delay, which indicates that neuronal dysfunction may spread within the anatomical pattern of amyloid pathology. Based on this finding we now hypothesize that in early AD patients quantitative longitudinal decline in hypometabolism may be related to the amount of baseline amyloid deposition during a follow-up period of 2 years. Fifteen patients with mild probable AD underwent baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2) examination after 24 ± 2.1 months with [18F]FDG PET, [11C]PIB PET, structural T1-weighted MRI and neuropsychological testing [Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery]. Longitudinal cognitive measures and quantitative PET measures of amyloid deposition and metabolism [standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs)] were obtained using volume of interest (VOI)-based approaches in the frontal-lateral-retrosplenial (FLR) network and in predefined bihemispheric brain regions after partial volume effect (PVE) correction of PET data. Statistical group comparisons (SUVRs and cognitive measures) between patients and 15 well-matched elderly controls who had undergone identical imaging procedures once as well as Pearson's correlation analyses within patients were performed. Group comparison revealed significant cognitive decline and increased mean PIB/decreased FDG SUVRs in the FLR network as well as in several AD-typical regions in patients

  8. Quantitative longitudinal interrelationships between brain metabolism and amyloid deposition during a 2-year follow-up in patients with early Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Klupp, Elisabeth [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Rominger, Axel [Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Foerstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Grimmer, Timo [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich (Germany); Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Similar regional anatomical distributions were reported for fibrillary amyloid deposition [measured by {sup 11}C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET)] and brain hypometabolism [measured by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET] in numerous Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies evaluating the interrelationships of these two different pathological markers in the same AD population. Our most recent AD study suggested that the longitudinal pattern of hypometabolism anatomically follows the pattern of amyloid deposition with temporal delay, which indicates that neuronal dysfunction may spread within the anatomical pattern of amyloid pathology. Based on this finding we now hypothesize that in early AD patients quantitative longitudinal decline in hypometabolism may be related to the amount of baseline amyloid deposition during a follow-up period of 2 years. Fifteen patients with mild probable AD underwent baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2) examination after 24 {+-} 2.1 months with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, [{sup 11}C]PIB PET, structural T1-weighted MRI and neuropsychological testing [Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery]. Longitudinal cognitive measures and quantitative PET measures of amyloid deposition and metabolism [standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs)] were obtained using volume of interest (VOI)-based approaches in the frontal-lateral-retrosplenial (FLR) network and in predefined bihemispheric brain regions after partial volume effect (PVE) correction of PET data. Statistical group comparisons (SUVRs and cognitive measures) between patients and 15 well-matched elderly controls who had undergone identical imaging procedures once as well as Pearson's correlation analyses within patients were performed. Group comparison revealed significant cognitive decline and increased mean PIB/decreased FDG SUVRs in the FLR network as well as

  9. Expression of microRNA-34a in Alzheimer's disease brain targets genes linked to synaptic plasticity, energy metabolism, and resting state network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S; Jun, S; Rellick, S; Quintana, D D; Cavendish, J Z; Simpkins, J W

    2016-09-01

    Polygenetic risk factors and reduced expression of many genes in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) impedes identification of a target(s) for disease-modifying therapies. We identified a single microRNA, miR-34a that is over expressed in specific brain regions of AD patients as well as in the 3xTg-AD mouse model. Specifically, increased miR-34a expression in the temporal cortex region compared to age matched healthy control correlates with severity of AD pathology. miR-34a over expression in patient's tissue and forced expression in primary neuronal culture correlates with concurrent repression of its target genes involved in synaptic plasticity, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis. The repression of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis related proteins correlates with reduced ATP production and glycolytic capacity, respectively. We also found that miR-34a overexpressed neurons secrete miR-34a containing exosomes that are taken up by neighboring neurons. Furthermore, miR-34a targets dozens of genes whose expressions are known to be correlated with synchronous activity in resting state functional networks. Our analysis of human genomic sequences from the tentative promoter of miR-34a gene shows the presence of NFκB, STAT1, c-Fos, CREB and p53 response elements. Together, our results raise the possibilities that pathophysiology-induced activation of specific transcription factor may lead to increased expression of miR-34a gene and miR-34a mediated concurrent repression of its target genes in neural networks may result in dysfunction of synaptic plasticity, energy metabolism, and resting state network activity. Thus, our results provide insights into polygenetic AD mechanisms and disclose miR-34a as a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27235866

  10. PET studies in Alzheimer disease and other degenerative dementias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurodegenerative disorders cause a variety of dementia including Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Huntington's disease. PET scan is useful for early detection and differential diagnosis of theses dementing disorders. Also, it provides valuable information about clinico-anatomical correlation, allowing better understanding of function of brain. Here we discuss recent achievements PET studies regarding these dementing disorders. Future progress in PET technology, new tracers, and image analysis will play an important role in further clarifying the disease pathophysiology and brain functions

  11. PET studies in Alzheimer disease and other degenerative dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong; Na, Duk L. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders cause a variety of dementia including Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Huntington's disease. PET scan is useful for early detection and differential diagnosis of theses dementing disorders. Also, it provides valuable information about clinico-anatomical correlation, allowing better understanding of function of brain. Here we discuss recent achievements PET studies regarding these dementing disorders. Future progress in PET technology, new tracers, and image analysis will play an important role in further clarifying the disease pathophysiology and brain functions.

  12. Medical foods for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Raj C

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive loss, behavioural changes, functional ability decline and caregiver burden. Given the worldwide public health impact of AD, novel interventions to reduce suffering experienced by AD patients need to be developed. Foods may offer a mechanism for intervention complementary to drugs, devices, biologicals and vaccines. Apart from foods with health claims (including dietary supplements), medical foods are also being explored as an intervention option. The purpose of this article is to describe how medical foods may complement other interventions for AD patients by: (i) defining what a medical food is; (ii) discussing whether AD is a condition amenable to medical food intervention; (iii) reviewing current clinical trial data on medical foods used in participants with AD; and (iv) highlighting steps needed to establish a more comprehensive framework for developing medical foods for AD. While medical foods may be defined differently in other countries, the US Orphan Drug Act of 1998 defined a medical food as a food formulated for enteral intake, taken under physician supervision, and intended to meet the distinctive nutritional requirements identified for a disease or condition. For AD to be amenable to medical food intervention, it must: (i) result in limited or impaired capacity to ingest, digest, absorb or metabolize ordinary foodstuff or certain nutrients; or (ii) have unique, medically determined nutrient requirements; and (iii) require dietary management that cannot be achieved by modification of the normal diet alone. While these criteria are most likely met in advanced AD, identifying unique nutritional requirements in early AD that cannot be met by normal diet modification requires a better understanding of AD pathophysiology. A PubMed search using the terms 'medical food' and 'Alzheimer', limited to clinical trials published in English with human participants with AD aged >65

  13. The usefulness of CT scanning in clinical observation on the patients with Alzheimer`s disease; Znaczenie tomografii komputerowej w obserwacji klinicznej pacjentow z choroba Alzheimera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golebiowski, M.; Barcikowska, M.; Pfeffer-Baczuk, A.; Luczywek, E. [Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    On the basis of brain CT studies of 150 patients of the clinic for persons with Alzheimer`s disease the diagnostic utility of measurement of hippocampal fissure and craniocerebral ratios was assessed. In analyzed group hippocampal fissure measurements greater than 4 mm occurred only in patients with symptoms of Alzheimer`s type dementia. The measurement showed 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity as the prognostic factor of clinical course, especially at the first part of the disease. The evaluation of the hippocampal fissure in conjunction with detailed analysis of CT picture of the atrophic brain allowed for precise final diagnosis. (author). 14 refs, 4 refs.

  14. 2016 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. It also examines in detail the financial impact of Alzheimer's on families, including annual costs to families and the difficult decisions families must often make to pay those costs. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's disease in the United States is projected to grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. Today, someone in the country develops Alzheimer's disease every 66 seconds. By 2050, one new case of Alzheimer's is expected to develop every 33 seconds, resulting in nearly 1 million new cases per year. In 2013, official death certificates recorded 84,767 deaths from Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age ≥ 65 years. Between 2000 and 2013, deaths resulting from stroke, heart disease, and prostate cancer decreased 23%, 14%, and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from Alzheimer's disease increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which Alzheimer's disease contributes is likely much larger than the number of deaths from Alzheimer's disease recorded on death certificates. In 2016, an estimated 700,000 Americans age ≥ 65 years will die with Alzheimer's disease, and many of them will die because of the complications caused by Alzheimer's disease. In 2015, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 18.1 billion hours of care to people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $221 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥ 65 years with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all

  15. Alzheimer's Disease and Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis; Exploring Shared Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Carolyn; Bartolotti, Nancy; Lazarov, Orly

    2016-01-01

    New neurons incorporate into the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurogenesis is modulated by behavior and plays a major role in hippocampal plasticity. Along with older mature neurons, new neurons structure the dentate gyrus, and determine its function. Recent data suggest that the level of hippocampal neurogenesis is substantial in the human brain, suggesting that neurogenesis may have important implications for human cognition. In support of that, impaired neurogenesis compromises hippocampal function and plays a role in cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. We review current work suggesting that neuronal differentiation is defective in Alzheimer's disease, leading to dysfunction of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, alterations in critical signals regulating neurogenesis, such as presenilin-1, Notch 1, soluble amyloid precursor protein, CREB, and β-catenin underlie dysfunctional neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we discuss the detectability of neurogenesis in the live mouse and human brain, as well as the therapeutic implications of enhancing neurogenesis for the treatment of cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27199641

  16. Magnetoencephalography as a Putative Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zamrini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common dementia in the elderly and is estimated to affect tens of millions of people worldwide. AD is believed to have a prodromal stage lasting ten or more years. While amyloid deposits, tau filaments, and loss of brain cells are characteristics of the disease, the loss of dendritic spines and of synapses predate such changes. Popular preclinical detection strategies mainly involve cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, magnetic resonance imaging, metabolic PET scans, and amyloid imaging. One strategy missing from this list involves neurophysiological measures, which might be more sensitive to detect alterations in brain function. The Magnetoencephalography International Consortium of Alzheimer's Disease arose out of the need to advance the use of Magnetoencephalography (MEG, as a tool in AD and pre-AD research. This paper presents a framework for using MEG in dementia research, and for short-term research priorities.

  17. Biomaterials for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Darya; Poot, André A

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease represents a huge unmet need for treatment. The low efficacy of current treatment methods is not only due to low drug potency but also due to the presence of various obstacles in the delivery routes. One of the main barriers is the blood-brain barrier. The increasing prevalence of AD and the low efficacy of current therapies have increased the amount of research on unraveling of disease pathways and development of treatment strategies. One of the interesting areas for the latter subject is biomaterials and their applications. This interest originates from the fact that biomaterials are very useful for the delivery of therapeutic agents, such as drugs, proteins, and/or cells, in order to treat diseases and regenerate tissues. Recently, manufacturing of nano-sized delivery systems has increased the efficacy and delivery potential of biomaterials. In this article, we review the latest developments with regard to the use of biomaterials for the treatment of AD, including nanoparticles and liposomes for delivery of therapeutic compounds and scaffolds for cell delivery strategies. PMID:27379232

  18. Traumatic brain injury as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease. Comparison of two retrospective autopsy cohorts with evaluation of ApoE genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrocklage Christian

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose The impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD is still controversial. The aim of our retrospective autopsy study was to assess the impact of TBE and ApoE allele frequency on the development of AD. Material and Methods We examined 1. the incidence of AD pathology (Braak stageing, CERAD, NIA-Reagan Institute criteria in 58 consecutive patients (mean age ± SD 77.0 ± 6.8 years with residual closed TBI lesions, and 2. the frequency of TBI residuals in 57 age-matched autopsy proven AD cases. In both series, ApoE was evaluated from archival paraffin-embedded brain material. Results 1. TBE series: 12.1 % showed definite and 10.3% probable AD (mean age 77.6 and 75.2 years, only 2/13 with ApoEε3/4. From 45 (77.6% non-AD cases (mean age 78.2 years, 3 had ApoEε3/4. The prevalence of 22.4% AD in this small autopsy cohort was significantly higher than 3.3% in a recent large clinical series and 14% in the general population over age 70. 2. In the AD cohort with ApoEε4 allele frequency of 30% similar to other AD series, residuals of closed TBI were seen in 4 brains (7% (mean age ± SD 78.2 ± 6.4, all lacking the ApoEε4 allele. TBI incidence was slightly lower than 8.5% in the clinical MIRAGE study. Conclusions The results of this first retrospective autopsy study of TBI, ApoEε allele frequency, and AD confirm clinical studies suggesting severe TBI to be a risk factor for the development AD higher in subjects lacking ApoEε4 alleles. Further studies in larger autopsy series are needed to elucidate the relationship between TBI, genetic predisposition, and AD.

  19. PET imaging of brain with the β-amyloid probe, [11C]6-OH-BTA-1, in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of [11C]6-OH-BTA-1 and positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET imaging was performed with the NIH ATLAS small animal scanner in six elderly transgenic mice (Tg2576; age 22.0±1.8 months; 23.6±2.6 g) overexpressing a mutated form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) known to result in the production of Aβ plaques, and in six elderly wild-type litter mates (age 21.8±1.6 months; 29.5±4.7 g). Dynamic PET scans were performed for 30 min in each mouse under 1% isoflurane inhalation anesthesia after a bolus injection of 13-46 MBq of [11C]6-OH-BTA-1. PET data were reconstructed with 3D OSEM. On the coronal PET image, irregular regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on frontal cortex (FR), parietal cortex (PA), striatum (ST), thalamus (TH), pons (PO), and cerebellum (CE), guided by a mouse stereotaxic atlas. Time-activity curves (TACs) (expressed as percent injected dose per gram normalized to body weight: % ID-kg/g) were obtained for FR, PA, ST, TH, PO, and CE. ROI-to-CE radioactivity ratios were also calculated. Following PET scans, sections of mouse brain prepared from anesthetized and fixative-perfused mice were stained with thioflavin-S. TACs for [11C]6-OH-BTA-1 in all ROIs peaked early (at 30-55 s), with radioactivity washing out quickly thereafter in both transgenic and wild-type mice. Peak uptake in all regions was significantly lower in transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. During the later part of the washout phase (12-30 min), the mean FR/CE and PA/CE ratios were higher in transgenic than in wild-type mice (1.06±0.04 vs 0.98±0.07, p=0.04; 1.06±0.09 vs 0.93±0.08 p=0.02) while ST/CE, TH/CE, and PO/CE ratios were not. Ex vivo staining revealed widespread Aβ plaques in cortex, but not in cerebellum of transgenic mice or in any brain regions of wild-type mice. Marked reductions in brain uptake of this

  20. Effects of donepezil on brain morphometric and metabolic changes in patients with Alzheimer's disease: A DARTEL-based VBM and (1)H-MRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    A few studies have performed on the brain morphometric changes over the whole brain structure following donepezil treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations and cellular metabolic changes in patients with AD before and after donepezil treatment, and further to reveal the correlations of the scores of various neuropsychological scales with the volumetric and metabolic changes. Twenty-one subjects comprising of 11 patients with AD and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. All of the patients participated in the follow-up study 24weeks following donepezil treatment. In this study, a combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to assess the brain morphometric and metabolic alterations in AD. In the GM volumetric analysis, both of the untreated and treated patients with donepezil showed significantly reduced volumes in the hippocampus (Hip), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), precuneus (PCu) and middle frontal gyrus compared with healthy controls. However, donepezil-treated patients showed significantly increased volumes in the Hip, PCu, fusiform gyrus and caudate nucleus compared to untreated patients. In the WM volumetric analysis, untreated and treated patients showed significant volume reductions in the posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC), cerebral peduncle of the midbrain and PHG compared to healthy controls. However, there was no significant WM morphological change after donepezil treatment in patients with AD. In MRS study, untreated patients with AD showed decreased N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and increased myo-inositol (mI)/Cr compared to healthy controls, while treated patients showed only decreased NAA/Cr in the same comparison. However, the treated patients showed simultaneously increased NAA/Cr and decreased mI/Cr and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios compared to untreated patients. This

  1. Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... interventions designed to lower the levels of Alzheimer's pathologies in the brain treatments for health issues that may be related to AD, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes cognitive training specific ...

  2. Cognitive debt and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Natalie L; Howard, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    We propose the concept of Cognitive Debt to characterize thoughts and behaviors that increase vulnerability to symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence indicates that depression, anxiety, sleep disorder, neuroticism, life stress, and post-traumatic stress disorder increase risk for AD, and we suggest they do so by increasing Cognitive Debt. Repetitive negative thinking (RNT), a behaviorally measurable process common to these factors, may drive Cognitive Debt acquisition. RNT transcends disorder-specific definition, encompasses rumination and worry, and is defined by perseverative, negative thought tendencies. Evidence of dysregulated stress responses supports the concept of Cognitive Debt, of RNT as its causal mechanism, and of an interaction with the APOE-ε4 genotype to increase vulnerability to clinical AD, independent from traditional AD pathology. Defining a more specific behavioral profile of risk would enable interventions to be targeted earlier and more precisely at individuals most vulnerable to developing AD. Additionally, modulating RNT could potentially reduce risk of clinical AD. Interventions to reduce RNT are discussed, as are suggestions for future research. For these reasons we submit that the Cognitive Debt model may aid understanding of the psychological mechanisms that potentially increase predisposition to AD. PMID:25362035

  3. A simple method for detection of abnormal brain regions in Alzheimer's disease patients using [11C]MP4A. Comparison with [123I]IMP SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a radiolabeled lipophilic acetylcholine analogue, N-[11C]methylpiperidin-4-yl acetate ([11C]MP4A) to measure brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo. Aiming to develop a new SPECT tracer similar to MP4A, we first proposed a simple method for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD) using [11C]MP4A PET. We performed [11C]MP4A PET and N-isopropyl [123I]iodoamphetamine ([123I]IMP) SPECT in 13 patients with AD and in 17 normal controls (NC). We calculated the ratio of radioactivity of the cortical region of interest (ROI) to that of the cerebellum measured with [11C]MP4A PET (MP4A ratio) and the ratio of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to that of the cerebellum measured with [123I]IMP SPECT (IMP ratio). Eleven cortical ROIs were placed in the frontal, sensorimotor, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortices in both hemispheres and in the posterior cingulate cortex, and z-score was calculated in each ROI in patients with AD compared with NC. When the z-score was 2 or more in a ROI, it was defined as a positive ROI. When a patient had 3 or more positive ROIs, the patient was diagnosed as having AD. The reduction in the MP4A ratio was greater than that in the IMP ratio in all cortical ROIs except for in the right parietal cortex and cingulate cortex in patients with AD. MP4A ratio method showed 92% sensitivity and the IMP ratio method 69% sensitivity for the diagnosis of AD. These results encourage us to develop a new SPECT tracer similar to MP4A for the diagnosis of AD. (author)

  4. Alzheimer disease pathology as a host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2008-06-01

    Identification of amyloid-beta and tau as the major protein components of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, respectively, led to an exponential increase in investigations of these proteins and their corresponding metabolic pathways in Alzheimer disease (AD). The presumptions inherent in most studies and in the dogma of the amyloid cascade concept are that these hallmark lesions in AD brains contain molecules that drive the disease process, and that the proteinaceous accumulations are themselves toxic. On the other hand, the lesions of AD are, by definition, end-stage, and their relationship to the clinical disease is inconsistent; this has long been known but, generally, has not been acknowledged until relatively recently. Some recent attempts to address the etiology and pathogenesis of AD discard the pathology and focus on the interplay between invisible toxic intermediates, that is, amyloid-beta oligomers and the synapse. The concept that the hallmark lesions may be nontoxic (something we have long suggested) is slowly gaining acceptance. We favor the interpretation that senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles represent a host response to an upstream pathophysiologic process, and that the therapeutic targeting of lesions, including toxic intermediates, will succeed only in the event that the host response is directly deleterious. Therefore, renewed efforts aimed at elucidating fundamental age-related processes such as oxidative stress and/or inflammatory mediators are warranted. PMID:18520771

  5. Alzheimer's Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) German (Deutsch) Hindi (हिन्दी) Italian (italiano) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ... Gehirn: Eine interaktive Tour - Deutsch (German) Alzheimer's Association Hindi (हिन्दी) Alzheimer's Disease हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual ...

  6. Brain perfusion SPECT in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: comparison of a semiquantitative and a visual evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the increasing importance of early recognition and differential diagnosis of dementias, cerebral perfusion scans using 'single photon emission computed tomography' (SPECT) are increasingly integrated into the examination routine. The goal of this study was to check the diagnostic validity of SPECT scans of MCI- and DAT-patients, two subgroups out of 369 persons with etiologically unclear cognitive dysfunction, which underwent an assessment program for probable dementia including cognitive testing, cranial computed tomography, ultrasound, routine laboratory testing including vascular risk factors. After exclusion of patients with no or other forms of dementia we analyzed SPECT data of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n = 85) and dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT; n = 78) in comparison with a healthy control group (n = 34). Visual assessment as well as a manual 'regions of interest' (ROI) regionalization of the cortex were performed, whereby a ROI/cerebellum ratio was calculated as a semi-quantitative value. Association cortex areas were assessed regarding frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of both hemispheres. When comparing the ratios of patients with DAT and controls, we found a statistically significant reduction of the cerebral perfusion in all measured cortex areas (p < 0.001). The comparison of patients with MCI with the selected control group also established a statistically significant difference in the cerebral perfusion for the evaluated cortex areas with the exception of the left hemispheric frontal and parietal cortex. A considerable number of the MCI patients showed an MMSE-score within the normal range, but with regard to the perfusion in the right hemispheric association cortex these patients also could be distinguished unambiguously from controls. Sensitivity levels found by visual assessment were at least as high as those found by the ROI method (pathological assessment: visual 49.4 % vs. ROI 47.1 % for MCI; visual 75.6 % vs

  7. Neurogenic Responses to Amyloid-Beta Plaques in the Brain of Alzheimer's Disease-Like Transgenic (pPDGF-APPSw,Ind) Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Li; Qiao, Shuhong; Lan, Xun; Chi, Liying; Luo, Chun; Lien, Lindsey; Liu, Qing Yan; Liu, Rugao

    2007-01-01

    Formation and accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques are associated with declined memory and other neurocognitive function in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. However, the effects of Aβ plaques on neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurogenesis from NPCs remain largely unknown. The existing data on neurogenesis in AD patients and AD-like animal models remain controversial. For this reason, we utilized the nestin second-intron enhancer controlled LacZ (pNes-LacZ) reporter transgenic mice ...

  8. Does ionizing radiation influence Alzheimer's disease risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a human neurodegenerative disease, and its global prevalence is predicted to increase dramatically in the following decades. There is mounting evidence describing the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on the brain, suggesting that exposure to IR might ultimately favor the development of AD. Therefore better understanding the possible connections between exposure to IR and AD pathogenesis is of utmost importance. In this review, recent developments in the research on the biological and cognitive effects of IR in the brain will be explored. Because AD is largely an age-related pathology, the effects of IR on ageing will be investigated

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A, a key player in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong LIU; Qing TIAN

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the pre-dominant serine/threonine phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. In the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), decreased PP2A activities were observed, which is suggested to be involved in neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation, disturbed amyloid precursor protein (APP) secretion and neurodegeneration in AD brain. Based on our research and other previous findings, decreased PP2Ac level, decreased PP2A holoenzyme composition, increased level of PP2A inhibitors, increased PP2Ac Leu309 demethylation and Tyr307 phosphorylation underlie PP2A inactivation in AD. β-amyloid (Aβ) over-production, estrogen deficiency and impaired homocys-teine metabolism are the possible up-stream factors that inactivate PP2A in AD neurons. Further studies are required to disclose the role of PP2A in Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Creativity and dementia: emerging diagnostic and treatment methods for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Miller, Bruce L; Christensen, Daniel D; Cherry, Debra

    2008-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease research is beginning to yield promising treatments and prevention strategies. Current Alzheimer's disease treatments benefit symptoms, but do not appreciably alter the basic disease process. The new generation of Alzheimer's disease medications, however, will likely include disease-modifying treatments, which will slow disease progression or stop it entirely. These new treatments pursue four points of intervention: increasing the clearance of amyloid-beta42 (Abeta42) proteins in the brain, blocking Abeta42 production, decreasing Abeta42 production, and decreasing Abeta42 aggregation. Neurogenerative therapies are being explored as well, suggesting future treatments may not only stop disease progression but also reverse it. Risk factors for developing Alzheimer's disease and factors associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease have been identified. Future Alzheimer's disease management may come to resemble routine cardiovascular disease prevention and management, which involves the control of modifiable risk factors and the use of medications that decrease or stop underlying pathology. The hope is that such management will arrest the disease process before cognitive symptoms have begun. Like other neurologic illnesses, Alzheimer's disease has a profound impact on creativity. Alzheimer's disease attacks the right posterior part of the brain, which enables people to retrieve internal imagery and copy images. Alzheimer's disease patients may lose the ability to copy images entirely. However, people with Alzheimer's disease can continue to produce art by using their remaining strengths, such as color or composition instead of shapes or realism. Studying art and dementia is a model for identifying the strengths of psychiatric patients. Remarkably, art emerges in some patients even in the face of degenerative disease. In this expert roundtable supplement, Jeffrey L. Cummings, MD, offers an overview of recent advances in Alzheimer's disease

  11. Brain and heart disease studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of important studies completed during the past year using the Donner 280-crystal positron ring tomograph are summarized in this article. Using rubidium-82, images of a brain tumor and an arteriovenous malformation are described. An image demonstrating methionine uptake in a patient with schizophrenia and an image reflecting sugar metabolism in the brain of a man with Alzheimer's disease are also included. Uptake of rubidium-82 in subjects before and after exercise is being investigated. The synthesis of new radiopharmaceuticals and the development of a new synthesis for C-taurine for use in the study of metabolism in the human heart are also being studied

  12. Use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghul, S; Wilkinson, D

    2001-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a growing problem in an aging Western world, estimated to have cost the US economy USD 1.75 trillion. Until recently, the management of Alzheimer's disease largely comprised support for the family, nursing care and the use of unlicensed medication to control behavioral disturbances. The three new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors licensed to treat Alzheimer's disease (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) have provided clinicians with a major impetus to their desire to diagnose and treat this lethal disease. Their effects on cognition are proven. More recent work on the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on behavioral symptoms, activities of daily living and caregiver burden have also been encouraging. Emerging work indicates their likely efficacy in other dementias (e.g., vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies). This review summarizes the evidence concerning the impact of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in dementia both currently and over the next 5 years. PMID:19811047

  13. Computational model for astroglial cell function in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eeva Mäkiraatikka; Amit K Nahata; Jalonen, Tuula O.

    2008-01-01

    Neuritic plaques, consisting mostly of aggregated amyloid-β peptide, are some of the pathological findings in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. The aggregated amyloid-β disturbs the cellular homeostasis, which can be monitored by e.g. measuring changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations [Ca2+]. As an intracellular second messenger, Ca2+ functions as a mediator in transporting extracellular signals into the cell. Normally, the Ca2+ concentration in the cytosol is kept...

  14. Cognitive rehabilitation in a visual variant of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Jorge; Rosana MAGALHÃES; Arantes, Mavilde; Cruz, Sara; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is commonly associated with marked memory deficits; however, nonamnestic variants have been consistently described as well. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a progressive degenerative condition in which posterior regions of the brain are predominantly affected, therefore resulting in a pattern of distinctive and marked visuospatial symptoms, such as apraxia, alexia, and spatial neglect. Despite the growing number of studies on cognitive and neural bases of the visu...

  15. Inflammation as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hjorth, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which is characterised by impairment of memory and learning. The impairment is caused by neuronal death which originates in the parts of the brain that execute memory functions: the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. The neuronal death is believed to be caused by the amyloid- (A) peptide which is prone to oligomerisation and aggregation into insoluble amyloid plaques (AP). The levels of soluble A and the nu...

  16. A Review: Inflammatory Process in Alzheimer's Disease, Role of Cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Miguel Rubio-Perez; Juana Maria Morillas-Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder to date. Neuropathological hallmarks are β -amyloid (A β ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, but the inflammatory process has a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of AD. Inflammatory components related to AD neuroinflammation include brain cells such as microglia and astrocytes, the complement system, as well as cytokines and chemokines. Cytokines play a key role in inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes in AD. ...

  17. Targeting HDACs: A Promising Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Xu; Xue-Ling Dai; Han-Chang Huang; Zhao-Feng Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications like DNA methylation and histone acetylation play an important role in a wide range of brain disorders. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the homeostasis of histone acetylation. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, which initially were used as anticancer drugs, are recently suggested to act as neuroprotectors by enhancing synaptic plasticity and learning and memory in a wide range of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Park...

  18. Geriatric Dentistry and the Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho GOIATO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The world population is getting old, mainly in countries in development like Brazil. So, the number of pathologies, which appears in the elderly, will happen in a higher frequency. Among these diseases, we can point Alzheimer, an irreversible dementia, that has been related to age, cerebral vascular disease, stroke, immunological defects and to genetic factors (Down Syndrome. It is known that with the progression of dementia, patients present difficulties of oral hygiene caused by decrease of motor and cognitive functions of Alzheimer's bearers. These patients demand specific strategies for a dental treatment without bigger difficulties. Objective: the aim of this paper was to review the articles about the relationship of geriatric dentistry and Alzheimer disease focusing and the characteristics of the patients with this kind of dementia and the cares to them. For this purpose, a peer-reviewed literature was completed using Medline database for the period from 1972 to 2006, including alzheimer disease and dentistry, and BBO for the period from 1987 to 2004, with geriatric keyword. Conclusion: The available data indicate that individuals with Alzheimer disease have more oral health problems than individuals without dementia.

  19. Alzheimer disease immunotherapeutics: then and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Sk, Shashikantha; Singh Malik, Jagbir

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is a public health priority and one of the major contributors to morbidity and global non-communicable disease burden, thus necessitating the need for significant health-care interventions. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and may contribute to 60-70% of cases. The cause and progression of AD are not well understood but have been thought to be due at least in part to protein misfolding (proteopathy) manifest as plaque accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau proteins in brain. There are about 8 million new cases per year. The total number of people with dementia is projected to almost double every 20 years, to 66 million in 2030 and 115 million in 2050. Immunotherapy in AD aimed at β-amyloid covers 2 types of vaccination: active vaccination against Aβ42 in which patients receive injections of the antigen itself, or passive vaccination in which patients receive injections of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against Aβ42. Three of the peptide vaccines for active immunizations, CAD106, ACC001, and Affitope, are in phase 2 clinical trials. Three of the mAbs solanezumab, gantenerumab, and crenezumab, are or were in phase 2 and 3 clinical studies. While the phase 3 trials failed, one of these may have shown a benefit at least in mild forms of AD. There is a need for a greater initiative in the development of immunotherapeutics. Several avenues have been explored and still to come. PMID:25483498

  20. Progress Report on Alzheimer's Disease: Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This document provides an overview of the state of scientific study of Alzheimer's disease, a disease of catastrophic proportions whose symptoms include serious forgetfulness; changes in personality; confused, restless, and irritable behavior; and problems with judgment, concentration, writing, reading, speech, and naming of objects. It discusses…

  1. Alzheimer's disease due to loss of function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a highly complex disease involving a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations that are currently not understood in combination. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, tau, presenilin, oxidative stress, and metal hypotheses. The...

  2. Differing astrocytic cytoskeleton alterations in alzheimer's disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olabarria, M.; Noristani, H.; Chvátal, Alexandr; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 13 (2009), S103-S104. ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cells in Health and Disease /9./. 09.09.2009-12.09.2009, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Brain imaging with a novel β-amyloid plaque probe 131I-IMPY in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of brain SPECT imaging with a novel Aβ plaque probe, 131I-2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodoimidazo [1,2-α] pyridine (131I-IMPY) in early AD. Methods: Thirteen patients with AD (3 males,10 females,age ranged 52-79 y), 11 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, 4 males, 7 females, age ranged 48-67 y) and 14 normal controls (6 males, 8 females, age ranged 42-67 y) were enrolled in this study. 131I-IMPY SPECT imaging was acquired in 2 -3 h after the agent injection. ROIs were drawn on cerebral lobes and cerebellum. The ratios of mean radioactivity of cerebral lobes over cerebellum (Rcl/cb) were calculated. The t-test was used for data analysis. Results: In patients with MCI, Rcl/cb ratios were increased in parietal gyrus, temporal gyrus and frontal gyrus (right: 1.15±0.18, 1.18±0.12, 1.14±0.14; left: 1.16±0.11, 1.19±0.18, 1.15±0.09)compared with those in normal control group (right: 1.02 ± 0.12, 1.05 ± 0.14, 1.01 ± 0.12; left: 1.03 ±0.13, 1.05 ±0.13, 1.01 ±0.14; t: 2.1642 to 2.8757, all P<0.05). Rcl/cb ratios of basel ganglia and occipital gyms in MCI group (right: 0.92 ±0.18, 1.12 ±0.15; left: 0.94 ±0.15, 1.13 ±0.17) showed no statistical difference compared with those in normal control group (right: 0.82 ±0.15, 1.06 ±0.18; left: 0.85 ±0.16, 1.08 ±0.15; t: 0.7805 to 1.4344, all P>0.05). In patients with AD, Rcl/cb ratios were increased in parietal, temporal, basal ganglia and occipital lobes (right: 1.16 ±0.19, 1.24 ±0.17, 1.16 ±0.13, 1.14±0.11, 1.23±0.10; left: 1.17±0.21, 1.25±0.15, 1.18±0.08, 1.17±0.16, 1.25±0.11) compared with those in normal control group (t: 2.1001 to 6.2789, all P<0.05). Rcl/cb ratios of parietal, temporal and frontal lobes in AD group showed no statistical difference compared with those in MCI group (t: 0.1316 to 0.9806, all P>0.05), while Rcl/cb ratios of basal ganglia and occipital lobes in AD group were increased compared with those in MCI group (t: 2.0850 to 3

  4. The PSEN1 I143T mutation in a Swedish family with Alzheimer's disease: clinical report and quantification of Aβ in different brain regions

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Lina; Welander, Hedvig; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Nennesmo, Inger; Wallin, Åsa K; Graff, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Early-onset dominantly inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are rare, but studies of such cases have revealed important information about the disease mechanisms. Importantly, mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1) and PSEN2, alter the APP processing and lead to an increased amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) 42/40 ratio. This, together with other studies on pathogenic mechanisms, show that Aβ42 is a major player in the etiology of AD. Here, we present a clinical and neu...

  5. Brain gangliosides of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with deficiency in GD3-synthase: expression of elevated levels of a cholinergic-specific ganglioside, GT1aα

    OpenAIRE

    Toshio Ariga; Yutaka Itokazu; Michael P. McDonald; Yoshio Hirabayashi; Susumu Ando; Robert K. Yu

    2013-01-01

    In order to examine the potential involvement of gangliosides in AD (Alzheimer's disease), we compared the ganglioside compositions of the brains of a double-transgenic (Tg) mouse model [APP (amyloid precursor protein)/PSEN1 (presenilin)] of AD and a triple mutant mouse model with an additional deletion of the GD3S (GD3-synthase) gene (APP/PSEN1/GD3S−/−). These animals were chosen since it was previously reported that APP/PSEN1/GD3S−/− triple-mutant mice performed ...

  6. Dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Engelhart (Marianne); M.I. Geerlings (Miriam); A. Ruitenberg (Annemieke); J.C. van Swieten; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCONTEXT: Laboratory findings have suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Therefore, the risk of Alzheimer disease might be reduced by intake of antioxidants that counteract the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. OB

  7. Alzheimer's disease: a mathematical model for onset and progression

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsch, Michiel; Marcello, Norina; Tesi, Maria Carla; Tosin, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease based on transport and diffusion equations. We regard brain neurons as a continuous medium, and structure them by their degree of malfunctioning. Two different mechanisms are assumed to be relevant for the temporal evolution of the disease: i) diffusion and agglomeration of soluble polymers of amyloid, produced by damaged neurons; ii) neuron-to-neuron prion-like transmission. We model these two processes by a system of Smoluchowski equations for the amyloid concentration, coupled to a kinetic-type transport equation for the distribution function of the degree of malfunctioning of neurons. The second equation contains an integral term describing the random onset of the disease as a jump process localized in particularly sensitive areas of the brain. Even though we deliberately neglect many aspects of the complexity of the brain and the disease, numerical simulations are in good qualitative agreement with clinical...

  8. A Case of Biopsy-proven Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease with Hemiparkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Eun Jung; Bang, Hyun; Im, Joo Hyuk; Chung, Sun Joo; Lee, Jae-Hong

    2005-01-01

    Patients with dementia and concomitant parkinsonism are frequently encountered in the elderly population. When it comes to young adults, however, coexistence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) is rare. We described a case of 47-year old man with presenile onset dementia associated with hemiparkinsonism involving the right extremities. Brain biopsy showed neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques, compatible with Alzheimer's disease. Iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen...

  9. Reexpression of a developmentally regulated antigen in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALZ-50 is a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a protein of apparent molecular mass 68 kilodaltons (A68). The protein is present in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease but is not detectable in normal adult brain tissue. The authors report that ALZ-50-reactive neurons are found in normal fetal and neonatal human brain and in brain tissue from neonatal individuals with Down syndrome. Reactive neurons decrease sharply in number after age 2 and reappear in older individuals with Down syndrome and in patients with Alzheimer disease

  10. Beta-amyloidolysis and glutathione in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasierra-Cirujeda J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available J Lasierra-Cirujeda,1 P Coronel,2 MJ Aza,3 M Gimeno2 1CM Hematológico SC, Logroño, La Rioja, Spain; 2Tedec-Meiji Farma, SA, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain; 3Pharmaceutical Act, Ministry of Health, Regional Government, La Rioja, Spain Abstract: In this review, we hypothesized the importance of the interaction between the brain glutathione (GSH system, the proteolytic tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA/plasminogen/plasmin system, regulated by plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1, and neuroserpin in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The histopathological characteristic hallmark that gives personality to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of neurofibroid tangles located intracellularly in the brain, such as the protein tau and extracellular senile plaques made primarily of amyloidal substance. These formations of complex etiology are intimately related to GSH, brain protective antioxidants, and the proteolytic system, in which t-PA plays a key role. There is scientific evidence that suggests a relationship between aging, a number of neurodegenerative disorders, and the excessive production of reactive oxygen species and accompanying decreased brain proteolysis. The plasminogen system in the brain is an essential proteolytic mechanism that effectively degrades amyloid peptides ("beta-amyloidolysis" through action of the plasmin, and this physiologic process may be considered to be a means of prevention of neurodegenerative disorders. In parallel to the decrease in GSH levels seen in aging, there is also a decrease in plasmin brain activity and a progressive decrease of t-PA activity, caused by a decrease in the expression of the t-PA together with an increase of the PAI-1 levels, which rise to an increment in the production of amyloid peptides and a lesser clearance of them. Better knowledge of the GSH mechanism and cerebral proteolysis will allow us to hypothesize about therapeutic practices. Keywords: glutathione

  11. Development of a computer-aided diagnostic system for Alzheimer's disease using magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Murase, Kenya; Gondo, Naohiko; Soma, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia accompanied with brain atrophy. Structural measurements of brain atrophy in specific brain structures such as hippocampus using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been reported to detect the development of dementia early in the course of the disease. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided diagnostic system for AD using MRI, which is based on the automatic volumetry of segmented brain images and generation of th...

  12. MR diffusion tensor imaging voxel-based analysis of whole brain white matter in patients with amnestic-type mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the microstructural integrity of white matter (WM) in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) using voxel-based analysis (VBA), and investigate the relationship between WM abnormalities and gray matter (GM) atrophy. Methods: Thirty-three cases with aMCI, 32 cases with mild AD and 31 normal aging volunteers as control subjects were scanned on a 3.0 T MR system using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled (3DSPGR) sequences. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and morphological images were preprocessed by SPM5 and voxel-based comparisons between the 2 patient groups and the control group were performed by t test. Results: Relative to the control group, patients with aMCI showed significantly reduced FA value in bilateral frontal, temporal and left occipital WM, left anterior part of cingulum, left inferior parietal lobule, and the WM adjacent to the triangular part of the right lateral ventricle (k ≥ 20 voxels). In mild AD, significantly reduced FA value was found in bilateral hippocampal, inferior parietal lobular, frontal, temporal, and occipital WM, bilateral corpus callosum, anterior part of cingulums, the WM adjacent to the triangular part of the bilateral lateral ventricles, left temporal stem, left thalamus, right precuneus (k ≥ 20 voxels). Significantly reduced GM volume was found in left hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, lingual gyrus and superior temporal gyrus, bilateral insulae and middle temporal gyri in aMCI group when compared with control group (k ≥ 50 voxels). In mild AD, significantly reduced GM volume was found in bilateral hippocampi, parahippocampal gyri, amygdalae, thalami, temporal, parietal, frontal, occipital cortex (k ≥ 50 voxels). The pattern of areas with reduced FA differs from that of the GM volumetric reduction. No areas with significantly reduced FA was detected in aMCI compared with mild AD. There was no significant

  13. Family History of Alzheimer's Disease and Cortical Thickness in Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganske, Steffi; Haussmann, Robert; Gruschwitz, Antonia; Werner, Annett; Osterrath, Antje; Baumgaertel, Johanna; Lange, Jan; Donix, Katharina L; Linn, Jennifer; Donix, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A first-degree family history of Alzheimer's disease reflects genetic risks for the neurodegenerative disorder. Recent imaging data suggest localized effects of genetic risks on brain structure in healthy people. It is unknown whether this association can also be found in patients who already have dementia. Our aim was to investigate whether family history risk modulates regional medial temporal lobe cortical thickness in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We performed high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and cortical unfolding data analysis on 54 patients and 53 nondemented individuals. A first-degree family history of Alzheimer's disease was associated with left hemispheric cortical thinning in the subiculum among patients and controls. The contribution of Alzheimer's disease family history to regional brain anatomy changes independent of cognitive impairment may reflect genetic risks that modulate onset and clinical course of the disease. PMID:27303063

  14. Cranial CT frindings of familial Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three cases of familial Alzheimer's disease were reported. The patients had an average of 41 years, and developed memory disturbance and pyramidal tract syndromes. Two had disturbance of gait and showed cerebellar symptoms. All three patients had hypotension, but had no hypotensive episodes, and no change in character or loss of character. Their IQ was extremely low, and encephalograms had delta theta waves dominant in right frontal region in one case, and general delta theta waves in the other two cases. Brain scintigraphy showed reflux to ventricle in case 2, but not in case 1. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal in all three cases, and chromosomes of cases 1 and 2 were normal 46 XY. CT scan showed that the cerebral cortex of all three patients was markedly shrunken, the sulci were enlarged and the ventricle was enlarged without being extremely rounded; the degree of cerebral atrophy according to Huckman et al. was mild in case 1 and moderate in cases 2 and 3. Slight cerebellar atrophy was detected in case 3. (Kaihara, S.)

  15. Perceptions, Knowledge, Incentives, and Barriers of Brain Donation among African American Elders Enrolled in an Alzheimer's Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Susan; Cantwell, Nicole; Islam, Fareesa; Horvath, Kathy; Jefferson, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To learn about African American older adults' knowledge and perceptions of brain donation, factors that relate to participating or not participating in a brain donation research program, and methods to increase African American brain donation commitment rates in the context of an Alzheimer's disease (AD) research program. Design and…

  16. Some enkephalin- or VIP-immunoreactive hippocampal pyramidal cells contain neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of aged humans and persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, H K

    1985-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are one of the histopathological neuronal abnormalities present in normal aging and especially in Alzheimer's Disease. We have utilized immunocytochemical staining for neuropeptides followed by Congo red with gallocyanin counterstaining and polarized illumination to determine whether enkephalin (Enk), somatostatin (Som), cholecystokinin (CCK), or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) are contained in neurons afflicted with such tangles. A few Enk- or VIP-immunoreactive pyramidal cells in field hl and subiculum were found to contain tangles. Many such Enk- or VIP-immunoreactive neurons and cells containing Som- or CCK-like immunoreactivity did not contain such tangles. PMID:2410823

  17. Toxoplasma gondii Infection in the Brain Inhibits Neuronal Degeneration and Learning and Memory Impairments in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Bong-Kwang; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Shin, Ki Young; Hwang, Young Sang; Lim, Hyoungsub; Lee, Sung Joong; Moon, Jung-Ho; Lee, Sang Hyung; Suh, Yoo-hun; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Immunosuppression is a characteristic feature of Toxoplasma gondii-infected murine hosts. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the immunosuppression induced by T. gondii infection on the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Tg2576 AD mice. Mice were infected with a cyst-forming strain (ME49) of T. gondii, and levels of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and nitric oxide), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β), neuronal damage, and β-amyloid plaque depos...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease: Genes, pathogenesis and risk prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Sleegers, Kristel; Duijn, Cock

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWith the aging of western society the contribution to morbidity of diseases of the elderly, such as dementia, will increase exponentially. Thorough preventative and curative strategies are needed to constrain the increasing prevalence of these disabling diseases. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of disease will enable development of therapy, prevention and the identification of high-risk groups in the population. Here, we review the genetic epidemiology of Alzheimer's dise...

  19. Alzheimer's Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung S.; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of neuronal cells in the central nervous system may occur in many neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer's disease is a common senile disease in people over 65 years, and it causes impairment characterized by the decline of mental function, including memory loss and cognitive impairment, and affects the quality of life of patients. However, the current therapeutic strategies against AD are only to relieve symptoms, but not to cure it. Because there are only a few therapeutic strategie...

  20. Physiological genomics analysis for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a common kind of dementia. This disorder can be detected in all countries around the world. This neurological disorder affects millions of population and becomes an important concern in modern neurology. There are many researches on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Although it has been determined for a long time, there is no clear-cut that this is a case with genetic disorder or not. A physiological genomics is a new application that is useful for track function to genes within the human genome and can be applied for answering the problem of underlying pathobiology of complex diseases. The physiogenomics can be helpful for study of systemic approach on the pathophysiology, and genomics might provide useful information to better understand the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The present advent in genomics technique makes it possible to trace for the underlying genomics of disease. In this work, physiological genomics analysis for Alzheimer's disease was performed. The standard published technique is used for assessment. According to this work, there are 20 identified physiogenomics relationship on several chromosomes. Considering the results, the HADH2 gene on chromosome X, APBA1 gene on chromosome 9, AGER gene on chromosome 6, GSK3B gene on chromosome 3, CDKHR1 gene on chromosome 17, APPBP1 gene on chromosome 16, APBA2 gene on chromosome 15, GAL gene on chromosome 11, and APLP2 gene on chromosome 11 have the highest physiogenomics score (9.26) while the CASP3 gene on chromosome 4 and the SNCA gene on chromosome 4 have the lowest physiogenomics score (7.44). The results from this study confirm that Alzheimer's disease has a polygenomic origin. PMID:23661967

  1. Impaired lysosomal cobalamin transport in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Garner, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) is required for erythrocyte formation and DNA synthesis and it plays a crucial role in maintaining neurological function. As a coenzyme for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, cobalamin utilization depends on its efficient transit through the intracellular lysosomal compartment and subsequent delivery to the cytosol and mitochondria. Lysosomal function deteriorates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Lysosomal acidification is defective in AD and lysosomal proteolysis is disrupted by AD-related presenilin 1 mutation. In this study, we propose that AD related lysosomal dysfunction may impair lysosomal cobalamin transport. The experiments use in vitro and in vivo models of AD to define how lysosomal dysfunction directly affects cobalamin utilization. SH-SY5Y-AβPP mutant cells were treated with a proteasome inhibitor to induce lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation. We metabolically labeled these cells with [57Co] cobalamin and isolated purified lysosomes, mitochondria, and cytosol fractions. The results indicated that proteasome inhibition was associated with lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation and a doubling of lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin levels. We also used AβPPxPS1 transgenic AD mice that were intraperitoneally injected with [57Co] cobalamin. The amount of [57Co] cobalamin in the major organs of these mice was measured and the subcellular [57Co] cobalamin distribution in the brain was assessed. The results demonstrated that lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin level was significantly increased by 56% in the AβPPxPS1 AD mouse brains as compared to wild type control mice. Together these data provide evidence that lysosomal cobalamin may be impaired in AD in association with amyloid-β accumulation. PMID:25125476

  2. A diagnostic approach in Alzheimer`s disease using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections of Fluorine-18-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoshima, S.; Frey, K.A.; Koeppe, R.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    To improve the diagnostic performance of PET as an aid in evaluating patients suspected of having Alzheimer`s disease, the authors developed a fully automated method which generates comprehensive image presentations and objective diagnostic indices. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET image sets were collected from 37 patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease (including questionable and mild dementia), 22 normal subjects and 5 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Following stereotactic anatomic standardization, metabolic activity on an individual`s PET image set was extracted to a set of predefined surface pixels (three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection, 3D-SSP), which was used in the subsequent analysis. A normal database was created by averaging extracted datasets of the normal subjects. Patients` datasets were compared individually with the normal database by calculating a Z-score on a pixel-by-pixel basis and were displayed in 3D-SSP views for visual inspections. Diagnostic indices were then generated based on averaged Z-scores for the association cortices. Patterns and severities of metabolic reduction in patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease were seen in the standard 3D-SSP views of extracted raw data and statistical Z-scores. When discriminating patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease from normal subjects, diagnostic indices of the parietal association cortex and unilaterally averaged parietal-temporal-frontal cortex showed sensitivities of 95% and 97%, respectively, with a specificity of 100%. Neither index yielded false-positive results for cerebrovascular disease. 3D-SSP enables quantitative data extraction and reliable localization of metabolic abnormalities by means of stereotactic coordinates. The proposed method is a promising approach for interpreting functional brain PET scans. 45 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Effects of Acanthopanax senticosus on learning and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and protection against free radical injury to brain tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanji Xu; Chunji Han; Songji Xu; Xing Yu; Guozhe Jiang; Chunhua Nan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Acanthopanax senticosus,a plant of the Araliaceae family,is used in traditional Chinese medicine.It can be used to replenish Qi,strengthen the spleen,tonify the kidney,and relieve mental strain.OBJECTIVE:To observe effects ofAcanthopanax senticosus on learning and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and abnormal biochemical changes in the brain tissue.DESIGN:A completely randomized grouping,controlled animal experiment.SETTING:Department of Preventive Medicine,School of Basic Medical Sciences,Yanbian University.MATERIALS:A total of 50 Kunming mice,aged 1-1.5 months,equal numbers of males and females,were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center,Yanbian University Medical College.The study was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.Acanthopanax was provided by Yanbian Chengda Pharmaceutical Co.,Ltd.Acanthopanax senticosus(0.5 kg)was soaked in water for 1 hour and transferred to 1.5 kg distilled water for extraction.It was boiled for 1 hour and extracted after 1 hour of boiling.The procedure was repeated 3 times.The extract was condensed to 500 mL and then adjusted to 500 and 1 000 g/L with water.Piracetam tablets were produced by Shandong Luoxin Pharmaceutical Corporation, China.Malonaldehyde(MDA),superoxide dismutase(SOD),and acetylcholinesterase(ACHE)kits were purchased from Nanjing Jiancheng Bioengineering Co.,Ltd.,China. METHODS:This study was performed at the Department of Preventive Medicine,School of Basic Medical Sciences,Yanbian University from January to June 2007.All mice were randomly divided into 5 groups with 10 mice in each:control group,model group,low-,and high-dose Acanthopanax senticosus-treated groups, and piracetam-treated group.All groups were administered 0.1 mL/10 g.In the control and model groups, mice were intragastrically administered saline each morning for 5 days prior to experimentation.Five days later,they were intraperitoneally perfused with saline and aluminum trichloride

  4. Estrogen receptor beta treats Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Tian; Jia Fan; Yang Zhao; Sheng Bi; Lihui Si; Qun Liu

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies have shown that estrogen receptor β can attenuate the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β protein on PC12 cells through the Akt pathway without estrogen stimulation. In this study, we aimed to observe the effect of estrogen receptor β in Alzheimer's disease rat models established by intraventricular injection of amyloid β protein. Estrogen receptor β lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection increased Akt content in the hippocampus, decreased interleukin-1β mRNA, tumor necrosis factor α mRNA and amyloid β protein levels in the hippocampus, and improved the learning and memory capacities in Alzheimer's disease rats. Estrogen receptor β short hairpin RNA lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection had none of the above impacts on Alzheimer's disease rats. These experimental findings indicate that estrogen receptor β, independent from estrogen, can reduce inflammatory reactions and amyloid β deposition in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease rats, and improve learning and memory capacities. This effect may be mediated through activation of the Akt pathway.

  5. Progression of Alzheimer Disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vellas, B; Hausner, L; Frolich, L;

    2012-01-01

    The clinical progression of Alzheimer disease (AD) was studied in European subjects under treatment with AChE inhibitors (AChE-I) in relation to geographical location over a 2-years period. One thousand three hundred and six subjects from 11 European countries were clustered into 3 regions (North...

  6. Normal tension glaucoma and Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kessing, Svend Vedel; Mogensen, Ulla;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is associated with increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer disease (AD). METHODS: A total of 69 patients with NTG were identified in the case note files in the Glaucoma Clinic, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Rigshospitalet...

  7. Atorvastatin attenuates oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Zhiyou; Yan Yong; Wang Yonglong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate serum level of SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE and Ach in AD, to study atorvastatin influence on serum level of SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE and Acb in AD and its neuroprotection mechanisms. Methods Subjects were divided into: normal blood lipid level group with Alzheimer's disease (A), higher blood lipid level group with Alzheimer's disease (AH), normal blood lipid level Alzheimer's disease group with atorvastatin treeatment (AT),higher blood lipid level Alzheimer's disease group with atorvastatin treeatment(AHT). Ox-LDL was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE, Ach and blood lipid level in AD was measured by biochemistry. Results: The serum level of MDA, AchE in AH group after atorvastatin treatment is lower ;The serum level of SOD, Ach in AH group is more increased than that of in A group; The serum level of ox-LDL in AH, A groups is lower than that of in A group; The dementia degree is lower after atorvastatin treatment. Conclusion: Atorvastatin can decrease serum level of MDA, AchE and ox-LDL, and increase that of SOD, Acb, and attenuate dementia symptom in AD, especially, with hyperlipemia. The hypothesis of atorvastatin neuroprotection is concluded that atorvastatin may restrain free radical reaction and retard oxidation in AD.

  8. Famous forgetters: notable people and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffrey M; Jones, Joni L

    2010-03-01

    As life expectancy continues to increase, Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become much more prevalent and as yet there is no cure. This has given rise to the situation Tithonus faced in Greek mythology of living longer but not staying young. In this article, the authors explore this phenomenon while reviewing some notable people and AD. PMID:19949162

  9. Alzheimer disease : presenilin springs a leak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandy, S.; Doeven, M.K.; Poolman, B.

    2006-01-01

    Presenilins are thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease through a protein cleavage reaction that produces neurotoxic amyloid-beta peptides. A new function for presenilins now comes to light - controlling the leakage of calcium out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Is this a serious challenge to the '

  10. Next generation therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bredesen, Dale E.; John, Varghese

    2013-01-01

    To date, no truly effective therapy has been developed for Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment. In searching for new approaches that may succeed where previous ones have failed, it may be instructive to consider the successful therapeutic developments for other chronic illnesses such as cancer and human immunodeficiency virus.

  11. The dynamics of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort

    OpenAIRE

    A. Caroli; Frisoni, G B

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamics of four of the most validated biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD), cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) Aβ 1–42, tau, hippocampal volume, and FDG-PET, in patients at different stage of AD. Two hundred twenty-nine cognitively healthy subjects, 154 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients converted to AD, and 193 (95 early and 98 late) AD patients were selected from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. For each biomarke...

  12. Inter-observer variation of diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPECT shows characteristic distribution in Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to define inter-observer variations in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Fifty-seven patients, included 19 Alzheimer's disease were collected from four institutions. Five-graded score was used to interprete SPECT in 18 regions. Ten nuclear medicine physicians interpreted SPECT referred with MMSE and clinical information. Among 57 cases 19 Alzheimer's disease were selected in this study. Statistics were performed between SPECT score and MMSE score. In conclusion, inter-observer variation is present in SPECT interpretation. There was a good correlation SPECT and MMSE with proper brain SPECT physicians. They are superior to in the interpretation not only resident, but other specialists. Education in the interpretation of brain SPECT looks important. (author)

  13. 100 Years of Alzheimer's disease (1906-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, José Manuel Martínez

    2006-01-01

    As we commemorate the first centennial since Alzheimer's disease (AD) was first diagnosed, this article casts back into the past while also looking to the future. It reflects on the life of Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) and the scientific work he undertook in describing the disorder suffered by Auguste D. from age 51 to 56 and the neuropathological findings revealed by her brain, reminding us of the origin of the eponym. It highlights how, throughout the 1960's, the true importance of AD as the major cause of late life dementia ultimately came to light and narrates the evolution of the concepts related to AD throughout the years and its recognition as a major public health problem. Finally, the article pays homage to the work done by the Alzheimer's Association and the research undertaken at the Alzheimer's Disease Centres within the framework of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Program, briefly discussing the long road travelled in the fight against AD in the past 25 years and the scientific odyssey that we trust will result in finding a cure. PMID:17004362

  14. Voxel-based morphometry findings in Alzheimer's disease: neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability correlations – preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano de Gois Vasconcelos; Andrea Parolin Jackowski; Maira Okada de Oliveira; Yoná Mayara Ribeiro Flor; Orlando Francisco Amodeo Bueno; Sonia Maria Dozzi Brucki

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The role of structural brain changes and their correlations with neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability in Alzheimer's disease are still poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To establish whether structural changes in grey matter volume in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease are associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability. METHODS: Nineteen Alzheimer's disease patients (9 females; total mean age  = 75.2 y old ±4.7; total mean education level  = 8.5 y ±4.9) underwent a ...

  15. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Dual task and postural control in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Pires de Andrade

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurodegenerative diseases are required to use cognitive resources while maintaining postural control. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a frontal cognitive task on postural control in patients with Alzheimer, Parkinson and controls. Thirty-eight participants were instructed to stand upright on a force platform in two experimental conditions: single and dual task. Participants with Parkinson's disease presented an increase in the coefficient of variation greater than 100% in the dual task as compared to the single task for center of pressure (COP area and COP path. In addition, patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease had a higher number of errors during the execution of the cognitive task when compared to the group of elderly without neurodegenerative diseases. The motor cortex, which is engaged in postural control, does not seem to compete with frontal brain regions in the performance of the cognitive task. However, patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease presented worsened performance in cognitive task.

  17. Drawing Disorders in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojano, Luigi; Gainotti, Guido

    2016-04-21

    Drawing is a multicomponential process that can be impaired by many kinds of brain lesions. Drawing disorders are very common in Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, and can provide clinical information for the distinction of the different dementing diseases. In our review we started from an overview of the neural and cognitive bases of drawing, and from a recollection of the drawing tasks more frequently used for assessing individuals with dementia. Then, we analyzed drawing disorders in dementia, paying special attention to those observed in Alzheimer's disease, from the prodromal stages of the amnesic mild cognitive impairment to the stages of full-blown dementia, both in the sporadic forms with late onset in the entorhino-hippocampal structures and in those with early onset in the posterior neocortical structures. We reviewed the drawing features that could differentiate Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia and from the most frequent forms of degenerative dementia, namely frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body disease. Finally, we examined some peculiar aspects of drawing disorders in dementia, such as perseverations, rotations, and closing-in. We argue that a careful analysis of drawing errors helps to differentiate the different forms of dementia more than overall accuracy in drawing. PMID:27104898

  18. Various MRS Application Tools for Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    F. Gao; Barker, P. B.

    2014-01-01

    MR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique that allows the detection of several naturally occurring compounds (metabolites) from well-defined regions of interest within the human brain. Alzheimer disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. During the past 20 years, multiple studies have been performed on MR spectroscopy in patients with both mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. Generally, MR spectroscopy studies have foun...

  19. Adiposity, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Luchsinger, José A.; Gustafson, Deborah R

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the epidemiologic evidence linking the continuum of adiposity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanisms relating adiposity and T2D to AD may include hyperinsulinemia, advanced products of glycosilation, cerebrovascular disease, and products of adipose tissue metabolism. Elevated adiposity in middle age is related to a higher risk of AD but the data on this association in old age is conflicting. Several studies ha...

  20. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonte, F.J. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  1. A disease state fingerprint for evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Virkki, Arho;

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are evolving. Knowledge about disease-specific biomarkers is constantly increasing and larger volumes of data are being measured from patients. To gain additional benefits from the collected data, a novel statistical modeling and data visualization...... interpretation of the information. To model the AD state from complex and heterogeneous patient data, a statistical Disease State Index (DSI) method underlying the DSF has been developed. Using baseline data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), the ability of the DSI to model disease...

  2. The vitamin D receptor gene is associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Donald J; Refsum, Helga; Warden, Donald R; Medway, Christopher; Wilcock, Gordon K; Smith, A David

    2011-10-24

    Vitamin D may have a role in brain function. Low levels have been frequently associated with cognitive decline and may contribute to diseases of the nervous system. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is widely expressed in human brain. Vitamin D appears to be neuroprotective and may regulate inflammation in the brain. We examined two VDR polymorphisms, Apa1 and Taq1. We used DNA from 255 Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases and 260 cognitively screened elderly controls from the longitudinal cohort of the Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing (OPTIMA). The presence of each of the linked alleles, Apa1 T and Taq1 G, was associated with the risk of AD, particularly in people vitamin D in AD. Nevertheless, we consider this to be a hypothesis-generating study, which needs to be replicated in a larger dataset. PMID:21911036

  3. Seven Stages of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Stages Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: ...

  4. Why musical memory can be preserved in advanced Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jörn-Henrik; Stelzer, Johannes; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Chételat, Gael; La Joie, Renaud; Turner, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Musical memory is considered to be partly independent from other memory systems. In Alzheimer's disease and different types of dementia, musical memory is surprisingly robust, and likewise for brain lesions affecting other kinds of memory. However, the mechanisms and neural substrates of musical memory remain poorly understood. In a group of 32 normal young human subjects (16 male and 16 female, mean age of 28.0 ± 2.2 years), we performed a 7 T functional magnetic resonance imaging study of brain responses to music excerpts that were unknown, recently known (heard an hour before scanning), and long-known. We used multivariate pattern classification to identify brain regions that encode long-term musical memory. The results showed a crucial role for the caudal anterior cingulate and the ventral pre-supplementary motor area in the neural encoding of long-known as compared with recently known and unknown music. In the second part of the study, we analysed data of three essential Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in a region of interest derived from our musical memory findings (caudal anterior cingulate cortex and ventral pre-supplementary motor area) in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (10 male and 10 female, mean age of 68.9 ± 9.0 years) and 34 healthy control subjects (14 male and 20 female, mean age of 68.1 ± 7.2 years). Interestingly, the regions identified to encode musical memory corresponded to areas that showed substantially minimal cortical atrophy (as measured with magnetic resonance imaging), and minimal disruption of glucose-metabolism (as measured with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography), as compared to the rest of the brain. However, amyloid-β deposition (as measured with (18)F-flobetapir positron emission tomography) within the currently observed regions of interest was not substantially less than in the rest of the brain, which suggests that the regions of interest were still in a very early stage of the expected course of

  5. Emerging targets in neurodegeneration: new opportunities for Alzheimer's disease treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampa, Angela; Gobbi, Silvia; Belluti, Federica; Bisi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the brain associated with memory impairment, progressive cognitive decline and changes in personality and behavior, with rising incidence among elderly people. Reflecting the world population ageing, the scenario is expected to worsen in the next decades if novel drugs or mechanisms that help to counteract neurodegeneration will not be identified. The complex neuropathology of AD is characterized by cholinergic loss, extracellular deposition of amyloid-β plaques, formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, chronic brain inflammation and oxidative damage. To date, there are no effective treatments that can slow or halt the disease, and currently approved drugs only seem to act as palliative by temporary ameliorating cognitive impairment. On the other hand, the role played by other biological systems in the pathogenetic process is now clearly growing and, as knowledge on how AD develops and triggers brain damage proceeds, drug discovery attempts to identify new potential therapeutic targets. This review will focus on these emerging strategies, some of which could open new therapeutic perspectives in Alzheimer's disease, adding new elements for the medicinal chemist to handle and combine for the design of novel multi-target-directed ligands able to simultaneously modulate 'old classic' and newly identified targets. PMID:23931436

  6. Alzheimer's disease: is a vaccine possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease is still unknown, but the disease is distinctively characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. These features have become the primary focus of much of the research looking for new treatments for the disease, including immunotherapy and vaccines targeting β-amyloid in the brain. Adverse effects observed in a clinical trial based on the β-amyloid protein were attributed to the presence of the target antigen and emphasized the relevance of finding safer antigen candidates for active immunization. For this kind of approach, different vaccine formulations using DNA, peptide, and heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens have been proposed. Promising results are expected from different vaccine candidates encompassing B-cell epitopes of the β-amyloid protein. In addition, recent results indicate that targeting another protein involved in the etiology of the disease has opened new perspectives for the effective prevention of the illness. Collectively, the evidence indicates that the idea of finding an effective vaccine for the control of Alzheimer's disease, although not without challenges, is a possibility

  7. Alzheimer's disease: is a vaccine possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, R.P.S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Departamento de Microbiologia, Laboratório de Desenvolvimento de Vacinas, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Desenvolvimento de Vacinas, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Yang, M.J. [Instituto Butantan, Laboratório de Genética, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Genética, Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, M.T.; Ferreira, L.C.S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Departamento de Microbiologia, Laboratório de Desenvolvimento de Vacinas, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Desenvolvimento de Vacinas, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease is still unknown, but the disease is distinctively characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. These features have become the primary focus of much of the research looking for new treatments for the disease, including immunotherapy and vaccines targeting β-amyloid in the brain. Adverse effects observed in a clinical trial based on the β-amyloid protein were attributed to the presence of the target antigen and emphasized the relevance of finding safer antigen candidates for active immunization. For this kind of approach, different vaccine formulations using DNA, peptide, and heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens have been proposed. Promising results are expected from different vaccine candidates encompassing B-cell epitopes of the β-amyloid protein. In addition, recent results indicate that targeting another protein involved in the etiology of the disease has opened new perspectives for the effective prevention of the illness. Collectively, the evidence indicates that the idea of finding an effective vaccine for the control of Alzheimer's disease, although not without challenges, is a possibility.

  8. Artificial neural networks that use single-photon emission tomography to identify patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, M.R.W. [Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Dobbs, A. [Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Hooper, H.R. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Cross Cancer Inst., Edmonton, AB (Canada); McEwan, A.J.B. [Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Triscott, J. [Dept. of Family Medicine and Div. of Geriatric Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Cooney, J. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1994-12-01

    Single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) images using technetium-99m labelled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime were obtained from 97 patients diagnosed as having Alzheimer`s disease, as well as from a comparison group of 64 normal subjects. Multiple linear regression was used to predict subject type (Alzheimer`s vs comparison) using scintillation counts from 14 different brain regions as predictors. These results were disappointing: the regression equation accounted for only 33.5% of the variance between subjects. However, the same data were also used to train parallel distributed processing (PDP) networks of different sizes to classify subjects. In general, the PDP networks accounted for substantially more (up to 95%) of the variance in the data, and in many instances were able to distinguish perfectly between the two subjects. These results suggest two conclusions. First, SPET images do provide sufficient information to distinguish patients with Alzheimer`s disease from a normal comparison group. Second, to access this diagnostic information, it appears that one must take advantage of the ability of PDP networks to detect higher-order nonlinear relationships among the predictor variables. (orig.)

  9. [Neuroepigenetics: Desoxyribonucleic acid methylation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendioroz Iriarte, Maite; Pulido Fontes, Laura; Méndez-López, Iván

    2015-05-21

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that controls gene expression. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), global DNA hypomethylation of neurons has been described in the human cerebral cortex. Moreover, several variants in the methylation pattern of candidate genes have been identified in brain tissue when comparing AD patients and controls. Specifically, DNA methylation changes have been observed in PSEN1 and APOE, both genes previously being involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In other degenerative dementias, methylation variants have also been described in key genes, such as hypomethylation of the SNCA gene in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies or hypermethylation of the GRN gene promoter in frontotemporal dementia. The finding of aberrant DNA methylation patterns shared by brain tissue and peripheral blood opens the door to use those variants as epigenetic biomarkers in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24907105

  10. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and multiple infarct dementia by tomographic imaging of iodine-123 IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomographic imaging of the brain was performed using a rotating slant hole collimator and [123I]N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in normal subjects (n = 6) and patients with either Alzheimer's disease (n = 5) or multiple infarct dementia (n = 3). Four blinded observers were asked to make a diagnosis from the images. Normal subjects and patients with multiple infarct dementia were correctly identified. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed in three of the five patients with this disease. One patient with early Alzheimer's disease was classified as normal by two of the four observers. Another patient with Alzheimer's disease had an asymmetric distribution of IMP and was incorrectly diagnosed as multiple infarct dementia by all four observers. Limited angle tomography of the cerebral distribution of 123I appears to be a useful technique for the evaluation of demented patients

  11. Alzheimer's Disease at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Alzheimer’s Disease at a Glance Share: On This Page ... health approaches for preventing or slowing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, there is no strong evidence that ...

  12. COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH FOR DESIGNING AND DEVELOPMENT OF POTENT DRUG INHIBITOR FOR APP GENE IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Behera*, Ritesh Kumar Behera and Manas Ranjan Barik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, reasoning, planning, language, and perception, and eventually even the ability to carry out the simplest tasks. Many scientists believe that Alzheimer's disease results from an increase in the production or accumulation of a specific protein (beta-amyloid protein in the brain that leads to nerve cell death. The brains of people with AD have an abundance of two abnormal structures amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that are made of misfolded proteins. This is especially true in certain regions of the brain that are important in memory. In people with Alzheimer's disease, deposits called amyloid plaques build up in the brain. These are composed, in part, of a protein called beta-amyloid, which is a fragment of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. A mutation in the gene that makes APP is believed to be responsible for 5 to 20 percent of all early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. People with a mutation in the APP gene tend to develop Alzheimer's disease at around age 50. The present work deals with the designing a suitable drug by molecular docking which acts on the APP gene to regulate the amyloid plagues formation in the brain.

  13. Effect of linearization correction on statistical parametric mapping (SPM). A 99mTc-HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT study in mild Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was employed to investigate the regional decline in cerebral blood flow (rCBF) as measured by 99mTc-hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of the post reconstruction image processing on the interpretation of SPM, which detects rCBF pattern, has not been precisely studied. We performed 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT in mild AD patients and analyzed the effect of linearization correction for washout of the tracer on the detectability of abnormal perfusion. Eleven mild AD (National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NINCDS-ADRDA), male/female, 5/6; mean±SD age, 70.6±6.2 years; mean±SD mini-mental state examination score, 23.9±3.41; clinical dementia rating score, 1) and eleven normal control subjects (male/female, 4/7; mean±SD age, 66.8±8.4 years) were enrolled in this study. 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT was performed with a four-head rotating gamma camera. We employed linearization uncorrected (LU) and linearization corrected (LC) images for the patients and controls. The pattern of hypoperfusion in mild AD on LU and LC images was detected by SPM99 applying the same image standardization and analytical parameters. A statistical inter image-group analysis (LU vs. LC) was also performed. Clear differences were observed between the interpretation of SPM with LU and LC images. Significant hypoperfusion in mild AD was found on the LU images in the left posterior cingulate gyrus, right precuneus, left hippocampus, left uncus, and left superior temporal gyrus (cluster level, corrected p99mTc-HMPAO SPECT with or without linearization correction, which should be carefully evaluated when interpreting the pattern of rCBF changes in mild Alzheimer's disease. (author)

  14. Screening for new agonists against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huiqin; Wei, Dong-Qing; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Chunfang; Wei, Huachun; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2007-09-01

    To find new drug candidates for treating Alzheimer's disease, we used the similarity search technique and GTS-21 as a template to search the Traditional Chinese Medicines Database. The high-score molecules thus obtained were compared with the template through the flexible alignment. Those molecules which had good alignment with GTS-21 were selected for conducting the docking studies aimed at the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The CHARMM22 force field was taken to compute the partial charge and the TABU search was adopted to operate the docking process. The docking results thus obtained were used to compare with that of GTS-21. Those molecules which had better docking results than that of GTS-21 were singled out for further consideration. Finally, it was found through an in-depth structural analysis that Mol 7235 might be a promising candidate for further modification by experiments to make it become an effective drug for treating Alzheimer's disease. PMID:17897076

  15. Alzheimer's disease: synaptic dysfunction and Abeta

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shankar, Ganesh M

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Synapse loss is an early and invariant feature of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) and there is a strong correlation between the extent of synapse loss and the severity of dementia. Accordingly, it has been proposed that synapse loss underlies the memory impairment evident in the early phase of AD and that since plasticity is important for neuronal viability, persistent disruption of plasticity may account for the frank cell loss typical of later phases of the disease. Extensive multi-disciplinary research has implicated the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the aetiology of AD and here we review the evidence that non-fibrillar soluble forms of Aβ are mediators of synaptic compromise. We also discuss the possible mechanisms of Aβ synaptotoxicity and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Atrophy and magnetization transfer ratio of the corpus callosum in patients with Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imon, Yukari; Hanyu, Haruo; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    We compared atrophy and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in the corpus callosum in patients with Alzheimer`s disease and age-matched normal subjects. Fifteen patients with Alzheimer`s disease and fourteen normal subjects received MRI. The corpus callosum was divided into three parts (anterior, middle, and posterior portions) on midsagittal slice, and their areas on T2-weighted reversed images and MTR on magnetization transfer contrast images in each portion were measured. The area and MTR decreased significantly in the posterior portion in patients with Alzheimer`s disease. In the anterior portion, MTR decreased significantly, but although the area showed no significant change. In the middle portion, the area and MTR showed no significant change. MTR and the area was correlated in each portion in patients with Alzheimer`s disease. The score of Hasegawa dementia scale-revised (HDS-R) and the area of the middle, posterior and total of corpus callosum were significantly related. The score of HDS-R and MTR in the anterior portion of corpus callosum were significantly related. The present study revealed decreases in MTR in the anterior portion of the corpus callosum of patients with Alzheimer`s disease although the area showed no significant change, and this change suggests the increase in free water and/or the decrease in bound water in tissues, probably due to demyelination and axonal degeneration. (author)

  17. The Achilles heel of Y-secretase: can we contain Alzheimer's disease by reducing synthesis of β-a myloid?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexei VERKHRATSKY; José Julio RODR(I)GUEZ

    2010-01-01

    @@ Alzheimer's disease is the ultimate scourge of mankind that hauntnts the ageing population and increasingly becomes the major health and social problem faced by our society.Alzheimer's disease(AD),described by Alois Alzheimer[1] as dementia praecox (and named Alzheimer's disease by Emil Kraepelin several years later[2]),is a severe neurodegenerative pathology associated with specific histopathological markers represented by focal extracellular deposits of fibrillar β-amyloid (also called neuritic or senile plaques) in the parenchyma of the brain and in the walls of blood vessels,and intraneuronal accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles that are composed of abnormal hyperphosphorylated tau filaments[3].

  18. Ayurvedic medicinal plants for Alzheimer's disease: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Rammohan V.; Descamps, Olivier,; John, Varghese; Bredesen, Dale E.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-associated, irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, unusual behavior, personality changes, and a decline in cognitive function. No cure for Alzheimer's exists, and the drugs currently available to treat the disease have limited effectiveness. It is believed that therapeutic intervention that could postpone the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease would dramatically reduce the number of cases in the n...

  19. Practical Principles for the Management of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Daniel D.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a complex disorder that is particularly challenging to treat and manage. Early recognition of Alzheimer's disease is the first step toward providing patients with optimal therapy and the best opportunity for treatment response. Subsequently, physicians will need to address issues that emerge as the disease inevitably progresses. As the number of elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease increases, it becomes increasingly important for the primary care physician—usually ...

  20. Molecular regulators of neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Leslie Anne

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive impairment, progressive neurodegeneration, and formation of amyloid-[Beta] (A[Beta])-containing plaques. These neuropathological features are accompanied by deregulation of signaling cascades such as the cyclin-dependent kinase- 5 (CDK5) pathway. Recent studies have revealed that neurodegeneration in AD is also associated with alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, which may play a critical role in cognitive impairments and memory loss....

  1. Adverse Stress, Hippocampal Networks, and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, Sarah M.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent clinical data have implicated chronic adverse stress as a potential risk factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and data also suggest that normal, physiological stress responses may be impaired in AD. It is possible that pathology associated with AD causes aberrant responses to chronic stress, due to potential alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Recent work in rodent models of AD suggests that chronic adverse stress exacerbates the cognitive def...

  2. Psychotherapy for individuals with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonder, B R

    1994-01-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer disease often experience depression, anger, and other psychological symptoms. Various forms of psychotherapy have been attempted with these individuals, including insight oriented therapy and less verbal therapies such as music therapy and art therapy. Although there are few data-based outcome studies that support the effectiveness of these interventions, case studies and descriptive information suggest that they can be helpful in alleviating negative emotions and minimizing problematic behaviors. PMID:7999349

  3. Neuroprotective peptides related to Alzheimer's disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slaninová, Jiřina; Borovičková, Lenka; Bláha, I.; Hlaváček, Jan; Krejčová, G.; Patočka, J.

    Patras : Typorama, 2005 - (Cordopatis, P.; Manessi-Zoupa, E.; Pairas, G.), 147-154 ISBN 960-7620-31-3. [Hellenic Forum on Bioactive Peptides /4./. Patras (GR), 22.04.2004-24.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/03/1100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : peptides * Alzheimer's disease * humanin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. Neurogenesis in Alzheimer´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 219, č. 1 (2011), s. 78-89. ISSN 0021-8782 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/08/1381; GA ČR GA305/08/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Alzheimer 's disease * hippocampus * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.370, year: 2011

  5. Diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, Alistair

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 2-stage process, in stage 1, the dementia syndrome, comprising neuropsychologic and neuropsychiatrie components together with deficits in activities of daily living, is differentiated on clinical grounds from a number of other conditions (delirium, concomitant physical illness, drug treatment normal memory loss, etc), in stage 2, the cause is determined, AD being the most common, followed by vascular dementia, Lewy-body dementia, frontal lobe dem...

  6. Functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L. Golden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Here we assessed the functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease using the well-known ‘cocktail party effect’ as a model paradigm whereby stored templates for auditory objects (e.g., hearing one's spoken name are used to segregate auditory ‘foreground’ and ‘background’. Patients with typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (n = 13 and age-matched healthy individuals (n = 17 underwent functional 3T-MRI using a sparse acquisition protocol with passive listening to auditory stimulus conditions comprising the participant's own name interleaved with or superimposed on multi-talker babble, and spectrally rotated (unrecognisable analogues of these conditions. Name identification (conditions containing the participant's own name contrasted with spectrally rotated analogues produced extensive bilateral activation involving superior temporal cortex in both the AD and healthy control groups, with no significant differences between groups. Auditory object segregation (conditions with interleaved name sounds contrasted with superimposed name sounds produced activation of right posterior superior temporal cortex in both groups, again with no differences between groups. However, the cocktail party effect (interaction of own name identification with auditory object segregation processing produced activation of right supramarginal gyrus in the AD group that was significantly enhanced compared with the healthy control group. The findings delineate an altered functional neuroanatomical profile of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease that may constitute a novel computational signature of this neurodegenerative pathology.

  7. Functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Hannah L; Agustus, Jennifer L; Goll, Johanna C; Downey, Laura E; Mummery, Catherine J; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Here we assessed the functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease using the well-known 'cocktail party effect' as a model paradigm whereby stored templates for auditory objects (e.g., hearing one's spoken name) are used to segregate auditory 'foreground' and 'background'. Patients with typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (n = 13) and age-matched healthy individuals (n = 17) underwent functional 3T-MRI using a sparse acquisition protocol with passive listening to auditory stimulus conditions comprising the participant's own name interleaved with or superimposed on multi-talker babble, and spectrally rotated (unrecognisable) analogues of these conditions. Name identification (conditions containing the participant's own name contrasted with spectrally rotated analogues) produced extensive bilateral activation involving superior temporal cortex in both the AD and healthy control groups, with no significant differences between groups. Auditory object segregation (conditions with interleaved name sounds contrasted with superimposed name sounds) produced activation of right posterior superior temporal cortex in both groups, again with no differences between groups. However, the cocktail party effect (interaction of own name identification with auditory object segregation processing) produced activation of right supramarginal gyrus in the AD group that was significantly enhanced compared with the healthy control group. The findings delineate an altered functional neuroanatomical profile of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease that may constitute a novel computational signature of this neurodegenerative pathology. PMID:26029629

  8. Differences in trace element concentrations between Alzheimer and 'normal' human brain tissue using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain samples obtained from the Netherlands Brain Bank were taken from the superior frontal gyrus, superior parietal gyrus and medial temporal gyrus of 'normal' and Alzheimer's disease subjects in order to determine elemental concentrations and compare elemental composition. Brain samples from the cortex were taken from 18 subjects, eight 'normals' (6 males and 2 females) and eleven with Alzheimer's disease, (1 male and 10 females) and the following elemental concentrations, Na, K, Fe, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Ag, Cs, Ba, and Eu were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The element which showed the greatest difference was Br, which was found to be significantly elevated in the cortex of Alzheimer's disease brains as compared to the 'normals' at significance (p < 0.001). (author)

  9. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dementia What is Alzheimer's Stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Virtual Library Interactive Brain Tour Learn how Alzheimer's affects ... Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ...

  10. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  11. Statistical physics approaches to Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouyong

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of late life dementia. In the brain of an AD patient, neurons are lost and spatial neuronal organizations (microcolumns) are disrupted. An adequate quantitative analysis of microcolumns requires that we automate the neuron recognition stage in the analysis of microscopic images of human brain tissue. We propose a recognition method based on statistical physics. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulations of an inhomogeneous Potts model are applied for image segmentation. Unlike most traditional methods, this method improves the recognition of overlapped neurons, and thus improves the overall recognition percentage. Although the exact causes of AD are unknown, as experimental advances have revealed the molecular origin of AD, they have continued to support the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which states that early stages of aggregation of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides lead to neurodegeneration and death. X-ray diffraction studies reveal the common cross-beta structural features of the final stable aggregates-amyloid fibrils. Solid-state NMR studies also reveal structural features for some well-ordered fibrils. But currently there is no feasible experimental technique that can reveal the exact structure or the precise dynamics of assembly and thus help us understand the aggregation mechanism. Computer simulation offers a way to understand the aggregation mechanism on the molecular level. Because traditional all-atom continuous molecular dynamics simulations are not fast enough to investigate the whole aggregation process, we apply coarse-grained models and discrete molecular dynamics methods to increase the simulation speed. First we use a coarse-grained two-bead (two beads per amino acid) model. Simulations show that peptides can aggregate into multilayer beta-sheet structures, which agree with X-ray diffraction experiments. To better represent the secondary structure transition happening during aggregation, we refine the

  12. [Development of Disease-modifying Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that can arrest the pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has emerged as one of the highest priorities of medical research. Two pathological hallmarks, amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein deposition and tau accumulation, are the major targets of DMT. Immunotherapy for Abeta removal and secretase inhibitors/modulators that reduce total or accumulation-prone Abeta are candidate DMTs against Abeta. Compounds that prevent tau aggregation are also under development. Clinical trials that test the efficacy of these DMT candidates are in preparation or ongoing. Recent studies of biomarkers of AD brain lesions have indicated that Abeta and tau accumulation appears 10 to 30 years before the occurrence of dementia and gradually propagate to reach the level that causes symptoms. Therefore, efficacy of DMT has to be evaluated in the preclinical stage of AD. The incidence of preclinical AD in the cognitively normal, aged population are estimated to be around 19%. Thus, currently available biomarkers, amyloid/tau PET imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measurements of Abeta and tau, are, perhaps, too invasive and costly. An international collaborative effort is needed to overcome this issue. PMID:27056864

  13. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey;

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined.......Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  14. Adrenergic Drugs Blockers or Enhancers for Cognitive Decline ? What to Choose for Alzheimer's Disease Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femminella, Grazia D; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The adrenergic system has an important role in normal central nervous system function as well as in brain disease. The locus coeruleus, the main source of norepinephrine in brain, is involved in the regulation of learning and memory, reinforcement of sleep-wake cycle and synaptic plasticity. In Alzheimer's disease, locus coeruleus degeneration is observed early in the course of the disease, years before the onset of clinical cognitive signs, with neurofibrillary detected at the stage of mild cognitive impairment, preceding amyloid deposition. Thus, in the last years, a great interest has grown in evaluating the possibility of central adrenergic system modulation as a therapeutic tool in Alzheimer's disease. However, evidences do not show univocal results, with some studies suggesting that adrenergic stimulation might be beneficial in Alzheimer's Disease and some others favoring adrenergic blockade. In this review, we summarize data from both hypothesis and describe the pathophysiological role of the adrenergic system in neurodegeneration. PMID:27189470

  15. Fluorodeoxyglucose 18F scan in Alzheimer's disease and multi-infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease and multi-infarct dementia were studied with scans using fluorodeoxyglucose tagged with fluorine 18. The rates of glucose metabolism were calculated. Patients with Alzheimer's dementia showed decreased metabolism in all areas of the brain but with preferential sparing of the primary motor and sensory cortex. Patients with multi-infarct dementia also had global reductions in glucose metabolic rates when compared with normal control subjects, but the areas of hypometabolism were focal and asymmetric

  16. A disease state fingerprint for evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Virkki, Arho;

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are evolving. Knowledge about disease-specific biomarkers is constantly increasing and larger volumes of data are being measured from patients. To gain additional benefits from the collected data, a novel statistical modeling and data visualization...... interpretation of the information. To model the AD state from complex and heterogeneous patient data, a statistical Disease State Index (DSI) method underlying the DSF has been developed. Using baseline data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), the ability of the DSI to model disease......'s degree of similarity to previously diagnosed disease population. A summary of patient data and results of the computation are displayed in a succinct Disease State Fingerprint (DSF) visualization. The visualization clearly discloses how patient data contributes to the AD state, facilitating rapid...

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular metabolic deficiency in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Mei Gu; Han-Chang Huang; Zhao-Feng Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder.The pathology of AD includes amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau,as well as neuronal loss in specific brain regions.Increasing epidemiological and functional neuroimaging evidence indicates that global and regional disruptions in brain metabolism are involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.Aβ precursor protein is cleaved to produce both extracellular and intracellular Aβ,accumulation of which might interfere with the homeostasis of cellular metabolism.Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that not only supply the main energy to the cell but also regulate apoptosis.Mitochondrial dysfunction might contribute to Aβ neurotoxicity.In this review,we summarize the pathways of Aβ generation and its potential neurotoxic effects on cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its role in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Yangling

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hippocampus, a brain area critical for learning and memory, is especially vulnerable to damage at early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Emerging evidence has indicated that altered neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus represents an early critical event in the course of AD. Although causal links have not been established, a variety of key molecules involved in AD pathogenesis have been shown to impact new neuron generation, either positively or negatively. From a functional point of view, hippocampal neurogenesis plays an important role in structural plasticity and network maintenance. Therefore, dysfunctional neurogenesis resulting from early subtle disease manifestations may in turn exacerbate neuronal vulnerability to AD and contribute to memory impairment, whereas enhanced neurogenesis may be a compensatory response and represent an endogenous brain repair mechanism. Here we review recent findings on alterations of neurogenesis associated with pathogenesis of AD, and we discuss the potential of neurogenesis-based diagnostics and therapeutic strategies for AD.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehericy, Stephane [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris, Cedex 13 (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Inserm U610, Paris, Cedex 13 (France); Marjanska, Malgorzata [University of Minnesota, Center for Magnetic Resonance Research and Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mesrob, Lilia; Kinkingnehun, Serge [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Inserm U610, Paris, Cedex 13 (France); Sarazin, Marie [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Department of Neurology, Paris, Cedex 13 (France)

    2007-02-15

    A modern challenge for neuroimaging techniques is to contribute to the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Early diagnosis includes recognition of pre-demented conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or having a high risk of developing AD. The role of neuroimaging therefore extends beyond its traditional role of excluding other conditions such as neurosurgical lesions. In addition, early diagnosis would allow early treatment using currently available therapies or new therapies in the future. Structural imaging can detect and follow the time course of subtle brain atrophy as a surrogate marker for pathological processes. New MR techniques and image analysis software can detect subtle brain microstructural, perfusion or metabolic changes that provide new tools to study the pathological processes and detect pre-demented conditions. This review focuses on markers of macro- and microstructural, perfusion, diffusion and metabolic MR imaging and spectroscopy in AD. (orig.)

  20. Dementia: Depression and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Dementia | Depression and Alzheimer’s Disease What is depression? When doctors talk about depression, they mean the medical illness called major depression. Someone who has ...