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Sample records for alveolar type-ii cell

  1. Repopulation of denuded tracheal grafts with alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Repopulation of denuded heterotopic tracheal grafts with populations of specific epithelial cell types is one approach to study the differentiation potential of various cell types. This technique has been adopted to delineate the differentiation pathways of alveolar type II cells isolated from rat lungs. Under the conditions of this experiment, the reestablished epithelial lining was alveolar-like, however, ultrastructural analysis of the cells showed them to be like Clara cells. These preliminary results suggest that the secretary cells of the lung parenchyma and terminal airways may share a common ancestry. (author)

  2. The role of alveolar type II cells in swine leptospirosis

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    Ângela P. Campos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aimed to investigate a possible relationship between alveolar type II cells and the inflammatory response to infection with Leptospira spp., and thus comprise a further element that can be involved in the pathogenesis of lung injury in naturally infected pigs. The study group consisted of 73 adult pigs that were extensively reared and slaughtered in Teresina, Piauí state, and Timon, Maranhão state, Brazil. The diagnosis of leptospirosis was made using the microscopic agglutination test (MAT aided by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. The MAT registered the occurrence of anti-Leptospira antibodies in 10.96% (8/73 of the pigs. Immunohistochemistry allowed for the visualization of the Leptospira spp. antigen in the lungs of 87.67% (64/73 of the pigs. There was hyperplasia of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue and circulatory changes, such as congestion of alveolar septa, parenchymal hemorrhage and edema within the alveoli. Lung inflammation was more intense (p = 0.0312 in infected animals, which also showed increased thickening of the alveolar septa (p = 0.0006. Evaluation of alveolar type II (ATII cells using an anti-TTF-1 (Thyroid Transcription Factor-1 antibody showed that there were more immunostained cells in the non-infected pigs (53.8% than in the infected animals (46.2% and that there was an inverse correlation between TTF-1 positive cells and the inflammatory infiltrate. There was no amplification of Leptospira DNA in the lung samples, but leptospiral DNA amplification was observed in the kidneys. The results of this study showed that a relationship exists between a decrease in alveolar type II cells and a leptospire infection. Thus, this work points to the importance of studying the ATII cells as a potential marker of the level of lung innate immune response during leptospirosis in pigs.

  3. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

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    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Type...... II) constitutively express the class II MHC led us to hypothesize that Type II cells play a role in the adaptive immune response. Because Type II cells do not express detectable levels of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, we propose that Type II cells suppress activation of naive T cells...

  4. Glutathione synthesis and homeostasis in isolated type II alveolar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Warshaw, J.B.; Prough, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    After isolation of Type II cells from neonatal rat lung, the glutathione (GSH) levels in these cells were greatly depressed. The total glutathione content could be increased 5-fold within 12-24 h by incubating the cells in media containing sulfur amino acids. Similarly, the activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase was low immediately after isolation, but was increased 2-fold during the first 24 h culture. Addition of either GSH or GSSG to the culture media increased the GSH content of Type II cells 2-2.5-fold. Buthionine sulfoximine and NaF prevented this replenishment of GSH during 24 h culture. When the rates of de novo synthesis of GSH and GSSG from 35 S-cysteine were measured, the amounts of newly formed GSH decreased to 80% in the presence of GSH or GSSG. This suggests that exogenous GSH/GSSG can be taken up by the Type II cells to replenish the intracellular pool of GSH. Methionine was not as effective as cysteine in the synthesis of GSH. These results suggest that GSH levels in the isolated Type II cell can be maintained by de novo synthesis or uptake of exogenous GSH. Most of the GSH synthesized from cysteine, however, was excreted into the media of the cultured cells indicative of a potential role for the type II cell in export of the non-protein thiol

  5. Alveolar type II cell transplantation restores pulmonary surfactant protein levels in lung fibrosis.

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    Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Xaubet, Antoni; Peinado, Victor I; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Alveolar Type II cell transplantation has been proposed as a cell therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Its long-term benefits include repair of lung fibrosis, but its success partly depends on the restoration of lung homeostasis. Our aim was to evaluate surfactant protein restoration after alveolar Type II cell transplantation in an experimental model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Lung fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. Alveolar Type II cells were obtained from healthy animals and transplanted 14 days after bleomycin was administered. Furthermore, one group transplanted with alveolar macrophages and another group treated with surfactant were established to evaluate the specificity of the alveolar Type II cell transplantation. The animals were euthanized at 21 days after bleomycin instillation. Lung fibrosis was confirmed by a histologic study and an evaluation of the hydroxyproline content. Changes in surfactant proteins were evaluated by mRNA expression, Western blot and immunofluorescence studies. The group with alveolar Type II cell transplantation was the only one to show a reduction in the degree of lung fibrosis and a complete recovery to normal levels of surfactant proteins. One of the mechanisms involved in the beneficial effect of alveolar Type II cell transplantation is restoration of lung surfactant protein levels, which is required for proper respiratory function. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Robinson, P.C.; Mason, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Restoration of the alveolar epithelium after injury is thought to be dependent on the proliferation of alveolar type II cells. To understand the factors that may be involved in promoting type II cell proliferation in vivo, we determined the effect of potential mitogens and culture substrata on DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. Type II cells cultured in basal medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) exhibited essentially no DNA synthesis. Factors that stimulated 3 H-thymidine incorporation included cholera toxin, epidermal growth factor, and rat serum. The greatest degree of stimulation was achieved by plating type II cells on an extracellular matrix prepared from bovine corneal endothelial cells and then by culturing the pneumocytes in medium containing rat serum, cholera toxin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor. Under conditions of stimulation of 3 H-thymidine incorporation there was an increased DNA content per culture dish but no increase in cell number. The ability of various culture conditions to promote DNA synthesis in type II cells was verified by autoradiography. Type II cells were identified by the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions, which were visualized by tannic acid staining before autoradiography. These results demonstrate the importance of soluble factors and culture substratum in stimulating DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture

  7. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Ty...

  8. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from normal rats stimulates DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Mason, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proliferation of alveolar type II cells after lung injury is important for the restoration of the alveolar epithelium. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) may represent an important source of growth factors for alveolar type II cells. To test this possibility, BALF fluid was collected from normal rats, concentrated 10-fold by Amicon filtration, and tested for its ability to stimulate DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. BALF induced a dose-dependent increase in type II cell DNA synthesis resulting in a 6-fold increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation. Similar doses also stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation into rat lung fibroblasts by 6- to 8-fold. Removal of pulmonary surface active material by centrifugation did not significantly reduce the stimulatory activity of BALF for type II cells. The stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by BALF was reduced by 100% after heating at 100 degrees C for 10 min, and by approximately 80% after reduction with dithiothreitol, and after trypsin treatment. Dialysis of BALF against 1 N acetic acid resulted in a 27% reduction in stimulatory activity. The effect of BALF in promoting type II cell DNA synthesis was more pronounced when tested in the presence of serum, although serum itself has very little effect on type II cell DNA synthesis. When BALF was tested in combination with other substances that stimulate type II cell DNA synthesis (cholera toxin, insulin, epidermal growth factor, and acidic fibroblast growth factor), additive effects or greater were observed. When BALF was chromatographed over Sephadex G150, the activity eluted with an apparent molecular weight of 100 kDa

  9. Carbon black nanoparticles induce type II epithelial cells to release chemotaxins for alveolar macrophages

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    Donaldson Ken

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are a key cell in dealing with particles deposited in the lungs and in determining the subsequent response to that particle exposure. Nanoparticles are considered a potential threat to the lungs and the mechanism of pulmonary response to nanoparticles is currently under intense scrutiny. The type II alveolar epithelial cell has previously been shown to release chemoattractants which can recruit alveolar macrophages to sites of particle deposition. The aim of this study was to assess the responses of a type II epithelial cell line (L-2 to both fine and nanoparticle exposure in terms of secretion of chemotactic substances capable of inducing macrophage migration. Results Exposure of type II cells to carbon black nanoparticles resulted in significant release of macrophage chemoattractant compared to the negative control and to other dusts tested (fine carbon black and TiO2 and nanoparticle TiO2 as measured by macrophage migration towards type II cell conditioned medium. SDS-PAGE analysis of the conditioned medium from particle treated type II cells revealed that a higher number of protein bands were present in the conditioned medium obtained from type II cells treated with nanoparticle carbon black compared to other dusts tested. Size-fractionation of the chemotaxin-rich supernatant determined that the chemoattractants released from the epithelial cells were between 5 and 30 kDa in size. Conclusion The highly toxic nature and reactive surface chemistry of the carbon black nanoparticles has very likely induced the type II cell line to release pro-inflammatory mediators that can potentially induce migration of macrophages. This could aid in the rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of particle deposition and the subsequent removal of the particles by phagocytic cells such as macrophages and neutrophils. Future studies in this area could focus on the exact identity of the substance(s released by the

  10. Dichloroacetate Decreases Cell Health and Activates Oxidative Stress Defense Pathways in Rat Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes

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    Alexis Valauri-Orton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dichloroacetate (DCA is a water purification byproduct that is known to be hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic and to induce peripheral neuropathy and damage macrophages. This study characterizes the effects of the haloacetate on lung cells by exposing rat alveolar type II (L2 cells to 0–24 mM DCA for 6–24 hours. Increasing DCA concentration and the combination of increasing DCA concentration plus longer exposures decrease measures of cellular health. Length of exposure has no effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, glutathione, SOD, or CAT. Increasing DCA concentration alone does not affect total glutathione or its redox ratio but does increase activity in the SOD/CAT oxidative stress defense pathway. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells rely on SOD and CAT more than glutathione to combat DCA-induced stress.

  11. Arachidonate metabolism increases as rat alveolar type II cells differentiate in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipchik, R.J.; Chauncey, J.B.; Paine, R.; Simon, R.H.; Peters-Golden, M.

    1990-01-01

    Rat type II alveolar epithelial cells are known to undergo morphological and functional changes when maintained in culture for several days. Having previously demonstrated that these cells can deacylate free arachidonic acid (AA) and metabolize it to products of the cyclooxygenase pathway, the present study was undertaken to determine whether in vitro differentiation was accompanied by alterations in the availability and metabolism of AA. We assessed the constitutive and ionophore A23187-induced deacylation and metabolism of endogenous AA, as well as the metabolism of exogenously supplied AA, in primary cultures of rat type II cells at days 2, 4, and 7 after isolation. Levels of free endogenous AA were increased at day 4, whereas eicosanoid synthesis, predominantly prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin, increased markedly only at day 7. A similar time course of augmentation of prostanoid release was seen in response to exogenous AA. Type II cells cultured on fibronectin, intended to hasten cell flattening and spreading, demonstrated accelerated increases in available free AA in response to A23187; cells cultured on basement membrane derived from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma, known to maintain the type II phenotype, exhibited diminished levels of available free AA. From these findings, we conclude that alterations in arachidonate metabolism are linked to alterations in cellular phenotype. The potentiation of eicosanoid synthesis accompanying in vitro differentiation suggests a possible role for the alveolar epithelium in the modulation of inflammation and fibrosis in the distal lung

  12. Cell stress induces upregulation of osteopontin via the ERK pathway in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

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    Aki Kato

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in cell growth, differentiation, migration and tissue fibrosis. In human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and murine bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, OPN is upregulated in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II. However, the mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II is not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate the molecular mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II and elucidate the functions of OPN in AEC II and lung fibroblasts. Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 and mouse alveolar epithelial cells (MLE12, used as type II alveolar epithelial cell lines for in vitro assays, and human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC were treated with either bleomycin, doxorubicin or tunicamycin. The mechanism of OPN induction in these cells and its function as a pro-fibrotic cytokine on A549 and lung fibroblasts were analyzed. The DNA damaging reagents bleomycin and doxorubicin were found to induce OPN expression in A549, MLE12 and HPAEpiC. OPN expression was induced via activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK-dependent signaling pathway in A549 and MLE12. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-inducing reagent tunicamycin induced OPN mRNA expression in A549, MLE12 and HPAEpiC, and OPN mRNA expression was induced via activation of the ERK-dependent signaling pathway in A549 and MLE12. Another ER stress-inducing reagent thapsigargin induced the expression of OPN mRNA as well as the subsequent production of OPN in A549 and MLE12. Furthermore, OPN promoted the proliferation of A549 and the migration of normal human lung fibroblasts. Inhibition of OPN by small interference RNA or neutralizing antibody suppressed both of these responses. The results of this study suggest that cell stress induces the upregulation of OPN in AEC II by signaling through the ERK pathway, and that upregulated OPN may play a role in fibrogenesis of the lung.

  13. Establishment and evaluation of a stable cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line.

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    Feng Su

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells are recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. Recent research has confirmed that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs also play important roles against mycobacterium infections. Thus, establishing a stable cattle AEC line for future endogenous immune research on bacterial invasion is necessary. In the present study, we first purified and immortalized type II AECs (AEC II cells by transfecting them with a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse trancriptase gene. We then tested whether or not the immortalized cells retained the basic physiological properties of primary AECs by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Finally, we tested the secretion capacity of immortalized AEC II cells upon stimulation by bacterial invasion. The cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line (HTERT-AEC II that we established retained lung epithelial cell characteristics: the cells were positive for surfactants A and B, and they secreted tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in response to bacterial invasion. Thus, the cell line we established is a potential tool for research on the relationship between AECs and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  14. Paraquat-induced injury of type II alveolar cells. An in vitro model of oxidant injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillrud, D.M.; Martin, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Paraquat, a widely used herbicide, causes severe, often fatal lung damage. In vivo studies suggest the alveolar epithelial cells (types I and II) are specific targets of paraquat toxicity. This study used 51 Cr-labeled type II cells to demonstrate that paraquat (10-5 M) resulted in type II cell injury in vitro, independent of interacting immune effector agents. With 51 Cr release expressed as the cytotoxic index (Cl), type II cell injury was found to accelerate with increasing paraquat concentrations (10(-5) M, 10(-4) M, and 10(-3) M, resulting in a Cl of 12.5 +/- 2.2, 22.8 +/- 1.8, and 35.1 +/- 1.9, respectively). Paraquat-induced cytotoxicity (10(-4) M, with a Cl of 22.8 +/- 1.8) was effectively reduced by catalase 1,100 U/ml (Cl 8.0 +/- 3.2, p less than 0.001), superoxide dismutase, 300 U/ml (Cl 17.4 +/- 1.7, p less than 0.05), alpha tocopherol, 10 micrograms/ml (Cl 17.8 +/- 1.6, p less than 0.05). Paraquat toxicity (10(-3) M) was potentiated in the presence of 95% O2 with an increase in Cl from 31.1 +/- 1.7 to 36.4 +/- 2.3 (p less than 0.05). Paraquat-induced type II cell injury was noted as early as 4 h incubation by electron microscopic evidence of swelling of mitochondrial cristae and dispersion of nuclear chromatin. Thus, this in vitro model indicates that paraquat-induced type II cell injury can be quantified, confirmed by morphologic ultrastructural changes, significantly reduced by antioxidants, and potentiated by hyperoxia

  15. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

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    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-06-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit.Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in

  16. Cytotoxicity of heavy metals on primary cultured alveolar type II cells.

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    Takano, Yasuo; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Isao; Balis, John U; Yuri, Kazunari

    2002-06-01

    The lung is the primary target organ of airborne heavy metal-induced toxicity. The aims of this study were to investigate differential acute lung cytotoxicity caused by heavy metals using a primary culture of alveolar type II cells and to establish an in vitro assessment model of lung toxicity. The cytotoxicity of heavy metals was determined by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase release and (51)chromium release from lyzed cells. With respect to the LC(50) values, drug concentrations causing a 50% loss in cell viability, the mean value of Hg was 110 microM and that of Cd was 220 to 250 microM. Cytotoxicity was graded high for Hg and Cd, moderate for Pb and Ni, and negligible for Mn. Additional morphological observations of cell membrane integrity by scanning electron microscopy were compatible with the results of biochemical measurements. In conclusion, we have presented an in vitro assessment model of lung toxicity, which can be used effectively to assess the differential effects of heavy metals on alveolar type II cells. The findings suggests that the potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity are dependent on both the nature and the concentration of the metals.

  17. Targeted transgenic expression of beta(2)-adrenergic receptors to type II cells increases alveolar fluid clearance.

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    McGraw, D W; Fukuda, N; James, P F; Forbes, S L; Woo, A L; Lingrel, J B; Witte, D P; Matthay, M A; Liggett, S B

    2001-10-01

    Clearance of edema fluid from the alveolar space can be enhanced by endogenous and exogenous beta-agonists. To selectively delineate the effects of alveolar type II (ATII) cell beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (beta(2)-ARs) on alveolar fluid clearance (AFC), we generated transgenic (TG) mice that overexpressed the human beta(2)-AR under control of the rat surfactant protein C promoter. In situ hybridization showed that transgene expression was consistent with the distribution of ATII cells. TG mice expressed 4.8-fold greater beta(2)-ARs than nontransgenic (NTG) mice (939 +/- 113 vs. 194 +/- 18 fmol/mg protein; P < 0.001). Basal AFC in TG mice was approximately 40% greater than that in untreated NTG mice (15 +/- 1.4 vs. 10.9 +/- 0.6%; P < 0.005) and approached that of NTG mice treated with the beta-agonist formoterol (19.8 +/- 2.2%; P = not significant). Adrenalectomy decreased basal AFC in TG mice to 9.7 +/- 0.5% but had no effect on NTG mice (11.5 +/- 1.0%). Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(1)-isoform expression was unchanged, whereas alpha(2)-isoform expression was approximately 80% greater in the TG mice. These findings show that beta(2)-AR overexpression can be an effective means to increase AFC in the absence of exogenous agonists and that AFC can be stimulated by activation of beta(2)-ARs specifically expressed on ATII cells.

  18. Evidence for the involvement of cofilin in Aspergillus fumigatus internalization into type II alveolar epithelial cells.

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    Bao, Zhiyao; Han, Xuelin; Chen, Fangyan; Jia, Xiaodong; Zhao, Jingya; Zhang, Changjian; Yong, Chen; Tian, Shuguang; Zhou, Xin; Han, Li

    2015-08-13

    The internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus into alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) is tightly controlled by host cellular actin dynamics, which require close modulation of the ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin family. However, the role of cofilin in A. fumigatus internalization into AECs remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that germinated A. fumigatus conidia were able to induce phosphorylation of cofilin in A549 cells during the early stage of internalization. The modulation of cofilin activity by overexpression, knockdown, or mutation of the cofilin gene in A549 cells decreased the efficacy of A. fumigatus internalization. Reducing the phosphorylation status of cofilin with BMS-5 (LIM kinase inhibitor) or overexpression of the slingshot phosphatases also impeded A. fumigatus internalization. Both the C. botulimun C3 transferase (a specific RhoA inhibitor) and Y27632 (a specific ROCK inhibitor) reduced the internalization of A. fumigatus and the level of phosphorylated cofilin. β-1,3-glucan (the major component of the conidial cell wall) and its host cell receptor dectin-1 did not seem to be associated with cofilin phosphorylation during A. fumigatus infection. These results indicated that cofilin might be involved in the modulation of A. fumigatus internalization into type II alveolar epithelial cells through the RhoA-ROCK-LIM kinase pathway.

  19. Ultrastructural Study of Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells by High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

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    Xiaofei Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECIIs containing lamellar bodies (LBs are alveolar epithelial stem cells that have important functions in the repair of lung structure and function after lung injury. The ultrastructural changes in AECIIs after high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV with a high lung volume strategy or conventional ventilation were evaluated in a newborn piglet model with acute lung injury (ALI. After ALI with saline lavage, newborn piglets were randomly assigned into five study groups (three piglets in each group, namely, control (no mechanical ventilation, conventional ventilation for 24 h, conventional ventilation for 48 h, HFOV for 24 h, and HFOV for 48 h. The lower tissues of the right lung were obtained to observe the AECII ultrastructure. AECIIs with reduced numbers of microvilli, decreased LBs electron density, and vacuole-like LBs deformity were commonly observed in all five groups. Compared with conventional ventilation groups, the decrease in numbers of microvilli and LBs electron density, as well as LBs with vacuole-like appearance and polymorphic deformity, was less severe in HFOV with high lung volume strategy groups. AECIIs were injured during mechanical ventilation. HFOV with a high lung volume strategy resulted in less AECII damage than conventional ventilation.

  20. Deletion of SMARCA4 impairs alveolar epithelial type II cells proliferation and aggravates pulmonary fibrosis in mice

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    Danyi Peng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs injury and failed reconstitution of the AECs barrier are both integral to alveolar flooding and subsequent pulmonary fibrosis (PF. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms regulating the regeneration of AECs post-injury still remain unclear. SMARCA4 is a part of the large ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complex SWI/SNF, which is essential for kidney and heart fibrosis. We investigates SMARCA4 function in lung fibrosis by establishing PF mice model with bleomycin firstly and found that the expression of SMARCA4 was mainly enhanced in alveolar type II (ATII cells. Moreover, we established an alveolar epithelium-specific SMARCA4-deleted SP-C-rtTA/(tetO7-Cre/SMARCA4f/f mice (SOSM4Δ/Δ model, as well as a new SMARCA4-deleted alveolar type II (ATII-like mle-12 cell line. We found that the bleomycin-induced PF was more aggressive in SOSM4Δ/Δ mice. Also, the proliferation of ATII cells was decreased with the loss of SMARCA4 in vivo and in vitro. In addition, we observed increased proliferation of ATII cells accompanied by abnormally high expression of SMARCA4 in human PF lung sections. These data uncovered the indispensable role of SMARCA4 in the proliferation of ATII cells, which might affect the progression of PF.

  1. SARS-CoV replicates in primary human alveolar type II cell cultures but not in type I-like cells

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    Mossel, Eric C.; Wang, Jieru; Jeffers, Scott; Edeen, Karen E.; Wang, Shuanglin; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Funk, C. Joel; Manzer, Rizwan; Miura, Tanya A.; Pearson, Leonard D.; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a disease characterized by diffuse alveolar damage. We isolated alveolar type II cells and maintained them in a highly differentiated state. Type II cell cultures supported SARS-CoV replication as evidenced by RT-PCR detection of viral subgenomic RNA and an increase in virus titer. Virus titers were maximal by 24 hours and peaked at approximately 105 pfu/mL. Two cell types within the cultures were infected. One cell type was type II cells, which were positive for SP-A, SP-C, cytokeratin, a type II cell-specific monoclonal antibody, and Ep-CAM. The other cell type was composed of spindle-shaped cells that were positive for vimentin and collagen III and likely fibroblasts. Viral replication was not detected in type I-like cells or macrophages. Hence, differentiated adult human alveolar type II cells were infectible but alveolar type I-like cells and alveolar macrophages did not support productive infection. PMID:18022664

  2. Exogenous surfactant application in a rat lung ischemia reperfusion injury model: effects on edema formation and alveolar type II cells

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    Richter Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic exogenous surfactant therapy is a promising way to attenuate the ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury associated with lung transplantation and thereby to decrease the clinical occurrence of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, there is little information on the mode by which exogenous surfactant attenuates I/R injury of the lung. We hypothesized that exogenous surfactant may act by limiting pulmonary edema formation and by enhancing alveolar type II cell and lamellar body preservation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of exogenous surfactant therapy on the formation of pulmonary edema in different lung compartments and on the ultrastructure of the surfactant producing alveolar epithelial type II cells. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to a control, Celsior (CE or Celsior + surfactant (CE+S group (n = 5 each. In both Celsior groups, the lungs were flush-perfused with Celsior and subsequently exposed to 4 h of extracorporeal ischemia at 4°C and 50 min of reperfusion at 37°C. The CE+S group received an intratracheal bolus of a modified natural bovine surfactant at a dosage of 50 mg/kg body weight before flush perfusion. After reperfusion (Celsior groups or immediately after sacrifice (Control, the lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion and processed for light and electron microscopy. Stereology was used to quantify edematous changes as well as alterations of the alveolar epithelial type II cells. Results Surfactant treatment decreased the intraalveolar edema formation (mean (coefficient of variation: CE: 160 mm3 (0.61 vs. CE+S: 4 mm3 (0.75; p 3 (0.90 vs. CE+S: 0 mm3; p 3 (0.39 vs. CE+S: 268 mm3 (0.43; p 3(0.10 and CE+S (481 μm3(0.10 compared with controls (323 μm3(0.07; p Conclusion Intratracheal surfactant application before I/R significantly reduces the intraalveolar edema formation and development of atelectases but leads to an increased development of

  3. STAT3 regulates ABCA3 expression and influences lamellar body formation in alveolar type II cells.

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    Matsuzaki, Yohei; Besnard, Valérie; Clark, Jean C; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2008-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lamellar body associated lipid transport protein required for normal synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. In this study, we demonstrate that STAT3, activated by IL-6, regulates ABCA3 expression in vivo and in vitro. ABCA3 mRNA and immunostaining were decreased in adult mouse lungs in which STAT3 was deleted from the respiratory epithelium (Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice). Consistent with the role of STAT3, intratracheal IL-6 induced ABCA3 expression in vivo. Decreased ABCA3 and abnormalities in the formation of lamellar bodies, the intracellular site of surfactant lipid storage, were observed in Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. Expression of SREBP1a and 1c, SCAP, ABCA3, and AKT mRNAs was inhibited by deletion of Stat3 in type II cells isolated from Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. The activities of PI3K and AKT were required for normal Abca3 gene expression in vitro. AKT activation induced SREBP expression and increased the activity of the Abca3 promoter in vitro, consistent with the role of STAT3 signaling, at least in part via SREBP, in the regulation of ABCA3. ABCA3 expression is regulated by IL-6 in a pathway that includes STAT3, PI3K, AKT, SCAP, and SREBP. Activation of STAT3 after exposure to IL-6 enhances ABCA3 expression, which, in turn, influences pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

  4. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

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    Nyström Max

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response.

  5. Design-based stereological analysis of the lung parenchymal architecture and alveolar type II cells in surfactant protein A and D double deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A; Allen, L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2005-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II cells synthesize and secrete surfactant. The surfactant-associated proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D), members of the collectin protein family, participate in pulmonary immune defense, modulation of inflammation, and surfactant metabolism. Both proteins are known to have...... overlapping as well as distinct functions. The present study provides a design-based stereological analysis of adult mice deficient in both SP-A and SP-D (A(-)D(-)) with special emphasis on parameters characterizing alveolar architecture and surfactant-producing type II cells. Compared to wild-type, A......, but the mean volume of a single lamellar body remains constant. These results demonstrate that chronic deficiency of SP-A and SP-D in mice leads to parenchymal remodeling, type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and disturbed intracellular surfactant metabolism. The design-based stereological approach...

  6. Effect of substratum, serum and linoleic acid on the lipid synthesis of isolated alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cott, G.R.; Edeen, K.E.; Hale, S.G.; Mason, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the effect of cellular substratum (plastic or amnionic basement membrane (ABM)) and serum additive (fetal bovine (FBS), pork, horse, rat or human) on phospholipid synthesis in alveolar type II cells. The cells were isolated from adult rats, cultured for 48 hours under the various substratum and serum conditions, and then incubated for an additional 2 hours with [1- 14 C] acetate. ABM consistently caused a significant increase in the percent of radiolabel incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) and/or phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Serum also had a significant effect with the highest values of PC and saturated PC being obtained with rat serum and the highest PG values with horse serum. The fatty acid composition of the sera used varied according to species with the largest variations in percent linoleic acid. Supplementing media with linoleic acid resulted in a marked increase in saturated PC values and a fall in PG values. Therefore, they conclude that: 1) ABM improves differentiated function, 2) FBS supplementation may not be optimal, and 3) the different effects of linoleic acid supplementation on PC, saturated PC, and PG values suggests an independent regulation of synthesis for these lipid species in vitro

  7. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

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    Prasse Antje

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11 in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II. AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response.

  8. The rate-limiting reaction in phosphatidylcholine synthesis by alveolar type II cells isolated from fetal rat lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, M.; Batenburg, J.J.; Golde, L.M.G. van; Smith, B.T.

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The rate-limiting reaction in the formation of phosphatidylcholine by type II cells isolated from fetal rat lung was examined. 2. 2. Studies on the uptake of [Me-3H]choline and its incorporation into its metabolites indicated that in these cells the choline phosphate pool was much larger

  9. Balance of life and death in alveolar epithelial type II cells: proliferation, apoptosis, and the effects of cyclic stretch on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Lynn M; Luellen, Charlean; Zhang, Zhihong; Tague, Larry L; Sinclair, Scott E; Waters, Christopher M

    2011-10-01

    After acute lung injury, repair of the alveolar epithelium occurs on a substrate undergoing cyclic mechanical deformation. While previous studies showed that mechanical stretch increased alveolar epithelial cell necrosis and apoptosis, the impact of cell death during repair was not determined. We examined epithelial repair during cyclic stretch (CS) in a scratch-wound model of primary rat alveolar type II (ATII) cells and found that CS altered the balance between proliferation and cell death. We measured cell migration, size, and density; intercellular gap formation; cell number, proliferation, and apoptosis; cytoskeletal organization; and focal adhesions in response to scratch wounding followed by CS for up to 24 h. Under static conditions, wounds were closed by 24 h, but repair was inhibited by CS. Wounding stimulated cell motility and proliferation, actin and vinculin redistribution, and focal adhesion formation at the wound edge, while CS impeded cell spreading, initiated apoptosis, stimulated cytoskeletal reorganization, and attenuated focal adhesion formation. CS also caused significant intercellular gap formation compared with static cells. Our results suggest that CS alters several mechanisms of epithelial repair and that an imbalance occurs between cell death and proliferation that must be overcome to restore the epithelial barrier.

  10. DJ-1 Modulates Nuclear Erythroid 2-Related Factor-2-Mediated Protection in Human Primary Alveolar Type II Cells in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmed, Karim; Messier, Elise M; Zhou, Wenbo; Tuder, Rubin M; Freed, Curt R; Chu, Hong Wei; Kelsen, Steven G; Bowler, Russell P; Mason, Robert J; Kosmider, Beata

    2016-09-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a main source of oxidative stress and a key risk factor for emphysema, which consists of alveolar wall destruction. Alveolar type (AT) II cells are in the gas exchange regions of the lung. We isolated primary ATII cells from deidentified organ donors whose lungs were not suitable for transplantation. We analyzed the cell injury obtained from nonsmokers, moderate smokers, and heavy smokers. DJ-1 protects cells from oxidative stress and induces nuclear erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, which activates the antioxidant defense system. In ATII cells isolated from moderate smokers, we found DJ-1 expression by RT-PCR, and Nrf2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 translocation by Western blotting and immunocytofluorescence. In ATII cells isolated from heavy smokers, we detected Nrf2 and HO-1 cytoplasmic localization. Moreover, we found high oxidative stress, as detected by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) (immunoblotting), inflammation by IL-8 and IL-6 levels by ELISA, and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay in ATII cells obtained from heavy smokers. Furthermore, we detected early DJ-1 and late Nrf2 expression after ATII cell treatment with CS extract. We also overexpressed DJ-1 by adenovirus construct and found that this restored Nrf2 and HO-1 expression and induced nuclear translocation in heavy smokers. Moreover, DJ-1 overexpression also decreased ATII cell apoptosis caused by CS extract in vitro. Our results indicate that DJ-1 activates the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense system. Furthermore, DJ-1 overexpression can restore the impaired Nrf2 pathway, leading to ATII cell protection in heavy smokers. This suggests a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting DJ-1 in CS-related lung diseases.

  11. Long Term Culture of the A549 Cancer Cell Line Promotes Multilamellar Body Formation and Differentiation towards an Alveolar Type II Pneumocyte Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, James Ross; Abdullatif, Muhammad Bilal; Burnett, Edward C; Kempsell, Karen E; Conforti, Franco; Tolley, Howard; Collins, Jane E; Davies, Donna E

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary research requires models that represent the physiology of alveolar epithelium but concerns with reproducibility, consistency and the technical and ethical challenges of using primary or stem cells has resulted in widespread use of continuous cancer or other immortalized cell lines. The A549 'alveolar' cell line has been available for over four decades but there is an inconsistent view as to its suitability as an appropriate model for primary alveolar type II (ATII) cells. Since most work with A549 cells involves short term culture of proliferating cells, we postulated that culture conditions that reduced proliferation of the cancer cells would promote a more differentiated ATII cell phenotype. We examined A549 cell growth in different media over long term culture and then used microarray analysis to investigate temporal regulation of pathways involved in cell cycle and ATII differentiation; we also made comparisons with gene expression in freshly isolated human ATII cells. Analyses indicated that long term culture in Ham's F12 resulted in substantial modulation of cell cycle genes to result in a quiescent population of cells with significant up-regulation of autophagic, differentiation and lipidogenic pathways. There were also increased numbers of up- and down-regulated genes shared with primary cells suggesting adoption of ATII characteristics and multilamellar body (MLB) development. Subsequent Oil Red-O staining and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed MLB expression in the differentiated A549 cells. This work defines a set of conditions for promoting ATII differentiation characteristics in A549 cells that may be advantageous for studies with this cell line.

  12. Water-pipe smoke condensate increases the internalization of Mycobacterium Bovis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Alipoor, Shamila D; Movassaghi, Masoud; Varahram, Mohammad; Ghorbani, Jahangir; Folkerts, Gert; Garssen, Johan; Adcock, Ian M

    2017-04-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, and there is an association between tobacco smoke and TB. Water pipe smoking has become an increasing problem not only in Middle Eastern countries but also globally because users consider it as safer than cigarettes. The presence of high levels of toxic substances in water-pipe smoke may be a predisposing factor that enhances the incidence of pulmonary disorders. For example, uncontrolled macropinocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells following exposure to water-pipe smoke may predispose subjects to pulmonary infection. Here, we studied the effects of water-pipe condense (WPC) on the internalization of Mycobacterium Bovis BCG by macropinocytosis in the alveolar epithelial cell line A549. A549 cells were exposed to WPC (4 mg/ml) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Cell viability was studied using the methyl thiazolyldipenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay and proliferation by bromodeoxyUridine (BrdU) incorporation. Cells were exposed to FITC-Dextran (1 mg/ml) (as a control) and FITC-BCG (MOI = 10) for 20 min at 37 °C before cells were collected and the uptake of BCG-FITC determined by flow cytometry. Similar experiments were performed at 4 °C as a control. The Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 (1 μM) was used to assess the mechanism by which WPC enhanced BCG uptake. WPC (4 mg/ml) increased the uptake of BCG-FITC after 72 (1.3 ± 0.1 fold, p WPC also significantly increased the uptake of FITC-Dextran (2.9 ± 0.3 fold, p WPC significantly decreased cell viability after 24 (84 ± 2%, p WPC. Cell proliferation showed a decreasing trend in a time-dependent manner with WPC exposure. WPC exposure increased epithelial cell endocytosis activity and death as well as enhancing their capacity for macropinocytosis. Our in vitro data indicates possible harmful effects of WPC on the ability of lung epithelial cells to phagocytose mycobacterium.

  13. Effect of exogenous surfactants on viability and DNA synthesis in A549, immortalized mouse type II and isolated rat alveolar type II cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemhöner, Andreas; Jennings, Paul; Haller, Thomas; Rüdiger, Mario; Simbruner, Georg

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In mechanically ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), exogenous surfactant application has been demonstrated both to decrease DNA-synthesis but also and paradoxically to increase epithelial cell proliferation. However, the effect of exogenous surfactant has

  14. The cytoprotective role of DJ-1 and p45 NFE2 against human primary alveolar type II cell injury and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li Hui; Bahmed, Karim; Lin, Chih-Ru; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Bolla, Sudhir; Criner, Gerard J; Kelsen, Steven; Madesh, Muniswamy; Kosmider, Beata

    2018-02-23

    Emphysema is characterized by irreversibly enlarged airspaces and destruction of alveolar walls. One of the factors contributing to this disease pathogenesis is an elevation in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the lung. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells produce and secrete pulmonary surfactants and proliferate to restore the epithelium after damage. We isolated ATII cells from control non-smokers, smokers and patients with emphysema to determine the role of NFE2 (nuclear factor, erythroid-derived 2). NFE2 is a heterodimer composed of two subunits, a 45 kDa (p45 NFE2) and 18 kDa (p18 NFE2) polypeptides. Low expression of p45 NFE2 in patients with emphysema correlated with a high ECM degradation. Moreover, we found that NFE2 knockdown increased cell death induced by cigarette smoke extract. We also studied the cross talk between p45 NFE2 and DJ-1. DJ-1 protein is a redox-sensitive chaperone that protects cells from oxidative stress. We detected that cigarette smoke significantly increased p45 NFE2 levels in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild-type mice. Our results indicate that p45 NFE2 expression is induced by exposure to cigarette smoke, has a cytoprotective activity against cell injury, and its downregulation in human primary ATII cells may contribute to emphysema pathogenesis.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Proteome Modulations in Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells in Response to PulmonaryAspergillus fumigatusInfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Pegah; Bracht, Thilo; Molinier-Frenkel, Válerie; Castellano, Flavia; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Schuster, Marc; Weski, Juliane; Hasenberg, Anja; Kraus, Andreas; Poschet, Gernot; Hager, Thomas; Theegarten, Dirk; Opitz, Christiane A; Brakhage, Axel A; Sitek, Barbara; Hasenberg, Mike; Gunzer, Matthias

    2017-12-01

    The ubiquitous mold Aspergillus fumigatus threatens immunosuppressed patients as inducer of lethal invasive aspergillosis. A. fumigatus conidia are airborne and reach the alveoli, where they encounter alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Previous studies reported the importance of the surfactant-producing AEC II during A. fumigatus infection via in vitro experiments using cell lines. We established a negative isolation protocol yielding untouched primary murine AEC II with a purity >90%, allowing ex vivo analyses of the cells, which encountered the mold in vivo By label-free proteome analysis of AEC II isolated from mice 24h after A. fumigatus or mock infection we quantified 2256 proteins and found 154 proteins to be significantly differentially abundant between both groups (ANOVA p value ≤ 0.01, ratio of means ≥1.5 or ≤0.67, quantified with ≥2 peptides). Most of these proteins were higher abundant in the infected condition and reflected a comprehensive activation of AEC II on interaction with A. fumigatus This was especially represented by proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation, hence energy production. However, the most strongly induced protein was the l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) Interleukin 4 induced 1 (IL4I1) with a 42.9 fold higher abundance (ANOVA p value 2.91 -10 ). IL4I1 has previously been found in B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and rare neurons. Increased IL4I1 abundance in AEC II was confirmed by qPCR, Western blot and immunohistology. Furthermore, A. fumigatus infected lungs showed high levels of IL4I1 metabolic products. Importantly, higher IL4I1 abundance was also confirmed in lung tissue from human aspergilloma. Because LAAO are key enzymes for bactericidal product generation, AEC II might actively participate in pathogen defense. We provide insights into proteome changes of primary AEC II thereby opening new avenues to analyze the molecular changes of this central lung cell on infectious threats. Data are available via Proteome

  16. Alterations of alveolar type II cells and intraalveolar surfactant after bronchoalveolar lavage and perfluorocarbon ventilation. An electron microscopical and stereological study in the rat lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhardt Wolfram

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL has been used in animals to induce surfactant depletion and to study therapeutical interventions of subsequent respiratory insufficiency. Intratracheal administration of surface active agents such as perfluorocarbons (PFC can prevent the alveolar collapse in surfactant depleted lungs. However, it is not known how BAL or subsequent PFC administration affect the intracellular and intraalveolar surfactant pool. Methods Male wistar rats were surfactant depleted by BAL and treated for 1 hour by conventional mechanical ventilation (Lavaged-Gas, n = 5 or partial liquid ventilation with PF 5080 (Lavaged-PF5080, n = 5. For control, 10 healthy animals with gas (Healthy-Gas, n = 5 or PF5080 filled lungs (Healthy-PF5080, n = 5 were studied. A design-based stereological approach was used for quantification of lung parenchyma and the intracellular and intraalveolar surfactant pool at the light and electron microscopic level. Results Compared to Healthy-lungs, Lavaged-animals had more type II cells with lamellar bodies in the process of secretion and freshly secreted lamellar body-like surfactant forms in the alveoli. The fraction of alveolar epithelial surface area covered with surfactant and total intraalveolar surfactant content were significantly smaller in Lavaged-animals. Compared with Gas-filled lungs, both PF5080-groups had a significantly higher total lung volume, but no other differences. Conclusion After BAL-induced alveolar surfactant depletion the amount of intracellularly stored surfactant is about half as high as in healthy animals. In lavaged animals short time liquid ventilation with PF5080 did not alter intra- or extracellular surfactant content or subtype composition.

  17. Hydrogen protects against hyperoxia-induced apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells via activation of PI3K/Akt/Foxo3a signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Liang, Mulin; Dang, Hongxing; Fang, Fang; Xu, Feng; Liu, Chengjun

    2018-01-08

    Oxidative stress is regarded as a key regulator in the pathogenesis of prolonged hyperoxia-induced lung injury, which causes injury to alveolar epithelial cells and eventually leads to development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Many studies have shown that hydrogen has a protective effect in a variety of cells. However, the mechanisms by which hydrogen rescues cells from damage due to oxidative stress in BPD remains to be fully elucidated. This study sought to evaluate the effects of hydrogen on hyperoxia-induced lung injury and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Primary type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECIIs) were divided into four groups: control (21% oxygen), hyperoxia (95% oxygen), hyperoxia + hydrogen, and hyperoxia + hydrogen + LY294002 (a PI3K/Akt inhibitor). Proliferation and apoptosis of AECIIs were assessed using MTS assay and flow cytometry (FCM), respectively. Gene and protein expression were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) and western blot analysis. Stimulation with hyperoxia decreased the expression of P-Akt, P- FoxO3a, cyclinD1 and Bcl-2. Hyperoxic conditions increased levels of Bim, Bax, and Foxo3a, which induced proliferation restriction and apoptosis of AECIIs. These effects of hyperoxia were reversed with hydrogen pretreatment. Furthermore, the protective effects of hydrogen were abrogated by PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002. The results indicate that hydrogen protects AECIIs from hyperoxia-induced apoptosis by inhibiting apoptosis factors and promoting the expression of anti-apoptosis factors. These effects were associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of surfactant protein A reveals dissociation of lipid aggregation and lipid uptake by alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunezawa, W; Sano, H; Sohma, H; McCormack, F X; Voelker, D R; Kuroki, Y

    1998-09-08

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) binds to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and induces phospholipid vesicle aggregation. It also regulates the uptake and secretion of surfactant lipids by alveolar type II cells. We introduced the single mutations Glu195-->Gln (rE195Q), Lys201-->Ala (rK201A) and Lys203-->Ala (rK203A) for rat SP-A, Arg199-->Ala (hR199A) and Lys201-->Ala (hK201A) for human SP-A, and the triple mutations Arg197, Lys201 and Lys203-->Ala (rR197A/K201A/K203A) for rat SP-A, into cDNAs for SP-A, and expressed the recombinant proteins using baculovirus vectors. All recombinant proteins avidly bound to DPPC liposomes. rE195Q, rK201A, rK203A, hR199A and hK201A function with activity comparable to wild type SP-A. Although rR197A/K201A/K203A was a potent inducer of phospholipid vesicle aggregation, it failed to stimulate lipid uptake. rR197A/K201A/K203A was a weak inhibitor for lipid secretion and did not competed with rat [125I]SP-A for receptor occupancy. From these results, we conclude that Lys201 and Lys203 of rat SP-A, and Arg199 and Lys201 of human SP-A are not individually critical for the interaction with lipids and type II cells, and that Glu195 of rat SP-A can be replaced with Gln without loss of SP-A functions. This study also demonstrates that the SP-A-mediated lipid uptake is not directly correlated with phospholipid vesicle aggregation, and that specific interactions of SP-A with type II cells are involved in the lipid uptake process.

  19. Effect of irradiation/bone marrow transplantation on alveolar epithelial type II cells is aggravated in surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Madsen, Jens; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Schneider, Jan Philipp; Schipke, Julia; Lutz, Dennis; Birkelbach, Bastian; Knudsen, Lars; Botto, Marina; Ochs, Matthias; Clark, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation (BM-Tx) is a frequent therapeutic intervention causing pathology to the lung. Although alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells are essential for lung function and are damaged by irradiation, the long-term consequences of irradiation and BM-Tx are not well characterized. In addition, it is unknown whether surfactant protein D (SP-D) influences the response of AE2 cells to the injurious events. Therefore, wildtype (WT) and SP-D -/- mice were subjected to a myeloablative whole body irradiation dose of 8 Gy and subsequent BM-Tx and compared with age- and sex-matched untreated controls. AE2 cell changes were investigated quantitatively by design-based stereology. Compared with WT, untreated SP-D -/- mice showed a higher number of larger sized AE2 cells and a greater amount of surfactant-storing lamellar bodies. Irradiation and BM-Tx induced hyperplasia and hypertrophy in WT and SP-D -/- mice as well as the formation of giant lamellar bodies. The experimentally induced alterations were more severe in the SP-D -/- than in the WT mice, particularly with respect to the surfactant-storing lamellar bodies which were sometimes extremely enlarged in SP-D -/- mice. In conclusion, irradiation and BM-Tx have profound long-term effects on AE2 cells and their lamellar bodies. These data may explain some of the clinical pulmonary consequences of this procedure. The data should also be taken into account when BM-Tx is used as an experimental procedure to investigate the impact of bone marrow-derived cells for the phenotype of a specific genotype in the mouse.

  20. In vivo metabolism of pulmonary alveolar epithelial type II pneumonocytes and macrophages from Syrian hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfleger, R.C.; Waide, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Young adult Syrian hamsters were injected intraperitoneally with 14 C-glycerol and 3 H-palmitate 17 hr before they were sacrificed and pulmonary alveolar epithelial type II cells and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were isolated. Incorporation of the two labeled components into the cellular lipids showed that the 3 H-specific activity of the phospholipids from the type II cells was three times that of the PAM and the utilization of 14 C-glycerol into phosphatidyl choline (PC) was 50% greater than incorporation into the PC from PAMs. The PC from type II cells showed that 30% was disaturated and from PAMs 21% was disaturated. Another phosphatide, phosphatidyl glycerol contained about one-third of the molecules in disaturated form. These data are consistent with the view that both type II cells and PAMs can synthesize surface-active phospholipids but it is generally accepted that only the pulmonary alveolar epithelial type II cells excrete the disaturated phospholipids which comprise the surface-active components of pulmonary surfactant

  1. Curcumin modulates the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines by type II alveolar epithelial cells in a rat COPD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lixing Gan,1 Chengye Li,2 Jian Wang,1 Xuejun Guo3 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Xin Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Studies have suggested that histone modification has a positive impact on various aspects associated with the progression of COPD. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2 suppresses proinflammatory gene expression through deacetylation of core histones.Objective: To investigate the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II in a rat COPD model and regulation of HDAC2 expression by curcumin in comparison with corticosteroid.Materials and methods: The rat COPD model was established by cigarette smoke exposure and confirmed by histology and pathophysioloy. AEC II were isolated and cultured in vitro from the COPD models and control animals. The cells were treated with curcumin, corticosteroid, or trichostatin A, and messenger RNA (mRNA expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α (MIP-2α was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The expression of HDAC2 was measured by Western blot. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect H3/H4 acetylation and H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of three kinds of chemokine genes (IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α. Results: Compared to the control group, the mRNAs of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α were upregulated 4.48-fold, 3.14-fold, and 2.83-fold, respectively, in the AEC II from COPD model. The protein expression of HDAC2 in the AEC II from COPD model was significantly lower than from the control group (P<0

  2. Runx3 is a key modulator during the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of alveolar type II cells in animal models of BPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiping; Fu, Jianhua; Yao, Li; Hou, Ana; Xue, Xindong

    2017-11-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a major challenge for premature infants; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We previously reported that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar type II (AT2) epithelial cells influences the normal alveolar development process. In this study, we wished to examine whether Runx3 is an important factor for BPD by regulating EMT in AT2 cells. In vivo, animal models of BPD were established by placing newborn rats in hyperoxia tanks. Lung tissue and isolated AT2 cells were collected on different days following exposure to oxygen. The pathological changes in lung tissue, alveolar development and Runx3 expression were then investigated. In vitro, RLE-6TN cells were divided into 5 groups as follows: the cont-rol, Runx3, siRunx3, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and Runx3 + TGF-β1 groups, and the biomarkers of EMT were investigated. In the newborn rat model of BPD, Runx3 protein and mRNA levels in both lung tissue and BPD-derived AT2 cells were significantly lower than those in the control group. The correlation between Runx3 protein expression and pulmonary development indicators was analyzed; Runx3 expression positively correlated with the radial alveolar count (RAC) and the percentage of smooth muscle actin-positive secondary septa, but negatively correlated with alveolar wall thickness. EMT was observed in the RLE-6TN cells in which the Runx3 gene was knocked down and follwoing TGF-β1‑induced EMT stimulation; however, TGF-β1 failed to induce EMT in the RLE-6TN cells overexpressing Runx3. On the whole, our data indicte that low Runx3 levels may promote EMT, while high Runx3 levels inhibit TGF-β1-induced EMT. Therefore, we predict that low levels of Runx3 in BPD lung tissue may promote EMT in AT2 cells, thus affecting alveolar development.

  3. [Effects of heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide pathway on the mitochondrial fusion in rat alveolar epithelial type II cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haojuan; Shi, Jia; Dong, Shu'an; Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Jianbo

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effects of heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) pathway on mitochondrial fusion in rat alveolar epithelial type II cells (AEC II) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Once the cultured in vitro rat AEC II cells line RLE-6TN reached confluency of 85%, they were subcultured and randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5 each). RLE-6TN cells were routinely cultured in control group. The cells in LPS group was stimulated with 10 mg/L LPS to reproduce the model of endotoxin challenge in AECII cells. The cells in carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2, in vitro CO release agent) + LPS group (CL group) and Hemin (HO-1 inducer) + LPS group (HL group) were pretreated with 100 μmol/L CORM-2 or 20 μmol/L Hemin for 1 hour, respectively, followed by 10 mg/L LPS stimulation. The cells in zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP-IX, HO-1 inhibitor) + LPS group (ZL group) was pretreated with 10 μmol/L ZnPP-IX for 0.5 hour followed by 10 mg/L LPS stimulation. The cells in CORM-2 + ZnPP-IX + LPS group (CZL group) and Hemin + ZnPP-IX + LPS group (HZL group) were pretreated with 100 μmol/L CORM-2 or 20 μmol/L Hemin respectively for 1 hour, and other treatments were similar to those previously described in ZL group. At 24 hours after LPS stimulation, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the supernatant were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the protein expressions of HO-1, mitochondrial fusion related proteins 1 and 2 (Mfn1, Mfn2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) were determined by Western Blot. Compared with control group, IL-6 and TNF-α contents in the supernatant were increased, HO-1 protein expression was up-regulated, Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 protein expressions were down-regulated in all treatment groups. Compared with LPS group, IL-6 and TNF-α contents were significantly decreased after CORM-2 or Hemin pretreatment [IL-6 (ng/L): 48.6±3.7, 48.4±3.1 vs. 58.7±2.5; TNF-α (ng/L): 40.7±5.3, 39.4±4.3 vs. 51.8±5

  4. DJ-1 Modulates Nuclear Erythroid 2–Related Factor-2–Mediated Protection in Human Primary Alveolar Type II Cells in Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmed, Karim; Messier, Elise M.; Zhou, Wenbo; Tuder, Rubin M.; Freed, Curt R.; Chu, Hong Wei; Kelsen, Steven G.; Bowler, Russell P.; Mason, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a main source of oxidative stress and a key risk factor for emphysema, which consists of alveolar wall destruction. Alveolar type (AT) II cells are in the gas exchange regions of the lung. We isolated primary ATII cells from deidentified organ donors whose lungs were not suitable for transplantation. We analyzed the cell injury obtained from nonsmokers, moderate smokers, and heavy smokers. DJ-1 protects cells from oxidative stress and induces nuclear erythroid 2–related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, which activates the antioxidant defense system. In ATII cells isolated from moderate smokers, we found DJ-1 expression by RT-PCR, and Nrf2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 translocation by Western blotting and immunocytofluorescence. In ATII cells isolated from heavy smokers, we detected Nrf2 and HO-1 cytoplasmic localization. Moreover, we found high oxidative stress, as detected by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) (immunoblotting), inflammation by IL-8 and IL-6 levels by ELISA, and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay in ATII cells obtained from heavy smokers. Furthermore, we detected early DJ-1 and late Nrf2 expression after ATII cell treatment with CS extract. We also overexpressed DJ-1 by adenovirus construct and found that this restored Nrf2 and HO-1 expression and induced nuclear translocation in heavy smokers. Moreover, DJ-1 overexpression also decreased ATII cell apoptosis caused by CS extract in vitro. Our results indicate that DJ-1 activates the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense system. Furthermore, DJ-1 overexpression can restore the impaired Nrf2 pathway, leading to ATII cell protection in heavy smokers. This suggests a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting DJ-1 in CS-related lung diseases. PMID:27093578

  5. Comparative study of the effects of PM1-induced oxidative stress on autophagy and surfactant protein B and C expressions in lung alveolar type II epithelial MLE-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ru; Guan, Longfei; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinxia; Rui, Wei; Zhang, Fang; Ding, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    There is a strong link between smaller air pollution particles and a range of serious health conditions. Thus, there is a need for understanding the impacts of airborne fine particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter of PM1) on lung alveolar epithelial cells. In the present study, mouse lung epithelial type II cell MLE-12 cells were used to examine the intracellular oxidative responses and the surfactant protein expressions after exposure to various concentrations of PM1 collected from an urban site and a steel-factory site (referred as uPM1 and sPM1 hereafter, respectively). Physicochemical characterization of PM1 was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity and autophagy induced by PM1 were assessed by using comprehensive approaches after MLE-12 cells were exposed to different concentrations of PM1 for various times. Expression of surfactant proteins B and C in MLE-12 cells was determined by Western blotting. All of the tested PM1 induced cytotoxicity evidenced by significant decrease of cell viability and increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in the exposed cells compared with the unexposed cells. A similar pattern of increase of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was also observed. PM1-induced autophagy was evidenced by an increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3) puncta, accumulation of LC3II, and increased levels of beclin1. Data from Western blotting showed significant decrease of surfactant protein B and C expressions. Relatively high concentrations of transition metals, including Fe, Cu and Mn, may be responsible for the higher toxicity of sPM1 compared with uPM1. Moreover, pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or Chelex (a metal chelating agent, which removes a large suite of metals from PM1) prevented the increase of

  6. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Philip L.; Lee, Jae W.; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R.; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W.; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at ∼95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days...

  7. Lipoteichoic acid induces surfactant protein-A biosynthesis in human alveolar type II epithelial cells through activating the MEK1/2-ERK1/2-NF-κB pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Feng-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a gram-positive bacterial outer membrane component, can cause septic shock. Our previous studies showed that the gram-negative endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, could induce surfactant protein-A (SP-A production in human alveolar epithelial (A549 cells. Objectives In this study, we further evaluated the effect of LTA on SP-A biosynthesis and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms. Methods A549 cells were exposed to LTA. Levels of SP-A, nuclear factor (NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, and mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK1 were determined. Results Exposure of A549 cells to 10, 30, and 50 μg/ml LTA for 24 h did not affect cell viability. Meanwhile, when exposed to 30 μg/ml LTA for 1, 6, and 24 h, the biosynthesis of SP-A mRNA and protein in A549 cells significantly increased. As to the mechanism, LTA enhanced cytosolic and nuclear NF-κB levels in time-dependent manners. Pretreatment with BAY 11–7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, significantly inhibited LTA-induced SP-A mRNA expression. Sequentially, LTA time-dependently augmented phosphorylation of ERK1/2. In addition, levels of phosphorylated MEK1 were augmented following treatment with LTA. Conclusions Therefore, this study showed that LTA can increase SP-A synthesis in human alveolar type II epithelial cells through sequentially activating the MEK1-ERK1/2-NF-κB-dependent pathway.

  8. In vitro effects of water-pipe smoke condensate on the endocytic activity of Type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549 with bacillus Calmette–Guérin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Adcock

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: WPC exposure increased epithelial cells' permeability and death and enhanced their capacity for macropinocytosis. Our in vitro data suggest possible harmful effects of WPC on the ability of lung epithelial cells to phagocytose mycobacteria. Further studies will be conducted to understand the mechanism of action of WPC.

  9. The Role of Alveolar Epithelial Type II-Like Cells in Uptake of Structurally Different Antigens and in Polarisation of Local Immune Responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akgün, J.; Schabussova, I.; Schwarzer, Martin; Kozáková, Hana; Kundi, M.; Wiedermann, U.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2015) E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BIRCH POLLEN ALLERGEN * DENDRITIC CELLS * AIRWAY INFLAMMATION Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  10. Ca2+ induced surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cultures isolated from the H-2Kb-tsA58 transgenic mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jennings, Paul; Bertocchi, Cristina; Frick, Manfred; Haller, Thomas; Pfaller, Walter; Dietl, Paul

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: There is a need for the development of transgenic mice to elucidate molecular mechanisms in surfactant secretion. However at present very little is known about the regulation of surfactant exocytosis in murine alveolar type II (AT II) cells. METHODS: We brought AT II cells isolated

  11. Polarized light microscopy reveals physiological and drug-induced changes in surfactant membrane assembly in alveolar type II pneumocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Thomas; Cerrada, Alejandro; Pfaller, Kristian; Braubach, Peter; Felder, Edward

    2018-01-06

    In alveolar type II (AT II) cells, pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthetized, stored and exocytosed from lamellar bodies (LBs), specialized large secretory organelles. By applying polarization microscopy (PM), we confirm a specific optical anisotropy of LBs, which indicates a liquid-crystalline mesophase of the stored surfactant phospholipids (PL) and an unusual case of a radiation-symmetric, spherocrystalline organelle. Evidence is shown that the degree of anisotropy is dependent on the amount of lipid layers and their degree of hydration, but unaffected by acutely modulating vital cell parameters like intravesicular pH or cellular energy supply. In contrast, physiological factors that perturb this structure include osmotic cell volume changes and LB exocytosis. In addition, we found two pharmaceuticals, Amiodarone and Ambroxol, both of which severely affect the liquid-crystalline order. Our study shows that PM is an easy, very sensitive, but foremost non-invasive and label-free method able to collect important structural information of PS assembly in live AT II cells which otherwise would be accessible by destructive or labor intense techniques only. This may open new approaches to dynamically investigate LB biosynthesis - the incorporation, folding and packing of lipid membranes - or the initiation of pathological states that manifest in altered LB structures. Due to the observed drug effects, we further suggest that PM provides an appropriate way to study unspecific drug interactions with alveolar cells and even drug-membrane interactions in general. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in alveolar macrophages, type II pneumocytes, and airways in smokers: relationship to lung function and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison M; Loy, Leanna B; Abboud, Raja T; D'Armiento, Jeanine M; Coxson, Harvey O; Muller, Nestor L; Kalloger, Steve; Li, Xing; Mark Elliott, W; English, John C; Finley, Richard J; Paré, Peter D

    2014-08-01

    An imbalance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Matrix metalloproteinase-1, also known as interstitial collagenase, has been implicated as a potentially important proteinase in the genesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and, more specifically, emphysema. We performed quantitative immunohistochemical assessment of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in the resected lung of 20 smokers/ex-smokers who had varying severity of airflow obstruction and emphysema and compared this with the lungs of 5 nonsmokers. Emphysema was measured using a morphometric measure of the lungs' surface area/volume ratio and with qualitative and quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema. There were significantly more matrix metalloproteinase-1-expressing alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes as well as a greater percentage of small airways that stained positively for matrix metalloproteinase-1 in the lungs of smokers than in those of nonsmokers (p lung surface area/volume ratio and to qualitative estimates of emphysema on CT. These findings suggest that cigarette smoking increases expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in alveolar macrophages as well as in alveolar and small airway epithelial cells. Smokers who develop emphysema have increased alveolar macrophage expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1.

  13. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Stoop (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies

  14. Expression of cyclin D{sub 1} during endotoxin-induced aleveolar type II cell hyperplasia in rat lung and the detection of apoptotic cells during the remodeling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfaigzi, J.; Wood, M.B.; Johnson, N.F.

    1995-12-01

    Our studies have shown that endotoxin intratracheally instilled into the rat lung induces proliferation of alveolar type II cells. In that study, the alveolar type II cells. In that study, the alveolar type II cell hyperplasia occurred 2 d after instillation of endotoxin and persisted for a further 2 d. After hyperplasia, the lung remodeled and returned to a normal state within 24-48 h. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the remodeling process of this transient hyperplasia may be useful to identify molecular changes that are altered in neoplasia. The purpose of the present study was to corroborate induction of epithelial cell hyperplasia by endotoxin and to delineate mechanisms involved in tissue remodeling after endotoxin-induced alveolar type II cell hyperplasia. In conclusion, immonostaining with cyclin D1 and cytokeratin shows that endotoxin induced epithelial cell proliferation and resulted in hyperplasia in the lung which persisted through 4 d post-instillation.

  15. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Philip L; Lee, Jae W; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at approximately 95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days on collagen-coated dishes with or without DCI for the final 3 days. In freshly isolated cells, highly expressed genes included SFTPA/B/C, SCGB1A, IL8, CXCL2, and SFN in addition to ubiquitously expressed genes. Transcript abundance was correlated between fetal and adult cells (r = 0.88), with a subset of 187 genes primarily related to inflammation and immunity that were expressed >10-fold higher in adult cells. During control culture, expression increased for 8.1% of expressed genes and decreased for approximately 4% including 118 immune response and 10 surfactant-related genes. DCI treatment promoted lamellar body production and increased expression of approximately 3% of probed genes by > or =1.5-fold; 40% of these were also induced in fetal cells. Highly induced genes (> or =10-fold) included PGC, ZBTB16, DUOX1, PLUNC, CIT, and CRTAC1. Twenty-five induced genes, including six genes related to surfactant (SFTPA/B/C, PGC, CEBPD, and ADFP), also had decreased expression during control culture and thus are candidates for hormonal regulation in vivo. Our results further define the adult human type II cell molecular phenotype and demonstrate that a subset of genes remains hormone responsive in cultured adult cells.

  16. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Stoop, Hans

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies presented here show valuable additional information on the microscopic diagnostics in daily practice. This enables proper and complete diagnosis of this relative rare variant of cancer ensuring the b...

  17. Truncated recombinant human SP-D attenuates emphysema and type II cell changes in SP-D deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mühlfeld Christian

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D deficient mice develop emphysema-like pathology associated with focal accumulations of foamy alveolar macrophages, an excess of surfactant phospholipids in the alveolar space and both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells. These findings are associated with a chronic inflammatory state. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with a truncated recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D has been shown to decrease the lipidosis and alveolar macrophage accumulation as well as production of proinflammatory chemokines. The aim of this study was to investigate if rfhSP-D treatment reduces the structural abnormalities in parenchymal architecture and type II cells characteristic of SP-D deficiency. Methods SP-D knock-out mice, aged 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 9 weeks were treated with rfhSP-D for 9, 6 and 3 weeks, respectively. All mice were sacrificed at age 12 weeks and compared to both PBS treated SP-D deficient and wild-type groups. Lung structure was quantified by design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level. Emphasis was put on quantification of emphysema, type II cell changes and intracellular surfactant. Data were analysed with two sided non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Main Results After 3 weeks of treatment, alveolar number was higher and mean alveolar size was smaller compared to saline-treated SP-D knock-out controls. There was no significant difference concerning these indices of pulmonary emphysema within rfhSP-D treated groups. Type II cell number and size were smaller as a consequence of treatment. The total volume of lamellar bodies per type II cell and per lung was smaller after 6 weeks of treatment. Conclusion Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with rfhSP-D leads to a reduction in the degree of emphysema and a correction of type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. This supports the concept that rfhSP-D might become a therapeutic option in diseases that are

  18. Truncated recombinant human SP-D attenuates emphysema and type II cell changes in SP-D deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias; Mackay, Rosemarie; Townsend, Paul; Deb, Roona; Mühlfeld, Christian; Richter, Joachim; Gilbert, Fabian; Hawgood, Samuel; Reid, Kenneth; Clark, Howard

    2007-10-03

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) deficient mice develop emphysema-like pathology associated with focal accumulations of foamy alveolar macrophages, an excess of surfactant phospholipids in the alveolar space and both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells. These findings are associated with a chronic inflammatory state. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with a truncated recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D) has been shown to decrease the lipidosis and alveolar macrophage accumulation as well as production of proinflammatory chemokines. The aim of this study was to investigate if rfhSP-D treatment reduces the structural abnormalities in parenchymal architecture and type II cells characteristic of SP-D deficiency. SP-D knock-out mice, aged 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 9 weeks were treated with rfhSP-D for 9, 6 and 3 weeks, respectively. All mice were sacrificed at age 12 weeks and compared to both PBS treated SP-D deficient and wild-type groups. Lung structure was quantified by design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level. Emphasis was put on quantification of emphysema, type II cell changes and intracellular surfactant. Data were analysed with two sided non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. After 3 weeks of treatment, alveolar number was higher and mean alveolar size was smaller compared to saline-treated SP-D knock-out controls. There was no significant difference concerning these indices of pulmonary emphysema within rfhSP-D treated groups. Type II cell number and size were smaller as a consequence of treatment. The total volume of lamellar bodies per type II cell and per lung was smaller after 6 weeks of treatment. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with rfhSP-D leads to a reduction in the degree of emphysema and a correction of type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. This supports the concept that rfhSP-D might become a therapeutic option in diseases that are characterized by decreased SP-D levels in the lung.

  19. Interaction of Aspergillus with alveolar Type II cells and phagocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escobar Salazar, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus species are worldwide distributed fungi and abundant in nature. Aspergilli are mainly saprotrophic obtaining nutrients by degrading dead organic material in particular that of plants. Currently, around 837 species have been reported. Due to the broad range of compound secreted by

  20. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  1. Type II NKT cells: a distinct CD1d-restricted immune regulatory NKT cell subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-08-01

    Type II natural killer T cells (NKT) are a subset of the innate-like CD1d-restricted lymphocytes that are reactive to lipid antigens. Unlike the type I NKT cells, which express a semi-invariant TCR, type II NKT cells express a broader TCR repertoire. Additionally, other features, such as their predominance over type I cells in humans versus mice, the nature of their ligands, CD1d/lipid/TCR binding, and modulation of immune responses, distinguish type II NKT cells from type I NKT cells. Interestingly, it is the self-lipid-reactivity of type II NKT cells that has helped define their physiological role in health and in disease. The discovery of sulfatide as one of the major antigens for CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells in mice has been instrumental in the characterization of these cells, including the TCR repertoire, the crystal structure of the CD1d/lipid/TCR complex, and their function. Subsequently, several other glycolipids and phospholipids from both endogenous and microbial sources have been shown to activate type II NKT cells. The activation of a specific subset of type II NKT cells following administration with sulfatide or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) leads to engagement of a dominant immunoregulatory pathway associated with the inactivation of type I NKT cells, conventional dendritic cells, and inhibition of the proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells. Thus, type II NKT cells have been shown to be immunosuppressive in autoimmune diseases, inflammatory liver diseases, and in cancer. Knowing their relatively higher prevalence in human than type I NKT cells, understanding their biology is imperative for health and disease.

  2. Crosstalk between type II NKT cells and T cells leads to spontaneous chronic inflammatory liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; He, Ying; Visvabharathy, Lavanya; Liao, Chia-Min; Tan, Xiaosheng; Balakumar, Arjun; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2017-10-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are CD1d-restricted innate-like T cells that modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Unlike the well-characterized invariant/type I NKT cells, type II NKT cells with a diverse T cell receptor repertoire are poorly understood. This study defines the pathogenic role of type II NKT cells in the etiology of chronic liver inflammation. Transgenic mice with the Lck promoter directing CD1d overexpression on T cells in Jα18 wild-type (Lck-CD1dTgJα18 + ; type I NKT cell sufficient) and Jα18-deficient (Lck-CD1dTgJα18 o , type I NKT cell deficient) mice were analyzed for liver pathology and crosstalk between type II NKT cells and conventional T cells. CD1d expression on T cells in peripheral blood samples and liver sections from autoimmune hepatitis patients and healthy individuals were also examined. Lck-CD1dTgJα18 o and Lck-CD1dTgJα18 + mice developed similar degrees of liver pathology resembling chronic autoimmune hepatitis in humans. Increased CD1d expression on T cells promoted the activation of type II NKT cells and other T cells. This resulted in T h 1-skewing and impaired T h 2 cytokine production in type II NKT cells. Dysfunction of type II NKT cells was accompanied by conventional T cell activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, leading to a hepatic T/B lymphocyte infiltration, elevated autoantibodies and hepatic injury in Lck-CD1dTg mice. A similar mechanism could be extended to humans as CD1d expression is upregulated on activated human T cells and increased presence of CD1d-expressing T cells was observed in autoimmune hepatitis patients. Our data reveals enhanced crosstalk between type II NKT cells and conventional T cells, leading to a T h 1-skewed inflammatory milieu, and consequently, to the development of chronic autoimmune liver disease. Lay summary: CD1d overexpression on T cells enhances crosstalk between type II NKT cells and T cells, resulting in their aberrant activation and leading to the

  3. Specific detection of type II human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit produced by trophoblastic and neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaz-Carroll, L; Richon, S; Dangles-Marie, V; Cocquebert, M; Fournier, T; Troalen, F; Stevens, D; Guery, B; Hersant, A-M; Guibourdenche, J; Nordor, A; Pecking, A; Bellet, D

    2015-04-15

    The sequence of the beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCGβ) varies depending on whether hCGβ is encoded by type I or type II genes. Type II genes are upregulated in trophoblast and cancer but hCGβ can be detected in the serum of nonpregnant women and healthy individuals. We aimed to determine whether monoclonal antibody (mAb) FBT11-II specifically detects hCGβ encoded by type II genes (type II hCGβ). Competitive inhibition assays with synthetic peptides, immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical studies, type II hCGβ dosing immunoassays and sequencing of CGB genes were performed. Competitive inhibition assays determined that mAb FBT11-II recognizes the type II hCGβ derived peptide. CGB mRNA sequencing of JEG-3 (trophoblastic) and T24 (bladder) cell lines confirmed that JEG-3 expresses type II genes while T24 expresses exclusively type I. FBT11-II only recognizes JEG-expressed hCGβ. Placenta immunohistochemical studies confirmed that type II hCGβ expression is restricted to the syncytiotrophoblast. Immunoassays detected type II hCGβ in serum of patients with either nontrophoblastic cancers or fetal Down syndrome. Type II gene expression can be detected using FBT11-II. This specific recognition could improve the clinical usefulness of assays aimed at either managing aggressive tumors or screening for Down syndrome. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  5. In vivo genotoxicity of hard metal dust: induction of micronuclei in rat type II epithelial lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; Hoet, Peter; Lombaert, Noömi; Nemery, Benoit; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-11-01

    Inhalation of hard metal dust (WC-Co particles) has been associated with an increased risk for lung cancer in occupational settings. In vitro, WC-Co was genotoxic in human lymphocytes producing DNA strand breaks and micronuclei. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo genotoxic effects of WC-Co dust in rat type II pneumocytes. DNA breaks/alkali-labile sites (alkaline comet assay) and chromosome/genome mutations (micronucleus test) were assessed after a single intra-tracheal (i.t.) instillation of WC-Co, including dose-effect and time trend relationships. In addition, the alkaline comet assay was performed on cells obtained after broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) and on peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC). As pulmonary toxicity parameters, protein content, lactate dehydrogenase activity, total and differential cell count in BAL fluid were evaluated in parallel. In type II pneumocytes, WC-Co induced a statistically significant increase in tail DNA (12 h time point) and in micronuclei (72 h) after a single treatment with 16.6 mg WC-Co/kg body wt, a dose that produced mild pulmonary toxicity. This observation provides the first evidence of the in vivo mutagenic potential of hard metal dust. In PBMC, no increase in DNA damage or micronuclei was observed. This study indicates the potential to detect chromosome/genome mutations (micronuclei) in relevant target cells (type II pneumocytes) after i.t. instillation of a particle mixture.

  6. CD1d-Restricted Type II NKT Cells Reactive With Endogenous Hydrophobic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Sakiko; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    NKT cells belong to a distinct subset of T cells that recognize hydrophobic antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecules, such as CD1d. Because NKT cells stimulated by antigens can activate or suppress other immunocompetent cells through an immediate production of a large amount of cytokines, they are regarded as immunological modulators. CD1d-restricted NKT cells are classified into two subsets, namely, type I and type II. CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells express invariant T cell receptors (TCRs) and react with lipid antigens, including the marine sponge-derived glycolipid α-galactosylceramide. On the contrary, CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells recognize a wide variety of antigens, including glycolipids, phospholipids, and hydrophobic peptides, by their diverse TCRs. In this review, we focus particularly on CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells that recognize endogenous hydrophobic peptides presented by CD1d. Previous studies have demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells usually act as pro-inflammatory cells but sometimes behave as anti-inflammatory cells. It has been also demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells play opposite roles to CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells; thus, they function as anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory cells depending on the situation. In line with this, CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells that recognize type II collagen peptide have been demonstrated to act as anti-inflammatory cells in diverse inflammation-induction models in mice, whereas pro-inflammatory CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells reactive with sterol carrier protein 2 peptide have been demonstrated to be involved in the development of small vessel vasculitis in rats.

  7. Recognition of lysophosphatidylcholine by type II NKT cells and protection from an inflammatory liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Igor; Girardi, Enrico; Zajonc, Dirk M; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-11-01

    Lipids presented by the MHC class I-like molecule, CD1d, are recognized by NK T (NKT) cells, which can be broadly categorized into two subsets. The well-characterized type I NKT cells express a semi-invariant TCR and can recognize both α- and β-linked glycolipids, whereas type II NKT cells are less well studied, express a relatively diverse TCR repertoire, and recognize β-linked lipids. Recent structural studies have shown a distinct mode of recognition of a self-glycolipid sulfatide bound to CD1d by a type II NKT TCR. To further characterize Ag recognition by these cells, we have used the structural data and screened other small molecules able to bind to CD1d and activate type II NKT cells. Using plate-bound CD1d and APC-based Ag presentation assay, we found that phospholipids such as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) can stimulate the sulfatide-reactive type II NKT hybridoma Hy19.3 in a CD1d-dependent manner. Using plasmon resonance studies, we found that this type II NKT TCR binds with CD1d-bound LPC with micromolar affinities similar to that for sulfatide. Furthermore, LPC-mediated activation of type II NKT cells leads to anergy induction in type I NKT cells and affords protection from Con A-induced hepatitis. These data indicate that, in addition to self-glycolipids, self-lysophospholipids are also recognized by type II NKT cells. Because lysophospholipids are involved during inflammation, our findings have implications for not only understanding activation of type II NKT cells in physiological settings, but also for the development of immune intervention in inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells in a cultured cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Scott, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    The functions of pulmonary type II cells, such as synthesis of pulmonary surfactant and metabolism of inhaled xenobiotics, can be studied in primary isolates of lung cells. However, isolated type II cells, when cultured, quickly lose the phenotypic expressions characteristics of type II cells, including surfactant lipid and protein synthesis and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity. A cultured cell line that maintained expression of type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous for the study of such functions as surfactant synthesis and secretion. Such a cell line would allow generation of a large number of homogeneous cells for study. The purpose of the current study was to induce markers of differentiated type II cells in a cultured cell line to facilitate studies of factors that control surfactant synthesis and secretion

  9. ACh-induced hyperpolarization and decreased resistance in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppi, Lauren A; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Drury, Hannah R; Jobling, Phillip; Callister, Robert J; Migliaccio, Americo A; Jordan, Paivi M; Holt, Joseph C; Rabbitt, Richard D; Lim, Rebecca; Brichta, Alan M

    2018-01-01

    In the mammalian vestibular periphery, electrical activation of the efferent vestibular system (EVS) has two effects on afferent activity: 1) it increases background afferent discharge and 2) decreases afferent sensitivity to rotational stimuli. Although the cellular mechanisms underlying these two contrasting afferent responses remain obscure, we postulated that the reduction in afferent sensitivity was attributed, in part, to the activation of α9- containing nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (α9*nAChRs) and small-conductance potassium channels (SK) in vestibular type II hair cells, as demonstrated in the peripheral vestibular system of other vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of the predominant EVS neurotransmitter ACh on vestibular type II hair cells from wild-type (wt) and α9-subunit nAChR knockout (α9 -/- ) mice. Immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase revealed there were no obvious gross morphological differences in the peripheral EVS innervation among any of these strains. ACh application onto wt type II hair cells, at resting potentials, produced a fast inward current followed by a slower outward current, resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and decreased membrane resistance. Hyperpolarization and decreased resistance were due to gating of SK channels. Consistent with activation of α9*nAChRs and SK channels, these ACh-sensitive currents were antagonized by the α9*nAChR blocker strychnine and SK blockers apamin and tamapin. Type II hair cells from α9 -/- mice, however, failed to respond to ACh at all. These results confirm the critical importance of α9nAChRs in efferent modulation of mammalian type II vestibular hair cells. Application of exogenous ACh reduces electrical impedance, thereby decreasing type II hair cell sensitivity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Expression of α9 nicotinic subunit was crucial for fast cholinergic modulation of mammalian vestibular type II hair cells. These findings show a multifaceted

  10. Influence of collagen type II and nucleus pulposus cells on aggregation and differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.F.; Zandieh Doulabi, B.; Wuisman, P.I.; Bank, R.A.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue microenvironment plays a critical role in guiding local stem cell differentiation. Within the intervertebral disc, collagen type II and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells are two major components. This study aimed to investigate how collagen type II and NP cells affect adipose tissue-derived stem

  11. Type II NKT-TFH cells against Gaucher lipids regulate B-cell immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shiny; Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Verma, Rakesh; Liu, Jun; Yang, Ruhua; Pastores, Gregory M; Mistry, Pramod K; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2015-02-19

    Chronic inflammation including B-cell activation is commonly observed in both inherited (Gaucher disease [GD]) and acquired disorders of lipid metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying B-cell activation in these settings remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that β-glucosylceramide 22:0 (βGL1-22) and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1), 2 major sphingolipids accumulated in GD, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT) cells. Human βGL1-22- and LGL1-reactive CD1d tetramer-positive T cells have a distinct T-cell receptor usage and genomic and cytokine profiles compared with the classical type I NKT cells. In contrast to type I NKT cells, βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells constitutively express T-follicular helper (TFH) phenotype. Injection of these lipids leads to an increase in respective lipid-specific type II NKT cells in vivo and downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of antilipid antibodies. Human βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells can provide efficient cognate help to B cells in vitro. Frequency of LGL1-specific T cells in GD mouse models and patients correlates with disease activity and therapeutic response. Our studies identify a novel type II NKT-mediated pathway for glucosphingolipid-mediated dysregulation of humoral immunity and increased risk of B-cell malignancy observed in metabolic lipid disorders. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Type II NKT Cells in Inflammation, Autoimmunity, Microbial Immunity, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Idania; Ware, Randle; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) recognize self and microbial lipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. Two major NKT cell subsets, type I and II, express different types of antigen receptors (TCR) with distinct mode of CD1d/lipid recognition. Though type II NKT cells are less frequent in mice and difficult to study, they are predominant in human. One of the major subsets of type II NKT cells reactive to the self-glycolipid sulfatide is the best characterized and has been shown to induce a dominant immune regulatory mechanism that controls inflammation in autoimmunity and in anti-cancer immunity. Recently, type II NKT cells reactive to other self-glycolipids and phospholipids have been identified suggesting both promiscuous and specific TCR recognition in microbial immunity as well. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved, a detailed understanding of the biology and function of type II NKT cells as well as their interplay with type I NKT cells or other innate and adaptive T cells will have major implications for potential novel interventions in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, microbial immunity, and cancer.

  13. Analysis of type II diabetes mellitus adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minteer, Danielle Marie; Young, Matthew T; Lin, Yen-Chih; Over, Patrick J; Rubin, J Peter; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2015-01-01

    To address the functionality of diabetic adipose-derived stem cells in tissue engineering applications, adipose-derived stem cells isolated from patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus were cultured in bioreactor culture systems. The adipose-derived stem cells were differentiated into adipocytes and maintained as functional adipocytes. The bioreactor system utilizes a hollow fiber-based technology for three-dimensional perfusion of tissues in vitro, creating a model in which long-term culture of adipocytes is feasible, and providing a potential tool useful for drug discovery. Daily metabolic activity of the adipose-derived stem cells was analyzed within the medium recirculating throughout the bioreactor system. At experiment termination, tissues were extracted from bioreactors for immunohistological analyses in addition to gene and protein expression. Type II diabetic adipose-derived stem cells did not exhibit significantly different glucose consumption compared to adipose-derived stem cells from patients without type II diabetes (p > 0.05, N = 3). Expression of mature adipocyte genes was not significantly different between diabetic/non-diabetic groups (p > 0.05, N = 3). Protein expression of adipose tissue grown within all bioreactors was verified by Western blotting.The results from this small-scale study reveal adipose-derived stem cells from patients with type II diabetes when removed from diabetic environments behave metabolically similar to the same cells of non-diabetic patients when cultured in a three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor, suggesting that glucose transport across the adipocyte cell membrane, the hindrance of which being characteristic of type II diabetes, is dependent on environment. The presented observation describes a tissue-engineered tool for long-term cell culture and, following future adjustments to the culture environment and increased sample sizes, potentially for anti-diabetic drug testing.

  14. [Sulfatide-loaded CD1d tetramer to detect typeII NKT cells in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gu-qin; Nie, Han-xiang; Yang, Jiong; Yu, Hong-ying

    2012-07-01

    To create a method of detecting typeII natural killer T (NKT) cells of mice. Biotinylated mouse CD1d monomers were mixed with sulfatide at a molar ratio of 1:3 (protein:lipid) and incubated at room temperature overnight, and then 80 μg of streptavidin-PE was added into 200 μg of the CD1d-sulfatide mixture and incubated at room temperature for 4 h to get sulfatide/CD1d tetramer. Flow cytometry was used to detect the percentage of typeII NKT cells in mononuclear cells (MNCs) of lung and spleen of normal mice, as well as the percentage of typeII NKT cells in spleen MNCs of mice after stimulated with sulfatide. In normal mice, the percentage of typeII NKT cells accounted for (0.875±0.096)% and (1.175±0.263)% in MNCs of spleen and lung; the percentage in spleen MNCs after activated with sulfatide was (2.75±0.603)%, which significantly increased as compared with that in normal mice (PNKT cells in mice.

  15. Metabolic shift in lung alveolar cell mitochondria following acrolein exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein, an α,β unsaturated electrophile, is an environmental pollutant released in ambient air from diesel exhausts and cooking oils. This study examines the role of acrolein in altering mitochondrial function and metabolism in lung-specific cells. RLE-6TN, H441, and primary alveolar type II (pAT2) cells were exposed to acrolein for 4 h, and its effect on mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates was studied by XF Extracellular Flux analysis. Low-dose acrolein exposure decreased mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner because of alteration in the metabolism of glucose in all the three cell types. Acrolein inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, leading to decreased substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN, H441, and pAT2 cells; the reduced GAPDH activity was compensated in pAT2 cells by an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the regulatory control of the pentose phosphate pathway. The decrease in pyruvate from glucose metabolism resulted in utilization of alternative sources to support mitochondrial energy production: palmitate-BSA complex increased mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN and pAT2 cells. The presence of palmitate in alveolar cells for surfactant biosynthesis may prove to be the alternative fuel source for mitochondrial respiration. Accordingly, a decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and an increase in phospholipase A2 activity were found in the alveolar cells after acrolein exposure. These findings have implications for understanding the decrease in surfactant levels frequently observed in pathophysiological situations with altered lung function following exposure to environmental toxicants.

  16. Collagen type II enhances chondrogenesis in adipose tissue-derived stem cells by affecting cell shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.; Bank, R.A.; Helder, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    Ideally, biomaterials have inductive properties, favoring specific lineage differentiation. For chondrogenic induction, these properties have been attributed to collagen type II. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether collagen type II favors

  17. Collagen Type II Enhances Chondrogenesis in Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells by Affecting Cell Shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, ZuFu; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, ChunLing; Bank, Ruud A.; Helder, Marco N.

    Ideally, biomaterials have inductive properties, favoring specific lineage differentiation. For chondrogenic induction, these properties have been attributed to collagen type II. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether collagen type II favors

  18. Anucleate Cell Blue Assay: a Useful Tool for Identifying Novel Type II Topoisomerase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hideaki; Fujimoto-Nakamura, Mika; Tanitame, Akihiko; Iwai, Noritaka; Nagai, Kazuo; Yamagishi, Jun-ichi; Wachi, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    About 95,000 compounds were screened by the anucleate cell blue assay. Fifty-one of the hit compounds had various structures and showed inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV. Moreover, the compounds exhibited antibacterial activity against a fluoroquinolone- and novobiocin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The anucleate cell blue assay is therefore a useful tool for finding novel type II topoisomerase inhibitors.

  19. The immunoregulatory role of type I and type II NKT cells in cancer and other diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2014-01-01

    NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that recognize lipid antigens. They also have been shown to play critical roles in the regulation of immune responses. In the immune responses against tumors, two subsets of NKT cells, type I and type II, play opposing roles and cross-regulate each other. As members of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, which form a network of multiple components, they also interact with other immune components. Here we discuss the function of NKT cells in tumor immunity and their interaction with other regulatory cells, especially CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. PMID:24384834

  20. The Adaptor Protein SAP Regulates Type II NKT Cell Development, Cytokine Production and Cytotoxicity Against Lymphoma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L.; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT cell TCR transgenic mouse model (24αβTg), we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells but not thymic epithelial cells meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Further, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT cell development by controlling Egr2 and PLZF expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IRF4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. PMID:25236978

  1. High-efficiency type II cell-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression facilitates cellular identification, tracking, and isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Jeff N; Gonzalez, Robert F; Allen, Lennell; Gillespie, AnneMarie; Leaffer, David; Dean, Willow B; Chapin, Cheryl; Dobbs, Leland G

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in virtually all type II (TII) alveolar epithelial cells. The CBG mouse (SPC-BAC-EGFP) contains a bacterial artificial chromosome modified to express EGFP within the mouse surfactant protein (SP)-C gene 3' untranslated region. EGFP mRNA expression is limited to the lung. EGFP fluorescence is both limited to and exhibited by all cells expressing pro-SP-C; fluorescence is uniform throughout all lobes of the lung and does not change as mice age. EGFP(+) cells also express SP-B but do not express podoplanin, a type I (TI) cell marker. CBG mice show no evidence of lung disease with aging. In 3 hours, TII cells can be isolated in >99% purity from CBG mice by FACS; the yield of 3.7 ± 0.6 × 10(6) cells represents approximately 25 to 60% of the TII cells in the lung. By FACS analysis, approximately 0.9% of TII cells are in mitosis in uninjured lungs; after bleomycin injury, 4.1% are in mitosis. Because EGFP fluorescence can be detected for >14 days in culture, at a time that SP-C mRNA expression is essentially nil, this line may be useful for tracking TII cells in culture and in vivo. When CBG mice are crossed to transgenic mice expressing rat podoplanin, TI and TII cells can be easily simultaneously identified and isolated. When bred to other strains of mice, EGFP expression can be used to identify TII cells without the need for immunostaining for SP-C. These mice should be useful in models of mouse pulmonary disease and in studies of TII cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics.

  2. Expression and purification of sea raven type II antifreeze protein from Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotter, Andrew J; Kuntz, Douglas A; Saul, Michelle; Graham, Laurie A; Davies, Peter L; Rose, David R

    2006-06-01

    We present a system for the expression and purification of recombinant sea raven type II antifreeze protein, a cysteine-rich, C-type lectin-like globular protein that has proved to be a difficult target for recombinant expression and purification. The cDNAs encoding the pro- and mature forms of the sea raven protein were cloned into a modified pMT Drosophila expression vector. These constructs produced N-terminally His(6)-tagged pro- and mature forms of the type II antifreeze protein under the control of a metallothionein promoter when transfected into Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells. Upon induction of stable cell lines the two proteins were expressed at high levels and secreted into the medium. The proteins were then purified from the cell medium in a simple and rapid protocol using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and specific protease cleavage by tobacco etch virus protease. The proteins demonstrated antifreeze activity indistinguishable from that of wild-type sea raven antifreeze protein purified from serum as illustrated by ice affinity purification, ice crystal morphology, and their ability to inhibit ice crystal growth. This expression and purification system gave yields of 95 mg/L of fully active mature sea raven type II AFP and 9.6 mg/L of the proprotein. This surpasses all previous attempts to express this protein in Escherichia coli, baculovirus-infected fall armyworm cells and Pichia pastoris and will provide sufficient protein for structural analysis.

  3. Activity of the Type II JAK2 Inhibitor CHZ868 in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Li, Loretta S; Kopp, Nadja; Montero, Joan; Chapuy, Bjoern; Yoda, Akinori; Christie, Amanda L; Liu, Huiyun; Christodoulou, Alexandra; van Bodegom, Diederik; van der Zwet, Jordy; Layer, Jacob V; Tivey, Trevor; Lane, Andrew A; Ryan, Jeremy A; Ng, Samuel Y; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Steensma, David; Wadleigh, Martha; Harris, Marian; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Sterker, Dario; Zender, Michael; Rodig, Scott J; Murakami, Masato; Hofmann, Francesco; Kuo, Frank; Eck, Michael J; Silverman, Lewis B; Sallan, Stephen E; Letai, Anthony; Baffert, Fabienne; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Radimerski, Thomas; Gaul, Christoph; Weinstock, David M

    2015-07-13

    A variety of cancers depend on JAK2 signaling, including the high-risk subset of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs) with CRLF2 rearrangements. Type I JAK2 inhibitors induce paradoxical JAK2 hyperphosphorylation in these leukemias and have limited activity. To improve the efficacy of JAK2 inhibition in B-ALL, we developed the type II inhibitor CHZ868, which stabilizes JAK2 in an inactive conformation. CHZ868 potently suppressed the growth of CRLF2-rearranged human B-ALL cells, abrogated JAK2 signaling, and improved survival in mice with human or murine B-ALL. CHZ868 and dexamethasone synergistically induced apoptosis in JAK2-dependent B-ALLs and further improved in vivo survival compared to CHZ868 alone. These data support the testing of type II JAK2 inhibition in patients with JAK2-dependent leukemias and other disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Possible Therapeutic Application of Targeting Type II Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Suppression of Tumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Terabe, Masaki

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell subset that exhibits characteristics from both the innate immune cells and T cells. There are at least two subsets of NKT cells, type I and type II. These two subsets of NKT cells have opposite functions in antitumor immunity. Type I NKT cells usually enhance and type II NKT cells suppress antitumor immunity. In addition, these two subsets of NKT cells cross-regulate each other. In this review, we mainly focus on immunosuppressive NKT cells, type II NKT cells. After summarizing their definition, experimental tools to study them, and subsets of them, we will discuss possible therapeutic applications of type II NKT cell pathway targeted therapies. PMID:29520281

  5. Development of a lung slice preparation for recording ion channel activity in alveolar epithelial type I cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crandall Edward D

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung fluid balance in the healthy lung is dependent upon finely regulated vectorial transport of ions across the alveolar epithelium. Classically, the cellular locus of the major ion transport processes has been widely accepted to be the alveolar type II cell. Although evidence is now emerging to suggest that the alveolar type I cell might significantly contribute to the overall ion and fluid homeostasis of the lung, direct assessment of functional ion channels in type I cells has remained elusive. Methods Here we describe a development of a lung slice preparation that has allowed positive identification of alveolar type I cells within an intact and viable alveolar epithelium using living cell immunohistochemistry. Results This technique has allowed, for the first time, single ion channels of identified alveolar type I cells to be recorded using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Conclusion This exciting new development should facilitate the ascription of function to alveolar type I cells and allow us to integrate this cell type into the general model of alveolar ion and fluid balance in health and disease.

  6. Dental pulp stem cell-derived chondrogenic cells demonstrate differential cell motility in type I and type II collagen hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; Flynn, Nikol

    2018-02-13

    Advances in the development of biomaterials and stem cell therapy provide a promising approach to regenerating degenerated discs. The normal nucleus pulposus (NP) cells exhibit the similar phenotype as chondrocytes. Because dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) can be differentiated into chondrogenic cells, the DPSCs and DPSCs-derived chondrogenic cells encapsulated in type I and type II collagen hydrogels can potentially be transplanted into degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP) to repair damaged tissue. The motility of transplanted cells is critical because the cells need to migrate away from the hydrogels containing the cells of high density and disperse into the NP tissue after implantation. The purpose of this study was to determine the motility of DPSC and DPSC-derived chondrogenic cells in type I and type II collagen hydrogels. The time lapse imaging that recorded cell migration was analyzed to quantify the cell migration velocity and distance. The cell viability of DPSCs in native or 4S-StarPEG - crosslinked type I and type II collagen hydrogels was determined using LIVE/DEAD ® cell viability assay and AlamarBlue® assay. DPSCs were differentiated into chondrogenic cells. The migration of DPSCs and DPSC-derived chondrogenic cells in these hydrogels was recorded using a time lapse imaging system. This study was funded by Regional Institute on Aging and Wichita Medical Research and Education Foundation and the authors declare no competing interest. DPSCs showed high cell viability in non-crosslinked and crosslinked collagen hydrogels. DPSCs migrated in collagen hydrogels, and the cell migration speed was not significantly different in either type I collagen or type II collagen hydrogels. The migration speed of DPSC-derived chondrogenic cells was higher in type I collagen hydrogel than in type II collagen hydrogel. Crosslinking of type I collagen with 4S-StarPEG significantly reduced the cell migration speed of DPSC-derived chondrogenic cells. After implantation of

  7. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  8. Large basolateral processes on type II hair cells comprise a novel processing unit in mammalian vestibular organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Rémy; Pickett, Sarah B.; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Stone, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory receptors in the vestibular system (hair cells) encode head movements and drive central motor reflexes that control gaze, body movements, and body orientation. In mammals, type I and II vestibular hair cells are defined by their shape, contacts with vestibular afferent nerves, and membrane conductance. Here, we describe unique morphological features of type II vestibular hair cells in mature rodents (mice and gerbils) and bats. These features are cytoplasmic processes that extend laterally from the hair cell’s base and project under type I hair cells. Closer analysis of adult mouse utricles demonstrated that the basolateral processes of type II hair cells range in shape, size, and branching, with the longest processes extending 3–4 hair cell widths. The hair cell basolateral processes synapse upon vestibular afferent nerves and receive inputs from vestibular efferent nerves. Further, some basolateral processes make physical contacts with the processes of other type II hair cells, forming some sort of network amongst type II hair cells. Basolateral processes are rare in perinatal mice and do not attain their mature form until 3–6 weeks of age. These observations demonstrate that basolateral processes are significant signaling regions of type II vestibular hair cells, and they suggest type II hair cells may directly communicate with each other, which has not been described in vertebrates. PMID:24825750

  9. Ca(2+) currents and voltage responses in Type I and Type II hair cells of the chick embryo semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetto, Sergio; Zampini, Valeria; Zucca, Giampiero; Valli, Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Type I and Type II hair cells, and Type II hair cells located in different zones of the semicircular canal crista, express different patterns of voltage-dependent K channels, each one specifically shaping the hair cell receptor potential. We report here that, close to hatching, chicken embryo semicircular canal Type I and Type II hair cells express a similar voltage-dependent L-type calcium current (I(Ca)), whose main features are: activation above -60 mV, fast activation kinetics, and scarce inactivation. I(Ca) should be already active at rest in Zone 1 Type II hair cells, whose resting membrane potential was on average slightly less negative than -60 mV. Conversely, I(Ca) would not be active at rest in Type II hair cells from Zone 2 and 3, nor in Type I hair cells, since their resting membrane potential was significantly more negative than -60 mV. However, even small depolarising currents would activate I(Ca) steadily in Zone 2 and 3 Type II hair cells, but not in Type I hair cells because of the robust repolarising action of their specific array of K(+) currents. The implications of the present findings in the afferent discharge are discussed.

  10. Comparison of the corneal endothelial cell count in type II diabetic patients with healthy adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, B.Z.; Zafar, O.

    2016-01-01

    To compare the mean corneal endothelial cell count in type II diabetic patients with healthy adults. Study Design: Case control. Place and Duration of Study: Out-patient Department of Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi from September 10, 2013 to March 25, 2014. Material and Methods: A hospital-based case-control study was carried out at out-patient department of Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology in which 130 eyes (65 diabetic eyes and 65 controls) were included. Non-probability consecutive sampling was adopted. Relevant detailed history including information about age, gender, duration of diabetes, any other medical illness and current medical treatment being taken by patient was recorded. Results: Data entry and analysis was done in SPSS version 10. Total 130 eyes (65 diabetic and 65 non-diabetic eyes) were included in our study according to the inclusion criteria. Mean age (years) of patient in both the groups was 59.55 +- 8.01 and 53.85 +- 10.07. Mean corneal endothelial cell count in both the groups was 2368.35 +- 389.58 and 2588.64 +- 269.84 respectively which was statistically significant (p-value=0.001) in both the groups. Conclusion: The conclusion of the study was that the mean corneal endothelial cell count in type II diabetic patients was significantly less as compared to healthy adults. (author)

  11. Vacuolization of mucolipidosis type II mouse exocrine gland cells represents accumulation of autolysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Marielle; van Meel, Eline; Oorschot, Viola; Klumperman, Judith; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2011-04-15

    We previously reported that mice deficient in UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase (mucolipidosis type II or Gnptab -/- mice), the enzyme that initiates the addition of the mannose 6-phosphate lysosomal sorting signal on acid hydrolases, exhibited extensive vacuolization of their exocrine gland cells, while the liver, brain, and muscle appeared grossly unaffected. Similar pathological findings were observed in several exocrine glands of patients with mucolipidosis II. To understand the basis for this cell type-specific abnormality, we analyzed these tissues in Gnptab -/- mice using a combined immunoelectron microscopy and biochemical approach. We demonstrate that the vacuoles in the exocrine glands are enlarged autolysosomes containing undigested cytoplasmic material that accumulate secondary to deficient lysosomal function. Surprisingly, the acid hydrolase levels in these tissues ranged from normal to modestly decreased, in contrast to skin fibroblasts, which accumulate enlarged lysosomes and/or autolysosomes also but exhibit very low levels of acid hydrolases. We propose that the lysosomal defect in the exocrine cells is caused by the combination of increased secretion of the acid hydrolases via the constitutive pathway along with their entrapment in secretory granules. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of the tissue-specific abnormalities seen in mucolipidosis type II.

  12. The adaptor protein SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity against lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L; Stein, Paul L; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT-cell TCR transgenic mouse model, we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells, but not thymic epithelial cells, meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Furthermore, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development by controlling early growth response 2 protein and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IFN regulatory factor 4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Mitochondrial type II NAD(PH dehydrogenases in fungal cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During aerobic respiration, cells produce energy through oxidative phosphorylation, which includes a specialized group of multi-subunit complexes in the inner mitochondrial membrane known as the electron transport chain. However, this canonical pathway is branched into single polypeptide alternative routes in some fungi, plants, protists and bacteria. They confer metabolic plasticity, allowing cells to adapt to different environmental conditions and stresses. Type II NAD(PH dehydrogenases (also called alternative NAD(PH dehydrogenases are non-proton pumping enzymes that bypass complex I. Recent evidence points to the involvement of fungal alternative NAD(PH dehydrogenases in the process of programmed cell death, in addition to their action as overflow systems upon oxidative stress. Consistent with this, alternative NAD(PH dehydrogenases are phylogenetically related to cell death - promoting proteins of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF-family.

  14. Silk-based biomaterials functionalized with fibronectin type II promotes cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Margarida; Machado, Raul; da Costa, André; Ribeiro, Artur; Collins, Tony; Gomes, Andreia C; Leonor, Isabel B; Kaplan, David L; Reis, Rui L; Casal, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work was to exploit the fibronectin type II (FNII) module from human matrix metalloproteinase-2 as a functional domain for the development of silk-based biopolymer blends that display enhanced cell adhesion properties. The DNA sequence of spider dragline silk protein (6mer) was genetically fused with the FNII coding sequence and expressed in Escherichia coli. The chimeric protein 6mer+FNII was purified by non-chromatographic methods. Films prepared from 6mer+FNII by solvent casting promoted only limited cell adhesion of human skin fibroblasts. However, the performance of the material in terms of cell adhesion was significantly improved when 6mer+FNII was combined with a silk-elastin-like protein in a concentration-dependent behavior. With this work we describe a novel class of biopolymer that promote cell adhesion and potentially useful as biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This work reports the development of biocompatible silk-based composites with enhanced cell adhesion properties suitable for biomedical applications in regenerative medicine. The biocomposites were produced by combining a genetically engineered silk-elastin-like protein with a genetically engineered spider-silk-based polypeptide carrying the three domains of the fibronectin type II module from human metalloproteinase-2. These composites were processed into free-standing films by solvent casting and characterized for their biological behavior. To our knowledge this is the first report of the exploitation of all three FNII domains as a functional domain for the development of bioinspired materials with improved biological performance. The present study highlights the potential of using genetically engineered protein-based composites as a platform for the development of new bioinspired biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cells And Their Emerging Role In Health And Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by a class I MHC-like molecule CD1d, a member of the CD1 family. While most of the initial studies on NKT cells focused on a subset with semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) termed iNKT cells, majority of CD1d-restricted lipid-reactive human T cells express diverse TCRs and are termed as type II NKT cells. These cells constitute a distinct population of circulating and tissue-resident effector T cells with immune-regulatory properties. They react to a growing list of self- as well as non-self lipid ligands, and share some properties with both iNKT as well as conventional T cells. Emerging body of evidence points to their role in the regulation of immunity to pathogens/tumors and in autoimmune/metabolic disorders. Improved understanding of the biology of these cells and the ability to manipulate their function may be of therapeutic benefit in diverse disease conditions. PMID:28115591

  16. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M; Burrows, M; Ferreira, S A; Dazzi, F; Apperley, J F; Bradshaw, A; Brand, D D; Czernuszka, J; Gentleman, E

    2017-03-03

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  17. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  18. Type II NKT Cells and Their Emerging Role in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Kumar, Vipin

    2017-02-01

    NKT cells recognize lipid Ags presented by a class I MHC-like molecule CD1d, a member of the CD1 family. Although most initial studies on NKT cells focused on a subset with semi-invariant TCR termed invariant NKT cells, the majority of CD1d-restricted lipid-reactive human T cells express diverse TCRs and are termed type II NKT cells. These cells constitute a distinct population of circulating and tissue-resident effector T cells with immune-regulatory properties. They react to a growing list of self- as well as non-self-lipid ligands, and share some properties with both invariant NKT and conventional T cells. An emerging body of evidence points to their role in the regulation of immunity to pathogens/tumors and in autoimmune/metabolic disorders. An improved understanding of the biology of these cells and the ability to manipulate their function may be of therapeutic benefit in diverse disease conditions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Study of Osmotic Fragility Status of Red Blood Cell in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihad Rownak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM is one of the most prevalent non-communicable diseases in the world. Cell membrane injury is an important mechanism for pathophysoilogical changes in DM. Osmotic fragility (OF status of Red blood cell (RBC in hyperglycemic patients is expected to be increased. This study was conducted in Chittagong medical college hospital and Chittagong Diabetic Hospital from January 2015 to December 2015. 100 newly diagnosed (duration ≤ 3 years type II diabetes mellitus patients (Fasting blood glucose is ≥7 mmol/L were selected as cases. Age, sex and BMI matched 100 healthy subjects were included as control. OF of RBC was measured by traditional method with a series of hypotonic solution of NaCl of different strength in twelve test tubes numbered serially. The relationship of OF with Fasting blood sugar (FBS and two hours post prandial blood sugar (2 HPPBS were evaluated. Unpaired Student ‘t’ test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test were done for statistical analysis. p value <0.05 was considered as significant. 87% of cases showed normal hemolysis and only 12% had early hemolysis. Mean value of NaCl solution for partial and complete hemolysis in cases were 0.44±0.06(% and 0.32±0.02(% respectively; for control group the findings were 0.04±0.06(% and 0.32±0.02(%. Significant relationship (p<0.001 was found regarding osmotic fragility with FBS ≥ 7 mmol/L and 2 HPPBS ≥ 11.1 mmol/L. OF of RBC is increased in type II diabetes mellitus.

  20. Natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity is increased by a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Chan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2017-01-02

    This study investigated the effects of a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus (AGAF) on natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the possible underlying mechanisms. This study reported that sustained exposure to AGAF increased NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as characterized according to the cellular lactic dehydrogenase leakage from K562 leukemia cells. Additionally, antibody neutralization studies have reported that interferon (IFN)-γ, but not perforin or tumor necrosis factor-α, released by NK-92MI NK cells is crucial in enhancing cytotoxicity through an autocrine loop. In this study, AGAF was further demonstrated to induce IFN-γ expression, increasing the susceptibility to NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity through the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB pathways. A pharmacological study revealed that Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of the signal transducers and of transcription 3 signaling are involved in IFN-γ-induced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Mechanism and efficiency of cell death of type II photosensitizers: effect of zinc chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, Christiane; Iamamoto, Yassuko; Baptista, Maurício S

    2012-01-01

    A series of meso-substituted tetra-cationic porphyrins, which have methyl and octyl substituents, was studied in order to understand the effect of zinc chelation and photosensitizer subcellular localization in the mechanism of cell death. Zinc chelation does not change the photophysical properties of the photosensitizers (all molecules studied are type II photosensitizers) but affects considerably the interaction of the porphyrins with membranes, reducing mitochondrial accumulation. The total amount of intracellular reactive species induced by treating cells with photosensitizer and light is similar for zinc-chelated and free-base porphyrins that have the same alkyl substituent. Zinc-chelated porphyrins, which are poorly accumulated in mitochondria, show higher efficiency of cell death with features of apoptosis (higher MTT response compared with trypan blue staining, specific acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, stronger cytochrome c release and larger sub-G1 cell population), whereas nonchelated porphyrins, which are considerably more concentrated in mitochondria, triggered mainly necrotic cell death. We hypothesized that zinc-chelation protects the photoinduced properties of the porphyrins in the mitochondrial environment. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Accurate segmentation of leukocyte in blood cell images using Atanassov's intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2014-06-01

    In this paper automatic leukocyte segmentation in pathological blood cell images is proposed using intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory. This is done to count different types of leukocytes for disease detection. Also, the segmentation should be accurate so that the shape of the leukocytes is preserved. So, intuitionistic fuzzy set and interval Type II fuzzy set that consider either more number of uncertainties or a different type of uncertainty as compared to fuzzy set theory are used in this work. As the images are considered fuzzy due to imprecise gray levels, advanced fuzzy set theories may be expected to give better result. A modified Cauchy distribution is used to find the membership function. In intuitionistic fuzzy method, non-membership values are obtained using Yager's intuitionistic fuzzy generator. Optimal threshold is obtained by minimizing intuitionistic fuzzy divergence. In interval type II fuzzy set, a new membership function is generated that takes into account the two levels in Type II fuzzy set using probabilistic T co norm. Optimal threshold is selected by minimizing a proposed Type II fuzzy divergence. Though fuzzy techniques were applied earlier but these methods failed to threshold multiple leukocytes in images. Experimental results show that both interval Type II fuzzy and intuitionistic fuzzy methods perform better than the existing non-fuzzy/fuzzy methods but interval Type II fuzzy thresholding method performs little bit better than intuitionistic fuzzy method. Segmented leukocytes in the proposed interval Type II fuzzy method are observed to be distinct and clear. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carrier extraction behaviour in type II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Hiromi; James, Juanita; Carrington, Peter J; Marshall, Andrew R J; Krier, Anthony; Wagener, Magnus C; Botha, Johannes R

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of quantum dot (QD) or quantum ring (QR) nanostructures into GaAs single-junction solar cells has shown enhanced photo-response above the GaAs absorption edge, because of sub-bandgap photon absorption. However, to further improve solar cell performance a better understanding of the mechanisms of photogenerated carrier extraction from QDs and QRs is needed. In this work we have used a direct excitation technique to study type II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells using a 1064 nm infrared laser, which enables us to excite electron–hole pairs directly within the GaSb QRs without exciting the GaAs host material. Temperature and laser intensity dependence of the current–voltage characteristics revealed that the thermionic emission process produced the dominant contribution to the photocurrent and accounts for 98.9% of total photocurrent at 0 V and 300 K. Although the tunnelling process gives only a low contribution to the photocurrent, an enhancement of the tunnelling current was clearly observed when an external electric field was applied. (paper)

  4. Sulfatide-activated type II NKT cells prevent allergic airway inflammation by inhibiting type I NKT cell function in a mouse model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guqin; Nie, Hanxiang; Yang, Jiong; Ding, Xuhong; Huang, Yi; Yu, Hongying; Li, Ruyou; Yuan, Zhuqing; Hu, Suping

    2011-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease involving many different cell types. Recently, type I natural killer T (NKT) cells have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the development of asthma. However, the roles of type II NKT cells in asthma have not been investigated before. Interestingly, type I and type II NKT cells have been shown to have opposing roles in antitumor immunity, antiparasite immunity, and autoimmunity. We hypothesized that sulfatide-activated type II NKT cells could prevent allergic airway inflammation by inhibiting type I NKT cell function in asthma. Strikingly, in our mouse model, activation of type II NKT cells by sulfatide administration and adoptive transfer of sulfatide-activated type II NKT cells result in reduced-inflammation cell infiltration in the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, decreased levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BALF; and decreased serum levels of ovalbumin-specific IgE and IgG1. Furthermore, it is found that the activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells leads to the functional inactivation of type I NKT cells, including the proliferation and cytokine secretion. Our data reveal that type II NKT cells activated by glycolipids, such as sulfatide, may serve as a novel approach to treat allergic diseases and other disorders characterized by inappropriate type I NKT cell activation.

  5. Effects of β-Carotene and Its Cleavage Products in Primary Pneumocyte Type II Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Haider

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available β-Carotene has been shown to increase the risk of developing lung cancer in smokers and asbestos workers in two large scale trails, the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET and the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-carotene Cancer Prevention Trial (ATBC. Based on this observation, it was proposed that genotoxic oxidative breakdown products may cause this effect. In support of this assumption, increased levels of sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, and chromosomal aberrations were found in primary hepatocyte cultures treated with a mixture of cleavage products (CPs and the major product apo-8′carotenal. However, because these findings cannot directly be transferred to the lung due to the exceptional biotransformation capacity of the liver, potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of β-carotene under oxidative stress and its CPs were investigated in primary pneumocyte type II cells. The results indicate that increased concentrations of β-carotene in the presence of the redox cycling quinone dimethoxynaphthoquinone (DMNQ exhibit a cytotoxic potential, as evidenced by an increase of apoptotic cells and loss of cell density at concentrations > 10 µM. On the other hand, the analysis of micronucleated cells gave no clear picture due to the cytotoxicity related reduction of mitotic cells. Last, although CPs induced significant levels of DNA strand breaks even at concentrations ≥ 1 µM and 5 µM, respectively, β-carotene in the presence of DMNQ did not cause DNA damage. Instead, β-carotene appeared to act as an antioxidant. These findings are in contrast with what was demonstrated for primary hepatocytes and may reflect different sensitivities to and different metabolism of β-carotene in the two cell types.

  6. Establishment of a vascular endothelial cell-reactive type II NKT cell clone from a rat model of autoimmune vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, Chihiro; Waki, Masashi; Kawakami, Ai; Yamaguchi, Madoka; Tomaru, Utano; Sasaki, Naomi; Masuda, Sakiko; Matsui, Yuki; Iwasaki, Sari; Baba, Tomohisa; Kasahara, Masanori; Yoshiki, Takashi; Paletta, Daniel; Herrmann, Thomas; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    We previously generated a rat model that spontaneously developed small vessel vasculitis (SVV). In this study, a T cell clone reactive with rat vascular endothelial cells (REC) was established and named VASC-1. Intravenous injection of VASC-1 induced SVV in normal recipients. VASC-1 was a TCRαβ/CD3-positive CD4/CD8 double-negative T cell clone with expression of NKG2D. The cytokine mRNA profile under unstimulated condition was positive for IL-4 and IFN-γ but negative for IL-2 and IL-10. After interaction with REC, the mRNA expression of IL-2, IL-5 and IL-6 was induced in VASC-1, which was inhibited by blocking of CD1d on the REC surface. Although the protein levels of these cytokines seemed to be lower than the detection limit in the culture medium, IFN-γ was detectable. The production of IFN-γ from the VASC-1 stimulated with LPS-pre-treated REC was inhibited by the CD1d blockade on the REC. These findings indicated VASC-1 as an NKT cell clone. The NKT cell pool includes two major subsets, namely types I and II. Type I NKT cells are characterized by expression of semi-invariant TCRs and the potential to bind to marine sponge-derived α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) loaded on CD1d; whereas, type II NKT cells do not manifest these characteristics. VASC-1 exhibited a usage of TCR other than the type I invariant TCR α chain and did not bind to α-GalCer-loaded CD1d; therefore, it was determined as a type II NKT cell clone. The collective evidence suggested that REC-reactive type II NKT cells could be involved in the pathogenesis of SVV in rats. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The Functions of Type I and Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chia-Min; Zimmer, Michael I.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2013-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells are a distinct subset of T cells that rapidly produce an array of cytokines upon activation and play a critical role in regulating various immune responses. NKT cells are classified into two groups based on differences in T cell receptor (TCR) usage. Type I NKT cells have an invariant TCRα-chain and are readily detectable by α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-loaded CD1d tetramers. Type II NKT cells have a more diverse TCR repertoire and cannot be directly identified. Both types of NKT cells as well as multiple CD1d-expressing cell types are present in the intestine and their interactions are likely to be modulated by pathogenic and commensal microbes, which in turn contribute to the intestinal immune responses in health and disease. Indeed, in several animal models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type I NKT cells have been shown to make both protective and pathogenic contributions to disease. In contrast, in human patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC), and a mouse model in which both CD1d expression and the frequency of Type II NKT cells are increased, Type II NKT cells appear to promote intestinal inflammation. In this review, we summarize present knowledge on the antigen recognition, activation and function of NKT cells with a particular focus on their role in IBD, and discuss factors that may influence the functional outcome of NKT cell responses in intestinal inflammation. PMID:23518808

  8. Choline Deficiency Causes Colonic Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cell Loss and Alleviates Murine Colitis under Type I NKT Cell Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagami, Shintaro; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Shinji; Fujita, Akira; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryohei; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Hinoi, Takao; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Serum levels of choline and its derivatives are lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in healthy individuals. However, the effect of choline deficiency on the severity of colitis has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the role of choline deficiency in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. Methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet lowered the levels of type II natural killer T (NKT) cells in the colonic lamina propria, peritoneal cavity, and mesenteric lymph nodes, and increased the levels of type II NKT cells in the livers of wild-type B6 mice compared with that in mice fed a control (CTR) diet. The gene expression pattern of the chemokine receptor CXCR6, which promotes NKT cell accumulation, varied between colon and liver in a manner dependent on the changes in the type II NKT cell levels. To examine the role of type II NKT cells in colitis under choline-deficient conditions, we assessed the severity of DSS-induced colitis in type I NKT cell-deficient (Jα18-/-) or type I and type II NKT cell-deficient (CD1d-/-) mice fed the MCD or CTR diets. The MCD diet led to amelioration of inflammation, decreases in interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 secretion, and a decrease in the number of IFN-γ and IL-4-producing NKT cells in Jα18-/- mice but not in CD1d-/- mice. Finally, adaptive transfer of lymphocytes with type II NKT cells exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in Jα18-/- mice with MCD diet. These results suggest that choline deficiency causes proinflammatory type II NKT cell loss and alleviates DSS-induced colitis. Thus, inflammation in DSS-induced colitis under choline deficiency is caused by type II NKT cell-dependent mechanisms, including decreased type II NKT cell and proinflammatory cytokine levels.

  9. Protein kinase C stimulation of phospholipid synthesis in a type II pneumocyte derived cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, M.E.; Finkelstein, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    In the Type II pneumocyte-derived cell line, A549, addition of 50 nM 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate more than doubled the rate of de novo synthesis of phophatidylcholine (PC). A similar increase was observed with the addition of the exogenous diacylglycerol, 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol. These results suggest a role for the activation of protein kinase C(PKC) in the stimulation of PC biosynthesis. The modulation of CTP:phosphocholine cytidyltransferase activity was examined as the locus for TPA mediated effects. Pulse chase experiments showed TPA caused a significant increase in the rate of utilization of phosphocholine. The observed effect of TPA on CT activity may be due to its nonspecific promotion of binding of the enzyme to the endoplasmic reticulum or a specific consequence of PKC activation and phosphorylation. Preincubation of cells with Compound 48/80, an inhibitor of PKC, reduced TPA stimulation of PC synthesis by 40-45%. Incubation with 4α-phorbol 12,13 didecanoate (PDD) which does not activate PKC had little stimulatory effect. Treatment of intact cells with TPA for 60 min increased CT from 0.401 nmol/min/mg to 0.787 nmol/min/mg. Preincubation with 48/80 prior to TPA reduced the increase in CT activity over 50%. Incubation with PDD only increased CT by 17%. These results strongly suggest that the phorbol ester stimulation of phospholipid synthesis is a specific effect due to its ability to activate PKC

  10. CD4(+) type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank; Briet, Claire; Löfbom, Linda; Yagita, Hideo; Lehuen, Agnes; Boitard, Christian; Holmberg, Dan; Sorokin, Lydia; Cardell, Susanna L

    2012-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry diverse TCRs, prevented T1D in the NOD mouse model for the human disease. In this study, we show that CD4(+) 24αβ type II NKT cells, but not CD4/CD8 double-negative NKT cells, were sufficient to downregulate diabetogenic CD4(+) BDC2.5 NOD T cells in adoptive transfer experiments. CD4(+) 24αβ NKT cells exhibited a memory phenotype including high ICOS expression, increased cytokine production, and limited display of NK cell markers, compared with double-negative 24αβ NKT cells. Blocking of ICOS or the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand 1 pathway was shown to abolish the regulation that occurred in the pancreas draining lymph nodes. To our knowledge, these results provide for the first time cellular and molecular information on how type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells regulate T1D.

  11. Decreased CXCL12 is associated with impaired alveolar epithelial cell migration and poor lung healing after lung resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jacob A; Sun, Haiying; Chiu, Stephen; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Sporn, Peter H S; Sznajder, Jacob I; Bharat, Ankit

    2015-10-01

    Prolonged air leak (PAL) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality after lung resection, but its pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Migration of alveolar type II epithelial cells is essential for lung wound repair. Here we determined the role of C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) on alveolar epithelial cell migration and lung wound healing. CXCL12 in the pleural fluid of patients was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Human A549 and murine MLE12 alveolar epithelial cell lines were used for wound closure, cell migration, and proliferation assays. Western blot was used to analyze Rac1 and cofilin. Pleural CXCL12 was decreased in patients with PAL (1,389 ± 192 vs 3,270 ± 247 pg/mL; P alveolar epithelial cell migration by binding to its receptor CXCR4 and may have a role in lung healing. CXCL12-mediated alveolar epithelial cell migration is associated with Rac1 and cofilin activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Proteomic peptide scan of porphyromonas gingivalis fima type ii for searching potential b-cell epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    LUCCHESE, A.; GUIDA, A.; CAPONE, G.; DONNARUMMA, G.; LAINO, L.; PETRUZZI, M.; SERPICO, R.; SILVESTRE, F.; GARGARI, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose To identify potential antigenic targets for Porphyromonas gingivalis vaccine development. Materials and methods In the present study, we analyzed the Porphyromonas gingivalis, fimA type II primary amino acid sequence and characterized the similarity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level. Results We found that exact peptide-peptide profiling of the fimbrial antigen versus the human proteome shows that only 19 out of 344 fimA type II pentapeptides are uniquely owned by the bacterial protein. Conclusions The concept that protein immunogenicity is allocated in rare peptide sequences and the search the Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA type II sequence for peptides unique to the bacterial protein and absent in the human host, might be used in new therapeutical approaches as a significant adjunct to current periodontal therapies. PMID:28042435

  13. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) exerts a growth inhibitory effect on many cell types through binding to two types of receptors, the type I and II receptors. Resistance to TGF-beta due to lack of type II receptor (RII) has been described in some cancer types including small cell lung...... cancer (SCLC). The purpose of this study was to examine the cause of absent RII expression in SCLC cell lines. Northern blot analysis showed that RII RNA expression was very weak in 16 of 21 cell lines. To investigate if the absence of RII transcript was due to mutations, we screened the poly-A tract...... for mutations, but no mutations were detected. Additional screening for mutations of the RII gene revealed a GG to TT base substitution in one cell line, which did not express RII. This mutation generates a stop codon resulting in predicted synthesis of a truncated RII of 219 amino acids. The nature...

  14. The phylogeny and molecular epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneine, W

    1996-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences from 29 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) strains from endemic and nonendemic populations led to the proposition of three HTLV-IIa phylogroups (A-I, A-II, and A-III) and four HTLV-IIb phylogroups (B-I, B-II, B-III, B-IV). B-I and B-II represented sequences from U.S. and European intravenous drug users, and B-IV included Amerindian sequences from the Guaymi and Wayuu. Interestingly, sequences from an African Pygmy and Seminole and Pueblo Indians and other non-India U.S. samples clustered together in B-III. Similarly, sequences from the Kayapo Indians from Brazil, a Brazilian blood donor, a Cameroonian, and a Ghanaian prostitute clustered together in A-II. Sequences from non-Indian U.S./European samples and a Pueblo Indian formed A-III. A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay was developed to identify rapidly the prevalence of the A and B phylogroups in 246 HTLV-II samples. The RFLP results suggest that A-III and B-II may represent cosmopolitan subtypes because of global distribution in urban areas. In contrast, B-IV and A-II infections were restricted primarily to Central and South America. The phylogenetic data suggest a possible Amerindian origin for B-III, A-II, and A-III infections in non-Indians and an evolution into A and B subtypes that preceded population migrations to the Americas.

  15. P2X7R: independent modulation of aquaporin 5 expression in CdCl2-injured alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heupel, Julia; Bläsche, Robert; Wesslau, Karl-Philipp; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2018-03-01

    The expression of aquaporin 5 in alveolar epithelial type I cells under conditions of cadmium-induced injury has not yet been discovered. We investigated the effect of the P2X7R agonist BzATP under this condition, since P2X7R is involved in altered regulation of aquaporin 5 in pulmonary fibrosis. CdCl 2 /TGF-β1 treatment of lung epithelial MLE-12 cells was leading to increasing P2X7R, and aquaporin 5 protein levels. The aquaporin 5 expression was P2X7R-independent in MLE-12 cells under cadmium, as was shown in blocking experiments with oxATP. Further, the expression of both proteins increased after 24 h CdCl 2 /TGF-β1 treatment of precision-cut lung slices, but decreased after 72 h. Using immunohistochemistry, the activation of the P2X7R with the agonist BzATP modulated the aquaporin 5 immunoreactivity in the alveolar epithelium of precision-cut lung slices from wild-type but not from P2X7R knockout mice. Similarly, aquaporin 5 protein was reduced in BzATP-treated immortal lung epithelial E10 cells. Surprisingly, untreated alveolar epithelial type II cells of P2X7R knockouts exhibited a pronounced apical immunoreactivity in addition to the remaining alveolar epithelial type I cells. BzATP exposure did not alter this distribution pattern, but increased the number of apoptotic alveolar epithelial type II cells in wild-type lung slices.

  16. Expression of functional toll-like receptor-2 and -4 on alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lynne; Medford, Andrew R L; Uppington, Kay M; Robertson, John; Witherden, Ian R; Tetley, Teresa D; Millar, Ann B

    2004-08-01

    The recognition of potentially harmful microorganisms involves the specific recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and the family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is known to play a central role in this process. TLR-4 is the major recognition receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, whereas TLR-2 responds to bacterial products from gram-positive organisms. Although resident alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense against microbial attack, it is now understood that the alveolar epithelium also plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity of the lung. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether human primary type II alveolar epithelial cells (ATII) express functional TLR-2 and TLR-4 and how they may be regulated by inflammatory mediators. We have used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry to determine basal and inducible expression on ATII. We have used highly purified preparations of the gram-positive bacterial product lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and LPS to look at the functional consequences of TLR-2 and TLR-4 ligation, respectively, in terms of interleukin-8 release. We have shown that human primary ATII cells express mRNA and protein for both TLR-2 and TLR-4, which can be modulated by incubation with LPS and tumor necrosis factor. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that these receptors are functional. This suggests that ATII have the potential to contribute significantly to the host defense of the human alveolus against bacteria.

  17. Na+ currents in vestibular type I and type II hair cells of the embryo and adult chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetto, S; Bosica, M; Correia, M J; Ottersen, O P; Zucca, G; Perin, P; Valli, P

    2003-08-01

    In birds, type I and type II hair cells differentiate before birth. Here we describe that chick hair cells, from the semicircular canals, begin expressing a voltage-dependent Na current (INa) from embryonic day 14 (E14) and continue to express the current up to hatching (E21). During this period, INa was present in most (31/43) type I hair cells irrespective of their position in the crista, in most type II hair cells located far from the planum semilunatum (48/63), but only occasionally in type II hair cells close to the planum semilunatum (2/35). INa activated close to -60 mV, showed fast time- and voltage-dependent activation and inactivation, and was completely, and reversibly, blocked by submicromolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin (Kd = 17 nM). One peculiar property of INa concerns its steady-state inactivation, which is complete at -60 mV (half-inactivating voltage = -96 mV). INa was found in type I and type II hair cells from the adult chicken as well, where it had similar, although possibly not identical, properties and regional distribution. Current-clamp experiments showed that INa could contribute to the voltage response provided that the cell membrane was depolarized from holding potentials more negative than -80 mV. When recruited, INa produced a significant acceleration of the cell membrane depolarization, which occasionally elicited a large rapid depolarization followed by a rapid repolarization (action-potential-like response). Possible physiological roles for INa in the embryo and adult chicken are discussed.

  18. Cytokine-induced killer cells are type II natural killer T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until now, cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells were assumed to be part of the type I natural killer T (NKT cell population, but it was not yet investigated if this is correct. Methods: For analysis, CIK cells were generated by various culture conditions. Human type I NKT cells express a T cell receptor (TCR composed of an invariant Vα24-JαQ chain combined with one of several Vβ chains. The Vα24 is a reliable marker for the presence of these TCRs. Results: While comparing cultures stimulated with different substances, we observed the lack of any Vα24 on the surface of CIK culture cells. Conclusion: We conclude that CIK cells do not belong to the type I NKT cells.

  19. Activity of the type II JAK2 inhibitor CHZ868 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Li, Loretta S.; Kopp, Nadja; Montero, Joan; Chapuy, Bjoern; Yoda, Akinori; Christie, Amanda L.; Liu, Huiyun; Christodoulou, Alexandra; van Bodegom, Diederik; van der Zwet, Jordy; Layer, Jacob V.; Tivey, Trevor; Lane, Andrew A.; Ryan, Jeremy A.; Ng, Samuel Y.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Stone, Richard M.; Steensma, David; Wadleigh, Martha; Harris, Marian; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Sterker, Dario; Zender, Michael; Rodig, Scott J.; Murakami, Masato; Hofmann, Francesco; Kuo, Frank; Eck, Michael J.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Letai, Anthony; Baffert, Fabienne; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Radimerski, Thomas; Gaul, Christoph; Weinstock, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A variety of cancers depend on JAK2 signaling, including the high-risk subset of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs) with CRLF2 rearrangements. Type I JAK2 inhibitors induce paradoxical JAK2 hyperphosphorylation in these leukemias and have limited activity. To improve the efficacy of JAK2 inhibition in B-ALL, we developed the type II inhibitor CHZ868, which stabilizes JAK2 in an inactive conformation. CHZ868 potently suppressed the growth of CRLF2-rearranged human B-ALL cells, abrogated JAK2 signaling, and improved survival in mice with human or murine B-ALL. CHZ868 and dexamethasone synergistically induced apoptosis in JAK2-dependent B-ALLs and further improved in vivo survival compared to CHZ868 alone. These data support the testing of type II JAK2 inhibition in patients with JAK2-dependent leukemias and other disorders. PMID:26175414

  20. Polyclonal type II natural killer T cells require PLZF and SAP for their development and contribute to CpG-mediated antitumor response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Weng, Xiufang; Bagchi, Sreya; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like T cells with potent immunomodulatory function via rapid production of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. NKT cells comprise well-characterized type I NKT cells, which can be detected by α-galactosylceramide-loaded CD1d tetramers, and less-studied type II NKT cells, which do not recognize α-galactosylceramide. Here we characterized type II NKT cells on a polyclonal level by using a Jα18-deficient IL-4 reporter mouse model. This model allows us to track type II NTK cells by the GFP+TCRβ+ phenotype in the thymus and liver. We found type II NKT cells, like type I NKT cells, exhibit an activated phenotype and are dependent on the transcriptional regulator promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) and the adaptor molecule signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) for their development. Type II NKT cells are potently activated by β-D-glucopyranosylceramide (β-GlcCer) but not sulfatide or phospholipids in a CD1d-dependent manner, with the stimulatory capacity of β-GlcCer influenced by acyl chain length. Compared with type I NKT cells, type II NKT cells produce lower levels of IFN-γ but comparable amounts of IL-13 in response to polyclonal T-cell receptor stimulation, suggesting they may play different roles in regulating immune responses. Furthermore, type II NKT cells can be activated by CpG oligodeoxynucletides to produce IFN-γ, but not IL-4 or IL-13. Importantly, CpG-activated type II NKT cells contribute to the antitumor effect of CpG in the B16 melanoma model. Taken together, our data reveal the characteristics of polyclonal type II NKT cells and their potential role in antitumor immunotherapy. PMID:24550295

  1. The development and plasticity of alveolar type 1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Hernandez, Belinda J.; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Narvaez del Pilar, Odemaris; Vila-Ellis, Lisandra; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Evans, Scott E.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Chen, Jichao

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells cover >95% of the gas exchange surface and are extremely thin to facilitate passive gas diffusion. The development of these highly specialized cells and its coordination with the formation of the honeycomb-like alveolar structure are poorly understood. Using new marker-based stereology and single-cell imaging methods, we show that AT1 cells in the mouse lung form expansive thin cellular extensions via a non-proliferative two-step process while retaining cellular plasticity. In the flattening step, AT1 cells undergo molecular specification and remodel cell junctions while remaining connected to their epithelial neighbors. In the folding step, AT1 cells increase in size by more than 10-fold and undergo cellular morphogenesis that matches capillary and secondary septa formation, resulting in a single AT1 cell spanning multiple alveoli. Furthermore, AT1 cells are an unexpected source of VEGFA and their normal development is required for alveolar angiogenesis. Notably, a majority of AT1 cells proliferate upon ectopic SOX2 expression and undergo stage-dependent cell fate reprogramming. These results provide evidence that AT1 cells have both structural and signaling roles in alveolar maturation and can exit their terminally differentiated non-proliferative state. Our findings suggest that AT1 cells might be a new target in the pathogenesis and treatment of lung diseases associated with premature birth. PMID:26586225

  2. CD4+ type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic ß cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry...... diverse TCRs, prevented T1D in the NOD mouse model for the human disease. In this study, we show that CD4(+) 24aß type II NKT cells, but not CD4/CD8 double-negative NKT cells, were sufficient to downregulate diabetogenic CD4(+) BDC2.5 NOD T cells in adoptive transfer experiments. CD4(+) 24aß NKT cells...... exhibited a memory phenotype including high ICOS expression, increased cytokine production, and limited display of NK cell markers, compared with double-negative 24aß NKT cells. Blocking of ICOS or the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand 1 pathway was shown to abolish the regulation that occurred...

  3. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  4. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9 eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the Γ(k = 0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407 meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  5. Nonuniform Effect of Carrier Separation Efficiency and Light Absorption in Type-II Perovskite Nanowire Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiping; He, Jialun; Cao, Yiyan; Kong, Lijing; Zheng, Xuanli; Wu, Yaping; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Shuping; Wu, Zhiming; Kang, Junyong

    2017-12-01

    Coaxial structures exhibit great potential for the application of high-efficiency solar cells due to the novel mechanism of radial charge separation. Here, we intensively investigate the nonuniform effect of carrier separation efficiency (CSE) and light absorption in perovskite-based type-II coaxial nanowire solar cells (ZnO/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 ). Results show that the CSE rapidly decreases along the radial direction in the shell, and the value at the outer side becomes extremely low for the thick shell. Besides, the position of the main light absorption gradually moves to the outer side with the increase of the shell thickness. As a result, the external quantum efficiency shows a positional dependence with a maximal value close to the border of the nanowire. Eventually, in our case, it is found that the maximal power conversion efficiency of the solar cells reduces from 19.5 to 17.9% under the effect of the nonuniformity of CSE and light absorption. This work provides a basis for the design of high-efficiency solar cells, especially type-II nanowire solar cells.

  6. Nonuniform Effect of Carrier Separation Efficiency and Light Absorption in Type-II Perovskite Nanowire Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiping; He, Jialun; Cao, Yiyan; Kong, Lijing; Zheng, Xuanli; Wu, Yaping; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Shuping; Wu, Zhiming; Kang, Junyong

    2017-03-01

    Coaxial structures exhibit great potential for the application of high-efficiency solar cells due to the novel mechanism of radial charge separation. Here, we intensively investigate the nonuniform effect of carrier separation efficiency (CSE) and light absorption in perovskite-based type-II coaxial nanowire solar cells (ZnO/CH3NH3PbI3). Results show that the CSE rapidly decreases along the radial direction in the shell, and the value at the outer side becomes extremely low for the thick shell. Besides, the position of the main light absorption gradually moves to the outer side with the increase of the shell thickness. As a result, the external quantum efficiency shows a positional dependence with a maximal value close to the border of the nanowire. Eventually, in our case, it is found that the maximal power conversion efficiency of the solar cells reduces from 19.5 to 17.9% under the effect of the nonuniformity of CSE and light absorption. This work provides a basis for the design of high-efficiency solar cells, especially type-II nanowire solar cells.

  7. Confirming a Role for α9nAChRs and SK Potassium Channels in Type II Hair Cells of the Turtle Posterior Crista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Xu Parks

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In turtle posterior cristae, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons (VENs synapse on type II hair cells, bouton afferents innervating type II hair cells, and afferent calyces innervating type I hair cells. Electrical stimulation of VENs releases acetylcholine (ACh at these synapses to exert diverse effects on afferent background discharge including rapid inhibition of bouton afferents and excitation of calyx-bearing afferents. Efferent-mediated inhibition is most pronounced in bouton afferents innervating type II hair cells near the torus, but becomes progressively smaller and briefer when moving longitudinally through the crista toward afferents innervating the planum. Sharp-electrode recordings have inferred that efferent-mediated inhibition of bouton afferents requires the sequential activation of alpha9-containing nicotinic ACh receptors (α9*nAChRs and small-conductance, calcium-dependent potassium channels (SK in type II hair cells. Gradations in the strength of efferent-mediated inhibition across the crista likely reflect variations in α9*nAChRs and/or SK activation in type II hair cells from those different regions. However, in turtle cristae, neither inference has been confirmed with direct recordings from type II hair cells. To address these gaps, we performed whole-cell, patch-clamp recordings from type II hair cells within a split-epithelial preparation of the turtle posterior crista. Here, we can easily visualize and record hair cells while maintaining their native location within the neuroepithelium. Consistent with α9*nAChR/SK activation, ACh-sensitive currents in type II hair cells were inward at hyperpolarizing potentials but reversed near −90 mV to produce outward currents that typically peaked around −20 mV. ACh-sensitive currents were largest in torus hair cells but absent from hair cells near the planum. In current clamp recordings under zero-current conditions, ACh robustly hyperpolarized type II hair cells. ACh

  8. Lung fibroblasts accelerate wound closure in human alveolar epithelial cells through hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoko; Correll, Kelly; Schiel, John A; Finigan, Jay H; Prekeris, Rytis; Mason, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    There are 190,600 cases of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) each year in the United States, and the incidence and mortality of ALI/ARDS increase dramatically with age. Patients with ALI/ARDS have alveolar epithelial injury, which may be worsened by high-pressure mechanical ventilation. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells are the progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium and are required to reestablish the alveolar epithelium during the recovery process from ALI/ARDS. Lung fibroblasts (FBs) migrate and proliferate early after lung injury and likely are an important source of growth factors for epithelial repair. However, how lung FBs affect epithelial wound healing in the human adult lung has not been investigated in detail. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is known to be released mainly from FBs and to stimulate both migration and proliferation of primary rat ATII cells. HGF is also increased in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum in patients with ALI/ARDS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF secreted by FBs would enhance wound closure in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Wound closure was measured using a scratch wound-healing assay in primary human AEC monolayers and in a coculture system with FBs. We found that wound closure was accelerated by FBs mainly through HGF/c-Met signaling. HGF also restored impaired wound healing in AECs from the elderly subjects and after exposure to cyclic stretch. We conclude that HGF is the critical factor released from FBs to close wounds in human AEC monolayers and suggest that HGF is a potential strategy for hastening alveolar repair in patients with ALI/ARDS. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products is a marker of type I lung alveolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Madoka; Fujiwara, Naoyuki; Hirabayashi, Susumu; Ohno, Hideki; Iida, Junko; Makita, Koshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    Lung alveolar epithelial cells are comprised of type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells. ATI cells are polarized, although they have very flat morphology. The identification of marker proteins for apical and basolateral membranes of ATI cells is important to investigate into the differentiation of ATI cells. In this paper, we characterized receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) as a marker for ATI cells. RAGE was localized on basolateral membranes of ATI cells in the immunoelectron microscopy and its expression was enhanced in a parallel manner to the differentiation of ATI cells in vivo and in primary cultures of ATII cells. RAGE and T1 alpha, a well-known ATI marker protein, were targeted to basolateral and apical membranes, respectively, when expressed in polarized Madine Darby canine kidney cells. Moreover, RAGE was expressed in ATI cells after T1 alpha in vivo and in ex in vivo organ cultures. In conclusion, RAGE is a marker for basolateral membranes of well-differentiated ATI cells. ATI cells require some signal provided by the in vivo environment to express RAGE.

  10. Inhibition of type I NKT cells by retinoids or following sulfatide-mediated activation of type II NKT cells attenuates alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Igor; Sheng, Huiming; Marrero, Idania; Seki, Ehikiro; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Chaturvedi, Som; Molle, Natasha; Mathews, K. Stephanie; Gao, Bin; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune mechanisms leading to liver injury following chronic alcohol ingestion are poorly understood. Natural killer T (NKT) cells, enriched in the liver and comprised of at least two distinct subsets, type I and type II, recognize different lipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules. We have investigated whether differential activation of NKT cell subsets orchestrates inflammatory events leading to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We found that following chronic plus binge feeding of Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet in male C57BL/6 mice, type I but not type II NKT cells are activated leading to recruitment of inflammatory Gr-1highCD11b+ cells into liver. A central finding is that liver injury following alcohol feeding is dependent upon type I NKT cells. Thus liver injury is significantly inhibited in Jα18−/− mice deficient in type I NKT cells as well as following their inactivation by sulfatide-mediated activation of type II NKT cells. Furthermore we have identified a novel pathway involving all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and its receptor RARγ signaling that inhibits type I NKT cells and consequently ALD. A semi-quantitative PCR analysis of hepatic gene expression of some of the key proinflammatory molecules shared in human disease indicated that their upregulation in ALD is dependent upon type I NKT cells. Conclusion Type I but not type II NKT cells become activated following alcohol feeding. Type I NKT cells-induced inflammation and neutrophil recruitment results in liver tissue damage while type II NKT cells protect from injury in ALD. Inhibition of type I NKT cells by retinoids or by sulfatide prevents ALD. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved between mice and humans, NKT cell subsets might be targeted for potential therapeutic intervention in ALD. PMID:25477000

  11. Multiple tissue-specific isoforms of sulfatide activate CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomqvist, Maria; Rhost, Sara; Teneberg, Susann

    2009-01-01

    The glycosphingolipid sulfatide (SO(3)-3Galbeta1Cer) is a demonstrated ligand for a subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which could regulate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a murine model for multiple sclerosis, as well as tumor immunity and experimental hepatitis. Native sulfatide...... isoforms by a CD1d-restricted NKT-cell clone, and suggest that sulfatide, a major component of the myelin sheet and pancreatic beta-cells, is one of several natural ligands for type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells....... is a mixture of sulfatide isoforms, i.e. sulfatide molecules with different long-chain bases and fatty acid chain lengths and saturation. Here, we demonstrate that sulfatide-specific CD1d-restricted murine NKT hybridomas recognized several different sulfatide isoforms. These included the physiologically...

  12. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Kashyap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM is a rare, chronic lung disease with bilateral intra-alveolar calcium and phosphate deposition throughout the lung parenchyma with predominance to lower and midzone. Although, etiology and pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, the mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium-phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type II cells resulting in the accumulation and forming of microliths rich in calcium phosphate (due to impaired clearance are considered to be the cause of the disease. Chest radiograph and high-resolution CT of thorax are nearly pathognomonic for diagnosing PAM. HRCT demonstrates diffuse micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in calcification of interlobular septa. Patients with PAM are asymptomatic till development of hypoxemia and cor-pulmonale. No therapy has been proven to be beneficial except lung transplantation.

  13. DNAM-1 mediates epithelial cell-specific cytotoxicity of aberrant intraepithelial lymphocyte lines from refractory celiac disease type II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjon, Jennifer M-L; Kooy-Winkelaar, Yvonne M C; Tack, Greetje J; Mommaas, A Mieke; Schreurs, Marco W J; Schilham, Marco W; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2011-06-01

    In refractory celiac disease (RCD), intestinal epithelial damage persists despite a gluten-free diet. Characteristic for RCD type II (RCD II) is the presence of aberrant surface TCR-CD3(-) intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) that can progressively replace normal IELs and eventually give rise to overt lymphoma. Therefore, RCD II is considered a malignant condition that forms an intermediate stage between celiac disease (CD) and overt lymphoma. We demonstrate in this study that surface TCR-CD3(-) IEL lines isolated from three RCD II patients preferentially lyse epithelial cell lines. FACS analysis revealed that DNAM-1 was strongly expressed on the three RCD cell lines, whereas other activating NK cell receptors were not expressed on all three RCD cell lines. Consistent with this finding, cytotoxicity of the RCD cell lines was mediated mainly by DNAM-1 with only a minor role for other activating NK cell receptors. Furthermore, enterocytes isolated from duodenal biopsies expressed DNAM-1 ligands and were lysed by the RCD cell lines ex vivo. Although DNAM-1 on CD8(+) T cells and NK cells is known to mediate lysis of tumor cells, this study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence that (pre)malignant cells themselves can acquire the ability to lyse epithelial cells via DNAM-1. This study confirms previous work on epithelial lysis by RCD cell lines and identifies a novel mechanism that potentially contributes to the gluten-independent tissue damage in RCD II and RCD-associated lymphoma.

  14. Glycosylation of type II collagen is of major importance for T cell tolerance and pathology in collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Bockermann, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Type II collagen (CII) is a candidate cartilage-specific autoantigen, which can become post-translationally modified by hydroxylation and glycosylation. T cell recognition of CII is essential for the development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and also occurs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA......). The common denominator of murine CIA and human RA is the presentation of an immunodominant CII-derived glycosylated peptide on murine Aq and human DR4 molecules, respectively. To investigate the importance of T cell recognition of glycosylated CII in CIA development after immunization with heterologous CII......, we treated neonatal mice with different heterologous CII-peptides (non-modified, hydroxylated and galactosylated). Treatment with the galactosylated peptide (galactose at position 264) was superior in protecting mice from CIA. Protection was accompanied by a reduced antibody response to CII...

  15. [Cation ions modulate the ACh-sensitive current in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Kai; Zhang, Song; Kong, Wei-Jia; Li, Qing-Tian; Li, Zhi-Wang

    2006-04-25

    Molecular biological studies and electrophysiological data have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) is the principal cochlear and vestibular efferent neurotransmitter among mammalians. However, the functional roles of ACh in type II vestibular hair cells among mammalians are still unclear, with the exception of the well-known alpha9-containing nicotinic ACh receptor (alpha9-nAChR) in cochlear hair cells and frog saccular hair cells. In this study, the properties of the ACh-sensitive current were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp technique in isolated type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs. The direct effect of extracellular ACh was to induce a hyperpolarization effect in type II vestibular hair cells. Type II vestibular hair cells displayed a sustained outward current in response to the perfusion of ACh. It took about 60 s for the ACh-sensitive current to get a complete re-activation. The reversal potential of the ACh-sensitive current was (-66 +/- 8) mV, which indicated that potassium ion was the main carrier of this current. The blocking effect by the submillimolar concentration of tetraethylammonium (TEA) further indicated that extracellular ACh stimulated the calcium-dependent potassium current. Following replacement of the compartment of NaCl in the normal external solution with TrisCl, LiCl or saccharose respectively, the amplitude of the ACh-sensitive current was not affected. Blocking of the release of intracellular Ca(2+) stores by intracellular application of heparin failed to inhibit the ACh-sensitive current. Therefore, extracellular Na(+)and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-dependent intracellular Ca(2+)release were not involved in the activation of the ACh-sensitive current. However, the ACh-sensitive current was strongly affected by the concentration of the extracellular K(+), extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular Mg(2+). The amplitude of the ACh- sensitive current was strongly inhibited by high concentration of extracellular K

  16. A heteromeric molecular complex regulates the migration of lung alveolar epithelial cells during wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Manik C; Makena, Patrudu S; Kennedy, Joseph; Teng, Bin; Luellen, Charlean; Sinclair, Scott E; Waters, Christopher M

    2017-05-19

    Alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATII) are instrumental in early wound healing in response to lung injury, restoring epithelial integrity through spreading and migration. We previously reported in separate studies that focal adhesion kinase-1 (FAK) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4 promote epithelial repair mechanisms. However, potential interactions between these two pathways were not previously considered. In the present study, we found that wounding of rat ATII cells promoted increased association between FAK and CXCR4. In addition, protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) increased its association with this heteromeric complex, while apoptosis signal regulating kinase-1 (ASK1) dissociated from the complex. Cell migration following wounding was decreased when PP5 expression was decreased using shRNA, but migration was increased in ATII cells isolated from ASK1 knockout mice. Interactions between FAK and CXCR4 were increased upon depletion of ASK1 using shRNA in MLE-12 cells, but unaffected when PP5 was depleted. Furthermore, we found that wounded rat ATII cells exhibited decreased ASK1 phosphorylation at Serine-966, decreased serine phosphorylation of FAK, and decreased association of phosphorylated ASK1 with FAK. These changes in phosphorylation were dependent upon expression of PP5. These results demonstrate a unique molecular complex comprising CXCR4, FAK, ASK1, and PP5 in ATII cells during wound healing.

  17. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression of Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma-Derived A549 Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy appears to be promising for restoring damaged or irreparable lung tissue. However, establishing a simple and reproducible protocol for preparing lung progenitor populations is difficult because the molecular basis for alveolar epithelial cell differentiation is not fully understood. We investigated an in vitro system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of alveolus-specific gene expression using a human alveolar epithelial type II (ATII cell line, A549. After cloning A549 subpopulations, each clone was classified into five groups according to cell morphology and marker gene expression. Two clones (B7 and H12 were further analyzed. Under serum-free culture conditions, surfactant protein C (SPC, an ATII marker, was upregulated in both H12 and B7. Aquaporin 5 (AQP5, an ATI marker, was upregulated in H12 and significantly induced in B7. When the RAS/MAPK pathway was inhibited, SPC and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. After treatment with dexamethasone (DEX, 8-bromoadenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, surfactant protein B and TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. We found that A549-derived clones have plasticity in gene expression of alveolar epithelial differentiation markers and could be useful in studying ATII maintenance and differentiation.

  18. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M.; Duance, V.; Maini, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis

  19. Inactivation of Tsc2 in Mesoderm-Derived Cells Causes Polycystic Kidney Lesions and Impairs Lung Alveolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Siying; Luo, Yongfeng; Chen, Hui; Warburton, David; Lam, Hilaire C; Wang, Larry L; Chen, Ping; Henske, Elizabeth P; Shi, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins are critical negative regulators of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway. Germline mutations of TSC1 or TSC2 cause TSC, affecting multiple organs, including the kidney and lung, and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of organ-specific disease in TSC remain incompletely understood, and the impact of TSC inactivation on mesenchymal lineage cells has not been specifically studied. We deleted Tsc2 specifically in mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells of multiple organs in mice using the Dermo1-Cre driver. The Dermo1-Cre-driven Tsc2 conditional knockout mice had body growth retardation and died approximately 3 weeks after birth. Significant phenotypes were observed in the postnatal kidney and lung. Inactivation of Tsc2 in kidney mesenchyme caused polycystic lesions starting from the second week of age, with increased cell proliferation, tubular epithelial hyperplasia, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In contrast, Tsc2 deletion in lung mesenchyme led to decreased cell proliferation, reduced postnatal alveolarization, and decreased differentiation with reduced numbers of alveolar myofibroblast and type II alveolar epithelial cells. Two major findings thus result from this model: inactivation of Tsc2 in mesoderm-derived cells causes increased cell proliferation in the kidneys but reduced proliferation in the lungs, and inactivation of Tsc2 in mesoderm-derived cells causes epithelial-lined renal cysts. Therefore, Tsc2-mTOR signaling in mesenchyme is essential for the maintenance of renal structure and for lung alveolarization. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesive interaction measured between AFM probe and lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonenko, Zoya; Finot, Eric; Amrein, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles entering the body through the lung is thought to be initially defined by the electrostatic and adhesive interaction of the particles with lung's wall. Here, we investigated the first step of the interaction of nanoparticles with lung epithelial cells using atomic force microscope (AFM) as a force apparatus. Nanoparticles were modeled by the apex of the AFM tip and the forces of interaction between the tip and the cell analyzed over time. The adhesive force and work of adhesion strongly increased for the first 100 s of contact and then leveled out. During this time, the tip was penetrating deeply into the cell. It first crossed a stiff region of the cell and then entered a much more compliant cell region. The work of adhesion and its progression over time were not dependent on the load with which the tip was brought into contact with the cell. We conclude that the initial thermodynamic aspects and the time course of the uptake of nanoparticles by lung epithelial cells can be studied using our experimental approach. It is discussed how the potential health threat posed by nanoparticles of different size and surface characteristics can be evaluated using the method presented

  1. Smac mimetics and type II interferon synergistically induce necroptosis in various cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekay, Michael John; Roesler, Stefanie; Frank, Tanja; Knuth, Anne-Kathrin; Eckhardt, Ines; Fulda, Simone

    2017-12-01

    Since cancer cells often evade apoptosis, induction of necroptosis as another mode of programmed cell death is considered a promising therapeutic alternative. Here, we identify a novel synergistic interaction of Smac mimetics that antagonize x-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP), cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis (cIAP) 1 and 2 with interferon (IFN)γ to induce necroptosis in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells in which caspase activation is blocked. This synergism is confirmed by calculation of combination indices (CIs) and found in both solid and hematological cancer cell lines as well as for different Smac mimetics (i.e. BV6, Birinapant), pointing to a broader relevance. Importantly, individual genetic knockdown of key components of necroptosis signaling, i.e. receptor-interacting protein (RIP) 1, RIP3 or mixed lineage kinase domain-like pseudokinase (MLKL), significantly protects from BV6/IFNγ-induced cell death. Similarly, pharmacological inhibitors of RIP1 (necrostatin-1(Nec-1)), RIP3 (GSK'872) or MLKL (necrosulfonamide (NSA)) significantly reduce BV6/IFNγ-stimulated cell death. Of note, IFN-regulatory factor (IRF)1 is required for BV6/IFNγ-mediated necroptosis, as IRF1 silencing provides protection from cell death. By comparison, antibodies blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or CD95 ligand fail to inhibit BV6/IFNγ-induced cell death, pointing to a mechanism independently of death receptor ligands. This is the first report showing that Smac mimetics synergize with IFNγ to trigger necroptosis in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells with important implications for Smac mimetic-based strategies for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF CELLS FROM BRONCHO ALVEOLAR LAVAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lezoray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Broncho alveolar lavage is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for confirming alveolar hemorrhage. Golde has introduced a ranking score, based on the hemosiderin content of macrophages which enables ranking cells from 0 to 4 based on the degree of Prussian blue stain. We propose a complete image analysis scheme to automatically perform both the extraction of the cellular objects and the ranking of each cell according to the Golde score. The image analysis techniques used mainly involve clustering and mathematical morphology. A 2D histogram is clustered to extract the main cellular components, a color watershed is used to determine and refine the regions. Finally, the cellular components of interest are firstly classified according to their hue and secondly according to their staining repartition. The proposed image analysis technique is very fast and produces reliable and accurate results.

  3. Lifeguard Inhibits Fas Ligand-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum-Calcium Release Mandatory for Apoptosis in Type II Apoptotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urresti, Jorge; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Coccia, Elena; Arévalo, Juan Carlos; Castellano, José; Fernández-Sanz, Celia; Galenkamp, Koen M O; Planells-Ferrer, Laura; Moubarak, Rana S; Llecha-Cano, Núria; Reix, Stéphanie; García-Dorado, David; Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Comella, Joan X

    2016-01-15

    Death receptors are members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Lifeguard (LFG) is a death receptor antagonist mainly expressed in the nervous system that specifically blocks Fas ligand (FasL)-induced apoptosis. To investigate its mechanism of action, we studied its subcellular localization and its interaction with members of the Bcl-2 family proteins. We performed an analysis of LFG subcellular localization in murine cortical neurons and found that LFG localizes mainly to the ER and Golgi. We confirmed these results with subcellular fractionation experiments. Moreover, we show by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that LFG interacts with Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, but not with Bax or Bak, and this interaction likely occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. We further investigated the relationship between LFG and Bcl-XL in the inhibition of apoptosis and found that LFG protects only type II apoptotic cells from FasL-induced death in a Bcl-XL dependent manner. The observation that LFG itself is not located in mitochondria raises the question as to whether LFG in the ER participates in FasL-induced death. Indeed, we investigated the degree of calcium mobilization after FasL stimulation and found that LFG inhibits calcium release from the ER, a process that correlates with LFG blockage of cytochrome c release to the cytosol and caspase activation. On the basis of our observations, we propose that there is a required step in the induction of type II apoptotic cell death that involves calcium mobilization from the ER and that this step is modulated by LFG. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Multiple tissue-specific isoforms of sulfatide activate CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Maria; Rhost, Sara; Teneberg, Susann; Löfbom, Linda; Østerbye, Thomas; Brigl, Manfred; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Cardell, Susanna L.

    2014-01-01

    The glycosphingolipid sulfatide (SO3-3Galβ1Cer) is a demonstrated ligand for a subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which could regulate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a murine model for multiple sclerosis, as well as tumor immunity and experimental hepatitis. Native sulfatide is a mixture of sulfatide isoforms, i.e. sulfatide molecules with different long-chain bases and fatty acid chain lengths and saturation. Here, we demonstrate that sulfatide-specific CD1d-restricted murine NKT hybridomas recognized several different sulfatide isoforms. These included the physiologically relevant isoforms C24:1 and C24:0, major constituents of the myelin sheet of the nervous system, and C16:0, prominent in the pancreatic islet β-cells. The most potent sulfatide isoform was lysosulfatide (lacking a fatty acid). Shortened fatty acid chain length (C24:1 versus C18:1), or saturation of the long fatty acid (C24:0), resulted in reduced stimulatory capacity, and fatty acid hydroxylation abolished the response. Moreover, sulfatide was not responsible for the natural autoreactivity toward splenocytes by XV19 T hybridoma cells. Our results reveal a promiscuity in the recognition of sulfatide isoforms by a CD1d-restricted NKT-cell clone, and suggest that sulfatide, a major component of the myelin sheet and pancreatic β-cells, is one of several natural ligands for type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PMID:19582739

  5. Differential effects of hypoxic stress in alveolar epithelial cells and microvascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signorelli, Sara; Jennings, Paul; Leonard, Martin O; Pfaller, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxic conditions eukaryotic cells and tissues undergo adaptive responses involving glycolysis, angiogenesis, vasoconstriction and inflammation. The underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully elucidated and are most likely cell and tissue specific. In the lung, alveolar epithelial

  6. Strain-balanced type-II superlattices for efficient multi-junction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo, A.; Utrilla, A. D.; Reyes, D. F.; Braza, V.; Llorens, J. M.; Fuertes Marr?n, D.; Al?n, B.; Ben, T.; Gonz?lez, D.; Guzman, A.; Hierro, A.; Ulloa, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-junction solar cells made by assembling semiconductor materials with different bandgap energies have hold the record conversion efficiencies for many years and are currently approaching 50%. Theoretical efficiency limits make use of optimum designs with the right lattice constant-bandgap energy combination, which requires a 1.0?1.15?eV material lattice-matched to GaAs/Ge. Nevertheless, the lack of suitable semiconductor materials is hindering the achievement of the predicted efficiencie...

  7. Essential role for cathepsin D in bleomycin-induced apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Rayford, Heather; Shu, Ruijie; Zhuang, Jiaju; Uhal, Bruce D

    2004-07-01

    Our earlier studies showed that bleomycin-induced apoptosis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires the autocrine synthesis and proteolytic processing of angiotensinogen into ANG II and that inhibitors of ANG-converting enzyme (ACEis) block bleomycin-induced apoptosis (Li X, Zhang H, Soledad-Conrad V, Zhuang J, and Uhal BD. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284: L501-L507, 2003). Given the documented role of cathepsin D (CatD) in apoptosis of other cell types, we hypothesized that CatD might be the AEC enzyme responsible for the conversion of angiotensinogen into ANG I, the substrate for ACE. Primary cultures of rat type II AECs challenged with bleomycin in vitro showed upregulation and secretion of CatD enzymatic activity and immunoreactive protein but no increases in CatD mRNA. The aspartyl protease inhibitor pepstatin A, which completely blocked CatD enzymatic activity, inhibited bleomycin-induced nuclear fragmentation by 76% and reduced bleomycin-induced caspase-3 activation by 47%. Antisense oligonucleotides against CatD mRNA reduced CatD-immunoreactive protein and inhibited bleomycin-induced nuclear fragmentation by 48%. A purified fragment of angiotensinogen (F1-14) containing the CatD and ACE cleavage sites, when applied to unchallenged AEC in vitro, yielded mature ANG II peptide and induced apoptosis. The apoptosis induced by F1-14 was inhibited 96% by pepstatin A and 77% by neutralizing antibodies specific for CatD (both P CatD in bleomycin-induced apoptosis of cultured AEC and suggest that the role(s) of CatD in AEC apoptosis include the conversion of newly synthesized angiotensinogen to ANG II.

  8. Potassium currents induced by hydrostatic pressure modulate membrane potential and transmitter release in vestibular type II hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong Dinh, Thien An; Haasler, Thorsten; Homann, Georg; Jüngling, Eberhard; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Vestibular type II hair cells respond to increases in the hydrostatic pressure with pressure-dependent K(+) currents. We examined whether such currents may modulate transmitter release (assessed as membrane capacitance increments) by altering membrane potentials and voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents. Capacitance increments were dependent on voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx. Stimulating currents (0.7 nA) in current clamp induced depolarisations that were more negative by 8.7 +/- 2.1 mV when the bath height was elevated from 0.2 to 0.5 cm. In voltage clamp, protocols were used that simulated the time course of the membrane potential in current clamp at either low (control) or high hydrostatic pressure (high bath). The low bath protocol induced significantly larger Ca(2+) currents and increases in capacitance than the high bath protocol. We conclude that pressure-dependent K(+) currents may alter the voltage response of vestibular hair cells to an extent critical for Ca(2+) currents and transmitter release. This mechanism may contribute to vestibular dysfunction in Meniere's disease.

  9. Water-pipe smoke condensate increases the internalization of Mycobacterium Bovis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Alipoor, Shamila D.; Movassaghi, Masoud; Varahram, Mohammad; Ghorbani, Jahangir; Folkerts, Gert; Garssen, Johan; Adcock, Ian M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, and there is an association between tobacco smoke and TB. Water pipe smoking has become an increasing problem not only in Middle Eastern countries but also globally because users consider it as safer than cigarettes. The presence of

  10. Enolase 1 (ENO1 and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3 regulate Wnt/β-catenin-driven trans-differentiation of murine alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Mutze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue destruction during lung injury. It consists of alveolar epithelial type I (ATI and type II (ATII cells. ATII cells are capable of self-renewal and exert progenitor function for ATI cells upon alveolar epithelial injury. Cell differentiation pathways enabling this plasticity and allowing for proper repair, however, are poorly understood. Here, we applied proteomics, expression analysis and functional studies in primary murine ATII cells to identify proteins and molecular mechanisms involved in alveolar epithelial plasticity. Mass spectrometry of cultured ATII cells revealed a reduction of carbonyl reductase 2 (CBR2 and an increase in enolase 1 (ENO1 and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3 protein expression during ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation. This was accompanied by increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Notably, ENO1 and PDIA3, along with T1α (podoplanin; an ATI cell marker, exhibited decreased protein expression upon pharmacological and molecular Wnt/β-catenin inhibition in cultured ATII cells, whereas CBR2 levels were stabilized. Moreover, we analyzed primary ATII cells from mice with bleomycin-induced lung injury, a model exhibiting activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo. We observed reduced CBR2 significantly correlating with surfactant protein C (SFTPC, whereas ENO1 and PDIA3 along with T1α were increased in injured ATII cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENO1, as well as PDIA3, in primary ATII cells led to reduced T1α expression, indicating diminished cell trans-differentiation. Our data thus identified proteins involved in ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation and suggest a Wnt/β-catenin-driven functional role of ENO1 and PDIA3 in alveolar epithelial cell plasticity in lung injury and repair.

  11. Combination of Obestatin and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevents Aggravation of Endocrine Pancreatic Damage in Type II Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Noha I; Ebrahim, Nesrine; Mohammed, Ola M; Sabry, Dina

    2017-11-30

    One of the new promising therapies in treatment of diabetes mellitus is mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which have an interesting therapeutic potentiality based on their paracrine effect and transdifferentiation potentiality. Also obestatin improves the generation of functional β cells/islet-like cell clusters in vitro, suggesting implications for cell-based replacement therapy in diabetes. So the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combination of both MSCs and obestatin on an experimental model of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sixty male rats were divided into; group I (control group), group II (T2DM group) induced by administration of high fat diet (HFD) and injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in low dose, group III (T2DM treated with MSCs), group IV (T2DM treated with obestatin), group V (T2DM treated with MSCs and obestatin). Fasting blood glucose, C-peptide, insulin and lipid profile were measured. HOMA-IR and HOMA- β were calculated. Pancreatic expression of insulin, glucagon like peptide -1 (GLP-1) and pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) mRNA levels were measured. In addition pancreatic histological changes, insulin and Bax were analyzed by immunohistochemical examination of islets of Langerhans. Diabetic rats showed significant increase in HOMA-IR, serum glucose and lipid profile levels with significant decrease in insulin, HOMA- β , GLP-1 and Pdx1 levels. MSCs and obestatin caused significant improvement in all parameters with more significant improvement in combined therapy. The protective effects afforded by MSCs and obestatin may derive from improvement of the metabolic profile, antiapoptosis and by increase in pancreatic GLP-1and Pdx1 gene expression.

  12. Multi-stacked GaSb/GaAs type-II quantum nanostructures for application to intermediate band solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Yasushi; Tamaki, Ryo; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the performance of 10-layer stacked GaSb/GaAs quantum dot (QD) and quantum ring (QR) solar cells (SCs) having a type-II band alignment. For both SCs, the external quantum efficiency (EQE) increased in the longer wavelength region beyond GaAs bandedge wavelength of λ > 870 nm due to an additive contribution from GaSb/GaAs QD or QR layers inserted in the intrinsic region of p-i-n SC structure. The EQE of GaSb/GaAs QRSC was higher than that of QDSC at room temperature and the photoluminescence intensity from GaSb/GaAs QRs was stronger compared with GaSb/GaAs QDs. These results indicate that crystal quality of GaSb/GaAs QRs is superior to that of GaSb/GaAs QDs. Furthermore, a photocurrent production due to two-step photo-absorption via GaSb/GaAs QD states or QR states, ΔEQE was measured at low temperature and the ratio of two-step absorption to total carrier extraction defined as ΔEQE / (ΔEQE + EQE), was higher for GaSb/GaAs QRSC than that of QDSC. The ratio of GaSb/GaAs QRSC exceeds 80% over the wavelength region of λ = 950 - 1250 nm. This suggests that two-step absorption process is more dominant for carrier extraction from GaSb/GaAs QR structure.

  13. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...

  14. Human type II pneumocyte chemotactic responses to CXCR3 activation are mediated by splice variant A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rong; Lee, Clement M; Gonzales, Linda W; Yang, Yi; Aksoy, Mark O; Wang, Ping; Brailoiu, Eugen; Dun, Nae; Hurford, Matthew T; Kelsen, Steven G

    2008-06-01

    Chemokine receptors control several fundamental cellular processes in both hematopoietic and structural cells, including directed cell movement, i.e., chemotaxis, cell differentiation, and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that CXCR3, the chemokine receptor expressed by Th1/Tc1 inflammatory cells present in the lung, is also expressed by human airway epithelial cells. In airway epithelial cells, activation of CXCR3 induces airway epithelial cell movement and proliferation, processes that underlie lung repair. The present study examined the expression and function of CXCR3 in human alveolar type II pneumocytes, whose destruction causes emphysema. CXCR3 was present in human fetal and adult type II pneumocytes as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. CXCR3-A and -B splice variant mRNA was present constitutively in cultured type II cells, but levels of CXCR3-B greatly exceeded CXCR3-A mRNA. In cultured type II cells, I-TAC, IP-10, and Mig induced chemotaxis. Overexpression of CXCR3-A in the A549 pneumocyte cell line produced robust chemotactic responses to I-TAC and IP-10. In contrast, I-TAC did not induce chemotactic responses in CXCR3-B and mock-transfected cells. Finally, I-TAC increased cytosolic Ca(2+) and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B kinases only in CXCR3-A-transfected cells. These data indicate that the CXCR3 receptor is expressed by human type II pneumocytes, and the CXCR3-A splice variant mediates chemotactic responses possibly through Ca(2+) activation of both mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways. Expression of CXCR3 in alveolar epithelial cells may be important in pneumocyte repair from injury.

  15. Elucidating the Mechanism of Regulation of Transforming Growth Factor β Type II Receptor Expression in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Halder

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung carcinogenesis in humans involves an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to alterations in normal lung epithelium, to in situ carcinoma, and finally to invasive and metastatic cancers. The loss of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor function in tumors plays a pivotal role in this process, and our previous studies have shown that resistance to TGF-β in lung cancers occurs mostly through the loss of TGF-β type II receptor expression (TβRII. However, little is known about the mechanism of down-regulation of TβRII and how histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors (HDIs can restore TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor function. Here we show that HDIs restore TβRII expression and that DNA hypermethylation has no effect on TβRII promoter activity in lung cancer cell lines. TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor function is restored by HDIs in lung cancer cell lines that lack TβRII expression. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway by either activated Ras or epidermal growth factor signaling is involved in the down-regulation of TβRII through histone deacetylation. We have immunoprecipitated the protein complexes by biotinylated oligonucleotides corresponding to the HDI-responsive element in the TβRII promoter (−127/(−75 and identified the proteins/factors using proteomics studies. The transcriptional repressor Meis1/2 is involved in repressing the TβRII promoter activity, possibly through its recruitment by Sp1 and NF-YA to the promoter. These results suggest a mechanism for the downregulation of TβRII in lung cancer and that TGF-β tumor suppressor functions may be restored by HDIs in lung cancer patients with the loss of TβRII expression.

  16. Syndecan-1 mediates the coupling of positively charged submicrometer amorphous silica particles with actin filaments across the alveolar epithelial cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Galya; Panther, David J; Cassens, Kaylyn J; Phillips, Jaclyn L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Pounds, Joel G

    2009-04-15

    The cellular interactions and pathways of engineered submicro- and nano-scale particles dictate the cellular response and ultimately determine the level of toxicity or biocompatibility of the particles. Positive surface charge can increase particle internalization, and in some cases can also increase particle toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we identify the cellular interaction and pathway of positively charged submicrometer synthetic amorphous silica particles, which are used extensively in a wide range of industrial applications, and are explored for drug delivery and medical imaging and sensing. Using time lapse fluorescence imaging in living cells and other quantitative imaging approaches, it is found that heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a critical role in the attachment and internalization of the particles in alveolar type II epithelial cell line (C10), a potential target cell type bearing apical microvilli. Specifically, the transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-1, is found to mediate the initial interactions of the particles at the cell surface, their coupling with actin filaments across the cell membrane, and their subsequent internalization via macropinocytosis. The observed interaction of syndecan molecules with the particle prior to their engagement with actin filaments suggests that the particles initiate their own internalization by facilitating the clustering of the molecules, which is required for the actin coupling and subsequent internalization of syndecan. Our observations identify a new role for syndecan-1 in mediating the cellular interactions and fate of positively charged submicrometer amorphous silica particles in the alveolar type II epithelial cell, a target cell for inhaled particles.

  17. Syndecan-1 mediates the coupling of positively charged submicrometer amorphous silica particles with actin filaments across the alveolar epithelial cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, Galya; Panther, David J.; Cassens, Kaylyn J.; Phillips, Jaclyn L.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular interactions and pathways of engineered submicro- and nano-scale particles dictate the cellular response and ultimately determine the level of toxicity or biocompatibility of the particles. Positive surface charge can increase particle internalization, and in some cases can also increase particle toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we identify the cellular interaction and pathway of positively charged submicrometer synthetic amorphous silica particles, which are used extensively in a wide range of industrial applications, and are explored for drug delivery and medical imaging and sensing. Using time lapse fluorescence imaging in living cells and other quantitative imaging approaches, it is found that heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a critical role in the attachment and internalization of the particles in alveolar type II epithelial cell line (C10), a potential target cell type bearing apical microvilli. Specifically, the transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-1, is found to mediate the initial interactions of the particles at the cell surface, their coupling with actin filaments across the cell membrane, and their subsequent internalization via macropinocytosis. The observed interaction of syndecan molecules with the particle prior to their engagement with actin filaments suggests that the particles initiate their own internalization by facilitating the clustering of the molecules, which is required for the actin coupling and subsequent internalization of syndecan. Our observations identify a new role for syndecan-1 in mediating the cellular interactions and fate of positively charged submicrometer amorphous silica particles in the alveolar type II epithelial cell, a target cell for inhaled particles.

  18. Classification of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes according to the FAB co-operative group's proposals. Proposals for a redefinition of blast cell type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, B; Thiede, T; Sundström, C; Hagberg, H

    1984-05-01

    53 patients with the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) were classified according to the proposals of the FAB cooperative group 1982. 29 patients had refractory anaemia (RA), 10 refractory anaemia with excess of blasts ( RAEB ), 5 RAEB in transformation, 7 RA with ringed sideroblasts and 2 chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia ( CMML ). Counting blast cells type I and II involved no difficulties. 4 of 15 patients who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) according to the FAB classification of 1976 did not fulfill the new 1982 criteria for AML. A redefinition of the blast cell type II to include a more granulated blast cells, without the characteristics of promyelocytes, would solve this problem. We conclude that a redefinition of the blast cell type II might turn out to be useful.

  19. The Milieu of Damaged Alveolar Epithelial Type 2 Cells Stimulates Alveolar Wound Repair by Endogenous and Exogenous Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Susan; Shi, Wei; Carraro, Gianni; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Da Sacco, Stefano; Driscoll, Barbara A.; Perin, Laura; De Filippo, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial integrity is dependent upon the alveolar milieu, yet the milieu of the damaged alveolar epithelial cell type 2 (AEC2) has been little studied. Characterization of its components may offer the potential for ex vivo manipulation of stem cells to optimize their therapeutic potential. We examined the cytokine profile of AEC2 damage milieu, hypothesizing that it would promote endogenous epithelial repair while recruiting cells from other locations and instructing their engraftment and differentiation. Bronchoalveolar lavage and lung extract from hyperoxic rats represented AEC2 in vivo damage milieu, and medium from a scratch-damaged AEC2 monolayer represented in vitro damage. CINC-2 and ICAM, the major cytokines detected by proteomic cytokine array in AEC2 damage milieu, were chemoattractive to normoxic AECs and expedited in vitro wound healing, which was blocked by their respective neutralizing antibodies. The AEC2 damage milieu was also chemotactic for exogenous uncommitted human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs), increasing migration greater than 20-fold. hAFSCs attached within an in vitro AEC2 wound and expedited wound repair by contributing cytokines migration inhibitory factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 to the AEC2 damage milieu, which promoted wound healing. The AEC2 damage milieu also promoted differentiation of a subpopulation of hAFSCs to express SPC, TTF-1, and ABCA3, phenotypic markers of distal alveolar epithelium. Thus, the microenvironment created by AEC2 damage not only promotes autocrine repair but also can attract uncommitted stem cells, which further augment healing through cytokine secretion and differentiation. PMID:21700959

  20. [Co-location of ACh-sensitive BK channels and L-type calcium channels in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Kai; Li, Guan-Qiao; Kong, Wei-Jia; Zhang, Song; Wu, Ting-Ting; Li, Jia-Li; Li, Qing-Tian

    2008-03-01

    To explore the mechanisms of the influx of calcium ions during the activation of ACh-sensitive BK channel (big conductance, calcium-dependent potassium channel) in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs. Type II vestibular hair cells were isolated by collagenase type IA. Under the whole-cell patch mode, the sensitivity of ACh-sensitive BK current to the calcium channels blockers was investigated, the pharmacological property of L-type calcium channel activator-sensitive current and ACh-sensitive BK current was compared. Following application of ACh, type II vestibular hair cells displayed a sustained outward potassium current, with a reversal potential of (-70.5 +/- 10.6) mV (x +/- s, n = 10). At the holding potential of -50 mV, the current amplitude of ACh-sensitive potassium current activated by 100 micromol/L ACh was (267 +/- 106) pA (n = 11). ACh-sensitive potassium current was potently sensitive to the BK current blocker, IBTX (iberiotoxin, 200 nmol/L). Apamin, the well-known small conductance, calcium-dependent potassium current blocker, failed to inhibit the amplitude of ACh-sensitive potassium current at a dose of 1 micromol/L. ACh-sensitive BK current was sensitive to NiCl2 and potently inhibited by CdCl2. NiCl2 and CdCl2 showed a dose-dependent blocking effect with a half inhibition-maximal response of (135.5 +/- 18.5) micromol/L (n = 7) and (23.4 +/- 2.6) micromol/L (n = 7). The L-type calcium channel activator, (-) -Bay-K 8644 (10 micromol /L), mimicked the role of ACh and activated the IBTX-sensitive outward current. ACh-sensitive BK and L-type calcium channels are co-located in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs.

  1. GaAsSb-capped InAs QD type-II solar cell structures — improvement by composition profiling of layers surrounding QD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodková, Alice; Vyskočil, Jan; Zíková, Markéta; Oswald, Jiří; Pangrác, Jiří; Petříček, Otto

    2017-02-01

    Type-II band alignment offers several advantages for proposed intermediate band solar cell structures. We focused on the quantum dot (QD) solar cell structures based on type-II InAs/GaAs QD layers capped with GaAsSb strain reducing layers. The GaAsSb strain reducing layers were prepared with or without graded Sb concentration. Strong enhancement of photocurrent was achieved by adding an InGaAs buffer layer under the type-II QD structure, thanks to improved electron extraction from QDs. For comparison, a structure with GaAs-capped InAs QDs was prepared, too. Properties of all structures are compared and the mechanism of carrier extraction or relaxation is discussed. Gradient of antimony concentration in a strain reducing layer (SRL) significantly improved resulting properties of solar cell structures. It is shown that in a multiple-QD structure with a GaAsSb SRL, electrons and holes have non-intersecting trajectories which prevents carrier recombination and improves the efficiency of solar cell structures. NextNano band structure calculations of different types of structures support our experimental results.

  2. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Williamson, Daniel; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  3. STL-based analysis of TRAIL-induced apoptosis challenges the notion of type I/type II cell line classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Stoma

    Full Text Available Extrinsic apoptosis is a programmed cell death triggered by external ligands, such as the TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL. Depending on the cell line, the specific molecular mechanisms leading to cell death may significantly differ. Precise characterization of these differences is crucial for understanding and exploiting extrinsic apoptosis. Cells show distinct behaviors on several aspects of apoptosis, including (i the relative order of caspases activation, (ii the necessity of mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP for effector caspase activation, and (iii the survival of cell lines overexpressing Bcl2. These differences are attributed to the activation of one of two pathways, leading to classification of cell lines into two groups: type I and type II. In this work we challenge this type I/type II cell line classification. We encode the three aforementioned distinguishing behaviors in a formal language, called signal temporal logic (STL, and use it to extensively test the validity of a previously-proposed model of TRAIL-induced apoptosis with respect to experimental observations made on different cell lines. After having solved a few inconsistencies using STL-guided parameter search, we show that these three criteria do not define consistent cell line classifications in type I or type II, and suggest mutants that are predicted to exhibit ambivalent behaviors. In particular, this finding sheds light on the role of a feedback loop between caspases, and reconciliates two apparently-conflicting views regarding the importance of either upstream or downstream processes for cell-type determination. More generally, our work suggests that these three distinguishing behaviors should be merely considered as type I/II features rather than cell-type defining criteria. On the methodological side, this work illustrates the biological relevance of STL-diagrams, STL population data, and STL-guided parameter search implemented in the

  4. STL-based analysis of TRAIL-induced apoptosis challenges the notion of type I/type II cell line classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoma, Szymon; Donzé, Alexandre; Bertaux, François; Maler, Oded; Batt, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic apoptosis is a programmed cell death triggered by external ligands, such as the TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Depending on the cell line, the specific molecular mechanisms leading to cell death may significantly differ. Precise characterization of these differences is crucial for understanding and exploiting extrinsic apoptosis. Cells show distinct behaviors on several aspects of apoptosis, including (i) the relative order of caspases activation, (ii) the necessity of mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) for effector caspase activation, and (iii) the survival of cell lines overexpressing Bcl2. These differences are attributed to the activation of one of two pathways, leading to classification of cell lines into two groups: type I and type II. In this work we challenge this type I/type II cell line classification. We encode the three aforementioned distinguishing behaviors in a formal language, called signal temporal logic (STL), and use it to extensively test the validity of a previously-proposed model of TRAIL-induced apoptosis with respect to experimental observations made on different cell lines. After having solved a few inconsistencies using STL-guided parameter search, we show that these three criteria do not define consistent cell line classifications in type I or type II, and suggest mutants that are predicted to exhibit ambivalent behaviors. In particular, this finding sheds light on the role of a feedback loop between caspases, and reconciliates two apparently-conflicting views regarding the importance of either upstream or downstream processes for cell-type determination. More generally, our work suggests that these three distinguishing behaviors should be merely considered as type I/II features rather than cell-type defining criteria. On the methodological side, this work illustrates the biological relevance of STL-diagrams, STL population data, and STL-guided parameter search implemented in the tool Breach

  5. Laser microdissection of the alveolar duct enables single-cell genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eBennett

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex tissues such as the lung are composed of structural hierarchies such as alveoli, alveolar ducts and lobules. Some structural units, such as the alveolar duct, appear to selectively participate in tissue regeneration. Here, we demonstrate an approach to conduct laser microdissection of the lung alveolar duct for single-cell PCR analysis. Our approach involved three steps. 1 The initial preparation used mechanical sectioning of the lung tissue with sufficient thickness to encompass the structure of interest. In the case of the alveolar duct, the precision-cut lung slices were 200um thick; the slices were processed using near-physiologic conditions to preserve the state of viable cells. 2 The lung slices were examined by transmission light microscopy to target the alveolar duct. The air-filled lung was sufficiently accessible by light microscopy that counterstains or fluorescent labels were unnecessary to identify the alveolar duct. 3 The enzymatic and microfluidic isolation of single cells allowed for the harvest of as few as several thousand cells for PCR analysis. Microfluidics based arrays were used to measure the expression of selected marker genes in individual cells to characterize different cell populations. Preliminary work suggests the unique value of this approach to understanding the intra- and intercellular interactions within the regenerating alveolar duct.

  6. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and response to commonly used anti-arthritic drugs were assessed and compared with DBA/1 mice. We confirmed that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to arthritis induced by immunisation with chicken type II collagen and develop strong and sustained T-cell responses to type II collagen. Arthritis was milder in C57BL/6 mice than DBA/1 mice and more closely resembled rheumatoid arthritis in its response to therapeutic intervention. Our findings show that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis, providing a valuable model for assessing the role of specific genes involved in the induction and/or maintenance of arthritis and for evaluating the efficacy of novel drugs, particularly those targeted at T cells.

  7. Induction of Programmed Cell Death in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Shahsavandi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Avian influenza viruses are considered as a serious threat to human and animal health. An increase in expression of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFN genes, as well as host cell death responses contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza infection. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the growth dynamics of subacute avian influenza virus in human respiratory alveolar epithelium cells (A549. Methods: The A549 cell cultures were infected at MOIs 0.1 and 2.0 viral doses in the presence and absence of trypsin. The virus growth kinetics were elucidated by the plaque assay and the cell viability was determined by MTT at various times after the infection. The induction quality of programmed cell death as well as the signal transduction pathway of death were assessed by genomic DNA fragmentation and western blotting respectively. Results: The study findings indicated that although the H9N2 virus replication did produce a marked cytopathic effect on the alveolar cells, which led to a reduction in the cell viability, the viral titers were increased in the infected cells. The virus replication of in these cells indicated repression of host defense mechanism as well as activation of cell death. The induction of apoptosis in A549 cells was correlated with the increased virus titers as well as virus replication (p< 0.05. Conclusion: H9N2 avian influenza virus were demonstrated to induce apoptosis in human alveolar epithelial cells via the intrinsic pathway in a dose-dependent manner.

  8. CpG-ODN Facilitates Effective Intratracheal Immunization and Recall of Memory against Neoantigen-Expressing Alveolar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Riehn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrapulmonary immune reactions are impaired by the tolerogenic environment of the lung. This is manifested by the absence of effective endogenous T cell responses upon neoantigen expression. This tolerance is considered to contribute to lung cancer and inefficient immune therapeutic interventions. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to lung tolerance and to overcome these restrictions, we developed a transgenic mouse model with induction of a neoantigen (OVA exclusively in alveolar type II epithelial cells. This model is characterized by the absence of functional endogenous T cell responses upon OVA neoantigen induction. Standard DNA and protein vaccination protocols resulted in the accumulation of high numbers of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the lung. However, clearance of antigen-expressing cells was not achieved. To overcome this tolerance, we induced inflammatory conditions by coapplication of the TLR ligands LPS and CpG-ODN during intrapulmonary vaccinations. Both ligands induced high numbers of neoantigen-specific T cells in the lung. However, only coapplication of CpG-ODN was sufficient to establish functional cytotoxic responses resulting in the elimination of neoantigen presenting target cells. Remarkably, CpG-ODN was also crucial for functional memory responses upon re-induction of the neoantigen. The results highlight the need of TLR9 co-stimulation for overcoming tolerization, which might be a key factor for therapeutic interventions.

  9. CXCL9 Regulates TGF-β1-Induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Beirne, Sarah L; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurélie; Reviriego, Carlota; Worrell, Julie C; Counihan, Ian P; Lumsden, Robert V; Cramton-Barnes, Jennifer; Belperio, John A; Donnelly, Seamas C; Boylan, Denise; Marchal-Sommé, Joëlle; Kane, Rosemary; Keane, Michael P

    2015-09-15

    Epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition (EMT), whereby fully differentiated epithelial cells transition to a mesenchymal phenotype, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). CXCR3 and its ligands are recognized to play a protective role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the presence and extent of EMT and CXCR3 expression in human IPF surgical lung biopsies and assessed whether CXCR3 and its ligand CXCL9 modulate EMT in alveolar epithelial cells. Coexpression of the epithelial marker thyroid transcription factor-1 and the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin and CXCR3 expression was examined by immunohistochemical staining of IPF surgical lung biopsies. Epithelial and mesenchymal marker expression was examined by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence in human alveolar epithelial (A549) cells treated with TGF-β1 and CXCL9, with Smad2, Smad3, and Smad7 expression and cellular localization examined by Western blotting. We found that significantly more cells were undergoing EMT in fibrotic versus normal areas of lung in IPF surgical lung biopsy samples. CXCR3 was expressed by type II pneumocytes and fibroblasts in fibrotic areas in close proximity to cells undergoing EMT. In vitro, CXCL9 abrogated TGF-β1-induced EMT. A decrease in TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 occurred with CXCL9 treatment. This was associated with increased shuttling of Smad7 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it inhibits Smad phosphorylation. This suggests a role for EMT in the pathogenesis of IPF and provides a novel mechanism for the inhibitory effects of CXCL9 on TGF-β1-induced EMT. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyatake, Kazumasa [Department of Joint Surgery and Sports Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuji, Kunikazu, E-mail: ktsuji.gcoe@tmd.ac.jp [International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases (Global Center of Excellence Program), Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer [Department of Joint Surgery and Sports Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Sekiya, Ichiro [Section of Cartilage Regeneration, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Muneta, Takeshi [Department of Joint Surgery and Sports Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases (Global Center of Excellence Program), Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  11. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis

  12. Cytochemical localization of Na+-K+-ATPase in rat type II pneumocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, E E; McCarthy, K M

    1986-05-01

    The distribution of sodium-potassium-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (Na+-K+-ATPase) in the alveolar portion of rat lungs was examined by indirect immunofluorescence with the use of a mouse monoclonal anti-rat Na+-K+-ATPase and by ultrastructural cytochemistry using p-nitrophenylphosphate as substrate. The reaction was inhibitable by 10 mM ouabain or by the omission of K+ from the reaction mixture. Cysteine or levamisole was used to inhibit alkaline phosphatase activity. By immunofluorescence, staining was confined to cuboidal cells in alveolar spaces. These were tentatively identified as type II pneumocytes. By ultrastructural cytochemistry reaction product was present on the cytoplasmic side of the basolateral membranes of type II pneumocytes. No reaction product was observed in type I pneumocytes or in endothelium. These results indicate that type II pneumocytes contain more Na+-K+-ATPase, an enzyme important in vectorial electrolyte transport, than type I pneumocytes or endothelial cells. More sensitive methods, however, are required to determine the amounts and distribution of this enzyme in type I pneumocytes and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells.

  13. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif ) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif ), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  14. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferranda Puig

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549 exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml or vehicle (control. Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  15. The Significance of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Type II in CD8+Regulatory T Cells and CD8+Effector T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin-Lin; Wei, Xiao-Shan; Zhang, Min; Niu, Yi-Ran; Zhou, Qiong

    2018-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions. The biological functions of TNF are mediated by two receptors, TNF receptor type I (TNFR1) and TNF receptor type II (TNFR2). TNFR1 is expressed universally on almost all cell types and has been extensively studied, whereas TNFR2 is mainly restricted to immune cells and some tumor cells and its role is far from clarified. Studies have shown that TNFR2 mediates the stimulatory activity of TNF on CD4 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8 + Foxp3 + Tregs, and is involved in the phenotypic stability, proliferation, activation, and suppressive activity of Tregs. TNFR2 can also be expressed on CD8 + effector T cells (Teffs), which delivers an activation signal and cytotoxic ability to CD8 + Teffs during the early immune response, as well as an apoptosis signal to terminate the immune response. TNFR2-induced abolition of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) degradation may play an important role in these processes. Consequently, due to the distribution of TNFR2 and its pleiotropic effects, TNFR2 appears to be critical to keeping the balance between Tregs and Teffs, and may be an efficient therapeutic target for tumor and autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the biological functions of TNFR2 expressed on CD8 + Foxp3 + Tregs and CD8 + Teffs, and highlight how TNF uses TNFR2 to coordinate the complex events that ultimately lead to efficient CD8 + T cell-mediated immune responses.

  16. Single-channel L-type Ca2+ currents in chicken embryo semicircular canal type I and type II hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Valeria; Valli, Paolo; Zucca, Giampiero; Masetto, Sergio

    2006-08-01

    Few data are available concerning single Ca channel properties in inner ear hair cells and particularly none in vestibular type I hair cells. By using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique in combination with the semicircular canal crista slice preparation, we determined the elementary properties of voltage-dependent Ca channels in chicken embryo type I and type II hair cells. The pipette solutions included Bay K 8644. With 70 mM Ba(2+) in the patch pipette, Ca channel activity appeared as very brief openings at -60 mV. Ca channel properties were found to be similar in type I and type II hair cells; therefore data were pooled. The mean inward current amplitude was -1.3 +/- 0.1 (SD) pA at - 30 mV (n = 16). The average slope conductance was 21 pS (n = 20). With 5 mM Ba(2+) in the patch pipette, very brief openings were already detectable at -80 mV. The mean inward current amplitude was -0.7 +/- 0.2 pA at -40 mV (n = 9). The average slope conductance was 11 pS (n = 9). The mean open time and the open probability increased significantly with depolarization. Ca channel activity was still present and unaffected when omega-agatoxin IVA (2 microM) and omega-conotoxin GVIA (3.2 microM) were added to the pipette solution. Our results show that types I and II hair cells express L-type Ca channels with similar properties. Moreover, they suggest that in vivo Ca(2+) influx might occur at membrane voltages more negative than -60 mV.

  17. [Zaocys type II collagen regulates mesenteric lymph node Treg/Th17 cell balance in mice with collagen-induced arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Feng, Zhitao; Zhu, Junqing; Li, Juan

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the effect of oral administration of Zaocys type II collagen (ZCII) on the percentages of Treg/Th17 cells in mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes (MLNLs) in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by immunization with chicken type II collagen. Three weeks later, ZCII, purified by pepsin digestion, was orally administered in the mice for 7 consecutive days (daily dose of 10, 20, or 40 µg/kg). The severity of arthritis in each limb was evaluated using a macroscopic scoring system, and histopathological changes of the joint were observed microscopically with HE staining. The percentages of Treg and Th17 cells in MLNLs was detected by flow cytometry, and the levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the supernatant of MLNLs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with normal control mice, the mice with CIA had significantly higher scores for arthritis and histopathological changes, with also significantly increased percentages of Treg and Th17 cells in MLNLs and elevated levels of TGF-β and IL-17 in MLNL supernatant (P<0.05). In ZCII peptide-treated mice, the scores for arthritis and histopathological changes were significantly lower than those in CIA model group (P<0.05), and Treg cell percentage in MLNLs was up-regulated while Th17 cell percentage lowered; the level of TGF-β was increased but IL-17 was decreased significantly (P<0.05). Oral administration of ZCII improves CIA in mice by regulating the percentages of Treg/Th17 cells and the cytokine levels in MLNLs, suggesting the value of ZCII as a promising candidate agent for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Environmental particulate (PM2.5 augments stiffness-induced alveolar epithelial cell mechanoactivation of transforming growth factor beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn M Dysart

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional pulmonary homeostasis and repair, including diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis (PF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and tumorigenesis have been increasing over the past decade, a fact that heavily implicates environmental influences. Several investigations have suggested that in response to increased transforming growth factor--beta (TGFβ signaling, the alveolar type II (ATII epithelial cell undergoes phenotypic changes that may contribute to the complex pathobiology of PF. We have previously demonstrated that increased tissue stiffness associated with PF is a potent extracellular matrix (ECM signal for epithelial cell activation of TGFβ. The work reported here explores the relationship between tissue stiffness and exposure to environmental stimuli in the activation of TGFβ. We hypothesized that exposure of ATII cells to fine particulate matter (PM2.5 will result in enhanced cell contractility, TGFβ activation, and subsequent changes to ATII cell phenotype. ATII cells were cultured on increasingly stiff substrates with or without addition of PM2.5. Exposure to PM2.5 resulted in increased activation of TGFβ, increased cell contractility, and elongation of ATII cells. Most notably, on 8 kPa substrates, a stiffness greater than normal but less than established fibrotic lung, addition of PM2.5 resulted in increased cortical cell stiffness, enhanced actin staining and cell elongation; a result not seen in the absence of PM2.5. Our work suggests that PM2.5 exposure additionally enhances the existing interaction between ECM stiffness and TGFβ that has been previously reported. Furthermore, we show that this additional enhancement is likely a consequence of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS leading to increased TGFβ signaling events. These results highlight the importance of both the micromechanical and biochemical environment in lung disease initiation and suggest that individuals in early stages of lung

  19. B Cell IgD Deletion Prevents Alveolar Bone Loss Following Murine Oral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Baker

    2009-01-01

    and CD4+ T cells in immune normal mice compared to IgD deficient mice. These data suggest that IgD is an important mediator of alveolar bone resorption, possibly through antigen-specific coactivation of B cells and CD4+ T cells.

  20. PACAP inhibits β-cell mass expansion in a mouse model of type II diabetes: persistent suppressive effects on islet density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki eInoue

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is a potent insulinotropic G-protein-coupled receptor ligand, for which morphoregulative roles in pancreatic islets have recently been suggested. Here, we evaluated the effects of pancreatic overexpression of PACAP on morphometric changes of islets in a severe type II diabetes model. Following cross-breeding of obese-diabetic model KKAy mice with mice overexpressing PACAP in their pancreatic β-cells, the resulting KKAy mice with or without PACAP transgene (PACAP/+:Ay/+ or Ay/+ mice were fed with a high-fat diet up to the age of 11 months. Pancreatic sections from 5 and 11 month old littermates were examined. Histomorphometric analyses revealed significant suppression of islet mass expansion in PACAP/+:Ay/+ mice compared with Ay/+ mice at 11 months, but no significant difference between PACAP/+ and +/+ (wild-type mice, as previously reported. The suppressed islet mass in PACAP/+:Ay/+ mice was due to a decrease in islet density but not islet size. In addition, the density of tiny islets (<0.001 mm2 and of insulin-positive clusters in ductal structures were markedly decreased in PACAP/+:Ay/+ mice compared with Ay/+ mice at 5 months of age. In contrast, PACAP overexpression caused no significant effects on the level of aldehyde-fuchsin reagent staining (a measure of β-cell granulation or the volume and localization of glucagon-positive cells in the pancreas. These results support previously reported inhibitory effects of PACAP on pancreatic islet mass expansion, and suggest it has persistent suppressive effects on pancreatic islet density which may be related with ductal cell-associated islet neogenesis in type II diabetes.

  1. A novel recombinant peptide containing only two T-cell tolerance epitopes of chicken type II collagen that suppresses collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Caixia; Tan, Liuxin; Sun, Yeping; Liang, Fei; Liu, Nan; Xue, Hong; Luo, Yuan; Yuan, Fang; Sun, Yuying; Xi, Yongzhi

    2009-02-01

    Immunotherapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using oral-dosed native chicken or bovine type II collagen (nCII) to induce specific immune tolerance is an attractive strategy. However, the majority of clinical trials of oral tolerance in human diseases including RA in recent years have been disappointing. Here, we describe a novel recombinant peptide rcCTE1-2 which contains only two tolerogenic epitopes (CTE1 and CTE2) of chicken type II collagen (cCII). These are the critical T-cell determinants for suppression of RA that were first developed and used to compare its suppressive effects with ncCII on the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. The rcCTE1-2 was produced using the prokaryotic pET expression system and purified by Ni-NTA His affinity chromatography. Strikingly, our results showed clearly that rcCTE1-2 was as efficacious as ncCII at the dose of 50 microg/kg/d. This dose significantly reduced footpad swelling, arthritic incidence and scores, and deferred the onset of disease. Furthermore, rcCTE1-2 of 50 microg/kg/d could lower the level of anti-nCII antibody in the serum of CIA animals, decrease Th1-cytokine INF-gamma level, and increase Th3-cytokine TGF-beta(1) produced level by spleen cells from CIA mice after in vivo stimulation with ncCII. Importantly, rcCTE1-2 was even more potent than native cCII, which was used in the clinic for RA. Equally importantly, the findings that the major T-cell determinants of cCII that are also recognized by H-2(b) MHC-restricted T cells have not previously been reported. Taken together, these results suggest that we have successfully developed a novel recombinant peptide rcCTE1-2 that can induce a potent tolerogenic response in CIA.

  2. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Jiang

    Full Text Available Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2 receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  3. Inflammatory response and barrier properties of a new alveolar type 1-like cell line (TT1).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaard, E.H.J. van den; Dailey, L.A.; Thorley, A.J.; Tetley, T.D.; Forbes, B.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the inflammatory response and barrier formation of a new alveolar type 1-like (transformed type I; TT1) cell line to establish its suitability for toxicity and drug transport studies. METHODS: TT1 and A549 cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Secretion of

  4. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron R Cunningham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections.

  5. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cameron R.; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V.; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M.; Wilson, Elizabeth B.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G.; Horwitz, Marcus A.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Smale, Stephen T.; Brooks, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections. PMID:26808628

  6. Recombinant human type II collagen hydrogel provides a xeno-free 3D micro-environment for chondrogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Virpi; Narcisi, Roberto; Nystedt, Johanna; Korhonen, Matti; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2017-03-01

    Recombinant human type II collagen (rhCII) hydrogel was tested as a xeno-free micro-environment for the chondrogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). The rhCII hydrogels were seeded with BM-MSCs and cultured in a xeno-free chondro-inductive medium for 14, 28 and 84 days. High-density pellet cultures served as controls. The samples were subjected to biochemical, histological and gene expression analyses. Although the cells deposited glycosaminoglycans into the extracellular space significantly more slowly in the rhCII hydrogels compared to the high-density pellets, a similar potential of matrix deposition was reached by the end of the 84-day culture. At day 28 of culture, the gene expression level for cartilage marker genes (i.e. genes encoding for Sox9 transcription factor, Collagen type II and Aggrecan) were considerably lower in the rhCII hydrogels than in the high-density pellets, but at the end of the 84-day culture period, all the cartilage marker genes analysed were expressed at a similar level. Interestingly, the expression of the matrix metallopeptidases (MMP)-13, MMP-14 and MMP-8, i.e. extracellular collagen network-degrading enzymes, were transiently upregulated in the rhCII hydrogel, indicating active matrix reorganization. This study demonstrated that the rhCII hydrogel functions as a xeno-free platform for BM-MSC chondrogenesis, although the process is delayed. The reversible catabolic reaction evoked by the rhCII hydrogel might be beneficial in graft integration in vivo and pinpoints the need to further explore the use of hydrogels containing recombinant extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to induce the chondrogenesis of MSCs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Assay and heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris of plant cell wall type-II membrane anchored glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent; Egelund, Jack; Damager, Iben

    2009-01-01

    Two Arabidopsis xylosyltransferases, designated RGXT1 and RGXT2, were recently expressed in Baculovirus transfected insect cells and by use of the free sugar assay shown to catalyse transfer of D-xylose from UDP-alpha-D-xylose to L-fucose and derivatives hereof. We have now examined expression...

  8. GaAsSb/InAs/(In)GaAs type II quantum dots for solar cell applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyskočil, Jan; Hospodková, Alice; Petříček, Otto; Pangrác, Jiří; Zíková, Markéta; Oswald, Jiří; Vetushka, Aliaksi

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 464, Apr (2017), s. 64-68 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-21285P; GA MŠk LO1603 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : InAs * GaAsSb * InGaAs * quantum dot * solar cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016

  9. Effects of thiazinamium chloride on surfactant production in primary cultures of type II cells isolated from adult rat lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilfillan, A.M.; Lewis, A.J.; Rooney, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    Thiazinamium-Cl (T), an analog of promethazine (P), has antiasthmatic activity that may be related to its antihistaminic and anticholinergic actions or its ability to inhibition thromboxane synthesis. To assess phosphatidylcholine (PC) secretion, freshly isolated cells were preincubated with /sup 3/H-choline for 18 h and then incubated in fresh medium +/- test agent for 90 min when /sup 3/H-PC in the cells and medium was measured. PC synthesis was similarly assessed during the latter incubation period by measuring the rate of /sup 3/H-choline incorporation into cellular PC. 10/sup -6/ M T stimulated PC secretion by 46% from 0.92 +/- 0.05 (PC in the medium as % of total) to 1.34 +/- 0.08 (P < 0.01, n = 6). The EC/sub 50/ was 2.9 x 10/sup -8/ M. In comparison, terbutaline (Tb) maximally stimulated PC secretion by 108% at 10/sup -5/ M (P < 0.001, n = 13) and isoproterenol (I) by 112% at 10/sup -7/ M (P < 0.01, n = 5). The EC/sub 50/ values for Tb and I were 1.6 x 10/sup -7/ M and 3.2 x 10/sup -9/ M, respectively. T did not stimulate PC synthesis nor increase lactate dehydrogenase release. Thus, the effect on secretion was not due to increased synthesis or to cell injury. The effect of T on PC secretion was mimicked by 10/sup -6/M P (48% stimulation, P < 0.01, n = 7) and by 10/sup -5/M pyrilamine, a structurally dissimilar antihistamine, (52% stimulation, P < 0.002, n = 7). The effects of T or pyrilamine and of Tb were additive suggesting a different mechanism of action. Although histamine did not inhibit PC secretion it may play a physiologic role in its regulation.

  10. Cigarette Smoke Enhances the Expression of Profibrotic Molecules in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Checa

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a progressive and lethal disease of unknown etiology. A growing body of evidence indicates that it may result from an aberrant activation of alveolar epithelium, which induces the expansion of the fibroblast population, their differentiation to myofibroblasts and the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that activate the alveolar epithelium are unknown, but several studies indicate that smoking is the main environmental risk factor for the development of IPF. In this study we explored the effect of cigarette smoke on the gene expression profile and signaling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells. Lung epithelial cell line from human (A549, was exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE for 1, 3, and 5 weeks at 1, 5 and 10% and gene expression was evaluated by complete transcriptome microarrays. Signaling networks were analyzed with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. At 5 weeks of exposure, alveolar epithelial cells acquired a fibroblast-like phenotype. At this time, gene expression profile revealed a significant increase of more than 1000 genes and deregulation of canonical signaling pathways such as TGF-β and Wnt. Several profibrotic genes involved in EMT were over-expressed, and incomplete EMT was observed in these cells, and corroborated in mouse (MLE-12 and rat (RLE-6TN epithelial cells. The secretion of activated TGF-β1 increased in cells exposed to cigarette smoke, which decreased when the integrin alpha v gene was silenced. These findings suggest that the exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to CSE induces the expression and release of a variety of profibrotic genes, and the activation of TGF-β1, which may explain at least partially, the increased risk of developing IPF in smokers.

  11. Functional transforming growth factor-β receptor type II expression by CD4+ T cells in Peyer's patches is essential for oral tolerance induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah S Gilbert

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that Peyer's patches (PPs play a key role in the induction of oral tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that PPs are an important site for Transforming Growth Factor (TGF-β signaling and sought to prove that this tissue is of importance in oral tolerance induction. We found that expression of TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII by CD4(+ T cells increases and persists in the PPs of normal C57BL/6 mice after either high- or low-dose feeding of OVA when compared to mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs and spleen. Approximately one-third of these TGFβRII(+ CD4(+ T cells express the transcription factor Foxp3. Interestingly, the number of TGFβRII(+ CD4(+ T cells in PPs decreased when OVA-fed mice were orally challenged with OVA plus native cholera toxin (CT. In contrast, numbers of TGFβRII(+ CD4(+ T cells were increased in the intestinal lamina propria (iLP of these challenged mice. Further, these PP CD4(+ TGFβRII(+ T cells upregulated Foxp3 within 2 hours after OVA plus CT challenge. Mice fed PBS and challenged with OVA plus CT did not reveal any changes in TGFβRII expression by CD4(+ T cells. In order to test the functional property of TGFβRII in the induction of oral tolerance, CD4dnTGFβRII transgenic mice, in which TGFβRII signaling is abrogated from all CD4(+ T cells, were employed. Importantly, these mice could not develop oral tolerance to OVA. Our studies show a critical, dose-independent, role for TGFβRII expression and function by CD4(+ T cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, further underlining the vital role of PPs in oral tolerance.

  12. Transcriptomic profiles of peripheral white blood cells in type II diabetes and racial differences in expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jinghe; Ai, Junmei; Zhou, Xinchun; Shenwu, Ming; Ong, Manuel; Blue, Marketta; Washington, Jasmine T; Wang, Xiaonan; Deng, Youping

    2011-12-23

    Along with obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of metabolic disorders, African American ethnicity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the United States. However, little is known about the differences in gene expression and transcriptomic profiles of blood in T2D between African Americans (AA) and Caucasians (CAU), and microarray analysis of peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) from these two ethnic groups will facilitate our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism in T2D and identify genetic biomarkers responsible for the disparities. A whole human genome oligomicroarray of peripheral WBCs was performed on 144 samples obtained from 84 patients with T2D (44 AA and 40 CAU) and 60 healthy controls (28 AA and 32 CAU). The results showed that 30 genes had significant difference in expression between patients and controls (a fold change of 1.4 with a P value <0.05). These known genes were mainly clustered in three functional categories: immune responses, lipid metabolism, and organismal injury/abnormaly. Transcriptomic analysis also showed that 574 genes were differentially expressed in AA diseased versus AA control, compared to 200 genes in CAU subjects. Pathway study revealed that "Communication between innate and adaptive immune cells"/"Primary immunodeficiency signaling" are significantly down-regulated in AA patients and "Interferon signaling"/"Complement System" are significantly down-regulated in CAU patients. These newly identified genetic markers in WBCs provide valuable information about the pathophysiology of T2D and can be used for diagnosis and pharmaceutical drug design. Our results also found that AA and CAU patients with T2D express genes and pathways differently.

  13. Mast cell-associated alveolar inflammation in patients with atopic uncontrolled asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Cecilia; Bergqvist, Anders; Mori, Michiko; Mauad, Thais; Bjermer, Leif; Erjefält, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Background: A significant proportion of patients with asthma have persistent symptoms despite treatment with inhaled glucocorticosteroids. Objective: We hypothesized that in these patients, the alveolar parenchyma is subjected to mast cell-associated alterations. Methods: Bronchial and transbronchial biopsies from healthy controls (n = 8), patients with allergic rhinitis (n = 8), and patients with atopic uncontrolled asthma (symptoms despite treatment with inhaled glucocorticosteroids; mean d...

  14. Mammary alveolar epithelial cells convert to brown adipocytes in post-lactating mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giordano, Antonio; Perugini, Jessica; Kristensen, David Møbjerg

    2017-01-01

    found close to the mammary alveoli contain milk protein granules. Use of the Cre-loxP recombination system allowed showing that the involuting mammary gland of whey acidic protein-Cre/R26R mice, whose secretory alveolar cells express the lacZ gene during pregnancy, contains some X...

  15. Evidence for an intracellular niche for Bordetella pertussis in broncho-alveolar lavage cells of mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, SMM; Hazenbos, WLW; van de Winkel, JGJ; Mooi, FR

    1999-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis can attach, invade and survive intracellularly in human macrophages in vitro. To study the significance of this bacterial feature in vivo, we analyzed the presence of viable bacteria in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells of mice infected with B, pertussis. We found B. pertussis

  16. Successful Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation of a Patient Suffering from Type II Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia A Rare Case Report from Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurang Modi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent form of congenital dyserythropoiesis (CDA is congenital dyserythropoietic anemia II (CDA II. CDA II is a rare genetic anemia in humans, inherited in an autosomally recessive mode, characterized by hepatosplenomegaly normocytic anemia and hemolytic jaundice. Patients are usually transfusion-independent except in severe type. We are here reporting a case of severe transfusion-dependent type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia in a 5-year-old patient who has undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT at our bone marrow transplantation centre. Patient has had up until now more than 14 mL/kg/month of packed cell volume (PCV, which he required every 15 to 20 days to maintain his hemoglobin of 10 gm/dL and hematocrit of 30%. His pre-HSCT serum ferritin was 1500 ng/mL and he was on iron chelating therapy. Donor was HLA identical sibling (younger brother. The preparative regimen used was busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin. Cyclosporine and short-term methotrexate were used for graft versus host disease (GVHD prophylaxis. Engraftment of donor cells was quick and the posttransplant course was uneventful. The patient is presently alive and doing well and he has been transfusion-independent for the past 33 months after HSCT.

  17. Transcriptomic profiles of peripheral white blood cells in type II diabetes and racial differences in expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Jinghe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of metabolic disorders, African American ethnicity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D in the United States. However, little is known about the differences in gene expression and transcriptomic profiles of blood in T2D between African Americans (AA and Caucasians (CAU, and microarray analysis of peripheral white blood cells (WBCs from these two ethnic groups will facilitate our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism in T2D and identify genetic biomarkers responsible for the disparities. Results A whole human genome oligomicroarray of peripheral WBCs was performed on 144 samples obtained from 84 patients with T2D (44 AA and 40 CAU and 60 healthy controls (28 AA and 32 CAU. The results showed that 30 genes had significant difference in expression between patients and controls (a fold change of 1.4 with a P value Conclusions These newly identified genetic markers in WBCs provide valuable information about the pathophysiology of T2D and can be used for diagnosis and pharmaceutical drug design. Our results also found that AA and CAU patients with T2D express genes and pathways differently.

  18. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial

  19. Type II cGMP‑dependent protein kinase inhibits the migration, invasion and proliferation of several types of human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Wu, Yan; Qian, Hai; Tao, Yan; Pang, Ji; Wang, Ying; Chen, Yongchang

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)‑dependent protein kinase (PKG II) could inhibit the proliferation and migration of gastric cancer cells. However, the effects of PKG II on the biological functions of other types of cancer cells remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of PKG II on cancer cells derived from various types of human tissues, including A549 lung, HepG2 hepatic, OS‑RC‑2 renal, SW480 colon cancer cells and U251 glioma cells. Cancer cells were infected with adenoviral constructs coding PKG II (Ad‑PKG II) to up‑regulate PKG II expression, and treated with 8‑(4‑chlorophenylthio) (8‑pCPT)‑cGMP to activate the kinase. A Cell Counting kit 8 assay was used to detect cell proliferation. Cell migration was measured using a Transwell assay, whereas a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'‑deoxyuridine, 5'‑triphosphate nick‑end labeling assay was used to detect cell apoptosis. A pull‑down assay was used to investigate the activation of Ras‑related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac) 1 and western blotting was used to detect the expression of proteins of interest. The present results demonstrated that EGF (100 ng/ml, 24 h) promoted the proliferation and migration of cancer cells, and it suppressed their apoptosis. In addition, treatment with EGF enhanced the activation of Rac1, and up‑regulated the protein expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2, MMP7 and B‑cell lymphoma (Bcl)‑2, whereas it down‑regulated the expression of Bcl‑2‑associated X protein. Transfection of cancer cells with Ad‑PKG II, and PKG II activation with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP, was identified to counteract the effects triggered by EGF. The present results suggested that PKG II may exert inhibitory effects on the proliferation and migration of various types of cancer cells.

  20. Cultured alveolar epithelial cells from septic rats mimic in vivo septic lung.

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    Taylor S Cohen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis results in the formation of pulmonary edema by increasing in epithelial permeability. Therefore we hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells isolated from septic animals develop tight junctions with different protein composition and reduced barrier function relative to alveolar epithelial cells from healthy animals. Male rats (200-300 g were sacrificed 24 hours after cecal ligation and double puncture (2CLP or sham surgery. Alveolar epithelial cells were isolated and plated on fibronectin-coated flexible membranes or permeable, non-flexible transwell substrates. After a 5 day culture period, cells were either lysed for western analysis of tight junction protein expressin (claudin 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 18, occludin, ZO-1, and JAM-A and MAPk (JNK, ERK, an p38 signaling activation, or barrier function was examined by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER or the flux of two molecular tracers (5 and 20 A. Inhibitors of JNK (SP600125, 20 microM and ERK (U0126, 10 microM were used to determine the role of these pathways in sepsis induced epithelial barrier dysfunction. Expression of claudin 4, claudin 18, and occludin was significantly lower, and activation of JNK and ERK signaling pathways was significantly increased in 2CLP monolayers, relative to sham monolayers. Transepithelial resistance of the 2CLP monolayers was reduced significantly compared to sham (769 and 1234 ohm-cm(2, respectively, however no significant difference in the flux of either tracer was observed. Inhibition of ERK, not JNK, significantly increased TER and expression of claudin 4 in 2CLP monolayers, and prevented significant differences in claudin 18 expression between 2CLP and sham monolayers. We conclude that alveolar epithelial cells isolated from septic animals form confluent monolayers with impaired barrier function compared to healthy monolayers, and inhibition of ERK signaling partially reverses differences between these monolayers. This model provides a unique

  1. Involvement of P2X7 receptor signaling on regulating the differentiation of Th17 cells and type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Guo, Yi-Hong; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Huang, Hui; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 producing T helper (Th17) cells are major effector cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has emerged as a potential site in the regulation of inflammation in RA but little is known of its functional role on the differentiation of Th17 cells. This study investigates the in vitro and in vivo effects of P2X7R on Th17 cell differentiation during type II collagen (CII) induced experimental arthritis model. In CII-treated dendritic cells (DCs) and DC/CD4+ T coculture system, pretreatment with pharmacological antagonists of P2X7R (Suramin and A-438079) caused strong inhibition of production of Th17-promoting cytokines (IL-1β, TGF-β1, IL-23p19 and IL-6). Exposure to CII induced the elevation of mRNAs encoding retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γt, which were abolished by pretreatment with P2X7R antagonists. Furthermore, blocking P2X7R signaling abolished the CII-mediated increase in IL-17A. Blockade of P2X7R remarkably inhibited hind paw swelling and ameliorated pathological changes in ankle joint of the collagen-induced arthritis mice. Thus, we demonstrated a novel function for P2X7R signaling in regulating CII-induced differentiation of Th17 cells. P2X7R signaling facilitates the development of the sophisticated network of DC-derived cytokines that favors a Th17 phenotype. PMID:27775097

  2. Detection of early changes in autoimmune T cell phenotype and function following intravenous administration of type II collagen in a TCR-transgenic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, David D; Myers, Linda K; Whittington, Karen B; Latham, Kary A; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H; Rosloniec, Edward F

    2002-01-01

    To study the phenotypic and functional changes in naive type II collagen (CII)-specific autoimmune T cells following a tolerogenic signal, a TCR-transgenic (Tg) mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis was developed. These Tg mice express an I-A(q)-restricted CII (260-267)-specific TCR that confers severe accelerated autoimmune arthritis following immunization with CII. Despite the fact that >90% of the alphabeta T cells express the Tg, these mice can be rendered completely tolerant to the induction of arthritis by i.v. administration of 200 microg of CII. As early as 24 h after CII administration, CII-specific T cells demonstrated a decreased ability to proliferate in response to the CII immunodominant peptide and phenotypically altered the expression of L-selectin to CD62L(low) and of phagocytic glycoprotein-1 to CD44(high), expression levels consistent with the phenotype of memory T cells. In addition, they up-regulated the expression of the activation markers CD71 and CD69. Functionally, following tolerogenic stimulation, the CII-specific T cells produced similar levels of IL-2 in comparison to controls when challenged with CII peptide, however, by 48 h after exposure to tolerogen, IL-2 production dropped and was replaced by high levels of IL-10 and IL-4. Based on their production of Th2 cytokines, these data suggest that T regulatory cells expressing activation and memory markers are induced by the tolerogen and may exert their influence via cytokines to protect the animals from the induction of arthritis.

  3. Expression of type I and type II bovine scavenger receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells: Lipid droplet accumulation and nonreciprocal cross competition by acetylated and oxidized low density lipoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (United States)); Ekkel, Y.; Rohrer, L.; Penman, M.; Freedman, N.J.; Krieger, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States)); Chisolm, G.M. (Research Inst. of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Type I and type II scavenger receptors, which have been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis and other macrophage-associated functions, differ only by the presence in the type I receptor of an extracellular cysteine-rich C-terminal domain. Stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell transfectants expressing high levels of either the type I or type II bovine scavenger receptors have been generated. Type I and type II receptors in these cells mediated high-affinity saturable endocytosis of both {sup 125}I-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and {sup 125}I-labeled oxidized LDL with the distinctive broad ligand specificity characteristic of scavenger receptors. After incubation for 2 days with acetylated LDL, the transfected cells accumulated oil red O-staining lipid droplets reminiscent of those in macrophage foam cells, whereas untransfected CHO cells did not. Thus, macrophage-specific gene products other than the scavenger receptor are not required for modified-LDL-induced intracellular lipid accumulation. In transfected cells, acetylated LDL efficiently competed for both its own endocytosis and that of oxidized LDL. This nonreciprocal cross competition suggests that these ligands may bind to nonidentical but interacting sites on a single receptor. Results were similar for transfectants expressing either type I or type II scavenger receptors. The nonreciprocal cross competition seen in the transfected CHO cells differs from that previously observed with cultured macrophages.

  4. When Is an Alveolar Type 2 Cell an Alveolar Type 2 Cell? A Conundrum for Lung Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Michael F; Moodley, Yuben

    2017-07-01

    Generating mature, differentiated, adult lung cells from pluripotent cells, such as induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells, offers the hope of both generating disease-specific in vitro models and creating definitive and personalized therapies for a host of debilitating lung parenchymal and airway diseases. With the goal of advancing lung-regenerative medicine, several groups have developed and reported on protocols using defined media, coculture with mesenchymal components, or sequential treatments mimicking lung development, to obtain distal lung epithelial cells from stem cell precursors. However, there remains significant controversy about the degree of differentiation of these cells compared with their primary counterparts, coupled with a lack of consistency or uniformity in assessing the resultant phenotypes. Given the inevitable, exponential expansion of these approaches and the probable, but yet-to-emerge second and higher generation techniques to create such assets, we were prompted to pose the question, what makes a lung epithelial cell a lung epithelial cell? More specifically for this Perspective, we also posed the question, what are the minimum features that constitute an alveolar type (AT) 2 epithelial cell? In addressing this, we summarize a body of work spanning nearly five decades, amassed by a series of "lung epithelial cell biology pioneers," which carefully describes well characterized molecular, functional, and morphological features critical for discriminately assessing an AT2 phenotype. Armed with this, we propose a series of core criteria to assist the field in confirming that cells obtained following a differentiation protocol are indeed mature and functional AT2 epithelial cells.

  5. RAGE-induced changes in the proteome of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Charles A; Johnson, Nicholle M; Tsaprailis, George; Helms, My N

    2018-02-12

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor and member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. RAGE is constitutively expressed in the distal lung where it co-localizes with the alveolar epithelium; RAGE expression is otherwise minimal or absent, except with disease. This suggests RAGE plays a role in lung physiology and pathology. We used proteomics to identify and characterize the effects of RAGE on rat alveolar epithelial (R3/1) cells. LC-MS/MS identified 177 differentially expressed proteins and the PANTHER Classification System further segregated proteins. Proteins involved in gene transcription (RNA and mRNA splicing, mRNA processing) and transport (protein, intracellular protein) were overrepresented; genes involved in a response to stimulus were underrepresented. Immune system processes and response to stimuli were downregulated with RAGE knockdown. Western blot confirmed RAGE-dependent changes in protein expression for NFκB and NLRP3 that was functionally supported by a reduction in IL-1β and phosphorylated p65. We also assessed RAGE's effect on redox regulation and report that RAGE knockdown attenuated oxidant production, decreased protein oxidation, and increased reduced thiol pools. Collectively the data suggest that RAGE is a critical regulator of epithelial cell response and has implications for our understanding of lung disease, specifically acute lung injury. In the present study, we undertook the first proteomic evaluation of RAGE-dependent processes in alveolar epithelial cells. The alveolar epithelium is a primary target during acute lung injury, and our data support a role for RAGE in gene transcription, protein transport, and response to stimuli. More over our data suggest that RAGE is a critical driver of redox regulation in the alveolar epithelium. The conclusions of the present work assist to unravel the molecular events that underlie the function of RAGE in alveolar epithelial cells and have

  6. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Oxidative Stress Induced Lung Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the lung injuries of critical ill patients. This study investigates the protection conferred by α2 adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine (Dex from lung alveolar epithelial cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and the underlying mechanisms. Methods. The lung alveolar epithelial cell line, A549, was cultured and then treated with 500 μM H2O2 with or without Dex (1 nM or Dex in combination with atipamezole (10 nM, an antagonist of α2 receptors. Their effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and the cell cycle was assessed by flow cytometry. Cleaved-caspases 3 and 9, BAX, Bcl-2, phospho-mTOR (p-mTOR, ERK1/2, and E-cadherin expression were also determined with immunocytochemistry. Results. Upregulation of cleaved-caspases 3 and 9 and BAX and downregulation of Bcl-2, p-mTOR, and E-cadherin were found following H2O2 treatment, and all of these were reversed by Dex. Dex also prevented the ROS generation, cytochrome C release, and cell cycle arrest induced by H2O2. The effects of Dex were partially reversed by atipamezole. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that Dex protected lung alveolar epithelial cells from apoptotic injury, cell cycle arrest, and loss of cell adhesion induced by H2O2 through enhancing the cell survival and proliferation.

  7. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression in CD4(+) T cells is associated with joint inflammatory alleviation in collagen type II-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu-Ying; Cui, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2013-10-01

    We have recently reported that CD4(+) T cells synthesize and secrete catecholamines that facilitate a shift of T helper 1 (Th1)/Th2 balance toward Th2 polarization. In this study, we used an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, collagen type II-induced arthritis (CIA), to explore relationship between catecholamine production in CD4(+) T cells and Th1-/Th2-mediated joint inflammation. Histopathological observation of ankle joints of CIA mice displayed an evident inflammatory change on day 35 and a major damage to bones on day 55 post-immunization. Expression of Th1-specific transcription factor, T-bet, and cytokines, IL-2 and IFN-γ, and Th2-specific transcription factor, GATA-3, and cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10, was all upregulated on days 35 and 55 post-immunization, but the elevated Th1 response tended to decrease and the enhanced Th2 response tended to increase with the CIA progression. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of catecholamines, dramatically increased in ankle joints of CIA mice, although this increase was reduced on day 55 relative to that on day 35 post-immunization. In synovial tissue of CIA ankle joints but not normal joints, CD4-, T-bet-, GATA-3-, and TH-immunoreactive cells were found. Importantly, co-expressed cells with CD4 and TH, T-bet and TH, and GATA-3 and TH were observed in synovial tissue of CIA ankle joints. These results suggest that an increase in catecholamine production occurs in inflamed joints of CIA. The catecholamines are, at least in part, from Th1 and Th2 cells, and they may be related to joint inflammatory alleviation in CIA progression.

  8. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  9. Human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein elicits a type II interferon-like host cell response that depends on activated STAT1 but not interferon-γ.

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    Theresa Knoblach

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV is a highly prevalent pathogen that, upon primary infection, establishes life-long persistence in all infected individuals. Acute hCMV infections cause a variety of diseases in humans with developmental or acquired immune deficits. In addition, persistent hCMV infection may contribute to various chronic disease conditions even in immunologically normal people. The pathogenesis of hCMV disease has been frequently linked to inflammatory host immune responses triggered by virus-infected cells. Moreover, hCMV infection activates numerous host genes many of which encode pro-inflammatory proteins. However, little is known about the relative contributions of individual viral gene products to these changes in cellular transcription. We systematically analyzed the effects of the hCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1 protein, a major transcriptional activator and antagonist of type I interferon (IFN signaling, on the human transcriptome. Following expression under conditions closely mimicking the situation during productive infection, IE1 elicits a global type II IFN-like host cell response. This response is dominated by the selective up-regulation of immune stimulatory genes normally controlled by IFN-γ and includes the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory chemokines. IE1-mediated induction of IFN-stimulated genes strictly depends on tyrosine-phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1 and correlates with the nuclear accumulation and sequence-specific binding of STAT1 to IFN-γ-responsive promoters. However, neither synthesis nor secretion of IFN-γ or other IFNs seems to be required for the IE1-dependent effects on cellular gene expression. Our results demonstrate that a single hCMV protein can trigger a pro-inflammatory host transcriptional response via an unexpected STAT1-dependent but IFN-independent mechanism and identify IE1 as a candidate determinant of hCMV pathogenicity.

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Elicits a Type II Interferon-Like Host Cell Response That Depends on Activated STAT1 but Not Interferon-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblach, Theresa; Grandel, Benedikt; Seiler, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) is a highly prevalent pathogen that, upon primary infection, establishes life-long persistence in all infected individuals. Acute hCMV infections cause a variety of diseases in humans with developmental or acquired immune deficits. In addition, persistent hCMV infection may contribute to various chronic disease conditions even in immunologically normal people. The pathogenesis of hCMV disease has been frequently linked to inflammatory host immune responses triggered by virus-infected cells. Moreover, hCMV infection activates numerous host genes many of which encode pro-inflammatory proteins. However, little is known about the relative contributions of individual viral gene products to these changes in cellular transcription. We systematically analyzed the effects of the hCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein, a major transcriptional activator and antagonist of type I interferon (IFN) signaling, on the human transcriptome. Following expression under conditions closely mimicking the situation during productive infection, IE1 elicits a global type II IFN-like host cell response. This response is dominated by the selective up-regulation of immune stimulatory genes normally controlled by IFN-γ and includes the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory chemokines. IE1-mediated induction of IFN-stimulated genes strictly depends on tyrosine-phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and correlates with the nuclear accumulation and sequence-specific binding of STAT1 to IFN-γ-responsive promoters. However, neither synthesis nor secretion of IFN-γ or other IFNs seems to be required for the IE1-dependent effects on cellular gene expression. Our results demonstrate that a single hCMV protein can trigger a pro-inflammatory host transcriptional response via an unexpected STAT1-dependent but IFN-independent mechanism and identify IE1 as a candidate determinant of hCMV pathogenicity. PMID:21533215

  11. Mitochondrial quality control in alveolar epithelial cells damaged byS. aureuspneumonia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Hagir B; Kraft, Bryan; Bartz, Raquel; Chen, Lingye; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial damage is often overlooked in acute lung injury (ALI), yet most of the lung's physiological processes, such as airway tone, mucociliary clearance, ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) matching, and immune surveillance require aerobic energy provision. Because the cell's mitochondrial quality control (QC) process regulates the elimination and replacement of damaged mitochondria to maintain cell survival, we serially evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy in the alveolar regions of mice in a validated Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia model. We report that apart from cell lysis by direct contact with microbes, modest epithelial cell death was detected despite significant mitochondrial damage. Cell death by TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining occurred on days 1 and 2 postinoculation: apoptosis shown by caspase-3 cleavage was present on days 1 and 2, while necroptosis shown by increased levels of phospho- mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) and receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) was present on day 1 Cell death in alveolar type I (AT 1 ) cells assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid receptor for advanced glycation end points (RAGE) levels was high, yet AT 2 cell death was limited while both mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy were induced. These mitochondrial QC mechanisms were evaluated mainly in AT 2 cells by localizing increases in citrate synthase content, increases in nuclear mitochondrial biogenesis regulators nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), and increases in light chain 3B protein (LC3-I)/LC3II ratios. Concomitant changes in p62, Pink 1, and Parkin protein levels indicated activation of mitophagy. By confocal microscopy, mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy were often observed on day 1 within the same AT 2 cells. These findings imply that mitochondrial QC activation in pneumonia-damaged AT 2 cells promotes cell

  12. Characterization of the in vitro adhesion of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to swine alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overbeke, Ingrid; Chiers, Koen; Charlier, Gerard; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2002-08-02

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biovar 1 serotypes 2, 5a, 9 and 10 strains were tested for their ability to adhere to alveolar epithelial cells in culture. For the serotypes 5a, 9 and 10 strains, optimal adherence was observed after growth of bacterial cells in a NAD-restricted medium (0.001% NAD). This condition was also associated with the expression of a 55 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) and of fimbriae. For the serotype 2 strain, adherence and expression of fimbriae and a 55 kDa OMP was less influenced by the growth conditions. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 55 kDa OMP had no homology with any known sequence, suggesting that it is an as yet unknown protein. Adherence capabilities were significantly reduced following treatment of the bacteria with proteolytic enzymes or heat. These findings suggest that proteins are involved in adhesion. The hydrophobic bond-breaking agent tetramethylurea was unable to inhibit the adherence of A. pleuropneumoniae to alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment of the bacteria with sodium metaperiodate resulted in lower adhesion scores for the serotypes 2 and 9 strains but the inhibition of adhesion was clearly lower than after treatment with proteolytic enzymes. This indicates that, besides proteins, carbohydrates might also be involved in adhesion of A. pleuropneumoniae to alveolar epithelial cells. The finding that inhibition of adhesion was very high when bacteria were treated with a combination of sodium metaperiodate and pronase also suggests that more than one adhesin is involved.

  13. Aase-Smith Syndrome type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soker, Murat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Isikdogan, Abdurrahman

    2004-01-01

    Aase-Smith syndrome type II is a rare in childhood and there a few reported cases. Here, we report an 8-months-old boy with congenital red cell aplasia and triphalangeal thumbs. In addition to thumb anomalies. He presented with growth failure, hypertelorism and novel osseous radiologic abnormalities, large fontanelles and micrognathia as extraordinary. Some clinical symptoms had complete clinical remission with deflazacort treatment. (author)

  14. Benzo[a]pyrene and tumor necrosis factor-alpha coordinately increase genotoxic damage and the production of proinflammatory mediators in alveolar epithelial type II cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Umannová, Lenka; Machala, M.; Topinka, Jan; Schmuczerová, Jana; Krčmář, P.; Neča, J.; Šujanová, Klára; Kozubík, Alois; Vondráček, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 206, č. 2 (2011), s. 121-129 ISSN 0378-4274 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/1227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : DNA adducts * proinflammatory cytokines * COX -2 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.230, year: 2011

  15. Inflammatory mediators accelerate metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene in rat alveolar type II cells: the role of enhanced cytochrome P450 1B1 expression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmerdová, Lenka; Neča, J.; Svobodová, J.; Topinka, Jan; Schmuczerová, Jana; Kubík, A.; Machala, M.; Vondráček, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 314, č. 1 (2013), s. 30-38 ISSN 0300-483X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/11/0142 Grant - others:GA MZe(CZ) MZE0002716202; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/1227 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : inflammation * CYP1B1 * polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.745, year: 2013

  16. Molecular analysis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II from Wayuu Indians of Colombia demonstrates two subtypes of HTLV-IIb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, W M; Owen, S M; Pieniazek, D A; Nerurkar, V R; Duenas-Barajas, E; Heneine, W; Lal, R B

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the genetic heterogeneity of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) have revealed the presence of two genetic subtypes, termed HTLV-IIa and HTLV-IIb. The HTLV-IIb subtype encodes an immunodominant epitope present at the C-terminus of the extended Tax protein and, by using an LTR-based, restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) assay, can be further classified into IIb60-IIb5, with HTLV-IIb1 (Central Amerindian-like) and HTLV-IIb5 (North Amerindian-like) being characteristic subtypes for Native American Indians. To determine the antigenic and genetic heterogeneity among HTLV-II-infected South Amerindians, we used a Tax synthetic peptide immunoassay on serum, and RFLP and phylogenetic analysis on LTR sequences amplified from genomic DNA from four Wayuu Indians of Colombia. The Wayuu specimens displayed seroreactivity to the immunodominant epitope located in the extended Tax region, as predicted, and demonstrated genetic heterogeneity by the presence of both the IIB1 (Wyu1, Zuc31) and IIb5 (Wyu2, Zuc42) subtypes sequences within separate phylogroups represented by the Guaymi Indian (IIb1) and North Amerindian (IIb5) sequences, respectively. Sequence analysis showed that major LTR regulatory motifs and the cis-acting repressive elements in the LTR RNA secondary structure were relatively conserved in both Wayuu subtypes, but the predicted secondary structure of the rex response stem loop in the Wyu2 (IIb5) LTR sequence was 45 nucleotides (nt) and 95 nt longer than that observed in the Wyu1 (IIb1) and G12.1 (IIb1) LTR sequences, respectively. These results extend our knowledge of the genetic heterogeneity of HTLV-II in South Amerindians.

  17. Ultrastructural types of alveolar macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavages from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Olaf; Lode, Hartmut; Welte, Tobias; Merker, Hans-Joachim

    2007-01-01

    By routine applied quantitative BAL methods are particularly helpful for the diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Here the morphology of the alveolar cells does not play a role. However, morphological and especially electron microscopic investigations might contribute to the clarification of the aetiology of this disease. In a prospective study we investigated the bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) from 10 patients with recently histologically diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis. Commonly applied cytological and immunological BAL diagnostic techniques were accompanied by morphological investigations of alveolar cells, especially alveolar macrophages, using light and electron microscopy. All patients showed lymphocytic alveolitis with an increased number of CD4 positive lymphocytes as well as an increased CD4/CD8 ratio. A striking light microscopic finding was the great morphological variety of the alveolar macrophages. Electron microscopy revealed typical lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils as well as three different types of alveolar macrophages in all 10 patients: type I (approx. 30%) with a normal macrophage morphology, a vacuole-rich type II (approx. 30%) with myelin-like structures and type III (approx. 40%) with electron-dense inclusions. The occurrence of intracellular myelin figures in type II macrophages is a hint for increased phagocytotic processes of surfactant with or without its overproduction in the sense of a secondary alveolar proteinosis. Numerous electron-dense inclusions in type III also indicate an increased macrophage activity that leads to an increased release of cytokines, which in turn can trigger an inflammatory reaction.

  18. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  19. Activated alveolar epithelial cells initiate fibrosis through autocrine and paracrine secretion of connective tissue growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jibing; Velikoff, Miranda; Canalis, Ernesto; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Kim, Kevin K

    2014-04-15

    Fibrogenesis involves a pathological accumulation of activated fibroblasts and extensive matrix remodeling. Profibrotic cytokines, such as TGF-β, stimulate fibroblasts to overexpress fibrotic matrix proteins and induce further expression of profibrotic cytokines, resulting in progressive fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a profibrotic cytokine that is indicative of fibroblast activation. Epithelial cells are abundant in the normal lung, but their contribution to fibrogenesis remains poorly defined. Profibrotic cytokines may activate epithelial cells with protein expression and functions that overlap with the functions of active fibroblasts. We found that alveolar epithelial cells undergoing TGF-β-mediated mesenchymal transition in vitro were also capable of activating lung fibroblasts through production of CTGF. Alveolar epithelial cell expression of CTGF was dramatically reduced by inhibition of Rho signaling. CTGF reporter mice demonstrated increased CTGF promoter activity by lung epithelial cells acutely after bleomycin in vivo. Furthermore, mice with lung epithelial cell-specific deletion of CTGF had an attenuated fibrotic response to bleomycin. These studies provide direct evidence that epithelial cell activation initiates a cycle of fibrogenic effector cell activation during progressive fibrosis. Therapy targeted at epithelial cell production of CTGF offers a novel pathway for abrogating this progressive cycle and limiting tissue fibrosis.

  20. Chicken type II collagen induced immune balance of main subtype of helper T cells in mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes in rats with collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tong; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying-Qi; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qing-Tong; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wei, Wei

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the oral administration of chicken type II collagen (CCII) on T cells from mesenteric lymph node (MLN) lymphocytes in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats immunized with CCII in Freund's complete adjuvant. CCII (10, 20, and 40 microg kg(-1) day(-1), i.g. x 7 days) was administered orally to rats from day 14 to 21 after immunization. Arthritis was evaluated by hind paw swelling and polyarthritis index, and MLNs and synovium were harvested for histological examination. Activity of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in MLN lymphocyte supernatant was measured by ConA-induced splenocyte proliferation in C57BL/6J mice, and IL-4, IL-17, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) levels in MLN lymphocytes were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and Th17 cells was determined by double-color labeling for flow cytometry analysis. The administration of CCII (10, 20, 40 microg/kg, i.g. x 7 days) suppressed secondary inflammatory reactions and histological changes in CIA model. The activity of IL-2 and IL-17 produced by MLN lymphocytes from CIA rats was significantly inhibited by the administration of CCII (10, 20, and 40 microg kg(-1) day(-1)). The levels of IL-4 and TGF-beta were increased in CCII (10, 20, and 40 microg kg(-1) day(-1)) groups. The flow cytometry analysis showed that CCII (10, 20, and 40 microg kg(-1) day(-1)) significantly increased the proportion of Treg and decreased the proportion of Th17. These results indicate that oral administration of CCII had therapeutic effects on CIA rats, which was related to decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-2, IL-17) and increased production of anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-4, TGF-beta). This suggests that CCII plays an important role in regulating the immune balance of Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg in rats with CIA.

  1. Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cell apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chunrong; Zheng, Haichong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia [Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Deng, Yubin, E-mail: dengyub@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Research Center of Translational Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zeng, Mian, E-mail: zengmian2004@163.com [Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an inhibitory role in cell apoptosis. Herein we investigate the protective effects of ghrelin in LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, along with the possible molecular mechanisms. LPS exposure impaired cell viability and increased apoptosis of A549 cells significantly in concentration- and time-dependent manners embodied in increased Bax and cleaved caspase-3 production, coupled with decreased Bcl-2 levels. Simultaneously, LPS remarkably decreased the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinas (ERK) in A549 cells. However, ghrelin'pretreatment ameliorated LPS-caused alterations in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 expression, whereas activated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. These results demonstrate that ghrelin lightens LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial cells partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway and thereby might benefit alleviating septic ALI. -- Graphical abstract: Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cells apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •It has been observed that LPS insult significantly increased apoptosis in A549 cells. •Both Akt and ERK signaling are critical adapter molecules to mediate the ghrelin-mediated proliferative effect. •Ghrelin may have a therapeutic effect in the prevention of LPS-induced apoptosis.

  2. Alveolar epithelial and endothelial cell apoptosis in emphysema: What we know and what we need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu C Morissette

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathieu C Morissette, Julie Parent, Julie MilotCentre de Recherche de l’Hôpital Laval, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l’Université Laval, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Emphysema is mainly caused by cigarette smoking and is characterized by the loss of alveolar integrity and an enlargement of the alveolar space. However, mechanisms involved in its development are not fully understood. Alveolar cell apoptosis has been previously investigated in the lung of emphysematous subjects as a potential contributor to the loss of alveolar cell and has been found abnormally elevated. Though, mechanisms involved in the increased alveolar apoptosis that occurs in emphysema have now become a prolific field of research. Those mechanisms are reviewed here with special focus on how they affect cell viability and how they may be implicated in emphysema. Moreover, we suggest a model that integrates all those mechanisms to explain the increased alveolar apoptosis observed in emphysema. This review also includes some reflections and suggestions on the research to come.Keywords: emphysema, apoptosis, proteases, VEGF, oxidative stress, TRAIL, autoimmunity

  3. High value of the radiobiological parameter Dq correlates to expression of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in a panel of small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Krarup, M; Nørgaard, P

    1998-01-01

    Our panel of SCLC cell lines have previously been examined for their radiobiological characteristics and sensitivity to treatment with TGF beta 1. In this study we examined the possible correlations between radiobiological parameters and the expression of the TGF beta type II receptor (TGF beta......-rII). We have, in other studies, shown that the presence of TGF beta-rII was mandatory for transmitting the growth inhibitory effect of TGF beta. The results showed a statistically significant difference in Dq, i.e. the shoulder width of the survival curve, between cell lines expressing TGF beta......-rII and cell lines which did not express the receptor (P = 0.01). Cell lines expressing TGF beta-rII had a high Dq-value. TGF beta-rII expression did not correlate with any other radiobiological parameters. We suggest that an intact growth inhibitory pathway mediated by the TGF beta-rII may have a significant...

  4. Effect of cigarette smoke and dexamethasone on Hsp72 system of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Krisztina; Cseh, Aron; Szalay, Balázs; Rusai, Krisztina; Vannay, Adám; Lukácsovits, József; Heemann, Uwe; Szabó, Attila J; Losonczy, György; Tamási, Lilla; Müller, Veronika

    2011-07-01

    Smoking is the leading risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. Corticosteroids are abundantly used in these patients; however, the interaction of smoking and steroid treatment is not fully understood. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) play a central role in the maintenance of cell integrity, apoptosis and cellular steroid action. To better understand cigarette smoke-steroid interaction, we examined the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and/or dexamethasone (DEX) on changes of intracellular heat shock protein-72 (Hsp72) in lung cells. Alveolar epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to increasing doses (0; 0.1; 1; and 10 μM/μl) of DEX in the medium in the absence(C) and presence of CSE. Apoptosis, necrosis, Hsp72 messenger-ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression of cells were measured, and the role of Hsp72 on steroid effect examined. CSE reduced the number of viable cells by significantly increasing the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells. DEX dose-dependently decreased the ratio of apoptosis when CSE was administered, without change in necrosis. CSE - DEX co-treatment dose-dependently increased Hsp72 mRNA and protein expression, with the highest level measured in CSE + DEX (10) cells, while significantly lower levels were noted in all respective C groups. Pretreatment with Hsp72 silencing RNA confirmed that increased survival observed following DEX administration in CSE-treated cells was mainly mediated via the Hsp72 system. CSE significantly decreases cell survival by inducing apoptosis and necrosis. DEX significantly increases Hsp72 mRNA and protein expression only in the presence of CSE resulting in increased cellular protection and survival. DEX exerts its cell protective effects by decreasing apoptotic cell death via the Hsp72 system in CSE-treated alveolar epithelial cells.

  5. Characterization of immortalized MARCO and SR-AI/II-deficient murine alveolar macrophage cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imrich Amy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages (AM avidly bind and ingest unopsonized inhaled particles and bacteria through class A scavenger receptors (SRAs MARCO and SR-AI/II. Studies to characterize the function of these SRAs have used AMs from MARCO or SR-AI/II null mice, but this approach is limited by the relatively low yield of AMs. Moreover, studies using both MARCO and SR-AI/II-deficient (MS-/- mice have not been reported yet. Hence, we sought to develop continuous cell lines from primary alveolar macrophages from MS-/- mice. Results We used in vitro infection of the primary AMs with the J2 retrovirus carrying the v-raf and v-myc oncogenes. Following initial isolation in media supplemented with murine macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, we subcloned three AM cell lines, designated ZK-1, ZK-2 and ZK-6. These cell lines grow well in RPMI-1640-10% FBS in the absence of M-CSF. These adherent but trypsin-sensitive cell lines have a doubling time of approximately 14 hours, exhibit typical macrophage morphology, and express macrophage-associated cell surface Mac-1 (CD11b and F4/80 antigens. The cell lines show robust Fc-receptor dependent phagocytosis of opsonized red blood cells. Similar to freshly isolated AMs from MS-/- mice, the cell lines exhibit decreased phagocytosis of unopsonized titanium dioxide (TiO2, fluorescent latex beads and bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus compared with the primary AMs from wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Our results indicated that three contiguous murine alveolar macrophage cell lines with MS-/- (ZK1, ZK2 and ZK6 were established successfully. These cell lines demonstrated macrophage morphology and functional activity. Interestingly, similar to freshly isolated AMs from MS-/- mice, the cell lines have a reduced, but not absent, ability to bind and ingest particles, with an altered pattern of blockade by scavenger receptor inhibitors. These cell lines will facilitate in vitro studies to further define

  6. Immunohistochemistry Evaluation of TGF-β1, SOX-9, Type II Collagen and Aggrecan in Cartilage Lesions Treated with Conditioned Medium of Umbilical Cord Mesencyhmal Stem Cells in Wistar Mice (Rattus novergicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bintang Soetjahjo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to be used as treatment options for any cartilage lesion. This research aimed to evaluate the effects of conditioned medium from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSC on damaged cartilage through the expression of proteins TGF-β1, SOX-9, type II collagen and aggrecan, which are known to be related to chondrogenesis. UC-MSC were isolated from 19-days-pregnant Wistar mice and were cultured using the standard procedure to obtain 80% confluence. Subsequently, the culture was confirmed through a microscopic examination that was driven to be an embryoid body to obtain a pre-condition medium. This research utilized 3-month-old male Wistar mice and was categorized into 6 groups (3 control and 3 treatment groups. Each animal had surgery performed to create a femur condyle cartilage defect. The treatment groups were administered a dose of stem cells at 1 mL/kg. Next, immunohistochemical (IHC staining was performed to examine the expression of TGF-β1, SOX-9, type II collagen and aggrecan in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th month of evaluation. The results were analyzed statistically using ANOVA test. For each of the treatment groups, there was increased expression (p < 0.05 in all proteins TGF-β1, SOX-9, type II collagen and aggrecan when compared with control groups at the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th month of evaluation. Pre-conditioned medium from UC-MSC potentially increases the expression of TGF-β1, SOX-9, type II collagen and aggrecan in the damaged cartilage of Wistar mice.

  7. Genipin cross-linked type II collagen/chondroitin sulfate composite hydrogel-like cell delivery system induces differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells and regenerates degenerated nucleus pulposus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaopeng; Wang, Jingkai; Fang, Weijing; Tao, Yiqing; Zhao, Tengfei; Xia, Kaishun; Liang, Chengzhen; Hua, Jianming; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2018-03-16

    Nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration is usually the origin of intervertebral disc degeneration and consequent lower back pain. Although adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-based therapy is regarded to be promising for the treatment of degenerated NP, there is a lack of viable cell carriers to transplant ADSCs into the NP while maintaining cell function. In this study, we developed a type II collagen/chondroitin sulfate (CS) composite hydrogel-like ADSC (CCSA) delivery system with genipin as the cross-linking agent. The induction effect of the scaffold on ADSC differentiation was studied in vitro, and a rat coccygeal vertebrae degeneration model was used to investigate the regenerative effect of the CCSA system on the degenerated NP in vivo. The results showed that the CCSA delivery system cross-linked with 0.02% genipin was biocompatible and promoted the expressions of NP-specific genes. After the injection of the CCSA system, the disc height, water content, extracellular matrix synthesis, and structure of the degenerated NP were partly restored. Our CCSA delivery system uses minimally invasive approaches to promote the regeneration of degenerated NP and provides an exciting new avenue for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. Nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration is usually the origin of intervertebral disc degeneration and consequent lower back pain. Stem cell-based tissue engineering is a promising method in NP regeneration, but there is a lack of viable cell carriers to transplant ADSCs into the NP while maintaining cell function. In this study, we developed a type II collagen/chondroitin sulfate (CS) composite hydrogel-like ADSC (CCSA) delivery system with genipin as the cross-linking agent. Although several research groups have studied the fabrication of injectable hydrogel with biological matrix, our study differs from other works. We chose type II collagen and CS, the two primary native components in the NP, as the main materials and combined them according

  8. Protein Expression Profile of Rat Type Two Alveolar Epithelial Cells During Hyperoxic Stress and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Maneesh

    Rationale: In rodent model systems, the sequential changes in lung morphology resulting from hyperoxic injury are well characterized, and are similar to changes in human acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the injured lung, alveolar type two (AT2) epithelial cells play a critical role restoring the normal alveolar structure. Thus characterizing the changes in AT2 cells will provide insights into the mechanisms underpinning the recovery from lung injury. Methods: We applied an unbiased systems level proteomics approach to elucidate molecular mechanisms contributing to lung repair in a rat hyperoxic lung injury model. AT2 cells were isolated from rat lungs at predetermined intervals during hyperoxic injury and recovery. Protein expression profiles were determined by using iTRAQRTM with tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Of 959 distinct proteins identified, 183 significantly changed in abundance during the injury-recovery cycle. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified cell cycle, cell differentiation, cell metabolism, ion homeostasis, programmed cell death, ubiquitination, and cell migration to be significantly enriched by these proteins. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis of data acquired during lung repair revealed differential expression of gene sets that control multicellular organismal development, systems development, organ development, and chemical homeostasis. More detailed analysis identified activity in two regulatory pathways, JNK and miR 374. A Short Time-series Expression Miner (STEM) algorithm identified protein clusters with coherent changes during injury and repair. Conclusion: Coherent changes occur in the AT2 cell proteome in response to hyperoxic stress. These findings offer guidance regarding the specific molecular mechanisms governing repair of the injured lung.

  9. Technical considerations and precautions in in situ bronchoalveolar lavage and alveolar infiltrating cells isolation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Wajhul

    2015-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) is an important tool in experimental toxicology and pharmacology. A number of researchers have utilized BAL in studies involving rodents. However, the detailed procedure of performing BAL in rodents has rarely been reported. In the present article, in situ BAL in rats has been described with technical points that ensure the quality and validity of BALF samples. BAL was performed in rats of Wistar strain. Flow cytometry and microscopy were utilized to analyze the BAL cells. The collected volume of BALF was 84.32 ± 2.7% of instilled volume. Alveolar macrophages were found to be prevalent in normal lungs when analyzed under microscope and by flow cytometry. The main problem that one may face is the accidental contamination of BALF samples with blood of the animal itself. Presence of blood in BALF certainly adds a significant number of cells and other biochemical variables. No blood contamination was detected in BALF. Here, a simple procedure for BAL and collection of alveolar cells (macrophages in the present study) is explained with an emphasis on technical steps and precautions, which ensures the quality of the BALF samples. Data exhibit that there is no blood contamination in the BALF and provide evidence that the technical points considered in the procedure here are successful in maintaining the quality and validity of BALF samples.

  10. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and respo...

  11. Alveolar architecture of clear cell renal carcinomas (≤5.0 cm) show high attenuation on dynamic CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Wakao, Fumihiko; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Tobisu, Kenichi; Kakizoe, Tadao; Sakamoto, Michiie

    1999-01-01

    To establish the correlation between tumor appearance on CT and tumor histology in renal cell carcinomas. The density and attenuation patterns of 96 renal cell carcinomas, each ≤5 cm in greatest diameter, were studied by non-enhanced CT and early and late after bolus injection of contrast medium using dynamic CT. The density and attenuation patterns and pathological maps of each tumor were individually correlated. High attenuated areas were present in 72 of the 96 tumors on early enhanced dynamic CT scanning. All 72 high attenuated areas were of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma and had alveolar architecture. The remaining 24 tumors that did not demonstrate high attenuated foci on early enhanced scanning included three clear cell, nine granular cell, six papillary, five chromophobe and one collecting duct type. With respect to tumor architecture, all clear cell tumors of alveolar architecture demonstrated high attenuation on early enhanced scanning. Clear cell renal cell carcinomas of alveolar architecture show high attenuation on early enhanced dynamic CT scanning. A larger number of patients are indispensable to obtaining clear results. However, these findings seem to be an important clue to the diagnosis of renal cell carcinomas as having an alveolar structure. (author)

  12. Reversal of tolerance induced by transplantation of skin expressing the immunodominant T cell epitope of rat type II collagen entitles development of collagen-induced arthritis but not graft rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Firan, Mihail

    2002-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is induced in H-2(q) mice after immunization with rat type II collagen (CII). The immunodominant T cell epitope on heterologous CII has been located to CII256-270. We have previously shown that TSC transgenic mice, which express the heterologous epitope in type I...... collagen (CI), e.g. in skin, are tolerized against rat CII and resistant to CIA. In this study we transplanted skin from TSC transgenic mice onto non-transgenic CIA-susceptible littermates to investigate whether introduction of this epitope to a naïve immune system would lead to T cell priming and graft...

  13. Cytotoxicity and gene array analysis of alveolar epithelial A549 cells exposed to paraquat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Suntres, Zacharias E

    2010-12-05

    Paraquat (PQ), a commonly used herbicide, is highly toxic to humans and animals. The primary injury occurs in the lung, where PQ is actively taken up by alveolar epithelial cells and consequently produces damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) via redox cycling. ROS have also been shown to induce expression of several early response genes and to activate transcription factors, which may contribute to the inflammatory response associated with PQ injury. In order to further elucidate the mechanism(s) of PQ injury, we investigated its effects on the cellular status and gene expression profile of immortalized human alveolar epithelial A549 cells in vitro. Incubation of cells with PQ resulted in concentration- and time-dependent PQ uptake, which correlated with increases in intracellular ROS levels and decreases in intracellular glutathione content, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell viability. Gene array analysis showed differential expression in response to PQ exposure over time, particularly increases in: (i) the expression of growth arrest and cell cycle-related genes (e.g. CDKN1A, DDIT3 GADD45A, GDF15, MDM2, EGR1, CASP10, CASP8) and (ii) the expression of pro-inflammatory genes (e.g. IL1A, IL6, IL18, NFKB1, SERPINE1), which correlated with increases in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-8, IL-6). These data suggest that uptake of PQ by A549 cells altered the cellular redox status and the expression of several early response genes, including the inflammatory response, all of which might contribute to the overall cytotoxicity of PQ. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Leukocyte compartments in the mouse lung: distinguishing between marginated, interstitial, and alveolar cells in response to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Kathryn E; Cagnina, R Elaine; Wallace, Kori L; Ramos, Susan I; Mehrad, Borna; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-31

    We developed a flow cytometry-based assay to simultaneously quantify multiple leukocyte populations in the marginated vascular, interstitial, and alveolar compartments of the mouse lung. An intravenous injection of a fluorescently labeled anti-CD45 antibody was used to label circulating and marginated vascular leukocytes. Following vascular flushing to remove non-adherent cells and collection of broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lungs were digested and a second fluorescent anti-CD45 antibody was added ex vivo to identify cells not located in the vascular space. In the naïve mouse lung, we found about 11 million CD45+ leukocytes, of which 87% (9.5 million) were in the vascular marginated compartment, consisting of 17% NK cells, 17% neutrophils, 57% mononuclear myeloid cells (monocytes, macrophage precursors and dendritic cells), and 10% T cells (CD4+, CD8+, and invariant NKT cells). Non-vascular compartments including the interstitial compartment contained 7.7×10(5)cells, consisting of 49% NK cells, 25% dendritic cells, and 16% other mononuclear myeloid cells. The alveolar compartment was overwhelmingly populated by macrophages (5.63×10(5)cells, or 93%). We next studied leukocyte margination and extravasation into the lung following acid injury, a model of gastric aspiration. At 1 h after injury, neutrophils were markedly elevated in the blood while all other circulating leukocytes declined by an average of 79%. At 4 h after injury, there was a peak in the numbers of marginated neutrophils, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a peak in the number of alveolar NK cells. Most interstitial cells consisted of DCs, neutrophils, and CD4+ T cells, and most alveolar compartment cells consisted of macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells. At 24 h after injury, there was a decline in the number of all marginated and interstitial leukocytes and a peak in alveolar neutrophils. In sum, we have developed a novel assay to study leukocyte margination and trafficking following

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of actin remodeling and endomembrane trafficking in alveolar epithelial type I cell wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Lindsay M; Vergen, Jorge; Prakash, Y S; Pagano, Richard E; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2011-04-01

    Alveolar epithelial type I cell (ATI) wounding is prevalent in ventilator-injured lungs and likely contributes to pathogenesis of "barotrauma" and "biotrauma." In experimental models most wounded alveolar cells repair plasma membrane (PM) defects and survive insults. Considering the force balance between edge energy at the PM wound margins and adhesive interactions of the lipid bilayer with the underlying cytoskeleton (CSK), we tested the hypothesis that subcortical actin depolymerization is a key facilitator of PM repair. Using real-time fluorescence imaging of primary rat ATI transfected with a live cell actin-green fluorescent protein construct (Lifeact-GFP) and loaded with N-rhodamine phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), we examined the spatial and temporal coordination between cytoskeletal remodeling and PM repair following micropuncture. Membrane integrity was inferred from the fluorescence intensity profiles of the cytosolic label calcein AM. Wounding led to rapid depolymerization of the actin CSK near the wound site, concurrent with accumulation of endomembrane-derived N-rhodamine PE. Both responses were sustained until PM integrity was reestablished, which typically occurs between ∼10 and 40 s after micropuncture. Only thereafter did the actin CSK near the wound begin to repolymerize, while the rate of endomembrane lipid accumulation decreased. Between 60 and 90 s after successful PM repair, after translocation of the actin nucleation factor cortactin, a dense actin fiber network formed. In cells that did not survive micropuncture injury, actin remodeling did not occur. These novel results highlight the importance of actin remodeling in ATI cell repair and suggest molecular targets for modulating the repair process.

  16. Growth suppression by transforming growth factor beta 1 of human small-cell lung cancer cell lines is associated with expression of the type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K

    1994-01-01

    the growth-suppressive effect of TGF-beta 1, the expression of functional pRb, as characterised by nuclear localisation, was examined by immunocytochemistry. Nuclear association of pRb was only seen in two of the five TGF-beta 1-responsive cell lines. These results indicate that in SCLC pRb is not required...

  17. Mammary alveolar cell as evaluation system for casein gene expression involved in glucose level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Tae Heo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective Glucose is an essential fuel in the energy metabolism and synthesis pathways of all mammalian cells. In lactating animals, glucose is the major precursor for lactose and is a substrate for the synthesis of milk proteins and fat in mammary secretory (alveolar epithelial cells. However, clear utilization of glucose in mammary cells during lactogenesis is still unknown, due to the lack of in vitro analyzing models. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test the reliability of the mammary alveolar (MAC-T cell as an in vitro study model for glucose metabolism and lactating system. Methods Undifferentiated MAC-T cells were cultured in three types of Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium with varying levels of glucose (no-glucose: 0 g/L, low-glucose: 1 g/L, and high-glucose: 4.5 g/L for 8 d, after which differentiation to casein secretion was induced. Cell proliferation and expression levels of apoptotic genes, Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF1 receptor, oxytocin receptor, αS1, αS2, and β casein genes were analyzed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 d after differentiation. Results The proliferation of MAC-T cells with high-glucose treatment was seen to be significantly higher. Expression of apoptotic genes was not affected in any group. However, expression levels of the mammary development related gene (IGF1 receptor and lactation related gene (oxytocin receptor were significantly higher in the low-glucose group. Expressions of αS1-casein, αS2-casein, and β-casein were also higher in the low-glucose treated group as compared to that in the no-glucose and high-glucose groups. Conclusion The results demonstrated that although a high-glucose environment increases cell proliferation in MAC-T cells, a low-glucose treatment to MAC-T cells induces higher expression of casein genes. Our results suggest that the MAC-T cells may be used as an in vitro model to analyze mammary cell development and lactation connected with precise biological effects.

  18. Gene expression patterns induced at different stages of rhinovirus infection in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Etemadi

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is the common virus that causes acute respiratory infection (ARI and is frequently associated with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. We aimed to investigate whether HRV infection induces a specific gene expression pattern in airway epithelial cells. Alveolar epithelial cell monolayers were infected with HRV species B (HRV-B. RNA was extracted from both supernatants and infected monolayer cells at 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours post infection (hpi and transcriptional profile was analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChip and the results were subsequently validated using quantitative Real-time PCR method. HRV-B infects alveolar epithelial cells which supports implication of the virus with LRTIs. In total 991 genes were found differentially expressed during the course of infection. Of these, 459 genes were up-regulated whereas 532 genes were down-regulated. Differential gene expression at 6 hpi (187 genes up-regulated vs. 156 down-regulated were significantly represented by gene ontologies related to the chemokines and inflammatory molecules indicating characteristic of viral infection. The 75 up-regulated genes surpassed the down-regulated genes (35 at 12 hpi and their enriched ontologies fell into discrete functional entities such as regulation of apoptosis, anti-apoptosis, and wound healing. At later time points of 24 and 48 hpi, predominated down-regulated genes were enriched for extracellular matrix proteins and airway remodeling events. Our data provides a comprehensive image of host response to HRV infection. The study suggests the underlying molecular regulatory networks genes which might be involved in pathogenicity of the HRV-B and potential targets for further validations and development of effective treatment.

  19. Signaling through Cdk2, importin-alpha and NuMA is required for H2O2-induced mitosis in primary type II pneumocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisavljevic, Ziv Manasija; González-Flecha, Beatriz; Manasija-Radisavljevic, Ziv

    2003-05-12

    Proliferation of alveolar type II pneumocytes, the multipotent stem cells of the alveoli, has been implicated in the development of lung adenocarcinoma. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), a potent promoter of signaling cascades, can mediate the transmission of many intracellular signals including those involved in cell proliferation. In this study using rat primary type II pneumocytes, we demonstrate that H(2)O(2) significantly increases mitosis through a pathway that includes cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2); importin-alpha, a nuclear trafficking regulator; and nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), an essential component in mitotic spindle pole formation. Upon H(2)O(2) treatment, Cdk2 is phosphorylated at position thr-160 leading to increases in importin-alpha and NuMA protein levels and resulting in a significant increase of G(2)/M phase in a roscovatine-dependent manner. Type II pneumocytes transfected with NuMA cDNA also show significant increases in G(2)/M phase, NuMA, Cdk2 thr-160 and importin-alpha expression. These effects were prevented by catalase. These results demonstrate that H(2)O(2) orchestrates a complex signaling network regulating S phase entry, nuclear trafficking and spindle pole formation through activation of Cdk2, importin-alpha, and NuMA. This pathway is essential for H(2)O(2)-induced mitosis in type II pneumocytes.

  20. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Type II Cochlear Afferents in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Pankhuri; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; Zimmerman, Amanda; Fuchs, Paul; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase. The present study was designed to determine whether TH-driven Cre recombinase (TH-2A-CreER) provides a selective and reliable tool for identification and genetic manipulation of type II rather than type I cochlear afferents. The "TH-2A-CreER neurons" radiated from the spiral lamina, crossed the tunnel of Corti, turned towards the base of the cochlea, and traveled beneath the rows of outer hair cells. Neither the processes nor the somata of TH-2A-CreER neurons were labeled by antibodies that specifically labeled type I afferents and medial efferents. TH-2A-CreER-positive processes partially co-labeled with antibodies to peripherin, a known marker of type II afferents. Individual TH-2A-CreER neurons gave off short branches contacting 7-25 outer hair cells (OHCs). Only a fraction of TH-2A-CreER boutons were associated with CtBP2-immunopositive ribbons. These results show that TH-2A-CreER provides a selective marker for type II versus type I afferents and can be used to describe the morphology and arborization pattern of type II cochlear afferents in the mouse cochlea.

  1. Comparison of lung alveolar and tissue cells in silica-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstrand, M; Absher, P M; Hemenway, D R; Trombley, L; Baldor, L C

    1991-01-01

    The silicon dioxide mineral, cristobalite (CRS) induces inflammation involving both alveolar cells and connective tissue compartments. In this study, we compared lung cells recovered by whole lung lavage and by digestion of lung tissue from rats at varying times after 8 days of exposure to aerosolized CRS. Control and exposed rats were examined between 2 and 36 wk after exposure. Lavaged cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage with phosphate-buffered saline. Lung wall cells were prepared via collagenase digestion of lung tissue slices. Cells from lavage and lung wall were separated by Percoll density centrifugation. The three upper fractions, containing mostly macrophages, were cultured, and the conditioned medium was assayed for effect on lung fibroblast growth and for activity of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Results demonstrated that the cells separated from the lung walls exhibited different reaction patterns compared with those cells recovered by lavage. The lung wall cells exhibited a progressive increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes compared with a steady state in cells of the lung lavage. This increase in macrophages apparently was due to low density cells, which showed features of silica exposure. Secretion of a fibroblast-stimulating factor was consistently high by lung wall macrophages, whereas lung lavage macrophages showed inconsistent variations. The secretion of NAG was increased in lung lavage macrophages, but decreased at most observation times in lung wall macrophages. No differences were found among cells in the different density fractions regarding fibroblast stimulation and enzyme secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... network of protein filaments that gives structure to cells (the cytoskeleton). Mutations that cause lattice corneal dystrophy type II change a single protein building block (amino acid) in the gelsolin protein. ... from the cell. These protein fragments clump together and form amyloid ...

  3. The activity of G-ROS and the predominant role of Type II reaction in the photodynamic therapy using 9-hydroxypheophorbide-α for HeLa cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2012-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that destroys the tumor. It activates the photosensitizer with the light of a specific wavelength, where the light is well absorbed by the photosensitizer, thus causing a fatal injury and thereby leading to a tumor necrosis. To date, a hematoporphyrin-derived photosensitizer has been widely used. It is disadvantageous, however, in that it causes a long-term photo-toxicity and has a poor selectivity for the tumor. This had led to the development of a chlorophyll-derived photosensitizer. We conducted this study to elucidate the mechanisms by which the activity of ROS is involved in the PDT using a novel type of chlorophyll-derived photosensitizer, 9-hydroxypheophorbide-α (9-HpbD-α), for the HeLa cell lines. Besides, we also attempted to determine which reaction plays a predominant role in the synthesis of ROS, either Type I reaction or Type II one, when both reactions are involved in the synthesis of ROS during the PDT using 9-HpbD-α. Our results showed not only that the activity of ROS is involved in the PDT using 9-HpbD-α in human uterine cervical cancer cell lines but also that the mechanisms of PDT are based on Type II reaction where the singlet oxygen is involved.

  4. Simulation of lung alveolar epithelial wound healing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sean H J; Matthay, Michael A; Mostov, Keith; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-08-06

    The mechanisms that enable and regulate alveolar type II (AT II) epithelial cell wound healing in vitro and in vivo remain largely unknown and need further elucidation. We used an in silico AT II cell-mimetic analogue to explore and better understand plausible wound healing mechanisms for two conditions: cyst repair in three-dimensional cultures and monolayer wound healing. Starting with the analogue that validated for key features of AT II cystogenesis in vitro, we devised an additional cell rearrangement action enabling cyst repair. Monolayer repair was enabled by providing 'cells' a control mechanism to switch automatically to a repair mode in the presence of a distress signal. In cyst wound simulations, the revised analogue closed wounds by adhering to essentially the same axioms available for alveolar-like cystogenesis. In silico cell proliferation was not needed. The analogue recovered within a few simulation cycles but required a longer recovery time for larger or multiple wounds. In simulated monolayer wound repair, diffusive factor-mediated 'cell' migration led to repair patterns comparable to those of in vitro cultures exposed to different growth factors. Simulations predicted directional cell locomotion to be critical for successful in vitro wound repair. We anticipate that with further use and refinement, the methods used will develop as a rigorous, extensible means of unravelling mechanisms of lung alveolar repair and regeneration.

  5. Trichomonas vaginalis induces cytopathic effect on human lung alveolar basal carcinoma epithelial cell line A549.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Membreve, Daile Meek C; Jacinto, Sonia D; Rivera, Windell L

    2014-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of trichomoniasis is generally known to inhabit the genitourinary tract. However, several case reports with supporting molecular and immunological identifications have documented its occurrence in the respiratory tract of neonates and adults. In addition, the reports have documented that its occurrence is associated with respiratory failures. The medical significance or consequence of this association is unclear. Thus, to establish the possible outcome from the interaction of T. vaginalis with lung cells, the cytopathic effects of the parasites were evaluated using monolayer cultures of the human lung alveolar basal carcinoma epithelial cell line A549. The possible effect of association of T. vaginalis with A549 epithelial cells was analyzed using phase-contrast, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), crystal-violet and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) assays were conducted for cytotoxicity testing. The results demonstrate that T. vaginalis: (1) adheres to A549 epithelial cells, suggesting a density-dependent parasite-cell association; (2) adherence on A549 is through flagella, membrane and axostyle; (3) causes cell detachment and cytotoxicity (50-72.4%) to A549 and this effect is a function of parasite density; and (4) induces apoptosis in A549 about 20% after 6 h of incubation. These observations indicate that T. vaginalis causes cytopathic effects on A549 cell. To date, this is the first report showing a possible interaction of T. vaginalis with the lung cells using A549 monolayer cultures. Further studies are recommended to completely elucidate this association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Amiodarone increases the accumulation of DEA in a human alveolar epithelium-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Satoru; Itagaki, Shirou; Kobayashi, Masaki; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2008-07-01

    Amiodarone (AMD)-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT) is the most life-threatening side-effect of AMD treatment. N-Monodesethylamiodarone (DEA), an active metabolite of AMD, also exhibits cytotoxicity and tends to accumulate in the lung more intensively than AMD. In this study, we characterized the mechanism of DEA accumulation using A549 cells as a model of the alveolar epithelium. Typical ATP-depletion compounds caused an approximately 30% increase in the accumulation of DEA in A549 cells, although these effects were less than those in Caco-2 cells. Triiodothyronine (T(3)), which exhibited an inhibitory effect on DEA efflux in Caco-2 cells, did not affect the accumulation of DEA in A549 cells. On the other hand, 100 microM AMD caused an approximately 200% increase in DEA content in A549 cells, although AMD accumulation was not affected by 100 microM DEA. Since the reducing effect of AMD on cellular ATP levels and that of FCCP were similar, the mechanism by which DEA accumulation is increased by AMD might be different from the ATP-dependent DEA efflux mechanism. The decrease in cell viability by DEA in the presence of AMD (IC(50) value of DEA for A549 cell viability: 25.4+/-2.4 microM) was more pronounced than that by DEA alone (IC(50) value: 11.5+/-3.0 microM). This further DEA accumulation by AMD might be a factor responsible for the greater accumulation of DEA than that of AMD in the lung in long-term AMD-treated patients.

  7. An in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of graphene nanosheets on alveolar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervin, Saoirse; Murphy, James; Aviles, Ruth; Pillai, Suresh C.; Garvey, Mary

    2018-03-01

    The collection of intrinsic properties possessed by graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs) results in their continuous exploitation for biomedical applications. The materials biomedical potential has motivated an upsurge in green preparation routes for the production of graphene like materials with limited toxicity. A number of bio-friendly reducing agents have been utilized for the preparation of chemically reduced graphene oxide (GO), and their resulting cytotoxic effects examined. However, the toxicology effects of one of the first biomolecules implemented for the reduction of GO, ascorbic acid (AA) has yet to be investigated. Herein, the toxicity of three distinct GFNs; GO, hydrazine reduced GO (H.rGO) and AA.rGO, prepared through diverse chemical routes are studied, to demonstrate the cytotoxic activity of a green reducer, in comparison to an established reduction method using hydrazine hydrate. The variation in atomic structure of GO, H.rGO and AA.rGO resulting from different synthesis techniques demonstrates the dependence of toxicity on particle shape and size. All GFNs induced high levels of alveolar cell toxicity. Interaction of AA.rGO with the A549 human lung epithelial carcinoma cell line resulted in increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, indicative of diminished cell membrane integrity. The uncharacteristic shape of the AA.rGO may be responsible for this proliferated release of the essential protein. The presented data therefore demonstrates that modification of synthetic processes significantly alter the biological activities of GFNs.

  8. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-12-01

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  9. Folliculin Controls Lung Alveolar Enlargement and Epithelial Cell Survival through E-Cadherin, LKB1, and AMPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Goncharova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothoraces due to lung cyst rupture afflict patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD syndrome, which is caused by mutations of the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN. The underlying mechanism of the lung manifestations in BHD is unclear. We show that BHD lungs exhibit increased alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis and that Flcn deletion in mouse lung epithelium leads to cell apoptosis, alveolar enlargement, and an impairment of both epithelial barrier and overall lung function. We find that Flcn-null epithelial cell apoptosis is the result of impaired AMPK activation and increased cleaved caspase-3. AMPK activator LKB1 and E-cadherin are downregulated by Flcn loss and restored by its expression. Correspondingly, Flcn-null cell survival is rescued by the AMPK activator AICAR or constitutively active AMPK. AICAR also improves lung condition of Flcnf/f:SP-C-Cre mice. Our data suggest that lung cysts in BHD may result from an underlying defect in alveolar epithelial cell survival, attributable to FLCN regulation of the E-cadherin-LKB1-AMPK axis.

  10. The Role of Mitochondrial DNA in Mediating Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P.; Williams, David B.; Kamp, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Convincing evidence has emerged demonstrating that impairment of mitochondrial function is critically important in regulating alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) programmed cell death (apoptosis) that may contribute to aging-related lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis following asbestos exposure). The mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for 13 proteins, including several essential for oxidative phosphorylation. We review the evidence implicating that oxidative stress-induced mtDNA damage promotes AEC apoptosis and pulmonary fibrosis. We focus on the emerging role for AEC mtDNA damage repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO-2) in maintaining mtDNA integrity which is important in preventing AEC apoptosis and asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. We then review recent studies linking the sirtuin (SIRT) family members, especially SIRT3, to mitochondrial integrity and mtDNA damage repair and aging. We present a conceptual model of how SIRTs modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven mitochondrial metabolism that may be important for their tumor suppressor function. The emerging insights into the pathobiology underlying AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis is suggesting novel therapeutic targets that may prove useful for the management of age-related diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:26370974

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is found in the cells of the nervous system, including sensory neurons. The mutations involved in HSAN2A result in ... Samuels M, Rouleau GA. Mutations in the nervous system--specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II. J Clin Invest. 2008 Jul; ...

  12. P2X7R-dependent regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and claudin-18 in alveolar epithelial type I cells of mice lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, K; Bläsche, R; Neißer, A; Bramke, S; Frank, J A; Kasper, M

    2016-12-01

    The purinergic receptor P2X7 represents an ATP-gated ionotropic receptor with a selective localization in alveolar epithelial type I cells of the lung. Despite the involvement of the receptor in inflammatory processes of the lung, it is not established whether this receptor plays a specific role in the alveolar epithelial cell biology. There is evidence that P2X7 receptor influences Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells under conditions of injury. Here, we investigated the expression of GSK-3β, a potent protein kinase involved in alveolar epithelial barrier functions, and of tight junction molecules occludin, claudin-4 and claudin-18 in wild-type and P2X7 -/- mice. Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed a remarkable increase in claudin-18 mRNA and protein in lungs of P2X7 -/- mice animals. Furthermore, alveolar epithelial cells from P2X7 -/- animals showed decreased levels of GSK-3β protein and its inactive form GSK-3β (pS9). Conversely, claudin-18 knockout mice exhibited decreased P2X7 mRNA transcript abundance as measured by mRNA expression microarray and quantitative PCR. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that P2X7R contributes to alveolar epithelial barrier function through effects on GSK-3β. Furthermore, these data suggest a potential reciprocal regulation of claudin-18 and P2X7R in the alveolar epithelium.

  13. beta-1,3-Glucan-Induced Host Phospholipase D Activation Is Involved in Aspergillus fumigatus Internalization into Type II Human Pneumocyte A549 Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Xuelin; Yu, Rentao; Zhen, Dongyu; Tao, Sha; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    2011-01-01

    The internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus into lung epithelial cells is a process that depends on host cell actin dynamics. The host membrane phosphatidylcholine cleavage driven by phospholipase D (PLD) is closely related to cellular actin dynamics. However, little is known about the impact of

  14. From the Cover: Vulnerability of C6 Astrocytoma Cells After Single-Compound and Joint Exposure to Type I and Type II Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Delfina M; Berardino, Bruno G; Wolansky, Marcelo J; Kotler, Mónica L

    2017-01-01

    A primary mode-of-action of all pyrethroid insecticides (PYRs) is the disruption of the voltage-gated sodium channel electrophysiology in neurons of target pests and nontarget species. The neurological actions of PYRs on non-neuronal cells of the nervous system remain poorly investigated. In the present work, we used C6 astrocytoma cells to study PYR actions (0.1-50 μM) under the hypothesis that glial cells may be targeted by and vulnerable to PYRs. To this end, we characterized the effects of bifenthrin (BF), tefluthrin (TF), α-cypermethrin (α-CYP), and deltamethrin (DM) on the integrity of nuclear, mitochondrial, and lysosomal compartments. In general, 24- to 48-h exposures produced concentration-related impairment of cell viability. In single-compound, 24-h exposure experiments, effective concentration (EC) 15 s 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay) were computed as follows (in μM): BF, 16.1; TF, 37.3; α-CYP, 7.8; DM, 5.0. We found concentration-related damage in several C6-cell subcellular compartments (mitochondria, nuclei, and lysosomes) at ≥ 10 -1 μM levels. Last, we examined a mixture of all PYRs (ie, Σ individual EC 15 ) using MTT assays and subcellular analyses. Our findings indicate that C6 cells are responsive to nM levels of PYRs, suggesting that astroglial susceptibility may contribute to the low-dose neurological effects caused by these insecticides. This research further suggests that C6 cells may provide relevant information as a screening platform for pesticide mixtures targeting nervous system cells by expected and unexpected toxicogenic pathways potentially contributing to clinical neurotoxicity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Effect of SLC34A2 gene mutation on extracellular phosphorus transport in PAM alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tiangang; Qu, Danhua; Yan, Bingdi; Zhang, Qinghua; Ren, Jin; Hu, Yanbing

    2018-01-01

    A mutation in the IIb sodium phosphate transporter SLC34A2 gene has recently been described in pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) patients. Experiments in this study were aimed at confirming the role of the gene product in PAM by comparing phosphorylated products in extracellular fluid of alveolar epithelial cells overexpressing the SLC34A2 gene or its mutated version. Eukaryotic expression vectors were constructed and transfected into A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. There were three groups of cells including those transfected with empty vector plasmid pcDNA3.1(+) (plasmid control group), those transfected with normal SLC34A2 gene expressed from pcDNA3.1 (normal control group), and those transfected with a version of the PAM SLC34A2 gene linked to the pcDNA3.1(+) (PAM group). Transfection efficiencies were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). At 48 h after transfection, the concentration of inorganic phosphorus in the culture medium was detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. Our results showed the concentration of inorganic phosphorus in the supernatant of the normal control group was significantly lower than that in the plasmid control and PAM groups (PPAM group was significantly lower than that in the plasmid control group (PPAM patients, given that the function of the phosphate transporter seems to be affected and it is conceivable that it would lead to extracellular fluid alterations in vivo .

  16. Intradermal administration of the Type II heat-labile enterotoxins LT-IIb and LT-IIc of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli enhances humoral and CD8+ T cell immunity to a co-administered antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Hu

    Full Text Available Vaccinations are extremely effective at combating infectious diseases. Many conserved antigen (Ag targets, however, are poorly immunogenic. Protein subunit vaccines frequently elicit only humoral immune responses and fail to confer protection against serious intracellular pathogens. These barriers to vaccine development are often overcome by the use of appropriate adjuvants. Heat-labile enterotoxins (HLT produced by enterotoxigenic strains of Escherichia coli are potent adjuvants when administered by mucosal or systemic routes. The efficacy of the type II HLT, however, has not been well-defined when administered by the intradermal (ID route. Using a murine ID immunization model, the adjuvant properties of LT-IIb and LT-IIc, two type II HLTs, were compared with those of LT-I, a prototypical type I HLT. While all three HLT adjuvants enhanced Ag-specific humoral responses to similar levels, LT-IIb and LT-IIc, in contrast to LT-I, induced a more vigorous Ag-specific CD8+ T cell response and proffered faster clearance of Listeria monocytogenes in a challenge model. Additionally, LT-IIb and LT-IIc induced distinct differences in the profiles of the Ag-specific CD8+ T cell responses. While LT-IIc stimulated a robust and rapid primary CD8+ T cell response, LT-IIb exhibited slower CD8+ T cell expansion and contraction kinetics with the formation of higher percentages of effector memory cells. In comparison to LT-I and LT-IIc, LT-IIb evoked better long-term protection after immunization. Furthermore, LT-IIb and LT-IIc enhanced the total number of dendritic cells (DC in the draining lymph node (DLN and expression of costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and CD40 on DCs. In contrast to LT-I, LT-IIb and LT-IIc induced less edema, cellular infiltrates, and general inflammation at the site of ID injection. Thus, LT-IIb and LT-IIc are attractive comprehensive ID adjuvants with unique characteristic that enhance humoral and cellular immunity to a co

  17. DNA damage and cytotoxicity in type II lung epithelial (A549) cell cultures after exposure to diesel exhaust and urban street particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2008-01-01

    can be reproduced independently, but exposure to such samples may not mimic the effects observed after exposure to authentic air pollution particles. This study was designed to compare the DNA oxidizing effects of authentic street particles with SRM1650 and SRM2975. The authentic street particles were...... be due to the much higher level of transition metals. CONCLUSION: Authentic street particles and SRMs differ in their ability to oxidize DNA in a cell-free environment, whereas cell culture experiments indicate that the particle preparations elicit a similar alteration of the level of DNA damage...... and small differences in cytotoxicity. Although it cannot be ruled out that SRMs and authentic street particles might elicit different effects in animal experimental models, this study indicates that on the cellular level, SRM1650 and SRM2975 are suitable surrogate samples for the study of authentic street...

  18. DNA damage and cytotoxicity in type II lung epithelial (A549 cell cultures after exposure to diesel exhaust and urban street particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller Peter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to air pollution particles has been acknowledged to be associated with excess generation of oxidative damage to DNA in experimental model systems and humans. The use of standard reference material (SRM, such as SRM1650 and SRM2975, is advantageous because experiments can be reproduced independently, but exposure to such samples may not mimic the effects observed after exposure to authentic air pollution particles. This study was designed to compare the DNA oxidizing effects of authentic street particles with SRM1650 and SRM2975. The authentic street particles were collected at a traffic intensive road in Copenhagen, Denmark. Results All of the particles generated strand breaks and oxidized purines in A549 lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner and there were no overt differences in their potency. The exposures also yielded dose-dependent increase of cytotoxicity (as lactate dehydrogenase release and reduced colony forming ability with slightly stronger cytotoxicity of SRM1650 than of the other particles. In contrast, only the authentic street particles were able to generate 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA, which might be due to the much higher level of transition metals. Conclusion Authentic street particles and SRMs differ in their ability to oxidize DNA in a cell-free environment, whereas cell culture experiments indicate that the particle preparations elicit a similar alteration of the level of DNA damage and small differences in cytotoxicity. Although it cannot be ruled out that SRMs and authentic street particles might elicit different effects in animal experimental models, this study indicates that on the cellular level, SRM1650 and SRM2975 are suitable surrogate samples for the study of authentic street particles.

  19. GaAsSb-capped InAs QD type-II solar cell structures improvement by composition profiling of layers surrounding QD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hospodková, Alice; Vyskočil, Jan; Zíková, Markéta; Oswald, Jiří; Pangrác, Jiří; Petříček, Otto

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 025502. ISSN 2053-1591 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-21285P; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1603 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : GaAsSb * InAs * InGaAs * quantum dot * solar cells * MOVPE Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.068, year: 2016

  20. Intravenous S-Ketamine Does Not Inhibit Alveolar Fluid Clearance in a Septic Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nina C.; van der Sluijs, Koen; Hackl, Florian; Hotz, Lorenz; Dahan, Albert; Hollmann, Markus W.; Berger, Marc M.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that intratracheally administered S-ketamine inhibits alveolar fluid clearance (AFC), whereas an intravenous (IV) bolus injection had no effect. The aim of the present study was to characterize whether continuous IV infusion of S-ketamine, yielding clinically relevant plasma concentrations, inhibits AFC and whether its effect is enhanced in acute lung injury (ALI) which might favor the appearance of IV S-ketamine at the alveolar surface. AFC was measured in fluid-instilled rat lungs. S-ketamine was administered IV over 6 h (loading dose: 20 mg/kg, followed by 20 mg/kg/h), or intratracheally by addition to the instillate (75 µg/ml). ALI was induced by IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 7 mg/kg). Interleukin (IL)-6 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-3 were measured by ELISA in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Isolated rat alveolar type-II cells were exposed to S-ketamine (75 µg/ml) and/or LPS (1 mg/ml) for 6 h, and transepithelial ion transport was measured as short circuit current (ISC). AFC was 27±5% (mean±SD) over 60 min in control rats and was unaffected by IV S-ketamine. Tracheal S-ketamine reduced AFC to 18±9%. In LPS-treated rats, AFC decreased to 16±6%. This effect was not enhanced by IV S-ketamine. LPS increased IL-6 and CINC-3 in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In alveolar type-II cells, S-ketamine reduced ISC by 37% via a decrease in amiloride-inhibitable sodium transport. Continuous administration of IV S-ketamine does not affect rat AFC even in endotoxin-induced ALI. Tracheal application with direct exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to S-ketamine decreases AFC by inhibition of amiloride-inhibitable sodium transport. PMID:25386677

  1. Efficiency Enhanced Colloidal Mn-Doped Type II Core/Shell ZnSe/CdS Quantum Dot Sensitized Hybrid Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jamshidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal Mn-doped ZnSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs are synthesized for the first time and employed as a strategy to boost the power conversion efficiency of quantum dot sensitized solar cells. By using Mn-doping as a band gap engineering tool for core/shell QDs an effective improvement of absorption spectra could be obtained. The mid-states generated by a proper Mn content alleviate carrier separation and enhance the electron injection rate, thus facilitating electron transport to the TiO2 substrate. It is demonstrated that a device constructed with 0.25% Mn-doped ZnSe/CdS leads to an enhancement of the electron injection rate and power conversion efficiency by 4 times and 1.3, respectively.

  2. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAP; Alveolar proteinosis; Pulmonary alveolar phospholipoproteinosis; Alveolar lipoproteinosis phospholipidosis ... PAP is unknown. In others, it occurs with lung infection or an immune problem. It also can ...

  3. DO GIANT PLANETS SURVIVE TYPE II MIGRATION?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ida, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Planetary migration is one of the most serious problems to systematically understand the observations of exoplanets. We clarify that the theoretically predicted type II, migration (like type I migration) is too fast, by developing detailed analytical arguments in which the timescale of type II migration is compared with the disk lifetime. In the disk-dominated regime, the type II migration timescale is characterized by a local viscous diffusion timescale, while the disk lifetime is characterized by a global diffusion timescale that is much longer than the local one. Even in the planet-dominated regime where the inertia of the planet mass reduces the migration speed, the timescale is still shorter than the disk lifetime except in the final disk evolution stage where the total disk mass decays below the planet mass. This suggests that most giant planets plunge into the central stars within the disk lifetime, and it contradicts the exoplanet observations that gas giants are piled up at r ∼> 1 AU. We examine additional processes that may arise in protoplanetary disks: dead zones, photoevaporation of gas, and gas flow across a gap formed by a type II migrator. Although they make the type II migration timescale closer to the disk lifetime, we show that none of them can act as an effective barrier for rapid type II migration with the current knowledge of these processes. We point out that gas flow across a gap and the fraction of the flow accreted onto the planets are uncertain and they may have the potential to solve the problem. Much more detailed investigation for each process may be needed to explain the observed distribution of gas giants in extrasolar planetary systems

  4. Differential replication of avian influenza H9N2 viruses in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells

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    Peiris Malik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Avian influenza virus H9N2 isolates cause a mild influenza-like illness in humans. However, the pathogenesis of the H9N2 subtypes in human remains to be investigated. Using a human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 as host, we found that A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2/G1, which shares 6 viral "internal genes" with the lethal A/Hong Kong/156/97 (H5N1/97 virus, replicates efficiently whereas other H9N2 viruses, A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2/Y280 and A/Chicken/Hong Kong/G9/97 (H9N2/G9, replicate poorly. Interestingly, we found that there is a difference in the translation of viral protein but not in the infectivity or transcription of viral genes of these H9N2 viruses in the infected cells. This difference may possibly be explained by H9N2/G1 being more efficient on viral protein production in specific cell types. These findings suggest that the H9N2/G1 virus like its counterpart H5N1/97 may be better adapted to the human host and replicates efficiently in human alveolar epithelial cells.

  5. Increased survival and proliferation of the epidemic strain Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Giovanni Monteiro; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Real, Fernando; Teixeira, Daniela; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane

    2017-09-13

    Outbreaks of infections caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria have been reported worldwide generally associated with medical procedures. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 was obtained during an epidemic of postsurgical infections and was characterized by increased persistence in vivo. To better understand the successful survival strategies of this microorganism, we evaluated its infectivity and proliferation in macrophages (RAW and BMDM) and alveolar epithelial cells (A549). For that, we assessed the following parameters, for both M. abscessus CRM0019 as well as the reference strain M. abscessus ATCC 19977: internalization, intracellular survival for up 3 days, competence to subvert lysosome fusion and the intracellular survival after cell reinfection. CRM0019 and ATCC 19977 strains showed the same internalization rate (approximately 30% after 6 h infection), in both A549 and RAW cells. However, colony forming units data showed that CRM0019 survived better in A549 cells than the ATCC 19977 strain. Phagosomal characteristics of CRM0019 showed the bacteria inside tight phagosomes in A549 cells, contrasting to the loosely phagosomal membrane in macrophages. This observation holds for the ATCC 19977 strain in both cell types. The competence to subvert lysosome fusion was assessed by acidification and acquisition of lysosomal protein. For M. abscessus strains the phagosomes were acidified in all cell lines; nevertheless, the acquisition of lysosomal protein was reduced by CRM0019 compared to the ATCC 19977 strain, in A549 cells. Conversely, in macrophages, both M. abscessus strains were located in mature phagosomes, however without bacterial death. Once recovered from macrophages M. abscessus could establish a new intracellular infection. Nevertheless, only CRM0019 showed a higher growth rate in A549, increasing nearly 10-fold after 48 and 72 h. M. abscessus CRM0019 creates a protective and replicative niche in alveolar epithelial cells mainly by

  6. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: review of the 1022 cases reported worldwide

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    Giuseppe Castellana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM is a rare disease characterised by the widespread intra-alveolar accumulation of minute calculi called microliths. It is caused by mutation of the SLC34A2 gene encoding the type IIb sodium phosphate cotransporter in alveolar type II cells. The present study explores the epidemiological, familial, genetic, clinical, diagnostic, radiological and therapeutic aspects with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of this uncommon disease. We searched articles on PAM published up to December 2014 and 544 papers were found, accounting for 1022 cases. PAM is present in all continents and in many nations, in particular in Turkey, China, Japan, India, Italy and the USA. Familiality is frequent. The clinical course is not uniform and the causes of this clinical variability seem to be largely nongenetic. The optimal diagnostic procedure is the association of chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT with bronchoalveolar lavage, but a chest radiograph may suffice in families in which a case has already been diagnosed. Moreover, chest radiography and HRCT allow the classification of the evolutionary phase of the disease and its severity. At present lung transplantation is the only effective therapy. However, better knowledge of the gene responsible offers hope for new therapies.

  7. Measuring type II stresses using 3DXRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for characterization of the grain resolved (type II) stress states in a polycrystalline sample based on monochromatic X-ray diffraction data. The algorithm is a robust 12-parameter-per-grain fit of the centre-of-mass grain positions, orientations and stress tensors...

  8. A co-culture system with an organotypic lung slice and an immortal alveolar macrophage cell line to quantify silica-induced inflammation.

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    Falk Hofmann

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that amorphous silica nanoparticles cause toxic effects on lung cells in vivo as well as in vitro and induce inflammatory processes. The phagocytosis of silica by alveolar macrophages potentiates these effects. To understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of silica toxicity, we applied a co-culture system including the immortal alveolar epithelial mouse cell line E10 and the macrophage cell line AMJ2-C11. In parallel we exposed precision-cut lung slices (lacking any blood cells as well as residual alveolar macrophages of wild type and P2rx7-/- mice with or without AMJ2-C11 cells to silica nanoparticles. Exposure of E10 cells as well as slices of wild type mice resulted in an increase of typical alveolar epithelial type 1 cell proteins like T1α, caveolin-1 and -2 and PKC-β1, whereas the co-culture with AMJ2-C11 showed mostly a slightly lesser increase of these proteins. In P2rx7-/- mice most of these proteins were slightly decreased. ELISA analysis of the supernatant of wild type and P2rx7-/- mice precision-cut lung slices showed decreased amounts of IL-6 and TNF-α when incubated with nano-silica. Our findings indicate that alveolar macrophages influence the early inflammation of the lung and also that cell damaging reagents e.g. silica have a smaller impact on P2rx7-/- mice than on wild type mice. The co-culture system with an organotypic lung slice is a useful tool to study the role of alveolar macrophages during lung injury at the organoid level.

  9. Gentamicin blocks the ACh-induced BK current in guinea pig type II vestibular hair cells by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-04-22

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels (BK) and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca²⁺ ions through L-type Ca²⁺ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC₅₀ value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]₀) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca²⁺ currents activated by (-)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  10. Scalar dark matter with type II seesaw

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    Arnab Dasgupta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the possibility of generating tiny neutrino mass through a combination of type I and type II seesaw mechanism within the framework of an abelian extension of standard model. The model also provides a naturally stable dark matter candidate in terms of the lightest neutral component of a scalar doublet. We compute the relic abundance of such a dark matter candidate and also point out how the strength of type II seesaw term can affect the relic abundance of dark matter. Such a model which connects neutrino mass and dark matter abundance has the potential of being verified or ruled out in the ongoing neutrino, dark matter, as well as accelerator experiments.

  11. An updated Type II supernova Hubble diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, E. E. E.; Kotak, R.; Leibundgut, B.; Taubenberger, S.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Smith, K.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2018-03-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of nine Type II-P/L supernovae (SNe) with redshifts in the 0.045 ≲ z ≲ 0.335 range, with a view to re-examining their utility as distance indicators. Specifically, we apply the expanding photosphere method (EPM) and the standardized candle method (SCM) to each target, and find that both methods yield distances that are in reasonable agreement with each other. The current record-holder for the highest-redshift spectroscopically confirmed supernova (SN) II-P is PS1-13bni (z = 0.335-0.012+0.009), and illustrates the promise of Type II SNe as cosmological tools. We updated existing EPM and SCM Hubble diagrams by adding our sample to those previously published. Within the context of Type II SN distance measuring techniques, we investigated two related questions. First, we explored the possibility of utilising spectral lines other than the traditionally used Fe IIλ5169 to infer the photospheric velocity of SN ejecta. Using local well-observed objects, we derive an epoch-dependent relation between the strong Balmer line and Fe IIλ5169 velocities that is applicable 30 to 40 days post-explosion. Motivated in part by the continuum of key observables such as rise time and decline rates exhibited from II-P to II-L SNe, we assessed the possibility of using Hubble-flow Type II-L SNe as distance indicators. These yield similar distances as the Type II-P SNe. Although these initial results are encouraging, a significantly larger sample of SNe II-L would be required to draw definitive conclusions. Tables A.1, A.3, A.5, A.7, A.9, A.11, A.13, A.15 and A.17 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A25

  12. Transplantation of osteoporotic bone marrow stromal cells rejuvenated by the overexpression of SATB2 prevents alveolar bone loss in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rongyao; Fu, Zongyun; Liu, Xue; Xiao, Tao; Zhang, Ping; Du, Yifei; Yuan, Hua; Cheng, Jie; Jiang, Hongbing

    2016-11-01

    Estrogen-deficient osteoporosis is an aging-related disease with high morbidity that not only significantly increases a woman's risk of fragility fracture but is also associated with tooth and bone loss in the supporting alveolar bone of the jaw. Emerging evidence suggests that the aging of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contributes to the development of osteoporosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2), a stemness and senescence regulator of craniofacial BMSCs, in rat ovariectomy-induced alveolar osteoporosis. We also sought to determine whether transplantation of SATB2-modified BMSCs could ameliorate estrogen deficient alveolar bone loss. Our data revealed that BMSCs from ovariectomy-induced alveolar bone exhibited typical senescence phenotypes such as diminished stemness and osteogenic capacity, increased expression of senescence or osteoclastic markers and enhanced adipogenic potential. These phenotypic changes are a result of SATB2-mediated senescence dysregulation as evidenced by nuclear γH2AX foci formation. Moreover, overexpression of SATB2 significantly alleviated the senescence of osteoporotic BMSCs in vitro. Importantly, transplantation of SATB2-modified BMSCs significantly attenuated ovariectomy-induced alveolar bone loss in vivo. Together, our results revealed that SATB2 is a critical regulator of alveolar BMSC senescence, and its overexpression decreases these senescent changes both in vitro and in vivo. SATB2-modified BMSC delivery could be a viable and promising therapeutic strategy for alveolar bone loss induced by estrogen-deficient osteoporosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tropomyosin-1 protects transformed alveolar epithelial cells against cigaret smoke extract through the stabilization of F-actin-dependent cell-cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagat, Maciej; Grzanka, Dariusz; Izdebska, Magdalena; Sroka, Wiktor Dariusz; Hałas-Wiśniewska, Marta; Grzanka, Alina

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of tropomyosin-1-based structural stabilization of F-actin in transformed human alveolar epithelial line H1299 cells subjected to high oxidative stress induced by cigaret smoke extract. We demonstrated here that cigaret smoke extract induces cell shrinking and detachment as a consequence of F-actin cytoskeleton degradation in H1299 cells not overexpressing tropomyosin-1. Furthermore, the treatment of these cells with cigaret smoke extract resulted in the loss of peripheral localization of ZO-1 and initiated apoptosis. In contrast, structural stabilization of F-actin, by overexpression of tropomyosin-1, preserved cell to cell interactions through the attenuation of cortical actin organization into thin fibers and thus protected these cells against oxidative stress-induced degradation of actin cytoskeleton and cell death. In conclusion, we suggest that structural stabilization of thin cortical F-actin fibers increases link between tight junctions proteins and actin cytoskeleton and thus protects H1299 cells against cigaret smoke extract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. B cell, CD8 + T cell and gamma delta T cell infiltration alters alveolar immune cell homeostasis in HIV-infected Malawian adults [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

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    Andrew Mwale

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV infection is associated with increased risk to lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI. However, the impact of HIV infection on immune cell populations in the lung is not well defined. We sought to comprehensively characterise the impact of HIV infection on immune cell populations in the lung. Methods: Twenty HIV-uninfected controls and 17 HIV-1 infected ART-naïve adults were recruited from Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi. Immunophenotyping of lymphocyte and myeloid cell populations was done on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peripheral blood cells. Results: We found that the numbers of CD8 + T cells, B cells and gamma delta T cells were higher in BAL fluid of HIV-infected adults compared to HIV-uninfected controls (all p<0.05. In contrast, there was no difference in the numbers of alveolar CD4 + T cells in HIV-infected adults compared to HIV-uninfected controls (p=0.7065. Intermediate monocytes were the predominant monocyte subset in BAL fluid (HIV-, 63%; HIV+ 81%, while the numbers of classical monocytes was lower in HIV-infected individuals compared to HIV-uninfected adults (1 × 10 5 vs. 2.8 × 10 5 cells/100ml of BAL fluid, p=0.0001. The proportions of alveolar macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells was lower in HIV-infected adults compared to HIV-uninfected controls (all p<0.05. Conclusions: Chronic HIV infection is associated with broad alteration of immune cell populations in the lung, but does not lead to massive depletion of alveolar CD4 + T cells. Disruption of alveolar immune cell homeostasis likely explains in part the susceptibility for LRTIs in HIV-infected adults.

  15. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E

    2014-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation. PMID:25504013

  16. [A pancreas suture-less type II binding pancreaticogastrostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shu-you; Hong, De-fei; Liu, Ying-bin; Li, Jiang-tao; Tao, Feng; Tan, Zhi-jian

    2009-12-01

    To explore the feasibility and safety of type II binding pancreaticogastrostomy (BPG) in pancreaticoduodenectomy and mid-segmentectomy of pancreas. From November 2008 to May 2009, 26 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and mid-segmentectomy of pancreas with type II BPG reconstruction, including 13 cases of pancreatic head cancer, 3 cases of duodenal adenocarcinoma, 2 cases of ampullary carcinoma, 4 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 1 case of bile duct cell severe atypical hyperplasia, and 1 case of stomach cancer. The process of type II BPG was described as the following: after pancreas remnant was mobilized for 2-3 cm, a piece of sero-muscular layer at the posterior gastric wall was excised and then a sero-muscular depth purse-suturing with 3-0 prolene was pre-placed (outer purse-string). Incising anterior gastric wall or opening part of the closed distal gastric stump, the mucosa layer at the sero-muscular defect was incised and then purse-suture at the mucosal tube was pre-placed (inner purse-string). Through the two pre-placed purse-strings, the pancreas remnant was pulled into the gastric lumen and then posterior gastric wall was pushed backward to keep it closely in contact with the retro-peritoneal wall. Thereafter, the outer purse-string was tied (outer binding) and then the inner purse-string was tied (inner binding). All cases underwent BPG of type II. The operative time ranged from 3 to 5.5 hours. The postoperative hospital stay ranged from 6 to 48 days. Postoperative complications included 1 case of ascites, 2 cases of delayed gastric emptying and 1 case of intra-abdominal bleeding. All cases with complications were cured after nonsurgical treatment. No mortality or pancreatic leakage occurred. Pancreaticogastrostomy is good for accommodating a large pancreas stump. Binding technique is very helpful in minimizing the leak rate of pancreaticogastrostomy. While type I BPG is safe and easy to perform, type II is even safer and easier to be done.

  17. Primary human alveolar bone cells isolated from tissue samples acquired at periodontal surgeries exhibit sustained proliferation and retain osteogenic phenotype during in vitro expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Marolt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bone tissue regeneration requires a source of viable, proliferative cells with osteogenic differentiation capacity. Periodontal surgeries represent an opportunity to procure small amounts of autologous tissues for primary cell isolation. Our objective was to assess the potential of human alveolar bone as a source of autologous osteogenic cells for tissue engineering and biomaterials and drug testing studies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Alveolar bone tissue was obtained from 37 patients undergoing routine periodontal surgery. Tissue harvesting and cell isolation procedures were optimized to isolate viable cells. Primary cells were subcultured and characterized with respect to their growth characteristics, gene expression of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization, under osteogenic stimulation. RESULTS: Alveolar bone cells were successfully isolated from 28 of the 30 samples harvested with bone forceps, and from 2 of the 5 samples obtained by bone drilling. The yield of cells in primary cultures was variable between the individual samples, but was not related to the site of tissue harvesting and the patient age. In 80% of samples (n = 5, the primary cells proliferated steadily for eight subsequent passages, reaching cumulative numbers over 10(10 cells. Analyses confirmed stable gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin in early and late cell passages. In osteogenic medium, the cells from late passages increased alkaline phosphatase activity and accumulated mineralized matrix, indicating a mature osteoblastic phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: Primary alveolar bone cells exhibited robust proliferation and retained osteogenic phenotype during in vitro expansion, suggesting that they can be used as an autologous cell source for bone regenerative therapies and various in vitro studies.

  18. NNMSM type-II and -III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); University of Tokyo, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We suggest two types of extension of the standard model, which are the so-called next to new minimal standard model type-II and -III. They can achieve gauge coupling unification as well as suitable dark matter abundance, small neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, inflation, and dark energy. The gauge coupling unification can be realized by introducing two or three extra new fields, and they could explain charge quantization. We also show that there are regions in which the vacuum stability, coupling perturbativity, and correct dark matter abundance can be realized with current experimental data at the same time. (orig.)

  19. Dual role for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 as soluble and as matricellular regulator of epithelial alveolar cell wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquerlot, François; Galiacy, Stephane; Malo, Michel; Guignabert, Christophe; Lawrence, Daniel A; d'Ortho, Maria-Pia; Barlovatz-Meimon, Georgia

    2006-11-01

    Epithelium repair, crucial for restoration of alveolo-capillary barrier integrity, is orchestrated by various cytokines and growth factors. Among them keratinocyte growth factor plays a pivotal role in both cell proliferation and migration. The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system also influences cell migration through proteolysis during epithelial repair. In addition, the complex formed by uPAR-uPA and matrix-bound plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) exerts nonproteolytic roles in various cell types. Here we present new evidence about the dual role of PAI-1 under keratinocyte growth factor stimulation using an in vitro repair model of rat alveolar epithelial cells. Besides proteolytic involvement of the uPA system, the availability of matrix-bound-PAI-1 is also required for an efficient healing. An unexpected decrease of healing was shown when PAI-1 activity was blocked. However, the proteolytic action of uPA and plasmin were still required. Moreover, immediately after wounding, PAI-1 was dramatically increased in the newly deposited matrix at the leading edge of wounds. We thus propose a dual role for PAI-1 in epithelial cell wound healing, both as a soluble inhibitor of proteolysis and also as a matrix-bound regulator of cell migration. Matrix-bound PAI-1 could thus be considered as a new member of the matricellular protein family.

  20. Genomic signature and toxicogenomics comparison of polycationic gene delivery nanosystems in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Barar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Of the gene delivery systems, non-viral polycationic gene delivery nanosystems have been alternatively exploited as a relatively safe delivery reagents compared to viral vectors. However, little is known about the genomic impacts of these delivery systems in target cells/tissues. In this study, the toxicogenomics and genotoxicity potential of some selected polycationic lipid/polymer based nanostructures (i.e., Oligofectamine® (OF, starburst polyamidoamine Polyfect® (PF and diaminobutane (DAB dendrimers were investigated in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. "nMethods: To study the nature and the ontology of the gene expression changes in A549 cells upon treatment with polycationic nanostructures, MTT assay and microarray gene expression profiling methodology were employed. For microarray analysis, cyanine (Cy3/Cy5 labeled cDNA samples from treated and untreated cells were hybridized on target arrays housing 200 genes. "nResults and major conclusions: The polycationic nanosystems induced significant gene expression changes belonging to different genomic ontologies such as cell defence and apoptosis pathways. These data suggest that polycationic nanosystems can elicit multiple gene expression changes in A549 cells upon their chemical structures and interactions with cellular/subcellular components. Such impacts may interfere with the main goals of the desired genemedicine.

  1. Peculiar Type II supernovae from blue supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiser, Io K. W.; Poznanski, Dovi; Kasen, Daniel; Young, Timothy R.; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Challis, Peter; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Kirshner, Robert P.; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Nugent, Peter E.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.

    2011-07-01

    The vast majority of Type II supernovae (SNeII) are produced by red supergiants, but SN 1987A revealed that blue supergiants (BSGs) can produce members of this class as well, albeit with some peculiar properties. This best-studied event revolutionized our understanding of SNe and linking it to the bulk of Type II events is essential. We present here the optical photometry and spectroscopy gathered for SN 2000cb, which is clearly not a standard SNII and yet is not a SN 1987A analogue. The light curve of SN 2000cb is reminiscent of that of SN 1987A in shape, with a slow rise to a late optical peak, but on substantially different time-scales. Spectroscopically, SN 2000cb resembles a normal SNII, but with ejecta velocities that far exceed those measured for SN 1987A or normal SNeII, above 18 000 km s-1 for Hα at early times. The red colours, high velocities, late photometric peak and our modelling of this object all point towards a scenario involving the high-energy explosion of a small-radius star, most likely a BSG, producing 0.1 M⊙ of 56Ni. Adding a similar object to the sample, SN 2005ci, we derive a rate of ˜2 per cent of the core-collapse rate for this loosely defined class of BSG explosions.

  2. The role of alveolar epithelial cells in initiating and shaping pulmonary immune responses: communication between innate and adaptive immune systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga D Chuquimia

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells have been recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. However, more recently, other cells in the lungs such as alveolar epithelial cells (AEC have been found to play important roles in the defense and pathogenesis of infection. In the present study we first compared AEC with pulmonary macrophages (PuM isolated from mice in their ability to internalize and control Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG growth and their capacity as APCs. AEC were able to internalize and control bacterial growth as well as present antigen to primed T cells. Secondly, we compared both cell types in their capacity to secrete cytokines and chemokines upon stimulation with various molecules including mycobacterial products. Activated PuM and AEC displayed different patterns of secretion. Finally, we analyzed the profile of response of AEC to diverse stimuli. AEC responded to both microbial and internal stimuli exemplified by TLR ligands and IFNs, respectively. The response included synthesis by AEC of several factors, known to have various effects in other cells. Interestingly, TNF could stimulate the production of CCL2/MCP-1. Since MCP-1 plays a role in the recruitment of monocytes and macrophages to sites of infection and macrophages are the main producers of TNF, we speculate that both cell types can stimulate each other. Also, another cell-cell interaction was suggested when IFNs (produced mainly by lymphocytes were able to induce expression of chemokines (IP-10 and RANTES by AEC involved in the recruitment of circulating lymphocytes to areas of injury, inflammation, or viral infection. In the current paper we confirm previous data on the capacity of AEC regarding internalization of mycobacteria and their role as APC, and extend the knowledge of AEC as a multifunctional cell type by assessing the secretion of a broad array of factors in response to several different types of stimuli.

  3. Human alveolar bone cell proliferation, expression of osteoblastic phenotype, and matrix mineralization on porous titanium produced by powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Crippa, Grasiele Edilaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; Taba, Mario; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Beloti, Marcio Mateus

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the influence of the porous titanium (Ti) structure on the osteogenic cell behaviour. Porous Ti discs were fabricated by the powder metallurgy process with the pore size typically between 50 and 400 microm and a porosity of 60%. Osteogenic cells obtained from human alveolar bone were cultured until subconfluence and subcultured on dense Ti (control) and porous Ti for periods of up to 17 days. Cultures grown on porous Ti exhibited increased cell proliferation and total protein content, and lower levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity than on dense Ti. In general, gene expression of osteoblastic markers-runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and osteocalcin was lower at day 7 and higher at day 17 in cultures grown on porous Ti compared with dense Ti, a finding consistent with the enhanced growth rate for such cultures. The amount of mineralized matrix was greater on porous Ti compared with the dense one. These results indicate that the porous Ti is an appropriate substrate for osteogenic cell adhesion, proliferation, and production of a mineralized matrix. Because of the three-dimensional environment it provides, porous Ti should be considered an advantageous substrate for promoting desirable implant surface-bone interactions.

  4. Wnt-inducible protein (WISP-1 is a key regulator of alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia in pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Königshoff

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic lung disease is characterized by distorted lung architecture and severe loss of respiratory function secondary to alveolar epithelial cell (AEC hyperplasia, enhanced extracellular matrix (ECM deposition and fibroblast proliferation. Repetitive epithelial injuries with impaired alveolar wound healing and altered AEC gene expression represent a trigger mechanism for development of fibrosis. To reveal gene regulatory networks in lung fibrosis, we compared gene expression profiles of freshly isolated AEC obtained from mice 14 days after saline or bleomycin (BM instillation using whole genome microarray analysis. Several genes of the Wnt signaling pathway, in particular WISP-1, a member of the CCN family, were highly regulated. WISP-1 protein expression was demonstrated in proliferating AEC in BM-treated lungs by immunofluorescence. When analyzing all six CCN family members, WISP-1 was upregulated the most 14 days after BM challenge, as analyzed by qRT-PCR. To elucidate WISP-1 function, cultured primary mouse AEC were stimulated with WISP-1 and demonstrated a 230% increase in proliferation, analyzed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. This was mediated through enhanced phosphorylation, but not expression of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt, as detected by immunoblot. Finally, increased expression of WISP-1 was detected in lung homogenates and isolated AEC from IPF patients, using qRT-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis of WISP-1 and Ki67 verified the existence of hyperplastic and proliferative AEC expressing WISP-1 in vivo. Our study thus identifies WISP-1 as a novel regulator of AEC injury and repair, and suggests that WISP-1 is a key mediator in pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Potential Osteoinductive Effects of Calcitriol on the m-RNA of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Alveolar Periosteum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Hsi Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized alveolar periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells (P-MSCs and examined the hypothesis that 1,25-(OH2D3 (calcitriol exerts osteoinductive effects on P-MSCs. The mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP, bone sialoprotein (BSP, core-binding factor alpha-1 (CBFA1, collagen-1 (Col-1, osteocalcin (OCN, and vitamin D3 receptor (VDR were assessed after incubation with calcitriol for 2 weeks. Vitamin C as positive control (Vit. C-p increased ALP and CBFA1 mRNA expression at both 1 and 2 weeks and increased BSP and Col-1 mRNA expression only at the first week. A concentration of 10−8 M calcitriol enhanced ALP, CBFA1, Col-1, and OCN mRNA expression at both weeks and BSP mRNA expression at the first week. Furthermore, 10−7 M calcitriol increased the mRNA expressions of all compounds at both weeks, except that of CBFA1 at the first week. 10−8 M calcitriol and Vit. C-p enhanced ALP activity at the second and third weeks. The results revealed that 10−9, 10−8, and 10−7 M calcitriol induced osteoinduction in alveolar P-MSCs by increasing ALP, CBFA1, Col-1, and OCN mRNA expression. A 10−7 M calcitriol yielded a higher mRNA expression than Vit. Cp on VDR and OCN mRNA expression at both weeks and on Col-1 mRNA at the second week.

  6. Alveolar development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis.

  7. Nucleosynthesis in Type II Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Carrie; Hix, W. Raphael; Harris, A.; Manneschmidt, A.

    2016-09-01

    Type II are the most common class of the ``core collapse'' supernova, involving the destruction of a high mass star (> 8M⊙). Their death is a result of a self-gravitational force becoming unbalanced as fusion ceases in the stellar core, leading to the collapse of the core to form a neutron star. The propagation of the shock ignites fusion into heavier elements as it progress through the star. This process is the origin of most elements present in the universe. In recent years, the complex nature of the explosion (its hydrodynamics, transport of energy, and the created isotopes) have been studied with increasing physical fidelity. Detailed nucleosynthesis from models of these core collapse supernovae is calculated in a post-processing step, using thermodynamic trajectories. My work on the project has been to develop the tools to visualize the results of post-processing calculations in the 2D grid. National Science Foundation (NSF).

  8. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  9. Carcinoma de células escamosas em rebordo alveolar inferior: diagnóstico e tratamento odontológico de suporte Squamous cell carcinoma in lower alveolar ridge: diagnosis and odontologic support treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Ivan Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma epidermóide é a neoplasia maligna mais comum de cavidade oral e estruturas adjacentes. Apresenta maior incidência no gênero masculino, após a quarta década de vida, e tem como principais fatores etiológicos os usos crônicos de tabaco e álcool. Neste trabalho é relatado um caso de carcinoma de células escamosas do rebordo alveolar inferior, que não é uma região preferencial para esse tipo de patologia. Também é discutida a importância do cirurgião-dentista na equipe de profissionais que assiste esses pacientes, tanto no diagnóstico precoce quanto no manejo das alterações estomatológicas advindas da terapia antineoplásica.Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in oral cavity and adjacent structures. Its prevalence is higher in males, after the fourth decade, and the main etiologic associated factors are smoking and alcohol. This study reports a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from the lower alveolar ridge, a non-preferential site for this pathology. It also discusses the importance of the dentist in the team of professionals assisting these patients, in early diagnosis and treatment of the stomatological alterations due to antineoplastic therapy.

  10. Differential effects of cigarette smoke on oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine release in primary human airway epithelial cells and in a variety of transformed alveolar epithelial cells

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    Rahman Irfan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke mediated oxidative stress and inflammatory events in the airway and alveolar epithelium are important processes in the pathogenesis of smoking related pulmonary diseases. Previously, individual cell lines were used to assess the oxidative and proinflammatory effects of cigarette smoke with confounding results. In this study, a panel of human and rodent transformed epithelial cell lines were used to determine the effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE on oxidative stress markers, cell toxicity and proinflammatory cytokine release and compared the effects with that of primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC. Methods Primary human SAEC, transformed human (A549, H1299, H441, and rodent (murine MLE-15, rat L2 alveolar epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of CSE (0.2–10% ranging from 20 min to 24 hr. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release assay, trypan blue exclusion method and double staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide. Glutathione concentration was measured by enzymatic recycling assay and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels by using lipid peroxidation assay kit. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-8 and IL-6 were measured by ELISA. Nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, NF-κB was assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting. Results Cigarette smoke extract dose-dependently depleted glutathione concentration, increased 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE levels, and caused necrosis in the transformed cell lines as well as in SAEC. None of the transformed cell lines showed any significant release of cytokines in response to CSE. CSE, however, induced IL-8 and IL-6 release in primary cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in SAEC. Conclusion This study suggests that primary, but not transformed, lung epithelial cells are an appropriate model to study the inflammatory

  11. Enhanced rifampicin delivery to alveolar macrophages by solid lipid nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuan Junlan; Li Yanzhen; Yang Likai; Sun Xun; Zhang Qiang; Gong Tao; Zhang Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed at developing a drug delivery system targeting the densest site of tuberculosis infection, the alveolar macrophages (AMs). Rifampicin (RFP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (RFP-SLNs) with an average size of 829.6 ± 16.1 nm were prepared by a modified lipid film hydration method. The cytotoxicity of RFP-SLNs to AMs and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECs) was examined using MTT assays. The viability of AMs and AECs was above 80 % after treatment with RFP-SLNs, which showed low toxicity to both AMs and AECs. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy was employed to observe the interaction between RFP-SLNs and both AMs and AECs. After incubating the cells with RFP-SLNs for 2 h, the fluorescent intensity in AMs was more and remained longer (from 0.5 to 12 h) when compared with that in AECs (from 0.5 to 8 h). In vitro uptake characteristics of RFP-SLNs in AMs and AECs were also investigated by detection of intracellular RFP by High performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that RFP-SLNs delivered markedly higher RFP into AMs (691.7 ng/mg in cultured AMs, 662.6 ng/mg in primary AMs) than that into AECs (319.2 ng/mg in cultured AECs, 287.2 ng/mg in primary AECs). Subsequently, in vivo delivery efficiency and the selectivity of RFP-SLNs were further verified in Sprague–Dawley rats. Under pulmonary administration of RFP-SLNs, the amount of RFP in AMs was significantly higher than that in AECs at each time point. Our results demonstrated that solid lipid nanoparticles are a promising strategy for the delivery of rifampicin to alveolar macrophages selectively.

  12. Sox2 Activates Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in the Respiratory Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Keiser, Angela R.; Wert, Susan E.; Bruno, Michael D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Sox2, a transcription factor critical for the maintenance of embryonic stem cells and induction of pluripotent stem cells, is expressed exclusively in the conducting airway epithelium of the lung, where it is required for differentiation of nonciliated, goblet, and ciliated cells. To determine the role of Sox2 in respiratory epithelial cells, Sox2 was selectively and conditionally expressed in nonciliated airway epithelial cells and in alveolar type II cells in the adult mouse. Sox2 induced e...

  13. Activity of interferon alpha, interleukin 6 and insulin in the regulation of differentiation in A549 alveolar carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, C; Freshney, R I; Speirs, V

    1995-02-01

    The differentiation of A549, a human tumour cell line from type II pneumocytes, can be induced by a crude fibroblast-derived factor (FDF) isolated from the conditioned medium of glucocorticoid-treated lung fibroblasts. In the present report, we have used alkaline phosphatase as a differentiation marker to investigate the activity of a number of growth factors as potential candidates for this paracrine activity. This showed that insulin, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) could simulate the activity of conditioned medium. Their effects were dexamethasone (DX) dependent, additive and reversible with a half-life of 1 week. Transforming growth factor alpha and beta, IL-1 alpha and epidermal growth factor, were all inhibitory, and inhibition was opposed, partially or completely, by DX. The most potent inducer was IL-6, but as DX was shown to decrease the concentration of IL-6 in lung fibroblast-conditioned medium it seems an unlikely candidate for FDF. Unlike FDF, all of the positive-acting factors were shown to induce plasminogen activator. FDF has also been shown to be active in the absence of DX. This suggests that differentiation-inducing activity may be present in several paracrine factors, but that so far a candidate for FDF has not been identified.

  14. Exposure to Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin affects integrin-mediated adhesion and mechanics in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angely, Christelle; Nguyen, Ngoc-Minh; Andre Dias, Sofia; Planus, Emmanuelle; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Filoche, Marcel; Chenal, Alexandre; Ladant, Daniel; Isabey, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin is a major virulent factor of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells where it produces high levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) affecting cellular physiology. Whether CyaA toxin can modulate cell matrix adhesion and mechanics of infected cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we use a recently proposed multiple bond force spectroscopy (MFS) with an atomic force microscope to assess the early phase of cell adhesion (maximal detachment and local rupture forces) and cell rigidity (Young's modulus) in alveolar epithelial cells (A549) for toxin exposure 95%) at CyaA concentration of 0.5 nM, but a significant effect (≈81%) at 10 nM. MFS performed on A549 for three different concentrations (0.5, 5 and 10 nM) demonstrates that CyaA toxin significantly affects both cell adhesion (detachment forces are decreased) and cell mechanics (Young's modulus is increased). CyaA toxin (at 0.5 nM) assessed at three indentation/retraction speeds (2, 5 and 10 μm/s) significantly affects global detachment forces, local rupture events and Young modulus compared with control conditions, while an enzymatically inactive variant CyaAE5 has no effect. These results reveal the loading rate dependence of the multiple bonds newly formed between the cell and integrin-specific coated probe as well as the individual bond kinetics which are only slightly affected by the patho-physiological dose of CyaA toxin. Finally, theory of multiple bond force rupture enables us to deduce the bond number N which is reduced by a factor of 2 upon CyaA exposure (N ≈ 6 versus N ≈ 12 in control conditions). MFS measurements demonstrate that adhesion and mechanical properties of A549 are deeply affected by exposure to the CyaA toxin but not to an enzymatically inactive variant. This indicates that the alteration of cell mechanics triggered by CyaA is a consequence of the increase in

  15. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  16. Response of human alveolar bone-derived cells to a novel poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene)/barium titanate membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, L N; Crippa, G E; Gimenes, R; Zaghete, M A; de Oliveira, P T; Rosa, A L; Beloti, M M

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the response of human alveolar bone-derived cells to a novel poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene)/barium titanate (P(VDF-TrFE)/BT) membrane. Osteoblastic cells were cultured in osteogenic conditions either on P(VDF-TrFE)/BT or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for up to 14 days. At 7 and 14 days, the mRNA expression of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), Type I collagen (COL I), Osteopontin (OPN), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), and Osteocalcin (OC), key markers of the osteoblastic phenotype, and of Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and Survivin (SUR), associated with the control of the apoptotic cell death, was assayed by real-time PCR. In situ ALP activity was qualitatively evaluated by means of Fast red staining. Surface characterization was also qualitatively and quantitatively assayed in terms of topography, roughness, and wettability. Cells grown on P(VDF-TrFE)/BT exhibited a significantly higher mRNA expression for all markers compared to the ones on PTFE, except for Bcl-2, which was not detected for both groups. Additionally, Fast red staining was noticeably stronger in cultures on P(VDF-TrFE)/BT at 7 and 14 days. At micron- and submicron scale, SEM images and roughness analysis revealed that PTFE and P(VDF-TrFE)/BT exhibited a smooth topography and a similar roughness, respectively. PTFE membrane displayed higher contact angles compared with P(VDF-TrFE)/BT, as indicated by wettability assay. The novel P(VDF-TrFE)/BT membrane supports the acquisition of the osteoblastic phenotype in vitro, while up-regulating the expression of apoptotic markers. Further in vivo experiments should be carried out to confirm the capacity of P(VDF-TrFE)/BT membrane in promoting bone formation in guided bone regeneration.

  17. Bile acids induce activation of alveolar epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts through farnesoid X receptor-dependent and independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bi; Cai, Hou-Rong; Xue, Shan; You, Wen-Jie; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Han-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The roles of bile acid microaspiration and bile acid-activated farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remain unclear. We hypothesized that bile acids activate alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and lung fibroblasts, which may be regulated by FXR activation. Human AECs and normal or IPF-derived lung fibroblast cells were incubated with the three major bile acids: lithocholic acid (LCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The AECs injury indices, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and lung fibroblast activation were evaluated. FXR expression in IPF lungs and the roles of FXR and FXR-independent pathways in bile acid-induced profibrotic effects were also investigated. LCA, DCA and CDCA reduced cell viability and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in A549 cells. They all induced EMT, as shown by enhanced α-SMA and vimentin and decreased E-cadherin levels. LCA directly induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. All three bile acids promoted cellular migration but not proliferation of lung fibroblasts. FXR expression was upregulated in IPF lungs, and inhibition of FXR restrained the bile acid-induced EMT and lung fibroblast activation. Differentiation and proliferation were enhanced in lung fibroblasts exposed to conditioned medium from bile acid-stimulated A549 cells, which contained increased levels of profibrotic factors. TGF-β/Smad3 signaling was also involved in the bile acid-induced EMT and lung fibroblast differentiation. Bile acid microaspiration may promote the development of pulmonary fibrosis by inducing activation of AECs and lung fibroblasts via FXR-dependent and independent pathways. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Small airway epithelial cells exposure to printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles induces cellular effects on human microvascular endothelial cells in an alveolar-capillary co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisler, Jennifer D; Pirela, Sandra V; Friend, Sherri; Farcas, Mariana; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Shvedova, Anna; Castranova, Vincent; Demokritou, Philip; Qian, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The printer is one of the most common office equipment. Recently, it was reported that toner formulations for printing equipment constitute nano-enabled products (NEPs) and contain engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) that become airborne during printing. To date, insufficient research has been performed to understand the potential toxicological properties of printer-emitted particles (PEPs) with several studies using bulk toner particles as test particles. These studies demonstrated the ability of toner particles to cause chronic inflammation and fibrosis in animal models. However, the toxicological implications of inhalation exposures to ENMs emitted from laser printing equipment remain largely unknown. The present study investigates the toxicological effects of PEPs using an in vitro alveolar-capillary co-culture model with Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells (SAEC) and Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMVEC). Our data demonstrate that direct exposure of SAEC to low concentrations of PEPs (0.5 and 1.0 µg/mL) caused morphological changes of actin remodeling and gap formations within the endothelial monolayer. Furthermore, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and angiogenesis were observed in the HMVEC. Analysis of cytokine and chemokine levels demonstrates that interleukin (IL)-6 and MCP-1 may play a major role in the cellular communication observed between SAEC and HMVEC and the resultant responses in HMVEC. These data indicate that PEPs at low, non-cytotoxic exposure levels are bioactive and affect cellular responses in an alveolar-capillary co-culture model, which raises concerns for potential adverse health effects.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Promotes Proliferation and Migration of Alveolar Epithelial Cells under Septic Conditions In Vitro via the JNK-P38 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based therapies may be useful for treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. We investigated the impact of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived MSC (hUC-MSC secreted factors on alveolar epithelial cells under septic conditions and determined the relevant intracellular signaling pathways. Methods: Human alveolar epithelial cells (AEC and primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC were subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS with or without the presence of hUC-MSC-conditioned medium (CM. Proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC were determined via an MTT assay, a wound healing assay and a transwell migration assay (only for AEC. Protein phosphorylation was determined by western blot and the experiments were repeated in presence of small-molecule inhibitors. The hMSC-secretory proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. Results: MSC-CM enhanced proliferation and migration. Activation of JNK and P38, but not ERK, was required for the proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC. Pretreatment of AEC or SAEC with SP600125, an inhibitor of JNK1 or SB200358, an inhibitor of P38, significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration. An array of proteins including TGF-beta receptor type-1, TGF-beta receptor type-2, Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 2 which influencing the proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC were detected in MSC-CM. Conclusion: Our data suggest MSC promote epithelial cell repair through releasing a repertoire of paracrine factors via activation of JNK and P38 MAPK.

  20. Differential regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor by hydrogen peroxide and flagellin in cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Noriko; Izumi, Shunsuke; Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Toku, Seikichi; Kakinohana, Manabu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-02-05

    In previous studies, we found that stimulation of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) by flagellin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAPK-2) through activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in cultured alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Our studies strongly suggested that MAPKAPK-2 phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Ser1047. It has been reported that phosphorylation of Ser1047 after treatment with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced the internalization of EGFR. In the present study, we first found that treatment of A549 cells with hydrogen peroxide induced the activation of MAPKAPK-2 and phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 within 30 min. This was different from flagellin treatment because hydrogen peroxide treatment induced the phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1173 as well as Ser1047, indicating the activation of EGFR. We also found that KN93, an inhibitor of CaM kinase II, inhibited the hydrogen peroxide-induced phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 through inhibition of the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Furthermore, we examined the internalization of EGFR by three different methods. Flow cytometry with an antibody against the extracellular domain of EGFR and biotinylation of cell surface proteins revealed that flagellin, but not hydrogen peroxide, decreased the amount of cell-surface EGFR. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by EGF treatment was reduced by flagellin pre-treatment. These results strongly suggested that hydrogen peroxide activated the p38 MAPK pathway via activation of CaM kinase II and that flagellin and hydrogen peroxide regulate the functions of EGFR by different mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development

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    Housley Gary D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms that consolidate neural circuitry are a major focus of neuroscience. In the mammalian cochlea, the refinement of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN innervation to the inner hair cells (by type I SGNs and the outer hair cells (by type II SGNs is accompanied by a 25% loss of SGNs. Results We investigated the segregation of neuronal loss in the mouse cochlea using β-tubulin and peripherin antisera to immunolabel all SGNs and selectively type II SGNs, respectively, and discovered that it is the type II SGN population that is predominately lost within the first postnatal week. Developmental neuronal loss has been attributed to the decline in neurotrophin expression by the target hair cells during this period, so we next examined survival of SGN sub-populations using tissue culture of the mid apex-mid turn region of neonatal mouse cochleae. In organotypic culture for 48 hours from postnatal day 1, endogenous trophic support from the organ of Corti proved sufficient to maintain all type II SGNs; however, a large proportion of type I SGNs were lost. Culture of the spiral ganglion as an explant, with removal of the organ of Corti, led to loss of the majority of both SGN sub-types. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF added as a supplement to the media rescued a significant proportion of the SGNs, particularly the type II SGNs, which also showed increased neuritogenesis. The known decline in BDNF production by the rodent sensory epithelium after birth is therefore a likely mediator of type II neuron apoptosis. Conclusion Our study thus indicates that BDNF supply from the organ of Corti supports consolidation of type II innervation in the neonatal mouse cochlea. In contrast, type I SGNs likely rely on additional sources for trophic support.

  2. Basaloid Squamous Cell Carcinoma Involving the Alveolar Ridge, Buccal & Lingual Vestibule - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Koshti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of oral mucosa is a rare and aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma. They can be differentiated from squamous cell carcinomas by their distinct clinical and histopathological features. Methods: 45 year old female patient presented with extra oral exophytic mass and intra-oral ulcerative lesion on right buccal mucosa and vestibule. The patient was referred for routine blood examination and radiography followed by incisional biopsy. The biopsy specimen was fixed, processed and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin for further microscopic examination. Results: On microscopic examination basaloid cells were seen proliferating along with dysplastic squamous cells in the connective tissue stroma. Conclusion: Based on the histopathological findings a diagnosis of ′Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma′ was made. The patient was referred to department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery for excision of the lesion followed by radiotherapy.

  3. Type-II Symmetry-Protected Topological Dirac Semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tay-Rong; Xu, Su-Yang; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Chang, Guoqing; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Bian, Guang; Belopolski, Ilya; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Neupert, Titus; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2017-07-01

    The recent proposal of the type-II Weyl semimetal state has attracted significant interest. In this Letter, we propose the concept of the three-dimensional type-II Dirac fermion and theoretically identify this new symmetry-protected topological state in the large family of transition-metal icosagenides, M A3 (M =V , Nb, Ta; A =Al , Ga, In). We show that the VAl3 family features a pair of strongly Lorentz-violating type-II Dirac nodes and that each Dirac node can be split into four type-II Weyl nodes with chiral charge ±1 via symmetry breaking. Furthermore, we predict that the Landau level spectrum arising from the type-II Dirac fermions in VAl3 is distinct from that of known Dirac or Weyl semimetals. We also demonstrate a topological phase transition from a type-II Dirac semimetal to a quadratic Weyl semimetal or a topological crystalline insulator via crystalline distortions.

  4. Enhancement of the repair of dog alveolar cleft by an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanzheng, Chen; Yan, Gao; Ting, Li; Yanjie, Fu; Peng, Wu; Nan, Bai

    2015-05-01

    Autologous bone graft has been regarded as the criterion standard for the repair of alveolar cleft. However, the most prominent issue in alveolar cleft treatment is the high absorption rate of the bone graft. The authors' objective was to investigate the effects of an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture on the repair of dog alveolar cleft. Twenty beagle dogs with unilateral alveolar clefts created by surgery were divided randomly into four groups: group A underwent repair with an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture; group B underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells; group C underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and platelet-rich fibrin; and group D underwent repair with autologous iliac bone as the control. One day and 6 months after transplantation, the transplant volumes and bone mineral density were assessed by quantitative computed tomography. All of the transplants were harvested for hematoxylin and eosin staining 6 months later. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin transplants formed the greatest amounts of new bone among the four groups. The new bone formed an extensive union with the underlying maxilla in groups A, B, and C. Transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture retained the majority of their initial volume, whereas the transplants in the control group showed the highest absorption rate. Bone mineral density of transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture 6 months later was significantly higher than in the control group (p bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin mixed transplants. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the structure of new bones formed the best in group A. Both bone marrow

  5. Response of a phagocyte cell system to products of macrophage breakdown as a probable mechanism of alveolar phagocytosis adaptation to deposition of particles of different cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalova, L I; Katsnelson, B A; Osipenko, A B; Yushkov, B N; Babushkina, L G

    1980-04-01

    The adaptation of the alveolar phagocytosis response to the quantitative and qualitative features of dust deposited during inhalation consists not only in enhanced recruitment of alveolar macrophages (AM), but also in adding a more or less pronounced neutrophil leukocyte (NL) recruitment as an auxiliary participant of particle clearance. The NL contribution to clearance is especially typical for response to cytotoxic particles (quartz, in particular). An important feature of the adaptation considered is the limitation of the number of AM and NL recruited when an efficient clearance can be achieved by a lesser number of cells due to increased AM reistance to the damaging actin of phagocytized particles. The main mechanism providing the adequacy of the alveolar phagocytosis response is its self-regulation thrugh the products of macrophage breakdown (PMB). In a series of experiments with intraperitoneal and intratracheal injections of syngenetic PMB into rats and mice, it was shown that these products stimulate respiration and migration of phagocytic cells, their dose-dependent attraction to the site of PMB formation with the predominant NL contribution, increasing with the increase of amount of PMB, the AM and NL precursor cells recruitment from reserve pools, and the replenishment of these reserves in the process of hemopoiesis. At least some of the above effects are connected with the action of the lipid components of PMB. The action of specialized regulative systems of the organism can modify the response to PMB, judging by the results obtained by hydrocortisone injection. Autocontrol of alveolar phagocytosis requires great care in attempts at artificial stimulation of this process, as an excessive cell recruitment may promote the retention of particles in lungs.

  6. The velocities of type II solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlamicha, A.; Karlicky, M.

    1976-01-01

    A list is presented of type II radio bursts identified at Ondrejov between January 1973 and December 1974 in the frequency range of the dynamic spectrum 70 to 810 MHz. The velocities of shock waves in the individual cases of type II bursts are given using the fourfold Newkirk model. Some problems associated with type II radio bursts and with the propagation of the shock wave into the interplanetary space and into the region of the Earth are also discussed. (author)

  7. PKMiner: a database for exploring type II polyketide synthases

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Jinki; Yi Gwan-Su

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Bacterial aromatic polyketides are a pharmacologically important group of natural products synthesized by type II polyketide synthases (type II PKSs) in actinobacteria. Isolation of novel aromatic polyketides from microbial sources is currently impeded because of the lack of knowledge about prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis and the difficulties in finding and optimizing target microorganisms. Comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and the prediction of possible polyke...

  8. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO 3 . We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O 2 − ). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O 2 − may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O 2 − may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

  9. Self-dual nonsupersymmetric Type II String Compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachru, Shamit; Silverstein, Eva

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that certain nonsupersymmetric type II orbifolds have vanishing perturbative contributions to the cosmological constant. We show that techniques of Sen and Vafa allow one to construct dual type II descriptions of these models (some of which have no weakly coupled heterotic dual). The dual type II models are given by the same orbifolds with the string coupling S and a T 2 volume T exchanged. This allows us to argue that in various strongly coupled limits of the original type II models, there are weakly coupled duals which exhibit the same perturbative cancellations as the original models

  10. Nonlocal conductivity in type-II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mou, C.; Wortis, R.; Dorsey, A.T.; Huse, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Multiterminal transport measurements on YBa 2 Cu 2 O 7 crystals in the vortex liquid regime have shown nonlocal conductivity on length scales up to 50 microns. Motivated by these results we explore the wave vector (k) dependence of the dc conductivity tensor, σ μν (k), in the Meissner, vortex lattice, and disordered phases of a type-II superconductor. Our results are based on time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) theory and on phenomenological arguments. We find four qualitatively different types of behavior. First, in the Meissner phase, the conductivity is infinite at k=0 and is a continuous function of k, monotonically decreasing with increasing k. Second, in the vortex-lattice phase, in the absence of pinning, the conductivity is finite (due to flux flow) at k=0; it is discontinuous there and remains qualitatively like the Meissner phase for k>0. Third, in the vortex liquid regime in a magnetic field and at low temperature, the conductivity is finite, smooth and nonmonotonic, first increasing with k at small k and then decreasing at larger k. This third behavior is expected to apply at temperatures just above the melting transition of the vortex lattice, where the vortex liquid shows strong short-range order and a large viscosity. Finally, at higher temperatures in the disordered phase, the conductivity is finite, smooth and again monotonically decreasing with k. This last, monotonic behavior applies in zero magnetic field for the entire disordered phase, i.e., at all temperatures above T c , while in a field the nonmonotonic behavior may occur in a low-temperature portion of the disordered phase

  11. Type-II Superlattice Avalanche Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun

    Type-II superlattice avalanche photodiodes have shown advantages compared to conventional mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes for infrared wavelength detection. However, surface or interface leakage current has been a major issue for superlattice avalanche photodiodes, especially in infrared wavelength region. First, passivation of the superlattice device with ammonium sulfide and thioacetamide was carried out, and its surface quality was studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The study showed that both ammonium sulfide and thiacetamide passivation can actively remove the native oxide at the surface. Thiacetamide passivation combine more sulfur bonds with III-V elements than that of ammonium sulfide. Another X-ray photoelectron spectra of thiacetamide-treated atomic layer deposited zinc sulfide capped InAs/GaSb superlattice was performed to investigate the interface sulfur bond conditions. Sb--S and As--S bonds disappear while In-S bond gets enhanced, indicating that Indium Sulfide should be the major components at the interface after ZnS deposition. Second, the simulation of electrical characteristics for zinc sulfide, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide passivated superlattice devices was performed by SILVACO software to fit the experimental results and to discover the surface current mechanism. Different surface current mechanism strengths were found. Third, several novel dual-carrier avalanche photodiode structures were designed and simulated. The structures had alternate carrier multiplication regions, placed next to a wider electron multiplication region, creating dual-carrier multiplication feedback systems. Gain and excess noise factor of these structures were simulated and compared based on the dead space multiplication theory under uniform electric field. From the simulation, the applied bias can be greatly lowered or the thickness can be shrunk to achieve the same gain from the conventional device. The width of the thin region was the most

  12. Blockage of glycolysis by targeting PFKFB3 alleviates sepsis-related acute lung injury via suppressing inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuanqi; Lan, Haibing; Yu, Zhihong; Wang, Meng; Wang, Shu; Chen, Yu; Rao, Haiwei; Li, Jingying; Sheng, Zhiyong; Shao, Jianghua

    2017-09-16

    Sepsis-related acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive lung inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells resulting in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Recent studies indicated that anaerobic glycolysis play an important role in sepsis. However, whether inhibition of aerobic glycolysis exhibits beneficial effect on sepsis-induced ALI is not known. In vivo, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced ALI mouse model was set up and mice treated with glycolytic inhibitor 3PO after CLP. The mice treated with the 3PO ameliorated the survival rate, histopathological changes, lung inflammation, lactate increased and lung apoptosis of mice with CLP-induced sepsis. In vitro, the exposure of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in cell apoptosis, inflammatory cytokine production, enhanced glycolytic flux and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased. While these changes were attenuated by 3PO treatment. Sequentially, treatment of A549 cells with lactate caused cell apoptosis and enhancement of ROS. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly lowered LPS and lactate-induced the generation of ROS and cell apoptosis in A549 cells. Therefore, these results indicate that anaerobic glycolysis may be an important contributor in cell apoptosis of sepsis-related ALI. Moreover, LPS specifically induces apoptotic insults to A549 cell through lactate-mediated enhancement of ROS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pneumocystis carinii major surface glycoprotein induces interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release from a human alveolar epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Lundgren, Bettina; Shelhamer, J H

    1999-01-01

    (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from an alveolar epithelial cell line (A549). RESULTS: Incubation of A549 cells with MSG in concentrations from 0.4 to 10 microg mL-1 for 24 h caused dose-dependent increases in IL-8 release (3.4-fold above control, P ..., suggesting that MSG stimulates A549 cells in part through carbohydrate moieties. Dexamethasone significantly inhibited MSG-induced IL-8 release in concentrations of 10-6-10-8 mol L-1 compared with control experiments (P

  14. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehisa Yanagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic lung diseases involve AECs both as a frequent target of injury and as a driver of ongoing pathological processes. Aberrantly activated AECs express most of the growth factors and chemokines responsible for the proliferation, migration, and activation of fibroblasts. Current evidences suggest that AECs may acquire overdrive activation in the initial step of fibrosis by several mechanisms, including abnormal recapitulation of the developmental pathway, defects of the molecules essential for epithelial integrity, and acceleration of aging-related properties. Among these initial triggering events, epithelial Pten, a multiple phosphatase that negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway and is crucial for lung development, is essential for the prevention of alveolar flooding and lung fibrosis through the regulation of AEC barrier integrity after injury. Reestablishment of AEC barrier integrity also involves the deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells.

  15. In vitro nanoparticle toxicity to rat alveolar cells and coelomocytes from the earthworm Lumbricus rubelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der M.J.C.; Berg, van den J.H.J.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Haan, de L.H.J.; Ershov, D.S.; Fokkink, R.G.; Zuilhof, H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Brink, van den N.W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity of immune cells (coelomocytes) of Lumbricus rubellus earthworms was investigated for exposure to selected nanoparticles, in order to obtain further insight in mechanisms of effects observed after in vivo C60 exposure. In the in vivo study, tissue damage appeared to occur without

  16. Mitochondrial catalase overexpressed transgenic mice are protected against lung fibrosis in part via preventing alveolar epithelial cell mitochondrial DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Cheng, Yuan; Hogan, Erin; Yeldandi, Anjana; Chi, Monica; Piseaux, Raul; Ridge, Karen; Michael Hart, C; Chandel, Navdeep; Scott Budinger, G R; Kamp, David W

    2016-12-01

    Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury and mitochondrial dysfunction are important in the development of lung fibrosis. Our group has shown that in the asbestos exposed lung, the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AEC mediate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and apoptosis which are necessary for lung fibrosis. These data suggest that mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants should ameliorate asbestos-induced lung. To determine whether transgenic mice that express mitochondrial-targeted catalase (MCAT) have reduced lung fibrosis following exposure to asbestos or bleomycin and, if so, whether this occurs in association with reduced AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Crocidolite asbestos (100µg/50µL), TiO 2 (negative control), bleomycin (0.025 units/50µL), or PBS was instilled intratracheally in 8-10 week-old wild-type (WT - C57Bl/6J) or MCAT mice. The lungs were harvested at 21d. Lung fibrosis was quantified by collagen levels (Sircol) and lung fibrosis scores. AEC apoptosis was assessed by cleaved caspase-3 (CC-3)/Surfactant protein C (SFTPC) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and semi-quantitative analysis. AEC (primary AT2 cells from WT and MCAT mice and MLE-12 cells) mtDNA damage was assessed by a quantitative PCR-based assay, apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation, and ROS production was assessed by a Mito-Sox assay. Compared to WT, crocidolite-exposed MCAT mice exhibit reduced pulmonary fibrosis as measured by lung collagen levels and lung fibrosis score. The protective effects in MCAT mice were accompanied by reduced AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Similar findings were noted following bleomycin exposure. Euk-134, a mitochondrial SOD/catalase mimetic, attenuated MLE-12 cell DNA damage and apoptosis. Finally, compared to WT, asbestos-induced MCAT AT2 cell ROS production was reduced. Our finding that MCAT mice have reduced pulmonary fibrosis, AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis following exposure to asbestos or bleomycin suggests an important role

  17. The prevalence of microalbuminuria among patients with type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional community-based study was carried out to determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria among patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting, and to study the association between various risk factors and the presence of microalbuminuria. All patients with type II diabetes mellitus who ...

  18. Characterisation of cellular adhesion reinforcement by multiple bond force spectroscopy in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Minh; Angely, Christelle; Andre Dias, Sofia; Planus, Emmanuelle; Filoche, Marcel; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Isabey, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion is a key process by which cells physically connect with their environment, and express sensitivity and adaptation through mechanotransduction. A critical step of cell adhesion is the formation of the first bonds which individually generate weak contacts (∼tens pN) but can sustain thousand times higher forces (∼tens nN) when associated. We propose an experimental validation by multiple bond force spectroscopy (MFS) of a stochastic model predicting adhesion reinforcement permitted by non-cooperative, multiple bonds on which force is homogeneously distributed (called parallel bond configuration). To do so, spherical probes (diameter: 6.6 μm), specifically coated by RGD-peptide to bind integrins, are used to statically indent and homogenously stretch the multiple bonds created for short contact times (2 s) between the bead and the surface of epithelial cells (A549). Using different separation speeds (v = 2, 5, 10 μm/s) and measuring cellular Young's modulus as well as the local stiffness preceding local rupture events, we obtain cell-by-cell the effective loading rates both at the global cell level and at the local level of individual constitutive bonds. Local rupture forces are in the range: f*=60-115 pN , whereas global rupture (detachment) forces reach F*=0.8-1.7 nN . Global and local rupture forces both exhibit linear dependencies with the effective loading rate, the slopes of these two linear relationships providing an estimate of the number of independent integrin bonds constituting the tested multiple bond structure (∼12). The MFS method enables to validate the reinforcement of integrin-mediated adhesion induced by the multiple bond configuration in which force is homogeneously distributed amongst parallel bonds. Local rupture events observed in the course of a spectroscopy manoeuver (MFS) lead to rupture force values considered in the literature as single-integrin bonds. Adhesion reinforcement permitted by the parallel

  19. Recent Concepts of Ovarian Carcinogenesis: Type I and Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Koshiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I ovarian tumors, where precursor lesions in the ovary have clearly been described, include endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, low grade serous, and transitional cell carcinomas, while type II tumors, where such lesions have not been described clearly and tumors may develop de novo from the tubal and/or ovarian surface epithelium, comprise high grade serous carcinomas, undifferentiated carcinomas, and carcinosarcomas. The carcinogenesis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma (CCC arising from endometriotic cysts is significantly influenced by the free iron concentration, which is associated with cancer development through the induction of persistent oxidative stress. A subset of mucinous carcinomas develop in association with ovarian teratomas; however, the majority of these tumors do not harbor any teratomatous component. Other theories of their origin include mucinous metaplasia of surface epithelial inclusions, endometriosis, and Brenner tumors. Low grade serous carcinomas are thought to evolve in a stepwise fashion from benign serous cystadenoma to a serous borderline tumor (SBT. With regard to high grade serous carcinoma, the serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs of the junction of the fallopian tube epithelium with the mesothelium of the tubal serosa, termed the “tubal peritoneal junction” (TPJ, undergo malignant transformation due to their location, and metastasize to the nearby ovary and surrounding pelvic peritoneum. Other theories of their origin include the ovarian hilum cells.

  20. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections.

  1. Natural transformation of an engineered Helicobacter pylori strain deficient in type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Blaser, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems are important for bacteria to limit foreign DNA invasion. The naturally competent bacterium Helicobacter pylori has highly diverse strain-specific type II systems. To evaluate the roles of strain-specific restriction in H. pylori natural transformation, a markerless type II restriction endonuclease-deficient (REd) mutant was constructed. We deleted the genes encoding all four active type II restriction endonucleases in H. pylori strain 26695 using sacB-mediated counterselection. Transformation by donor DNA with exogenous cassettes methylated by Escherichia coli was substantially (1.7 and 2.0 log(10) for cat and aphA, respectively) increased in the REd strain. There also was significantly increased transformation of the REd strain by donor DNA from other H. pylori strains, to an extent corresponding to their shared type II R-M system strain specificity with 26695. Comparison of the REd and wild-type strains indicates that restriction did not affect the length of DNA fragment integration during natural transformation. There also were no differentials in cell growth or susceptibility to DNA damage. In total, the data indicate that the type II REd mutant has enhanced competence with no loss of growth or repair facility compared to the wild type, facilitating H. pylori mutant construction and other genetic engineering.

  2. Gene expression profiles of human dendritic cells interacting with Aspergillus fumigatus in a bilayer model of the alveolar epithelium/endothelium interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Oliver Morton

    Full Text Available The initial stages of the interaction between the host and Aspergillus fumigatus at the alveolar surface of the human lung are critical in the establishment of aspergillosis. Using an in vitro bilayer model of the alveolus, including both the epithelium (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line, A549 and endothelium (human pulmonary artery epithelial cells, HPAEC on transwell membranes, it was possible to closely replicate the in vivo conditions. Two distinct sub-groups of dendritic cells (DC, monocyte-derived DC (moDC and myeloid DC (mDC, were included in the model to examine immune responses to fungal infection at the alveolar surface. RNA in high quantity and quality was extracted from the cell layers on the transwell membrane to allow gene expression analysis using tailored custom-made microarrays, containing probes for 117 immune-relevant genes. This microarray data indicated minimal induction of immune gene expression in A549 alveolar epithelial cells in response to germ tubes of A. fumigatus. In contrast, the addition of DC to the system greatly increased the number of differentially expressed immune genes. moDC exhibited increased expression of genes including CLEC7A, CD209 and CCL18 in the absence of A. fumigatus compared to mDC. In the presence of A. fumigatus, both DC subgroups exhibited up-regulation of genes identified in previous studies as being associated with the exposure of DC to A. fumigatus and exhibiting chemotactic properties for neutrophils, including CXCL2, CXCL5, CCL20, and IL1B. This model closely approximated the human alveolus allowing for an analysis of the host pathogen interface that complements existing animal models of IA.

  3. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orona, N.S. [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D.R., E-mail: deborah.tasat@unsam.edu.ar [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, M. T. de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup −} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup −} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through

  4. Structural studies on a non toxic homologue of type II RIPs from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Each domain carries a carbohydrate binding site in type II RIPS of known structure. BGSL has a sugar binding site only on one domain, thus impairing its interaction at the cell surface. The adenine binding site in the catalytic chain is defective. Thus, defects in sugar binding as well as adenine binding appear to contribute to ...

  5. Chains of N=2, D=4 heterotic type II duals

    CERN Document Server

    Aldazabal, G; Font, A; Quevedo, Fernando

    1996-01-01

    We report on a search for N=2 heterotic strings that are dual candidates of type II compactifications on Calabi-Yau threefolds described as K3 fibrations. We find many new heterotic duals by using standard orbifold techniques. The associated type II compactifications fall into chains in which the proposed duals are heterotic compactifications related one another by a sequential Higgs mechanism. This breaking in the heterotic side typically involves the sequence SU(4)\\rightarrow SU(3)\\rightarrow SU(2)\\rightarrow 0, while in the type II side the weights of the complex hypersurfaces and the structure of the K3 quotient singularities also follow specific patterns.

  6. Biomarkers of Type II Synthetic Pyrethroid Pesticides in Freshwater Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilava Kaviraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type II synthetic pyrethroids contain an alpha-cyano group which renders them more neurotoxic than their noncyano type I counterparts. A wide array of biomarkers have been employed to delineate the toxic responses of freshwater fish to various type II synthetic pyrethroids. These include hematological, enzymatic, cytological, genetic, omic and other types of biomarkers. This review puts together the applications of different biomarkers in freshwater fish species in response to the toxicity of the major type II pyrethroid pesticides and assesses their present status, while speculating on the possible future directions.

  7. Cartilage turnover reflected by metabolic processing of type II collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Karoline Natasja Stæhr; Wang, Jianxia; Hoielt, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP....... To our knowledge this is the first assay, which is able to specifically evaluate PIIBNP excretion. The Pro-C2 assay seems to provide a promising and novel marker of type II collagen formation....

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuebao; Zhang, Kezhong

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes) or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes). Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper fu...

  9. Reduced Frizzled Receptor 4 Expression Prevents WNT/β-Catenin-driven Alveolar Lung Repair in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skronska-Wasek, Wioletta; Mutze, Kathrin; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Bracke, Ken R; Alsafadi, Hani N; Lehmann, Mareike; Costa, Rita; Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Novellino, Ettore; Brusselle, Guy G; Wagner, Darcy E; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Königshoff, Melanie

    2017-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular emphysema, is characterized by loss of parenchymal alveolar tissue and impaired tissue repair. Wingless and INT-1 (WNT)/β-catenin signaling is reduced in COPD; however, the mechanisms thereof, specifically the role of the frizzled (FZD) family of WNT receptors, remain unexplored. To identify and functionally characterize specific FZD receptors that control downstream WNT signaling in impaired lung repair in COPD. FZD expression was analyzed in lung homogenates and alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells of never-smokers, smokers, patients with COPD, and two experimental COPD models by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence. The functional effects of cigarette smoke on FZD4, WNT/β-catenin signaling, and elastogenic components were investigated in primary ATII cells in vitro and in three-dimensional lung tissue cultures ex vivo. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches were applied to determine the effects of FZD4 signaling on alveolar epithelial cell wound healing and repair, as well as on expression of elastogenic components. FZD4 expression was reduced in human and experimental COPD lung tissues as well as in primary human ATII cells from patients with COPD. Cigarette smoke exposure down-regulated FZD4 expression in vitro and in vivo, along with reduced WNT/β-catenin activity. Inhibition of FZD4 decreased WNT/β-catenin-driven epithelial cell proliferation and wound closure, and it interfered with ATII-to-ATI cell transdifferentiation and organoid formation, which were augmented by FZD4 overexpression. Moreover, FZD4 restoration by overexpression or pharmacological induction led to induction of WNT/β-catenin signaling and expression of elastogenic components in three-dimensional lung tissue cultures ex vivo. Reduced FZD4 expression in COPD contributes to impaired alveolar repair capacity.

  10. CT appearance of liver and gallbladder in type II diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingshan; Li Wei; Zhang Yuzhong; Zhao Xiuyi; Zhang Xuelin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT findings of liver and gallbladder in type II diabetics and to discuss diabetic, and investigate the correlation between type II diabetics, and investigate the correlation between the diabetes and the lesions found in the liver or gallbladder. Methods: Retrospective analysis was made on the CT findings of hepatic and gallbladder lesions in 586 cases of II diabetes. Results: In total 586 type II diabetics, cholecystitis and/or gallstone were revealed in 33.45% patients; and hepatic alteration was noted in 20.48% cases. Hepatic abnormalities were found in 58.67% cases in the cholecystitis/gallstone group, significantly different from the group with unremarkable gallbladder, in which hepatic lesions were found only in 1.28% cases. Conclusion: The hepatic alteration is secondary to the gallbladder lesions in type II diabetics. (authors)

  11. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type II change single protein building blocks ( amino acids ) in the protein sequence. If either protein is altered, they may be more likely to cluster together and form clumps (aggregates). Aggregates of heat shock proteins may ...

  12. PKMiner: a database for exploring type II polyketide synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jinki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial aromatic polyketides are a pharmacologically important group of natural products synthesized by type II polyketide synthases (type II PKSs in actinobacteria. Isolation of novel aromatic polyketides from microbial sources is currently impeded because of the lack of knowledge about prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis and the difficulties in finding and optimizing target microorganisms. Comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and the prediction of possible polyketide chemotypes in various actinobacterial genomes will thus enable the discovery or synthesis of novel polyketides in the most plausible microorganisms. Description We performed a comprehensive computational analysis of type II PKSs and their gene clusters in actinobacterial genomes. By identifying type II PKS subclasses from the sequence analysis of 280 known type II PKSs, we developed highly accurate domain classifiers for these subclasses and derived prediction rules for aromatic polyketide chemotypes generated by different combinations of type II PKS domains. Using 319 available actinobacterial genomes, we predicted 231 type II PKSs from 40 PKS gene clusters in 25 actinobacterial genomes, and polyketide chemotypes corresponding to 22 novel PKS gene clusters in 16 genomes. These results showed that the microorganisms capable of producing aromatic polyketides are specifically distributed within a certain suborder of Actinomycetales such as Catenulisporineae, Frankineae, Micrococcineae, Micromonosporineae, Pseudonocardineae, Streptomycineae, and Streptosporangineae. Conclusions We could identify the novel candidates of type II PKS gene clusters and their polyketide chemotypes in actinobacterial genomes by comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and prediction of aromatic polyketides. The genome analysis results indicated that the specific suborders in actinomycetes could be used as prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis. The chemotype-prediction rules with

  13. PKMiner: a database for exploring type II polyketide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinki; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2012-08-08

    Bacterial aromatic polyketides are a pharmacologically important group of natural products synthesized by type II polyketide synthases (type II PKSs) in actinobacteria. Isolation of novel aromatic polyketides from microbial sources is currently impeded because of the lack of knowledge about prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis and the difficulties in finding and optimizing target microorganisms. Comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and the prediction of possible polyketide chemotypes in various actinobacterial genomes will thus enable the discovery or synthesis of novel polyketides in the most plausible microorganisms. We performed a comprehensive computational analysis of type II PKSs and their gene clusters in actinobacterial genomes. By identifying type II PKS subclasses from the sequence analysis of 280 known type II PKSs, we developed highly accurate domain classifiers for these subclasses and derived prediction rules for aromatic polyketide chemotypes generated by different combinations of type II PKS domains. Using 319 available actinobacterial genomes, we predicted 231 type II PKSs from 40 PKS gene clusters in 25 actinobacterial genomes, and polyketide chemotypes corresponding to 22 novel PKS gene clusters in 16 genomes. These results showed that the microorganisms capable of producing aromatic polyketides are specifically distributed within a certain suborder of Actinomycetales such as Catenulisporineae, Frankineae, Micrococcineae, Micromonosporineae, Pseudonocardineae, Streptomycineae, and Streptosporangineae. We could identify the novel candidates of type II PKS gene clusters and their polyketide chemotypes in actinobacterial genomes by comprehensive analysis of type II PKSs and prediction of aromatic polyketides. The genome analysis results indicated that the specific suborders in actinomycetes could be used as prolific taxa for polyketide synthesis. The chemotype-prediction rules with the suggested type II PKS modules derived using this resource

  14. TNF-α increases Staphylococcus aureus-induced death of human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 associated with RIP3-mediated necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shun-Hang; Lin, Luo-Na; Wu, Hu-Jun; Yu, Lu; Lin, Li; Zhu, Li-Li; Li, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Li, Chang-Chong

    2018-02-15

    To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on Staphylococcus aureus-induced necroptosis in alveolar epithelial cells. The A549 alveolar epithelial cell line was pretreated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against receptor interacting protein-3 (RIP3) and then stimulated by S. aureus, where some cells were pretreated with TNF-α or TNF-α with anti-TNF-α antibody simultaneously. A549 cell death was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and flow cytometry analyses. The protein expressions of RIP1, RIP3, cleaved caspase-1, and cleaved caspase-8 were analyzed by western blot. S. aureus-induced LDH release was increased significantly by TNF-α. In addition, flow cytometry showed that TNF-α increased A549 cell apoptosis and necrosis in S. aureus-infected cell cultures. Levels of RIP3 and cleaved caspase-1 protein in A549 cells infected with S. aureus increased at 12 h post-infection, as shown by western blot. Significant additional increases in RIP3 expression were observed following the addition of TNF-α. Decreasing RIP3 levels by siRNA significantly suppressed the release of LDH induced by TNF-α and S. aureus. RIP3 siRNA also significantly suppressed A549 cell necrosis induced by S. aureus and TNF-α at 6 and 12 h post-infection as shown by flow cytometry analysis. TNF-α enhances the damage of S. aureus on lung epithelial cells, and its mechanism is associated with RIP3 mediated necroptosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Significance of type II fiber atrophy in chronic alcoholic myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Solá, J; Sacanella, E; Estruch, R; Nicolás, J M; Grau, J M; Urbano-Márquez, A

    1995-05-01

    To determine the significance of type II fiber atrophy in alcoholic myopathy and its relationship with ethanol-related diseases a prospective study was carried out in 100 chronic alcoholics who showed clinical suspicion of skeletal myopathy. Measurement of muscle strength, laboratory analysis, nutritional assessment and open biopsy of deltoid muscle were performed in each case, as well as electrophysiological testing for peripheral neuropathy. Hepatic ultrasonography and liver biopsy, echocardiography and radionuclide cardiac scanning were carried out in selected subjects. According to histomorphometric analysis, type II fiber atrophy was found in 33 cases (33%), being selective for type II B fiber in 23 (70%). Skeletal myopathy was diagnosed in 61 cases, alcoholic cardiomyopathy in 26, peripheral neuropathy in 23 and cirrhosis in 12. Patients with type II fiber atrophy had a significantly higher total lifetime dose of ethanol, presented a greater incidence of skeletal myopathy and peripheral neuropathy, and exhibited significantly lower values of percentage of ideal body weight and lean body mass than their counterparts. However, the only independent factors for developing type II fiber atrophy were the coexistence of caloric malnutrition (p = 0.004) and the presence of skeletal myopathy (p = 0.043). Selective type II fiber atrophy is a non-specific finding in alcohol-induced muscle damage appearing, overall, in the patients with caloric malnutrition as well as in those with histologic evidence of myopathy.

  16. Antioxidant activity of pomegranate juice reduces emphysematous changes and injury secondary to cigarette smoke in an animal model and human alveolar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husari A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad Husari,1,* Yasmine Hashem,1 Hala Bitar,1 Ghassan Dbaibo,2,3 Ghazi Zaatari,4 Marwan El Sabban5,* 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 5Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Cigarette smoke (CS increases oxidative stress (OS in the lungs. Pomegranate juice (PJ possesses potent antioxidant activities, attributed to its polyphenols. This study investigates the effects of PJ on the damaging effects of CS in an animal model and on cultured human alveolar cells (A549. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into the following groups: Control, CS, CS + PJ, and PJ. Acute CS exposure was for 3 days, while chronic exposure was for 1 and 3 months (5 days of exposure/week. PJ groups received daily 80 µmol/kg via bottle, while other groups received distilled water. At the end of the experiments, different parameters were studied: 1 expression levels of inflammatory markers, 2 apoptosis, 3 OS, and 4 histopathological changes. In vitro, A549 cells were pretreated for 48 hours with either PJ (0.5 µM or vehicle. Cells were then exposed to increasing concentrations of CS extracted from collected filters. Cell viability was assessed by counting of live and dead cells with trypan blue staining. Results: Acutely, a significant increase in interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α expression, apoptosis, and OS was noted in CS when compared to Control. PJ significantly attenuated the expression of inflammatory mediators, apoptosis, and OS. Chronically (at 1 and 3 months, increased expression of TNF-α was observed, and lung sections

  17. Differentiation and cytokine synthesis of human alveolar osteoblasts compared to osteoblast-like cells (MG63) in response to titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch-fan, Xiaohui; Qu, Zhe; Wieland, Marco; Matejka, Michael; Schedle, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different implant surface topographies and chemistries on the expression of differentiation/proliferation markers on MG63 cells and primary human alveolar osteoblasts. Hydrophobic acid-etched (A) and hydrophobic coarse-grit-blasted, acid-etched (SLA) surfaces and hydrophilic acid-etched (modA) and hydrophilic coarse-grit-blasted (modSLA) surfaces were produced. Thereby, modA and modSLA surfaces were rinsed under nitrogen protection and stored in a sealed glass tube containing isotonic NaCl solution at pH 4-6. Tissue culture plates without specimens served as controls. The behavior of MG63 cells and primary human alveolar osteoblasts (AOB) grown on all surfaces was compared through determination of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, cell proliferation ((3)H-thymidin incorporation, MTT colorimetric assay) and expression of osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta(1)) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), detected with commercial available test kits. Proliferation of MG63 and primary cells was highest on controls, followed by A surfaces, modA and SLA surfaces being almost on the same level and lowest on modSLA surfaces. modSLA surfaces exhibited highest ALP and OC production, followed by SLA, modA and A surfaces. Proliferation and OC production were comparable for MG63 cells and AOB. OPG, TGF-beta(1) and VEGF produced on primary cells showed a slightly different rank order on different surfaces compared to MG63 cells. modSLA still showed the highest production of OPG, TGF-beta(1) and VEGF, but was followed by modA, SLA and A. Statistical significance was checked by ANOVA (pmodA surfaces showed enhanced expression of OPG, TGF-beta(1) and VEGF on MG63 cells compared to primary human alveolar osteoblasts. Overall, the lowest proliferation rates and the highest expressions of differentiation markers and growth factor productions were observed on modSLA.

  18. Müllerian inhibiting substance type II receptor (MISIIR): a novel, tissue-specific target expressed by gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N; Aletti, Giovanni; Lewis, Kriste A; Keeney, Gary L; Thomas, Bijoy M; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Cliby, William A

    2008-01-01

    Müllerian inhibiting substance type II receptor (MISIIR) is expressed by ovarian, breast, and prostate cancers [Masiakos PT, et al. Human ovarian cancer, cell lines, and primary ascites cells express the human Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) Type II Receptor, bind, and are responsive to MIS. Clin Cancer Res 1999;5:3488-99; Hoshiya Y, et al. Mullerian inhibiting substance promotes interferon {gamma}-induced gene expression and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. J Biol Chem 2003;278:51703-12; Hoshiya Y, et al. Mullerian inhibiting substance induces NFkB signaling in breast and prostate cancer cells. Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 2003;211:43-9. [1-3

  19. Genetic manipulation of individual somatic mammary cells in vivo reveals a master role of STAT5a in inducing alveolar fate commitment and lactogenesis even in the absence of ovarian hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Tong, Tammy; Reynado, Amanda M; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Huang, Shixia; Li, Yi

    2010-10-15

    Assessing the molecular control of development and cell fate in individual cells in the intact mammary epithelium has not been possible to date. By exploiting an intraductal retrovirus (RCAS)-mediated gene delivery method to introduce a marker gene, we found that ductal epithelial cells are turned over with a half time of approximately 1month in adult virgin mice. However, following RCAS-mediated introduction of a constitutively activated STAT5a (caSTAT5a), caSTAT5a-activated ductal epithelial cells expand and replace other cells in the epithelium, eventually forming a mammary gland resembling that in a late pregnant mouse, suggesting that STAT5a activation alone is sufficient to mediate pregnancy-induced mammary cell expansion, alveolar cell fate commitment, and lactogenesis. Furthermore, such caSTAT5a-induced alveolar differentiation does not require ovarian functions, although caSTAT5a-induced cell proliferation is partly reduced in ovariectomized mice. In conclusion, in this first report of studying the developmental role of a gene in a few cells in a normally developed virgin mammary ductal tree, STAT5a activation causes alveolar fate commitment and lactogenesis, and with the help of ovarian hormones, drives alveolar expansion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteinosis alveolar pulmonar Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Sánchez Infante

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La proteinosis alveolar pulmonar es una enfermedad respiratoria crónica, caracterizada por alteración en el metabolismo del surfactante, lo que determina su acumulación anormal en el espacio alveolar. Es una enfermedad extremadamente rara. Se han reportado solamente 500 casos en la literatura. Se describió por primera vez en 1958. Se presenta un caso de proteinosis alveolar pulmonar en un lactante de 2 meses, con desnutrición proteico energética, que ingresa por dificultad respiratoria e hipoxemia, y, con imágenes radiológicas de tipo retículo-nodulillar, en vidrio deslustrado, en el cual se plantea inicialmente el diagnóstico de bronconeumonía. Ante la evolución desfavorable y no respuesta al tratamiento, se realizó un estudio para descartar enfermedades pulmonares crónicas. El paciente fallece y se confirma el diagnóstico por anatomía patológica. Se realiza una revisión del tema.The pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by surfactant metabolism alteration determining its abnormal accumulation in the alveolar space. It is a disease very rare and in literature only 500 cases have been reported; it was described for the first time in 1958. This is a case presentation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in an infant aged 2 months with energetic protein malnutrition admitted due to respiratory difficulty and hypoxemia and with radiologic images of the reticulonodulillary, in frosting glass, where initially is made the diagnosis of bronchopneumonia. In the face of unfavorable evolution and no response to treatment, a study was conducted to rule out chronic pulmonary diseases. Patient died confirming the diagnosis according to the pathologic anatomy. A review on subject is carried out.

  1. Dentin phosphoprotein gene locus is not associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, M.; Zeichner-David, M.; Davis, A.; Slavkin, H. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Murray, J. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Crall, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is an autosomal dominant inherited dental disease which affects dentin production and mineralization. Genetic linkage studies have been performed on several multigeneration informative kindreds. These studies determined linkage between DGI types II and III and group-specific component (vitamin D-binding protein). This gene locus has been localized to the long arm of human chromosome 4 in the region 4q11-q21. Although this disease has been mapped to chromosome 4, the defective gene product is yet to be determined. Biochemical studies have suggested abnormal levels of dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) associated with DGI type II. This highly acidic protein is the major noncollagenous component of dentin, being solely expressed by the ectomesenchymal derived odontoblast cells of the tooth. The purpose of the present study was to establish whether DPP is associated with DGI types II and III, by using molecular biology techniques. The results indicated that DPP is not localized to any region of human chromosome 4, thus suggesting that the DPP gene is not directly associated with DGI type II or DGI type III. The data do not exclude the possibility that other proteins associated with DPP posttranslational modifications might be responsible for this genetic disease.

  2. Enhanced Materials Based on Submonolayer Type-II Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamargo, Maria C [City College of New York, NY (United States); Kuskovsky, Igor L. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States) Queens College; Meriles, Carlos [City College of New York, NY (United States); Noyan, Ismail C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2017-04-15

    We have investigated a nanostructured material known as sub-monolayer type-II QDs, made from wide bandgap II-VI semiconductors. Our goal is to understand and exploit their tunable optical and electrical properties by taking advantage of the type-II band alignment and quantum confinement effects. Type-II ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) in a ZnSe host are particularly interesting because of their relatively large valence band and conduction band offsets. In the current award we have developed new materials based on sub-monolayer type-II QDs that may be advantageous for photovoltaic and spintronics applications. We have also expanded the structural characterization of these materials by refining the X-ray diffraction methodologies needed to investigate them. In particular, we have 1) demonstrated ZnCdTe/ZnCdSe type-II QDs materials that have ideal properties for the development of novel high efficiency “intermediate band solar cells”, 2) we developed a comprehensive approach to describe and model the growth of these ultra-small type-II QDs, 3) analysis of the evolution of the photoluminescence (PL) emission, combined with other characterization probes allowed us to predict the size and density of the QDs as a function of the growth conditions, 4) we developed and implemented novel sophisticated X-ray diffraction techniques from which accurate size and shape of the buried type-II QDs could be extracted, 5) a correlation of the shape anisotropy with polarization dependent PL was observed, confirming the QDs detailed shape and providing insight about the effects of this shape anisotropy on the physical properties of the type-II QD systems, and 6) a detailed “time-resolved Kerr rotation” investigation has led to the demonstration of enhanced electron spin lifetimes for the samples with large densities of type-II QDs and an understanding of the interplay between the QDs and Te-isoelectroic centers, a defect that forms in the spacer layers that separate the QDs.

  3. A Statistical Study of Interplanetary Type II Bursts: STEREO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Magdalenic, J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kruparova, O.; Szabo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the primary cause of the most severe and disruptive space weather events such as solar energetic particle (SEP) events and geomagnetic storms at Earth. Interplanetary type II bursts are generated via the plasma emission mechanism by energetic electrons accelerated at CME-driven shock waves and hence identify CMEs that potentially cause space weather impact. As CMEs propagate outward from the Sun, radio emissions are generated at progressively at lower frequencies corresponding to a decreasing ambient solar wind plasma density. We have performed a statistical study of 153 interplanetary type II bursts observed by the two STEREO spacecraft between March 2008 and August 2014. These events have been correlated with manually-identified CMEs contained in the Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service (HELCATS) catalogue. Our results confirm that faster CMEs are more likely to produce interplanetary type II radio bursts. We have compared observed frequency drifts with white-light observations to estimate angular deviations of type II burst propagation directions from radial. We have found that interplanetary type II bursts preferably arise from CME flanks. Finally, we discuss a visibility of radio emissions in relation to the CME propagation direction.

  4. Anomalous Nernst effect in type-II Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhodip; Tewari, Sumanta

    2018-01-01

    Topological Weyl semimetals (WSM), a new state of quantum matter with gapless nodal bulk spectrum and open Fermi arc surface states, have recently sparked enormous interest in condensed matter physics. Based on the symmetry and fermiology, it has been proposed that WSMs can be broadly classified into two types, type-I and type-II Weyl semimetals. While the undoped, conventional, type-I WSMs have point like Fermi surface and vanishing density of states (DOS) at the Fermi energy, the type-II Weyl semimetals break Lorentz symmetry explicitly and have tilted conical spectra with electron and hole pockets producing finite DOS at the Fermi level. The tilted conical spectrum and finite DOS at Fermi level in type-II WSMs have recently been shown to produce interesting effects such as a chiral anomaly induced longitudinal magnetoresistance that is strongly anisotropic in direction and a novel anomalous Hall effect. In this work, we consider the anomalous Nernst effect in type-II WSMs in the absence of an external magnetic field using the framework of semi-classical Boltzmann theory. Based on both a linearized model of time-reversal breaking WSM with a higher energy cut-off and a more realistic lattice model, we show that the anomalous Nernst response in these systems is strongly anisotropic in space, and can serve as a reliable signature of type-II Weyl semimetals in a host of magnetic systems with spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry.

  5. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  6. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone type II (GnRH-II) agonist regulates the invasiveness of endometrial cancer cells through the GnRH-I receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hsien-Ming; Wang, Hsin-Shih; Huang, Hong-Yuan; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Lee, Chyi-Long; Soong, Yung-Kuei; Leung, Peter CK

    2013-01-01

    More than 25% of patients diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma have an invasive primary cancer accompanied by metastases. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays an important role in reproduction. In mammals, expression of GnRH-II is higher than GnRH-I in reproductive tissues. Here, we examined the effect of a GnRH-II agonist on the motility of endometrial cancer cells and its mechanism of action in endometrial cancer therapy. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to determine the expression of the GnRH-I receptor protein in human endometrial cancer. The activity of MMP-2 in the conditioned medium was determined by gelatin zymography. Cell motility was assessed by invasion and migration assay. GnRH-I receptor si-RNA was applied to knockdown GnRH-I receptor. The GnRH-I receptor was expressed in the endometrial cancer cells. The GnRH-II agonist promoted cell motility in a dose-dependent manner. The GnRH-II agonist induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, and the phosphorylation was abolished by ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and the JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Cell motility promoted by GnRH-II agonist was suppressed in cells that were pretreated with U0126 and SP600125. Moreover, U0126 and SP600125 abolished the GnRH-II agonist-induced activation of MMP-2. The inhibition of MMP-2 with MMP-2 inhibitor (OA-Hy) suppressed the increase in cell motility in response to the GnRH-II agonist. Enhanced cell motility mediated by GnRH-II agonist was also suppressed by the knockdown of the endogenous GnRH-I receptor using siRNA. Our study indicates that GnRH-II agonist promoted cell motility of endometrial cancer cells through the GnRH-I receptor via the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, and the subsequent, MAPK-dependent activation of MMP-2. Our findings represent a new concept regarding the mechanism of GnRH-II-induced cell motility in endometrial cancer cells and suggest the possibility of exploring GnRH-II as a potential therapeutic target for the

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM, a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes. Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper function of insulin signaling. Accumulating evidence suggests that deleterious ER stress and excessive intracellular lipids in nonadipose tissues, such as myocyte, cardiomyocyte, and hepatocyte, cause pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance, leading to type II diabetes. The excessive deposition of lipid droplets (LDs in specialized cell types, such as adipocytes, hepatocytes, and macrophages, has been found as a hallmark in ER stress-associated metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis. However, much work remains to be done in understanding the mechanism by which ER stress response regulates LD formation and the pathophysiologic role of ER stress-associated LD in metabolic disease. This paper briefly summarizes the recent advances in ER stress-associated LD formation and its involvement in type II diabetes.

  8. Effects of a putty-form hydroxyapatite matrix combined with the synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 on alveolar ridge preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Rodrigo F; Tsao, Yi-Pin; Eber, Robert; Shotwell, Jeffrey; Billy, Edward; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2008-02-01

    Various grafting materials have been used for preservation of the dimensions of the residual alveolar ridge following tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical, histomorphometric, and radiographic healing 4 months after tooth extraction with or without placement of a putty-form anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix combined with a synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 (Putty P15) to determine the effect on alveolar ridge preservation following exodontia. Twenty-four consecutive subjects in need of extraction of maxillary premolars were recruited. Recruited subjects were randomly assigned to the test (Putty P15 and bioabsorbable collagen wound dressing material) or control (bioabsorbable collagen wound dressing material only) group. Data were recorded at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after ridge preservation procedures. At 16 weeks, a reentry surgery was performed, clinical measurements were repeated, and bone core biopsies were obtained for histomorphometric analysis prior to dental implant placement. The control group had a mean reduction in ridge height of -0.56 +/- 1.04 mm, whereas alveolar ridge height appeared to remain unchanged in the test group (0.15 +/- 1.76). The test group showed a mean reduction in ridge width of -1.31 +/- 0.96 mm, whereas the mean value for the control group was -1.43 +/- 1.05 mm. No statistical significance was observed between the groups. Mean bone density was significantly superior in the test group (2.08 +/- 0.65 versus 3.33 +/- 0.65). Histomorphometric analyses revealed similar percentages of bone vitality (test: 29.92% +/- 8.46%; control: 36.54% +/- 7.73%). Comparable percentages of bone marrow and fibrous tissue also were observed (test: 65.25% +/- 6.41%; control: 62.67% +/- 7.41%). Only 6.25% of the Putty P15 particles remained at 4 months in the analyzed biopsies. A favorable response was observed when Putty P15 was applied to extraction sockets, suggesting that it may be useful for alveolar ridge

  9. Effect of Emdogain enamel matrix derivative and BMP-2 on the gene expression and mineralized nodule formation of alveolar bone proper-derived stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim M; Dörfer, Christof; Ungefroren, Hendrick; Kassem, Neemat; Wiltfang, Jörg; Paris, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Emdogain (Enamel Matrix Derivative, EMD) and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2), either solely or in combination, on the gene expression and mineralized nodule formation of alveolar bone proper-derived stem/progenitor cells. Stem/progenitor cells were isolated from human alveolar bone proper, magnetically sorted using STRO-1 antibodies, characterized flowcytometrically for their surface markers' expression, and examined for colony formation and multilineage differentiation potential. Subsequently, cells were treated over three weeks with 100 μg/ml Emdogain (EMD-Group), or 100 ng/ml BMP-2 (BMP-Group), or a combination of 100 ng/ml BMP-2 and 100 μg/ml Emdogain (BMP/EMD-Group). Unstimulated stem/progenitor cells (MACS(+)-Group) and osteoblasts (OB-Group) served as controls. Osteogenic gene expression was analyzed using RTq-PCR after 1, 2 and 3 weeks (N = 3/group). Mineralized nodule formation was evaluated by Alizarin-Red staining. BMP and EMD up-regulated the osteogenic gene expression. The BMP Group showed significantly higher expression of Collagen-I, III, and V, Alkaline phosphatase and Osteonectin compared to MACS(+)- and OB-Group (p Emdogain and BMP-2 up-regulate the osteogenic gene expression of stem/progenitor cells. The combination of BMP-2 and Emdogain showed no additive effect and would not be recommended for a combined clinical stimulation. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Type II see-saw dominance in SO(10)

    CERN Document Server

    Melfo, Alejandra; Senjanovic, Goran

    2010-01-01

    Grand unified theories where the neutrino mass is given by Type II seesaw have the potential to provide interesting connections between the neutrino and charged fermion sectors. We explore the possibility of having a dominant Type II seesaw contribution in supersymmetric SO(10). We show that this can be achieved in the model where symmetry breaking is triggered by 54 and 45-dimensional representations, without the need for additional fields other than those already required to have a realistic charged fermion mass spectrum. Physical consequences, such as the implementation of the BSV mechanism, the possibility of the fields responsible for Type II see-saw dominance being messengers of supersymmetry breaking, and the realization of baryo and leptogenesis in this theories are discussed.

  11. The Omega-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates Inflammatory Mediator Release in Human Alveolar Cells Exposed to Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid of ARDS Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cotogni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study investigated whether the 1 : 2 ω-3/ω-6 ratio may reduce proinflammatory response in human alveolar cells (A549 exposed to an ex vivo inflammatory stimulus (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS patients. Methods. We exposed A549 cells to the BALF collected from 12 ARDS patients. After 18 hours, fatty acids (FA were added as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, ω-3 and arachidonic acid (AA, ω-6 in two ratios (1 : 2 or 1 : 7. 24 hours later, in culture supernatants were evaluated cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and prostaglandins (PGE2 and PGE3 release. The FA percentage content in A549 membrane phospholipids, content of COX-2, level of PPARγ, and NF-κB binding activity were determined. Results. The 1 : 2 DHA/AA ratio reversed the baseline predominance of ω-6 over ω-3 in the cell membranes (P < 0.001. The proinflammatory cytokine release was reduced by the 1 : 2 ratio (P < 0.01 to <0.001 but was increased by the 1 : 7 ratio (P < 0.01. The 1 : 2 ratio reduced COX-2 and PGE2 (P < 0.001 as well as NF-κB translocation into the nucleus (P < 0.01, while it increased activation of PPARγ and IL-10 release (P < 0.001. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that shifting the FA supply from ω-6 to ω-3 decreased proinflammatory mediator release in human alveolar cells exposed to BALF of ARDS patients.

  12. First-in-human study and clinical case reports of the alveolar bone regeneration with the secretome from human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Kawai, Takamasa; Hibi, Hideharu

    2016-01-15

    Secreted growth factors and cytokines in the conditioned medium from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) have several effects on cell behavior. Our previous studies revealed that MSC-CM enhances bone regeneration by increasing cell mobilization, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. This clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the safety and use of MSC-CM for alveolar bone regeneration in eight patients who were diagnosed as needing bone augmentation prior to dental implant placement. The protocol of this clinical study was approved by the ethics committee of Nagoya University Hospital. MSC-CM was prepared from conditioned medium from commercially available human bone marrow-derived MSCs. Patients were treated with beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) or an atelocollagen sponge soaked with MSC-CM. Clinical and radiographic assessments were performed during the follow-up period. Histological assessments were also performed in some cases. Clinical and histological data from patients who underwent the SFE procedure without MSC-CM were also used retrospectively as reference controls. MSC-CM contained several cytokines such as insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1, and hepatocyte growth factor in relatively low amounts. No systemic or local complications were reported throughout the study. Radiographic evaluation revealed early bone formation in all cases. Histological evaluation also supported the radiographic findings. Furthermore, infiltration of inflammatory cells was scarce throughout the specimens. MSC-CM was used safely and with less inflammatory signs and appears to have great osteogenic potential for regenerative medicine of bone. This is the first in-human clinical study of alveolar bone regeneration using MSC-CM.

  13. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (Pniacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  14. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Alveolocapillary model system to study alveolar re-epithelialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, Coen H.M.P.; Zimmermann, Luc J.I.; Sanders, Patricia J.L.T.; Wagendorp, Margot; Kloosterboer, Nico [Department of Paediatrics, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem [Division of Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Duimel, Hans J.Q.; Verheyen, Fons K.C.P. [Electron Microscopy Unit, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Iwaarden, J. Freek van, E-mail: f.vaniwaarden@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Paediatrics, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    In the present study an in vitro bilayer model system of the pulmonary alveolocapillary barrier was established to investigate the role of the microvascular endothelium on re-epithelialization. The model system, confluent monolayer cultures on opposing sides of a porous membrane, consisted of a human microvascular endothelial cell line (HPMEC-ST1.6R) and an alveolar type II like cell line (A549), stably expressing EGFP and mCherry, respectively. These fluorescent proteins allowed the real time assessment of the integrity of the monolayers and the automated analysis of the wound healing process after a scratch injury. The HPMECs significantly attenuated the speed of re-epithelialization, which was associated with the proximity to the A549 layer. Examination of cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the model system revealed protrusions through the membrane pores and close contact between the A549 cells and the HPMECs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that these close contacts consisted of heterocellular gap-, tight- and adherens-junctions. Additional analysis, using a fluorescent probe to assess gap-junctional communication, revealed that the HPMECs and A549 cells were able to exchange the fluorophore, which could be abrogated by disrupting the gap junctions using connexin mimetic peptides. These data suggest that the pulmonary microvascular endothelium may impact the re-epithelialization process. -- Highlights: ► Model system for vital imaging and high throughput screening. ► Microvascular endothelium influences re-epithelialization. ► A549 cells form protrusions through membrane to contact HPMEC. ► A549 cells and HPMECs form heterocellular tight-, gap- and adherens-junctions.

  16. Thyroid hormone is required for the pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the mouse cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Srividya; Balasubbu, Suganthalakshmi; Mustapha, Mirna

    2015-01-01

    Afferent connections to the sensory inner and outer hair cells in the cochlea refine and functionally mature during the thyroid hormone (TH)- critical period of inner ear development that occurs perinatally in rodents. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypothyroidism on afferent type II innervation to outer hair cells (OHCs) using the Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1dw). Using a transgenic approach to specifically label type II spiral ganglion neurons, we found that a lack of TH causes persistence of excess type II SGN connections to the OHCs, as well as continued expression of the hair cell functional marker, otoferlin, in the OHCs beyond the maturation period. We also observed a concurrent delay in efferent attachment to the OHCs. Supplementing with TH during the early postnatal period from postnatal day (P) 3 to P4 reversed the defect in type II SGN pruning but did not alter otoferlin expression. Our results show that hypothyroidism causes a defect in the large-scale pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea, and a delay in efferent attachment and the maturation of otoferlin expression. Our data suggest that the state of maturation of hair cells, as determined by otoferlin expression, may not regulate the pruning of their afferent innervation. PMID:26592716

  17. Mucosal tolerance and suppression of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) induced by nasal inhalation of synthetic peptide 184-198 of bovine type II collagen (CII) expressing a dominant T cell epitope

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAINES, N. A.; HARPER, N.; WARD, F. J.; MALMSTRÖM, V.; HOLMDAHL, R.; BANSAL, S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to map the dominant T cell epitope of the CB11 sequence of CII in RT1u haplotype rats and to determine if, when used as a synthetic peptide, it would induce tolerance to protect against CIA. A dominant epitope corresponding to residues 184-198 included in the sequence of the CB11 fragment of bovine CII was identified in proliferation assay using peptides in an epitope scanning system using synthetic peptides of 15 amino acids, overlapping by 12 amino acids. This epitope is bovine-specific, but cross-reacts with the corresponding rat peptide. Minor epitopes in the bovine CB11 sequence were also autoantigenic. Use of independently synthesized and purified 184-198 peptide confirmed its dominance in the T cell responses of arthritic rats. The peptide itself was not arthritogenic. Cells from lymph nodes draining arthritic feet were particularly responsive to the dominant peptide sequence, and showed evidence of epitope spreading to include reactions to at least four subdominant epitopes. Mucosal tolerance was successfully induced by instilling CII into the nose of rats before induction of CIA; this was found to delay the onset of disease, reduce mean disease severity, shift the anti-CII antibody response to favour antibodies of the IgGl, rather than the IgG2b isiotype, and to reduce T cell reactivity to both CII and to the 184-198 peptide. The dominant 184-198 peptide itself had the same tolerogenic effects when given nasally to rats daily, on the 4 days immediately preceding the induction of CIA. Two forms of CIA with acute and delayed disease onset were each modified by pre-treatment with the peptide. This study demonstrates that mucosal tolerance to CII can be induced by delivering it nasally in a way similar to that achieved previously by oral delivery, and that the use of an immunodominant epitope contained in a synthetic peptide will also suppress the immunologic and arthritic responses to collagen. PMID:8608633

  18. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report | Ayadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy ...

  19. A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiac and cerebrovascular illnesses are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Thromboembolisms, which are the result of cardiac arrhythmia, are important causes of ischemic stroke. In this study, we present a rare case of multicentric ischemic stroke induced by Mobitz type II atrioventricular block. The Pan African ...

  20. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  1. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Einstein's field equations are considered for a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi Type-II space–time in the presence of a massless scalar field with a scalar potential. Exact solutions of scale factors and other physical parameters are obtained by using a special law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields a constant ...

  2. Conversion of DNA gyrase into a conventional type II topoisomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1996-01-01

    -dependent manner. Novobiocin, a competitive inhibitor of ATP binding by gyrase, inhibits this reaction. The truncated enzyme, unlike gyrase, does not introduce a right-handed wrap when bound to DNA and stabilizes DNA crossovers; characteristics reminiscent of conventional type II topoisomerases. This new enzyme...

  3. Cardiovascular risk markers in type II diabetes and hypertension at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sly

    1. Cardiovascular risk markers in type II diabetes and hypertension at the Battor. Catholic Hospital, Volta Region of Ghana. WILLIAM K.B.A. OWIREDU1,3* .... Table 1: General socio-demographic characteristics of respondents by disease status. Variable. Total, n (%) Control, n (%). Case, n (%). P-value. Sex. Female.

  4. Knowledge Is Power: Teaching Children about Type II Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feild-Berner, Natalie; Balgopal, Meena

    2011-01-01

    World Diabetes Day (November 14) offers a wonderful opportunity to educate elementary children about the power they have to control their health. First lady Michelle Obama has urged Americans to educate themselves about childhood obesity, which is often associated with the onset of type II diabetes (Rabin 2010). The authors developed activities to…

  5. Hypertension In Type II Diabetes Mellitus In Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A cross-sectional study of hypertension in type II diabetic patients in Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria Results: Forty-two of the patients were hypertensive with only 28 (32.9%) previously diagnosed and were on treatment. Age of patient, duration of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy were significantly ...

  6. Left Ventricular Geometry In Nigerians With Type II Diabetes Mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy is independently associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular and all cause mortality. In a relatively healthy hypertensive adult population, type II diabetes is associated with higher left ventricular mass, concentric left ventricular geometry and lower ...

  7. Evidence for topological type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2017-12-11

    Recently, a type-II Weyl fermion was theoretically predicted to appear at the contact of electron and hole Fermi surface pockets. A distinguishing feature of the surfaces of type-II Weyl semimetals is the existence of topological surface states, so-called Fermi arcs. Although WTe2 was the first material suggested as a type-II Weyl semimetal, the direct observation of its tilting Weyl cone and Fermi arc has not yet been successful. Here, we show strong evidence that WTe2 is a type-II Weyl semimetal by observing two unique transport properties simultaneously in one WTe2 nanoribbon. The negative magnetoresistance induced by a chiral anomaly is quite anisotropic in WTe2 nanoribbons, which is present in b-axis ribbon, but is absent in a-axis ribbon. An extra-quantum oscillation, arising from a Weyl orbit formed by the Fermi arc and bulk Landau levels, displays a two dimensional feature and decays as the thickness increases in WTe2 nanoribbon.

  8. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 707–720. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration parameter in general relativity. C P SINGH* and S KUMAR. Department of Applied Mathematics, Delhi College of Engineering, Bawana Road,. Delhi 110 042, India. E-mail: cpsphd@rediffmail.com. MS received 24 January 2006; revised 19 January ...

  9. Cardiovascular risk markers in type II diabetes and hypertension at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sly

    Keywords: Type II diabetes, hypertension, Cardiovascular disease, Cardiovascular risk score, Inflammation, ... matched healthy individuals in the study area without a history of diabetes, hypertension or any ... sex, educational background, period of work, dietary salt, sugar, fat as well as alcohol consumption, physical.

  10. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in

  11. Type II restriction endonucleases--a historical perspective and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss 'Type II' REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Ambitwistor pure spinor string in a type II supergravity background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandia, Osvaldo [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez,Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez,Diagonal Las Torres 2640, Peñalolén, Santiago (Chile); Vallilo, Brenno Carlini [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello,República 220, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-06-30

    We construct the ambitwistor pure spinor string in a general type II supergravity background in the semi-classical regime. Almost all supergravity constraints are obtained from nilpotency of the BRST charge and further consistency conditions from additional world-sheet the case of AdS{sub 5}×S{sup 5} background.

  13. Effects of type II thyroplasty on adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yumoto, Eiji; Minoda, Ryosei; Kodama, Narihiro

    2010-04-01

    Type II thyroplasty, or laryngeal framework surgery, is based on the hypothesis that the effect of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) on the voice is due to excessively tight closure of the glottis, hampering phonation. Most of the previous, partially effective treatments have aimed to relieve this tight closure, including recurrent laryngeal nerve section or avulsion, extirpation of the adductor muscle, and botulinum toxin injection, which is currently the most popular. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of type II thyroplasty on aerodynamic and acoustic findings in patients with AdSD. Case series. University hospital. Ten patients with AdSD underwent type II thyroplasty between August 2006 and December 2008. Aerodynamic and acoustic analyses were performed prior to and six months after surgery. Mean flow rates (MFRs) and voice efficiency were evaluated with a phonation analyzer. Jitter, shimmer, the harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), standard deviation of the fundamental frequency (SDF0), and degree of voice breaks (DVB) were measured from each subject's longest sustained phonation sample of the vowel /a/. Voice efficiency improved significantly after surgery. No significant difference was found in the MFRs between before and after surgery. Jitter, shimmer, HNR, SDF0, and DVB improved significantly after surgery. Treatment of AdSD with type II thyroplasty significantly improved aerodynamic and acoustic findings. The results of this study suggest that type II thyroplasty provides relief from voice strangulation in patients with AdSD. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Puerarin protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced injury of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells via downregulating alpha-hemolysin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng; Li, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Yong-Hua; Li, Zhe; Tang, Yu-Shun; Kou, Xu; Wang, Shu-De; Bao, Min; Qu, Lian-Da; Li, Min; Li, Bing

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-hemolysin, a secreted pore-forming toxin, plays an indispensable role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of puerarin against S. aureus was investigated; as a result, puerarin showed no influence on the growth of this organism. However, hemolysis and western blotting assays showed that puerarin concentration dependently inhibited the secretion of alpha-hemolysin at low concentrations. Real-time RT-PCR assay was further employed to evaluate the transcriptional level of hla, the gene encoding alpha-hemolysin, and RNAIII, an effector molecule of the agr system. The results indicated that the RNAIII expression and subsequent hla transcription were also inhibited by puerarin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, puerarin significantly prevented human alveolar epithelial A549 cells from S. aureus-induced injury. Thereby, puerarin may be considered as a potential candidate for the development of antivirulence drugs in the treatment of S. aureus-mediated infections.

  15. Ultrafast dynamics of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komolibus, K.; Piwonski, T.; Gradkowski, K.; Reyner, C. J.; Liang, B.; Huffaker, D. L.; Huyet, G.; Houlihan, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, room temperature two-colour pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots. Our results demonstrate a strong dependency of carrier capture/escape processes on applied reverse bias voltage, probing wavelength and number of injected carriers. The extracted timescales as a function of both forward and reverse bias may provide important information for the design of efficient solar cells and quantum dot memories based on this material. The first few picoseconds of the dynamics reveal a complex behaviour with an interesting feature, which does not appear in devices based on type-I materials, and hence is linked to the unique carrier capture/escape processes possible in type-II structures

  16. The application and evaluation of insulin release test and quantitative parameter in diabetic type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chenggang; Chen Xiaoyan; Guan Xiaofeng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the curve of Insulin Release Test (IRT) about the patients whit type II diabetes, to evaluate β-cell function and the sensitivity of body to Insulin using Insulin Release Index (IRI) and Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI), and to probe the value for clinical therapy. Methods: 1) Have a IRT of 396 cases with type II diabetes and 17 normal bodies and acquire the IRT curve, 2) Design the count methods about IRI and ISI, IRI = Ins max/Ins FBI x Δ Ins max/T max (minute), ISI=(Ins max-Ins FBI)/(Ins 180'-Ins FBI), 3) Compare IRI Changes of before and after treatment for 12 cases with no insulin release and 9 cases with less insulin release. Results: IRT curve type (No release type 21.0%, less release type 33.3%, peak delay type 36.9%, high insulin type 6.0%, release delay type 2.8%); respective IRI, ISI compared to normal, P<0.01; IRI of before and after treatment with insulin P<0.01. Conclusions: IRT Curve combining IRI and ISI can reflect accurately β-cell function with type II diabetes and the sensitivity of body to insulin, Also it has some reference value for clinical therapy

  17. Isolation and molecular characterization of type I and type II feline coronavirus in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Alazawy; Siti Suri, Arshad; Abdul Rahman, Omar; Mohd, Hair Bejo; Faruku, Bande; Saeed, Sharif; Tengku Azmi, Tengku Ibrahim

    2012-11-21

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) are two important coronaviruses of domestic cat worldwide. Although FCoV is prevalent among cats; the fastidious nature of type I FCoV to grow on cell culture has limited further studies on tissue tropism and pathogenesis of FCoV. While several studies reported serological evidence for FCoV in Malaysia, neither the circulating FCoV isolated nor its biotypes determined. This study for the first time, describes the isolation and biotypes determination of type I and type II FCoV from naturally infected cats in Malaysia. Of the total number of cats sampled, 95% (40/42) were RT-PCR positive for FCoV. Inoculation of clinical samples into Crandell feline kidney cells (CrFK), and Feline catus whole fetus-4 cells (Fcwf-4), show cytopathic effect (CPE) characterized by syncytial cells formation and later cell detachment. Differentiation of FCoV biotypes using RT-PCR assay revealed that, 97.5% and 2.5% of local isolates were type I and type II FCoV, respectively. These isolates had high sequence homology and phylogenetic similarity with several FCoV isolates from Europe, South East Asia and USA. This study reported the successful isolation of local type I and type II FCoV evident with formation of cytopathic effects in two types of cell cultures namely the CrFK and Fcwf-4 , where the later cells being more permissive. However, the RT-PCR assay is more sensitive in detecting the antigen in suspected samples as compared to virus isolation in cell culture. The present study indicated that type I FCoV is more prevalent among cats in Malaysia.

  18. Isolation and molecular characterization of type I and type II feline coronavirus in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Alazawy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV are two important coronaviruses of domestic cat worldwide. Although FCoV is prevalent among cats; the fastidious nature of type I FCoV to grow on cell culture has limited further studies on tissue tropism and pathogenesis of FCoV. While several studies reported serological evidence for FCoV in Malaysia, neither the circulating FCoV isolated nor its biotypes determined. This study for the first time, describes the isolation and biotypes determination of type I and type II FCoV from naturally infected cats in Malaysia. Findings Of the total number of cats sampled, 95% (40/42 were RT-PCR positive for FCoV. Inoculation of clinical samples into Crandell feline kidney cells (CrFK, and Feline catus whole fetus-4 cells (Fcwf-4, show cytopathic effect (CPE characterized by syncytial cells formation and later cell detachment. Differentiation of FCoV biotypes using RT-PCR assay revealed that, 97.5% and 2.5% of local isolates were type I and type II FCoV, respectively. These isolates had high sequence homology and phylogenetic similarity with several FCoV isolates from Europe, South East Asia and USA. Conclusions This study reported the successful isolation of local type I and type II FCoV evident with formation of cytopathic effects in two types of cell cultures namely the CrFK and Fcwf-4 , where the later cells being more permissive. However, the RT-PCR assay is more sensitive in detecting the antigen in suspected samples as compared to virus isolation in cell culture. The present study indicated that type I FCoV is more prevalent among cats in Malaysia.

  19. Non-toxic engineered carbon nanodiamond concentrations induce oxidative/nitrosative stress, imbalance of energy metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction in microglial and alveolar basal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresta, Claudia G; Chakraborty, Aishik; Wijesinghe, Manjula B; Amorini, Angela M; Lazzarino, Giacomo; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Tavazzi, Barbara; Lunte, Susan M; Caraci, Filippo; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Caruso, Giuseppe

    2018-02-14

    Engineered nanoparticles are finding a wide spectrum of biomedical applications, including drug delivery and capacity to trigger cytotoxic phenomena, potentially useful against tumor cells. The full understanding of their biosafety and interactions with cell processes is mandatory. Using microglial (BV-2) and alveolar basal epithelial (A549) cells, in this study we determined the effects of engineered carbon nanodiamonds (ECNs) on cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as on energy metabolism. Particularly, we initially measured decrease in cell viability as a function of increasing ECNs doses, finding similar cytotoxic ECN effects in the two cell lines. Subsequently, using apparently non-cytotoxic ECN concentrations (2 µg/mL causing decrease in cell number < 5%) we determined NO and ROS production, and measured the concentrations of compounds related to energy metabolism, mitochondrial functions, oxido-reductive reactions, and antioxidant defences. We found that in both cell lines non-cytotoxic ECN concentrations increased NO and ROS production with sustained oxidative/nitrosative stress, and caused energy metabolism imbalance (decrease in high energy phosphates and nicotinic coenzymes) and mitochondrial malfunctioning (decrease in ATP/ADP ratio).These results underline the importance to deeply investigate the molecular and biochemical changes occurring upon the interaction of ECNs (and nanoparticles in general) with living cells, even at apparently non-toxic concentration. Since the use of ECNs in biomedical field is attracting increasing attention the complete evaluation of their biosafety, toxicity and/or possible side effects both in vitro and in vivo is mandatory before these highly promising tools might find the correct application.

  20. Instability in the magnetic field penetration in type II superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Isaías G. de, E-mail: isaias@ufrrj.br

    2015-07-17

    Under the view of the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau theory we have investigated the penetration of the magnetic field in the type II superconductors. We show that the single vortices, situated along the borderline, between the normal region channel and the superconducting region, can escape to regions still empty of vortices. We show that the origin of this process is the repulsive nature of vortex–vortex interaction, in addition to the non-homogeneous distribution of the vortices along the normal region channel. Using London theory we explain the extra gain of kinetic energy by the vortices situated along this borderline. - Highlights: • TDGL is used to study the magnetic field penetration in type II superconductors. • Instability process is found during the magnetic field penetration. • Vortices along the front of the normal region escape to superconducting region. • We explain the extra-gain of kinetic energy by vortices along the borderline.

  1. Subclinical onychomycosis in patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Elbendary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal organisms could be present in the nail without any clinical manifestations. As onychomycosis in diabetics has more serious complications, early detection of such infection could be helpful to prevent them. We aim in this study to assess the possibility of detecting subclinical onychomycosis in type II diabetic patients and addressing possible associated neuropathy. A cross sectional, observational study included patients with type II diabetes with normal big toe nail. All were subjected to nail clipping of the big toe nail, followed by staining with Hematoxylin and Eosin and Periodic-Acid-Schiff (PAS stains and examined microscopically. A total of 106 patients were included, fungal infection was identified in eight specimens, all were uncontrolled diabetes, and six had neuropathy. Using the nail clipping and microscopic examination with PAS stain to detect such subclinical infection could be an applicable screening test for diabetic patients, for early detection and management of onychomycosis.

  2. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; Krisciunas, Kevin; Krzeminski, Wojtek; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values

  3. Unification of type-II strings and T duality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohm, Olaf; Kwak, Seung Ki; Zwiebach, Barton

    2011-10-21

    We present a unified description of the low-energy limits of type-II string theories. This is achieved by a formulation that doubles the space-time coordinates in order to realize the T-duality group O(10,10) geometrically. The Ramond-Ramond fields are described by a spinor of O(10,10), which couples to the gravitational fields via the Spin(10,10) representative of the so-called generalized metric. This theory, which is supplemented by a T-duality covariant self-duality constraint, unifies the type-II theories in that each of them is obtained for a particular subspace of the doubled space. © 2011 American Physical Society

  4. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 60, La Serena (Chile); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Krisciunas, Kevin [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, Wojtek [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); McCarthy, Patrick [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: lgalbany@das.uchile.cl [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (IALP, CONICET) (Argentina); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  5. Progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2018-01-01

    The progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are believed to be red supergiant (RSG) stars, but there is much disparity in the literature concerning their mass at core collapse and therefore on the main sequence. Here, we model the SN radiation arising from the low-energy explosion of RSG stars of 12, 25 and 27 M⊙ on the main sequence and formed through single star evolution. Despite the narrow range in ejecta kinetic energy (2.5-4.2 × 1050 erg) in our model set, the SN observables from our three models are significantly distinct, reflecting the differences in progenitor structure (e.g. surface radius, H-rich envelope mass and He-core mass). Our higher mass RSG stars give rise to Type II SNe that tend to have bluer colours at early times, a shorter photospheric phase, and a faster declining V-band light curve (LC) more typical of Type II-linear SNe, in conflict with the LC plateau observed for low-luminosity SNe II. The complete fallback of the CO core in the low-energy explosions of our high-mass RSG stars prevents the ejection of any 56Ni (nor any core O or Si), in contrast to low-luminosity SNe II-P, which eject at least 0.001 M⊙ of 56Ni. In contrast to observations, Type II SN models from higher mass RSGs tend to show an H α absorption that remains broad at late times (due to a larger velocity at the base of the H-rich envelope). In agreement with the analyses of pre-explosion photometry, we conclude that low-luminosity SNe II-P likely arise from low-mass rather than high-mass RSG stars.

  6. Interaction of Ultrasound with Vortices in Type-II Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Sonin, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    The theory of the ultrasound propagation in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is shown to be linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths used in the ultrasound experiments now. Therefore, in contrast to pre...

  7. Flavour-symmetric type-II Dirac neutrino seesaw mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Lamprea, J. M.; Peinado, Eduardo; Valle, Jose W. F.

    2018-04-01

    We propose a Standard Model extension with underlying A4 flavour symmetry where small Dirac neutrino masses arise from a Type-II seesaw mechanism. The model predicts the "golden" flavour-dependent bottom-tau mass relation, requires an inverted neutrino mass ordering and non-maximal atmospheric mixing angle. Using the latest neutrino oscillation global fit [1] we derive restrictions on the oscillation parameters, such as a correlation between δCP and mνlightest.

  8. Evaluation of Oral Health in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rathy Ravindran; M.G. Deepa; A.K. Sruthi; Cherian Kuruvila; S Priya; S Sunil; Joseph Edward; G Roopesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral cav ity re flects the general health status of a person and diagnosing and treating oral manifestations of systemic disease pose a greater challenge. Even though there is strong evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and diabetes mellitus, oral health awareness is lacking among diabetic patients and health professionals. The present study was undertaken to determine the oral health status in type II diabetic patients and also...

  9. Type II restriction endonucleases—a historical perspective and more

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss ‘Type II’ REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. PMID:24878924

  10. Rapid single step subcloning procedure by combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingenspor Martin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subcloning of a DNA fragment from an entry vector into a destination vector is a routinely performed task in molecular biology labs. Results We here present a novel benchtop procedure to achieve rapid recombination into any destination vector of choice with the sole requirement of an endonuclease recognition site. The method relies on a specifically designed entry vector and the combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase. The formulation leads to accumulation of a single stable cloning product representing the desired insert carrying destination vector. Conclusion The described method provides a fast single step procedure for routine subcloning from an entry vector into a series of destination vectors with the same restriction enzyme recognition site.

  11. Rapid single step subcloning procedure by combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin

    2007-11-26

    The subcloning of a DNA fragment from an entry vector into a destination vector is a routinely performed task in molecular biology labs. We here present a novel benchtop procedure to achieve rapid recombination into any destination vector of choice with the sole requirement of an endonuclease recognition site. The method relies on a specifically designed entry vector and the combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase. The formulation leads to accumulation of a single stable cloning product representing the desired insert carrying destination vector. The described method provides a fast single step procedure for routine subcloning from an entry vector into a series of destination vectors with the same restriction enzyme recognition site.

  12. Reconstruction of alveolar bone defects using bone morphogenetic protein 2 mediated rabbit dental pulp stem cells seeded on nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Chen; E, Ling-Ling; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Su, Fang; Wu, Xia; Shi, Zhan-Ping; Lv, Yan; Wang, Jia-Zhu

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of a tissue-engineered bone complex of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2)-mediated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide) (nHAC/PLA) to reconstruct critical-size alveolar bone defects in New Zealand rabbit. Autologous DPSCs were isolated from rabbit dental pulp tissue and expanded ex vivo to enrich DPSCs numbers, and then their attachment and differentiation capability were evaluated when cultured on the culture plate or nHAC/PLA. The alveolar bone defects were treated with nHAC/PLA, nHAC/PLA+rhBMP-2, nHAC/PLA+DPSCs, nHAC/PLA+DPSCs+rhBMP-2, and autogenous bone (AB) obtained from iliac bone or were left untreated as a control. X-ray and a polychrome sequential fluorescent labeling were performed postoperatively and the animals were sacrificed 12 weeks after operation for histological observation and histomorphometric analysis. Our results showed that DPSCs expressed STRO-1 and vementin, and favored osteogenesis and adipogenesis in conditioned media. DPSCs attached and spread well, and retained their osteogenic phenotypes on nHAC/PLA. The rhBMP-2 could significantly increase protein content, alkaline phosphatase activity/protein, osteocalcin content, and mineral formation of DPSCs cultured on nHAC/PLA. The X-ray graph, the fluorescent, histological observation, and histomorphometric analysis showed that the nHAC/PLA+DPSCs+rhBMP-2 tissue-engineered bone complex had an earlier mineralization and more bone formation inside the scaffold than nHAC/PLA, nHAC/PLA+rhBMP-2, and nHAC/PLA+DPSCs, or even autologous bone. Implanted DPSCs' contribution to new bone was detected through transfected eGFP genes. Our findings indicated that stem cells existed in adult rabbit dental pulp tissue. The rhBMP-2 promoted osteogenic capability of DPSCs as a potential cell source for periodontal bone regeneration. The nHAC/PLA could serve as a good scaffold for

  13. Andrographolide antagonizes cigarette smoke extract-induced inflammatory response and oxidative stress in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells through induction of microRNA-218.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-jie; Yu, Chang-hai; Li, Jing-bo; Wu, Xi-ya

    2013-12-01

    Andrographolide is a major bioactive labdane diterpenoid isolated from Andrographis paniculata and has protective effects against cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung injury. This study was done to determine whether such protective effects were mediated through modulation of microRNA (miR)-218 expression. Therefore, we exposed human alveolar epithelial A549 cells to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) with or without andrographolide pretreatment and measured the level of glutathione, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation, proinflammatory cytokine production, and miR-218 expression. We found that andrographolide pretreatment significantly restored the glutathione level in CSE-exposed A549 cells, coupled with reduced inhibitor κB (IκB)-α phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation and interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6 secretion. The miR-218 expression was significantly upregulated by andrographolide pretreatment. To determine the biological role of miR-218, we overexpressed and downregulated its expression using miR-218 mimic and anti-miR-218 inhibitor, respectively. We observed that miR-218 overexpression led to a marked reduction in IκB-α phosphorylation, p65 nuclear accumulation, and NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity in CSE-treated A549 cells. In contrast, miR-218 silencing enhanced IκB-α phosphorylation and p65 nuclear accumulation in cells with andrographolide pretreatment and reversed andrographolide-mediated reduction of IL-6 and IL-8 production. In addition, depletion of miR-218 significantly reversed the upregulation of glutathione levels in A549 cells by andrographolide. Taken together, our results demonstrate that andrographolide mitigates CSE-induced inflammatory response in A549 cells, largely through inhibition of NF-κB activation via upregulation of miR-218, and thus has preventive benefits in CS-induced inflammatory lung diseases.

  14. Clara cell adhesion and migration to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    deMello Daphne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clara cells are the epithelial progenitor cell of the small airways, a location known to be important in many lung disorders. Although migration of alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells has been examined, the migratory response of Clara cells has received little attention. Methods Using a modification of existing procedures for Clara cell isolation, we examined mouse Clara cells and a mouse Clara-like cell line (C22 for adhesion to and migration toward matrix substrate gradients, to establish the nature and integrin dependence of migration in Clara cells. Results We observed that Clara cells adhere preferentially to fibronectin (Fn and type I collagen (Col I similar to previous reports. Migration of Clara cells can be directed by a fixed gradient of matrix substrates (haptotaxis. Migration of the C22 cell line was similar to the Clara cells so integrin dependence of migration was evaluated with this cell line. As determined by competition with an RGD containing-peptide, migration of C22 cells toward Fn and laminin (Lm 511 (formerly laminin 10 was significantly RGD integrin dependent, but migration toward Col I was RGD integrin independent, suggesting that Clara cells utilize different receptors for these different matrices. Conclusion Thus, Clara cells resemble alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells by showing integrin mediated pro-migratory changes to extracellular matrix components that are present in tissues after injury.

  15. Mice deficient in CD38 develop an attenuated form of collagen type II-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Cerezo-Wallis, Daniela; Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime; Merino, Ramón; Merino, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    CD38, a type II transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in many cells of the immune system, is involved in cell signaling, migration and differentiation. Studies in CD38 deficient mice (CD38 KO mice) indicate that this molecule controls inflammatory immune responses, although its involvement in these responses depends on the disease model analyzed. Here, we explored the role of CD38 in the control of autoimmune responses using chicken collagen type II (col II) immunized C57BL/6-CD38 KO mice as a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We demonstrate that CD38 KO mice develop an attenuated CIA that is accompanied by a limited joint induction of IL-1β and IL-6 expression, by the lack of induction of IFNγ expression in the joints and by a reduction in the percentages of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in the spleen. Immunized CD38 KO mice produce high levels of circulating IgG1 and low of IgG2a anti-col II antibodies in association with reduced percentages of Th1 cells in the draining lymph nodes. Altogether, our results show that CD38 participates in the pathogenesis of CIA controlling the number of iNKT cells and promoting Th1 inflammatory responses.

  16. Mice deficient in CD38 develop an attenuated form of collagen type II-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Postigo

    Full Text Available CD38, a type II transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in many cells of the immune system, is involved in cell signaling, migration and differentiation. Studies in CD38 deficient mice (CD38 KO mice indicate that this molecule controls inflammatory immune responses, although its involvement in these responses depends on the disease model analyzed. Here, we explored the role of CD38 in the control of autoimmune responses using chicken collagen type II (col II immunized C57BL/6-CD38 KO mice as a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA. We demonstrate that CD38 KO mice develop an attenuated CIA that is accompanied by a limited joint induction of IL-1β and IL-6 expression, by the lack of induction of IFNγ expression in the joints and by a reduction in the percentages of invariant NKT (iNKT cells in the spleen. Immunized CD38 KO mice produce high levels of circulating IgG1 and low of IgG2a anti-col II antibodies in association with reduced percentages of Th1 cells in the draining lymph nodes. Altogether, our results show that CD38 participates in the pathogenesis of CIA controlling the number of iNKT cells and promoting Th1 inflammatory responses.

  17. Detection of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in pleural fluid with immunocytochemistry on cell block and determination of PAX/FKHR fusion mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Jinawath, Artit; Pongtippan, Atcharaporn; Anurathapan, Usanarat; Hongeng, Suradej

    2011-11-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma is a primitive malignant round cell neoplasm, which shows skeletal muscle differentiation. Although their histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings are well known, the cytology, immunocytochemistry and molecular study on pleural effusion have not been well documented. To apply molecular method in the diagnosis and monitoring of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. The case of a 14-year-old Thai male, who presented with dyspnea and left pleural effusion. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed a huge heterogeneous enhancing mass at the left retroperitoneum. Pleural fluid cytology showed malignant small round blue cells. Immunocytochemical stains on cell block material showed positive reactivity to vimentin, sarcomeric actin, desmin, MyoD1, myogenin, and CD56 in round cell tumor Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated PAX/FKHR fusion transcript. The patient received chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced-stage rhabdomyosarcoma. Finally, he succumbed to the disease, thirteen months after the diagnosis. Immunocytochemistry on cell block in conjunction with determination of PAX/FKHR fusion mRNA by RT-PCR is a molecular method in the diagnosis and monitoring of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma inpleural fluid.

  18. Innate immune response to a H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus in newborn porcine trachea cells, alveolar macrophages, and precision-cut lung slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Melo, Sandrine; Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Ramé, Christelle; Olivier, Michel; Soubieux, Denis; Marc, Daniel; Simon, Gaëlle; Herrler, Georg; Berri, Mustapha; Dupont, Joëlle; Meurens, François

    2014-04-09

    Viral respiratory diseases remain of major importance in swine breeding units. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the main known contributors to infectious respiratory diseases. The innate immune response to swine influenza viruses has been assessed in many previous studies. However most of these studies were carried out in a single-cell population or directly in the live animal, in all its complexity. In the current study we report the use of a trachea epithelial cell line (newborn pig trachea cells - NPTr) in comparison with alveolar macrophages and lung slices for the characterization of innate immune response to an infection by a European SIV of the H3N2 subtype. The expression pattern of transcripts involved in the recognition of the virus, interferon type I and III responses, and the host-response regulation were assessed by quantitative PCR in response to infection. Some significant differences were observed between the three systems, notably in the expression of type III interferon mRNA. Then, results show a clear induction of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways in infected NPTr cells. Conversely, PI3K/Akt signaling pathways was not activated. The inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway clearly reduced interferon type I and III responses and the induction of SOCS1 at the transcript level in infected NPTr cells. Similarly, the inhibition of MAPK pathway reduced viral replication and interferon response. All together, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the innate immune response to H3N2 SIV and may help identify strategies to effectively control SIV infection.

  19. Type II diabetes mellitus and menopause: a multinational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, A; Blümel, J E; Portela-Buelvas, K; Mezones-Holguín, E; Barón, G; Bencosme, A; Benítez, Z; Bravo, L M; Calle, A; Chedraui, P; Flores, D; Espinoza, M T; Gómez, G; Hernández-Bueno, J A; Laribezcoa, F; Lima, S; Martino, M; Mostajo, D; Ojeda, E; Onatra, W; Sánchez, H; Navarro, D; Tserotas, K; Vallejo, M S; Witis, S; Zuñiga, M C

    2013-12-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus causes metabolic changes that may lead to early menopause and worsen climacteric symptoms. To determine the risk factors for type II diabetes mellitus and assess the impact of this disease on the age of menopause and on climacteric symptoms. A total of 6079 women aged between 40 and 59 years from 11 Latin American countries were requested to answer the Menopause Rating Scale and Goldberg Anxiety-Depression Scale. The prevalence of diabetes was 6.7%. Diabetes mellitus was associated with arterial hypertension (odds ratio (OR) 4.49; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.47-5.31), the use of psychotropic drugs (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.22-1.94), hormonal therapy (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.11-1.92), ≥ 50 years of age (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.86), overweight or obese (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.15-1.89), and waist circumference ≥ 88 cm (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.06-1.65). Factors associated with lower risk of diabetes were the use of hormonal contraceptives (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.35-0.87), alcohol (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.98) and living in cities > 2500 meters above sea level (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.53-0.91) or with high temperatures (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88). In turn, diabetes tripled the risk of menopause in women under 45 years of age. Diabetes did not increase the risk of deterioration of quality of life due to climacteric symptoms. Menopause does not increase the risk of type II diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is associated with early menopause in women under 45 years of age.

  20. Type II Superstring Field Theory: Geometric Approach and Operadic Description

    CERN Document Server

    Jurco, Branislav

    2013-01-01

    We outline the construction of type II superstring field theory leading to a geometric and algebraic BV master equation, analogous to Zwiebach's construction for the bosonic string. The construction uses the small Hilbert space. Elementary vertices of the non-polynomial action are described with the help of a properly formulated minimal area problem. They give rise to an infinite tower of superstring field products defining a $\\mathcal{N}=1$ generalization of a loop homotopy Lie algebra, the genus zero part generalizing a homotopy Lie algebra. Finally, we give an operadic interpretation of the construction.

  1. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Hamida, Emira Ben; Rebeh, Rania Ben; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy termination; they felt that the diagnosis was late. At birth, the newborn presented immediate respiratory distress. Postnatal examination and bone radiography confirmed the diagnosis of OI type IIA. Death occurred on day 25 of life related to respiratory failure.

  2. Predicted continuum spectra of type II supernovae - LTE results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaviv, G.; Wehrse, R.; Wagoner, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The continuum spectral energy distribution of the flux emerging from type II supernovae is calculated from quasi-static radiative transfer through a power-law density gradient, assuming radiative equilibrium and LTE. It is found that the Balmer jump disappears at high effective temperatures and low densities, while the spectrum resembles that of a dilute blackbody but is flatter with a sharper cutoff at the short-wavelength end. A significant UV excess is found in all models calculated. The calculation should be considered exploratory because of significant effects which are anticipated to arise from departure from LTE.

  3. Vitamin D - Dependent Rickets, Type II Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Hoxha, Rina; Grajçevci-Uka, Violeta; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this work the report of one case with vitamin D-dependent rickets, type II. Methods: Diagnosis has been established based on anamnesis, physical examination, laboratory findings and radiological examination. Results: A female child (age 25 months) has been hospitalized due to bone deformity, bone pain, alopecia and walking difficulties. The laboratory findings have revealed that the calcium values was low (1.20 mmol/L), phosphates in the reference value (1.30 mmol/L) the alkal...

  4. Type II canal configuration and Type I Dens invaginatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liji, Mele Puthukudy; Chandrababu, Krishnankutty; Kumar, Maroli Ramesh; Jayashree, Santhadevi

    2014-07-01

    The prevalent notion about maxillary central incisor with normal external morphology is a tooth with single root and root canal. A case in which all four maxillary incisors were having Type II canal configurations (Vertucci's classification) is reported, in addition, the lateral incisors revealed dens invaginatus with a Type I pattern as suggested by Ohler's classification and a large periapical lesion was seen in relation to the right lateral incisor. The diagnosis was confirmed with the aid of spiral computed tomography (CT) and canals obturated. Nonsurgical healing of the lesion was assessed by reviewing the case at prefixed intervals of time.

  5. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of type II dens invaginatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    MA, Rajini; Kaiwar, Anjali; N, Meena; Kumari R, Anitha; Shetty, Ashish; DN, Naveen; N, Shubhashini

    2009-01-01

    The endodontic treatment of teeth with dens invaginatus, characterized by an infolding of enamel and dentin, extending deep into the pulp cavity near the root apex, may be complicated and challenging. The complexity of the internal anatomy may create challenges for the complete removal of diseased pulpal tissue and the subsequent sealing of the canal system. Because of the bizarre root canal anatomy and widely open apex, a combination of nonsurgical and surgical endodontic treatment or extraction is the most common choice of therapy. This article describes case reports of nonsurgical endodontic treatment of Type II dens invaginatus associated with periradicular lesion. PMID:20617071

  6. Type II restriction endonucleases : a historical perspective and more

    OpenAIRE

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss ‘Type II’ REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nea...

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 enhances the expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in chondrocytes embedded in alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründer, Tatiana; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Fritz, Jürgen; Stoop, Reinout; Hortschansky, Peter; Mollenhauer, Jürgen; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2004-07-01

    For autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) chondrocytes are expanded in vitro. During expansion these cells may dedifferentiate. This change in phenotype is characterized by a raised expression of type I collagen and a decrease in type II collagen expression. Since high expression of type II collagen is of central importance for the properties of hyaline cartilage, we investigated if the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) may modulate the chondrogenic phenotype in monolayer cell cultures and in three-dimensional culture systems. Chondrocytes from articular knee cartilage of 11 individuals (average age: 39.8 years) with no history of joint disease were isolated and seeded either in monolayer cultures or embedded in alginate beads in presence or absence of human recombinant BMP-2 (hr-BMP-2). Then, cells were harvested and analysis of the chondrogenic phenotype was performed using quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and ELISA. Addition of BMP-2 to chondrocytes expanded in two-dimensional (2D) cultures during the first subculture (P1) had no effect on mRNA amounts encoding type II collagen and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In contrast, seeding chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) alginate cultures raised type II collagen expression significantly and addition of BMP-2 enhanced this effect. We conclude that chondrocytes during expansion for ACT may benefit from BMP-2 activation only when seeded in an appropriate 3D culture system. Copyright 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International

  8. TGF-β type II receptor phosphorylates PTH receptor to integrate bone remodelling signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Tao; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Fengjie; Clemens, Thomas L.; Wan, Mei; Cao, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) regulates calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism by activating PTH type I receptor (PTH1R). Here we show that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β type II receptor (TβRII) forms an endocytic complex with PTH1R in response to PTH and regulates signalling by PTH and TGF-β. TβRII directly phosphorylates the PTH1R cytoplasmic domain, which modulates PTH-induced endocytosis of the PTH1R–TβRII complex. Deletion of TβRII in osteoblasts increases the cell-surface expression o...

  9. Downregulation of LRRC8A protects human ovarian and alveolar carcinoma cells against Cisplatin-induced expression of p53, MDM2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and Caspase-9/-3 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Nielsen, Dorthe; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna

    2016-01-01

    ovarian (A2780) and alveolar (A549) carcinoma cells. In Cisplatin-sensitive cells Cisplatin treatment increases p53-protein level as well as downstream signaling, e.g., expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1), Bax, Noxa, MDM2, and activation of caspase-9/-3. In contrast, Cisplatin-resistant cells do not enter....../-3 activation, expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and MDM2 and (ii) that down-regulation of LRRC8A-dependent osmolyte transporters contributes to acquirement of Cisplatin resistance in ovarian and lung carcinoma cells. Activation of LRRC8A containing channels is upstream to apoptotic volume decrease as hypertonic...

  10. Wood Bark Smoke Induces Lung and Pleural Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 and Stabilizes Its mRNA in Porcine Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    in situ. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids by Western blotting. Induction of PAI-1 was determined at the...APRV Airway-pressure-release ventilation; ATII Alveolar type II cells; AU Arbitrary fluorescence emission units; BAL Bronchoalveolar lavage ; BALF BAL...As measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, this defect in fibrinolysis is mainly attributable to overexpression of plasminogen activator

  11. Gravitational Field Shielding by Scalar Field and Type II Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gravitational field shielding by scalar field and type II superconductors are theoret- ically investigated. In accord with the well-developed five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field, which unifies the Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory, the scalar field cannot only polarize the space as shown previously, but also flatten the space as indicated recently. The polariza- tion of space decreases the electromagnetic field by increasing the equivalent vacuum permittivity constant, while the flattening of space decreases the gravitational field by decreasing the equivalent gravitational constant. In other words, the scalar field can be also employed to shield the gravitational field. A strong scalar field significantly shield the gravitational field by largely decreasing the equivalent gravitational constant. According to the theory of gravitational field shielding by scalar field, the weight loss experimentally detected for a sample near a rotating ceramic disk at very low tempera- ture can be explained as the shielding of the Earth gravitational field by the Ginzburg- Landau scalar field, which is produced by the type II superconductors. The significant shielding of gravitational field by scalar field produced by superconductors may lead to a new spaceflight technology in future.

  12. Vitamin D - Dependent Rickets, Type II Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Hoxha, Rina; Grajçevci-Uka, Violeta; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this work the report of one case with vitamin D-dependent rickets, type II. Methods: Diagnosis has been established based on anamnesis, physical examination, laboratory findings and radiological examination. Results: A female child (age 25 months) has been hospitalized due to bone deformity, bone pain, alopecia and walking difficulties. The laboratory findings have revealed that the calcium values was low (1.20 mmol/L), phosphates in the reference value (1.30 mmol/L) the alkaline phosphatase value was quite high (852 IU/L), high value of parathyroid hormone (9.21 pmol/L), normal value of 25- hydroxyvitamin D, whereas the values of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was high (185 μmol/L). Radiographic changes were evident and typical in the distal metaphysis of radius and ulna as well as in the bones of lower limbs (distal metaphysis of femur and proximal metaphysis of tibia and fibula). After treatment with calcium and calcitriol, the above mentioned clinical manifestations, laboratory test values and the radiographic changes in bones withdrew. Conclusions: Vitamin D-dependent rickets, type II is a rare genetic recessive disease, and its treatment includes a constant use of calcium and calcitriol. PMID:24757409

  13. Characterization of hearing loss in aged type II diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Susan T.; Mapes, Frances; Kim, SungHee; Frisina, D. Robert; Frisina, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Presbycusis – age-related hearing loss – is the number one communicative disorder and a significant chronic medical condition of the aged. Little is known about how type II diabetes, another prevalent age-related medical condition, and presbycusis interact. The present investigation aimed to comprehensively characterize the nature of hearing impairment in aged type II diabetics. Hearing tests measuring both peripheral (cochlea) and central (brainstem and cortex) auditory processing were utilized. The majority of differences between the hearing abilities of the aged diabetics and their age-matched controls were found in measures of inner ear function. For example, large differences were found in pure-tone audiograms, wideband noise and speech reception thresholds, and otoacoustic emissions. The greatest deficits tended to be at low frequencies. In addition, there was a strong tendency for diabetes to affect the right ear more than the left. One possible interpretation is that as one develops presbycusis, the right ear advantage is lost, and this decline is accelerated by diabetes. In contrast, auditory processing tests that measure both peripheral and central processing showed fewer declines between the elderly diabetics and the control group. Consequences of elevated blood sugar levels as possible underlying physiological mechanisms for the hearing loss are discussed. PMID:16309862

  14. Sequential changes of lamellar body hydrolases during ozone-induced alveolar injury and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glew, R.H.; Basu, A.; Shelley, S.A.; Paterson, J.F.; Diven, W.F.; Montgomery, M.R.; Balis, J.U.

    1989-05-01

    Lamellar body hydrolases in acutely damaged and regenerating type II cells were determined using an established rat model with well-defined stages of bronchiolo-alveolar injury and repair. Lamellar bodies were isolated from control and ozone-exposed (3.0 ppm for 8 hours) adult male rats by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and analyzed for their content of six different lysosomal hydrolases. Immediately after 3 ppm ozone exposure (zero-time) there was a significant decrease in specific enzyme activity (units/mg protein) of five lamellar body hydrolases and these activities remained depressed for at least 24 hours after exposure. In addition, total enzyme activity (units/lung) was reduced at zero-time for beta-hexosaminidase and at 24 hours postexposure for alpha-mannosidase and alpha-L-fucosidase. During the reparative and recovery stages (48 to 96 hours) the hydrolases demonstrated variable elevations in both specific activity and total activity (units/lung). Characteristically, beta-hexosaminidase and beta-galactosidase reached supranormal values at 96 hours, whereas alpha-mannosidase remained below normal levels through the recovery stage. Moreover, at 24 to 48 hours the lamellar body fraction demonstrated prominent enzyme depletion relative to the expanding pool of stored surfactant. It is concluded that acute ozone stress initiates the development of hydrolase deficiency within the lamellar bodies of injured and regenerating type II cells. This deficiency state is followed by asynchronous lamellar body hydrolase elevations that reflect distinct patterns of response rather than uniform return to normal condition. The lysosomal enzyme changes of lamellar bodies may be pathogenetically linked to the development of associated alterations in the storage and secretion of surfactant.

  15. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II in Guaraní Indians, Southern Brazil Vírus linfotrópico de células T-humanas do tipo II em Índios Guaraní, Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Menna-Barreto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II is found in many New World Indian groups on the American continent. In Brazil, HTLV-II has been found among urban residents and Indians in the Amazon region, in the North. Guaraní Indians in the South of Brazil were studied for HTLV-I/II infection. Among 52 individuals, three (5.76% showed positive anti-HTLV-II antibodies (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot. This preliminary report is the first seroepidemiological study showing HTLV-II infection among Indians in the South of Brazil.O vírus linfotrópico de células T-humanas do tipo II (HTLV-II é identificado em muitos grupos de ameríndios. No Brasil, tem sido encontrado em indivíduos da população urbana, bem como em índios oriundos da região Amazônica. Os Índios Guaraní, do Sul do país, foram investigados para infecção por HTLV-I/II. Três indivíduos, oriundos de uma amostra de 52 índios, demonstraram sororeatividade para HTLV-II (ensaio imunoenzimático e Western blot. Este estudo preliminar foi o primeiro a identificar a presença de infecção por HTLV-II em ameríndios do Sul do Brasil.

  16. Keeping the wolves at bay: antitoxins of prokaryotic type II toxin-antitoxin systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Ting eChan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I – VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA

  17. Proteinosis alveolar pulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Sánchez Infante

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La proteinosis alveolar pulmonar es una enfermedad respiratoria crónica, caracterizada por alteración en el metabolismo del surfactante, lo que determina su acumulación anormal en el espacio alveolar. Es una enfermedad extremadamente rara. Se han reportado solamente 500 casos en la literatura. Se describió por primera vez en 1958. Se presenta un caso de proteinosis alveolar pulmonar en un lactante de 2 meses, con desnutrición proteico energética, que ingresa por dificultad respiratoria e hipoxemia, y, con imágenes radiológicas de tipo retículo-nodulillar, en vidrio deslustrado, en el cual se plantea inicialmente el diagnóstico de bronconeumonía. Ante la evolución desfavorable y no respuesta al tratamiento, se realizó un estudio para descartar enfermedades pulmonares crónicas. El paciente fallece y se confirma el diagnóstico por anatomía patológica. Se realiza una revisión del tema.

  18. The effect of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain®) on gene expression profiles of human primary alveolar bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Z; Rathe, F; Gilissen, C; van der Zande, M; Veltman, J; Junker, R; Yang, F; Jansen, J A; Walboomers, X F

    2014-06-01

    Emdogain® is frequently used in regenerative periodontal treatment. Understanding its effect on gene expression of bone cells would enable new products and pathways promoting bone formation to be established. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of Emdogain® on expression profiles of human-derived bone cells with the help of the micro-array, and subsequent validation. Bone was harvested from non-smoking patients during dental implant surgery. After outgrowth, cells were cultured until subconfluence, treated for 24 h with either Emdogain® (100 µg/ml) or control medium, and subsequently RNA was isolated and micro-array was performed. The most important genes demonstrated by micro-array data were confirmed by qPCR and ELISA tests. Emdogain tipped the balance between genes expressed for bone formation and bone resorption towards a more anabolic effect, by interaction of the PGE2 pathway and inhibition of IL-7 production. In addition the results of the present study indicate that Emdogain possibly has an effect on gene expression for extracellular matrix formation of human bone cells, in particular on bone matrix formation and on proliferation and differentiation. With the micro-array and the subsequent validation, the genes possibly involved in Emdogain action on bone cells were identified. These results can contribute to establishing new products and pathways promoting bone formation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Electrostatics of DNA-DNA juxtapositions: consequences for type II topoisomerase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Graham L; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Buck, Gregory R; Zechiedrich, E Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve problematic DNA topologies such as knots, catenanes, and supercoils that arise as a consequence of DNA replication and recombination. Failure to remove problematic DNA topologies prohibits cell division and can result in cell death or genetic mutation. Such catastrophic consequences make topoisomerases an effective target for antibiotics and anticancer agents. Despite their biological and clinical importance, little is understood about how a topoisomerase differentiates DNA topologies in a molecule that is significantly larger than the topoisomerase itself. It has been proposed that type II topoisomerases recognize angle and curvature between two DNA helices characteristic of knotted and catenated DNA to account for the enzyme's preference to unlink instead of link DNA. Here we consider the electrostatic potential of DNA juxtapositions to determine the possibility of juxtapositions occurring through Brownian diffusion. We found that despite the large negative electrostatic potential formed between two juxtaposed DNA helices, a bulk counterion concentration as small as 50 mM provides sufficient electrostatic screening to prohibit significant interaction beyond an interhelical separation of 3 nm in both hooked and free juxtapositions. This suggests that instead of electrostatics, mechanical forces such as those occurring in anaphase, knots, catenanes, or the writhe of supercoiled DNA may be responsible for the formation of DNA juxtapositions

  20. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjljara@ugr.es [Instituto de Biotecnología, Campus Fuentenueva, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Bernier-Villamor, Laura [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Sevilla, Francisca [Departamento de Biología del Estrés y Patología Vegetal, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-30080 Murcia (Spain); Lázaro, Juan-José [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The isolation, purification, crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from P. sativum is reported. A cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 199 amino acids corresponding to a type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum with its transit peptide was isolated by RT-PCR. The 171-amino-acid mature protein (estimated molecular weight 18.6 kDa) was cloned into the pET3d vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A full data set (98.2% completeness) was collected using a rotating-anode generator to a resolution of 2.8 Å from a single crystal flash-cooled at 100 K. X-ray data revealed that the protein crystallizes in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.88, b = 66.40, c = 77.23 Å, α = 102.90, β = 104.40, γ = 99.07°, and molecular replacement using a theoretical model predicted from the primary structure as a search model confirmed the presence of six molecules in the unit cell as expected from the Matthews coefficient. Refinement of the structure is in progress.

  1. Type II collagen in cartilage evokes peptide-specific tolerance and skews the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, V; Kjellén, P; Holmdahl, R

    1998-06-01

    T cell recognition of type II collagen (CII) is a crucial event in the induction of collagen-induced arthritis in the mouse. Several CII peptides have been shown to be of importance, dependent on which MHC haplotype the mouse carries. By sequencing the rat CII and comparing the sequence with mouse, human, bovine and chicken CII, we have found that the immunodominant peptides all differ at critical positions compared with the autologous mouse sequence. Transgenic expression of the immunodominant Aq-restricted heterologous CII 256-270 epitope inserted into type I collagen (TSC mice) or type II collagen (MMC-1 mice) led to epitope-specific tolerance. Immunization of TSC mice with chick CII led to arthritis and immune responses, dependent on the subdominant, Aq-restricted and chick-specific CII 190-200 epitope. Immunization of F1 mice, expressing both H-2q and H-2r as well as transgenic expression of the Aq-restricted CII 256-270 epitope in cartilage, with bovine CII, led to arthritis, dependent on the Ar-restricted, bovine-specific epitope CII 607-621. These data show that the immunodominance of CII recognition is directed towards heterologous determinants, and that T cells directed towards the corresponding autologous epitopes are tolerated without evidence of active suppression.

  2. Why is coronary collateral growth impaired in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocic, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are strong predictors of severity of occlusive coronary disease and poorer outcomes of coronary revascularization therapies. Coronary collateral growth can provide an alternative or accessory pathway of revascularization. However, collateral growth is impaired in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Although many factors necessary for collateral growth are known and many interventions have shown promising results in animal studies, not a single attempt to induce coronary collateral growth in human clinical trials has led to satisfactory results. Accordingly, the first part of this review outlines the known deleterious effects of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome on factors necessary for collateral growth, including pro-angiogenic growth factors, endothelial function, the redox state of the coronary circulation, intracellular signaling, leukocytes and bone marrow-derived progenitors cells. The second section highlights the gaps in our current knowledge of how these factors interact with the radically altered environment of the coronary circulation in diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The interplay between these pathologies and inadequately explored areas related to the temporal regulation of collateral remodeling and the roles of the extracellular matrix, vascular cell phenotype and pro-inflammatory cytokines are emphasized with implications to development of efficient therapies. PMID:22342811

  3. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio; López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier; Bernier-Villamor, Laura; Sevilla, Francisca; Lázaro, Juan-José

    2006-01-01

    The isolation, purification, crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from P. sativum is reported. A cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 199 amino acids corresponding to a type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum with its transit peptide was isolated by RT-PCR. The 171-amino-acid mature protein (estimated molecular weight 18.6 kDa) was cloned into the pET3d vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A full data set (98.2% completeness) was collected using a rotating-anode generator to a resolution of 2.8 Å from a single crystal flash-cooled at 100 K. X-ray data revealed that the protein crystallizes in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.88, b = 66.40, c = 77.23 Å, α = 102.90, β = 104.40, γ = 99.07°, and molecular replacement using a theoretical model predicted from the primary structure as a search model confirmed the presence of six molecules in the unit cell as expected from the Matthews coefficient. Refinement of the structure is in progress

  4. Cigarette smoke extract-treated mast cells promote alveolar macrophage infiltration and polarization in experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tian; Ning, Qian; Li, Feiyan; Chen, Tianjun; Yao, Yan; Sun, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may modulate the immune response of exposed individuals. Mast cell function can be altered by cigarette smoking, but the role of smoking in COPD remains poorly understood. The current study aimed to explore the role of cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated mast cells in COPD pathogenesis. Cytokine and chemokine expression as well as degranulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were detected in cells exposed to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and various doses of CSE. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs into C57BL/6J mice was performed, and macrophage infiltration and polarization were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Furthermore, a coculture system of BMMCs and macrophages was established to examine macrophage phenotype transition. The role of protease serine member S31 (Prss31) was also investigated in the co-culture system and in COPD mice. CSE exposure suppressed cytokine expression and degranulation in BMMCs, but promoted the expressions of chemokines and Prss31. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs induced macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization in the mouse lung. Moreover, CSE-treated BMMCs triggered macrophage M2 polarization via Prss31 secretion. Recombinant Prss31 was shown to activate interleukin (IL)-13/IL-13Rα/Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 6 signaling in macrophages. Additionally, a positive correlation was found between Prss31 expression and the number of M2 macrophages in COPD mice. In conclusion, CSE-treated mast cells may induce macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization via Prss31 expression, and potentially contribute to COPD progression.

  5. Successful Pregnancy Outcome In Maternal Crigler Najjar Syndrome Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuntala PN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimated incidence of Crigler-Najjar syndrome(CNS is 1 case per 1,000,000 births(1 million. The overall prevalence of CN syndrome is unknown, with only several hundred people reported to have this disease. It is interestingly very rare to encounter a pregnant adult women with congenital jaundice. Pregnancy in CN type II patients is a diagnostic and a therapeutic challenge because of the high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy with serious neurological damage as life-threatening complications for the fetus. To date 8 pregnancy outcome have been reported from 5 women and we report the6 woman with a successful 9 th pregnancy outcome. We have discussed detail history, presentation and management during pregnancy and care of the new born.

  6. Distribution of magnetic field in type II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.L. de.

    1986-09-01

    The magnetie field penetration profile, in type II superconductor, has studied in specially designed cylindrical samples. The samples consist of alternated thick layers ( > 30 μm ) of niobium and copper deposited, by electron-beam evaporation or electro-chemical deposition, on cylindric core of either niobium or copper. The magnetization curves, the magnetic susceptibility and the differential susceptibility for small hysteresis loop ( H c1 c2 ) were measured for all the samples between 4. 2 and 9.5 K. These measurements, done with flux pinned and without, show some peculiar descontinuities and inflections which seems to resemble the samples shape. A simple phenonenological extension of Bean's critical state model was applied to these results, giving a resonable qualitative agreement. Also, a more elaborated theoretical model was improve which could give more quantitative fitting. (author) [pt

  7. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Type II Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ram Borgaonkar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old female was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in 1976 and Addison’s disease in 1979. At that time, her antimitochondrial antibody (AMA level was elevated at 1:32. She subsequently developed premature ovarian failure and type I diabetes mellitus. In 1996, she became jaundiced with a cholestatic enzyme pattern. AMA was positive at a titre of 1:256. A liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC. She underwent a liver transplantation in January 1998. This is the first report of PBC in association with type II autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. The association of PBC with other organ-specific autoimmune diseases supports an immune-mediated pathogenesis and may have implications in further studies of PBC.

  8. Vacuum stability and naturalness in type-II seesaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki [Shimane University, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Matsue (Japan); Okada, Nobuchika [University of Alabama, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Yamaguchi, Yuya [Shimane University, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Matsue (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We study the vacuum stability and perturbativity conditions in the minimal type-II seesaw model. These conditions give characteristic constraints to the model parameters. In the model, there is a SU(2){sub L} triplet scalar field, which could cause a large Higgs mass correction. From the naturalness point of view, heavy Higgs masses should be lower than 350 GeV, which may be testable by the LHC Run-II results. Due to the effects of the triplet scalar field, the branching ratios of the Higgs decay (h → γγ, Zγ) deviate from the standard model, and a large parameter region is excluded by the recent ATLAS and CMS combined analysis of h → γγ. Our result of the signal strength for h → γγ is R{sub γγ}

  9. Flux-flow noise in type II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, H.M.; Ziel, A. van der

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses flux-flow noise in type II superconductors. A theoretical expression is given for flux-flow noise in a rectangular sample with two probes, and compared with earlier models; the differences are not very large. Experiments give no flicker noise below 20 μW/mm 2 dissipation at 4.2 K, whereas much larger dissipations can be tolerated below the lambda temperature before flicker noise sets in. The shape of the spectrum at elevated frequencies is of the 1/f type, as predicted by the theory, followed by a probe size effect at still higher frequencies. The noise is much larger than would be expected from single fluxoids; this is caused by the flux bundle effect which, in turn, is due to pinning and fluxoid interaction. The size of the flux bundles can be determined from the data, it decreases with increasing current. (Auth.)

  10. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

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    Eric A. Bergshoeff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond–Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana–Weyl spinor of O(D,D. Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor–spinor of O(D,D is determined. This tensor–spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O(D,D to GL(D, one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  11. Neutrinos from Choked Jets Accompanied by Type-II Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao-Ning; Kusenko, Alexander; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2018-04-01

    The origin of the IceCube neutrinos is still an open question. Upper limits from diffuse gamma-ray observations suggest that the neutrino sources are either distant or hidden from gamma-ray observations. It is possible that the neutrinos are produced in jets that are formed in core-collapsing massive stars and fail to break out, the so-called choked jets. We study neutrinos from the jets choked in the hydrogen envelopes of red supergiant stars. Fast photo-meson cooling softens the neutrino spectrum, making it hard to explain the PeV neutrinos observed by IceCube in a one-component scenario, but a two-component model can explain the spectrum. Furthermore, we predict that a newly born jet-driven type-II supernova may be observed to be associated with a neutrino burst detected by IceCube.

  12. Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease in children

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    A. N. Semyachkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data available in the literature, which reflect the manifestations, diagnosis, and current treatments of the rare (orphan inherited disease glycogen storage disease type II or Pomp disease in children, as well as its classification. The infant form is shown to be most severe, resulting in death from cardiovascular or pulmonary failure generally within the first year of a child’s life. Emphasis is laid on major difficulties in the differential and true diagnosis of this severe disease. Much attention is given to the new pathogenetic treatment — genetically engineered enzyme replacement drug Myozyme®. The authors describe their clinical case of a child with the juvenile form of glycogen storage disease type II (late-onset Pompe disease. Particular emphasis is laid on the clinical symptoms of the disease and its diagnostic methods, among which the morphological analysis of a muscle biopsy specimen by light and electron microscopies, and enzyme and DNA diagnoses are of most importance. The proband was found to have significant lysosomal glycogen accumulation in the muscle biopsy specimen, reduced lymphocyte acid α-1,4-glucosidase activity to 4,2 nM/mg/h (normal value, 13,0—53,6 nM/mg/h, described in the HGMD missense mutation database from 1000 G>A p.Gly334er of the GAA in homozygous state, which verified the diagnosis of Pompe disease. 

  13. Magnetoexcitons in type-II semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Barticevic, Zdenka; Pacheco, Monica; Oliveira, Luiz E.

    2004-03-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of excitons in type-II semiconductor quantum dots (QD). In these systems the confinement of electrons inside the QD and the hole outside the QD produces a ring-like structure [1-2]. Recently, Ribeiro et al [3], in a magnetophotoluminescence study of type-II InP/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots, observed Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations characteristic of the ring topology for neutral excitons. Using a simple model they have derived the groundstate hole energy as a function of the magnetic field, and obtained values for the ring parameters which are in good agreement with the measured values. However, some of the features observed experimentally, in the photoluminescence intensity, can not be well explained under that approach. In this work we present a more realistic model which considers the finite width of the ring and the electron-hole interaction included via a perturbative approach. The calculations are performed within the oneparticle formalism using the effective mass approximation. The confinement potential for electrons is modelled as the superposition of a quantum well potential along the axial direction, and a parabolic lateral confinement potential. The energies for the hole in the ring plane are calculated using the method of reference [4]. Theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results of reference [3] provided that excitonic effects are properly taken into account. References 1. A.O. Govorov et al., Physica E 13 , 297 (2002). 2. K. L. Janssens et al. Phys. Rev B64, 155324 (2001), and Phys. Rev. B66, 075314 (2002). 3. E. Ribeiro, G. Medeiros-Ribeiro, and W.Carvalho Jr., and A.O. Govorov, condmat/0304092 (2003). 4. Z. Barticevic, G. Fuster, and M. Pacheco,Phys. Rev. B 65, 193307 (2002).

  14. Preferential type II muscle fiber damage from plyometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W; Myburgh, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle fibers.

  15. Functional assessment of feet of patients with type II diabetes

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    Vinicius Saura Cardoso

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the incidence of functional changes and risk of developing ulcers in type II diabetic patients seen in Primary Healthcare Units (Unidades Básicas de Saúde- UBS. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative and descriptive study comprising 80patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM aged between 41 to 85 years and attended inthe UBS in the city of Parnaíba-PI. Volunteers responded to the identification form and theMichigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI, followed by an evaluation of the lowerlimbs, as follows: achilles and patellar reflex, palpation of arterial pulses (dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial, tactile sensitivity (Monofilament 10g and vibration sensitivity (128Hz tuning fork; identification of the presence of changes such as ingrown toenails, calluses,claw toes and hair loss. Finally, using the information acquired from the assessment, subjects were classified according to the risk of developing wounds. Results: The sample consisted of 76 diabetic patients, with average age of 63.8 ± 10.4 years, 63 (82.8% were female, mean diagnostic time 8.8 ± 7.2 years, average body mass index (BMI 28.2 ± 5.4 kg/m2, with 15.7% of the sample being smokers. The myotatic reflexes and arterial pulses were reduced. Tactile sensitivity was identified in 81.5% and 13.1% did not feel the vibration of the tuning fork. The most dominant changes identified were calluses, 76.3% (n = 58. Risk level 2 of developing ulcers stood out, 52.6% (n = 40. Conclusion: Functional changes were detected in the sample and a classification of risk 2 for developing wounds was found in more than 50% of the assessed patients. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p563

  16. A Sample of Light Curves of Type II-n and other Unclassified Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Justin; Martin, J. C.; Hambsch, F.; Strickland, W.; Cason, A.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a connection between supernova impostors and Type II-n supernovae. The modern Type II-n spectroscopic classification overlaps a great deal with Zwicky’s “Type V” supernovae, which includes several impostors. In late 2012, SN 2009ip, a known impostor, may have exploded as a Type II-n supernova. The decline from that event exhibited unusual fluctuations in brightness that are not evident in other Type II-n light curves. We present the light curves of several more recent Type II-n supernova and compare them with other published samples.

  17. The effect of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain(R)) on gene expression profiles of human primary alveolar bone cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, X.Z.; Rathe, F.; Gilissen, C.; Zande, M. van der; Veltman, J.; Junker, R.; Yang, F.; Jansen, J.A.; Walboomers, X.F.

    2014-01-01

    Emdogain(R) is frequently used in regenerative periodontal treatment. Understanding its effect on gene expression of bone cells would enable new products and pathways promoting bone formation to be established. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of Emdogain(R) on expression profiles of

  18. Conditional Expression of Oncogenic C-RAF in Mouse Pulmonary Epithelial Cells Reveals Differential Tumorigenesis and Induction of Autophagy Leading to Tumor Regression

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    Fatih Ceteci

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a novel conditional mouse lung tumor model for investigation of the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. On the basis of the frequent involvement of the Ras-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in human non–small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, we have explored the target cell availability, reversibility, and cell type specificity of transformation by oncogenic C-RAF. Targeting expression to alveolar type II cells or to Clara cells, the two likely precursors of human NSCLC, revealed differential tumorigenicity between these cells. Whereas expression of oncogenic C-RAF in alveolar type II cells readily induced multifocal macroscopic lung tumors independent of the developmental state, few tumors with type II pneumocytes features and incomplete penetrance were found when targeted to Clara cells. Induced tumors did not progress and were strictly dependent on the initiating oncogene. Deinduction of mice resulted in tumor regression due to autophagy rather than apoptosis. Induction of autophagic cell death in regressing lung tumors suggests the use of autophagy enhancers as a treatment choice for patients with NSCLC.

  19. Purification and characterization of nuclear type