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Sample records for alveolar nerve transection

  1. Healing of periodontal defects and calcitonin gene related peptide expression following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Linlin; Wang, Yanzhi; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ting; Li, Shu

    2014-06-01

    The roles of nerve and neuropeptides in the process of bone formation and remolding have been studied previously. However, the effects of nervous system and neuropeptide on periodontal alveolar bone formation remained unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of innervation on regeneration of alveolar bone and expression levels of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) in periodontal tissues of rats, so as to have a better understanding of the effect of nerve and its related neuropeptide on periodontal tissue regeneration. Rats received transection of the left inferior alveolar nerve and a surgery to produce bilateral periodontal defect, then the alveolar tissue was obtained from animals of each group at week 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after operation, respectively. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, and Masson staining were performed to evaluate the ability to restore and repair periodontal tissues at 4, 6 and 8 after surgery. Then new bone formation area and mineralized area were quantified using imagepro-plus6.0 software after pictures were taken under the microscope and SPSS17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to investigate the expression of CGRP at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Rats received transection of the left inferior alveolar nerve surgery and were then sacrificed at day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 after the operation. The change of CGRP expression in periodontal tissue was detected using immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that the volume of new bone formation was not significantly difference between the experimental and control groups, but the mineralized new bone area between the two groups was statistically significant. The level of CGRP expression was lower than normal at week 1, and then it began to rise in the next stage. The plateau, at higher than normal level, was reached at 6 weeks post-surgery. Results of transection of the left inferior alveolar nerve demonstrated the expression of CGRP

  2. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

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    Angélica Castro Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics.

  3. Nerve damage associated with inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Bryan, J; Regezi, J

    1995-08-01

    The authors reviewed 12 cases in which altered sensation occurred in the distribution of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves following injection of a local anesthetic for restorative treatment only. Most patients suffered only partial damage, but recovery was poor. The exact mechanism of the nerve damage is unknown, but a number of theories are proposed. The extent of this problem is also unknown, but many more cases probably exist than have been reported to date.

  4. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

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    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  5. Calcitonin pump improves nerve regeneration after transection injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ji-Geng; Logiudice, John; Davis, John; Zhang, Lin-Ling; Agresti, Michael; Sanger, James; Matloub, Hani S; Havlik, Robert

    2015-02-01

    After nerve injury, excessive calcium impedes nerve regeneration. We previously showed that calcitonin improved nerve regeneration in crush injury. We aimed to validate the direct effect of calcitonin on transected and repaired nerve. Two rat groups (n = 8) underwent sciatic nerve transection followed by direct repair. In the calcitonin group, a calcitonin-filled mini-osmotic pump was implanted subcutaneously, with a catheter parallel to the repaired nerve. The control group underwent repair only, without a pump. Evaluation and comparison between the groups included: (1) compound muscle action potential recording of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle; (2) tetanic muscle force test of EDL; (3) nerve calcium concentration; and (4) nerve fiber count and calcified spot count. The calcitonin pump group showed superior recovery. Calcitonin affects injured and repaired peripheral nerve directly. The calcitonin-filled mini-osmotic pump improved nerve functional recovery by accelerating calcium absorption from the repaired nerve. This finding has potential clinical applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Vitality of intact teeth anterior to the mental foramen after inferior alveolar nerve repositioning: nerve transpositioning versus nerve lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehahmadi, S; Rahpeyma, A; Bidar, M; Jafarzadeh, H

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare two methods used in inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning to evaluate their effect on the vitality of intact teeth anterior to the mental foramen. Nerve lateralization (NL) is defined as the lateral reflection of the IAN without incisive nerve transection; nerve transposition (NT) involves sacrifice of the incisive nerve. Twenty-one patients were included in this study. Vitality tests for the teeth anterior to the mental foramen, including pulse oximetry and electric pulp testing, were evaluated at 1 week prior to surgery and at 1 week, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Lower lip and chin neurosensory changes were also recorded at the same time intervals by static light touch test with a cotton-tipped applicator and two-point discrimination test with sharp callipers. Vitality tests were negative after the operation in the NT group, while all had normal values at 1 week prior to the operation. In the NL group, only two patients (20%) had negative test results at 1 week after surgery. Lip and chin neurosensory changes in the total transpositions (28 operations) were seen in 7.1% at 1 year after the operation. It appears that NL is a more physiological procedure than NT. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes peripheral nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve transection in rat

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    Mohammadi Rahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To evaluate the local effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on transected sciatic nerve regeneration. Methods: Sixty male white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups randomly (n=15. In transected group the left sciatic nerve was transected and the stump was fixed to adjacent muscle. In treatment group the defect was bridged using a silicone graft filled with 10 µL VEGF. In silicone group the graft was filled with phosphate-buffered saline. In sham-operated group the sciatic nerve was ex- posed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups with five animals in each and nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after operation. Results: Behavioral test, functional study of sciatic nerve, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indi- ces confirmed a faster recovery of regenerated axons in VEGF group than in silicone group (P<0.05. In immunohistochemi- cal assessment, reactions to S-100 in VEGF group were more positive than that in silicone group. Conclusion: Local administration of VEGF will im- prove functional recovery and morphometric indices of sci- atic nerve. Key words: Peripheral nerves; Nerve regeneration; Sciatic nerve; Vascular endothelial growth factor

  8. A silk sericin/silicone nerve guidance conduit promotes regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongjian; Yang, Wen; Chen, Jianghai; Zhang, Jinxiang; Lu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xiaobo; Huang, Kun; Li, Huili; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-28

    Peripheral nerve gap defects lead to significant loss of sensory or motor function. Tissue engineering has become an important alternative to nerve repair. Sericin, a major component of silk, is a natural protein whose value in tissue engineering has just begun to be explored. Here, the first time use of sericin in vivo is reported as a long-term implant for peripheral nerve regeneration. A sericin nerve guidance conduit is designed and fabricated. This conduit is highly porous with mechanical strength matching peripheral nerve tissue. It supports Schwann cell proliferation and is capable of up-regulating the transcription of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in Schwann cells. The sericin conduit wrapped with a silicone conduit (sericin/silicone double conduits) is used for bridging repair of a 5 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. The sericin/silicone double conduits achieve functional recovery comparable to that of autologous nerve grafting as evidenced by drastically improved nerve function and morphology. Importantly, this improvement is mainly attributed to the sericin conduit as the silicone conduit alone only produces marginal functional recovery. This sericin/silicone-double-conduit strategy offers an efficient and valuable alternative to autologous nerve grafting for repairing damaged peripheral nerve. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. PERFORATION OF INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BY MAXILLARY ARTERY. LA PERFORACION DEL NERVIO ALVEOLAR INFERIOR POR LA ARTERIA MAXILAR

    OpenAIRE

    Vanishree S Nayak; Ramachandra Bhat K; Prakash Billakanti Babu

    2011-01-01

    Infratemporal fossa is clinically important anatomical area for the delivery of local anesthetic agents in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Variations in the anatomy of the inferior alveolar nerve and maxillary artery were studied in infratemporal dissection. During routine dissection of the head in an adult male cadaver an unusual variation in the origin of the inferior alveolar nerve and its relationship with the surrounding structures was observed. The inferior alveolar nerve originate...

  10. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection

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    Yi-ke Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well understood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection and unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection. Rats were allowed up to 42 days of recovery before being euthanized. The taste buds were visualized using a cytokeratin 8 antibody. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers were quantified and compared among groups. No significant difference was detected between the chorda tympani nerve transection and chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection groups. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers on the ipsilateral side all decreased significantly compared with control. On the contralateral side, the number of taste buds remained unchanged over time, but they were larger, and taste receptor cells were more numerous postoperatively. There was no evidence for a role of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the anterior taste buds.

  11. Buccal Infiltration versus Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and buccal infiltration anesthesia of mandibular second premolar with irreversible pulpitis and to evaluate the level of patient discomfort with these methods. Matherials and Methods: Forty patients, who.

  12. Buccal infiltration versus inferior alveolar nerve block in mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and buccal infiltration anesthesia of mandibular second premolar with irreversible pulpitis and to evaluate the level of patient discomfort with these methods. Materials and Methods: Forty patients, who had irreversible ...

  13. Evidence-based outcomes following inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury and repair: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnerev, E; Yates, J M

    2015-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual (LN) are susceptible to iatrogenic surgical damage. Systematically review recent clinical evidence regarding IAN/LN repair methods and to develop updated guidelines for managing injury. Recent publications on IAN/LN microsurgical repair from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were screened by title/abstract. Main texts were appraised for exclusion criteria: no treatment performed or results provided, poor/lacking procedural description, cohort injury type, injury timing, neurosensory disturbances and intra-operative findings. Best functional nerve recovery occurred after direct apposition and suturing if nerve ending gaps were nerve grafting (sural/greater auricular nerve). Timing of microneurosurgical repair after injury remains debated. Most authors recommend surgery when neurosensory deficit shows no improvement 90 days post-diagnosis. Nerve transection diagnosed intra-operatively should be repaired in situ; minor nerve injury repair can be delayed. No consensus exists regarding optimal methods and timing for IAN/LN repair. We suggest a schematic guideline for treating IAN/LN injury, based on the most current evidence. We acknowledge that additional RCTs are required to provide definitive confirmation of optimal treatment approaches. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. c-Fos induction in the brainstem following electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion of chronically mandibular nerve-transected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T; Shimoda, T; Urade, M; Hasegawa, M; Sugiyo, S; Takemura, M

    2013-12-01

    Neuronal excitability in the trigeminal sensory nuclei (TSN) changes after nerve transection. We examined the effects of chronic transection of the trigeminal nerve on the c-Fos-immunoreactivity in the TSN induced 2 h after 10 min of electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) at C-fiber activating condition (1.0 mA, 5 ms, 5 Hz) in urethane-anesthetized rats. In the non-transected control rats, stimulation of the TG induced c-Fos-immunoreactive cells (c-Fos-IR cells) mostly in superficial layers (VcI/II) of the nucleus caudalis (Vc) in its full extent along the dorsomedial-ventrolateral axis, but modestly in the rostral TSN above the obex, the principal, oral, and interpolar nuclei. Three days, 1, 2, or 3 weeks after transection of the inferior alveolar (IAN), infraorbital, or masseteric nerves, the stimulation of the TG induced c-Fos-IR cells in the central terminal fields of the transected nerve in the rostral TSN and magnocellular zone of the Vc. However, the number of c-Fos-IR cells in the VcI/II decreased inside the central terminal fields of the transected nerve and increased outside the fields. These results indicate that transection of the trigeminal nerve increases the excitability of TSN neurons that receive inputs from injured mechanoreceptors and uninjured nociceptors, but decreases it from injured nociceptors. The altered c-Fos responses may imply mechanisms of neuropathic pain seen after nerve injury.

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use.

  16. PERFORATION OF INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BY MAXILLARY ARTERY. Perforation of inferior alveolar nerve by maxillary artery

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash B Billakanti

    2016-01-01

    La fosa infratemporal es un área anatómica clínicamente importante para la administración de agentes anestésicos locales en odontología y cirugía maxilofacial. Fueron estudiadas variaciones en la anatomía del nervio alveolar inferior y la arteria maxilar en la disección infratemporal. Durante la disección rutinaria de la cabeza en el cadáver de un varón adulto, fue observada una variación excepcional en el origen del nervio alveolar inferior y su relación con las estructuras circundantes. El ...

  17. Histological modifications of the rat prostate following transection of somatic and autonomic nerves

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    Rosaura Diaz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that hormones influence significantly the prostate tissue. However, we reported that mating induces an increase in androgen receptors, revealing a neural influence on the gland. These data suggested that somatic afferents (scrotal and genitofemoral nerves and autonomic efferents (pelvic and hypogastric nerves could regulate the structure of the prostate. Here we assessed the role of these nerves in maintaining the histology of the gland. Hence, afferent or efferent nerves of male rats were transected. Then, the ventral and dorsolateral regions of the prostate were processed for histology. Results showed that afferent transection affects prostate histology. The alveoli area decreased and increased in the ventral and dorsolateral prostate, respectively. The epithelial cell height increased in both regions. Efferent denervation produced dramatic changes in the prostate gland. The tissue lost its configuration, and the epithelium became scattered and almost vanished. Thus, afferent nerves are responsible for spinal processes pertaining to the trophic control of the prostate, activating its autonomic innervation. Hence, our data imply that innervation seems to be synergic with hormones for the healthy maintenance of the prostate. Thus, it is suggested that some prostate pathologies could be due to the failure of the autonomic neural pathways regulating the gland.Sabe-se que os hormônios influenciam significativamente o tecido prostático. Entretanto, nós demonstramos que o acasalamento induz um aumento nos receptores androgênicos, revelando uma influência neural sobre a glândula. Esses dados sugerem que os aferentes somáticos (nervos escrotal e genito-femural e os eferentes autonômicos (nervos pélvicos e hipo-gástricos poderiam regular a estrutura da próstata. Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a função destes nervos na manutenção da histologia da glândula. Dessa forma, os nervos aferentes e eferentes de ratos machos foram

  18. Modified technique for preservation of inferior alveolar nerve during mandibulectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Jie; Yang, Chi; Huang, Dong; He, Dong-Mei; Wang, Yi-Wen; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the modified technique of preservation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) during mandibulectomy for a benign lesion. Five cases of osteofibrous hyperplasia and 3 cases of centricity osteomyelitis were included. During surgery, the IAN was marked using a planned cutting guide. Using an oscillating saw, the depth of the osteotomy along the IAN was controlled until the bone cortex was cut through. After splitting, the bony section was removed, leaving the neurovascular bundle intact. The sensation of the lower lip was evaluated using current perceptive threshold testing during follow-up. After follow-up for 6-27 months, no recurrence or secondary deformity was found. One patient had severe sensory disturbance. With the use of a cutting guide and osteotomy tricks, mandibulectomy with preservation of the IAN can be accurately performed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Inferior alveolar nerve cutting; legal liability versus desired patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Jong Ho

    2017-10-01

    Mandibular angle reduction or reduction genioplasty is a routine well-known facial contouring surgery that reduces the width of the lower face resulting in an oval shaped face. During the intraoral resection of the mandibular angle or chin using an oscillating saw, unexpected peripheral nerve damage including inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) damage could occur. This study analyzed cases of damaged IANs during facial contouring surgery, and asked what the basic standard of care in these medical litigation-involved cases should be. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 28 patients with IAN damage after mandibular contouring from August 2008 to July 2015. Most of the patients did not have an antipathy to medical staff because they wanted their faces to be ovoid shaped. We summarized three representative cases according to each patient's perceptions and different operation procedures under the approvement by the Institutional Review Board of Seoul National University. Most of the patients did not want to receive any further operations not due to fear of an operation but because of the changes in their facial appearance. Thus, their fear may be due to a desire for a better perfect outcome, and to avoid unsolicited patient complaints related litigation. This article analyzed representative IAN cutting cases that occurred during mandibular contouring esthetic surgery and evaluated a questionnaire on the standard of care for the desired patient outcomes and the specialized surgeon's position with respect to legal liability.

  20. Study of Transected Sciatic Nerve Repair by Amniotic Membrane with Betamethasone in Adult Albino Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Parivar, Kazem; Arabi, Farzaneh; Moattari, Mehrnaz; Kaka, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Korosh

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of amniotic membrane impregnated with betamethasone on regeneration of transected sciatic nerve injury in adult albino Wister rats. In this research, 42 male adult rats were divided into six equal groups. 1) Normal (intact) group: healthy rats without any injury; 2) CONTROL GROUP: sciatic nerve was cut and sutured; 3) Sham group: 0.2 mL culture medium was injected on the epineurium in the injury; 4) Amniotic membrane group (AM): Acellular amniotic membrane was used around the damaged sciatic nerve; 5) Betamethasone group (B): 0.2 mL Betamethasone (4 mg/mL) was injected in the site of damaged nerve and 6) Amniotic membrane group and Betamethasone (AM/B) group: Acellular amniotic membrane impregnated with 0.2 mL betamethasone was used around the damaged sciatic nerve. The rate of recovery was studied by Sciatic Functional Index (SFI), withdrawal reflex latency (WRL) test and electroctrophysiological assessments at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after surgery. Histological assessment was done 8 weeks after surgery. At 8 weeks after surgery, SFI, WRL test and electrophysiological values in AM/B group were significantly improved compared to control and sham groups (P nerve regeneration of transected sciatic nerve in a rat model.

  1. Relationship of distraction rate with inferior alveolar nerve degeneration-regeneration shift

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    Ying-hua Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis is an important technique for the treatment of maxillofacial abnormities and defects. However, distraction osteogenesis may cause the injury of the inferior alveolar nerve. The relationship between distraction rate and nerve degeneration-regeneration shift remains poorly understood. In this study, 24 rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. To establish the rabbit mandibular distraction osteogenesis model, the mandibles of rabbits in distraction osteogenesis groups were subjected to continuous osteogenesis distraction at a rate of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm/d, respectively, by controlling rounds of screwing each day in the distractors. In the sham group, mandible osteotomy was performed without distraction. Pin-prick test with a 10 g blunt pin on the labium, histological and histomorphometric analyses with methylene blue staining, Bodian's silver staining, transmission electron microscopy and myelinated fiber density of inferior alveolar nerve cross-sections were performed to assess inferior alveolar nerve conditions. At 28 days after model establishment, in the pin-prick test, the inferior alveolar nerve showed no response in the labium to a pin pricks in the 2 mm/d group, indicating a severe dysfunction. Histological and histomorphometric analyses indicated that the inferior alveolar nerve suffered more degeneration and injuries at a high distraction rate (2 mm/d. Importantly, the nerve regeneration, indicated by newborn Schwann cells and axons, was more abundant in 1.0 and 1.5 mm/d groups than in 2.0 mm/d group. We concluded that the distraction rate was strongly associated with the inferior alveolar nerve function, and the distraction rates of 1.0 and 1.5 mm/d had regenerative effects on the inferior alveolar nerve. This study provides an experimental basis for the relationship between distraction rate and nerve degeneration-regeneration shift during distraction osteogenesis, and may facilitate reducing nerve

  2. A free vein graft cap influences neuroma formation after nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Manasseri, Benedetto; Risitano, Giovanni; Geuna, Stefano; Di Scipio, Federica; La Rosa, Paola; Delia, Gabriele; D'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Colonna, Michele R

    2009-01-01

    : Neuroma formation is a major problem in nerve surgery and consensus about its prevention has not been reached. It has been suggested that vein covering can reduce neuroma formation in transected nerves. In this article, the Authors propose an easy and novel method of covering by nerve stump capping with a free vein graft. : Neuroma-like lesions were created on the rat thigh sectioning the femoral nerve above its division in 16 animals. The proximal nerve stump was invaginated into the lumen of a 1.5 cm long femoral free vein graft on the right side, and the vein was closed on itself by microsurgical sutures to form a cap for the nerve stump. On the left side acting as the control neuroma, the nerve was cut and left uncovered. Histological and immunohistochemical assessment was used to quantify the degree of neuroma formation. : Significant differences were found in both neuroma size and axon-glia organization between the treated and control sides indicating that free vein graft capping reduced neuroma formation in comparison to uncovered nerve stumps. : Our results confirm that vein-covering of a transected nerve stump can be effective in reducing neuroma formation. Moreover, unlike previous works that buried the nerve into an adjacent vein left in place, our experiments showed that also the use of a free vein graft cap can hinder neuroma formation. Although translation of rat experiments to the clinics should be dealt with caution, our data suggest a careful clinical use of the technique. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2009.

  3. Nerve transection repair using laser-activated chitosan in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Neel K; Khan, Taleef R; Mejias, Christopher; Paniello, Randal C

    2017-08-01

    Cranial nerve transection during head and neck surgery is conventionally repaired with microsuture. Previous studies have demonstrated recovery with laser nerve welding (LNW), a novel alternative to microsuture. LNW has been reported to have poorer tensile strength, however. Laser-activated chitosan, an adhesive biopolymer, may promote nerve recovery while enhancing the tensile strength of the repair. Using a rat posterior tibial nerve injury model, we compared four different methods of nerve repair in this pilot study. Animal study. Animals underwent unilateral posterior tibial nerve transection. The injury was repaired by potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser alone (n = 20), KTP + chitosan (n = 12), microsuture + chitosan (n = 12), and chitosan alone (n = 14). Weekly walking tracks were conducted to measure functional recovery (FR). Tensile strength (TS) was measured at 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, KTP laser alone had the best recovery (FR = 93.4% ± 8.3%). Microsuture + chitosan, KTP + chitosan, and chitosan alone all showed good FR (87.4% ± 13.5%, 84.6% ± 13.0%, and 84.1% ± 10.0%, respectively). One-way analysis of variance was performed (F(3,56) = 2.6, P = .061). A TS threshold of 3.8 N was selected as a control mean recovery. Three groups-KTP alone, KTP + chitosan, and microsuture + chitosan-were found to meet threshold 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.1%-88.3%), 75% (95% CI: 46.8%-91.1%), and 100% (95% CI: 75.8%-100.0%), respectively. In the posterior tibial nerve model, all repair methods promoted nerve recovery. Laser-activated chitosan as a biopolymer anchor provided good TS and appears to be a novel alternative to microsuture. This repair method may have surgical utility following cranial nerve injury during head and neck surgery. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E253-E257, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Effect of Preoperative Pain on Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Sharma, Vikram; Sharma, Ritu; Prakash, Venkatachalam; Geethapriya, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the amount and severity of preoperative pain will affect the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One-hundred seventy-seven adult volunteer subjects, actively experiencing pain in a mandibular molar, participated in this prospective double-blind study carried out at 2 different centers. The patients were classified into 3 groups on the basis of severity of preoperative pain: mild, 1–54 mm on the Heft-Parker visual analog scale (HP VAS); moderate, 55–114 mm; and severe, greater than 114 mm. After IANB with 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine, endodontic access preparation was initiated. Pain during treatment was recorded using the HP VAS. The primary outcome measure was the ability to undertake pulp access and canal instrumentation with no or mild pain. The success rates were statistically analyzed by multiple logistic regression test. There was a significant difference between the mild and severe preoperative pain group (P = .03). There was a positive correlation between the values of preoperative and intraoperative pain (r = .2 and .4 at 2 centers). The amount of preoperative pain can affect the anesthetic success rates of IANB in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26650491

  5. Retinal glutamate transporter changes in experimental glaucoma and after optic nerve transection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R G; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Valenta, Danielle; Baumrind, Lisa; Pease, Mary Ellen; Quigley, Harry A

    2002-07-01

    High levels of glutamate can be toxic to retinal ganglion cells. Effective buffering of extracellular glutamate by retinal glutamate transporters is therefore important. This study was conducted to investigate whether glutamate transporter changes occur with two models of optic nerve injury in the rat. Glaucoma was induced in one eye of 35 adult Wistar rats by translimbal diode laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork. Twenty-five more rats underwent unilateral optic nerve transection. Two glutamate transporters, GLAST (EAAT-1) and GLT-1 (EAAT-2), were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantitative Western blot analysis. Treated and control eyes were compared 3 days and 1, 4, and 6 weeks after injury. Optic nerve damage was assessed semiquantitatively in epoxy-embedded optic nerve cross sections. Trabecular laser treatment resulted in moderate intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in all animals. After 1 to 6 weeks of experimental glaucoma, all treated eyes had significant optic nerve damage. Glutamate transporter changes were not detected by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis demonstrated significantly reduced GLT-1 in glaucomatous eyes compared with control eyes at 3 days (29.3% +/- 6.7%, P = 0.01), 1 week (55.5% +/- 13.6%, P = 0.02), 4 weeks (27.2% +/- 10.1%, P = 0.05), and 6 weeks (38.1% +/- 7.9%, P = 0.01; mean reduction +/- SEM, paired t-tests, n = 5 animals per group, four duplicate Western blot analyses per eye). The magnitude of the reduction in GLT-1 correlated significantly with mean IOP in the glaucomatous eye (r(2) = 0.31, P = 0.01, linear regression). GLAST was significantly reduced (33.8% +/- 8.1%, mean +/- SEM) after 4 weeks of elevated IOP (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 5 animals per group). In contrast to glaucoma, optic nerve transection resulted in an increase in GLT-1 compared with the control eye (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 15 animals). There was no significant change in GLAST after transection. GLT-1 and GLAST were significantly

  6. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Chyi Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI (P<0.01 and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit.

  7. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  8. A multivariate statistical analysis on variables affecting inferior alveolar nerve damage during third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippi, R; Santoro, M

    2015-08-28

    The risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve damage during third molar surgery were investigated. Surgeries performed during a period of 50 months by a single expert surgeon were reviewed. Only those surgeries that met the selected inclusion criteria were considered for this study. The following tests were applied for the statistical analysis: the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the principal components analysis, the Mann-Whitney U test, the two-tailed exact Fisher test and the Bonferroni sequential correction. The surgical difficulty index, multi-rooted third molars and changes in the inferior alveolar nerve running in relation to the tooth roots are predictors of nerve damage. Computed tomography is mandatory when the nerve is superimposed on the tooth root on the ortopantomography. SCIENTIFIC RATIONALE FOR STUDY: Lower third molar extraction is one of the most common procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgery, and it is burdened by the risk of inferior alveolar nerve damage. Understanding which factors are able to predict this complication is therefore essential in correctly programming surgery. Surgical difficulty index, multi-rooted third molars and changes in inferior alveolar nerve running in relation to the tooth roots are predictors of nerve damage. If, on the orthopantomography, the nerve is superimposed on the tooth root, a computed tomography is mandatory to define all of these variables.

  9. Connexin 43 contributes to ectopic orofacial pain following inferior alveolar nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Kaori; Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Unno, Syumpei; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, it is well known that injury of mandibular nerve fiber induces persistent ectopic pain which can spread to a wide area of the orofacial region innervated by the uninjured trigeminal nerve branches. However, the exact mechanism of such persistent ectopic orofacial pain is not still known. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of connexin 43 in the trigeminal ganglion on mechanical hypersensitivity in rat whisker pad skin induced by inferior alveolar nerve injury. Here, we examined changes in orofacial mechanical sensitivity following inferior alveolar nerve injury. Furthermore, changes in connexin 43 expression in the trigeminal ganglion and its localization in the trigeminal ganglion were also examined. In addition, we investigated the functional significance of connexin 43 in relation to mechanical allodynia by using a selective gap junction blocker (Gap27). Long-lasting mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin and the upper eyelid skin, and activation of satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, were induced after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Connexin 43 was expressed in the activated satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin, and the connexin 43 protein expression was significantly increased after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Administration of Gap27 in the trigeminal ganglion significantly reduced satellite glial cell activation and mechanical hypersensitivity in the whisker pad skin. Moreover, the marked activation of satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin following inferior alveolar nerve injury implies that the satellite glial cell activation exerts a major influence on the excitability of nociceptive trigeminal ganglion neurons. These findings indicate that the propagation of satellite glial cell activation throughout the trigeminal ganglion via gap junctions, which are composed of connexin 43, plays a

  10. Restoration of elbow flexion by performing contralateral lateral thoracic and thoracodorsal nerve transfers after experimental musculocutaneous nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Cuvilliez, Valérie; Klein, Arnaud; Carozzo, Claude; Escriou, Catherine; Gnirs, Kirsten; Blot, Stéphane; Hidalgo, Antoine

    2005-07-01

    The immediate transfer of the right lateral thoracic nerve (LTN) and the thoracodorsal nerve (TDN) to the transected left musculocutaneous nerve (MCN), leading to nerve cross-neurotization, was performed in cats to evaluate reinnervation of the biceps brachii muscle (BBM). Surgery to produce cross-neurotization of the MCN was performed in 12 cats (treatment group). Transection of the MCN was performed without attempts at neurotization in three cats (control group). Reinnervation of the BBM was assessed by performing electromyography (EMG) 6 months (14 cats) and 26 months (one cat) postsurgery. True Blue retrograde axonal tracing studies, tensile force measurements (muscle extensometry), and histopathological analyses were performed. All cats in the treatment group recovered voluntary contraction of the BBM and regained elbow flexion. Electromyography revealed no abnormal spontaneous activity in the BBM. Muscle evoked potentials were recorded in that muscle after right C-8 ventral branch stimulation. The muscle contraction strength in the left BBM varied from 108 to 557 g. The BBMs regained their normal appearances. The region of the MCN distal to the anastomosis displayed a normal histological appearance. Fluorescence was detected in the ventral horn of the spinal cord in the right C-8 and T-1 segments. In contrast, in all cats in the control group there was atrophy of the BBM, no EMG signal, and no clinical sign of recovery. There was no contraction of the BBM, no labeled neuron in the spinal cord, and the MCN displayed major degenerative changes. These findings demonstrate that the LTN and TDN can be used to neurotize injured contralateral brachial plexus nerves and obtain successful reinnervation in cats.

  11. Functional recovery after transection of the sciatic nerve at an early age : a pilot study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, Marcel F.; IJkema-Paassen, Jos; Gramsbergen, Albert

    It is often clinically noted that peripheral nerve transections in infants and very young children seem to show better functional recovery after nerve repair compared with adult patients. There can be several reasons for this (e.g. outgrowing axons might have maintained their potential to locate

  12. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic transection and repair of an obturator nerve during pelvic lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhat, Farr R; Chang-Jackson, Shao-Chun R; Acholonu, Uchenna C; Vetere, Patrick F

    2012-02-01

    Obturator nerve injury may occur in gynecologic surgery, particularly in cases in which extensive pelvic sidewall retroperitoneal dissection is performed. The lack of tactile feedback from the robotic surgical system may contribute to obturator nerve injury. If surgical division occurs, microsurgical end-to-end anastomosis of the obturator nerve may be performed. A 76-year-old woman with stage IA endometrial adenocarcinoma sustained a left obturator nerve transection during pelvic lymphadenectomy that was recognized immediately. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair was performed successfully, with the patient experiencing no residual neuropathy 6 months postoperatively. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair is feasible for the treatment of obturator nerve injury.

  13. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; García-Delgado, Raúl; Catena, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Background Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). Study Design In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Results Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. Conclusions This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, mandibular nerve, mental foramen. PMID:28809376

  14. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Torres, M; Padial-Molina, M; Avila-Ortiz, G; García-Delgado, R; Catena, A; Galindo-Moreno, P

    2017-09-01

    Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension.

  15. Electrospun micro- and nanofiber tubes for functional nervous regeneration in sciatic nerve transections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadio Stefano

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many nerve prostheses have been proposed in recent years, in the case of consistent loss of nervous tissue peripheral nerve injury is still a traumatic pathology that may impair patient's movements by interrupting his motor-sensory pathways. In the last few decades tissue engineering has opened the door to new approaches;: however most of them make use of rigid channel guides that may cause cell loss due to the lack of physiological local stresses exerted over the nervous tissue during patient's movement. Electrospinning technique makes it possible to spin microfiber and nanofiber flexible tubular scaffolds composed of a number of natural and synthetic components, showing high porosity and remarkable surface/volume ratio. Results In this study we used electrospun tubes made of biodegradable polymers (a blend of PLGA/PCL to regenerate a 10-mm nerve gap in a rat sciatic nerve in vivo. Experimental groups comprise lesioned animals (control group and lesioned animals subjected to guide conduits implantated at the severed nerve stumps, where the tubular scaffolds are filled with saline solution. Four months after surgery, sciatic nerves failed to reconnect the two stumps of transected nerves in the control animal group. In most of the treated animals the electrospun tubes induced nervous regeneration and functional reconnection of the two severed sciatic nerve tracts. Myelination and collagen IV deposition have been detected in concurrence with regenerated fibers. No significant inflammatory response has been found. Neural tracers revealed the re-establishment of functional neuronal connections and evoked potential results showed the reinnervation of the target muscles in the majority of the treated animals. Conclusion Corroborating previous works, this study indicates that electrospun tubes, with no additional biological coating or drug loading treatment, are promising scaffolds for functional nervous regeneration. They

  16. Pulsed electromagnetic fields accelerate functional recovery of transected sciatic nerve bridged by chitosan conduit: an animal model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Faraji, Darab; Alemi, Hanieh; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2014-12-01

    Effect of whole body exposure to pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve transection model was assessed. Sixty male white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: In transected group (TC) left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in adjacent muscle. In chitosan group (CHIT) the defect was bridged using a chitosan conduit filled with phosphate-buffered saline. In treatment group (CHIT/PEMF) the whole body was exposed to PEMF (0.3 mT, 2 Hz) for 4 h/day within 1-5 days. In normal control group (NC) sciatic nerve was only dissected and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral, functional, electrophysiological, biomechanical, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in CHIT/PEMF than in CHIT group (p PEMF were more positive than that in CHIT group. Whole body exposure to PEMF improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Detailed mechanism of neuroprotective action remains to be investigated. PEMF combine with chitosan grafting could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Participation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in experimental neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chacur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nerve injury leads to a neuropathic pain state that results from central sensitization. This phenomenom is mediated by NMDA receptors and may involve the production of nitric oxide (NO. In this study, we investigated the expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS in the spinal cord of 3-month-old male, Wistar rats after sciatic nerve transection (SNT. Our attention was focused on the dorsal part of L3-L5 segments receiving sensory inputs from the sciatic nerve. SNT resulted in the development of neuropathic pain symptoms confirmed by evaluating mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall and Selitto test and allodynia (von Frey hair test. Control animals did not present any alteration (sham-animals. The selective inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (0.2 and 2 µg in 50 µL, blocked hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by SNT. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that nNOS was increased (48% by day 30 in the lumbar spinal cord after SNT. This increase was observed near the central canal (Rexed’s lamina X and also in lamina I-IV of the dorsal horn. Real-time PCR results indicated an increase of nNOS mRNA detected from 1 to 30 days after SNT, with the highest increase observed 1 day after injury (1469%. Immunoblotting confirmed the increase of nNOS in the spinal cord between 1 and 15 days post-lesion (20%, reaching the greatest increase (60% 30 days after surgery. The present findings demonstrate an increase of nNOS after peripheral nerve injury that may contribute to the increase of NO production observed after peripheral neuropathy.

  18. [Application of miniscrew for extraction of mesially impacted wisdom tooth adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-qing; Fan, Jian-fen; Xu, Pei-cheng; Xiang, Fei; Qin, Fei

    2015-04-01

    To study the value of miniscrew for extraction of mesially impacted wisdom tooth adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal. Fourteen mesially impacted wisdom teeth were proven to be adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal by means of cone-beam CT scan. The treatment began with the miniscrew traction of the wisdom teeth. After 2-5 months, they were moved away from the canal and then extracted. After extraction, all 14 cases did not show any obvious side effect. Application of miniscrew traction is a valuable method for minimally invasive extraction of mesially impacted wisdom tooth that is adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal.

  19. Combination of Local Transplantation of In Vitro Bone-marrow Stromal Cells and Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields Accelerate Functional Recovery of Transected Sciatic Nerve Regeneration: A Novel Approach in Transected Nerve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Mahmoodzadeh, Sirvan

    2015-01-01

    Effect of combination of undifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on transected sciatic nerve regeneration was assessed in rats. A 10 mm nerve segment was excised and a vein graft was used to bridge the gap. Twenty microliter undifferentiated BMSCs (2× 107 cells /mL) were administered into the graft inBMSC group with no exposure to PEMF. In BMSC/PEMF group the whole body was exposed to PEMF (0.3 mT, 2Hz) for 4h/day within 1-5 days. In PEMF group the transected nerve was bridged and phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft. In authograft group (AUTO), the transected nervesegments were reimplanted reversely and the whole body was exposed to PEMF. The regenerated nerve fibers were studied within 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral, functional, electrophysiological, biomechanical, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings, morphometric indices and immuonohistochemical reactions confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in BMSC/PEMF group compared to those in the other groups (PPEMF improved functional recovery. Combination of local transplantation of in vitro bone-marrow stromal cells and pulsed electromagnetic fields could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice.

  20. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection.

  1. Should we be giving bilateral inferior alveolar and lingual nerve blocks for third molar surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, J; Shekar, V; Mitchell, D A; Brennan, P A

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of mandibular third molars is one of the most common procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgery, and it is normal practice to extract both teeth at one visit under general anaesthesia. However, when both teeth are extracted under local anaesthesia, bilateral inferior alveolar and lingual nerve blocks are required, which is a subject of debate among clinicians. Much of the controversy surrounds the safety and efficacy of bilateral anaesthesia even though many surgeons use local anaesthetic solutions for perioperative and postoperative pain relief after day case general anaesthesia with no reports of unwanted effects. The evidence presented in this review explores published research for and against the use of unilateral and bilateral inferior alveolar and lingual nerve blocks. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Correction: Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2011-11-30

    ABSTRACT: Following the publication of our article [Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report. Journal of Medical Case Reports 2011, 5:122] it was brought to our attention that we inadvertently used the registered trademark of the Laryngeal Mask Company Limited (LMA) as the abbreviation for laryngeal mask airway. A Portex(R) Soft Seal(R) Laryngeal Mask was used and not a device manufactured by the Laryngeal Mask Company.

  3. Measurement of amino acid levels in the vitreous humor of rats after chronic intraocular pressure elevation or optic nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Martin, Keith R G; Quigley, Harry A; Baumrind, Lisa A; Pease, Mary Ellen; Valenta, Danielle

    2002-10-01

    To investigate whether the levels of free amino acids and protein in the vitreous of rat eyes are altered with chronic intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation or after optic nerve transection. The concentrations of 20 amino acids in the vitreous humor were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in both eyes of 41 rats with unilateral IOP elevation induced by translimbal photocoagulation. Eyes were studied 1 day and 1, 2, 4, and 9 weeks after initial IOP elevation. The same amino acids were measured in 41 rats 1 day and 2, 4, and 9 weeks after unilateral transection of the orbital optic nerve. The intravitreal protein level was assayed in additional 22 rats with IOP elevation and 12 rats after nerve transection. Two masked observers evaluated the amount of optic nerve damage with a semiquantitative, light-microscopic technique. In rats with experimental glaucoma, amino acid concentrations were unchanged 1 day after treatment. At 1 week, 4 of 20 amino acids (aspartate, proline, alanine, and lysine) were higher than in control eyes ( 0.05). Vitreous protein level was significantly higher in glaucomatous eyes than their paired controls at 1 day ( 0.01).

  4. Regenerative Effects of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on Restoration of Thyroarytenoid Muscle Atrophy Caused by Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mami; Tsuji, Takuya; Kishimoto, Yo; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Hirano, Shigeru

    2017-10-27

    Vocal fold atrophy following unilateral vocal fold paralysis is caused by atrophy of the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle and remains a challenge. Medialization procedures are popular treatment options; however, hoarseness often remains due to the reduction in mass or tension of the TA muscle. Therefore, in addition to medialization procedures, TA muscle reinnervation is desirable. In vivo studies have shown the potential for basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to affect muscular and nerve regeneration. The present study aimed to examine the regenerative effects of bFGF on restoration of TA muscle atrophy caused by recurrent laryngeal nerve transection. Prospective animal experiments with controls. TA muscle atrophy was induced by unilateral transection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. One month after transection, different doses (200 ng, 100 ng, 10 ng) of bFGF in 50 µL were repeatedly injected into the TA muscle four times with an interval of 1 week between injections. Saline only was injected in the sham group. Larynges were harvested for histologic and immunohistochemical examination 4 weeks after the final injection. The cross-sectional TA muscle area was significantly larger in the bFGF-treated groups compared with the sham-treated groups. Immunohistochemistry indicated that bFGF significantly increases the number of neuromuscular junctions and satellite cells in the TA muscle. These results suggest that local application of bFGF to the TA muscle may improve TA muscle atrophy caused by recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Furthermore, bFGF may have regenerative effects on both nerves and muscles. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Positive effects of bFGF modified rat amniotic epithelial cells transplantation on transected rat optic nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Xin Xie

    Full Text Available Effective therapy for visual loss caused by optic nerve injury or diseases has not been achieved even though the optic nerve has the regeneration potential after injury. This study was designed to modify amniotic epithelial cells (AECs with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF gene, preliminarily investigating its effect on transected optic nerve.A human bFGF gene segment was delivered into rat AECs (AECs/hbFGF by lentiviral vector, and the gene expression was examined by RT-PCR and ELISA. The AECs/hbFGF and untransfected rat AECs were transplanted into the transected site of the rat optic nerve. At 28 days post transplantation, the survival and migration of the transplanted cells was observed by tracking labeled cells; meanwhile retinal ganglion cells (RGCs were observed and counted by employing biotin dextran amine (BDA and Nissl staining. Furthermore, the expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43 within the injury site was examined with immunohistochemical staining.The AECs/hbFGF was proven to express bFGF gene and secrete bFGF peptide. Both AECs/hbFGF and AECs could survive and migrate after transplantation. RGCs counting implicated that RGCs numbers of the cell transplantation groups were significantly higher than that of the control group, and the AECs/hbFGF group was significantly higher than that of the AECs group. Moreover GAP-43 integral optical density value in the control group was significantly lower than that of the cell transplantation groups, and the value in the AECs/hbFGF group was significantly higher than that of the AECs group.AECs modified with bFGF could reduce RGCs loss and promote expression of GAP-43 in the rat optic nerve transected model, facilitating the process of neural restoration following injury.

  6. The anatomical relationship between the roots of mandibular second molars and the inferior alveolar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, B S; Quinn, A; Pawar, R R; Makdissi, J; Sidhu, S K

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the anatomical relationship between the roots of mandibular second molars and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) in relation to the risk of potential nerve injury during root canal treatment. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from the patient record database at a dental hospital were selected. The anonymized CBCT images were reconstructed and examined in three planes (coronal, axial and sagittal) using 3D viewing software. The relationship between each root apex of mandibular second molars and the IAN was evaluated by measuring the horizontal and vertical distances from coronal CBCT sections, and the actual distance was then calculated mathematically using Pythagoras' theorem. In 55% of the 272 mandibular second molar roots evaluated, from a total of 134 scans, the distance between the anatomical root apex and the IAN was ≤3 mm. In over 50% of the cases evaluated, there was an intimate relationship between the roots of mandibular second molars and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). Therefore, root canal treatment of mandibular second molars may pose a more significant potential risk of IAN injury; necessary precautions should be exercised, and the prudent use of CBCT should be considered if an intimate relationship is suspected. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of Locally Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Survival of Transected and Repaired Adult Sheep Facial Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Al Abri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine whether the administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF at the site of repaired facial nerve enhances regeneration in the adult sheep model. Methods: Ten adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: control and study group (CNTF group. In the CNTF group, the buccal branch of the facial nerve was transected and then repaired by epineural sutures. CNTF was injected over the left depressor labii maxillaris muscle in the vicinity of the transected and repaired nerve for 28 days under local anesthesia. In the CNTF group, the sheep were again anesthetized after nine months and the site of facial nerve repair was exposed. Detailed electrophysiological, tension experiments and morphometric studies were carried out and then analyzed statistically. Results: The skin CV min, refractory period, Jitter and tension parameters were marginally raised in the CNTF group than the control but the difference was statistically insignificant between the two groups. Morphometric indices also did not show any significant changes in the CNTF group. Conclusion: CNTF has no profound effect on neuronal regeneration of adult sheep animal model.

  8. Skin and mucosal ischemia as a complication after inferior alveolar nerve block

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    Pedro Christian Aravena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anesthetic block of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN is one of the most common techniques used in dental practice. The local complications are due to the failures on the anesthetic block or to anatomic variations in the tap site such as intravascular injection, skin ischemia and ocular problems. The aim of this article is to present a case and discuss the causes of itching and burning sensation, blanching, pain and face ischemia in the oral cavity during the IAN block.

  9. Role of JNK isoforms in the development of neuropathic pain following sciatic nerve transection in the mouse

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    Manassero Giusi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current tools for analgesia are often only partially successful, thus investigations of new targets for pain therapy stimulate great interest. Consequent to peripheral nerve injury, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activity in cells of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and spinal cord is involved in triggering neuropathic pain. However, the relative contribution of distinct JNK isoforms is unclear. Using knockout mice for single isoforms, and blockade of JNK activity by a peptide inhibitor, we have used behavioral tests to analyze the contribution of JNK in the development of neuropathic pain after unilateral sciatic nerve transection. In addition, immunohistochemical labelling for the growth associated protein (GAP-43 and Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP in DRGs was used to relate injury related compensatory growth to altered sensory function. Results Peripheral nerve injury produced pain–related behavior on the ipsilateral hindpaw, accompanied by an increase in the percentage of GAP43-immunoreactive (IR neurons and a decrease in the percentage of CGRP-IR neurons in the lumbar DRGs. The JNK inhibitor, D-JNKI-1, successfully modulated the effects of the sciatic nerve transection. The onset of neuropathic pain was not prevented by the deletion of a single JNK isoform, leading us to conclude that all JNK isoforms collectively contribute to maintain neuropathy. Autotomy behavior, typically induced by sciatic nerve axotomy, was absent in both the JNK1 and JNK3 knockout mice. Conclusions JNK signaling plays an important role in regulating pain threshold: the inhibition of all of the JNK isoforms prevents the onset of neuropathic pain, while the deletion of a single splice JNK isoform mitigates established sensory abnormalities. JNK inactivation also has an effect on axonal sprouting following peripheral nerve injury.

  10. Evaluation of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Regeneration by Bifocal Distraction Osteogenesis with Retrograde Transportation of Horseradish Peroxidase in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Emiko Tanaka

    2014-01-01

    Background Bifocal distraction osteogenesis has been shown to be a reliable method for reconstructing segmental mandibular defects. However, there are few reports regarding the occurrence of inferior alveolar nerve regeneration during the process of distraction. Previously, we reported inferior alveolar nerve regeneration after distraction, and evaluated the regenerated nerve using histological and electrophysiological methods. In the present study, we investigated axons regenerated by bifocal distraction osteogenesis using retrograde transportation of horseradish peroxidase in the mandibles of dogs to determine their type and function. Methods and Findings Using a bifocal distraction osteogenesis method, we produced a 10-mm mandibular defect, including a nerve defect, in 11 dogs and distracted using a transport disk at a rate of 1 mm/day. The regenerated inferior alveolar nerve was evaluated by retrograde transportation of HRP in all dogs at 3 and 6 months after the first operation. At 3 and 6 months, HRP-labeled neurons were observed in the trigeminal ganglion. The number of HRP-labeled neurons in each section increased, while the cell body diameter of HRP-labeled neurons was reduced over time. Conclusions We found that the inferior alveolar nerve after bifocal distraction osteogenesis successfully recovered until peripheral tissue began to function. Although our research is still at the stage of animal experiments, it is considered that it will be possible to apply this method in the future to humans who have the mandibular defects. PMID:24732938

  11. Long Term Follow-Up in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition: Our Experience

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    Giulio Gasparini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Inferior alveolar nerve transposition (IANT is a surgical technique used in implantoprosthetic rehabilitation of the atrophic lower jaw which has not been well embraced because of the high risk of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN. There are cases in which this method is essential to obtain good morphologic and functional rebalancing of the jaw. In this paper, the authors present their experience with IANT, analyzing the various situations in which IANT is the only surgical preprosthetic option. Methods. Between 2003 and 2011, 35 patients underwent surgical IANT at our center. Thermal and physical sensitivity were evaluated in each patient during follow-up. The follow-up ranged from 14 to 101 months. Results and Conclusion. Based on our experience, absolute indications of IANT are as follows: (1 class IV, V, or VI of Cawood and Howell with extrusion of the antagonist tooth and reduced prosthetic free space; (2 class V or VI of Cawood and Howell with presence of interforaminal teeth; (3 class V or VI of Cawood and Howell if patient desires fast implantoprosthetic rehabilitation with predictable outcomes; (4 class VI of Cawood and Howell when mandibular height increase with inlay grafts is advisable.

  12. Study of the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block using articaine in irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zeeshan H; Ravikumar, H; Karale, Rupali; Preethanath, R S; Sukumaran, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) using 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine supplemented with buccal infiltration. Forty five patients, diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth were included in the study. The first group of 15 patients received 2% lidocaine with 1:200000 epinephrine, the second group 2% lidocaine with 1: 80,000 epinephrine and the third group of 15 subjects received 4% articaine with 1:100000 epinephrine. During the access cavity preparation those patients who complained of pain received an additional buccal infiltration. The percentage of subjects who got profound anesthesia and failure to achieve anesthesia were calculated and tabulated using a visual analog scale. The results revealed that 87% of subjects who received 4% Articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine got satisfactory anesthesia with inferior alveolar nerve block alone. Only 2 (13%) subjects received an additional buccal infiltration and none of the patients failed to obtain complete anesthesia with articaine. In comparison only 40% of subjects got complete anesthesia with 2% lidocaine with 1:200000 and 60% with 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000. It can be concluded that 4% articaine can be used effectively for obtaining profound anesthesia for endodontic procedures in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

  13. Antinociceptive and antiallodynic effects of Momordica charantia L. in tibial and sural nerve transection-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vivek; Pareek, Ashutosh; Paliwal, Nishant; Ratan, Yashumati; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Momordica charantia L. (MC) in tibial and sural nerve transection (TST)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. TST was performed by sectioning tibial and sural nerve portions (2 mm) of the sciatic nerve, and leaving the common peroneal nerve intact. Acetone drop, pin-prick, hot plate, paint-brush, and walking track tests were performed to assess cold allodynia, mechanical and heat hyperalgesia, and dynamic mechanical allodynia and tibial functional index, respectively. The levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and thio-barbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured in the sciatic nerve as an index of inflammation and oxidative stress. MC (all doses, orally, once daily) was administered to the rats for 24 consecutive days. TST led to significant development of cold allodynia, mechanical and heat hyperalgesia, dynamic mechanical allodynia, and functional deficit in walking along with rise in the levels of TBARS and TNF-alpha. Administration of MC (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg) significantly attenuated TST-induced behavioural and biochemical changes. Furthermore, pretreatment of BADGE (120 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) abolished the protective effect of MC in TST-induced neuropathic pain. Collectively, it is speculated that PPAR-gamma agonistic activity, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative potential is critical for antinociceptive effect of MC in neuropathic pain.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of tempol (4 hydroxy-tempo) on neuronal death induced by sciatic nerve transection in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarotto, Gabriela Bortolança; Drummond, Luisa; Cavarretto, Gabriela; Bombeiro, André Luis; de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injury in newborn rats triggers extensive neuronal death within the spinal cord. Because most neurodegeneration is related to oxidative stress and apoptosis, the use of antioxidants may be of therapeutic interest. Tempol is promising because of its ability to chelate reactive oxygen species and to minimize or even prevent tissue damage. Here, we evaluated neuroprotective effects of tempol following neonatal sciatic nerve transection. Two-day-old pups underwent sciatic nerve axotomy followed by tempol (12, 24 and 48 mg/kg) treatment (i.p.) at 10 min, 6 h, and every 24 h up to 1 week after injury. The rats were then killed for lumbar intumescence analysis. Nissl staining, TUNEL, synaptophysin immunolabeling and qRT-PCR (Caspase 3, Bax and Bcl2) were carried out. The results indicated that tempol treatment, at 24 mg/kg, increased up to 21% spinal cord motoneuron survival (ptempol-treated animals. qRT-PCR results indicated differential increase in Caspase 3 (3-fold), Bax (13-fold) and Bcl2 (28-fold) gene expression, after 12 h following axotomy and tempol treatment. In conclusion, tempol administration has proven to be neuroprotective after neonatal nerve injury, leading to improved motoneuron survival, synapse preservation and minimizing apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Digital versus conventional panoramic radiography in predicting inferior alveolar nerve injury after mandibular third molar removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, József; Lempel, Edina; Jeges, Sára; Olasz, Lajos

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of conventional and digital panoramic radiography (OPG) in relation to 4 specific high-risk signs (interruption of the superior cortical line, diversion, narrowing of the canal, and dark band of the root), which would indicate a close anatomic relationship between third molar roots and the inferior alveolar canal.Four hundred mandibular third molar surgical removals after conventional and 272 after digital radiographs were evaluated in the study. The association between postoperative inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paresthesia and the presence of any preoperative high-risk signs in the OPG was investigated. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were completed to compare the accuracy of conventional and digital radiographic techniques detecting high-risk signs predicting possible IAN paresthesia.Digital OPG results showed significantly higher sensitivity in diversion (P = 0.014) and narrowing (P analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis did not prove the significant difference between digital and conventional imaging according to the examined high-risk signs. Positive predictive values of the signs were found in conventional radiography between 3.6% and 10.9%, whereas in the digital images, it ranged from 2.9% to 7.9%.The results of this study failed to prove significant difference between the accuracy of digital and conventional OPG for predicting IAN paresthesia, whereas low positive predictive values indicate both imaging techniques as inadequate screening methods for predicting IAN paresthesia after mandibular third molar removal.

  16. Beneficial effect of splanchnic nerve transection and harmful effect of vagotomy on acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Chu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Qi, Shi-Fang; Chang, Yong-Chao; Xin, Shi-Yong; Liu, Wei-Feng; Yang, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Tian-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system interacts dynamically with the immune system to modulate inflammation through humoral and neural pathways. However, the influence of visceral nerve (VN) on acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) has drawn little attention. To investigate the influence of VN on the pathophysiological process of ANP in dogs. The dogs were divided into a sham operation (SO) group, ANP group, ANP + vagal nerve trunk transection (VNTT) group, and ANP + greater splanchnic nerve transection (GSNT) group. The VNTT and GSNT groups underwent VNTT and GSNT respectively immediately after ANP induction. The levels of serum pancreatic amylase (AMY), calcium, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HCRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were monitored dynamically and the pathological examinations of the pancreas was performed at postoperative day 7. All serum parameters among the four groups showed no differences before the experiment (p > 0.05). At different postoperative times, the serum TNF-α, IL-1β, HCRP, and AMY were significantly increased, however, the serum calcium and IL-10 had dropped in the ANP group versus SO group (p < 0.05); an alike variation trend occurred between the VNTT group and ANP group (p < 0.05); an opposite variation trend occurred between the GSNT group and the ANP group (p < 0.05). The pancreas pathological scoring of VNTT group was highest in the four groups (p < 0.05) and GSNT group was lower versus ANP group (p < 0.05). The GSNT has been shown to alleviate development of ANP, however, VNTT may exacerbate the ANP.

  17. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part II: a Systematic Review of Neurosensory Complications

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    Boris Abayev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This article, the second in a two-part series, continues the discussion of inferior alveolar nerve lateralization/transposition for dental implant placement. The aim of this article is to review the scientific literature and clinical reports in order to analyse the neurosensory complications, risks and disadvantages of lateralization/transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve followed by implant placement in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods: A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC databases, as well as academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014. Articles in English language, which included adult patients between 18 - 80 years of age who had minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal and had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN repositioning, with minimum 6 months of follow-up, were included. Results: A total of 21 studies were included in this review. Ten were related to IAN transposition, 7 to IAN lateralization and 4 to both transposition and lateralization. The IAN neurosensory disturbance function was present in most patients (99.47% [376/378] for 1 to 6 months. In total, 0.53% (2/378 of procedures the disturbances were permanent. Conclusions: Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning is related to initial transient change in sensation in the majority of cases. The most popular causes of nerve damage are spatula-caused traction in the mucoperiosteal flap, pressure due to severe inflammation or retention of fluid around the nerve and subsequent development of transient ischemia, and mandibular body fracture.

  18. Comparison of two local anesthesia techniques (conventional & akinosi for inferior alveolar dental nerve

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    Refua Y

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Different techniques for local anesthesia are used in the mandible. The purpose of this study"nwas to determine the effects of inferior alveolar dental nerve blocks by comparing the two akinosi and"nconventional techniques. 80 patients (aged 15-60 years old were randomly divided into tow groups for"nextracting the mandibuler posterior teeth by akinosi and conventional techniques. Patients were all"ninjected with 1.8 ml of Lidocaine 2% plus Adernaline j^nnnn .Then the Pain Sensation during injection,"npositive aspiration, beginning time of anesthesia, duration of anesthesia depth of anesthesia, and the anesthesia of soft tissue related to sensory nerves were evaluated. The results showed that the pain sensation in conventional technique was significantly higher than that of akinosi technique. The number of positive aspirations in conventional technique (12,5% was higher than that of akinosi (5% but not significantly different. The long buccal nerve anesthesia in akinosi technique (75% was significantly higher than that of conventional technique. There was no significant difference between the two techniques for the depth of anesthesia. The success rate was 87.5% in conventional technique and 80% in akinosi technique. The average time of lips anesthesia in conventional technique was 3 minutes compared with 4 minutes in akinosi technique, which was not significantly different from each other. However, the beginning time of aneshtesia in tongue was significantly lower in conventional technique. No significant difference in the duration of anesthesia in lips and tonques between the two techniques was observed.

  19. Risk factors for permanent injury of inferior alveolar and lingual nerves during third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Edward; Grubor, Dragan; Chandu, Arun

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of and risk factors for permanent neurologic injuries to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or lingual nerve (LN) after the removal of third molars. This report also describes the use of a Clinical Incident Review (CIR) process, allowing close monitoring of all patients with neurologic injuries as a result of dentoalveolar surgery. A database associated with a CIR process at the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne from January 2006 through December 2009 was assessed. Factors assessed included gender, age, operator class, method of anesthesia, spacial relation, depth of impaction, ramus relation, proximity of the IAN on orthopantomogram, cone-beam computed tomographic usage, and side of injury. During this 4-year period, 11,599 lower third molars were removed in 6,803 patients. The incidence of an IAN injury was 0.68%, and the incidence of an LN injury was 0.15%. Important risk factors for permanent IAN injury were increasing age, surgery performed by staff dentists, type of anesthesia, and mesioangular impactions. The mean time of complete resolution was 4.3 months. No factors were found to statistically increase the risk of LN injury, although most injuries were seen in patients with a distoangular impaction. The overall incidences of IAN and LN injuries were low. Some risk factors for permanent IAN nerve injury were identified. Important risk factors for permanent IAN injury were increasing age (≥25 yr old), surgery performed by staff dentists, surgery under general anesthesia, and mesioangular impaction. No factors were found to statistically increase the risk of LN injury. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy and complications associated with a modified inferior alveolar nerve block technique. A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-Bosch, Marta; Nogueira-Magalhães, Pedro; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy and complication rates of two different techniques for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB). Study Design: A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial comprising 109 patients who required lower third molar removal was performed. In the control group, all patients received an IANB using the conventional Halsted technique, whereas in the experimental group, a modified technique using a more inferior injection point was performed. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized. The modified technique group showed a significantly higher onset time in the lower lip and chin area, and was frequently associated to a lingual electric discharge sensation. Three failures were recorded, 2 of them in the experimental group. No relevant local or systemic complications were registered. Conclusions: Both IANB techniques used in this trial are suitable for lower third molar removal. However, performing an inferior alveolar nerve block in a more inferior position (modified technique) extends the onset time, does not seem to reduce the risk of intravascular injections and might increase the risk of lingual nerve injuries. Key words:Dental anesthesia, inferior alveolar nerve block, lidocaine, third molar, intravascular injection. PMID:24608204

  1. H-REFLEX UP-CONDITIONING ENCOURAGES RECOVERY OF EMG ACTIVITY AND H-REFLEXES AFTER SCIATIC NERVE TRANSECTION AND REPAIR IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Yu; Chen, Lu; Sun, Chenyuo; English, Arthur W.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2010-01-01

    Operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or its electrical analog, the H-reflex, produces spinal cord plasticity and can thereby affect motoneuron responses to primary afferent input. To explore whether this conditioning can affect the functional outcome after peripheral nerve injury, we assessed the effect of up-conditioning soleus (SOL) H-reflex on SOL and tibialis anterior (TA) function after sciatic nerve transection and repair. Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with EMG electro...

  2. Lycium barbarum (wolfberry reduces secondary degeneration and oxidative stress, and inhibits JNK pathway in retina after partial optic nerve transection.

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    Hongying Li

    Full Text Available Our group has shown that the polysaccharides extracted from Lycium barbarum (LBP are neuroprotective for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in different animal models. Protecting RGCs from secondary degeneration is a promising direction for therapy in glaucoma management. The complete optic nerve transection (CONT model can be used to study primary degeneration of RGCs, while the partial optic nerve transection (PONT model can be used to study secondary degeneration of RGCs because primary degeneration of RGCs and secondary degeneration can be separated in location in the same retina in this model; in other situations, these types of degeneration can be difficult to distinguish. In order to examine which kind of degeneration LBP could delay, both CONT and PONT models were used in this study. Rats were fed with LBP or vehicle daily from 7 days before surgery until sacrifice at different time-points and the surviving numbers of RGCs were evaluated. The expression of several proteins related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathways were detected with Western-blot analysis. LBP did not delay primary degeneration of RGCs after either CONT or PONT, but it did delay secondary degeneration of RGCs after PONT. We found that LBP appeared to exert these protective effects by inhibiting oxidative stress and the JNK/c-jun pathway and by transiently increasing production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. This study suggests that LBP can delay secondary degeneration of RGCs and this effect may be linked to inhibition of oxidative stress and the JNK/c-jun pathway in the retina.

  3. Buffered Lidocaine With Sodium Bicarbonate did not Increase Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Success Rate in Patients Having Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    Effect of buffered 4% lidocaine on the success of the inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Schellenberg J, Drum M, Reader A, Nusstein J, Fowler S, Beck M. J Endod 2015;41(6):791-6. The study was supported by Meyers/Reader Graduate Endodontic Support Fund Double blinded randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New quantitative classification of the anatomical relationship between impacted third molars and the inferior alveolar nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei-Quan; Chen, Michael Y. C.; Huang, Heng-Li; Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Before extracting impacted lower third molars, dentists must first identify the spatial relationship between the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and an impacted lower third molar to prevent nerve injury from the extraction. Nevertheless, the current method for describing the spatial relationship between the IAN and an impacted lower third molar is deficient. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (1) evaluate the relative position between impacted lower third molars and the IAN; and (2) investigate the relative position between impacted lower third molars and the IAN by using a cylindrical coordinate system. From the radiology department’s database, we selected computed tomography images of 137 lower third molars (from 75 patients) requiring removal and applied a Cartesian coordinate system by using Mimics, a medical imaging software application, to measure the distribution between impacted mandibular third molars and the IAN. In addition, the orientation of the lower third molar to the IAN was also measured, but by using a cylindrical coordinate system with the IAN as the origin. According to the Cartesian coordinate system, most of the IAN runs through the inferior side of the third molar (78.6 %), followed by the lingual side (11.8 %), and the buccal side (8.9 %); only 0.7 % is positioned between the roots. Unlike the Cartesian coordinate system, the cylindrical coordinate system clearly identified the relative position, r and θ, between the IAN and lower third molar. Using the cylindrical coordinate system to present the relationship between the IAN and lower third molar as (r, θ) might provide clinical practitioners with a more explicit and objective description of the relative position of both sites. However, comprehensive research and cautious application of this system remain necessary

  5. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part I: a Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Abayev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this first part of a two-part series was to review the literature concerning the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages and surgical techniques of the lateralization and transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve, followed by the placement of an implant in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods: A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC database, academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014 and comprised English-language articles that included adult patients between 18 and 80 years old with minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal who had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN repositioning with a minimum 6 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 16 studies were included in this review. Nine were related to IAN transposition, 4 to IAN lateralization and 3 to both transposition and lateralization. Implant treatment results and complications were presented. Conclusions: Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization and transposition in combination with the installation of dental implants is sometimes the only possible procedure to help patients to obtain a fixed prosthesis, in edentulous atrophic posterior mandibles. With careful pre-operative surgical and prosthetic planning, imaging, and extremely precise surgical technique, this procedure can be successfully used for implant placement in edentulous posterior mandibular segments.

  6. Autogenous Partial Bone Chip Grafting on the Exposed Inferior Alveolar Nerve After Cystic Enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi Hyun; Eo, Mi Young; Cho, Yun Ju; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Suk Keun

    2018-03-01

    This prospective study evaluated the clinical effectiveness of the new approach of partial autogenous bone chip grafts for the treatment of mandibular cystic lesions related to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). A total of 38 patients treated for mandibular cysts or benign tumors were included in this prospective study and subsequently divided into 3 groups depending on the bone grafting method used: cystic enucleation without a bone graft (group 1), partial bone chip graft covering the exposed IAN (group 2), and autogenous bone graft covering the entire defect (group 3). We evaluated the symptoms, clinical signs, and radiographic changes using dental panorama preoperatively, immediate postoperatively, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographic densities were compared using Adobe Photoshop CS5 (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, CA). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used for statistical evaluation with SPSS 22.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL), and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Radiopacities were the most increased at 1 year postoperative in group 3; groups 2 and 3 did not show statistically significant differences, whereas groups 1 and 3 were statistically significant. In terms of radiographic bone healing with clinical regeneration of the exposed IAN, healing occurred in all patients, although the best healing was achieved in group 2.This autogenous partial bone chip grafting procedure to cover the exposed IAN is suggested as a new surgical protocol for the treatment of cystic lesions associated with the IAN.

  7. Alveolar nerve repositioning with rescue implants for management of previous treatment. A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amet, Edward M; Uehlein, Chris

    2013-12-01

    The goal of modern implant dentistry is to return patients to oral health in a rapid and predictable fashion, following a diagnostically driven treatment plan. If only a limited number of implants can be placed, or some fail and the prosthetic phase of implant dentistry is chosen to complete the patient's treatment, the final outcome may result in partial patient satisfaction and is commonly referred to as a "compromise." Previous All-on-4 implant treatment for the patient presented here resulted in a compromise, with an inadequate support system for the mandibular prosthesis and a maxillary complete denture with poor esthetics. The patient was unable to function adequately and also was disappointed with the resulting appearance. Correction of the compromised treatment consisted of bilateral inferior alveolar nerve elevation and repositioning without bone removal for lateral transposition, to gain room for rescue implants for a totally implant-supported and stabilized prosthesis. Treatment time to return the patient to satisfactory comfort, function, facial esthetics, and speech was approximately 2 weeks. The definitive mandibular prosthesis was designed for total implant support and stability with patient retrievability. Adequate space between the mandibular bar system and the soft tissue created a high water bridge effect for self-cleansing. Following a short interim mandibular healing period, the maxillary sinuses were bilaterally grafted to compensate for bone inadequacies and deficiencies for future maxillary implant reconstruction. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Comparison of periodontal ligament injection and inferior alveolar nerve block in mandibular primary molars pulpotomy: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghgoo, Roza; Taleghani, Ferial

    2015-05-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block is a common technique for anesthesia of the primary mandibular molars. A number of disadvantages have been shown to be associated with this technique. Periodontal ligament (PDL) injection could be considered as an alternative to inferior alveolar nerve block. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PDL injection in the anesthesia of primary molar pulpotomy with mandibular block. This study was performed using a sequential double-blind randomized trial design. 80 children aged 3-7 years old who required pulpotomy in symmetrical mandibular primary molars were selected. The teeth of these children were anesthetized with periodontal injection on one side of the mandible and block on the other. Pulpotomy was performed on each patient during the same appointment. Signs of discomfort, including hand and body tension and eye movement, the verbal complaint and crying (SEM scale), were evaluated by a dental assistant who was blinded to the treatment allocation of the patients. Finally, the data were analyzed using the exact Fisher test and Pearson Chi-squared exact test. Success rate was 88/75 and 91/25 in the PDL injection and nerve block groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the two techniques (P = 0.250). Results showed that PDL injection can be used as an alternative to nerve block in pulpotomy of the mandibular primary molars.

  9. Delayed treatment of secondary degeneration following acute optic nerve transection using a combination of ion channel inhibitors

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    Nathanael J Yates

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that a combined application of several ion channel inhibitors immediately after central nervous system injury can inhibit secondary degeneration. However, for clinical use, it is necessary to determine how long after injury the combined treatment of several ion channel inhibitors can be delayed and efficacy maintained. In this study, we delivered Ca2+ entry-inhibiting P2X7 receptor antagonist oxidized-ATP and AMPA receptor antagonist YM872 to the optic nerve injury site via an iPRECIO@ pump immediately, 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days after partial optic nerve transection surgery. In addition, all of the ion channel inhibitor treated rats were administered with calcium channel antagonist lomerizine hydrochloride. It is important to note that as a result of implantation of the particular pumps required for programmable delivery of therapeutics directly to the injury site, seromas occurred in a significant proportion of animals, indicating infection around the pumps in these animals. Improvements in visual function were observed only when treatment was delayed by 6 hours; phosphorylated Tau was reduced when treatment was delayed by 24 hours or 7 days. Improvements in structure of node/paranode of Ranvier and reductions in oxidative stress indicators were also only observed when treatment was delayed for 6 hours, 24 hours, or 7 days. Benefits of ion channel inhibitors were only observed with time-delayed treatment, suggesting that delayed therapy of Ca2+ ion channel inhibitors produces better neuroprotective effects on secondary degeneration, at least in the presence of seromas.

  10. Effectiveness comparison of inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia using direct and indirect technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehatta Yongki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthesia is important to do prior to tooth extraction procedure to control the patient's pain. Local anesthetic technique in dentistry consists of topical, infiltration, and anesthetic blocks. For molar tooth extraction, mandibular block technique is used either direct or indirect. This study aimed to see if there are differences in effectiveness of inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia techniques between direct and indirect. This clinical experimental design study used 20 patients as samples during February-April. 10 patients were taken as a group that carried out direct technique while 10 others group conducted indirect techniques. The sample selection using purposive sampling method. Pain level were measured using objective assessments (pain experienced by the patient after a given stimulus and subjective evaluation (thick taste perceived by the patient. The average time of onset in direct and indirect techniques in each sample was 16.88 ± 5.30 and 102.00 ± 19.56 seconds (subjectively and 22.50 ± 8.02 and 159.00 ± 25.10 (objectively. These results indicated direct techniques onset faster than indirect techniques. The average duration of direct and indirect techniques respectively was 121.63 ± 8.80 and 87.80 ± 9.96 minutes (subjectively and 91.88 ± 8.37 and 60.20 ± 10.40 minutes (objectively. These results indicated the duration of direct technique is longer than indirect technique. There was no significant difference when viewed from anesthesia depth and aspiration level. This study indicated that direct technique had better effect than indirect technique in terms of onset and duration, while in terms of anesthesia depth and aspiration level was relatively equal. Insignificant differences were obtained when assessing anesthetic technique successful rate based on gender, age and extracted tooth.

  11. Anaesthetic efficacy of lidocaine/clonidine for inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmehr, E; Aminozarbian, M G; Akhavan, A; Mahdavian, P; Davoudi, A

    2017-06-01

    This prospective, randomized, double-blind study aimed to compare the efficacy of lidocaine with epinephrine versus lidocaine with clonidine for inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and hemodynamic stability (heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure) in patients with irreversible pulpitis. One hundred patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molar teeth randomly received 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with clonidine (15 μg mL -1 ) or 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine (12.5 μg mL -1 ), using a conventional IANB technique. Endodontic access cavities were prepared 15 min after solution deposition, and all patients were required to have profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recording) upon endodontic access cavity preparation or initial canal instrumentation. The hemodynamic parameters were measured before, during and 5, 10 and 30 min after administration. Finally, the collected data were subjected to independent t-test, chi-square and Fisher's exact test using spss software ver.20 at a significant level of 0.05. The success rates for IANB using lidocaine with epinephrine and lidocaine with clonidine solutions were 29% and 59%, respectively. The clonidine group exhibited a significantly higher success rate (P irreversible pulpitis, addition of clonidine to lidocaine improved the success rate of IANB compared to a standard lidocaine/epinephrine solution. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Virtual Reality simulator for dental anesthesia training in the inferior alveolar nerve block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléber Gimenez CORRÊA

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study shows the development and validation of a dental anesthesia-training simulator, specifically for the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB. The system developed provides the tactile sensation of inserting a real needle in a human patient, using Virtual Reality (VR techniques and a haptic device that can provide a perceived force feedback in the needle insertion task during the anesthesia procedure. Material and Methods To simulate a realistic anesthesia procedure, a Carpule syringe was coupled to a haptic device. The Volere method was used to elicit requirements from users in the Dentistry area; Repeated Measures Two-Way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance, Tukey post-hoc test and averages for the results’ analysis. A questionnaire-based subjective evaluation method was applied to collect information about the simulator, and 26 people participated in the experiments (12 beginners, 12 at intermediate level, and 2 experts. The questionnaire included profile, preferences (number of viewpoints, texture of the objects, and haptic device handler, as well as visual (appearance, scale, and position of objects and haptic aspects (motion space, tactile sensation, and motion reproduction. Results The visual aspect was considered appropriate and the haptic feedback must be improved, which the users can do by calibrating the virtual tissues’ resistance. The evaluation of visual aspects was influenced by the participants’ experience, according to ANOVA test (F=15.6, p=0.0002, with p<0.01. The user preferences were the simulator with two viewpoints, objects with texture based on images and the device with a syringe coupled to it. Conclusion The simulation was considered thoroughly satisfactory for the anesthesia training, considering the needle insertion task, which includes the correct insertion point and depth, as well as the perception of tissues resistances during the insertion.

  13. Anesthetic efficacy of the inferior alveolar nerve block in red-haired women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droll, Brock; Drum, Melissa; Nusstein, John; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike

    2012-12-01

    The exact reasons for failure of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block are not completely known, but red hair could play a role. The genetic basis for red hair involves specific mutations, red hair color (RHC) alleles, in the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene. The purpose of this prospective randomized study was to investigate a possible link between certain variant alleles of the MC1R gene or its phenotypic expression of red hair and the anesthetic efficacy of the IAN block in women. One-hundred twenty-four adult female subjects (62 red haired and 62 dark haired) participated in this study. Dental anxiety was determined in each subject using the Corah Dental Anxiety Questionnaire. The subjects were given 2 cartridges of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine via the IAN block. Pulpal anesthesia was measured in the posterior and anterior teeth in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes using an electric pulp tester. The MC1R alleles were genotyped for each subject from cheek cells containing DNA collected using buccal swabs. Women with red hair and women with 2 RHC alleles reported significantly higher levels of dental anxiety compared with women with dark hair or women with 0 RHC alleles. No significant differences in anesthetic success were found between any of the groups for any of the teeth. Red hair and the MC1R gene were significantly linked to higher levels of dental anxiety but were unrelated to success rates of the IAN block in women with healthy pulps. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Relationships of the Maxillary Sinus With the Superior Alveolar Nerves and Vessels as Demonstrated by Cone-Beam CT Combined With μ-CT and Histological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Norio; Morita, Wataru; Tanaka, Ray; Hayashi, Takafumi; Kenmotsu, Shinichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2016-05-01

    There are no available detailed data on the three-dimensional courses of the human superior alveolar nerves and vessels. This study aimed to clarify the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar nerves and vessels using cone-beam computed tomography (CT) combined with μ-CT and histological analyses. Digital imaging and communication in medicine data obtained from the scanned heads/maxillae of cadavers used for undergraduate/postgraduate dissection practice and skulls using cone-beam CT were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) images using software. The 3D images were compared with μ-CT images and histological sections. Cone-beam CT clarified the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar canals/grooves. The main anterior superior alveolar canal/groove ran anteriorly through the upper part of the sinus and terminated at the bottom of the nasal cavity near the piriform aperture. The main middle alveolar canal ran downward from the upper part of the sinus to ultimately join the anterior one. The main posterior alveolar canal ran through the lateral lower part of the sinus and communicated with the anterior one. Histological analyses demonstrated the existence of nerves and vessels in these canals/grooves, and the quantities of these structures varied across each canal/groove. Furthermore, the superior dental nerve plexus exhibited a network that was located horizontally to the occlusal plane, although these nerve plexuses appeared to be the vertical network that is described in most textbooks. In conclusion, cone-beam CT is suggested to be a useful method for clarifying the superior alveolar canals/grooves including the nerves and vessels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fast and slow recovery phases of goldfish behavior after transection of the optic nerve revealed by a computer image processing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S; Devadas, M; Okada, K; Shimada, Y; Ohkawa, M; Muramoto, K; Takizawa, N; Matsukawa, T

    1999-01-01

    As the goldfish is a common experimental animal for vision research, including psychophysical behavior, it is very important to quantitatively score fish behavior. We have previously developed a computer image processing system which can acquire the positional coordinates of goldfish moving freely in an aquarium and determine turning directions (go straight, right or left turn). In the present study, an algorithm to determine tilting angles of moving goldfish was constructed. We also made histograms for quantifying the interaction between pairs of goldfish (two-point distance). By using these histograms, we estimated the time-course of behavioral regeneration after optic nerve transection in goldfish. Control goldfish showed an equal percentage of right or left turns and maintained an upright position in a dorsoventral axis. When the optic nerve of a goldfish was unilaterally sectioned, the goldfish showed predominant turning and slight tilting toward the intact eye. The abnormal turning and tilting behaviors lasted for 10-14 days and then gradually decreased, returning to control behaviors by one month after the unilateral transection. When the optic nerve of a single goldfish was bilaterally sectioned, it did not show any preferential turning and tilting behavior, which is similar to what was observed in control goldfish. However, the trace maps showed that, after bilateral sectioning, fish preferred to cross the center of the tank, which was unlike control fish. In control pairs, one goldfish chased the other with a fixed small range of two-point distances. However, in pairs of goldfish with bilateral transection of the optic nerve, the blind goldfish behaved independently of each other, with a long two-point distance. The long two-point distance of the blind goldfish lasted for at least two months and then slowly returned to control two-point distance by four months after bilateral transection. Such fast and slow recovery in goldfish behaviors evoked after

  16. Use of Gore-Tex tubing as a conduit for inferior alveolar and lingual nerve repair: experience with 6 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, M C; Wolford, L M; Mehra, P; Hopkin, J

    2001-05-01

    This report evaluates treatment outcomes associated with the use of Gore-Tex (GT; W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) vein graft tubing as a conduit for repair of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual nerve (LN) continuity defects. Six patients (5 female and 1 male) with painful dysesthesia secondary to injuries of the IAN (n = 3) or LN (n = 3) underwent surgical exploration and resection of pathologic tissue. Reconstruction of the resultant continuity defects was performed using 3-mm diameter GT tubing sutured to the epineurium of the proximal and distal nerve trunks. Nerve reconstruction was performed an average of 20 months after injury (range, 4 to 48 months). Patients were tested before and after surgery with the following tests: subjective pain level using an analogue scale, sharp stimulus, touch, cold sensation, directional sense, and 2-point discrimination. Four patients reported no change in subjective pain level, and 2 patients had minimal decrease in pain. Two patients reported some sensation to sharp stimulus, and 1 patient was hypersensitive. Three patients responded to touch, and 3 had no response. Four patients had no response to cold sensation, and 2 had a delayed response. Only 1 patient could detect brushstroke direction. Three patients had no response to 2-point discrimination, and 3 responded at greater than 20 mm. Use of GT tubing in this group of patients produced poor clinical outcomes and is not recommended for nerve reconstruction of IAN and LN continuity defects. Copyright 2001 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

  17. Predictive Value of Panoramic Radiography for Injury of Inferior Alveolar Nerve After Mandibular Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naichuan; van Wijk, Arjen; Berkhout, Erwin; Sanderink, Gerard; De Lange, Jan; Wang, Hang; van der Heijden, Geert J M G

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review was to assess the added value of panoramic radiography in predicting postoperative injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) in the decision-making before mandibular third molar (MM3) surgery. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched electronically to identify the diagnostic accuracy of studies that had assessed the predictive value of 7 panoramic radiographic signs, including root-related signs (darkening of the root, deflection of the root, narrowing of the root, and dark and bifid apex of the root) and canal-related signs (interruption of the white line of the canal, diversion of the canal, and narrowing of the canal) for IAN injury after MM3 surgery. A total of 8 studies qualified for the meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of the 7 signs ranged from 0.06 to 0.49 and 0.81 to 0.97, respectively. The area under the summary area under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranged from 0.42 to 0.89. The pooled positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) ranged from 7.5 to 26.6% and 95.9 to 97.7%, respectively. The added value of a positive sign for ruling in an IAN injury (PPV minus the prior probability) ranged from 3.4 to 22.2%. The added value of a negative sign for ruling out an IAN injury (NPV minus [1 minus the prior probability]) ranged from 0.1 to 2.2%. For all 7 signs, the added value of panoramic radiography is too low to consider it appropriate for ruling out postoperative IAN in the decision-making before MM3 surgery. The added value of panoramic radiography for determining the presence of diversion of the canal, interruption of the white line of the canal, and darkening of the root can be considered sufficient for ruling in the risk of postoperative IAN injury in the decision-making before MM3 surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immediate Loading of One-Piece Implants in Conjunction with a Modified Technique of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization: 10 Years Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Eldibany, Riham; Rodriguez, Joaquin G.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a treatment modification for a patient presented with severely resorbed bilateral edentulous posterior mandible and mobility of the anterior teeth. There was less than 8 mm of bone between the crest of the alveolar ridge and the mandibular canal as revealed by radiographic examination. A modified technique for inferior alveolar nerve lateralization (IANL) in conjunction with ridge expansion was performed using threaded bone expanders, which allowed for better primary sta...

  19. Extraction of mandibular premolars and molars: comparison between local infiltration via pressure syringe and inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Daniel G E; Schnaith, Florian; Van Aken, Caroline M E; Köntges, Anne; Kumar, Vinay V; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Kämmerer, Peer W

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficiency of local infiltration anesthesia administered with a pressure syringe (P-INF) via a special technique versus direct block anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve (IANB) for tooth extraction in the posterior mandible. In a prospective randomized study, 101 teeth in 101 patients were extracted in the posterior mandible under local anesthesia whereby two different administration techniques were used (P-INF n = 48; IANB n = 53). Primary objectives were comparisons of anesthetic success rate (yes/no) and efficacy (full/sufficient vs. insufficient). Secondary objectives were patients' pain perception during treatment, pain of injection (numerical rating scale), need for second injections (always IANB), time until onset of anesthetic action (min), and duration of local numbness (min). IANB was successful in all cases, whereas initial P-INF achieved 35% of success only. Furthermore, IANB reached significant higher values of anesthetic efficacy compared to P-INF (P local numbness were found to be equal. For anesthetic efficacy as well as anesthetic success, block anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve (IANB) turned out to be more proficient to local infiltration via special delivering system with a special technique. Infiltration, even when performed with 4% articaine and a pressure syringe system, is not a suitable method of anesthesia in the posterior mandible.

  20. Sciatic nerve transection in the adult rat : Abnormal EMG patterns during locomotion by aberrant innervation of hindleg muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramsbergen, A; IJkema-Paassen, J; Meek, MF

    The effects of lesions in the sciatic nerve were studied in adult rats, In the left hindleg, a segment 12 mm long was resected from the proximal part of the nerve, before the bifurcation into the peroneal and tibial nerves, This segment in a reversed orientation was used as a nerve graft. EMG

  1. Coronectomy versus surgical removal of the lower third molars with a high risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. A bibliographical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Vicente, Javier; Schiavone-Mussano, Rocío; Clemente-Salas, Enrique; Marí-Roig, Antoni; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronectomy is the surgical removal of the crown of the tooth deliberately leaving part of its roots. This is done with the hope of eliminating the pathology caused, and since the roots are still intact, the integrity of the inferior alveolar nerve is preserved. Objectives The aim is to carry out a systematic review in order to be able to provide results and conclusions with the greatest scientific evidence possible. Material and Methods A literature review is carried out through the following search engines: Pubmed MEDLINE, Scielo, Cochrane library and EMI. The level of evidence criteria from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was applied, and the clinical trials’ level of quality was analyzed by means of the JADAD criteria. Results The following articles were obtained which represents a total of 17: 1 systematic review, 2 randomized clinical trials and 2 non-randomized clinical trials, 3 cohort studies, 2 retrospective studies, 3 case studies and 4 literature reviews. Conclusions Coronectomy is an adequate preventative technique in protecting the inferior alveolar nerve, which is an alternative to the conventional extraction of third molars, which unlike the former technique, presents a high risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. However, there is a need for new clinical studies, with a greater number of samples and with a longer follow-up period in order to detect potential adverse effects of the retained roots. Key words: Coronectomy, inferior alveolar nerve, nerve injury, wisdom tooth removal, paresthesia, and systematic review. PMID:25858081

  2. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinnitsa Buzoianu-Anguiano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG, TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model.

  3. Total Retinal Blood Flow in a Nonhuman Primate Optic Nerve Transection Model Using Dual-Beam Bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT and Microsphere Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Told, Reinhard; Wang, Lin; Cull, Grant; Thompson, Simon J; Burgoyne, Claude F; Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Werkmeister, René M

    2016-03-01

    We validated noninvasive Doppler-optical coherence tomography (OCT) blood flow measurements against the terminal microsphere method in a surgical induced optic nerve transection nonhuman primate model. In 6 nonhuman primates, total retinal blood flow (TRBF) was measured with a custom-built dual-beam bidirectional Doppler Fourier Domain (FD)-OCT. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) was measured by Spectralis spectral-domain (SD)-OCT. Measurements were performed every 10 to 15 days before and after unilateral optic nerve transection (ONT) until RNFLT was reduced by more than 40% from baseline. Before the animals were killed, TRBF was measured using the microsphere technique. A significant correlation between all arterial and venous Doppler OCT TRBF measurements was found in ONT and contralateral control eyes (both P FD-OCT and the microsphere method. It also was possible to monitor changes over time in TRBF after ONT with Doppler OCT. These findings highlight the accuracy and potential of noninvasive Doppler OCT to provide valuable information for detecting early changes in ocular disease in future.

  4. H-reflex up-conditioning encourages recovery of EMG activity and H-reflexes after sciatic nerve transection and repair in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Yu; Chen, Lu; Sun, Chenyou; English, Arthur W; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2010-12-01

    Operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or its electrical analog, the H-reflex, produces spinal cord plasticity and can thereby affect motoneuron responses to primary afferent input. To explore whether this conditioning can affect the functional outcome after peripheral nerve injury, we assessed the effect of up-conditioning soleus (SOL) H-reflex on SOL and tibialis anterior (TA) function after sciatic nerve transection and repair. Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with EMG electrodes in SOL and TA and stimulating cuffs on the posterior tibial nerve. After control data collection, the sciatic nerve was transected and repaired and the rat was exposed for 120 d to continued control data collection (TC rats) or SOL H-reflex up-conditioning (TU rats). At the end of data collection, motoneurons that had reinnervated SOL and TA were labeled retrogradely. Putative primary afferent terminals [i.e., terminals containing vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1)] on SOL motoneurons were studied immunohistochemically. SOL (and probably TA) background EMG activity recovered faster in TU rats than in TC rats, and the final recovered SOL H-reflex was significantly larger in TU than in TC rats. TU and TC rats had significantly fewer labeled motoneurons and higher proportions of double-labeled motoneurons than untransected rats. VGLUT1 terminals were significantly more numerous on SOL motoneurons of TU than TC rats. Combined with the larger H-reflexes in TU rats, this anatomical finding supports the hypothesis that SOL H-reflex up-conditioning strengthened primary afferent reinnervation of SOL motoneurons. These results suggest that H-reflex up-conditioning may improve functional recovery after nerve injury and repair.

  5. Comparison of Anaesthetic Efficacy of 4 percent Articaine Primary Buccal Infiltration Versus 2 percent Lidocaine Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Symptomatic Mandibular First Molar Teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain, M.; Khattak, S. U. R.; Shah, S. A.; Fayyaz, M.; Sikandar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate success of pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular 1st molar by using 4 percentage articaine in buccal infiltration versus 2 percentage lidocaine in inferior alveolar nerve block. Study Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Operative Dentistry, Sardar Begum Dental College, Gandhara University, Peshawar, from March to August 2014. Methodology: One hundred and fifty-six emergency patients, who had 1st molar diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis, participated in the study. Subjects were divided into two groups by random allocation. One group received 4 percentage articaine buccal infiltration and the other group received inferior alveolar nerve block of 2 percentage lidocaine. Subjects self-reported pain response was recorded on Heft Parker Visual Analogue Scale after local anaesthetic administration during access cavity preparation and pulp extirpation. Results: Mean age of subjects was 31.46 ±10.994 years. The success rate of 4 percentage buccal infiltration was 76.9 percentage; whereas the success rate of 2 percentage lidocaine inferior alveolar nerve block was 62.8 percentage. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: 4 percentage articaine buccal infiltration can be considered a viable alternative to 2 percentage lidocaine inferior alveolar nerve block in securing successful pulpal anaesthesia for endodontic therapy. (author)

  6. The correlation between Rood and Shehab’s radiographic features and the incidence of inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia following odontectomy of lower third molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Buntoro Kamadjaja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Odontectomy of lower third molar has a potential risk for inferior alveolar nerve impairment. Paresthesia of inferior alveolar nerve has often been associated with close relationship between the apex of lower third molar and mandibular canal. Rood and Shehab’s category has been commonly used for radiological prediction of inferior alveolar nerve injury following third molar surgery. Purpose: This study aimed to determine whether there was correlation between Rood and Shehab’s radiographic features and the incidence of inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia following odontectomy of lower third molar. Method: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study, using data obtained from the dental record of patients who had undergone odontectomy of lower third molars in Dental hospital of Universitas Airlangga during 2 years period. Samples were cases that, from presurgical radiograph, showed close relationship between lower third molar roots and mandibular canal. The case and non-case groups were assigned based on the presence of paraesthesia and non-paraesthesia of inferior alveolar nerves, respectively. Based on Rood and Shehab’s category, the samples collected were then classified into two groups which were those whose relationship matched and did not match with the category, respectively. Data were analyzed using Chi-square correlation test. Result: Of 975 odontectomy cases included in this study, 80 cases were taken as study samples consisting of 15 and 65 cases assigned, respectively, as case and non-case. The 32 cases matched with the criteria of Rood and Shehab's category while the remainder of 48 cases did not. Of 32 cases which met the criteria of Rood and Shehab’s relationship, only 5 cases showed paraesthesia, whereas out of 48 cases which did not met the criteria 10 cases showed paraesthesia. Statistical analysis showed significance value of 0.770 (p>0.05 indicating that there was no significant correlation between

  7. Relationship between the position of the mental foramen and the anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve as determined by cone beam computed tomography combined with mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuogeng; Chen, Donghui; Tang, Li; Wang, Fenfen

    2015-01-01

    The position of the mental foramen and the anterior loop length of the inferior alveolar nerve serve as important anatomical landmarks for surgical procedures in the anterior mandibular region. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve and the mental foramen by combining cone beam computed tomography and Mimics, a software used to construct 3-dimensional (3D) interactive models of anatomical structures. Cone beam computed tomography images from a total of 60 patients were obtained and studied using GALAXY viewer or were imported into Mimics. The anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve was reconstructed 3-dimensionally, and then relevant parameters were measured. The parameters were measured, and their values include mean (SD) anterior loop length, 1.16 (1.78) mm; anterior loop angle, 19.13 (26.89) degrees; inferior alveolar canal diameter, 3.01 (0.67) mm; height of the inferior alveolar canal, 10.32 (1.56) mm; 2-dimensional mental foramen diameter, 2.97 (0.61) mm; 3D mental foramen diameter, 2.95 (0.59) mm; 2-dimensional vertical height of the mental foramen, 14.67 (1.67) mm; and 3D vertical height of the mental foramen, 14.61 (1.69) mm. The mental foramen was located apically between the first and second premolars in 51.67% and below the second premolar in 40.83% of the cases. A relationship was observed between the location of the mental foramen and the presence of the anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve. We highlight the effectiveness of cone beam computed tomography and 3D reconstruction in the identification of important anatomical structures relevant for preoperative assessment for surgical procedures in the anterior region of the mandible.

  8. Inferior alveolar nerve injury and surgical difficulty prediction in third molar surgery: the role of dental panoramic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerjes, W; El-Maaytah, M; Swinson, B; Upile, T; Thompson, G; Gittelmon, S; Baldwin, D; Hadi, H; Vourvachis, M; Abizadeh, N; Al Khawalde, M; Hopper, C

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between preoperative panoramic radiological findings and postoperative inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia following third molar surgery, and to assess the surgical difficulty. This retrospective study involved two groups of patients who were randomly selected. The first group presented with inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paresthesia following surgery, and the second group presented with no complications, including IAN paresthesia. Radiological findings were collected from the panoramic radiographs of those patients and compared to postoperative paresthesia. The degree of surgical difficulty was also assessed radiographically. The application of Chi-square testing on the numbness group and the control group, as well as the numbness group (two years postoperatively) and the control group, showed that parameters like type of impaction (fully impacted), depth of impaction (depth C), ramus/space (class 3), spatial relationship (distoangular and horizontal), number of roots (multiple and incomplete), shape of root (thick and incomplete), shape of the tip of root (curved and incomplete), and relation to IAN (touching, superimposed, or non-specific) are highly significant (p or = 1 mm from IAC has a 98% probability of no numbness, while if the tooth is touching the IAC the probability of numbness between one week and darkening of the root is 48% for > two years, deflection of the root has a 42% probability of > two years numbness, narrowing of the root has 87% of numbness between > one month and six months and one month and six months to > two years numbness, while narrowing of the canal has a probability of 100% of > six months to > two years numbness. By using logistic regression, cases that were recorded as "very difficult," according to the Pederson Difficulty Index, were more likely to develop permanent paresthesia (95%). The application of logistic regression on the radiological findings showed that we can

  9. Anesthetic Efficacy of Gow-Gates Nerve Block, Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block, and Their Combination in Mandibular Molars with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Masoud; Shafiee, Maryam; Khademi, Abbasali; Memarzadeh, Bahareh

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of the Gow-Gates nerve block (GGNB), the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB), and their combination for mandibular molars in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred fifty patients diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular molar were selected. The patients randomly received 2 GGNB injections, 2 IANB injections, or 1 GGNB injection plus 1 IANB injection of 1.8 mL 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Access cavity preparation was initiated 15 minutes after injections. Lip numbness was a requisite for all of the patients. Success was specified as no or mild pain on the basis of Heft-Parker visual analog scale recordings during access cavity preparation or initial instrumentation. Data were analyzed with the chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and analysis of variance tests. The success rates of anesthesia were 40%, 44%, and 70% for the GGNB, IANB, and GGNB + IANB groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the success rate of anesthesia between the GGNB and IANB groups (P > .05). The anesthesia success rate for the GGNB + IANB group was significantly different from those of the GGNB and IANB groups (P irreversible pulpitis, but it would still require supplemental anesthesia. Further research may be needed to confirm the results of this study. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tooth Multi-Sectioning with the Use of Magnification, for Extraction of a Deeply Impacted Lower Second Molar with Entrapment of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilaveridis Ioannis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inferior alveolar nerve injury is one of the most serious complications of mandibular molar surgery and may lead to litigation for mal-practice. Entrapment of the inferior alveolar nerve to roots of an impacted mandibular molars is extremely rare. The aim of this case report is to stress the importance of tooth multi-sectioning with the use of magnification for the safe removal of a deeply impacted second molar with entrapment of the inferior alveolar nerve in its proximal root.

  11. Intermuscular pterygoid-temporal abscess following inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia-A computer tomography based navigated surgical intervention: Case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Jürgen; Reinbacher, Knut Ernst; Pau, Mauro; Feichtinger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) anesthesia is a common local anesthetic procedure. Although IANB anesthesia is known for its safety, complications can still occur. Today immediately or delayed occurring disorders following IANB anesthesia and their treatment are well-recognized. We present a case of a patient who developed a symptomatic abscess in the pterygoid region as a result of several inferior alveolar nerve injections. Clinical symptoms included diffuse pain, reduced mouth opening and jaw's hypomobility and were persistent under a first step conservative treatment. Since image-based navigated interventions have gained in importance and are used for various procedures a navigated surgical intervention was initiated as a second step therapy. Thus precise, atraumatic surgical intervention was performed by an optical tracking system in a difficult anatomical region. A symptomatic abscess was treated by a computed tomography-based navigated surgical intervention at our department. Advantages and disadvantages of this treatment strategy are evaluated.

  12. Preoperative oral use of Ibuprofen or dexamethasone may improve the anesthetic efficacy of an inferior alveolar nerve block in patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusstein, John M

    2013-09-01

    Effect of premedication with ibuprofen and dexamethasone on success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block for teeth with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial. Shahi S, Moktari H, Rahimi S, Yavari HR, Narimani S, Abdolrahmi M, Nezafati S. J Endod 2013;39(2):160-2. John M. Nusstein, DDS, MS PURPOSE/QUESTION: To determine whether preoperative oral administration of ibuprofen (400 mg), dexamethasone (0.5 mg), or placebo (lactose) would improve the anesthetic success rate of an inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with molars diagnosed with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis University: Dental and Periodontal Research Center of Tabriz, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Randomized controlled trial Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Not applicable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Topically-administered acetyl-L-carnitine increases sciatic nerve regeneration and improves functional recovery after tubulization of transected short nerve gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Amini, Keyvan

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries repair is still among the most challenging and concern-raising tasks in neurosurgery. The effect of an acetyl-L-carnitin-loaded silicone tube as an in-situ delivery system in defects bridging was studied using a rat sciatic nerve regeneration model. A 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged using a silicone tube (SIL/ALC) filled with 10 µL acetyl-L-carnitine (100 ng/mL). In the control group (SIL), the tube was filled with the same volume of the phosphate-buffered solution. The regenerated fibers were studied 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks after surgery. The functional study confirmed faster recovery of the regenerated axons in acetyl-L-carnitine treated than control group (PL-carnitine, when loaded in a silicone tube, can bring to an improvement in functional recovery and quantitative morphometric indices of sciatic nerve.

  14. Morphological study on the pressure ulcer-like dermal lesions formed in the rat heel skin after transection of the sciatic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Daijiro; Minami, Chie; Miyagawa, Miki; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Due to transection of bilateral sciatic nerves, pressure ulcer-like dermal lesion occurred in the hairy skin covering of the heel skin in almost all rats. In the present study, chronological changes of the rat heel skin after the transection were morphologically and immunohistochemically examined. In the heel skin, redness and swelling began by 3days after the operation, and open wound formed by 17days. At the redness and swelling stage, edema extensively occurred in the dermis. At the thickening stage, the epidermis at the pressed site became transiently thicker, and at the whitening stage, rapidly thinner. At these stages, the epidermis in the skin surrounding the pressed site became gradually thicker. At the yellow scar stage, the skin was covered only by necrotic tissues and horny layer. These layers were scratched during walking and turning, and the yellow scar stage became the open wound stage. Inflammatory reaction began at the thickening stage, and at the yellow scar and open wound stages, necrosis, infiltration of inflammatory cells and dilation of small blood vessels were observed. These morphological features are quite similar to those in the human pressure ulcer. These findings suggest that these dermal injuries could compare the human pressure ulcer for medical treatment and depressurization in future study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Peripheral Nerve Transplantation Combined with Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Chondroitinase Induces Regeneration and Improves Urinary Function in Complete Spinal Cord Transected Adult Mice.

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    Marc A DePaul

    Full Text Available The loss of lower urinary tract (LUT control is a ubiquitous consequence of a complete spinal cord injury, attributed to a lack of regeneration of supraspinal pathways controlling the bladder. Previous work in our lab has utilized a combinatorial therapy of peripheral nerve autografts (PNG, acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF, and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC to treat a complete T8 spinal cord transection in the adult rat, resulting in supraspinal control of bladder function. In the present study we extended these findings by examining the use of the combinatorial PNG+aFGF+ChABC treatment in a T8 transected mouse model, which more closely models human urinary deficits following spinal cord injury. Cystometry analysis and external urethral sphincter electromyograms reveal that treatment with PNG+aFGF+ChABC reduced bladder weight, improved bladder and external urethral sphincter histology, and significantly enhanced LUT function, resulting in more efficient voiding. Treated mice's injured spinal cord also showed a reduction in collagen scaring, and regeneration of serotonergic and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons across the lesion and into the distal spinal cord. Regeneration of serotonin axons correlated with LUT recovery. These results suggest that our mouse model of LUT dysfunction recapitulates the results found in the rat model and may be used to further investigate genetic contributions to regeneration failure.

  16. Time course of functional recovery during the first 3 mo after surgical transection and repair of nerves to the feline soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Robert J; Maas, Huub; Bulgakova, Margarita A; Oliver, Alanna; English, Arthur W; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2018-03-01

    Locomotion outcomes after peripheral nerve injury and repair in cats have been described in the literature for the period immediately following the injury (muscle denervation period) and then again for an ensuing period of long-term recovery (at 3 mo and longer) resulting in muscle self-reinnervation. Little is known about the changes in muscle activity and walking mechanics during midrecovery, i.e., the early reinnervation period that takes place between 5 and 10 wk of recovery. Here, we investigated hindlimb mechanics and electromyogram (EMG) activity of ankle extensors in six cats during level and slope walking before and every 2 wk thereafter in a 14-wk period of recovery after the soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle nerves in one hindlimb were surgically transected and repaired. We found that the continued increase in SO and LG EMG magnitudes and corresponding changes in hindlimb mechanics coincided with the formation of neuromuscular synapses revealed in muscle biopsies. Throughout the recovery period, EMG magnitude of SO and LG during the stance phase and the duration of the stance-related activity were load dependent, similar to those in the intact synergistic medial gastrocnemius and plantaris. These results and the fact that EMG activity of ankle extensors and locomotor mechanics during level and upslope walking recovered 14 wk after nerve transection and repair suggest that loss of the stretch reflex in self-reinnervated muscles may be compensated by the recovered force-dependent feedback in self-reinnervated muscles, by increased central drive, and by increased gain in intermuscular motion-dependent pathways from intact ankle extensors. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study provides new evidence that the timeline for functional recovery of gait after peripheral nerve injury and repair is consistent with the time required for neuromuscular junctions to form and muscles to reach preoperative tensions. Our findings suggest that a permanent loss of

  17. A Comparison of Different Volumes of Articaine for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block for Molar Teeth with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazarpoor, Ramin; Parirokh, Masoud; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Abbott, Paul V

    2015-09-01

    Achieving anesthesia in mandibular molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis is very difficult. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of 1.8 mL and 3.6 mL articaine for an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) when treating molars with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. In a randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 82 first mandibular molar teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis randomly received conventional IANB injection either with 1 (1.8 mL) or 2 cartridges (3.6 mL) of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. The patients recorded their pain before and during access cavity preparation as well as during root canal instrumentation using a Heft-Parker visual analog scale. No or mild pain was considered as successful anesthesia. Data were analyzed by t and chi-square tests. Eighty patients were eligible to participate in this study, which showed that 3.6 mL articaine provided a significantly higher success rate (77.5%) of IANBs compared with 1.8 mL of the same anesthetic solution (27.5%) although neither group had 100% successful anesthesia (P pulpitis, but it did not result in 100% anesthetic success. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of preoperative alprazolam on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block for teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Abbas Ali; Saatchi, Masoud; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Rostamizadeh, Nasim; Sharafi, Fatemeh

    2012-10-01

    Success of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block decreases in patients with irreversible pulpitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative administration of alprazolam on the success of the IAN block for teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Sixty patients with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular molar were selected for this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The patients received identical capsules of either 0.5 mg of alprazolam or placebo 45 minutes before the administration of a conventional IAN block. Access cavity preparation was initiated 15 minutes after the IAN block injection. Lip numbness was recorded for all the patients. Success was defined as no or mild pain on the basis of visual analogue scale recordings during access cavity preparation and initial instrumentation. Data were analyzed by t test, Mann-Whitney, and χ(2) tests. The success rate was 53% for alprazolam group and 40% for placebo group, with no significant difference between the 2 groups (P = .301). Within the scope of the current study, preoperative oral administration of 0.5 mg of alprazolam did not improve the success of the IAN block in mandibular molars in patients with irreversible pulpitis, and the success rate was not adequate to ensure profound pulpal anesthesia. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anesthetic efficacy of articaine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic versus asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argueta-Figueroa, Liliana; Arzate-Sosa, Gabriel; Mendieta-Zeron, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth and if individual patient factors, pulpal disease characteristics, and previous medication are correlated to local anesthetic success. A second objective was to determine the specificity and sensibility of a cold test for prediction of anesthetic success prior to endodontic treatment. Seventy patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth received 1.6 mL of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) using a metal guide. The anesthetic solution was injected with a computer-preprogrammed delivery system for local anesthesia. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after solution deposition; later, patients rated their discomfort using the visual analog scale (VAS). The success rate for the IA NB using articaine was 64.2% in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and 86.9% in patients with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Cold test prior to root canal treatment had a specificity and sensibility of 12.5% and 87.1%, respectively. The anesthetic efficacy of articaine in irreversible pulpitis is moderately acceptable, and anesthetic success increases when the patient has been premedicated with NSAIDs. The cold test appears to be a favorable indicator for predicting anesthetic success.

  20. Effect of nitrous oxide on the efficacy of the inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, William; Drum, Melissa; Nusstein, John; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike

    2012-05-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block does not always result in successful pulpal anesthesia. Anesthetic success rates might be affected by increased anxiety. Nitrous oxide has been shown to have both anxiolytic and analgesic properties. Therefore, the purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of nitrous oxide on the anesthetic success of the IAN block in patients experiencing symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred emergency patients diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth were enrolled in this study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive an inhalation regimen of nitrous oxide/oxygen mix or room air/oxygen mix (placebo) 5 minutes before the administration of the IAN block. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after completion of the IAN block, and all patients had profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recordings) on access or instrumentation. The success rate for the IAN block was 50% for the nitrous oxide group and 28% for the placebo group. There was a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (P = .024). For mandibular teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, administration of 30%-50% nitrous oxide resulted in a statistically significant increase in the success of the IAN block compared with room air/oxygen. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential diagnosis of endodontic-related inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia with cone beam computed tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarini, G; Plotino, G; Grande, N M; Testarelli, L; Prencipe, M; Messineo, D; Fratini, L; D'Ambrosio, F

    2011-02-01

    To discuss the use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the differential diagnosis of a case of labiomandibular paraesthesia caused by extrusion of endodontic sealer into the mandibular canal. A 59-year-old woman suffering from a paraesthesia on the left posterior mandible and numbness on the left side of the lower lip was referred to an endodontic specialist 1 month after multiple root canal treatments. A panoramic radiograph revealed the presence of extruded root filling material beyond the apex of the mesial root of the mandibular left second molar and also beyond the apex of the first premolar. A cone beam computed tomography examination was undertaken, which confirmed the presence of radiopaque root canal filling material in the periapical area of the second molar, and revealed that the material was inside the mandibular canal. No extruded filling material was found inside the mental foramen beyond the apex of the first premolar tooth. Small field of view CBCT (where possible) can be considered an effective radiographic diagnostic device when endodontic-related inferior alveolar nerve or mental foramen paraesthesia are suspected. CBCT is able to provide detailed three-dimensional images of the tooth, the root canal system and the surrounding tissue. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  2. Infection Related Inferior Alveolar Nerve Paresthesia in the Lower Premolar Teeth

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    Rachele Censi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this paper was to describe two cases of IAN infection-induced paresthesia and to discuss the most appropriate treatment solutions. Methods. For two patients, periapical lesions that induced IAN paresthesia were revealed. In the first case, the tooth was previously endodontically treated, whereas in the second case the lesion was due to pulp necrosis. Results. For the first patient, a progressive healing was observed only after the tooth extraction. In the second patient, the paresthesia had resolved after endodontic treatment. Conclusions. The endodontic-related paresthesia is a rare complication that can be the result of a combination of etiopathogenic mechanisms such as mechanical pressure on the nerve fibers due to the expanding infectious process and the production of microbial toxins. Paresthesia resulting from periapical lesions usually subsides through elimination of infection by root canal treatment. However, if there are no signs of enhancement, the immediate extraction of the tooth is the treatment of choice in order to prevent irreversible paresthesia because it was demonstrated that there is a correlation between the duration of mechanical or chemical irritation and the risk of permanent paresthesia.

  3. An example of neural plasticity evoked by putative behavioral demand and early use of vibrissal hairs after facial nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma L; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Grosheva, Maria; Streppel, Michael; Schraermeyer, Ulrich; Neiss, Wolfram F; Angelov, Doychin N

    2002-12-01

    Abnormally associated movements inevitably occur after surgical repair of the facial nerve. The reason for this postparalytic syndrome is poor navigation of regrowing axons. Despite the valuable functional advantage provided by the easily detected movement of vibrissae in rats, the major investigative tools for establishing the degree of misdirected reinnervation are still electrophysiologic recordings and retrograde tracing. In the present study we complemented data from pre- and postoperative retrograde labeling (FluoroGold, Fast Blue, DiI) of facial motoneurons with an evaluation of whisker movements. Using a video-based motion analysis system, we compared the recovery of vibrissae motor performance in visually normal and blind rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain. The analysis of whisker movement after facial nerve surgery revealed a striking discrepancy between morphologic and functional estimates. Whereas retrograde labeling displayed poor accuracy of target reinnervation and supernumerary axonal branching in both groups, the video-based motion analysis showed a perfect recovery of vibrissae movements in the blind rats. Attributing the complete recovery of whisker movement in the blind rats to an extraordinary plasticity of the facial motoneurons induced by putative behavioral demand and forced overuse, we conclude that the video-based analysis of whisker movement is a valuable tool for studying the progress in functional recovery.

  4. Effect of premedication to provide analgesia as a supplement to inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, Daniel; Goldberg, Jack; Hobbs, Edward H; Ram, Saravanan; Clark, Glenn T; Enciso, Reyes

    2016-06-01

    The authors' objective was to determine whether scientific evidence supports the use of oral premedication to increase the efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and to decrease endodontic treatment pain in patients with diagnosed irreversible pulpitis. The authors included randomized controlled trials that involved enteral premedication and 2% lidocaine IANB for adults with irreversible pulpitis compared with placebo. In particular, the authors reviewed studies comparing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), benzodiazepines, acetaminophen, and corticosteroids with placebo. The authors searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and Web of Science. The authors analyzed 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Patients who took the NSAIDs under study, including ibuprofen, ketorolac, diclofenac, indomethacin, and lornoxicam, 1 hour before endodontic treatment showed statistically significant improvement in the outcome of having "little or no pain" during endodontic treatment compared with patients who took a placebo 1 hour before endodontic treatment (risk ratio [RR], 1.989; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.495-2.646; P < .001). Benzodiazepines were not as well represented in the literature, but the 2 included studies did not show a significant improvement in patients' having "little or no pain" during endodontic treatment over placebo (RR, 0.989; 95% CI, 0.677-1.444; P = .954). There is moderate evidence to support the use of oral NSAIDs-in particular, ibuprofen (600 milligrams)-1 hour before the administration of IANB local anesthetic (1.8-3.6 milliliters of 2% lidocaine) to provide additional analgesia to the patient. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence of missed inferior alveolar nerve blocks in vital asymptomatic subjects and in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Sara; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of missed inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) blocks by using a 1- or 2-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in vital asymptomatic teeth and in emergency patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. As part of 37 studies, 3169 subjects/patients were evaluated for missed IAN blocks. The study included 2450 asymptomatic subjects and 719 emergency patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Each subject or patient received either a 1- or 2-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. A missed block was defined as no lip numbness at 15-20 minutes after the IAN block. The effect of anesthetic volume on the incidence of missed blocks was assessed by using mixed models logistic regression with individual studies as a random effect. The incidence of missed blocks for asymptomatic subjects was 6.3% for the 1-cartridge volume and 3.8% for the 2-cartridge volume. For patients presenting with irreversible pulpitis, the incidence of missed blocks was 7.7% for the 1-cartridge volume and 2.3% for the 2-cartridge volume. In both asymptomatic subjects and patients with irreversible pulpitis, the 2-cartridge volume was significantly (P = .0395) better than the 1-cartridge volume. There were no significant effects for pulpal diagnosis (P = .7523) or the pulpal diagnosis and anesthetic volume interaction (P = .3973). Concerning missed IAN blocks, we concluded that administration of a 2-cartridge volume was significantly better (P = .0395) than a 1-cartridge volume in both asymptomatic subjects and emergency patients presenting with irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnostic value of panoramic radiography in predicting inferior alveolar nerve injury after mandibular third molar extraction: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Yin, W; Zhang, R; Li, J; Zheng, Y

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of panoramic radiography on inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury after extraction of the mandibular third molar. Relevant studies up to 1 June 2014 that discussed the association of panoramic radiography signs and post-mandibular third molar extraction IAN injury were systematically retrieved from the databases of PubMed, Embase, Springerlink, Web of Science and Cochrane library. The effect size of pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios (PLR), negative likelihood ratios (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were statistically analysed with Meta-disc 1.4 software. Nine articles were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity were 0.56 (95% CI: 0.50-0.61) and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.84-0.87), respectively. The overall PLR was 3.46 (95% CI: 2.02-5.92) and overall NLR was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.45-0.73). The pooled estimate of DOR was 6.49 (95% CI: 2.92-14.44). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.7143 ± 0.0604. The meta-analysis indicated that interpretation of panoramic radiography based on darkening of the root had a high specificity in predicting IAN injury after mandibular third molar extraction. However, the ability of this panoramic radiography marker to detect true positive IAN injury was not satisfactory. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Comparative Finite Element Analysis of Short Implants and Lateralization of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve With Different Prosthesis Heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayme, Sérgio J; Ramalho, Paulo R; De Franco, Leonardo; Jugdar, Ricardo Elias; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Vasco, Marco A A

    2015-11-01

    The lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve (LIAN) and short implants are efficient options for rehabilitation of the posterior atrophic mandible. However, the loss of bone leads to prosthesis with greater height and lever effect that in turn can have different impact on treatments. Through the finite element method, the present study tests the hypothesis that conventional implants placed under LIAN and short implants have similar risk of bone loss regarding variable height of the crown and that crown-to-implant ratio is not a reliable resource to evaluate risk in these treatments. Computed tomography scans of mandibles were processed and implants and prosthetic components were reverse engineered for reconstruction of three-dimensional models to simulate 3 elements fixed partial dentures supported by 2 osseointegrated implants. The models of implants were based on MK III implants (Nobel Biocare, Zurich, Switzerland) with 4 mm in diameter by 7 mm in length representing short implants, and 15 mm in length representing implants used in LIAN. The implant/crown ratio for short implants was 1:1.5, 1:2, and 1:2.5 and LIAN models were modeled with exactly the same prosthesis, resulting in implant/crown ratios of 1:0.67, 1:0.89, and 1:1.12. The results partially rejected the hypothesis that LIAN and short implants have similar risk of bone loss, showing that although LIAN results were better in the models evaluated, the variations in height had proportionally similar impact on both treatments and accepted the hypothesis that crown-to-implant ratio was not a reliable resource to evaluate risk.

  8. Effects of systemic administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor on Bax and Bcl-2 proteins in the lumbar spinal cord of neonatal rats after sciatic nerve transection

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    A.C.S. Rezende

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a cytokine that plays a neuroprotective role in relation to axotomized motoneurons. We determined the effect of daily subcutaneous doses of CNTF (1.2 µg/g for 5 days; N = 13 or PBS (N = 13 on the levels of mRNA for Bcl-2 and Bax, as well as the expression and inter-association of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins, and the survival of motoneurons in the spinal cord lumbar enlargement of 2-day-old Wistar rats after sciatic nerve transection. Five days after transection, the effects were evaluated on histological and molecular levels using Nissl staining, immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The motoneuron survival ratio, defined as the ratio between the number of motoneurons counted on the lesioned side vs those on the unlesioned side, was calculated. This ratio was 0.77 ± 0.02 for CNTF-treated rats vs 0.53 ± 0.02 for the PBS-treated controls (P < 0.001. Treatment with CNTF modified the level of mRNA, with the expression of Bax RNA decreasing 18% (with a consequent decrease in the level of Bax protein, while the expression of Bcl-2 RNA was increased 87%, although the level of Bcl-2 protein was unchanged. The amount of Bcl-2/Bax heterodimer increased 91% over that found in the PBS-treated controls. These data show, for the first time, that the neuroprotective effect of CNTF on neonatal rat axotomized motoneurons is associated with a reduction in free Bax, due to the inhibition of Bax expression, as well as increased Bcl-2/Bax heterodimerization. Thus, the neuroprotective action of the CNTF on axotomized motoneurons can be related to the inhibition of this apoptotic pathway.

  9. The prognostic value of panoramic radiography of inferior alveolar nerve damage after mandibular third molar removal: retrospective study of 400 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, József; Lempel, Edina; Jeges, Sára; Szabó, Gyula; Olasz, Lajos

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the accuracy of panoramic radiographic signs predicting inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paresthesia after lower third molar removal. In a case-control study the sample was composed of 41 cases with postoperative IAN paresthesia and 359 control cases without it. The collected data included "classic" specific signs indicating a close spatial relationship between third molar root and inferior alveolar canal (IAC), root curvatures, and the extent of IAC-root tip overlap. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were completed to estimate the association between radiographic findings and IAN paresthesia. The multivariate logistic analysis identified 3 signs significantly associated with IAN paresthesia (P 99%. Panoramic radiography is an inadequate screening method for predicting IAN paresthesia after mandibular third molar removal. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immediate Loading of One-Piece Implants in Conjunction with a Modified Technique of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization: 10 Years Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldibany, Riham; Rodriguez, Joaquin G.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a treatment modification for a patient presented with severely resorbed bilateral edentulous posterior mandible and mobility of the anterior teeth. There was less than 8 mm of bone between the crest of the alveolar ridge and the mandibular canal as revealed by radiographic examination. A modified technique for inferior alveolar nerve lateralization (IANL) in conjunction with ridge expansion was performed using threaded bone expanders, which allowed for better primary stability and placing longer implants. A total of four postextraction implants were in the anterior region of the mandible. The mandible received a total of nine one-piece implants to allow for immediate nonfunctional loading. The definitive ceramometallic prosthesis was delivered 3 months postoperatively. The 10 years clinical and radiographic assessment showed minimal bone resorption around osseointegrated implants. One-piece implants showed great success rate and minimal bone resorption following the modified technique of IANL and immediate implantation. PMID:24624258

  11. Immediate loading of one-piece implants in conjunction with a modified technique of inferior alveolar nerve lateralization: 10 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldibany, Riham; Rodriguez, Joaquin G

    2014-03-01

    This report describes a treatment modification for a patient presented with severely resorbed bilateral edentulous posterior mandible and mobility of the anterior teeth. There was less than 8 mm of bone between the crest of the alveolar ridge and the mandibular canal as revealed by radiographic examination. A modified technique for inferior alveolar nerve lateralization (IANL) in conjunction with ridge expansion was performed using threaded bone expanders, which allowed for better primary stability and placing longer implants. A total of four postextraction implants were in the anterior region of the mandible. The mandible received a total of nine one-piece implants to allow for immediate nonfunctional loading. The definitive ceramometallic prosthesis was delivered 3 months postoperatively. The 10 years clinical and radiographic assessment showed minimal bone resorption around osseointegrated implants. One-piece implants showed great success rate and minimal bone resorption following the modified technique of IANL and immediate implantation.

  12. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on glucose uptake in the presence and absence of lactate in the frog dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord

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    F Rigon

    Full Text Available Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms because the simplicity of their nervous tissue and the phylogenetic aspect of this question. One of these models is the sciatic nerve transection (SNT, which mimics the clinical symptoms of “phantom limb”, a condition that arises in humans after amputation or transverse spinal lesions. In mammals, the SNT increases glucose metabolism in the central nervous system, and the lactate generated appears to serve as an energy source for nerve cells. An answerable question is whether there is elevated glucose uptake in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG after peripheral axotomy. As glucose is the major energy substrate for frog nervous tissue, and these animals accumulate lactic acid under some conditions, bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus were used to demonstrate the effect of SNT on DRG and spinal cord 1-[14C] 2-deoxy-D-glucose (14C-2-DG uptake in the presence and absence of lactate. We also investigated the effect of this condition on the formation of 14CO2 from 14C-glucose and 14C-L-lactate, and plasmatic glucose and lactate levels. The 3-O-[14C] methyl-D-glucose (14C-3-OMG uptake was used to demonstrate the steady-state tissue/medium glucose distribution ratio under these conditions. Three days after SNT, 14C-2-DG uptake increased, but 14C-3-OMG uptake remained steady. The increase in 14C-2-DG uptake was lower when lactate was added to the incubation medium. No change was found in glucose and lactate oxidation after SNT, but lactate and glucose levels in the blood were reduced. Thus, our results showed that SNT increased the glucose metabolism in the frog DRG and spinal cord. The effect of lactate on this uptake suggests that glucose is used in glycolytic pathways after SNT.

  13. Dose-Dependent Protective Effect of Lithium Chloride on Retinal Ganglion Cells Is Interrelated with an Upregulated Intraretinal BDNF after Optic Nerve Transection in Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Mei Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection of lithium for axotomized retinal ganglion cells (RGCs is attributed to upregulated intraretinal Bcl-2. As lithium also upregulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF which can rescue axotomized RGCs, it is hypothesized that lithium could protect RGCs through BDNF. This study investigated this hypothesis and a possible relationship between the dose and protection of lithium. All adult experimental rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of lithium chloride (LiCl at 30, 60 or 85 mg/kg·bw until they were euthanized 2, 7 or 14 days after left intraorbital optic nerve (ON transection. Our results revealed that RGC densities promoted and declined with increased dose of LiCl and the highest RGC densities were always in the 60 mg/kg·bw LiCl group at both 7 and 14 day points. Similar promotion and decline in the mRNA and protein levels of intraretinal BDNF were also found at the 14 day point, while such BDNF levels increased in the 30 mg/kg·bw LiCl group but peaked in the 60 and 85 mg/kg·bw LiCl groups at the 7 day point. These findings suggested that lithium can delay the death of axotomized RGCs in a dose-dependent manner within a certain period after ON injury and such beneficial effect is interrelated with an upregulated level of intraretinal BDNF.

  14. Evidence that activation of P2X7R does not exacerbate neuronal death after optic nerve transection and focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Berrak; Caglayan, Ahmet B; Beker, Mustafa C; Yalcin, Esra; Beker, Merve; Kelestemur, Taha; Sertel, Elif; Ozturk, Gürkan; Kilic, Ulkan; Sahin, Fikrettin; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2017-10-01

    Conflicting data in the literature about the function of P2X7R in survival following ischemia necessitates the conductance of in-depth studies. To investigate the impacts of activation vs inhibition of the receptor on neuronal survival as well as the downstream signaling cascades, in addition to optic nerve transection (ONT), 30min and 90min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) models were performed in mice. Intracellular calcium levels were assessed in primary cortical neuron cultures. Here, we show that P2X7R antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG) decreased DNA fragmentation, infarct volume, brain swelling, neurological deficit scores and activation of microglial cells after focal cerebral ischemia. BBG also significantly increased the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after ONT and the number of surviving neurons following MCAo. Importantly, receptor agonist BzATP resulted in increased activation of microglial cells and induced phosphorylation of ERK, AKT and JNK. These results indicated that inhibition of P2X7R with BBG promoted neuronal survival, not through the activation of survival kinase pathways, but possibly by improved intracellular Ca 2+ overload and decreased the levels of Caspase 1, IL-1β and Bax proteins. On the other hand, BzATP-mediated increased number of activated microglia and increased survival kinase levels in addition to increased caspase-1 and IL-1β levels indicate the complex nature of the P2X7 receptor-mediated signaling in neuronal injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bowel function and quality of life after superior mesenteric nerve plexus transection in right colectomy with D3 extended mesenterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Y; Stimec, B; Andersen, S N; Lindstrom, J C; Pfeffer, F; Oresland, T; Ignjatovic, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the impact of injury to the superior mesenteric nerve plexus caused by right colectomy with D3 extended mesenterectomy as performed in the prospective multicenter trial: "Safe Radical D3 Right Hemicolectomy for Cancer through Preoperative Biphasic Multi-detector Computed Tomography" in which all soft tissue surrounding the superior mesenteric vessels from the level of the middle colic artery to that of the ileocolic artery was removed. Bowel function and gastrointestinal quality of life in two consecutive cohorts that underwent right colectomy with and without D3 extended mesenterectomy were compared. Main outcome measures were the Diarrhea Assessment Scale (DAS) and Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI). The data were collected prospectively through telephone interviews. Forty-nine patients per group, comparable for age, sex, length of bowel resected but with significantly shorter follow-up time in the experimental group, were included. There was no difference in total DAS scores, subscores or additional questions except for higher bowel frequency scores in the D3 group (p = 0.02). Comparison of total GIQLI scores and subscales showed no difference between groups. Regression analysis with correction for confounding factors showed 0.48 lower bowel frequency scores in the D2 group (p = 0.022). Within the D3 group presence of jejunal arteries cranial to the D3 dissection area showed 1.78 lower DAS scores and 0.7 lower bowel frequency scores. Small bowel denervation after right colectomy with D3 extended mesenterectomy leads to increased bowel frequency but does not impact gastrointestinal quality of life. Individual anatomical variants can affect postoperative bowel function differently despite standardized surgery.

  16. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on ultrastructure, NADPH-diaphorase reaction and serotonin-, tyrosine hydroxylase-, c-Fos-, glucose transporter 1- and 3-like immunoreactivities in frog dorsal root ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rigon

    Full Text Available Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms. Since we did not find any reports on the effects of sciatic nerve transection (SNT on the ultrastructure and pattern of metabolic substances in frog dorsal root ganglion (DRG cells, in the present study, 18 adult male frogs (Rana catesbeiana were divided into three experimental groups: naive (frogs not subjected to surgical manipulation, sham (frogs in which all surgical procedures to expose the sciatic nerve were used except transection of the nerve, and SNT (frogs in which the sciatic nerve was exposed and transected. After 3 days, the bilateral DRG of the sciatic nerve was collected and used for transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect reactivity for glucose transporter (Glut types 1 and 3, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and c-Fos, as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-diaphorase. SNT induced more mitochondria with vacuolation in neurons, satellite glial cells (SGCs with more cytoplasmic extensions emerging from cell bodies, as well as more ribosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, intermediate filaments and mitochondria. c-Fos immunoreactivity was found in neuronal nuclei. More neurons and SGCs surrounded by tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactivity were found. No change occurred in serotonin- and Glut1- and Glut3-like immunoreactivity. NADPH-diaphorase occurred in more neurons and SGCs. No sign of SGC proliferation was observed. Since the changes of frog DRG in response to nerve injury are similar to those of mammals, frogs should be a valid experimental model for the study of the effects of SNT, a condition that still has many unanswered questions.

  17. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on ultrastructure, NADPH-diaphorase reaction and serotonin-, tyrosine hydroxylase-, c-Fos-, glucose transporter 1- and 3-like immunoreactivities in frog dorsal root ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rigon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms. Since we did not find any reports on the effects of sciatic nerve transection (SNT on the ultrastructure and pattern of metabolic substances in frog dorsal root ganglion (DRG cells, in the present study, 18 adult male frogs (Rana catesbeiana were divided into three experimental groups: naive (frogs not subjected to surgical manipulation, sham (frogs in which all surgical procedures to expose the sciatic nerve were used except transection of the nerve, and SNT (frogs in which the sciatic nerve was exposed and transected. After 3 days, the bilateral DRG of the sciatic nerve was collected and used for transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect reactivity for glucose transporter (Glut types 1 and 3, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and c-Fos, as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-diaphorase. SNT induced more mitochondria with vacuolation in neurons, satellite glial cells (SGCs with more cytoplasmic extensions emerging from cell bodies, as well as more ribosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, intermediate filaments and mitochondria. c-Fos immunoreactivity was found in neuronal nuclei. More neurons and SGCs surrounded by tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactivity were found. No change occurred in serotonin- and Glut1- and Glut3-like immunoreactivity. NADPH-diaphorase occurred in more neurons and SGCs. No sign of SGC proliferation was observed. Since the changes of frog DRG in response to nerve injury are similar to those of mammals, frogs should be a valid experimental model for the study of the effects of SNT, a condition that still has many unanswered questions.

  18. Transplantation of muscle-derived stem cells plus biodegradable fibrin glue restores the urethral sphincter in a pudendal nerve-transected rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Xu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether fibrin glue (FG could promote urethral sphincter restoration in muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC-based injection therapies in a pudendal nerve-transected (PNT rat, which was used as a stress urinary incontinence (SUI model. MDSCs were purified from the gastrocnemius muscles of 4-week-old inbred female SPF Wistar rats and labeled with green fluorescent protein. Animals were divided into five groups (N = 15: sham (S, PNT (D, PNT+FG injection (F, PNT+MDSC injection (M, and PNT+MDSC+FG injection (FM. Each group was subdivided into 1- and 4-week groups. One and 4 weeks after injection into the proximal urethra, leak point pressure (LPP was measured to assess urethral resistance function. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed 4 weeks after injection. LPP was increased significantly in FM and M animals after implantation compared to group D (P < 0.01, but was not different from group S. LPP was slightly higher in the FM group than in the M group but there was no significant difference between them at different times. Histological and immunohistochemical examination demonstrated increased numbers of surviving MDSCs (109 ± 19 vs 82 ± 11/hpf, P = 0.026, increased muscle/collagen ratio (0.40 ± 0.02 vs 0.34 ± 0.02, P = 0.044, as well as increased microvessel density (16.9 ± 0.6 vs 14.1 ± 0.4/hpf, P = 0.001 at the injection sites in FM compared to M animals. Fibrin glue may potentially improve the action of transplanted MDSCs to restore the histology and function of the urethral sphincter in a SUI rat model. Injection of MDSCs with fibrin glue may provide a novel cellular therapy method for SUI.

  19. [Mechanisms disordering wound healing on the lip after bilateral crossing of the inferior alveolar nerve and experimental validation of correction methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volozhin, A I; Brusenina, N D; Gemonov, V V; Rybalkina, E A; Druzhinina, R A

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms of lip wound healing after bilateral crossing of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were studied on Chinchilla rabbits in 3 experimental series, 6 animals per series. In group 1 bilateral crossing of IAN was carried out, in group 2 bilateral crossing of IAN was paralleled by removal of a mucous flap in the middle of the lower lip, and in group 3 the same wound as in group 2 was created, after which the wounds in this group were daily treated with a special ointment and a single injection of lidocaine (1% solution) under the wound. The nerve crossing led to development of ulcer on the lip with degenerative changes in the vascular walls, destruction of nerve fibers, and fragmentation of some axial cylinders. Crossing of IAN simultaneously with removal of the lower lip flap led to more severe degenerative changes in the tissue. Daily treatment of the lip with the ointment and lidocaine blocking normalized wound healing. A possible mechanism of the changes observed is discussed.

  20. Risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury after extraction of the mandibular third molar--a comparative study of preoperative images by panoramic radiography and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, T; Ri, S; Shigeta, T; Akashi, M; Imai, Y; Kakei, Y; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2013-07-01

    In this study we investigated the relationships among the risk factors for inferior alveolar nerve injury (IANI), and the difference between preoperative imaging findings on panoramic radiographs and computed tomography (CT), by univariate and multivariate analyses. We determined the following to be significant variables by multivariate analysis: panoramic radiographic signs, such as the loss of the white line of the inferior alveolar canal or the diversion of the canal; excessive haemorrhage during extraction; and a close relationship of the roots to the IAN (type 1 cases) on CT examination. CT findings of type 1 were associated with a significantly higher risk (odds ratio 43.77) of IANI. In addition, many panoramic findings were not consistent with CT findings (275 of 440 teeth; 62.5%). These results suggest that CT findings may be able to predict the development of IANI more accurately than panoramic findings. Panoramic radiography alone did not provide sufficiently reliable images required for predicting IANI. Therefore, when the panoramic image is suggestive of a close relationship between the impacted tooth and the IAN, CT should be recommended as a means of conducting further investigations. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A prospective randomized trial of different supplementary local anesthetic techniques after failure of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaa, Mohammad D; Whitworth, John M; Meechan, John Gerard

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of supplementary repeat inferior alveolar nerve block with 2% lidocaine and epinephrine, buccal infiltration with 4% articaine with epinephrine, intraligamentary injection, or intraosseous injection (both with 2% lidocaine with epinephrine) after failed inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for securing pain-free treatment in patients experiencing irreversible pulpitis in mandibular permanent teeth. This randomized clinical trial included 182 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular teeth. Patients received 2.0 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine as an IANB injection. Patients who did not experience pain-free treatment received randomly 1 of 4 supplementary techniques, namely repeat lidocaine IANB (rIANB), articaine buccal infiltration (ABI), lidocaine intraligamentary injection (PDL), or lidocaine intraosseous injection (IO). Successful pulp anesthesia was considered to have occurred when no response was obtained to the maximum stimulation (80 reading) of the pulp tester, at which time treatment commenced. Treatment was regarded as being successfully completed when it was associated with no pain. Data were analyzed by χ(2) and Fisher exact tests. Of the 182 patients, 122 achieved successful pulpal anesthesia within 10 minutes after initial IANB injection; 82 experienced pain-free treatment. ABI and IO allowed more successful (pain-free) treatment (84% and 68%, respectively) than rIANB or PDL supplementary techniques (32% and 48%, respectively); this was statistically significant (P = .001). IANB injection alone does not always allow pain-free treatment for mandibular teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Supplementary buccal infiltration with 4% articaine with epinephrine and intraosseous injection with 2% lidocaine with epinephrine are more likely to allow pain-free treatment than intraligamentary and repeat IANB injections with 2% lidocaine with epinephrine for patients experiencing

  2. Functional and regenerative effects of local administration of autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells combined with silicone conduit on transected femoral nerve of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Anelise Bonilla; Schestatsky, Pedro; Torres, Vítor Félix; Gomes, Cristiano; Gianotti, Giordano Cabral; Paz, Ana Helena da Rosa; Terraciano, Paula Barros; Marques, Janete Maria Volpato; Guimarães, Karina Magano; Graça, Dominguita Lühers; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth Obino; Contesini, Emerson Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The inoculation of cells into injury sites can accelerate and improve the quality of nerve regeneration. This study aimed to evaluate the functional and regenerative effects of mononuclear autologous bone marrow cells (MABMC) combined with silicon conduit grafting in rabbit femoral nerves. Twenty-eight animals were allocated to one of two groups: treatment group (TG) or control group (CG), divided according to the time of evaluation, at either 50 or 75 days. After neurotmesis of the femoral nerve, surgical repair was performed with nerve autografts in silicon conduits, leaving a 5mm gap in both groups. The TG received MABMC in silicon conduits, and CG received a sham saline inoculum. Histological, clinical and electrophysiological analyses detected no differences between groups, but analysis of leg diameter showed that TG diameters were larger. This cell therapy did not improve regeneration of the femoral nerve, but there was a tendency for better functional recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine for inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ravi; Shetty, Shashit

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was done to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine with that of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine during pulpectomy in patients with irreversible pulpitis for inferior alveolar nerve block in mandibular posterior teeth. Material and Methods: Patients with irreversible pulpitis referred to the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, K.D. Dental College, randomly received a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block containing 1.8 mL of either 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. After the patient’s subjective assessment of lip anesthesia, the absence/presence of pulpal anesthesia through electric pulp stimulation was recorded and the absence/presence of pain was recorded through visual analogue scale. Results: The pulpal anesthesia success for articaine (76%) was slightly more than with lidocaine (58%) as measured with pulp tester as well as for the pain reported during the procedure the success rate of articaine (88%) was slightly more than that of lidocaine (82%) although the difference between the two solutions was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Both the local anesthetic solutions had similar effects on patients with irreversible pulpitis when used for inferior alveolar nerve block. Key words:Anesthesia, articaine, lignocaine, pulpitis. PMID:25674319

  4. Anesthetic Efficacy of Articaine and Ketamine for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaeimanesh, Vahid; Khazaei, Saber; Kaviani, Naser; Saatchi, Masoud; Shafiei, Maryam; Khademi, Abbasali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to investigate the effect of articaine combined with ketamine on the success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in posterior mandible teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Forty two adult patients with diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth were selected. The patients received two cartridges of either containing 3.2 mL 4% articaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 0.4 mL 50 mg/mL ketamine hydrochloride (A-ketamine group) or 3.2 mL 4% articaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 0.4 mL normal saline (A-saline group) using conventional IANB injections. Access cavity preparation started 15 min after injection. Lip numbness was required for all the patients. Success was considered as no or mild pain on the basis of Heft-Parker visual analog scale recordings upon access cavity preparation or initial instrumentation. Data were analyzed by independent student t , Mann-Whitney and Chi -square tests. The success rates were 55% and 42.9% for A-ketamine and A-saline group, respectively, with no significant differences between the two groups ( P =0.437) . Adding 0.4 mL 50 mg/mL ketamine hydrochloride to the articaine local anesthetic did not increase the efficacy of IANB for posterior mandibular teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

  5. Effect of bupivacaine on postoperative pain for inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia after single-visit root canal treatment in teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud; Yosefi, Mohammad Hosein; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Manochehrifar, Hamed; Abbott, Paul V; Reza Forghani, Farshid

    2012-08-01

    Pain control after root canal treatment is of great importance in endodontic practice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a long-acting anesthetic (bupivacaine) on postoperative pain and the use of analgesics after root canal treatment. In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 60 patients (30 per group) having first or second mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis randomly received either 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine as the anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. After single-visit root canal treatment, each patient recorded their pain score on a visual analogue scale at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 hours after treatment. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney, χ(2), Cochrane Q, and t tests as well as Pearson correlation analysis. The results indicate that patients who received bupivacaine had significantly lower pain scores at 6 and 12 hours after root canal treatment compared with the patients who received lidocaine (P irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars had significantly less early postoperative pain and used fewer analgesics than those who had lidocaine as the anesthetic. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of combination of preoperative ibuprofen/acetaminophen on the success of the inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael; Drum, Melissa; Nusstein, John; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of the administration of the combination of preoperative ibuprofen/acetaminophen on the success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred endodontic emergency patients in moderate to severe pain diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received, in a double-blind manner, identical capsules of either a combination of 800 mg ibuprofen and 1000 mg acetaminophen or placebo 45 minutes before the administration of a conventional IAN block. Access was begun 15 minutes after completion of the IAN block, and all patients had profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recordings) on access or initial instrumentation. The success rate for the IAN block was 32% for the combination ibuprofen/acetaminophen group and 24% for the placebo, with no significant difference (P = .37) between the 2 groups. For mandibular posterior teeth, a combination dose of 800 mg ibuprofen and 1000 mg acetaminophen given 45 minutes before administration of the IAN block did not result in a statistically significant increase in anesthetic success in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of preoperative medications on the efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis: A placebo-controlled clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Amit; Shashirekha, Govind

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to compare the effect of the administration of preoperative ibuprofen, ketorolac, combination of etodolac with paracetamol and combination of aceclofenac with paracetamol versus placebo for the potential increased effectiveness of the inferior alveolar nerve block [IANB] anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 endodontic emergency patients in moderate to severe pain diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received, in a double-blind manner, either a drug or placebo 30 minutes before the administration of a conventional IANB. Cold testing was done before administration of anesthesia to determine level of pain using Heft-Parker Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score. Success was defined as no pain or pain (VAS) on access or initial instrumentation. Results: Overall success was 54% for all the groups. Success was highest (70%) for the ketorolac group, 55% for both ibuprofen group and combination of aceclofenac with paracetamol group, 50% for combination of etodolac with paracetamol group, and 40% for the placebo group. Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, the use of preoperative medication did improve the anesthetic efficacy of IANB for the treatment of teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis but not significantly. PMID:23716973

  8. Effect of intraosseous injection versus inferior alveolar nerve block as primary pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhad, Alireza; Razavian, Hamid; Shafiee, Maryam

    2018-01-27

    This study sought to assess the success rate, effect on blood pressure, and pain of intraosseous injection (IO) and inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis as the primary anaesthetic technique. This randomized clinical trial (IRCT2013022712634N1) was conducted on 60 patients between 18 and 65 years suffering from symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group one received IO while group two received IANB with 3% mepivacaine. After anaesthetic injection, success rate of pulpal anaesthesia was assessed by pulp testing in the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures of patients were compared before and after the anaesthetic injections. Level of pain during injection was scored using a visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20, t-test and chi square test at p = .05 level of significance. Success rate of IO (56.7%) was significantly higher than that of IANB (23.3%) (p = .008). There was no significant difference in pain during anaesthetic injection (p = .304) or change in systolic (p = .80) and diastolic (p = .28) blood pressures following injection between the two techniques. IO had a higher success rate than IANB for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Neither technique provided profound pulpal anaesthesia.

  9. The Effect of Acupuncture on the Success of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block for Teeth with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Triple-blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Shahrzad; Moradi Majd, Nima; Torabi, Samane; Habibi, Mohammad; Homayouni, Hamed; Mohammadi, Navid

    2015-09-01

    An inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) does not always provide satisfactory anesthesia for patients with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preoperative acupuncture on the success rate of IANBs for teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. In a randomized triple-blinded clinical trial, 40 patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were divided into 2 groups: the acupuncture and control groups. In the acupuncture group, a disposable needle was inserted at LI4 (Hegu) acupoint, and after 15 minutes, for patients who had reported the De qi sensation, an IANB was administered. In the control group, 15 minutes before the administration of an IANB, the practitioner simply imitated the acupuncture procedure but did not actually insert the needle. Endodontic treatments were conducted for the patients who reported lip numbness 15 minutes after the injection of the IANB. If the patients felt intolerable pain (>20 mm on a visual analog scale of 100 mm) during the procedure, a supplementary injection was administered. In those situations, the IANB was considered an unsuccessful injection. Data were evaluated by the chi-square, Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney, and t tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The overall success rates of IANB for the acupuncture and control groups were 60% and 20%, respectively (P pulpitis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The success rate of bupivacaine and lidocaine as anesthetic agents in inferior alveolar nerve block in teeth with irreversible pulpitis without spontaneous pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosefi, Mohammad Hosein; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Achieving adequate anesthesia with inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB) is of great importance during dental procedures. The aim of the present study was to assess the success rate of two anesthetic agents (bupivacaine and lidocaine) for IANB when treating teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods Sixty volunteer male and female patients who required root canal treatment of a mandibular molar due to caries participated in the present study. The inclusion criteria included prolonged pain to thermal stimulus but no spontaneous pain. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine or 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine as an IANB injection. The sensitivity of the teeth to a cold test as well as the amount of pain during access cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation were recorded. Results were statistically analyzed with the Chi-Square and Fischer's exact tests. Results At the final step, fifty-nine patients were included in the study. The success rate for bupivacaine and lidocaine groups were 20.0% and 24.1%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any stage of the treatment procedure. Conclusions There was no difference in success rates of anesthesia when bupivacaine and lidocaine were used for IANB injections to treat mandibular molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Neither agent was able to completely anesthetize the teeth effectively. Therefore, practitioners should be prepared to administer supplemental anesthesia to overcome pain during root canal treatment. PMID:25984478

  11. Efficacy of preoperative ibuprofen on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera-Gonzalez, D; Cerda-Cristerna, B I; Chavarria-Bolaños, D; Flores-Reyes, H; Pozos-Guillen, A

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of preoperative oral ibuprofen (IBU) on the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs) with mepivacaine containing 1 : 100 000 epinephrine for patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP). The present study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The study included two study groups each consisting of 25 patients who exhibited symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth. The patients presented prolonged moderate or severe pain (>10 s) after cold testing and indicated their pain scores on a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale. The patients received identically appearing capsules containing either 600 mg IBU (IBUg) or gelatin (placebo, PLAg) 1 h before administration of IANB with 2% mepivacaine containing 1 : 100 000 epinephrine. After 15 min, the anaesthetic blockade was assessed by a three-step examination (lip numbness, positive/negative response to cold testing and clinical discomfort during endodontic access). IANB success was defined as the absence of pain during any of these evaluations. The data were analysed using the chi-squared test. All of the patients reported moderate or severe pain before the preoperative procedure. Statistically significant differences were observed between the IBUg and PLAg (P pulpitis. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Efficacy of supplementary buccal infiltrations and intraligamentary injections to inferior alveolar nerve blocks in mandibular first molars with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, M; Sadr, S; Nakhaee, N; Abbott, P V; Askarifard, S

    2014-10-01

    This randomized double-blinded controlled trial was performed to compare the efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) injection for mandibular first molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis with or without supplementary buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection. Eighty-two patients with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis received either a combination of intraligamentary injection + buccal infiltration+ IANB or with traditional IANB injection in mandibular first molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Each patient recorded their pain score on a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale before commencing treatment, in response to a cold test 15 min after the designated anaesthetic injection, during access cavity preparation and during root canal instrumentation. No or mild pain at any stage was considered a success. Data were analysed by chi-square test. At the final stage of treatment, 69 of the 82 patients were eligible to be included in the study. No significant difference was found between age (P = 0.569) and gender (P = 0.570) amongst the patients in the two groups. The success rate of anaesthesia in the IANB and the combination groups were 22% and 58%, respectively. The success rate of anaesthesia in the combination group was significantly higher than the traditional IANB injection (P = 0.003). A combination of anaesthetic techniques can improve the success rate of anaesthesia for mandibular first molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The success rate of bupivacaine and lidocaine as anesthetic agents in inferior alveolar nerve block in teeth with irreversible pulpitis without spontaneous pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Parirokh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Achieving adequate anesthesia with inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB is of great importance during dental procedures. The aim of the present study was to assess the success rate of two anesthetic agents (bupivacaine and lidocaine for IANB when treating teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods Sixty volunteer male and female patients who required root canal treatment of a mandibular molar due to caries participated in the present study. The inclusion criteria included prolonged pain to thermal stimulus but no spontaneous pain. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine or 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine as an IANB injection. The sensitivity of the teeth to a cold test as well as the amount of pain during access cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation were recorded. Results were statistically analyzed with the Chi-Square and Fischer's exact tests. Results At the final step, fifty-nine patients were included in the study. The success rate for bupivacaine and lidocaine groups were 20.0% and 24.1%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any stage of the treatment procedure. Conclusions There was no difference in success rates of anesthesia when bupivacaine and lidocaine were used for IANB injections to treat mandibular molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Neither agent was able to completely anesthetize the teeth effectively. Therefore, practitioners should be prepared to administer supplemental anesthesia to overcome pain during root canal treatment.

  14. Anesthetic Efficacy of Articaine and Ketamine for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaeimanesh, Vahid; Khazaei, Saber; Kaviani, Naser; Saatchi, Masoud; Shafiei, Maryam; Khademi, Abbasali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to investigate the effect of articaine combined with ketamine on the success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in posterior mandible teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Methods and Materials: Forty two adult patients with diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth were selected. The patients received two cartridges of either containing 3.2 mL 4% articaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 0.4 mL 50 mg/mL ketamine hydrochloride (A-ketamine group) or 3.2 mL 4% articaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 0.4 mL normal saline (A-saline group) using conventional IANB injections. Access cavity preparation started 15 min after injection. Lip numbness was required for all the patients. Success was considered as no or mild pain on the basis of Heft-Parker visual analog scale recordings upon access cavity preparation or initial instrumentation. Data were analyzed by independent student t, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests. Results: The success rates were 55% and 42.9% for A-ketamine and A-saline group, respectively, with no significant differences between the two groups (P=0.437). Conclusion: Adding 0.4 mL 50 mg/mL ketamine hydrochloride to the articaine local anesthetic did not increase the efficacy of IANB for posterior mandibular teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. PMID:29225640

  15. Comparison of anesthetic efficacy between lidocaine with and without magnesium sulfate USP 50% for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Krishna Prasad; Satish, Sarvepalli Venkata; Kilaru, Krishna Rao; Sardar, Poonam; Luke, Alexander M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy between lidocaine with and without magnesium sulfate USP 50% for inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth were selected for the study. The patients received 1 mL magnesium sulfate USP 50% or distilled water (placebo) 1 hour before administration of conventional IAN block. Endodontic access cavity preparation was initiated 15 minutes after the IAN block injection. Lip numbness was recorded for all the patients. Success of IAN block was defined as no or mild pain on the visual analogue scale during access cavity preparation and initial instrumentation. The success rate for the IAN block was 58% for magnesium sulfate group and 32% for the placebo group, with statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (P = .016). In mandibular posterior teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, preoperative administration of 1 mL magnesium sulfate USP 50% resulted in statistically significant increase in success of IAN block compared with placebo. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Reliability of Panoramic Radiography Versus Cone Beam Computed Tomography when Evaluating the Distance to the Alveolar Nerve in the Site of Lateral Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česaitienė, Gabrielė; Česaitis, Kęstutis; Junevičius, Jonas; Venskutonis, Tadas

    2017-07-04

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to compare the reliability of panoramic radiography (PR) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the evaluation of the distance of the roots of lateral teeth to the inferior alveolar nerve canal (IANC). MATERIAL AND METHODS 100 PR and 100 CBCT images that met the selection criteria were selected from the database. In PR images, the distances were measured using an electronic caliper with 0.01 mm accuracy and white light x-ray film reviewer. Actual values of the measurements were calculated taking into consideration the magnification used in PR images (130%). Measurements on CBCT images were performed using i-CAT Vision software. Statistical data analysis was performed using R software and applying Welch's t-test and the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the mean distance from the root of the second premolar and the mesial and distal roots of the first molar to the IANC between PR and CBCT images. The difference in the mean distance from the mesial and distal roots of the second and the third molars to the IANC measured in PR and CBCT images was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS PR may be uninformative or misleading when measuring the distance from the mesial and distal roots of the second and the third molars to the IANC.

  17. Comparison of Articaine and Lidocaine for Buccal Infiltration After Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block For Intraoperative Pain Control During Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva-Junior, Geraldo Prisco; de Almeida Souza, Liane Maciel; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    In order to compare the efficacy of lidocaine and articaine for pain control during third molar surgery, 160 patients presenting bilateral asymptomatic impacted mandibular third molars were selected. They received 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:100,000 during inferior alveolar nerve block. In group 1 (n = 80), an infiltrative injection of 0.9 mL of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:100,000 was performed in buccal-distal mucosa of the third molar. Group 2 (n = 80) received 0.9 mL of 4% articaine with epinephrine 1:100,000 in the contralateral side. All procedures were performed at the same visit, by a single operator, in a double-blind and parallel design. The duration of each surgery and the moment when the patient expressed pain were noted. Data were analyzed by nonpaired t test and chi-square test (alpha = 5%). Duration of surgery did not differ (p = .83) between Groups 1 (19.8 ± 2.3 minutes) and 2 (19.7 ± 3.0 minutes). Pain was expressed more in group 1 (26.3%) than in group 2 (10%) (odds ratio = 3.2, p = .0138). In both groups, tooth sectioning was the most painful event (p third molar surgery.

  18. Effect of sodium bicarbonate-buffered lidocaine on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block for teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a prospective, randomized double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Masoud; Khademi, Abbasali; Baghaei, Badri; Noormohammadi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of buffered with nonbuffered 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine solution for inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in patients with mandibular posterior teeth experiencing symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Eighty adult patients diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth were selected. The patients received 2 cartridges of either 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine buffered with 0.18 mL 8.4% sodium bicarbonate or 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine with 0.18 mL sterile distilled water using conventional IAN block injections. Endodontic access preparation was initiated 15 minutes after injection. Lip numbness was required for all the patients. Success was determined as no or mild pain on the basis of Heft-Parker visual analog scale recordings upon access cavity preparation or initial instrumentation. Data were analyzed by the t, Mann-Whitney, and chi-square tests. The success rates were 62.5% and 47.5% for buffered and nonbuffered groups, respectively, with no significant differences between the two groups (P = .381). Buffering the 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine with 8.4% sodium bicarbonate did not improve the success of the IAN block in mandibular molars in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High-resolution dental magnetic resonance imaging of inferior alveolar nerve responses to the extraction of third molars

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    Kress, B.; Stippich, C.; Sartor, K.; Gottschalk, A.; Baehren, W.; Anders, L.; Palm, F.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether signal changes can be detected in the neurovascular bundle of the mandibular canal after the extraction of a third molar. We retrospectively analyzed MRI scans of 30 test subjects with healthy mandibles and 41 patients who had had a wisdom tooth extracted. Signal intensities were measured at particular sites in the neurovascular bundle, which were defined as regions of interest (ROI) in the sagittal T1-weighted images before and after intravenous administration of a paramagnetic contrast agent. On the basis of the signal intensity increases that were measured after contrast agent administration, we compared the signal increases obtained for the patients who had received surgical treatment with the results obtained for the population of test subjects with unremarkable mandibles (t-test, P<0.05). Compared with the healthy test subjects, patients who had received surgical treatment showed significantly higher signal intensity increases at two measurement sites, i.e., the second molar and the second premolar (P<0.05). We found no significant differences when the measurements were performed at the first molar (P=0.06), the third molar (P=0.47) and in the area of the ascending mandibular ramus (P=0.79). Compared with a population of healthy test subjects, patients who had their third molars surgically removed show higher signal intensity increases in the neurovascular bundle after intravenous contrast agent administration. The underlying cause may be the higher blood flow in the arteries and veins and the perineural plexus, which may give evidence of the pathophysiological mechanism of nerve damage in the narrow canal as a result of osteotomy. (orig.)

  20. High-resolution dental magnetic resonance imaging of inferior alveolar nerve responses to the extraction of third molars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B.; Stippich, C.; Sartor, K. [Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg, Medical Center, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Gottschalk, A.; Baehren, W. [Department of Radiology, Armed Forces Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Anders, L.; Palm, F. [Department of Dental, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Armed Forces Hospital, Ulm (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether signal changes can be detected in the neurovascular bundle of the mandibular canal after the extraction of a third molar. We retrospectively analyzed MRI scans of 30 test subjects with healthy mandibles and 41 patients who had had a wisdom tooth extracted. Signal intensities were measured at particular sites in the neurovascular bundle, which were defined as regions of interest (ROI) in the sagittal T1-weighted images before and after intravenous administration of a paramagnetic contrast agent. On the basis of the signal intensity increases that were measured after contrast agent administration, we compared the signal increases obtained for the patients who had received surgical treatment with the results obtained for the population of test subjects with unremarkable mandibles (t-test, P<0.05). Compared with the healthy test subjects, patients who had received surgical treatment showed significantly higher signal intensity increases at two measurement sites, i.e., the second molar and the second premolar (P<0.05). We found no significant differences when the measurements were performed at the first molar (P=0.06), the third molar (P=0.47) and in the area of the ascending mandibular ramus (P=0.79). Compared with a population of healthy test subjects, patients who had their third molars surgically removed show higher signal intensity increases in the neurovascular bundle after intravenous contrast agent administration. The underlying cause may be the higher blood flow in the arteries and veins and the perineural plexus, which may give evidence of the pathophysiological mechanism of nerve damage in the narrow canal as a result of osteotomy. (orig.)

  1. Comparative evaluation of local infiltration of articaine, articaine plus ketorolac, and dexamethasone on anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block with lidocaine in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Rizvi, Abbas; Miglani, Sanjay

    2011-04-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) has a poor success rate in patients with irreversible pulpitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ketorolac and dexamethasone infiltration along with standard IANB on the success rate. Ninety-four adult volunteers who were actively experiencing pain participated in this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. All patients received standard IANB of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine. Twenty-four patients did not receive any supplemental infiltrations (control). Twenty-four patients received supplemental buccal infiltration of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 ephinephrine, and 24 patients received supplemental buccal infiltration of 1 mL/4 mg of dexamethasone. It was planned to give supplemental buccal infiltration of 1 mL/30 mg of ketorolac tromethamine in 26 patients, but the first 2 patients experienced severe injection pain after ketorlac infiltration and were excluded from the study. In the subsequent patients, 0.9 mL of 4% articaine was infiltrated before injecting ketorolac. Endodontic access preparation was initiated after 15 minutes of initial IANB. Pain during treatment was recorded by using a Heft-Parker visual analog scale. Success was recorded as none or mild pain. Statistical analysis was done by using nonparametric χ(2) tests. Control IANB gave 39% success rate. Buccal infiltration of articaine and articaine plus ketorolac significantly increased the success rate to 54% and 62%, respectively (P infiltration gave 45% success rate, which was insignificant with control IANB. Articaine and ketorolac infiltration can increase the success rate of IANB in patients with irreversible pulpitis. None of the tested techniques gave 100% success rate. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dental Students’ Preference with regard to Tactile or Visual Determination of Injection Site for an Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Children: A Crossover Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Instruction of local anesthesia injection in an important part of dental education curricula. This study was performed to compare dental students’ preference with regard to tactile or visual determination of injection site for an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB in children.Materials and Methods: This crossover randomized clinical trial was conducted on dental students of Zahedan Dental School who took the first practical course of pediatric dentistry in the first academic semester of 2013-14 (n=42. They were randomly divided into two groups. During the first phase, group I was instructed to find the needle insertion point for an IANB via tactile method and group II was instructed to do it visually. In the second phase, the groups received instructions for the alternate technique. Both instructions were done using live demonstrations by the same instructor and immediately after instruction the learners practiced an IANB using the taught method. A five-point Likert scale questionnaire was then filled out by the students. The preference score was determined by calculating the mean of item scores. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon Singed Rank tests in SPSS 19 at P=0.05 level of significance.Results: Thirty-eight students completed the study. By using the visual method to perform an IANB, students gained a significantly higher mean preference score (P=0.020. There was a significant difference in the preference of male students (P=0.008.Conclusions: Instruction of IANB by visual identification of needle insertion point is more desirable by students. 

  3. Sensitivity, Specificity, Predictive Values, and Accuracy of Three Diagnostic Tests to Predict Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blockade Failure in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Wong, Laura; Noguera-González, Danny; Esparza-Villalpando, Vicente; Montero-Aguilar, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is the most common anesthetic technique used on mandibular teeth during root canal treatment. Its success in the presence of preoperative inflammation is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of three diagnostic tests used to predict IANB failure in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP). Methodology A cross-sectional study was carried out on the mandibular molars of 53 patients with SIP. All patients received a single cartridge of mepivacaine 2% with 1 : 100000 epinephrine using the IANB technique. Three diagnostic clinical tests were performed to detect anesthetic failure. Anesthetic failure was defined as a positive painful response to any of the three tests. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, accuracy, and ROC curves were calculated and compared and significant differences were analyzed. Results IANB failure was determined in 71.7% of the patients. The sensitivity scores for the three tests (lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access) were 0.03, 0.35, and 0.55, respectively, and the specificity score was determined as 1 for all of the tests. Clinically, none of the evaluated tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy (0.30, 0.53, and 0.68 for lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access, resp.). A comparison of the areas under the curve in the ROC analyses showed statistically significant differences between the three tests (p < 0.05). Conclusion None of the analyzed tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy to be considered a reliable diagnostic tool for the prediction of anesthetic failure. PMID:28694714

  4. Variation in Location of the Mandibular Foramen/Inferior Alveolar Nerve Complex Given Anatomic Landmarks Using Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacher, Jonathan; Van DaHuvel, Scott; Parashar, Vijay; Mitchell, John C

    2016-03-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injection is 1 of the most commonly administered and useful injections in the field of dentistry. Practitioners use intraoral anatomic landmarks, which vary greatly among patients. The objective of this study was to assist practitioners by identifying a range of normal variability within certain landmarks used in delivering IAN anesthesia. A total of 203 randomly selected retrospective cone-beam computed tomographic scans were obtained from the Midwestern University Dental Institute cone-beam computed tomographic database. InVivoDental5.0 volumetric imaging software (Anatomage, San Jose, CA) was used to measure 2 important parameters used in locating the mandibular foramen (MF)/IAN complex: (1) the angle from the contralateral premolar contact area to the MF and (2) the distance above the mandibular occlusal plane to the center of the MF. The variation of these measurements was compared with established reference values and statistically analyzed using a 1-sample t test. The angle from the contralateral premolar contact area to the MF for the right and left sides was 42.99° and 42.57°, respectively. The angulations varied significantly from the reference value of 45° (P < .001). The minimum height above the mandibular occlusal plane for the right and left sides was 9.85 mm and 9.81 mm, respectively. The heights varied significantly from the minimum reference value of 6 mm but not the maximum reference value of 10 mm (P < .001). Orienting the syringe barrel at an angulation slightly less than 45° and significantly higher than 6 mm above the mandibular occlusal plane can aid in successfully administering anesthesia to the MF/IAN complex. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficacy of Ketorolac Buccal Infiltrations and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Patients with Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Double-blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Nahid Mohammadzadeh; Hormozi, Behnoush; Abbott, Paul V; Khalilak, Zohreh

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine whether ketorolac buccal infiltrations (BIs) helped to improve the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs) in patients with acute irreversible pulpitis (AIP). Forty adult volunteers with AIP in a mandibular molar were included in this study. Patients were instructed to evaluate their pain by using a Heft-Parker visual analog scale. They were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 20). All patients received standard IANB injection and after that a BI of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. After 5 minutes, 20 patients received a BI of 30 mg/mL ketorolac, and the other received a BI of normal saline (control group). Endodontic access cavity preparation (ACP) was initiated 15 minutes after the IANB when the patient reported lip numbness and had 2 electric pulp tests with no responses. The patient's pain during caries and dentin removal, ACP, and canal length measurements (CLM) was recorded by using Heft-Parker visual analog scale. Successful anesthesia was defined as no or mild pain during any of these steps, without the need for additional injection. Data were statistically analyzed by using Mann-Whitney U and χ(2) tests. Successful anesthesia after an IANB plus BI of articaine was obtained in 15% of patients in the control group at the end of CLM. Adding BI of ketorolac significantly increased the success rate to 40% (P < .05). Patient's pain during ACP and CLM was significantly lower in the ketorolac group (P < .05). Ketorolac BI can increase the success rate of anesthesia after IANB and BI with articaine in patients with AIP. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Oral Premedication on the Efficacy of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Dubey, Sandeep; Kala, Shubham; Misuriya, Abhinav; Kataria, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is generally accepted that achieving complete anaesthesia with an Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block (IANB) in mandibular molars with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is more challenging than for other teeth. Therefore, administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents (NSAIDs) 1 hour prior to anaesthetic administration has been proposed as a means to increase the efficacy of the IANB in such patients. Aim The purpose of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to determine the effect of administration of oral premedication with ketorolac (KETO) and diclofenac potassium (DP) on the efficacy of IANB in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods One hundred and fifty patients with irreversible pulpitis were evaluated preoperatively for pain using Heft Parker visual analogue scale, after which they were randomly divided into three groups. The subjects received identical tablets of ketorolac, diclofenac pottasium or cellulose powder (placebo), 1 hour prior to administration of IANB with 2% lidocaine containing 1:200 000 epinephrine. Lip numbness as well as positive and negative responses to cold test were ascertained. Additionally pain score of each patient was recorded during cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation. Success was defined as the absence of pain or mild pain based on the visual analog scale readings. The data was analysed using One-Way Anova, Post-Hoc Tukey pair wise, Paired T – Test and chi-square test. Trial Registery Number is 4722/2015 for this clinical trial study. Results There were no significant differences with respect to age (p =0.098), gender (p = 0.801) and pre-VAS score (DP-KETO p=0.645, PLAC-KETO p =0.964, PLAC-DP p = 0.801) between the three groups. All patients had subjective lip anaesthesia with the IAN blocks. Patients of all the three groups reported a significant decrease in active pain after local anaesthesia (ppulpitis than pre-medication with 50 mg DP & PLAC. PMID

  7. Effect of Buffered 4% Lidocaine on the Success of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Jared; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Fowler, Sara; Beck, Mike

    2015-06-01

    Medical studies have suggested that buffering local anesthetic may increase the ability to achieve anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 4% buffered lidocaine on the anesthetic success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in patients experiencing symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred emergency patients diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received a conventional IAN block using either 2.8 mL 4% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2.8 mL 4% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine buffered with sodium bicarbonate in a double-blind manner. For the buffered solution, each cartridge was buffered with 8.4% sodium bicarbonate using the OnPharma (Los Gatos, CA) system to produce a final concentration of 0.18 mEq/mL sodium bicarbonate. Fifteen minutes after administration of the IAN block, profound lip numbness was confirmed, and endodontic access was initiated. Success was defined as no or mild pain (≤54 mm on a 170-mm visual analog scale) on access or instrumentation of the root canal. The success rate for the IAN block was 32% for the buffered group and 40% for the nonbuffered group, with no significant difference (P = .4047) between the groups. Injection pain ratings for the IAN block were not significantly (P = .9080) different between the 2 formulations. For mandibular posterior teeth, a 4% buffered lidocaine formulation did not result in a statistically significant increase in the success rate or a decrease in injection pain of the IAN block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Sensitivity, Specificity, Predictive Values, and Accuracy of Three Diagnostic Tests to Predict Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blockade Failure in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chavarría-Bolaños

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB is the most common anesthetic technique used on mandibular teeth during root canal treatment. Its success in the presence of preoperative inflammation is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of three diagnostic tests used to predict IANB failure in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was carried out on the mandibular molars of 53 patients with SIP. All patients received a single cartridge of mepivacaine 2% with 1 : 100000 epinephrine using the IANB technique. Three diagnostic clinical tests were performed to detect anesthetic failure. Anesthetic failure was defined as a positive painful response to any of the three tests. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, accuracy, and ROC curves were calculated and compared and significant differences were analyzed. Results. IANB failure was determined in 71.7% of the patients. The sensitivity scores for the three tests (lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access were 0.03, 0.35, and 0.55, respectively, and the specificity score was determined as 1 for all of the tests. Clinically, none of the evaluated tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy (0.30, 0.53, and 0.68 for lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access, resp.. A comparison of the areas under the curve in the ROC analyses showed statistically significant differences between the three tests (p<0.05. Conclusion. None of the analyzed tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy to be considered a reliable diagnostic tool for the prediction of anesthetic failure.

  9. Effect of premedication with ibuprofen and dexamethasone on success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block for teeth with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Shahriar; Mokhtari, Hadi; Rahimi, Saeed; Yavari, Hamid Reza; Narimani, Shima; Abdolrahimi, Majid; Nezafati, Saeed

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2 kinds of anti-inflammatory medicines (ie, dexamethasone and ibuprofen) with a placebo according to their effects on the success rates of an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for the endodontic treatment of mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis. A total of 165 patients were divided into 3 groups of 55 patients each and were given a capsule of the same color and size (ie, a placebo of lactose powder, 400 mg ibuprofen, or 0.5 mg dexamethasone). One hour after the oral administration of the capsules, all the patients received a standard IANB. In patients with a successful IANB, the teeth were examined with a cold pulp test. Patients were asked to assess their pain using the visual analog scale. Then, endodontic access cavity preparation was initiated. In case of pain during the treatment, the patients were asked to rate the pain on the visual analog scale. Success was defined as no or mild pain during treatment. The chi-square test and analysis of variance were used to compare qualitative and quantitative data among the groups. No significant differences were found regarding the sex of the patients in the 3 groups (P > .05). The dexamethasone group showed significantly higher success rates compared with the placebo group (P = .001). There were no significant differences between the ibuprofen and placebo groups (P = .055) or the dexamethasone and ibuprofen groups (P = .34). Premedication with dexamethasone increased the success rate of an IANB in mandibular molars with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaesthetic efficacy of supplemental lingual infiltration of mandibular molars after inferior alveolar nerve block plus buccal infiltration in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, L; Luo, J; Yang, D

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of supplemental lingual infiltration (LI) of mandibular molars following an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) plus buccal infiltration (BI) in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Eighty adult patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis participated in this prospective study. All patients received standard IANB via injection of 4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Ten minutes after the IANB, patients with numbness of the lower lip were randomly divided into two groups. In the BI group, 40 patients received supplemental BI of 0.9 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. In the buccal plus lingual infiltration (BLI) group, 40 patients received supplemental BI of 0.9 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine and, subsequently, LIs with the same anaesthetic solution and dose. Endodontic access cavity preparation began 15 min after the IANB. Pain during treatment was recorded using a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale. Success was defined when pain was 'none' or 'mild' on endodontic access and initial instrumentation. The pain was estimated and statistically analysed by the chi-squared test (α = 0.05). The success rates for the BI and BLI groups were 70% and 62.5%, respectively. No statistical difference was found between the two groups (P = 0.478). Supplemental LIs are not recommended for administration in mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis, because they do not improve the anaesthetic success after IANB plus BI. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Anesthetic Success of an Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block and Supplemental Articaine Buccal Infiltration for Molars and Premolars in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Sara; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the anesthetic success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block, and supplemental articaine buccal infiltration after a failed IAN block, in first and second molars and premolars in patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. As part of 6 studies, 375 emergency patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis received 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine via an IAN block. After profound lip numbness, endodontic access and instrumentation were initiated. If the patient felt moderate to severe pain, a supplemental buccal infiltration of a cartridge of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was administered (204 patients), and endodontic treatment continued. Success was defined as the ability to access and instrument the tooth without pain (visual analogue scale rating of 0) or mild pain (visual analogue scale rating less than or equal to 54 mm). IAN block success was 28% for the first molars, 25% for the second molars, and 39% for the premolars. There were no significant differences when comparing molars with premolars. For the supplemental articaine buccal infiltration, success was 42% for the first molars, 48% for the second molars, and 73% for the premolars. There were no significant differences when comparing the molars, but there was a significant difference when comparing the premolars with the molars. For patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, the success rates for the IAN block and supplemental buccal infiltration of articaine of the molars and premolars would not be high enough to ensure profound pulpal anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Oral Premedication on the Efficacy of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Jain, Sohini; Dubey, Sandeep; Kala, Shubham; Misuriya, Abhinav; Kataria, Devendra

    2016-02-01

    It is generally accepted that achieving complete anaesthesia with an Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block (IANB) in mandibular molars with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is more challenging than for other teeth. Therefore, administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents (NSAIDs) 1 hour prior to anaesthetic administration has been proposed as a means to increase the efficacy of the IANB in such patients. The purpose of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to determine the effect of administration of oral premedication with ketorolac (KETO) and diclofenac potassium (DP) on the efficacy of IANB in patients with irreversible pulpitis. One hundred and fifty patients with irreversible pulpitis were evaluated preoperatively for pain using Heft Parker visual analogue scale, after which they were randomly divided into three groups. The subjects received identical tablets of ketorolac, diclofenac pottasium or cellulose powder (placebo), 1 hour prior to administration of IANB with 2% lidocaine containing 1:200 000 epinephrine. Lip numbness as well as positive and negative responses to cold test were ascertained. Additionally pain score of each patient was recorded during cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation. Success was defined as the absence of pain or mild pain based on the visual analog scale readings. The data was analysed using One-Way Anova, Post-Hoc Tukey pair wise, Paired T - Test and chi-square test. Trial Registery Number is 4722/2015 for this clinical trial study. There were no significant differences with respect to age (p =0.098), gender (p = 0.801) and pre-VAS score (DP-KETO p=0.645, PLAC-KETO p =0.964, PLAC-DP p = 0.801) between the three groups. All patients had subjective lip anaesthesia with the IAN blocks. Patients of all the three groups reported a significant decrease in active pain after local anaesthesia (pblock in patients with irreversible pulpitis than pre-medication with 50 mg DP & PLAC.

  13. Anesthetic Efficacy of a Combination of 4% Prilocaine/2% Lidocaine with Epinephrine for the Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Olivia; Nusstein, John; Drum, Melissa; Fowler, Sara; Reader, Al; Draper, John

    2018-02-17

    Prilocaine plain has a high pH and concentration (4%), which could decrease the pain of injection and increase success. The purpose of this study was to compare pain associated with anesthetic solution deposition and the degree of pulpal anesthesia obtained with the combination of prilocaine and lidocaine versus a lidocaine and lidocaine combination when used for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs). One hundred eighteen asymptomatic subjects were randomly given a combination of 1 cartridge of 4% prilocaine plain plus 1 cartridge of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or a combination of 2 cartridges of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for the IANB at 2 separate appointments. Subjects rated the pain associated with anesthetic solution deposition of injection. Mandibular teeth were tested with an electric pulp tester every 4 minutes for 57 minutes. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 17 minutes and the 80 reading was continuously sustained for 57 minutes. Comparisons for anesthetic success were analyzed using the exact McNemar test, and pain ratings associated with anesthetic solution deposition were analyzed using multiple Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank tests; both were adjusted using the step-down Bonferroni method of Holm. Four percent prilocaine plain was significantly less painful upon anesthetic solution deposition. Pulpal anesthetic success was not significantly different between the 2 combinations. The combination of 4% prilocaine plain plus 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine did not increase pulpal anesthetic success for IANBs compared with a combination of 2 cartridges of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Pain associated with anesthetic solution deposition from the first cartridge of 4% prilocaine plain was significantly less when compared with the first cartridge of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published

  14. Combined application of neutrophin-3 gene and neural stem cells is ameliorative to delay of denervated skeletal muscular atrophy after tibial nerve transection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sen; Xu, Jianguang; Hu, Shaonan; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yang; Gu, Yudong

    2011-01-01

    Examination of the therapeutic efficacy of neural stem cells (NSCs) has recently become the focus of much investigation. In this study we present an insight of the effects of combined application with neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and NSCs that derived from rat embryo spinal cord on delaying denervated skeletal muscular atrophy after tibial nerve was severed. NT-3 gene was amplified by PCR and subcloned into lentiviral vector pWPXL-MOD to construct a lentiviral expression vector pWPXL-MOD-NT-3. A positive clone expressing NT-3 (named NSCs-NT-3) was obtained and used for differentiation in vitro and transplantation. Sixty adult rats, whose tibial nerves were sectioned, were divided into two groups: one grafted with NSCs-NT-3 (experimental group, n = 30) and the other with NSCs transfected by pWPXL-MOD (control group, n = 30). The cell survival and differentiation, NT-3 gene expression, and effect of delaying denervated skeletal muscular atrophy were examined through immunohistostaining, RT-PCR, Western blot, electrophysiological analysis, and mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of gastrocnemius, respectively. The results show that the NT-3 gene, which is comprised of 777 bp, was cloned and significantly different expression were detected between NSCs and NSCs-NT-3 in vitro. Quantitative analysis of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunopositive cells revealed a significant increase in experimental group compared to the control group 4 weeks after implantation (p muscular atrophy is indicated in the EMG examination and mean CSA of gastrocnemius. These findings suggest that the neural stem cells expressing NT-3 endogenously would be a better graft candidate for the delay of denervated skeletal muscular atrophy.

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve block for the treatment of teeth presenting with irreversible pulpitis: A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, Stefano; Taschieri, Silvio; Mannocci, Francesco; Rosen, Eyal; Tsesis, Igor; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present systematic review was to evaluate, in patients with irreversible pulpitis affecting mandibular posterior teeth, if premedication with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can increase the efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) if compared to placebo administration; if one anesthetic agent is more effective than another; if 1.8 mL injection is more effective than 3.6 mL injection to increase the efficacy of IANB; and if supplementary buccal injection is able to increase the efficacy of IANB as compared to a negative control/placebo group. Randomized controlled clinical trials investigating different aspects (technique, premedication with anti-inflammatory drugs, different anesthetic agents) were searched. Success of IANB, as defined in the studies, was considered as the primary outcome. A meta-analysis was performed evaluating relative risks (RRs). Electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central) were searched after preparation of an appropriate search string. After application of selection criteria, a total of 37 studies were included; 19 of them were considered in the meta-analysis. There was evidence of a difference in favor of the use of premedication with anti-inflammatory drugs (RR, 1.80; CI 95%, 1.50-2.14; P < .0001). There was no evidence of a difference between articaine and lidocaine (RR, 1.05; CI 95%, 0.91-1.21; P = .94). With regard to the volume of anesthetic infiltrated, the computed RR was 1.17 (CI, 0.73-1.88) without any significant difference between the use of one or two cartridges (P = .52). The estimated RR for a supplementary buccal infiltration was 1.56 (CI, 1.00-2.42; P = .05). The use of premedication with anti-inflammatory drugs before IANB can increase the efficacy of the IANB. The type of anesthetic agent, the volume of anesthetic, and the use of a supplemental buccal infiltration do not seem to affect the efficacy of anesthesia.

  16. Anesthetic efficacy of combinations of 0.5 mol/L mannitol and lidocaine with epinephrine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Timothy; Kiser, Russell; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Drum, Melissa; Beck, Mike

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of these 2 prospective, randomized, single-blind studies was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of lidocaine with epinephrine compared with a combination lidocaine with epinephrine plus 0.5 mol/L mannitol for inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) blocks in patients experiencing symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. In study one, 55 emergency patients randomly received IAN blocks by using a 3.18-mL formulation containing 63.6 mg of lidocaine with 31.8 μg epinephrine or a 5-mL formulation containing 63.6 mg of lidocaine with 31.8 μg epinephrine (3.18 mL) plus 1.82 mL of 0.5 mol/L mannitol. In study two, 51 emergency patients randomly received IAN blocks by using a 1.9-mL formulation containing 76.4 mg of lidocaine with 36 μg epinephrine or a 3-mL formulation containing 76.4 mg of lidocaine with 36 μg epinephrine (1.9 mL) plus 1.1 mL of 0.5 mol/L mannitol. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after the IAN block, and all patients had profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analogue scale recordings) on endodontic access or instrumentation. The 1.9 mL of lidocaine (76.4 mg) with epinephrine plus 0.5 mol/L mannitol had a significantly (P = .04) better success rate of 39% when compared with the lidocaine formulation without mannitol (13% success rate). For mandibular posterior teeth in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, the addition of 0.5 mol/L mannitol to 1.9 mL of lidocaine (76.4 mg) with epinephrine resulted in a statistically higher success rate. However, the combination lidocaine/mannitol formulation would not result in predictable pulpal anesthesia. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of mepivacaine-tramadol combination on the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Wong, L; Pozos-Guillen, A; Silva-Herzog, D; Chavarría-Bolaños, D

    2016-04-01

    To compare the success of an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) after injecting a combination of mepivacaine and tramadol or mepivacaine alone in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP) in mandibular permanent molars. This study was a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Two study groups were selected, each consisting of 28 patients who exhibited SIP on the first or second mandibular molars. All included patients presented with moderate-to-severe preoperative pain according to the modified Heft-Parker visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients were anaesthetized using the IANB technique employing identical cartridges that contained either 1.3 mL of 2% mepivacaine with epinephrine 1 : 100 000 plus 0.5 mL of tramadol 50 mg mL(-1) (experimental group) or 1.8 mL of 2% mepivacaine with epinephrine 1 : 100 000 (control group). After 15 min, anaesthesia was evaluated by a progressive four-test examination, that is numbness of the lip, positive or negative cold test, asymptomatic management of dental hard tissues and access to dental pulp. Success of the IANB was defined as the absence of pain during any of these evaluations. The data were analysed with a chi-square, Fisher's or Mann-Whitney U test. A total of 74 patients were initially assessed, with 56 patients eventually included and 18 excluded. No significant differences in age (P = 0.384) or gender (P = 1) were found between the two groups. The success rates of anaesthesia with the IANB for the experimental and control groups were 57.1 and 46.4%, respectively. The success rate of anaesthesia in the experimental group was not significantly different (P ˃ 0.05) from that of the control group. The duration of the anaesthetic effect was significantly longer for the experimental group (P = 0.026). The combination of mepivacaine-tramadol achieved similar success rates for IANB when compared to mepivacaine 2% epinephrine 1 : 100 000. There was no significant difference in the anaesthetic efficacy

  18. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAP; Alveolar proteinosis; Pulmonary alveolar phospholipoproteinosis; Alveolar lipoproteinosis phospholipidosis ... PAP is unknown. In others, it occurs with lung infection or an immune problem. It also can ...

  19. Comparison of the diagnostic value of CBCT and Digital Panoramic Radiography with surgical findings to determine the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar to the inferior alveolar nerve canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraydar-Baser, R; Dehghani-Tafti, M; Navab-Azam, A; Ezoddini-Ardakani, F; Nayer, S; Safi, Y; Shamloo, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated and determined the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar (TMM) to the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) by using CBCT and digital panoramic radiography. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic research applied CBCT and panoramic radiographs for 60 subjects (28 men, 32 women). Subjects selected showed a close proximity about the TMM to the inferior nerve canal on panoramic radiographs; these subjects then received CBCT radiographs. The CBCT findings for the proximity of the TMM to inferior nerve canal used the outcomes of surgical findings as the standard of comparison. Results: Eight cases showed positive surgical findings indicating vicinity of the third molar and the mandibular nerve canal. Only 13.3% of the cases in which panoramic views showed the proximity of the TMM and the IAC were confirmed during surgery. The result for CBCT radiographic diagnosis was 95%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that CBCT is preferred over panoramic radiography to determine the proximity of the impacted TMM to the IAC. Narrowing of the mandibular canal or root canal, disconnection of root borders in panoramic radiography, and the inferior-lingual proximity of the tooth to the root in CBCT strongly indicated the close nearness of the impacted TMM to the IAC. PMID:28316671

  20. A prospective, randomized, single-blind comparative evaluation of anesthetic efficacy of posterior superior alveolar nerve blocks, buccal infiltrations, and buccal plus palatal infiltrations in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Miglani, Sanjay; Ansari, Irfan; Kohli, Sarita

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the anesthetic efficacy of posterior superior alveolar (PSA) nerve blocks, buccal infiltrations, and buccal plus palatal infiltrations with 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine in maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis. Ninety-four adult patients participated in this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. The patients were divided into 3 treatment groups on a random basis. Twenty-eight patients received a PSA nerve block, 33 patients received buccal infiltrations, and 33 patients received buccal plus palatal infiltrations with 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine. Endodontic access preparation was initiated 15 minutes after injection. Pain during treatment was recorded using a Heft-Parker visual analog scale. Success was recorded as "none" or "mild" pain. Statistical analysis using nonparametric chi-square tests revealed that there was no statistical difference between the anesthetic success of PSA nerve blocks (64%), buccal infiltrations (54%), and buccal plus palatal infiltrations (70%). None of the tested methods gave 100% anesthetic success rates in maxillary first molars with irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection using 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine in patients with irreversible pulpitis after inferior alveolar nerve block: A clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pushpendra Kumar; Srivastava, Ruchi; Ramesh, Kumar M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The inferior alveolar nerve block (IAN) is the most frequently used mandibular injection technique for achieving local anesthesia in endodontics. Supplemental injections are essential to overcome failure of IAN block in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Aim: To evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine) in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth when conventional IAN block failed. Materials and Methods: Thirty emergency patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in a mandibular posterior tooth received an IAN block and experienced moderate to severe pain on endodontic access or initial instrumentation. The X-tip system was used to administer 1.8 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. The success of X-tip intraosseous injection was defined as none or mild pain (Heft-Parker visual analogue scale ratings irreversible pulpitis. PMID:23716971

  2. Comparison of Effect of Oral Premedication with Ibuprofen or Dexamethasone on Anesthetic Efficacy of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidar, Maryam; Mortazavi, Soheil; Forghani, Maryam; Akhlaghi, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of preoperative oral administration of ibuprofen or dexamethasone on the success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Seventy-eight patients with irreversible pulpitis were randomly divided into 3 groups (26 per group) and given one of the following at 1 hr prior to performing local anesthesia: a placebo; 400 mg ibuprofen; or 4 mg dexamethasone. Each patient recorded their pain level on a visual analog scale before taking the medication or placebo, at 15 min after completion of IANB, and during treatment if pain occurred. The success of the anesthesia was defined as no or mild pain at any stage during the endodontic procedure. The success rate of the IANB was 38.5, 73.1, and 80.8% with the placebo, ibuprofen, and dexamethasone, respectively. Both ibuprofen and dexamethasone were significantly more effective than the placebo. No significant difference was observed, however, between the two experimental medications in terms of effectiveness. The results of the present study suggest that premedication with ibuprofen or dexamethasone increases the success rate of an IANB in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis in the mandibular molars.

  3. The efficacy of pre-operative oral medication of lornoxicam and diclofenac potassium on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis: a double-blind, randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, N; Subbarao, C V; Gutmann, J L

    2011-04-01

    To determine the effect of administration of pre-operative lornoxicam (LNX) or diclofenac potassium (DP) on the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB) in patients with irreversible pulpitis in a double-blind randomised controlled trial. One hundred and fourteen patients with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth participated. Patients indicated their pain scores on a Heft Parker visual analogue scale, after which they were randomly divided into three groups (n = 38). The subjects received identical capsules containing 8 mg LNX, 50 mg DP or cellulose powder (placebo, PLAC), 1 h before administration of IANB with 2% lidocaine containing 1 : 200 000 epinephrine. Lip numbness was assessed after 15 min, following which the teeth were tested with cold spray and their responses (negative or positive) were recorded. Access cavities were then prepared and success of IANB was defined as the absence of pain during access preparation and root canal instrumentation. The data were analysed using chi-squared tests. The percentages of teeth giving a negative response to cold test were 42.8% (PLAC), 78.5% (LNX) and 67.8% (DP), with no significant differences amongst the groups (P > 0.05). The success rates for the IANB in descending order were 71.4% (LNX), 53.5% (DP) and 28.5 (PLAC). A significant (P irreversible pulpitis, whilst the effect of pre-medication with DP was not significantly different from the PLAC.

  4. Does additional cone beam computed tomography decrease the risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury in high-risk cases undergoing third molar surgery?Does CBCT decrease the risk of IAN injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Y T; Kayıpmaz, S; Senel, F C; Atasoy, K T; Gumrukcu, Z

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of additional cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging on decreasing the risk of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury during third molar removal in patients at high risk and to assess the surgical outcomes. The study sample included patients considered at high risk for IAN injury based on panoramic radiography (PAN) evaluation. The primary predictor was the type of imaging method (PAN only or with additional CBCT). The other variables were demographic and anatomical/radiographic factors. The primary outcome variable was IAN injury. The secondary outcome variables were the preoperative surgical plan and surgical results including IAN exposure and duration of surgery. The sample comprised 122 patients (139 teeth) aged 18-48 years. Postoperative temporary IAN injury was present in three (4.2%) cases in the CBCT group and 11 (16.4%) in the PAN group at 7 days after surgery. However, none of the patients had a permanent IAN injury at the 6-month follow-up. Additional CBCT imaging was not superior to PAN in reducing IAN injury after third molar surgery during long-term follow-up. Nonetheless, CBCT may decrease the prevalence of temporary IAN injury and improve the surgical outcomes in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Anesthetic Efficacy of 2% Lidocaine, 4% Articaine, and 0.5% Bupivacaine on Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Miglani, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    To compare the anesthetic efficacy of 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine, 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine on producing inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. A total of 91 adult patients who were actively experiencing mandibular molar pain were involved in this study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups on the basis of the anesthetic solution used. The first group received IANB with 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine, the second group received IANB with 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and the third group received IANB with 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine. After 15 minutes of IANB, conventional endodontic access preparation was started. The pain during the treatment was noted on a Heft-Parker visual analog scale (HP VAS). The primary outcome measure was anesthetic success, and anesthesia was considered successful if the patient reported no pain or weak/mild pain (HP VAS score .05). The 2% lidocaine solution used for IANB had similar success rates when compared with 4% articaine and 0.5% bupivacaine.

  6. Effect of preoperative acetaminophen/hydrocodone on the efficacy of the inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullmer, Spencer; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of the administration of the combination acetaminophen/hydrocodone on the anesthetic success of mandibular posterior teeth in patients experiencing symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred emergency patients in moderate to severe pain diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received, in a double-blind manner, identical capsules of either a combination dose of 1000 mg acetaminophen/10 mg hydrocodone or placebo 60 minutes before the administration of a conventional inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after completion of the block, and all patients used for data analysis had profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recordings) on pulpal access or instrumentation. The success rate for the IAN block was 32% for the combination dose of 1000 mg acetaminophen/10 hydrocodone and 28% for the placebo dose, with no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (P = .662). A combination dose of 1000 mg acetaminophen/10 mg hydrocodone given 60 minutes before the administration of the IAN block did not result in a statistically significant increase in anesthetic success for mandibular posterior teeth in patients experiencing symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anesthetic efficacy of four percent articaine for pulpal anesthesia by using inferior alveolar nerve block and buccal infiltration techniques in patients with irreversible pulpitis: a prospective randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorni, Saravanan; Veniashok, Baskaran; Senthilkumar, Ayyampudur Durairaj; Indira, Rajamani; Ramachandran, Sundararaman

    2011-12-01

    The study was designed as a randomized double-blind trial to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and infiltration anesthetic techniques to anesthetize mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis. The study was composed of 2 test arms and 1 control arm. Subjects in the test arms received either a standard IANB or a buccal infiltration (B Infil) of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, whereas the subjects in the control arm received a standard IANB of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Subject's self-reported pain response was recorded on Heft Parker Visual Analogue Scale after local anesthetic administration during access preparation and pulp extirpation. For statistical analysis Pearson χ(2), Student's paired t test, 1-way analysis of variance, and Friedman tests showed no significant difference in success rates among the 3 arms of the trial. Although B Infil and IANB of 4% articaine were equally effective, B Infil can be considered a viable alterative in IANB for pulpal anesthesia in mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pacific Equatorial Transect

    OpenAIRE

    Pälike, Heiko; Nishi, Hiroshi; Lyle, Mitch; Raffi, Isabella; Klaus, Adam; Gamage, Kusali

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 320/321, "Pacific Equatorial Age Transect" (Sites U1331–U1338), was designed to recover a continuous Cenozoic record of the paleoequatorial Pacific by coring above the paleoposition of the Equator at successive crustal ages on the Pacific plate. These sediments record the evolution of the paleoequatorial climate system throughout the Cenozoic. As we gained more information about the past movement of plates and when in Earth's history "critical" cli...

  9. Effect of a Combination of Intranasal Ketorolac and Nitrous Oxide on the Success of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stentz, Daniel; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Fowler, Sara; Beck, Mike

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies in patients with irreversible pulpitis have reported increased success of the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) using premedication with ketorolac. Preemptive nitrous oxide administration has also shown an increase in the success of the IANB. Recently, ketorolac has been made available for intranasal delivery. Perhaps combining ketorolac and nitrous oxide would increase success. Therefore, the purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to determine the effect of a combination of intranasal ketorolac and nitrous oxide/oxygen on the anesthetic success of the IANB in patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred two patients experiencing spontaneous moderate to severe pain with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis in a mandibular posterior tooth participated. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups and received either 31.5 mg intranasal ketorolac or intranasal saline placebo 20 minutes before the administration of nitrous oxide/oxygen. Ten minutes after the administration of nitrous oxide/oxygen, the IANB was given. After profound lip numbness, endodontic treatment was performed. Success was defined as the ability to perform endodontic access and instrumentation with no pain or mild pain. The odds of success for the IANB was 1.631 in the intranasal saline/nitrous oxide group versus the intranasal ketorolac/nitrous oxide group with no significant difference between the groups (P = .2523). Premedication with intranasal ketorolac did not significantly increase the odds of success for the IANB over the use of nitrous oxide/oxygen alone. Supplemental anesthesia will still be needed to achieve adequate anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of Preoperative Oral Ketorolac on Anesthetic Efficacy of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block and Buccal and Lingual Infiltration with Articaine and Lidocaine in Patients with Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Meetu; Grewal, Mandeep S; Grewal, Stutee; Deshwal, Parul

    2015-11-01

    Irreversible pulpitis (IP) commonly results in decreased anesthetic efficacy of the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for mandibular molar. It has been shown that supplementary buccal and/or lingual infiltration as well as premedication with ketorolac result in improved efficacy of the IANB. One hundred fifty emergency patients who had their lower first or/and second molar diagnosed with IP participated in the study. All patients were randomly divided into 2 major IANB groups: 1 group received 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and the other group received 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Each group was further divided into 3 subgroups of 25 each: (1) buccal and lingual infiltration with articaine and lidocaine, respectively; (2) preoperative oral medication of ketorolac; and (3) preoperative oral medication of ketorolac followed by buccal and lingual infiltration with articaine and lidocaine, respectively. Endodontic access was initiated 15 minutes after solution deposition, and all patients were required to have profound lip numbness. Success of the anesthetic was defined as none or mild pain on endodontic access and initial instrumentation. Statistical analysis was performed using multiple-comparison analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis) and t tests. Articaine IANB with infiltrations plus oral ketorolac premedication significantly increased the success rate to 76%. The success rate after the administration of an articaine IANB with infiltration injections was 64%, whereas with lidocaine it was 32% (P < .05). Premedication with ketorolac significantly increases the anesthetic efficacy of articaine IANB plus infiltration in mandibular molars with IP. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is a volume of 3.6 mL better than 1.8 mL for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Sara; Reader, Al

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block using either 3.6 mL or 1.8 mL 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. As part of 7 previously published studies, 319 emergency patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis received either a 1.8-mL volume or 3.6-mL volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in an IAN block. One hundred ninety patients received a 1.8-mL volume, and 129 received a 3.6-mL volume. Endodontic emergency treatment was completed on each subject. Success was defined as the ability to access and instrument the tooth without pain (visual analog scale score of 0) or mild pain (VAS rating ≤54 mm). Success of the 1.8-mL volume was 28%, and for the 3.6-mL volume it was 39%. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 volumes. In conclusion, for patients presenting with irreversible pulpitis, success was not significantly different between a 3.6-mL volume and a 1.8-mL volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. The success rates (28%-39%) with either volume were not high enough to ensure complete pulpal anesthesia. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Sodium Bicarbonate Buccal Infiltration on the Success of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Mandibular First Molars with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Masoud; Farhad, Ali Reza; Shenasa, Naghmeh; Haghighi, Saeideh Karimi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to evaluate the effect of a buccal infiltration of sodium bicarbonate on the anesthetic success of the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for mandibular first molars in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred patients diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular first molar were selected. The patients randomly received a buccal infiltration injection of either 0.7 mL 8.4% sodium bicarbonate with 0.3 mL 2% lidocaine containing 1:80,000 epinephrine or 0.7 mL sterile distilled water with 0.3 mL 2% lidocaine containing 1:80,000 epinephrine in a double-blind manner. After 15 minutes, all the patients received conventional IANB injection using 3.6 mL 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Access cavity preparation was initiated 15 minutes after the IANB injection. Lip numbness was a requisite for all the patients. Success was determined as no or mild pain on the basis of Heft-Parker visual analog scale recordings upon access cavity preparation or initial instrumentation. Data were analyzed using the t, chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. The success rate after the buccal infiltration of sodium bicarbonate was 78%, whereas without the buccal infiltration of sodium bicarbonate it was 44% (P sodium bicarbonate increased the success rate of IANBs in mandibular first molars with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of oral premedication on the anaesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis - A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikkotil, S J; Nagendrababu, V; Veettil, S K; Jinatongthai, P; Setzer, F C

    2018-02-26

    This systematic review (SR; PROSPERO database: CRD42017075160) and network meta-analysis (NMA) identified the most effective oral premedication for anaesthetic success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB) in cases of irreversible pulpitis. Medline and Ebscohost databases were searched up until 10/2017. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) studying the effect of oral premedication, alone or in combination, on the success of IANB for cases of irreversible pulpitis, compared to placebo or other oral premedications, were included. Quality of the included studies was appraised by the revised Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized trials. Pairwise analysis, NMA and quality of evidence assessment using GRADE criteria were performed. Nineteen studies (n = 1654 participants) were included. NMA demonstrated that compared to placebo, dexamethasone was most effective in increasing anaesthetic success (RR, 2.92 [95% CI 1.74,4.91]; SUCRA = 0.96), followed by NSAIDs (RR, 1.92 [95% CI 1.63,2.27], SUCRA = 0.738) and Tramadol (RR, 2.03 [95% CI 1.18,3.49], SUCRA = 0.737). Premedication with acetaminophen added to NSAIDs demonstrated similar efficacy as NSAIDs alone (RR, 1.06 [95% CI 0.79,1.43]). Sensitivity analyses proved the superiority of dexamethasone or NSAIDs over any other premedications. Subgroup analyses of specific dosages in comparison with placebo demonstrated that dexamethasone 0.5 mg was most effective, followed by ketorolac 10 mg, piroxicam 20 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg + acetaminophen 500 mg and Tramadol 50 mg. Ibuprofen 400 mg, 600 mg and 800 mg had a significantly improved IANB success, while Ibuprofen 300 mg had no effect. Oral premedication with dexamethasone, NSAIDs or Tramadol significantly increased anaesthetic success. More trials are needed to evaluate the premedication effects of dexamethasone or Tramadol for improved anaesthetic success of IANB when treating irreversible pulpitis. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John

  14. Preoperative oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the success of the inferior alveolar nerve block in irreversible pulpitis treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjie; Yang, Xianrui; Ma, Xiangyu; Li, Longjiang; Shi, Zongdao

    2012-03-01

    To assess the effect and safety of pre-emptive oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the success of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in irreversible pulpitis treatment. Medline (via OVID, 1948 to July 2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 2, 2011), EMBASE (via OVID, 1984 to July 2011), Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (1978 to July 2011), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1994 to July 2011), and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched electronically. In addition, relevant journals as well as reference lists of included studies were hand searched for randomized clinical trials comparing the effect or safety of NSAIDs in irreversible pulpitis treatment. Risk of bias assessment with the Cochrane collaboration tool and data extraction were independently performed by two reviewers. Meta-analysis was delivered with RevMan 5.1. Seven studies were included. Six of them had low risk of bias, and one had an unclear risk of bias. A dosage of 600 to 800 mg of ibuprofen showed a significant effect in increasing the success rate of IANB (relative risk [RR], 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.98; P = .002), and the results were moderately reliable. A dosage of 75 mg of indomethacin had a significant effect compared to a placebo (RR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.22 to 3.06; P = .005), as did 8 mg of lornoxicam (RR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.59 to 4.93; P = .0004) and 50 mg of diclofenac potassium (RR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.34 to 4.31; P = .003). Other NSAIDs such as ketorolac, ibuprofen and acetaminophen together, and acetaminophen alone showed no statistical significance compared to the placebo. No serious adverse events were reported. The clinical evidence suggests that pre-emptive oral NSAIDs might have a good effect and are safe in increasing the success rate of IANB, but more studies are necessary to confirm such outcomes.

  15. Iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren

    2008-01-01

    assessing tactile, thermal, and positional perception as well as two-point discrimination and pain. In 48 patients with IAN injuries of differing etiologies who did not undergo surgery, 32 patients with injury associated with third molar surgery exhibited significant spontaneous improvement of sensory...... function. Recovery improvement of sensory function was insignificant in the patients with other etiologies. In most patients the level of sensory perception was such that microsurgical repair was only occasionally indicated. Four patients had microsurgical repair; the outcome was favourable in three. IAN...

  16. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-four injection injuries in 52 patients were caused by mandibular block analgesia affecting the lingual nerve (n=42) and/or the inferior alveolar nerve (n=12). All patients were examined with a standardized test of neurosensory functions. The perception of the following stimuli was assessed......: feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...... inferior alveolar nerve injury. All grades of loss of neurosensory and gustatory functions were found, and a range of persisting neurogenic malfunctions was reported. Subjective complaints and neurosensory function tests indicate that lingual nerve lesions are more incapacitating than inferior alveolar...

  17. Proteinosis alveolar pulmonar Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Sánchez Infante

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La proteinosis alveolar pulmonar es una enfermedad respiratoria crónica, caracterizada por alteración en el metabolismo del surfactante, lo que determina su acumulación anormal en el espacio alveolar. Es una enfermedad extremadamente rara. Se han reportado solamente 500 casos en la literatura. Se describió por primera vez en 1958. Se presenta un caso de proteinosis alveolar pulmonar en un lactante de 2 meses, con desnutrición proteico energética, que ingresa por dificultad respiratoria e hipoxemia, y, con imágenes radiológicas de tipo retículo-nodulillar, en vidrio deslustrado, en el cual se plantea inicialmente el diagnóstico de bronconeumonía. Ante la evolución desfavorable y no respuesta al tratamiento, se realizó un estudio para descartar enfermedades pulmonares crónicas. El paciente fallece y se confirma el diagnóstico por anatomía patológica. Se realiza una revisión del tema.The pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by surfactant metabolism alteration determining its abnormal accumulation in the alveolar space. It is a disease very rare and in literature only 500 cases have been reported; it was described for the first time in 1958. This is a case presentation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in an infant aged 2 months with energetic protein malnutrition admitted due to respiratory difficulty and hypoxemia and with radiologic images of the reticulonodulillary, in frosting glass, where initially is made the diagnosis of bronchopneumonia. In the face of unfavorable evolution and no response to treatment, a study was conducted to rule out chronic pulmonary diseases. Patient died confirming the diagnosis according to the pathologic anatomy. A review on subject is carried out.

  18. Is 2 mm a safe distance from the inferior alveolar canal to avoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Conclusion: When 2 mm is considered as a safety distance, the distance of the implants to the IAC did not yield any statistical difference regarding postoperative neurosensory complications. Keywords: Dental implants, inferior alveolar nerve ...

  19. Bacterial melanin promotes recovery after sciatic nerve injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Olga V Gevorkyan; Irina B Meliksetyan; Tigran R Petrosyan; Anichka S Hovsepyan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial melanin, obtained from the mutant strain of Bacillus Thuringiensis, has been shown to promote recovery after central nervous system injury. It is hypothesized, in this study, that bacterial melanin can promote structural and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Rats subjected to sciatic nerve transection were intramuscularly administered bacterial melanin. The sciatic nerve transected rats that did not receive intramuscular administration of bacterial melanin served as...

  20. Is 2 mm a safe distance from the inferior alveolar canal to avoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-30

    Oct 30, 2015 ... related to implants inserted closer than 2 mm to the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) with those inserted further than 2 ... KEYWORDS: Dental implants, inferior alveolar nerve injury, neurosensory complication. Department of .... such injury occurs, a complete healing is difficult if the extent of the injury is not minor ...

  1. Carbon dioxide laser-assisted nerve repair: effect of solder and suture material on nerve regeneration in rat sciatic nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, Tomas; Beek, Johan F.

    2003-01-01

    In order to further improve and explore the role of lasers for nerve reconstruction, this study was designed to investigate regeneration of sharply transected peripheral nerves repaired with a CO(2) milliwatt laser in combination with three different suture materials and a bovine albumin protein

  2. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    decellularized nerve allograft for inferior alveolar nerve reconstruction: a case report. Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of...the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 2011 Feb;69(2):550-3. PubMed PMID: 21145638. Epub 2010/12/15. eng. 16. Gunn S, Cosetti M...Massachusetts General Hospital (protocol #2012N000117) and was also granted ACURO approval on 11/19/2012. Task 2b. Rodent surgeries for segmental deficit

  3. Therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue using implantable thin-film wireless nerve stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Gamble, Paul; Stephen, Manu; Ray, Wilson Z

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue has been shown to accelerate axonal regeneration. Yet existing methods of applying electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerves have presented significant barriers to clinical translation. In this study, the authors examined the use of a novel implantable wireless nerve stimulator capable of simultaneously delivering therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue and providing postoperative serial assessment of functional recovery. METHODS Flexible wireless stimulators were fabricated and implanted into Lewis rats. Thin-film implants were used to deliver brief electrical stimulation (1 hour, 20 Hz) to sciatic nerves after nerve crush or nerve transection-and-repair injuries. RESULTS Electrical stimulation of injured nerves via implanted wireless stimulators significantly improved functional recovery. Brief electrical stimulation was observed to increase the rate of functional recovery after both nerve crush and nerve transection-and-repair injuries. Wireless stimulators successfully facilitated therapeutic stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue and serial assessment of nerve recovery. CONCLUSIONS Implantable wireless stimulators can deliver therapeutic electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerve tissue. Implantable wireless nerve stimulators might represent a novel means of facilitating therapeutic electrical stimulation in both intraoperative and postoperative settings.

  4. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Riley, D Colton; Boyer, Richard B; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P

    2017-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA) were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR) and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups ( P < 0.01, P < 0.05). These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion.

  5. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Bamba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.05. These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion.

  6. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Kashyap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM is a rare, chronic lung disease with bilateral intra-alveolar calcium and phosphate deposition throughout the lung parenchyma with predominance to lower and midzone. Although, etiology and pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, the mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium-phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type II cells resulting in the accumulation and forming of microliths rich in calcium phosphate (due to impaired clearance are considered to be the cause of the disease. Chest radiograph and high-resolution CT of thorax are nearly pathognomonic for diagnosing PAM. HRCT demonstrates diffuse micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in calcification of interlobular septa. Patients with PAM are asymptomatic till development of hypoxemia and cor-pulmonale. No therapy has been proven to be beneficial except lung transplantation.

  7. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çιtlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thicknes...

  8. Anatomy of the intercostal nerve: its importance during thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D C

    1982-09-01

    Complications from attempts to block the intercostal nerves intraneurally before closure of a thoracotomy have resulted in hypotension with or without spinal block. Placement of a chest tube has resulted in transection of the intercostal nerve. The first of these complications can be avoided by not attempting intraneural block of the nerves intrathoracically. Avoidance of the latter requires careful dissection of the intercostal spaces and identification of the intercostal nerve, as opposed to stab insertion of a chest tube.

  9. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  10. Proteinosis alveolar pulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Sánchez Infante

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La proteinosis alveolar pulmonar es una enfermedad respiratoria crónica, caracterizada por alteración en el metabolismo del surfactante, lo que determina su acumulación anormal en el espacio alveolar. Es una enfermedad extremadamente rara. Se han reportado solamente 500 casos en la literatura. Se describió por primera vez en 1958. Se presenta un caso de proteinosis alveolar pulmonar en un lactante de 2 meses, con desnutrición proteico energética, que ingresa por dificultad respiratoria e hipoxemia, y, con imágenes radiológicas de tipo retículo-nodulillar, en vidrio deslustrado, en el cual se plantea inicialmente el diagnóstico de bronconeumonía. Ante la evolución desfavorable y no respuesta al tratamiento, se realizó un estudio para descartar enfermedades pulmonares crónicas. El paciente fallece y se confirma el diagnóstico por anatomía patológica. Se realiza una revisión del tema.

  11. Alveolar development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis.

  12. Recovery of colonic transit following extrinsic nerve damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Tong, Wei Dong; Kosinski, Lauren; Takahashi, Toku; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2011-06-01

    Injury to pelvic sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves from surgical and obstetrical trauma has long been cited as a cause for abnormal colorectal motility in humans. Using a rat model, acute transaction of these extrinsic nerves has been shown to effect colorectal motility. The aim of this study is to determine in a rat model how transection of these extrinsic nerves affects colonic transit over time. Eighty-two Sprague-Dawley rats underwent placement of a tunneled catheter into the proximal colon. Bilateral hypogastric, pelvic nerves (HGN and PN) or both were transected in 66 rats. The remaining 16 rats received a sham operation. Colonic transit was evaluated at postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, and 7 by injecting and calculating the geometric center (GC) of the distribution of (51)Cr after 3 h of propagation. At POD 1, transection of PNs significantly delayed colonic transit (GC = 4.9, p < 0.05), while transection of HGNs (GC = 8.5, p < 0.05) or transection of both nerves (GC = 7.8, p < 0.05) significantly accelerated colonic transit, when compared with sham operation (GC = 6.0). A significant trend toward recovery was noted in both the HGN and PN transection groups at POD 7. Damage to the extrinsic sympathetic and/or parasympathetic PNs affects colonic transit acutely. These changes in large bowel motor function normalize over time implicating a compensatory mechanism within the bowel itself.

  13. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  14. Long-term reinnervation effects after sciatic nerve lesions in adult rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJkema-Paassen, J; Meek, MF; Gramsbergen, A

    Transection of the sciatic nerve in adult rats induces drastic changes in hindleg muscles. Earlier, we demonstrated that the reinnervated soleus (SOL) muscle, 21 weeks after a transection mainly contains type II fibers. This is in striking contrast to normal muscle, which consists to 80% of type I

  15. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  16. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tata Memorial Hospital, Dr. E. Borges Road,. Parel, Mumbai ‑ 12, Maharashtra, India. E‑mail: sanketbankar23@gmail.com mobilized. There was complete transection of the third part of the duodenum [Figure 1] with normal pancreas. Edges were freshened and primary anastomosis was done with. 3.0 mersilk in two layers.

  17. Visualizing peripheral nerve regeneration by whole mount staining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-peng Dun

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve trauma triggers a well characterised sequence of events both proximal and distal to the site of injury. Axons distal to the injury degenerate, Schwann cells convert to a repair supportive phenotype and macrophages enter the nerve to clear myelin and axonal debris. Following these events, axons must regrow through the distal part of the nerve, re-innervate and finally are re-myelinated by Schwann cells. For nerve crush injuries (axonotmesis, in which the integrity of the nerve is maintained, repair may be relatively effective whereas for nerve transection (neurotmesis repair will likely be very poor as few axons may be able to cross between the two parts of the severed nerve, across the newly generated nerve bridge, to enter the distal stump and regenerate. Analysing axon growth and the cell-cell interactions that occur following both nerve crush and cut injuries has largely been carried out by staining sections of nerve tissue, but this has the obvious disadvantage that it is not possible to follow the paths of regenerating axons in three dimensions within the nerve trunk or nerve bridge. To try and solve this problem, we describe the development and use of a novel whole mount staining protocol that allows the analysis of axonal regeneration, Schwann cell-axon interaction and re-vascularisation of the repairing nerve following nerve cut and crush injuries.

  18. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  19. Facial nerve repair after operative injury: Impact of timing on hypoglossal-facial nerve graft outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Robert J; Wright, Harry V; Francis, David O; Stephan, Scott; Bennett, Marc L

    Reanimation of facial paralysis is a complex problem with multiple treatment options. One option is hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting, which can be performed in the immediate postoperative period after nerve transection, or in a delayed setting after skull base surgery when the nerve is anatomically intact but function is poor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of timing of hypoglossal-facial grafting on functional outcome. A retrospective case series from a single tertiary otologic referral center was performed identifying 60 patients with facial nerve injury following cerebellopontine angle tumor extirpation. Patients underwent hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis following facial nerve injury. Facial nerve function was measured using the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system at a median follow-up interval of 18months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used determine how time to hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting affected odds of achieving House-Brackmann grade of ≤3. Patients who underwent acute hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair (0-14days from injury) were more likely to achieve House-Brackmann grade ≤3 compared to those that had delayed repair (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.5-16.9, p=0.01). Early hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair after acute facial nerve injury is associated with better long-term facial function outcomes and should be considered in the management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ulnar Nerve Injury as a Result of Galeazzi Fracture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettges, Paul; Turker, Tolga

    2017-09-01

    Sparse documentation of Galeazzi fracture with associated nerve injury exists in the medical literature. The purpose of this report is to review the available literature in regard to incidence, nerve injury type, treatment strategies, and expected outcomes. We present a classic Galeazzi fracture dislocation with associated complete ulnar nerve transection injury at the level of the wrist. After rigid internal bony stabilization, allograft nerve repair was performed. The patient's presentation, operative management, recovery, and a thorough literature review are discussed. Fracture union was attained with near full wrist and elbow range of motion. Despite lack of ulnar nerve function return, the patient was able to resume manual labor occupation. Despite its close proximity to the dislocating distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), thorough review reveals rare associated ulnar nerve palsy. If there is suspicion for nerve injury in the setting of open DRUJ dislocation, the nerve should be explored to identify possible entrapment or transection. Literature supports likely return of nerve function in cases of intact nerve; however, management of nerve transection remains debatable.

  1. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Guam, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Guam in the...

  2. Alveolar bone resorption after tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Popovski, Stipica

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar ridge resorption has long been considered an unavoidable consequence of tooth extraction. Atrophy of the alveolar bone may cause significant esthetic and surgical problems in implantation, as well as at prosthetic and restorative dentistry. Alveolar ridge prophylaxis immediately upon tooth extraction may reduce such sequelae for both, the treating dentist and the patient. Attempts to reduce alveolar bone resorption have included the placement of natural roots, root analogues, and...

  3. A 2-year follow-up survey of 523 cases with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chun-qing; Zhang, Li-hai; Liu, Xian-fei; Tang, Pei-fu

    2015-01-01

    We performed a 2-year follow-up survey of 523 patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province, China. Nerve injuries were classified into three types: type I injuries were nerve transection injuries, type II injuries were nerve compression injuries, and type III injuries displayed no direct neurological dysfunction due to trauma. In this study, 31 patients had type I injuries involving 41 nerves, 419 had type II injuries involving 823 nerves, and 73 had type III injuries involving 150 nerves. Twenty-two patients had open transection nerve injury. The restoration of peripheral nerve function after different treatments was evaluated. Surgical decompression favorably affected nerve recovery. Physiotherapy was effective for type I and type II nerve injuries, but not substantially for type III nerve injury. Pharmacotherapy had little effect on type II or type III nerve injuries. Targeted decompression surgery and physiotherapy contributed to the effective treatment of nerve transection and compression injuries. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for nerve injury severity declined with increasing duration of being trapped. In the first year after treatment, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for grades 3 to 5 nerve injury increased by 28.2% to 81.8%. If scores were still poor (0 or 1) after a 1-year period of treatment, further treatment was not effective. PMID:25883624

  4. Intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.; Prat, J.; Lopez, J.I.; Velilla, O.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975 Dail and Liebow described the clinical and pathological characteristics of a pulmonary tumor which they dominated intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor (IVBAT). Our aim is to acquaint radiologists with the existence of this tumor by describing the radiologic findings in 2 patients with IVBAT, 1 with hepatic involvement ant the other with pulmonary osteoarthropathy. (author). 7 refs.; 2 figs

  5. Human alveolar echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usubalieva, Jumagul; Minbaeva, Gulnara; Ziadinov, Iskender; Deplazes, Peter; Torgerson, Paul R

    2013-07-01

    Human echinococcosis is a reportable disease in Kyrgyzstan. Between 1995 and 2011, human alveolar echinococcosis increased from 60 cases per year. The origins of this epidemic, which started in 2004, may be linked to the socioeconomic changes that followed the dissolution of the former Soviet Union.

  6. True Fibroma of Alveolar Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankargouda Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign fibrous overgrowths are often found in the oral cavity, almost always being reactive/irritational in nature. However, benign mesenchymal neoplasms of the fibroblasts are extremely uncommon. Here we report a case of “True Fibroma of Alveolar Mucosa” for its rarity.

  7. Iatrogenic injury to oral branches of the trigeminal nerve: records of 449 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren

    2007-01-01

    , it also seems to be the most devastating type of lesion. Third molar surgery (n = 319) counts for the majority of injuries to the lingual, inferior alveolar, and buccal nerves. Lesions related to the injection of local analgesics was the second most frequent etiology (n = 78), and the lingual nerve...

  8. Computed tomography of the alveolar bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, H.

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the conventional radiological methods used in odontology, computed tomography (CT) provides superposition-free images of the mandible and maxilla. Its value has been proved not only in cases of malignancy but also in many other problems. If an examination is performed with a slice thickness of less than 1.5 mm, the form and position of retained teeth in the alveolar bone, as well as subsequent lesions of neighboring permanent teeth, can be visualized so that early treatment can be planned. If the parodontal space of a retained tooth is visible, orthodontic intervention is possible. Precise assessment of horizontal or vertical bone loss is essential in inflammatory dental diseases. The morphology and extent of benign cystic lesions are also shown by CT. With CT surgical strategy of an intended implant therapy can take into account the remaining bone substance and the exact position of nerves and foramina. If such therapy is possible, the location, form and number of implants are easily defined. (orig.) [de

  9. Up-regulation of Robo1 in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-05

    Jan 5, 2012 ... post-SNT. Neither normal, nor SNT DRG exhibited co-localization of Robo1 and 2, and this observation was independent of neuron diameter. These results suggest that Robo1 in DRG is upregulated following sciatic nerve transection in rats. Key words: Dorsal root ganglion, rat, roundabout 1, sciatic nerve ...

  10. Functional and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Traumatic Peripheral Nerve-Muscle Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Renate; Gey, Manuel; Abaei, Alireza; Warnecke, Daniela; de Roy, Luisa; Dürselen, Lutz; Rasche, Volker; Knöll, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic injuries to human peripheral nerves are frequently associated with damage to nerve surrounding tissues including muscles and blood vessels. Currently, most rodent models of peripheral nerve injuries (e.g., facial or sciatic nerve) employ surgical nerve transection with scissors or scalpels. However, such an isolated surgical nerve injury only mildly damages neighboring tissues and weakly activates an immune response. In order to provide a rodent nerve injury model accounting for such nerve-associated tissue damage and immune cell activation, we developed a drop tower-based facial nerve trauma model in mice. We compare nerve regeneration in this novel peripheral nerve trauma model with the established surgical nerve injury along several parameters. These include gene expression, histological and functional facial motoneuron (FMN) regeneration, facial nerve degeneration, immune cell activation and muscle damage. Regeneration-associated genes (RAGs; e.g., Atf3) were strongly induced in FMNs subjected to traumatic and surgical injury. Regeneration of FMNs and functional recovery of whisker movement were faster in traumatic versus complete surgical injury, thus cutting down experimentation time. Wallerian degeneration of distal nerve stumps was readily observed in this novel trauma injury model. Importantly, drop tower-inflicted facial nerve injury resulted in muscle damage, activation of muscle satellite cell markers (PAX7) and pronounced infiltration of immune cells to the injury site only in this model but not upon surgical nerve transection. Thus, we provide a novel rodent PNS trauma model that can be easily adopted to other PNS nerves such as the sciatic nerve. Since this nerve trauma model replicates multiple tissue damage frequently encountered in clinical routine, it will be well suited to identify molecular and cellular mechanisms of PNS nerve repair in wild-type and genetically modified rodents.

  11. Long-term alterations in peripheral taste responses to NaCl in adult rats following neonatal chorda tympani transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Louis J; Sollars, Suzanne I

    2015-02-01

    The peripheral taste system of the adult rodent is highly resilient against damage, with morphological, behavioral, and functional recovery evident after regeneration of a transected nerve. If chorda tympani transection (CTX) occurs at early postnatal ages however, the nerve fails to regenerate and effects on tongue morphology and behavior are more severe and longer-lasting compared to adult denervation. To examine whether neonatal CTX induces functional changes in intact nerves, whole-nerve electrophysiology was performed on the glossopharyngeal (GL) and chorda tympani (CT) nerves of adult rats that received CTX at P10. Attenuation of NaCl-elicited GL responses were observed in CTX rats 2 months after surgery, with bilateral denervation causing the largest decreases in responses. When assessed 1 year after neonatal CTX, amiloride-sensitive responses to NaCl in the contralateral CT increased while amiloride-insensitive responses decreased. Responses to other tastants were consistent with control animals. This is the first evidence of long-term functional changes to the peripheral taste system after injury in rats fed a normal diet. This study further characterizes the developing peripheral taste system as highly susceptible to change following neural injury. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  13. Is it necessary to use the entire root as a donor when transferring contralateral C7 nerve to repair median nerve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-ming Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available If a partial contralateral C7 nerve is transferred to a recipient injured nerve, results are not satisfactory. However, if an entire contralateral C7 nerve is used to repair two nerves, both recipient nerves show good recovery. These findings seem contradictory, as the above two methods use the same donor nerve, only the cutting method of the contralateral C7 nerve is different. To verify whether this can actually result in different repair effects, we divided rats with right total brachial plexus injury into three groups. In the entire root group, the entire contralateral C7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve of the affected limb. In the posterior division group, only the posterior division of the contralateral C7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve. In the entire root + posterior division group, the entire contralateral C7 root was transected but only the posterior division was transferred to the median nerve. After neurectomy, the median nerve was repaired on the affected side in the three groups. At 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively, electrophysiological examination showed that maximum amplitude, latency, muscle tetanic contraction force, and muscle fiber cross-sectional area of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle were significantly better in the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups than in the posterior division group. No significant difference was found between the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups. Counts of myelinated axons in the median nerve were greater in the entire root group than in the entire root + posterior division group, which were greater than the posterior division group. We conclude that for the same recipient nerve, harvesting of the entire contralateral C7 root achieved significantly better recovery than partial harvesting, even if only part of the entire root was used for transfer. This result indicates that the entire root should

  14. Pudendal nerve stimulation induces urethral contraction and relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. le Feber (Joost); E. van Asselt (Els)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn this study we measured urethral pressure changes in response to efferent pudendal nerve stimulation in rats. All other neural pathways to the urethra were transected, and the urethra was continuously perfused. We found fast twitch-like contractions,

  15. Fractured cervical spine and aortic transection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, M J

    2012-02-03

    A 17-year-old victim of a road traffic accident presented. Following investigation diagnoses of fractured first cervical vertebra, aortic transection, diffuse cerebral oedema, fractured right ribs 2-4 and pubic rami were made. Management of this case presented a number of anaesthetic dilemmas: management of the airway, use of cross-clamp vs. shunting or heparinization and bypass, cardiovascular and neurological monitoring, maintenance of cardiovascular stability during and post cross-clamp, minimizing the risk of post-operative renal and neurological dysfunction.

  16. Nerve regeneration-induced recovery of quinine avoidance after complete gustatory deafferentation of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geran, Laura C; Garcea, Mircea; Spector, Alan C

    2004-11-01

    The concentration-dependent decrease in quinine licking by rats is substantially attenuated by combined bilateral transection of the chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (GL) nerves, but transection of either nerve alone produces marginal impairments at most. Here we tested whether regeneration of one or both of these nerves after combined transection would result in recovery of taste avoidance. Water-restricted rats were presented with a series of brief-access (5 s) taste trials (water and 0.003-3.0 mM quinine-HCl) in a 5-day test block of 40-min sessions both before nerve transection and starting 75-77 days after transection. Licking avoidance returned to presurgical levels when both nerves were allowed to regenerate. When only the GL was allowed to regenerate, performance did not differ from that of sham-transected animals. This suggests that even after considerable gustatory deafferentation, regeneration has the capacity to restore normal taste-guided behavior. Surprisingly, when only the CT was allowed to regenerate, avoidance behavior was severely impaired and was not different from that of rats in which regeneration of both nerves was prevented. Taking into account prior findings, it appears that the absence of the GL in the presence of an intact CT is fundamentally different from the absence of the GL in the presence of a regenerated CT with respect to some taste functions. This represents the first reported instance to our knowledge in which the capacity of a regenerated nerve to maintain taste-guided behavior was distinctly different from that of an intact nerve in a rodent model. Copyright 2004 American Physiological Society

  17. Regenerative scaffold electrodes for peripheral nerve interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Isaac P; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Srinivasan, Akhil; Bentley, John T; Andreasen, Dinal S; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-07-01

    Advances in neural interfacing technology are required to enable natural, thought-driven control of a prosthetic limb. Here, we describe a regenerative electrode design in which a polymer-based thin-film electrode array is integrated within a thin-film sheet of aligned nanofibers, such that axons regenerating from a transected peripheral nerve are topographically guided across the electrode recording sites. Cultures of dorsal root ganglia were used to explore design parameters leading to cellular migration and neurite extension across the nanofiber/electrode array boundary. Regenerative scaffold electrodes (RSEs) were subsequently fabricated and implanted across rat tibial nerve gaps to evaluate device recording capabilities and influence on nerve regeneration. In 20 of these animals, regeneration was compared between a conventional nerve gap model and an amputation model. Characteristic shaping of regenerated nerve morphology around the embedded electrode array was observed in both groups, and regenerated axon profile counts were similar at the eight week end point. Implanted RSEs recorded evoked neural activity in all of these cases, and also in separate implantations lasting up to five months. These results demonstrate that nanofiber-based topographic cues within a regenerative electrode can influence nerve regeneration, to the potential benefit of a peripheral nerve interface suitable for limb amputees.

  18. Effects of pelvic, pudendal, or hypogastric nerve cuts on Fos induction in the rat brain following vaginocervical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaus, James G; Manitt, Colleen; Coopersmith, Carol B

    2006-12-30

    In the female rat, genitosensory input is conveyed to the central nervous system predominantly through the pelvic, pudendal, and hypogastric nerves. The present study examined the relative contribution of those three nerves in the expression of Fos immunoreactivity within brain regions previously shown to be activated by vaginocervical stimulation (VCS). Bilateral transection of those nerves, or sham neurectomy, was conducted in separate groups of ovariectomized, sexually-experienced females. After recovery, females were primed with estrogen and progesterone and given either 50 manual VCSs with a lubricated glass rod over the course of 1 h. VCS increased the number of neurons expressing Fos immunoreactivity in the medial preoptic area, lateral septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventromedial hypothalamus, and medial amygdala of sham neurectomized females. Transection of the pelvic nerve reduced Fos immunoreactivity in the medial preoptic area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventromedial hypothalamus, and medial amygdala, whereas transection of the pudendal nerve had no effect. In contrast, transection of the hypogastric nerve increased Fos immunoreactivity in the medial preoptic area and lateral septum, whereas transaction of the pelvic nerve increased Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral septum, following VCS. All females given VCS, except those with pelvic neurectomy, displayed a characteristic immobility during each application. These data confirm that the pelvic nerve is largely responsible for the neural and behavioral effects of VCS, and support a separate function for the hypogastric nerve.

  19. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  20. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Richard B; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Riley, D Colton; Sexton, Kevin W; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Dortch, Richard D; Nanney, Lillian B; Does, Mark D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries.

  1. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Richard B.; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Riley, D. Colton; Sexton, Kevin W.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Shack, R. Bruce; Dortch, Richard D.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Does, Mark D.; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26323827

  2. Pain caused by a dental implant impinging on an accessory inferior alveolar canal: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Arman; Sultan, Ahmed Ali; Bottini, Gian Battista; Hopper, Colin

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case history of intractable facial pain following the placement of a posterior mandibular implant. The pain was resistant to all medical management, but a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan showed that the implant impinged on an unusual accessory inferior alveolar nerve. The decision to remove the implant led to significant pain reduction. This clinical example underscores the need for scrupulous imaging prior to implant placement.

  3. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field with Predatory Stress on Functional and Histological Index of Injured-Sciatic Nerve in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasbih-Forosh, Maryam; Zarei, Leila; Saboory, Ehsan; Bahrami-Bukani, Mehran

    2017-04-01

    To assess the effect of combination of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) with predatory stress on transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rats. In sham- operated group (SOG) the nerve was manipulated and left intact. The 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap was created in rats. In transected group (Transected) nerve stumps were sutured to adjacent muscle and in vein graft group (VG) the gap was bridged using an inside-out vein graft. In VG/PEMF group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the whole body was exposed to PEMF. In VG/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the rats underwent predatory stress (PS).  In VG/PEMF/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft, the whole body was exposed to PEMF and the rats underwent predatory stress. The regenerated nerve fibers were studied within 12 weeks after surgery. Functional, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in VG/PEMF and VG/PEMF/PS groups compared to those in the other groups ( p =0.001). The whole body exposure to PEMF improved functional recovery. Predatory stress did not affect nerve regeneration in the animals undergone predatory stress ( p =0.343). Pulsed electromagnetic fields could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice.

  4. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field with Predatory Stress on Functional and Histological Index of Injured-Sciatic Nerve in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasbih -Forosh, Maryam; Zarei, Leila; Saboory, Ehsan; Bahrami-Bukani, Mehran

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of combination of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) with predatory stress on transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.  Methods: In sham- operated group (SOG) the nerve was manipulated and left intact. The 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap was created in rats. In transected group (Transected) nerve stumps were sutured to adjacent muscle and in vein graft group (VG) the gap was bridged using an inside-out vein graft. In VG/PEMF group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the whole body was exposed to PEMF. In VG/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the rats underwent predatory stress (PS).  In VG/PEMF/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft, the whole body was exposed to PEMF and the rats underwent predatory stress. The regenerated nerve fibers were studied within 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Functional, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in VG/PEMF and VG/PEMF/PS groups compared to those in the other groups (p=0.001). The whole body exposure to PEMF improved functional recovery. Predatory stress did not affect nerve regeneration in the animals undergone predatory stress (p=0.343).  Conclusion: Pulsed electromagnetic fields could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice. PMID:28507996

  5. SAFARI 2000 Vegetation Cover Characteristics, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Vegetation cover and composition, including species types and richness assessments, were measured at four locations along the Kalahari Transect in Botswana...

  6. SAFARI 2000 Vegetation Cover Characteristics, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vegetation cover and composition, including species types and richness assessments, were measured at four locations along the Kalahari Transect in Botswana...

  7. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medda, B. K.; Jadcherla, S.; Shaker, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  8. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Loercher, U.; Kitz, R.; Zielen, S.; Ahrens, P.; Koenig, R.

    1996-01-01

    Two asymptomatic Turkish sibs are presented, a 4-year-old boy and his 7-year-old sister, with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage. Chest radiographs and high resolution CT demonstrated wide-spread intra-alveolar calcifications in both lungs. The lesions were sharply defined and less than 1 mm in diameter. CT documented a high concentration of microliths along the bronchovascular bundles, the intralobular fissue and the (sub)pleural lung parenchyma. The combination of bronchoalveolar lavage and roentgenographic appearance in high resolution CT are characteristic and pathognomonic, and can confirm the diagnosis. The more severe changes in the elder sib and the radiographic controls suggest that the pulmonary disease may be progressive in our patients. The described family of consanguineous, unaffected parents with two affected and one healthy child confirmed the autosomal recessive inheritance of PAM (McKusick 265100). In addition, the affected girl had autosomal recessive Waardenburg-anophthalmia syndrome (McKusick 206920), raising the question of whether this is a chance occurrence or possibly a contiguous gene syndrome. (orig.)

  9. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin.

  10. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin.

  11. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin.

  12. CT quantification of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurche, K.D.; Kubale, R.; Vallee, D.; Ostertag, H.

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare, familial disease with massive symmetrical intra-alveolar calcium deposition. Conventional CT findings and CT measurements with a dual energy technique were carried out in a 26-year-old patient suffering from this disease. The importance of the findings in the differential diagnosis and for estimating the progression and prognosis of the disease is discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. Comparative Study of Three Transect Methods to Assess Coral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three different transect methods were compared at two different sites in Kenya, on their efficiency to estimate hard coral cover, genus richness and Shannon diversity index. For a modified line transect method (LTM), the line intercept method (LIT) and a linear point intercept (LPI) method the relative efficiency of the three ...

  14. Design unbiased estimation in line intersect sampling using segmented transects

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L.R. Affleck; Timothy G. Gregoire; Harry T. Valentine; Harry T. Valentine

    2005-01-01

    In many applications of line intersect sampling. transects consist of multiple, connected segments in a prescribed configuration. The relationship between the transect configuration and the selection probability of a population element is illustrated and a consistent sampling protocol, applicable to populations composed of arbitrarily shaped elements, is proposed. It...

  15. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part I: Mandibular Canal and Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle in Relation with Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hom-Lay Wang

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is critical to determine the location and configuration of the mandibular canal and related vital structures during the implant treatment. The purpose of the present study was to review the literature concerning the mandibular canal and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle anatomical variations related to the implant surgery.Material and Methods: Literature was selected through the search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1973 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, prosthetic and periodontal journals and books were performed.Results: In total, 46 literature sources were obtained and morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to implant treatment in posterior mandible were presented as two entities: intraosseous mandibular canal and associated inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle.Conclusions: A review of morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to mandibular canal and mandibular vital structures are very important especially in implant therapy since inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle exists in different locations and possesses many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that osteotomies in implant dentistry should not be developed in the posterior mandible until the position of the mandibular canal is established.

  16. Anastomotic stoma coated with chitosan film as a betamethasone dipropionate carrier for peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Scar hyperplasia at the suture site is an important reason for hindering the repair effect of peripheral nerve injury anastomosis. To address this issue, two repair methods are often used. Biological agents are used to block nerve sutures and the surrounding tissue to achieve physical anti-adhesion effects. Another agent is glucocorticosteroid, which can prevent scar growth by inhibiting inflammation. However, the overall effect of promoting regeneration of the injured nerve is not satisfactory. In this regard, we envision that these two methods can be combined and lead to shared understanding for achieving improved nerve repair. In this study, the right tibial nerve was transected 1 cm above the knee to establish a rat tibial nerve injury model. The incision was directly sutured after nerve transection. The anastomotic stoma was coated with 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 chitosan sheets with betamethasone dipropionate. At 12 weeks after injury, compared with the control and poly (D, L-lactic acid groups, chitosan-betamethasone dipropionate film slowly degraded with the shape of the membrane still intact. Further, scar hyperplasia and the degree of adhesion at anastomotic stoma were obviously reduced, while the regenerated nerve fiber structure was complete and arranged in a good order in model rats. Electrophysiological study showed enhanced compound muscle action potential. Our results confirm that chitosan-betamethasone dipropionate film can effectively prevent local scar hyperplasia after tibial nerve repair and promote nerve regeneration.

  17. Uptake of Retrograde Tracers by Intact Optic Nerve Axons: A New Way to Label Retinal Ganglion Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Ti-Fei; So, Kwok-Fai

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde labelling of retinal ganglion cells with optic nerve transection often leads to degeneration of ganglion cells in prolonged experiments. Here we report that an intact optic nerve could uptake retrograde tracers applied onto the surface of the nerve, leading to high efficiency labelling of ganglion cells in the retina with long-term survival of cells. This method labelled a similar number of ganglion cells (2289 +/- 174 at 2 days) as the retrograde labeling technique from the superi...

  18. Peripheral nerve regeneration with conduits: use of vein tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Guerra Sabongi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a challenge to modern medicine due to the complexity of the neurobiological nerve regenerating process. There is a greater challenge when the transected nerve ends are not amenable to primary end-to-end tensionless neurorraphy. When facing a segmental nerve defect, great effort has been made to develop an alternative to the autologous nerve graft in order to circumvent morbidity at donor site, such as neuroma formation, scarring and permanent loss of function. Tubolization techniques have been developed to bridge nerve gaps and have been extensively studied in numerous experimental and clinical trials. The use of a conduit intends to act as a vehicle for moderation and modulation of the cellular and molecular ambience for nerve regeneration. Among several conduits, vein tubes were validated for clinical application with improving outcomes over the years. This article aims to address the investigation and treatment of segmental nerve injury and draw the current panorama on the use of vein tubes as an autogenous nerve conduit.

  19. Effect of neural-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma on facial nerve regeneration in an acute nerve injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyong-Ho; Jang, Sujeong; Lee, Sang-Chul; Jeong, Han-Seong; Park, Jong-Seong; Han, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Bum

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and neural-induced human mesenchymal stem cells (nMSCs) on axonal regeneration from a facial nerve axotomy injury in a guinea pig model. Prospective, controlled animal study. Experiments involved the transection and repair of the facial nerve in 24 albino guinea pigs. Four groups were created based on the method of repair: suture only (group I, control group); PRP with suture (group II); nMSCs with suture (group III); and PRP and nMSCs with suture (group IV). Each method of repair was applied immediately after nerve transection. The outcomes measured were: 1) functional outcome measurement (vibrissae and eyelid closure movements); 2) electrophysiologic evaluation; 3) neurotrophic factors assay; and 4) histologic evaluation. With respect to the functional outcome measurement, the functional outcomes improved after transection and reanastomosis in all groups. The control group was the slowest to demonstrate recovery of movement after transection and reanastomosis. The other three groups (groups II, III, and IV) had significant improvement in function compared to the control group 4 weeks after surgery (P facial nerve regeneration in an animal model of facial nerve axotomy. The use of nMSCs showed no benefit over the use of PRP in facial nerve regeneration, but the combined use of PRP and nMSCs showed a greater beneficial effect than use of either alone. This study provides evidence for the potential clinical application of PRP and nMSCs in peripheral nerve regeneration of an acute nerve injury. Laryngoscope, 2010.

  20. A 3D-engineered porous conduit for peripheral nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jie; Hu, Yu; Wang, Shujuan; Zhang, Jiumeng; Liu, Xuan; Gou, Zhiyuan; Cheng, Hao; Liu, Qianqi; Zhang, Qianqian; You, Shenglan; Gou, Maling

    2017-04-12

    End-to-end neurorrhaphy is the most commonly used method for treating peripheral nerve injury. However, only 50% of patients can regain useful function after treating with neurorrhaphy. Here, we constructed a 3D-engineered porous conduit to promote the function recovery of the transected peripheral nerve after neurorrhaphy. The conduit that consisted of a gelatin cryogel was prepared by molding with 3D-printed moulds. Due to its porous structure and excellent mechanical properties, this conduit could be collapsed by the mechanical force and resumed its original shape after absorption of normal saline. This shape-memory property allowed a simply surgery process for installing the conduits. Moreover, the biodegradable conduit could prevent the infiltration of fibroblasts and reduce the risk of scar tissue, which could provide an advantageous environment for nerve regeneration. The efficiency of the conduits in assisting peripheral nerve regeneration after neurorrhaphy was evaluated in a rat sciatic nerve transected model. Results indicated that conduits significantly benefitted the recovery of the transected peripheral nerve after end-to-end neurorrhaphy on the static sciatic index (SSI), electrophysiological results and the re-innervation of the gastrocnemius muscle. This work demonstrates a biodegradable nerve conduit that has potentially clinical application in promoting the neurorrhaphy.

  1. Effect of Alveolar Segmental Sandwich Osteotomy on Alveolar Height: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan S; Prasad, Kavitha; Shetty, Vibha; Ranganath, Krishnappa; Lalitha, R M; Dexith, Jayashree; Munoyath, Sejal K; Kumar, Vineeth

    2017-12-01

    Bone loss following extraction is maximum in horizontal dimension. Height is also reduced which is pronounced on the buccal aspect. Various surgical procedures are available to correct the bone volume viz. GBR, onlay bone grafting, alveolar distraction and sandwich osteotomy. Sandwich osteotomy has been found to increase the vertical alveolar bone height successfully. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of alveolar segmental sandwich osteotomy on alveolar height and crestal width. A prospective study was undertaken from December 2012 to August 2014. Seven patients with 12 implant sites with a mean age of 36 years were recruited. All seven patients with 12 implant sites underwent alveolar segmental sandwich osteotomy and interpositional bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was assessed radiographically preoperatively, immediate post-op, and at 3 months post-op. Alveolar bone width was assessed radiographically preoperatively and at 3 months post-op. Statistical significance was inferred at p  Sandwich osteotomy can be used as an alternative technique to increase alveolar bone height prior to implant placement. Moderate alveolar deficiency can be predictably corrected by this technique.

  2. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were...

  3. SAFARI 2000 PAR Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Botswana, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Ceptometer data from a Decagon AccuPAR (Model PAR-80) were collected at four sites in Botswana during the SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect Wet Season Campaign...

  4. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Spectral Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign between March 3 and March 18,...

  5. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Spectral Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign between March 3 and...

  6. SAFARI 2000 Canopy Structural Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains leaf area index (LAI), leaf inclination angle, and canopy dimension data from study sites along the Kalahari Transect in southwest...

  7. SAFARI 2000 PAR Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Botswana, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ceptometer data from a Decagon AccuPAR (Model PAR-80) were collected at four sites in Botswana during the SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect Wet Season Campaign (March,...

  8. Diabetes does not accelerate neuronal loss following nerve injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    To determine the resistance of neuronal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in experimental diabetes, we studied the neuronal cell loss after severe axonal injury in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats with unilateral transection of the L5 spinal nerve for 12 weeks. Fifty 18-week-old inbred male Wistar...... rats were randomly allocated to three study groups. In study group 1 without spinal nerve injury, STZ diabetes was induced in 9 and 10 rats were kept as nondiabetic controls. In study group 2, spinal nerve injury was performed in 10 diabetic rats and in 10 nondiabetic controls. In study group 3, six...... nondiabetic control rats at 18 weeks and five nondiabetic control rats at 30 weeks were included to determine whether DRG cell changes occur without nerve injury during the study period. In group 1, the stereologically determined number of all neuronal DRG cells was unchanged after 12 weeks of diabetes...

  9. Smooth muscle adaptation after intestinal transection and resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J S; Quigley, E M; Adrian, T E

    1996-09-01

    Changes in motor function occur in the intestinal remnant after intestinal resection. Smooth muscle adaptation also occurs, particularly after extensive resection. The time course of these changes and their interrelationship are unclear. Our aim was to evaluate changes in canine smooth muscle structure and function during intestinal adaptation after transection and resection. Twenty-five dogs underwent either transection (N = 10), 50% distal resection (N = 10), or 50% proximal resection (N = 5). Thickness and length of the circular (CM) and longitudinal (LM) muscle layers were measured four and 12 weeks after resection. In vitro length-tension properties and response to a cholinergic agonist were studied in mid-jejunum and mid-ileum. Transection alone caused increased CM length in the jejunum proximal to the transection but did not affect LM length or muscle thickness. A 50% resection resulted in increased length of CM throughout the intestine and thickening of CM and LM near the anastomosis. Active tension of jejunal CM increased transiently four weeks after resection. Active tension in jejunal LM was decreased 12 weeks after transection and resection. Sensitivity of CM to carbachol was similar after transection and resection. It is concluded that: (1) Structural adaptation of both circular and longitudinal muscle occurs after intestinal resection. (2) This process is influenced by the site of the intestinal remnant. (3) Only minor and transient changes occur in smooth muscle function after resection. (4) Factors other than muscle adaptation are likely involved in the changes in motor function seen following massive bowel resection.

  10. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Shadmehr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment.

  11. Retrospective analysis of oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in Brazilians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Tito Salla

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuroma, neurofibroma, neurilemmoma, palisaded encapsulated neuroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST are peripheral nerve sheath tumors and present neural origin. The goal of this study was to describe the epidemiological data of oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in a sample of the Brazilian population. Biopsies requested from the Oral Pathology Service, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais (MG, Brazil, between 1966 and 2006 were evaluated. Lesions diagnosed as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were submitted to morphologic and to immunohistochemical analyses. All cases were immunopositive to the S-100 protein. Thirty-five oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors were found, representing 0.16% of all lesions archived in the Oral Pathology Service. Traumatic neuroma (15 cases most frequently affected the mental foramen. Solitary neurofibroma (10 cases was more frequently observed in the palate. Neurofibroma associated with neurofibromatosis type I (2 cases was observed in the gingival and alveolar mucosa. Neurilemmoma (4 cases was more commonly observed in the buccal mucosa. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (3 cases occurred in the mandible, palate, and tongue. Palisaded encapsulated neuroma (1 case occurred in the buccal mucosa. The data confirmed that oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors are uncommon in the oral region, with some lesions presenting a predilection for a specific gender or site. This study may be useful in clinical dentistry and oral pathology practice and may be used as baseline data regarding oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in other populations.

  12. Effect of platelet rich plasma and fibrin sealant on facial nerve regeneration in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Tarik Y; Lehar, Mohamed; Verhaegen, Pauline; Carson, Kathryn A; Byrne, Patrick J

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effects of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and fibrin sealant (FS) on facial nerve regeneration. Prospective, randomized, and controlled animal study. Experiments involved the transection and repair of facial nerve of 49 male adult rats. Seven groups were created dependant on the method of repair: suture; PRP (with/without suture); platelet poor plasma (PPP) (with/without suture); and FS (with/without suture) groups. Each method of repair was applied immediately after the nerve transection. The outcomes measured were: 1) observation of gross recovery of vibrissae movements within 8-week period after nerve transection and repair using a 5-point scale and comparing the left (test) side with the right (control) side; 2) comparisons of facial nerve motor action potentials (MAP) recorded before and 8 weeks after nerve transection and repair, including both the transected and control (untreated) nerves; 3) histologic evaluation of axons counts and the area of the axons. Vibrissae movement observation: the inclusion of suturing resulted in overall improved outcomes. This was found for comparisons of the suture group with PRP group; PRP with/without suture groups; and PPP with/without suture groups (P .05). The movement recovery of the suture group was significantly better than the FS group (P = .014). The recovery of function of the PRP groups was better than that of the FS groups, although this did not reach statistical significance (P = .09). Electrophysiologic testing: there was a significantly better performance of the suture group when compared with the PRP and PPP without suture groups in nerve conduction velocity (P facial nerve axotomy models occurred when the nerve ends were sutured together. At the same time, the data demonstrated a measurable neurotrophic effect when PRP was present, with the most favorable results seen with PRP added to suture. There was an improved functional outcome with the use of PRP in comparison with FS or no bioactive

  13. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  14. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  15. Astrocytes promote peripheral nerve injury-induced reactive synaptogenesis in the neonatal CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Zhao, Shuxin; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal damage to the trigeminal nerve leads to “reactive synaptogenesis” in the brain stem sensory trigeminal nuclei. In vitro models of brain injury-induced synaptogenesis have implicated an important role for astrocytes. In this study we tested the role of astrocyte function in reactive synaptogenesis in the trigeminal principal nucleus (PrV) of neonatal rats following unilateral transection of the infraorbital (IO) branch of the trigeminal nerve. We used electrophysiological multiple inp...

  16. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin, E-mail: chengleiyx@126.com

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  17. Evaluation of Sensorimotor Nerve Damage in Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma; a Single Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorian, Behnaz; Bemanali, Mehdi; Chavoshinejad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate sensorimotor nerve damage in patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to Taleghani hospital, Tehran, Iran Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during a 2-year period from 2014 to 2012 in Taleghani hospital of Tehran. We included a total number of 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to our center during the study period. The demographic information, type of fracture, location of fracture and nerve injuries were assessed and recorded in each patients. The frequency of sensorimotor injuries in these patients was recorded. Data are presented as frequencies and proportions as appropriate. Results: Overall we included 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma with mean age of 31.5±13.8 years. There were 430 (86.9% men and in 65 (13.1%) women among the patients. The frequency of nerve injuries was 67.7% (336 patients). The mean age of the patients with nerve injuries was 33.4 ± 3.7 years. Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve was the most common involved nerve being involved in 5 patients (1%). Regarding trigeminal nerve, the inferior alveolar branch (194 patients 39.1%) was the most common involved branch followed by infraorbital branch (135 patients 27.2%). Mandibular fracture was the most common injured bone being reported in 376 patient (75.9%) patients followed by zygomatic bone in 100 patient (20%). Conclusion: The most frequent fracture occurred in mandible followed by zygoma and the most injured nerve was inferior alveolar nerve followed by infraorbital branch of trigeminal nerve. In facial nerve the marginal branch was the most involved nerve. The frequency of nerve injury and the male to female ratio was higher in the current study compared to the literature. PMID:27331065

  18. [Cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae. Proposal of new alveolar score by the Alveolar Cleft Score (ACS) classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molé, C; Simon, E

    2015-06-01

    The management of cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae remains problematic today. To optimize it, we tried to establish a new clinical index for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Seven tissue indicators, that we consider to be important in the management of alveolar sequelae, are listed by assigning them individual scores. The final score, obtained by adding together the individual scores, can take a low, high or maximum value. We propose a new classification (ACS: Alveolar Cleft Score) that guides the therapeutic team to a prognosis approach, in terms of the recommended surgical and prosthetic reconstruction, the type of medical care required, and the preventive and supportive therapy to establish. Current studies are often only based on a standard radiological evaluation of the alveolar bone height at the cleft site. However, the gingival, the osseous and the cellular areas bordering the alveolar cleft sequelae induce many clinical parameters, which should be reflected in the morphological diagnosis, to better direct the surgical indications and the future prosthetic requirements, and to best maintain successful long term aesthetic and functional results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods:Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group, sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3 and macrophages (CD68 in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly  decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  20. Perawatan Ortodontik Gigi Anterior Berjejal dengan Tulang Alveolar yang Tipis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miesje K. Purwanegara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior teeth movement in orthodontic treatment is limited to labiolingual direction by very thin alveolar bone. An uncontrolled anterior tooth movement to labiolingual direction can cause alveolar bone perforation at its root segment. This case report is to remind us that alveolar bone thickness limits orthodontc tooth movement. A case of crowded anterior teeth with thin alveolar bone in malocclusion I is reported. This case is treated using adgewise orthodontic appliance. Protraction of anterior teeth is anticipated due to thin alveolar bone on the anterior surface. The conclusion is although the alveolar bone surrounding the crowded anterior teeth is thin, by controlling the movement the teeth reposition is allowed.

  1. Sensory action potentials of the maxillary nerve: a methodologic study with clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Torben; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently, recording of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) was described and is used as a diagnostic test of traumatic neuropathic trigeminal disorders. The technique is limited to IAN damage; therefore, we adapted the technique to the maxillary...... nerve, which is also frequently injured by either trauma or orthognathic surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in this methodologic study in which the infraorbital nerve (ION) was stimulated with 2 needle electrodes. The SNAPs were recorded from the maxillary nerve...... difference. Repeated tests within a session test demonstrated no significant differences in the latency data (ANOVA: P= .225) or amplitude data (ANOVA: P= .44). Stimulus-response curves indicated that the SNAPs saturated at 5.1+/-4.4 mA stimulus intensity. In 1 subject, stimulation of the mental nerve...

  2. Peripheral nerve disorders and treatment strategies according to Avicenna in his medical treatise, Canon of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aciduman, Ahmet; Er, Uygur; Belen, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    The written transmission of knowledge has played a great part in the advancement of medicine, and historical documents hold the key to a full exploration of the history of medicine. Some fields, including disciplines that deal with peripheral nerve disorders, have received little benefit from such valuable material. In particular, peripheral nerve surgery lacks perspectives from historical data. For many years, physicians have obtained positive results in the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve diseases. Relevant documents reveal that the first author who described the surgical repair of damaged peripheral nerves was Avicenna, a leading figure of the medieval era who lived in the Middle East. In his primary medical work, the Canon, he provides a description, albeit sketchy, of a suture procedure for peripheral nerve transection. This treatise influenced physicians for several centuries. In this presentation, we analyze excerpts from the Canon that concern peripheral nerve disorders and strategies for their management.

  3. Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve transposition: Renaissance of an old concept in the light of new anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Amgad S

    2017-04-01

    Meralgia paresthetica causes pain in the anterolateral thigh. Most surgical procedures involve nerve transection or decompression. We conducted a cadaveric study to determine the feasibility of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) transposition. In three cadavers, the LFCN was exposed in the thigh and retroperitoneum. The two layers of the LFCN canal superficial and deep to the nerve were opened. The nerve was then mobilized medially away from the ASIS, by cutting the septum medial to sartorius. It was possible to mobilize the nerve for 2 cm medial to the ASIS. The nerve acquired a much straighter course with less tension. A new technique of LFCN transposition is presented here as an anatomical feasibility study. The surgical technique is based on the new understanding of the LFCN canal. Clin. Anat. 30:409-412, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A transgenic rat expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in peripheral nerves provides a new hindlimb model for the study of nerve injury and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy M; Borschel, Gregory H; Santosa, Katherine A; Flagg, Eric R; Tong, Alice Y; Kasukurthi, Rahul; Newton, Piyaraj; Yan, Ying; Hunter, Daniel A; Johnson, Philip J; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2012-02-15

    In order to evaluate nerve regeneration in clinically relevant hindlimb surgical paradigms not feasible in fluorescent mice models, we developed a rat that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) in neural tissue. Transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat lines were created using pronuclear injection of a transgene expressing GFP under the control of the thy1 gene. Nerves were imaged under fluorescence microscopy and muscles were imaged with confocal microscopy to determine GFP expression following sciatic nerve crush, transection and direct suturing, and transection followed by repair with a nerve isograft from nonexpressing littermates. In each surgical paradigm, fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the loss and reappearance of fluorescence with regeneration of axons following injury. Nerve regeneration was confirmed with imaging of Wallerian degeneration followed by reinnervation of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle motor endplates using confocal microscopy. The generation of a novel transgenic rat model expressing GFP in neural tissue allows in vivo imaging of nerve regeneration and visualization of motor endplate reinnervation. This rat provides a new model for studying peripheral nerve injury and regeneration over surgically relevant distances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Can mammalian vision be restored following optic nerve degeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuffler DP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Damien P Kuffler Institute of Neurobiology, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico Abstract: For most adult vertebrates, glaucoma, trauma, and tumors close to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs result in their neuron death and no possibility of vision reestablishment. For more distant traumas, RGCs survive, but their axons do not regenerate into the distal nerve stump due to regeneration-inhibiting factors and absence of regeneration-promoting factors. The annual clinical incidence of blindness in the United States is 1:28 (4% for persons >40 years, with the total number of blind people approaching 1.6 million. Thus, failure of optic nerves to regenerate is a significant problem. However, following transection of the optic nerve of adult amphibians and fish, the RGCs survive and their axons regenerate through the distal optic nerve stump and reestablish appropriate functional retinotopic connections and fully functional vision. This is because they lack factors that inhibit axon regeneration and possess factors that promote regeneration. The axon regeneration in lower vertebrates has led to extensive studies by using them as models in studies that attempt to understand the mechanisms by which axon regeneration is promoted, so that these mechanisms might be applied to higher vertebrates for restoring vision. Although many techniques have been tested, their successes have varied greatly from the recovery of light and dark perceptions to partial restoration of the optomotor response, depth perception, and circadian photoentrainment, thus demonstrating the feasibility of reconstructing central circuitry for vision after optic nerve damage in mature mammals. Thus, further research is required to induce the restoration of vision in higher vertebrates. This paper examines the causes of vision loss and techniques that promote transected optic nerve axons to regenerate and reestablish functional vision, with a focus on approaches

  6. Motor Axonal Regeneration After Partial and Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Paul; Blesch, Armin; Graham, Lori; Wang, Yaozhi; Samara, Ramsey; Banos, Karla; Haringer, Verena; Havton, Leif; Weishaupt, Nina; Bennett, David; Fouad, Karim; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    We subjected rats to either partial mid-cervical or complete upper thoracic spinal cord transections and examined whether combinatorial treatments support motor axonal regeneration into and beyond the lesion. Subjects received cAMP injections into brainstem reticular motor neurons to stimulate their endogenous growth state, bone marrow stromal cell grafts in lesion sites to provide permissive matrices for axonal growth, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gradients beyond the lesion to stimulate distal growth of motor axons. Findings were compared to several control groups. Combinatorial treatment generated motor axon regeneration beyond both C5 hemisection and complete transection sites. Yet despite formation of synapses with neurons below the lesion, motor outcomes worsened after partial cervical lesions and spasticity worsened after complete transection. These findings highlight the complexity of spinal cord repair, and the need for additional control and shaping of axonal regeneration. PMID:22699902

  7. A novel therapy to promote axonal fusion in human digital nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Waitayawinyu, Thanapong; Nookala, Ratnam; Riley, David Colton; Boyer, Richard B; Sexton, Kevin W; Boonyasirikool, Chinnakart; Niempoog, Sunyarn; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Does, Mark D; Dortch, Richard D; Shack, Robert Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P

    2016-11-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can have a devastating impact on our military and veteran population. Current strategies for peripheral nerve repair include techniques such as nerve tubes, nerve grafts, tissue matrices, and nerve growth guides to enhance the number of regenerating axons. Even with such advanced techniques, it takes months to regain function. In animal models, polyethylene glycol (PEG) therapy has shown to improve both physiologic and behavioral outcomes after nerve transection by fusion of a portion of the proximal axons to the distal axon stumps. The objective of this study was to show the efficacy of PEG fusion in humans and to retrospectively compare PEG fusion to standard nerve repair. Patients with traumatic lacerations involving digital nerves were treated with PEG after standard microsurgical neurorrhaphy. Sensory assessment after injury was performed at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 2 months using static two-point discrimination and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing. The Medical Research Council Classification (MRCC) for Sensory Recovery Scale was used to evaluate the level of injury. The PEG fusion group was compared to patient-matched controls whose data were retrospectively collected. Four PEG fusions were performed on four nerve transections in two patients. Polyethylene glycol therapy improves functional outcomes and speed of nerve recovery in clinical setting assessed by average MRCC score in week 1 (2.8 vs 1.0, p = 0.03). At 4 weeks, MRCC remained superior in the PEG fusion group (3.8 vs 1.3, p = 0.01). At 8 weeks, there was improvement in both groups with the PEG fusion cohort remaining statistically better (4.0 vs 1.7, p = 0.01). Polyethylene glycol fusion is a novel therapy for peripheral nerve repair with proven effectiveness in animal models. Clinical studies are still in early stages but have had encouraging results. Polyethylene glycol fusion is a potential revolutionary therapy in peripheral nerve repair but needs further

  8. Bone graft healing in alveolar osteoplasty in patients with unilateral lip, alveolar process, and palate clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlik, Dariusz; Wójcicki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Secondary osteoplasty by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting is the most common procedure used in the reconstruction of the continuity of the maxillary alveolar process. The aim of the study was to analyze retrospectively the effect of certain factors on the course of the bone graft healing process in patients with unilateral complete clefts of the lip, alveolar process, and palate. The investigations involved 62 children aged 8 to 14 years (mean age, 11 years) with unilateral complete cleft of the lip, alveolar process, and palate operated on at the Clinic of Plastic Surgery in Polanica Zdrój from November 2007 to April 2009. All the procedures consisted in the reconstruction of the maxillary alveolar process by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting from the iliac bone. The analysis was performed on the basis of computed tomography scans presenting maxillary alveolar processes in the horizontal cross-sectional planes performed on the second or third postoperative day and after 6 months. They were used as the basis for the measurement of the volume and density (condensation) of the bone graft, the surface of its adhesion to the maxillary alveolar bone, and the volume and density of the healed bone. The following correlation coefficients were determined: between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the volume of the healed bone, between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the density of the healed bone, and between the density of the graft and the volume of the healed bone. Increasing the surface of the graft adhesion to the bone ridges of the alveolar cleft contributes to increased volume of the healed bone and slows down the increase in its density (on 6-month follow-up). Crushing of the bone graft increases its resorption and reduces volume of the healed bone.

  9. Alveolar Ridge Carcinoma. Two Cases Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupo Triguero, Raul J; Vivar Bauza, Miriam; Alvarez Infante, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Two cases with alveolar ridge carcinoma due to prosthetist traumatism are discussed in this paper, after 9 and 10 years of using dental prosthesis. Both patients began with disturbance in the alveolar ridge. The clinical examination and biopsy showed a well differenced carcinoma. The treatment was radical surgery and radiotherapy in the first patient, and conservative surgery with radiotherapy in the second case .The patients had xerostomia after radiotherapy and the woman had difficulties with mastication. The advantages and disadvantages of the treatment were discussed, focused on the prevention and treatment for oral

  10. Complete inferior rectus muscle transection secondary to orbital blowout fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Jonathan M; Lewis, Kyle T

    2018-01-05

    Complete extraocular muscle transection is uncommon in the setting of blunt trauma. We report a case of a 53-year-old male that developed diplopia after hitting his face directly on a concrete slab after a fall. On examination, he had a right hypertropia with a complete infraduction deficit. A CT scan of the face showed an orbital floor blowout fracture with complete inferior rectus transection. On surgical exploration, the distal and proximal ends of the muscle were identified and sutured together, and the floor fracture was repaired. At his post-operative visits, the patient had a persistent infraduction deficit, but subjectively had improved diplopia.

  11. Likelihood-based inference for clustered line transect data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge; Schweder, Tore

    The uncertainty in estimation of spatial animal density from line transect surveys depends on the degree of spatial clustering in the animal population. To quantify the clustering we model line transect data as independent thinnings of spatial shot-noise Cox processes. Likelihood-based inference...... is implemented using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to obtain efficient estimates of spatial clustering parameters. Uncertainty is addressed using parametric bootstrap or by consideration of posterior distributions in a Bayesian setting. Maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian inference is compared...

  12. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiang Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN to phrenic nerve (PN in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4. Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  13. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Junxiang; Yang, Mingjie; Li, Lijun; Sun, Guixin; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN) to phrenic nerve (PN) in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4). Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP) amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF) by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF) by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  14. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other t...

  15. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  16. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were perf...

  17. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Microbial characteristics of soils on a latitudinal transect in Siberia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantrůčková, Hana; Bird, M. I.; Kalaschnikov, Y. N.; Grund, M.; Elhottová, Dana; Šimek, Miloslav; Grigoryev, S.; Gleixner, G.; Arneth, A.; Schulze, E.D.; Lloyd, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2003), s. 1106-1117 ISSN 1354-1013 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/99/P033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : latitudial transect * microbial net growth rate * soil microbial activity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.152, year: 2003

  19. Preliminary clinical study on non-transecting anastomotic bulbomembranous urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jinfu; Wu, Denglong; Liu, Bo

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty for treatment of posterior urethral stricture. A total of 23 patients with traumatic posterior urethral stricture were enrolled and then divided into two groups. In one group, 12 patients underwent non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty. In the other group, 11 patients underwent conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis. The effect of operation was evaluated using the following parameters: the bleeding amount during operation, operation time, IIEF-5 scores after operation, maximum flow rate (Qmax), and rating scale of quality of life (QoL). The comparison between the conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis group and the non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty group showed no significant difference with regard to average operation time. However, a significant difference was observed between the groups with regard to the bleeding amount during operation. The patients in the group of non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty urinated smoothly after the removal of catheter. Meanwhile, one patient from the group of conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis had difficulty urinating after the removal of catheter. Furthermore, significant differences in the operation time, bleeding amount during operation, IIEF-5 scores after operation, and rating scale of QoL were observed, whereas no significant difference was observed between urine flow rates of the two groups after operation. Overall, nontransecting anastomotic urethroplasty is effective for posterior urethra reconstruction, and it can reduce the occurrence rate of erectile dysfunction after operation.

  20. Non-transecting bulbar urethroplasty using buccal mucosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Bugeja

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... ference of the urethra is anastomosed in an end-to-end fashion and the dorsal hemi-circumference .... transecting fashion (d) leaving healthy underlying spongiosal tissue. (e) Mucosal ends anastomosed ... (h) Appearance of urethra after suturing edges of stricturotomy to graft edges. Note the characteristic ...

  1. Fornix transection: Discrimination between neuropeptide effects on attention and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van; Croiset, G.; Schuiling, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Transection of the fornix and the stria terminalis completely blocks the inhibitory action of ACTH 4–10 on extinction of a conditioned avoidance response (CAR), whereas this effect of the vasopressin analogue des-glycinamide-lysine-vasopressin (DG-LVP) is not affected. These data indicate that the

  2. Postoperative splinting for isolated digital nerve injuries in the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipond, Nicole; Taylor, William; Rider, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Digital nerve injuries in the hand are common and can result in significant impairment and functional restriction. Despite this, there is relatively little literature, particularly with respect to postoperative rehabilitation. Splinting after repair, purported to protect the repaired nerve from excessive stretch is still commonly used. Recent cadaveric studies indicate postoperative rehabilitation is not necessary with resection up to 2.5mm. A randomized controlled trial was therefore undertaken to determine whether splinting after isolated 5th degree digital nerve transection is in fact necessary. Twenty-six subjects were recruited over a two-year period and randomized to either three weeks of hand-based splinting or free active motion. ANCOVA indicated no differences in sensibility at six months between the two groups. Subjects also reported their greatest functional limitations were because of hyperesthesia. Although this study is underpowered, these limited results suggest splinting may not be required postoperatively.

  3. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  4. Perineurial glia are essential for motor axon regrowth following nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gwendolyn M; Kucenas, Sarah

    2014-09-17

    Development and maintenance of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are essential for an organism to survive and reproduce, and damage to the PNS by disease or injury is often debilitating. Remarkably, the nerves of the PNS are capable of regenerating after trauma. However, full functional recovery after nerve injuries remains poor. Peripheral nerve regeneration has been studied extensively, with particular emphasis on elucidating the roles of Schwann cells and macrophages during degeneration and subsequent regeneration. In contrast, the roles of other essential nerve components, including perineurial glia, are poorly understood. Here, we use laser nerve transection and in vivo, time-lapse imaging in zebrafish to investigate the role and requirement of perineurial glia after nerve injury. We show that perineurial glia respond rapidly and dynamically to nerve transections by extending processes into injury sites and phagocytizing debris. Perineurial glia also bridge injury gaps before Schwann cells and axons, and we demonstrate that these bridges are essential for axon regrowth. Additionally, we show that perineurial glia and macrophages spatially coordinate early debris clearance and that perineurial glia require Schwann cells for their attraction to injury sites. This work highlights the complex nature of cell-cell interactions after injury and introduces perineurial glia as integral players in the regenerative process. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412762-16$15.00/0.

  5. Local administration of prostaglandin E1 combined with silicone chamber improves peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Alireza; Mohammadi, Rahim; Faraji, Darab; Amini, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of locally administered prostaglandin E1 on peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Sixty male healthy white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: In transected group (TC), left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in the adjacent muscle. In treatment group defect was bridged using silicone graft (SIL/PE) filled with 10 μL prostaglandin E1. In silicone graft group (SIL), the graft was filled with phosphate-buffered saline alone. In sham-operated group (SHAM), sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and regenerated nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/PE than SIL group (p prostaglandin E1 improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Local application of prostaglandin E1 improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Local effect of celecoxib on peripheral nerve repair combined with silicone tubulization in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To assess local effect of celecoxib on nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Methods: Forty-five male healthy white Wistar rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=15 for each: sham-oper ation (SHAM, control (SIL and celecoxib treated (SIL/CLX groups. In SHAM group after anesthesia left sciatic nerve was exposed and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In SIL group the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibioperoneal bifurcation leaving a 10 mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone tube and filled with 10 µl phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/CLX group defect was bridged using a silicone tube filled with 10 µl celecoxib (0.1 g/L. Results: Functional study and gastrocnemius muscle mass confirmed faster and better recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/CLX than in SIL group(P<0.05. Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed number and diameter of the my elinated fibers in SIL/CLX were significantly greater than those in control group. In immunohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/CLX was clearly more positive than that in SIL group. Conclusion: Response to local treatment of celecoxib demonstrates that it influences and improves functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration. Key words: Peripheral nerve; Sciaticnerve; Celecoxib; Nerve regeneration

  7. Contribution of myelunated fibers from spinal L4, L5 and L6 nerves to the sciatic nerve and its main branches in the adult rat Contribución de fibras mielínicas provenientes de los nervios espinales lumbares L4, L5 y L6 al nervio ciático de rata adulta y sus ramas principales

    OpenAIRE

    Juan D. Robles; Marlen Arias; Miguel Baldovino; Jeanelle Ariza; José V. Montoya Guarín; John J. Sutachán; Hernán Hurtado

    2000-01-01

    The rat sciatic nerve is composed by the L4, L5 and L6 lumbar spinal nerves. However, the contribution in myelinated fibers originating from these nerves along this nervous trunk has not yet been defined. In the present study, the L4, L5 and L4-L5 spinal nerves were selectively transected. After one week the sciatic, tibial, sural and peroneal nerves were dissected. These samples were fixed and processed for optical microscopy, and both degenerated and normal myelinated fibers were counted in...

  8. N-Acetylcysteine Prevents Retrograde Motor Neuron Death after Neonatal Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Joseph; Zhang, Jennifer; Scholl, David; Chiang, Cameron; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2017-05-01

    Neuronal death may be an overlooked and unaddressed component of disability following neonatal nerve injuries, such as obstetric brachial plexus injury. N-acetylcysteine and acetyl-L-carnitine improve survival of neurons after adult nerve injury, but it is unknown whether they improve survival after neonatal injury, when neurons are most susceptible to retrograde neuronal death. The authors' objective was to examine whether N-acetylcysteine or acetyl-L-carnitine treatment improves survival of neonatal motor or sensory neurons in a rat model of neonatal nerve injury. Rat pups received either a sciatic nerve crush or transection injury at postnatal day 3 and were then randomized to receive either intraperitoneal vehicle (5% dextrose), N-acetylcysteine (750 mg/kg), or acetyl-L-carnitine (300 mg/kg) once or twice daily. Four weeks after injury, surviving neurons were retrograde-labeled with 4% Fluoro-Gold. The lumbar spinal cord and L4/L5 dorsal root ganglia were then harvested and sectioned to count surviving motor and sensory neurons. Transection and crush injuries resulted in significant motor and sensory neuron loss, with transection injury resulting in significantly less neuron survival. High-dose N-acetylcysteine (750 mg/kg twice daily) significantly increased motor neuron survival after neonatal sciatic nerve crush and transection injury. Neither N-acetylcysteine nor acetyl-L-carnitine treatment improved sensory neuron survival. Proximal neonatal nerve injuries, such as obstetric brachial plexus injury, produce significant retrograde neuronal death after injury. High-dose N-acetylcysteine significantly increases motor neuron survival, which may improve functional outcomes after obstetrical brachial plexus injury.

  9. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  10. A Physicochemically Optimized and Neuroconductive Biphasic Nerve Guidance Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alan J; Lackington, William A; Hibbitts, Alan J; Matheson, Austyn; Alekseeva, Tijna; Stejskalova, Anna; Roche, Phoebe; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2017-12-01

    Clinically available hollow nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) have had limited success in treating large peripheral nerve injuries. This study aims to develop a biphasic NGC combining a physicochemically optimized collagen outer conduit to bridge the transected nerve, and a neuroconductive hyaluronic acid-based luminal filler to support regeneration. The outer conduit is mechanically optimized by manipulating crosslinking and collagen density, allowing the engineering of a high wall permeability to mitigate the risk of neuroma formation, while also maintaining physiologically relevant stiffness and enzymatic degradation tuned to coincide with regeneration rates. Freeze-drying is used to seamlessly integrate the luminal filler into the conduit, creating a longitudinally aligned pore microarchitecture. The luminal stiffness is modulated to support Schwann cells, with laminin incorporation further enhancing bioactivity by improving cell attachment and metabolic activity. Additionally, this biphasic NGC is shown to support neurogenesis and gliogenesis of neural progenitor cells and axonal outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia. These findings highlight the paradigm that a successful NGC requires the concerted optimization of both a mechanical support phase capable of bridging a nerve defect and a neuroconductive phase with an architecture capable of supporting both Schwann cells and neurons in order to achieve functional regenerative outcome. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Optic pathway glioma associated with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia in a child with neurofibromatosis-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikas, Ioannis; Theofanopoulou, Maria; Lampropoulou, Penelope; Hadjigeorgi, Christiana [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Imaging Department, Athens (Greece); Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Kosmidis, Helen [Children' s Hospital, A. Kyriakou, Department of Oncology, Athens (Greece)

    2006-11-15

    Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) is a multisystem disorder presenting with a variety of clinical and imaging manifestations. Neural and non-neural tumours, and unusual benign miscellaneous conditions, separately or combined, are encountered in variable locations. We present a 21/2-year-old boy with NF-1 who demonstrated coexisting optic pathway glioma with involvement of the chiasm and optic nerve, orbital alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia. (orig.)

  12. Laminin-based Nanomaterials for Peripheral Nerve Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Rebekah Anne

    Peripheral nerve transection occurs commonly in traumatic injury, causing motor and sensory deficits distal to the site of injury. One option for surgical repair is the nerve conduit. Conduits currently on the market are hollow tubes into which the nerve ends are sutured. Although these conduits fill the gap, they often fail due to the slow rate of regeneration over long gaps. To facilitate increased speed of regeneration and greater potential for functional recovery, the ideal conduit should provide biochemically relevant signals and physical guidance cues, thus playing an active role in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this dissertation, I fabricated laminin-1 and laminin-polycaprolactone (PCL) blend nanofibers that mimic the geometry and functionality of the peripheral nerve basement membrane. These fibers resist hydration in aqueous media and require no harsh chemical crosslinkers. Adhesion and differentiation of both neuron-like and neuroprogenitor cells is improved on laminin nanofibrous meshes over two-dimensional laminin substrates. Blend meshes with varying laminin content were characterized for composition, tensile properties, degradation rates, and bioactivity in terms of cell attachment and axonal elongation. I have established that 10% (wt) laminin content is sufficient to retain the significant neurite-promoting effects of laminin critical in peripheral nerve repair. In addition, I utilized modified collector plate design to manipulate electric field gradients during electrospinning for the fabrication of aligned nanofibers. These aligned substrates provide enhanced directional guidance cues to the regenerating axons. Finally, I replicated the clinical problem of peripheral nerve transection using a rat tibial nerve defect model for conduit implantation. When the lumens of conduits were filled with nanofiber meshes of varying laminin content and alignment, I observed significant recovery of sensory and motor function over six weeks. This recovery was

  13. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other tooth trauma is detected. Any suggestion of alveolar fractures should be further investigated with an appropriate radiograph. This case report shows a pathognomonic sign that detects and diagnosis single tooth alveolar bone fractures, i.e. , a localized hematoma crossing the attached gingiva from the free gingival margin to the vestibular mucosa. This should serve as a warning for localized alveolar bone fracture. A visualized hematoma and gentle, careful palpation may help detect covered fractures when the overlying mucosa is not perforated.

  14. Etiology and mechanisms of ulnar and median forearm nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puzović Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacgraund/Aim. Most often injuries of brachial plexus and its branches disable the injured from using their arms and/or hands. The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and mechanisms of median and ulnar forearm nerves injuries. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included 99 patients surgically treated in the Clinic of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2010. All data are obtained from the patients' histories. Results. The majority of the injured patients were male, 81 (81.8%, while only 18 (18.2% were females, both mainly with nerve injuries of the distal forearm - 75 (75.6%. Two injury mechanisms were present, transection in 85 patients and traction and contusion in 14 of the patients. The most frequent etiological factor of nerve injuries was cutting, in 61 of the patients. Nerve injuries are often associated with other injuries. In the studied patients there were 22 vascular injuries, 33 muscle and tendon injuries and 20 bone fractures. Conclusion. The majority of those patients with peripheral nerve injuries are represented in the working age population, which is a major socioeconomic problem. In our study 66 out of 99 patients were between 17 and 40 years old, in the most productive age. The fact that the majority of patients had nerve injuries of the distal forearm and that they are operated within the first 6 months after injury, promises them good functional prognosis.

  15. Preliminary investigation of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel "nerve glue"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDaniel Candice

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyethylene glycol (PEG hydrogel is a biocompatible semi-adherent gel like substance that can potentially augment nerve repair much like a fibrin sealant. Potential advantages of this substance include fast preparation and set up time, as well as adhesion inhibiting properties. The purpose of this study was to perform an initial evaluation of PEG hydrogel in this application. Methods The sciatic nerves of 29 rats were transected and repaired using two 10-0 nylon sutures and either PEG hydrogel or fibrin glue. After 10 weeks, contraction forces of the reinnervated muscles were evaluated and histological assessment of scar tissue performed. Results Muscle strength testing revealed the average ratio of experimental to control sides for the fibrin glue group was 0.75 and for the PEG hydrogel group was 0.72 (no significant difference. Longitudinal sections through the nerve repair site showed no significant difference in nerve diameter but did demonstrate a significant reduction in scar thickness in the PEG hydrogel group (p Conclusion Though further study is necessary to fully evaluate, PEG hydrogel results in less scar tissue formation and equivalent muscle recovery as fibrin sealant when applied as a nerve glue in a rodent sciatic nerve repair model.

  16. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  17. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  18. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Asuncion Island, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Asuncion Island in the...

  19. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAS), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at Howland in the Pacific...

  20. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Alamagan, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Alamagan in the...

  1. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Uracas (Farallon de Pajaros), Marianas Archipelago 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Uracas (Farallon de...

  2. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Baker in the Pacific...

  3. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Surveys at the Kingman Reef, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kingman Reef in April,...

  4. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Wake Island, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Wake Island in the...

  5. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Sarigan Island, CNMI, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Sarigan in the...

  6. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Guam, Marianas Archipelago, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 10 sites at Guam in the Marianas...

  7. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Maro Reef in the NW...

  8. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Surveys at Midway Atoll, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in October...

  9. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Zealandia Bank, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 2 sites at Zealandia Bank in the...

  10. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Zealandia Bank, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 2 sites at Zealandia Bank in the...

  11. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Sarigan, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Sarigan in the Marianas...

  12. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Saipan Island, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 5 sites at Saipan in the...

  13. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Rota, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at Rota in the Marianas...

  14. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Rota Island, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at Rota in the...

  15. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Saipan, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 8 sites at Saipan in the Marianas...

  16. Odontoma localizado dentro del conducto dentario inferior: diagnóstico radiográfico y tratamiento quirúrgico de un caso clínico Odontoma located within the inferior alveolar nerve: radiographic diagnosis and surgical management of a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vázquez Diego

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso clínico de odontoma localizado dentro del conducto dentario inferior. El paciente de 54 años de edad es de sexo femenino. Se utiliza la técnica radiográfica panorámica para poder localizar y diagnosticar la afección. Posteriormente se realizó la intervención quirúrgica para extirpar la lesión y se realizó un seguimiento a corto y largo plazo para evaluar la recuperación de la sensibilidad de la zona afectada. El estudio histopatológico confirmó el diagnóstico de odontoma. Basado en lo expuesto se analiza al odontoma según ubicación, sexo y edad habiendo realizado una revisión de la literatura representada en tablas y gráficos.A clinical case of odontoma, located within the inferior dental nerve in a 54-year-old female patient, is reported. The lesion was situated and diagnosed by means of a conventional panoramic radiography technique. Then, a surgical approach was carried out to remove the pathological entity, and a short- and long-term follow-up control was done to evaluate sensitive recovery of the involved area. Later on, a histo-pathological study confirmed our previous diagnosis of odontoma. Based on our findings, odontoma is analyzed according to its location, sex and age of patients, as well as radiographic appearance. This analysis is presented through tables and graphics, after reviewing the scientific literature on this subject published over the last decade.

  17. Rare Lung Diseases II: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed.

  18. Silver Nanoparticles in Alveolar Bone Surgery Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver (Ag ions have well-known antimicrobial properties and have been applied as nanostrategies in many medical and surgical fields, including dentistry. The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs may be an option for reducing bacterial adhesion to dental implant surfaces and preventing biofilm formation, containing the risk of peri-implant infections. Modifying the structure or surface of bone grafts and membranes with Ag NPs may also prevent the risk of contamination and infection that are common when alveolar bone augmentation techniques are used. On the other hand, Ag NPs have revealed some toxic effects on cells in vitro and in vivo in animal studies. In this setting, the aim of the present paper is to summarize the principle behind Ag NP-based devices and their clinical applications in alveolar bone and dental implant surgery.

  19. Alveolar ridge preservation immediately after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Bouckaert, M; Lemmer, J

    2013-10-01

    Ridge preservation procedures immediately after tooth extraction, are commonly used with a view to minimising remodelling and shrinkage of the alveolar ridge, associated with socket healing. These procedures may sometimes be effective, but they cannot completely prevent reduction in dimension of the ridge. Certain biomater als used may actually hamper normal deposition of bone within the healing socket, reducing bone trabeculae that can integrate with the implant surface. However, in extraction sockets in alveolar ridges of low bone density, particles of implanted bone substitute incorporated in the healing bone, may enhance the mechanical support for the implant, provided by normal healed bone of low trabecular density alone. This paper reviews biological rationales and procedures for ridge preservation immediately after extraction and comments on their clinical use.

  20. Model for estimating of population abundance using line transect sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulraqeb Abdullah Saeed, Gamil; Muhammad, Noryanti; Zun Liang, Chuan; Yusoff, Wan Nur Syahidah Wan; Zuki Salleh, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    Today, many studies use the nonparametric methods for estimating objects abundance, for the simplicity, the parametric methods are widely used by biometricians. This paper is designed to present the proposed model for estimating of population abundance using line transect technique. The proposed model is appealing because it is strictly monotonically decreasing with perpendicular distance and it satisfies the shoulder conditions. The statistical properties and inference of the proposed model are discussed. In the presented detection function, theoretically, the proposed model is satisfied the line transect assumption, that leads us to study the performance of this model. We use this model as a reference for the future research of density estimation. In this paper we also study the assumption of the detection function and introduce the corresponding model in order to apply the simulation in future work.

  1. Long-term visuospatial retention unaffected by fornix transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sze Chai; Buckley, Mark J

    2010-08-01

    As part of an earlier experiment (Kwok and Buckley, 2009), six macaque monkeys (three with fornix transection and three unoperated controls) were trained postoperatively to discriminate a total of 104 new concurrent visuospatial conditional problems to criterion. Our experiment measured and compared long-term retention of these problems with two separate one-trial postoperative retention tests administered 3 and 15 months, respectively, after acquisition. All animals showed some degree of forgetting of these problems but all remembered above chance levels, even after 15 months. The amount forgotten by each group did not differ significantly at either time point. These results show that long-term retention of visuospatial information is independent of the fornix. Similarities in resistance to forgetting are drawn between fornix-transected macaques and patients with amnesia and the implications for clinical rehabilitation are discussed. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Sleeve resection for delayed presentation of traumatic bronchial transection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohamed, H Y

    2010-02-01

    Tracheobronchial disruption is uncommon in blunt chest trauma. Many of these patients die before reaching the hospital. In the majority of survivors diagnosis is occasionally delayed resulting in complications like airway stenosis and lung collapse. Thus it is important to have radiological follow up after severe thoracic trauma. Sleeve resection can be an excellent option to conserve lung tissue in delayed presentation of bronchial transection.

  3. Traumatic transection of the optic chiasm: Magnetic resonance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.; Goyal, M.; Sharma, A.; Dada, V.K.; Berry, M. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Departments of Radiodiagnosis and Ophthalmology

    1998-02-01

    Disruption of the optic chiasm is a rare complication of head trauma. Non-contrast Computed tomography of the head showed basi-frontal contusion but no evidence of haematoma. We present the findings on MRI of this entity in a 40-year-old patient presenting with bitemporal hemianopia. Complete chismal transection was confirmed on T1-weighted axial, coronal and sagittal images. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 10 refs., 1 fig.

  4. [Clinical research on repairing alveolar cleft with osteoinduction active material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Qian; Tian, Kun; Yang, Li; Xiong, Gui-fa

    2010-08-01

    To study the feasibility and authenticity of repairing alveolar defects in alveolar cleft patients with osteoinduction active material (OAM) in clinic. Twenty-seven cases of alveolar defect chosen from clinic were divided into two groups (test group and control group). For test group (12 cases), OAM was transplanted to repair the alveolar cleft. For control group (15 cases), autogenous ilium cancellous bone were transplanted into the defect region to repair alveolar cleft. At 6 months after operation, CT and three-dimensional reconstruction were used to observe alveolar appearance, and the effect and clinical success rate of recover alveolar cleft by using different repair material were compared. In the 27 cases, all the maxillary continuity was restored except two of test group and two of control group. There was no significant difference between test group and control group regarding the clinical success rate of the alveolar cleft repair (P = 1.000). OAM was used to repair the alveolar cleft that can result in new bone formations and the burgeon of canines from the bone grafted areas. There is no significant difference between OAM and autogenous ilium cancellous bone regarding the effect of the alveolar cleft repair.

  5. Alveolar ridge preservation in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ronald E; Ioannidis, Alexis; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2018-02-27

    In the esthetic zone, in the case of tooth extraction, the clinician is often confronted with a challenge regarding the optimal decision-making process for providing a solution using dental implants. This is because, after tooth extraction, alveolar bone loss and structural and compositional changes of the covering soft tissues, as well as morphological alterations, can be expected. Ideally, the therapeutic plan starts before tooth extraction and it offers three options: spontaneous healing of the extraction socket; immediate implant placement; and techniques for preserving the alveolar ridge at the site of tooth removal. The decision-making process mainly depends on: (i) the chosen time-point for implant placement and the ability to place a dental implant; (ii) the quality and quantity of soft tissue in the region of the extraction socket; (iii) the remaining height of the buccal bone plate; and (iv) the expected rates of implant survival and success. Based on scientific evidence, three time-periods for alveolar ridge preservation are described in the literature: (i) soft-tissue preservation with 6-8 weeks of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the soft tissues); (ii) hard- and soft-tissue preservation with 4-6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard and soft tissues); and (iii) hard-tissue preservation with > 6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard tissues). © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fornix transection selectively impairs fast learning of conditional visuospatial discriminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sze Chai; Buckley, Mark J

    2010-03-01

    As the fornix has previously been implicated in the rapid learning of associations, we hypothesized that fornix transection in macaques would selectively impair the acquisition of rapidly learned conditional visuospatial discrimination problems. Macaque monkeys learned, postoperatively, three sets of concurrent problems of increasing sizes containing 8, 32, and 64 problems, respectively. Each problem consisted of four identical visual stimuli and animals had to learn which stimulus position was rewarded. The lesioned animals made significantly more errors-to-criterion on the smallest set of problems, consistent with the idea that the most rapidly acquired sets would be more vulnerable to fornical damage. Moreover, during the early stages of acquisition across all three sets, fornix transection selectively impeded monkeys' abilities to eliminate nonperseverative errors in correction trials, consistent with an inability to monitor or correct erroneous spatial responses made further back in time than the last trial. Both one-trial learning and an errorless learning (facilitation of performance) were observed in control and fornix lesioned animals but neither were fornix-dependent and overcoming the deleterious effect upon subsequent learning of having made prior errors was also unaffected by fornix transection. The data indicate that the fornix is not important for all forms of new learning; rather it is selectively concerned with the relatively rapid acquisition of spatial and temporal relationships between stimuli and responses.

  7. The inhibitory effects of pudendal nerve stimulation on bladder overactivity in spinal cord injury dogs: is early stimulation necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqing; Liao, Limin; Dong, Qian; Ju, Yanhe

    2012-01-01

    To determine the inhibitory effects of pudendal nerve stimulation (5 Hz) on bladder overactivity at early and late stages of spinal cord injury in dogs. The study was performed in eight dogs with chronic spinal cord transection at the T9-T10 level. Group 1 (four dogs) underwent electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve one month after spinal cord transection. Group 2 (four dogs) underwent stimulation six months after spinal cord transection. The bladders were removed for histological examination of fibrosis after the stimulation. The bladder capacity and the compliance were significantly increased (p stimulation in group 1, but not in group 2. The nonvoiding contractions were inhibited in both groups by electrical stimulation. Collagen fiber was increased, while elastic fiber was significantly decreased (p stimulation can increase the bladder capacity and compliance only during the early period before the bladder wall becomes fibrosit and can inhibit the nonvoiding contraction during two stages. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  8. Distinct membrane effects of spinal nerve ligation on injured and adjacent dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapunar, Damir; Ljubkovic, Marko; Lirk, Philipp; McCallum, J. Bruce; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2005-01-01

    Painful peripheral nerve injury results in disordered sensory neuron function that contributes to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, the relative roles of neurons with transected axons versus intact adjacent neurons have not been resolved. An essential first step is identification of

  9. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  10. ATF3 upregulation in glia during Wallerian degeneration: differential expression in peripheral nerves and CNS white matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffin Robert S

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many changes in gene expression occur in distal stumps of injured nerves but the transcriptional control of these events is poorly understood. We have examined the expression of the transcription factors ATF3 and c-Jun by non-neuronal cells during Wallerian degeneration following injury to sciatic nerves, dorsal roots and optic nerves of rats and mice, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Results Following sciatic nerve injury – transection or transection and reanastomosis – ATF3 was strongly upregulated by endoneurial, but not perineurial cells, of the distal stumps of the nerves by 1 day post operation (dpo and remained strongly expressed in the endoneurium at 30 dpo when axonal regeneration was prevented. Most ATF3+ cells were immunoreactive for the Schwann cell marker, S100. When the nerve was transected and reanastomosed, allowing regeneration of axons, most ATF3 expression had been downregulated by 30 dpo. ATF3 expression was weaker in the proximal stumps of the injured nerves than in the distal stumps and present in fewer cells at all times after injury. ATF3 was upregulated by endoneurial cells in the distal stumps of injured neonatal rat sciatic nerves, but more weakly than in adult animals. ATF3 expression in transected sciatic nerves of mice was similar to that in rats. Following dorsal root injury in adult rats, ATF3 was upregulated in the part of the root between the lesion and the spinal cord (containing Schwann cells, beginning at 1 dpo, but not in the dorsal root entry zone or in the degenerating dorsal column of the spinal cord. Following optic nerve crush in adult rats, ATF3 was found in some cells at the injury site and small numbers of cells within the optic nerve displayed weak immunoreactivity. The pattern of expression of c-Jun in all types of nerve injury was similar to that of ATF3. Conclusion These findings raise the possibility that ATF3/c-Jun heterodimers may play a role in

  11. Use of thallium transport to visualize functional olfactory nerve regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Hideaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Hirota, Kyoko; Amano, Ryohei; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Miwa, Takaki

    2009-12-01

    To image olfactory nerve regeneration in vivo using a high-resolution gamma cam- era and radiography after nasal administration of thallium-201 (olfacto-scintigraphy). Six Wistar rats were trained to avoid the smell of cycloheximide as a test of olfactory function. The olfactory nerve fibers of 3 rats were then carefully transected bilaterally with a Teflon knife, avoiding damage to the olfactory bulbs. The remaining 3 rats underwent sham operations and were used as controls. Steel wires were implanted in the left olfactory bulb of each rat for locating the bulbs with plain X-rays. The rats were assessed 2, 14, 28, and 42 d after the olfactory nerve transection or sham operation for their ability to detect odours and for transport of 201Tl to the olfactory bulb area 8 h after nasal administration of 201Tl. Both transport of 201Tl to the olfactory bulb area (p < 0.04) and ability to detect odours (p < 0.04) significantly increased with a time course after olfactory nerve transection. 201Tl transport to the olfactory bulb may be useful to visually assess olfactory ability in vivo. We plan to test olfacto-scintigraphy clinically by nasal administration of 201Tl in patients with posttraumatic olfactory loss.

  12. The North American Monsoon GPS TRANSECT Experiment 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. K.; Bennett, R. A.; Perez, O. R.; Minjarez, C.; Serra, Y. L.; Quintanar, A.; Alatorre, L.; Granados, A.; Vazquez, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    The need for meteorology observations in Northwest Mexico strongly motivated the North American Monsoon GPS TRANSECT Experiment 2013; however, the goals of this experiment are much broader. The GNSS/GPS technique for providing water vapor measurements has now been used for almost two decades, particularly for validation, observational studies and forecasting. These studies suggest the technique provides total column water vapor with high accuracy and with a high degree of stability over time making it very useful for many research applications over a variety of time scales. The Experiment has two principal scientific aims: (1) to address basic science questions regarding the role of water vapor fluxes in the SMO in initiating deep convection and growth into MCSs by utilizing a novel measurement technique. (2) to improve NAM operational forecasts through PWV data assimilation Broader impacts of the experiment also include strengthening the international long-term collaborative efforts between Mexico and the US focusing on the climate and meteorology of Northwest Mexico and the Southwest US. 10 GPS meteorological stations in addition to 7 existing Suominet sites (http://www.suominet.ucar.edu/) . were arranged in 3 specific transects, each with a particular observational goal. To cover the highest reaches of the SMO, a transect from Bahía de Kino to Chihuahua City was constructed providing the opportunity to evaluate convective initiation and the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor fields over complex terrain. The second transect along the Gulf of California (GoC) coastal plains was motivated by the need to capture of low-level moisture "gulf surges" propagating up the GoC in addition to other tropical disturbances. The third transect, Los Mochis to Badiraguato, captures the strong precipitation gradient between the GoC and the foothills of Sinaloa. We present initial results on the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor as a function of elevation for both

  13. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  14. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the iatrogenic peripheral nerve injuries in upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabay, Nuri [Department of Radiology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: nurikarabay@gmail.com; Toros, Tulgar [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: tulgartoros@yahoo.com; Ademoglu, Yalcin [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: yalcinademoglu@yahoo.com; Ada, Sait [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: sait_ada@yahoo.com

    2010-02-15

    The aim of our study is to assess the efficiency of the ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. This study includes nine patients (six radial, one median and two posterior interosseous (PIO) nerves) with peripheral nerve injury diagnosed by clinical and electrophysiological methods in the last 3 years. Preoperatively, an ultrasonographic examination was performed and correlated with physical exam and surgical findings. Five patients, who were diagnosed as peripheral nerve transection by US, underwent surgery. The ultrasonographic findings were concordant with the intraoperative findings. Axonal swelling alone was found in the remaining three patients, who were treated conservatively because of preserved nerve continuity without display of nerve compression. In one patient, we were unable to visualize the nerve due to obesity and soft tissue edema. High-resolution US provide morphological information about the exact location, intensity and extent of the nerve injuries, facilitating the preoperative diagnosis. Thus, US may be a useful method for planning optimal treatment strategy in especially iatrogenic nerve injuries.

  15. Elucidating mechanisms of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Samuel K; Lairmore, Terry C; Hendricks, John C; Roberts, John W

    2008-01-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring during thyroidectomy, parathyroidectomy, or related central neck procedures can elucidate actual or potential mechanisms of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, especially visually intact nerves, which were previously unknown to the endocrine surgeon. In this prospective evaluation study, 373 patients underwent 380 consecutive thyroidectomy- or parathyroidectomy-related operations using intraoperative nerve monitoring, with 666 RLNs at risk. The success of visual and functional identification of the RLN, persistent loss of RLN function to nerve stimulation, the mechanism and location of RLN injury, and anatomy of the RLN or technical difficulties that appeared potentially risky for RLN injury were recorded. RLN was identified visually or functionally in 98.2% of nerves at risk. Initial intraoperative injury to the RLN occurred in 25 nerves at risk (3.75%). It was significantly more likely to be a visually intact RLN (n = 22; 3.3%) than a transected RLN (n = 3; 0.45%), p cause of injury resulted from traction to the anterior motor branch of a bifurcated RLN near the ligament of Berry (n = 7; 28%), then paratracheal lymph node dissection (n = 6; 24%), incorporating ligature (n = 4; 16%), and adherent cancer (n = 4; 16%). Fifty nerves at risk (7.5%) were identified as particularly at risk for injury, most notably those with anatomic variants (n = 26; 52%) and large or vascular thyroid lobes (n = 19; 38%). RLN injury during thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy occurs intraoperatively significantly more often to a visually intact RLN than to a transected nerve. The anterior motor branch of an RLN bifurcating near the ligament of Berry is particularly at risk of traction injury.

  16. Intranasal Fentanyl Intoxication Leading to Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzycki, Shannon; Yarema, Mark; Dunham, Michael; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Increasing rates of opioid abuse, particularly fentanyl, may lead to more presentations of unusual effects of opioid toxicity. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare complication of fentanyl overdose. A 45-year-old male presented in hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring intubation. Comprehensive drug screening detected fentanyl without exposure to cocaine. Further history upon the patient's recovery revealed exposure to snorted fentanyl powder immediately prior to presentation. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potential, though rare, presentation of opioid intoxication. Recognition of less common complications of opioid abuse such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is important in proper management of overdoses.

  17. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    project was to develop an alternative to autologous nerve grafts used in repair of peripheral nerve injuries in war and civilian life. Based on our...gradient compositions tested in Aim 1 in preparation to studies in the large animal model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . As it was not...this specific aim was to test the efficacy of optimized nanofiber nerve guide in a canine model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . Peripheral nerve

  18. Computed tomography of the alveolar bone; Computertomographie des Alveolarkammes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    1996-03-01

    In addition to the conventional radiological methods used in odontology, computed tomography (CT) provides superposition-free images of the mandible and maxilla. Its value has been proved not only in cases of malignancy but also in many other problems. If an examination is performed with a slice thickness of less than 1.5 mm, the form and position of retained teeth in the alveolar bone, as well as subsequent lesions of neighboring permanent teeth, can be visualized so that early treatment can be planned. If the parodontal space of a retained tooth is visible, orthodontic intervention is possible. Precise assessment of horizontal or vertical bone loss is essential in inflammatory dental diseases. The morphology and extent of benign cystic lesions are also shown by CT. With CT surgical strategy of an intended implant therapy can take into account the remaining bone substance and the exact position of nerves and foramina. If such therapy is possible, the location, form and number of implants are easily defined. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Computertomographie ermoeglicht in Ergaenzung zu den in der Zahnheilkunde gebraeuchlichen radiologischen Untersuchungsverfahren eine ueberlagerungsfreie Darstellung von Ober- und Unterkiefer. Neben der bereits etablierten Anwendung der CT bei malignen Erkrankungen hat sich ihr Einsatz bei weiteren Fragestellungen bewaehrt. Wird die Untersuchung mit einer Schichtdicke von weniger als 1,5 mm durchgefuehrt, lassen sich Form und Lage retinierter Zaehne im Kieferknochen und die durch die retinierten Zaehne verursachten Schaeden an bleibenden Zaehnen beurteilen, so dass eine fruehzeitige Therapie moeglich ist. Laesst sich der Parodontalspalt des retinierten Zahnes abgrenzen, ist eine kieferorthopaedische Einordnung moeglich. Bei entzuendlichen Zahnerkrankungen ist der horizontale und vertikale Knochenabbau genau zu bestimmen. Die Morphologie und Ausdehnung von benignen zystischen Raumforderungen ist mit der CT erfassbar. Vor einer beabsichtigten

  19. Electrical stimulation does not enhance nerve regeneration if delayed after sciatic nerve injury: the role of fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate and enhance nerve regeneration in sensory and motor neurons after injury, but there is little evidence that focuses on the varying degrees of fibrosis in the delayed repair of peripheral nerve tissue. In this study, a rat model of sciatic nerve transection injury was repaired with a biodegradable conduit at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 2 months after injury, when the rats were divided into two subgroups. In the experimental group, rats were treated with electrical stimuli of frequency of 20 Hz, pulse width 100 ms and direct current voltage of 3 V; while rats in the control group received no electrical stimulation after the conduit operation. Histological results showed that stained collagen fibers comprised less than 20% of the total operated area in the two groups after delayed repair at both 1 day and 1 week but after longer delays, the collagen fiber area increased with the time after injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the expression level of transforming growth factor β (an indicator of tissue fibrosis decreased at both 1 day and 1 week after delayed repair but increased at both 1 and 2 months after delayed repair. These findings indicate that if the biodegradable conduit repair combined with electrical stimulation is delayed, it results in a poor outcome following sciatic nerve injury. One month after injury, tissue degeneration and distal fibrosis are apparent and are probably the main reason why electrical stimulation fails to promote nerve regeneration after delayed repair.

  20. Segment distraction to reduce a wide alveolar cleft before alveolar bone grafting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binger, T.; Katsaros, C.; Rucker, M.; Spitzer, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a method for reduction of wide alveolar clefts prior to bone grafting. This method aims to facilitate bone grafting and achieve adequate soft tissue coverage of the graft with attached gingiva. CASE REPORT: Treatment of a patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate with a

  1. Alveolar soft part sarcoma: A rare diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS is an extremely rare disease arising from connective tissues with a propensity for recurrence and metastasis. Clinically, it can be confused with hemangioma or arterio-venous malformations. Thus, a high index of suspicion and histopathological examination are required to make a definitive diagnosis. We report a case of recurrent ASPS in a young female with multiple sites involvement without any features of metastasis who has been treated with excision of the symptomatic lesions followed by chemotherapy.

  2. Postoperative Airway Emergency following Accidental Flexometallic Tube Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Habib MR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal intubation using flexometallic tubes are often required in anaesthesia practice for a variety of reasons. It is preferred in the head and neck region surgeries due to its relative resistance to kinking forces. At times, these patients postoperatively may need to be shifted to ICU or HDU without extubation for further stabilization/management and extubation after adequate recovery. We present an unusual accident where a new flexometallic endotracheal tube was permanently tapered, transected and migrated proximally due to patient’s bite on tube leading to airway emergency in post-operative recovery period.

  3. Delayed Death from Complete Aortic Transection: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakda Sathirareuangchai, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Blunt chest trauma is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in road traffic accident. One of the life- threatening injuries is traumatic aortic injury. The authors reported a case of delayed death from blunt chest trauma in a young Thai male, who had a traffic accident 2 weeks prior to his death. The autopsy revealed complete transection of thoracic aorta at the isthmus and false aneurysm formation. The clinical findings and mechanism of traumatic aortic injury are reviewed. Traumatic aortic injury is a fatal blunt chest trauma in which the victims rarely survive to the hospital. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment can decrease morbidity and mortality.

  4. A 700 km long crustal transect across northern Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Ramon; Gallart, Josep; Díaz, Jordi; Gil, Alba; Harnafi, Mimoun; Ouraini, Fadila; Ayarza, Puy; Teixell, Antonio; Arboleya, Maria Luisa; Palomeras, Imma; Levander, Alan

    2013-04-01

    Two controlled-source wide angle seismic reflection experiments have been acquired recently (2010 and 2011) in northern Africa across Morocco. A lithospheric scale transect can be constructed by joining both data sets. Hence, an approximately 700 km-long seismic velocity cross section can be derived. From south-to-north the transect goes from the Sahara Platform, south of Merzouga, to Tanger in the north. The first experiment, SIMA, aimed to constrain the crustal structure across the Atlas Mountains. The Rif, the orogenic belt located just south of the coast of Alboran Sea, was the target of the second experiment, RIFSIS. In both cases 900 recording instruments (TEXANS) from the IRIS-PASSCAL instrument center were used to record the acoustic energy generated by explosion shots. In both experiments the shots consisted of 1 TM of explosives fired in ~30 m deep boreholes. Although the data quality varies from shot to shot, key seismic phases as Pg, PmP, Pn, and a few intra-crustal arrivals have been identified to constrain the velocity-depth structure along the whole transect. Forward modelling of the seismic reflection/refraction phases reveals a crust consisting of 3 layers in average. The Moho topography shows from south to north a relatively moderate crustal root beneath the High Atlas, which can reach 40-42 km depth. The crust is thicker beneath the Rif where the Moho is imaged as an asymmetric feature that locally defines a crustal root reaching depths of 50 km and suggesting a crustal imbrication. P wave velocities are rather low in the crust and upper mantle. First arrivals/reflections tomography supports the forward modelling results. Low fold wide-angle stacks obtained by using hyperbolic move-out reveals the geometry of the Moho along the entire transect. Beneath the Atlas, the moderate crustal root inferred is not isostatically consistent with the high surface elevations, hence supporting the idea of a 'mantle plume' as main contributor to the Atlas

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic transection of the optic chiasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nunzio, M.; McAuliffe, W.; Chakera, T.M.H. [Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic lesions of the visual pathways are an uncommon, but well recognized complication of head injury. Optimal visualization of such lesions is probably best achieved using multiplanar magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A case of complete sagittal transection of the optic chiasm using MR imaging is reported. This has been rarely documented in the literature. Computerized tomography demonstrated a basal skull fracture extending through the sphenoid sinus and into the floor of the pituitary fossa. However, MRI is advocated as the optimal imaging modality for the diagnosis of traumatic lesions of suprasellar structures, perhaps obviating the need for future investigations. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  6. A Multicenter, Prospective, Randomized, Pilot Study of Outcomes for Digital Nerve Repair in the Hand Using Hollow Conduit Compared With Processed Allograft Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Kenneth R; Rinker, Brian D; Higgins, James P; Payne, S Houston; Merrell, Gregory A; Wilgis, E F Shaw

    2016-06-01

    Current repair options for peripheral nerve injuries where tension-free gap closure is not possible include allograft, processed nerve allograft, and hollow tube conduit. Here we report on the outcomes from a multicenter prospective, randomized, patient- and evaluator-blinded, pilot study comparing processed nerve allograft and hollow conduit for digital nerve reconstructions in the hand. Across 4 centers, consented participants meeting inclusion criteria while not meeting exclusion criteria were randomized intraoperatively to either processed nerve allograft or hollow conduit. Standard sensory and safety assessments were conducted at baseline, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after reconstruction. The primary outcome was static 2-point discrimination (s2PD) testing. Participants and assessors were blinded to treatment. The contralateral digit served as the control. We randomized 23 participants with 31 digital nerve injuries. Sixteen participants with 20 repairs had at least 6 months of follow-up while 12-month follow-up was available for 15 repairs. There were no significant differences in participant and baseline characteristics between treatment groups. The predominant nerve injury was laceration/sharp transection. The mean ± SD length of the nerve gap prior to repair was 12 ± 4 mm (5-20 mm) for both groups. The average s2PD for processed allograft was 5 ± 1 mm (n = 6) compared with 8 ± 5 mm (n = 9) for hollow conduits. The average moving 2PD for processed allograft was 5 ± 1 mm compared with 7 ± 5 mm for hollow conduits. All injuries randomized to processed nerve allograft returned some degree of s2PD as compared with 75% of the repairs in the conduit group. Two hollow conduits and one allograft were lost due to infection during the study. In this pilot study, patients whose digital nerve reconstructions were performed with processed nerve allografts had significantly improved and more consistent functional sensory outcomes compared with hollow conduits.

  7. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include Numbness in your ...

  9. Nostril Base Augmentation Effect of Alveolar Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woojin Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The aims of alveolar bone grafting are closure of the fistula, stabilization ofthe maxillary arch, support for the roots of the teeth adjacent to the cleft on each side.We observed nostril base augmentation in patients with alveolar clefts after alveolar bonegrafting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nostril base augmentation effect ofsecondary alveolar bone grafting in patients with unilateral alveolar cleft.Methods Records of 15 children with alveolar clefts who underwent secondary alveolar bonegrafting with autogenous iliac cancellous bone between March of 2011 and May of 2012 werereviewed. Preoperative and postoperative worm’s-eye view photographs and reconstructedthree-dimensional computed tomography (CT scans were used for photogrammetry. Thedepression of the nostril base and thickness of the philtrum on the cleft side were measuredin comparison to the normal side. The depression of the cleft side pyriform aperture wasmeasured in comparison to the normal side on reconstructed three-dimensional CT.Results Significant changes were seen in the nostril base (P=0.005, the philtrum length(P=0.013, and the angle (P=0.006. The CT measurements showed significant changes in thepyriform aperture (P<0.001 and the angle (P<0.001.Conclusions An alveolar bone graft not only fills the gap in the alveolar process but alsoaugments the nostril base after surgery. In this study, only an alveolar bone graft was performedto prevent bias from other procedures. Nostril base augmentation can be achieved byperforming alveolar bone grafts in children, in whom invasive methods are not advised.

  10. Lower lip paresthesia as a sequel of mental nerve irritation secondary to periradicular periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mahmoud Riyahi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to present a case report describing lower lip paresthesia following failed endodontic treatment and development of periapical lesion. A 42-year-old female presented difficulty in swallowing with pain in right mandibular second premolar and numbness in the right side of her lower lip. Radiographic examination revealed inadequate root canal and a large periapical lesion in the mental nerve area. The lesion appeared extending into the inferior alveolar canal causing irritation of inferior alveolar nerve and its mental branch. Following root canal retreatment, there was improvement of the clinical symptoms and gradual reduction in size of the lesion. A full resolution of symptoms was demonstrated 4 months after successful endodontic therapy. It was concluded that careful clinical and radiographic diagnosis followed by proper endodontic treatment proved to be successful in treating lower lip paresthesia occurred following failed root canal therapy.

  11. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Wen, Xuehua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  12. Brief electrical stimulation and synkinesis after facial nerve crush injury: a randomized prospective animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Adrian; Hopkins, Alex; Biron, Vincent L; Seikaly, Hadi; Zhu, Lin Fu; Côté, David W J

    2018-03-07

    Recent studies have examined the effects of brief electrical stimulation (BES) on nerve regeneration, with some suggesting that BES accelerates facial nerve recovery. However, the facial nerve outcome measurement in these studies has not been precise or accurate. Furthermore, no previous studies have been able to demonstrate the effect of BES on synkinesis. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of brief electrical stimulation (BES) on facial nerve function and synkinesis in a rat model. Four groups of six rats underwent a facial nerve injury procedure. Group 1 and 2 underwent a crush injury at the main trunk of the nerve, with group 2 additionally receiving BES for 1 h. Group 3 and 4 underwent a transection injury at the main trunk, with group 4 additionally receiving BES for 1 h. A laser curtain model was used to measure amplitude of whisking at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Fluorogold and fluororuby neurotracers were additionally injected into each facial nerve to measure synkinesis. Buccal and marginal mandibular branches of the facial nerve were each injected with different neurotracers at 3 months following injury. Based on facial nucleus motoneuron labelling of untreated rats, comparison was made to post-treatment animals to deduce whether synkinesis had taken place. All animals underwent trans-cardiac perfusion with subsequent neural tissue sectioning. At week two, the amplitude observed for group 1 and 2 was 14.4 and 24.0 degrees, respectively (p = 0.0004). Group 4 also demonstrated improved whisking compared to group 3. Fluorescent neuroimaging labelling appear to confirm improved pathway specific regeneration with BES following facial nerve injury. This is the first study to use an implantable stimulator for serial BES following a crush injury in a validated animal model. Results suggest performing BES after facial nerve injury is associated with accelerated facial nerve function and improved facial nerve specific pathway regeneration in a rat

  13. Alveolar bone loss in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulkarim, Maher; Bissada, Nabil; Al-Zahrani, Mohammad; Ficara, Anthony; Siegel, Burton

    2005-04-01

    Obesity was found to be significantly associated with periodontal disease prevalence as measured by probing depth and clinical attachment loss. The aim of this study was to examine if obesity correlates with chronic periodontitis as diagnosed by radiographic alveolar bone loss. Four hundred subjects > or =18 years old were included; 200 with body mass index (BMI) > or =30 kg/m2 (obese) and 200 with BMI periodontitis. Obesity was found to be significantly associated with periodontitis in the uni-variate regression analysis (OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.55-3.63). After adjusting for age, gender, smoking, employment, diabetes, marital status, and number of teeth present, obese subjects were found to be 1.86 times more likely to have periodontitis (95% CI, 0.99-3.51) than non-obese ones. When the sample was stratified based on age, the multivariate association was statistically significant among individuals or = 40 years of age the association was statistically insignificant (OR = 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.95). Stratifying the sample based on gender and smoking status revealed a stronger association among females than males (OR = 3.14 vs. 1.95) and among non-smokers than smokers (OR = 3.36 vs. 2.22). Obesity is associated with increased prevalence of periodontitis as measured by radiographic alveolar bone loss, especially among younger individuals. Prevention and management of obesity may be considered to promote better systemic and periodontal health.

  14. Radon and ammonia transects across the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semprini, L.; Kruger, P.

    1981-01-01

    Radon and ammonia transects, conducted at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, involve measurement of concentration gradients at wells along lines of structural significance in the reservoir. Analysis of four transects showed radon concentrations ranging from 0.20 to 3.60 nCi/kg and ammonia concentrations from 17.6 to 59.3 mg/l. The data showed the lower concentrations in wells of lowest enthalpy fluid and the higher concentrations in wells of highest enthalpy fluid. Linear correlation analysis of the radon-enthalpy data indicated a strong relationship, with a marked influence by the two-phase conditions of the produced fluid. It appears that after phase separation in the reservoir, radon achieves radioactive equilibrium between fluid and rock, suggesting that the phase separation occurs well within the reservoir. A two-phase mixing model based on radon-enthalpy relations allows estimation of the fluid phase temperatures in the reservoir. Correlations of ammonia concentration with fluid enthalpy suggests an equilibrium partitioning model in which enrichment of ammonia correlates with higher enthalpy vapor.

  15. Anterior Loop of the Mental Nerve and Its Radiologic Imaging: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    GÜMÜŞOK, Mustafa; KAYADÜĞÜN, Aylin; ÜÇOK, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    The mental foramen region is important for dental practise. Wheninferior alveolar nerve arises from the mandibular canal, it runsout ward, upward and backward to open at the mental foramenthen it was called as “anterior loop of mental nerve”. The correctvisualization of anterior loop has an important role for planning ofimplant placement in preventing complications like paresthesiaand bleeding. Reliability and precision of the images obtained withtwo-dimension conventional methods like periap...

  16. Prevention of Alveolar Osteitis After Third Molar Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-16

    May 16, 2017 ... development of alveolar osteitis were obtained and analyzed. Comparative statistics were done using ... KEY WORDS: Alveolar osteitis, chlorhexidine, prevention, warm saline. Department of Dental. Surgery .... healing by inducing vasodilatation of the vasculature of oral cavity, and thus enhances migration ...

  17. Increased alveolar soluble Annexin V promotes lung inflammation and fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, S.; Shi, W.; Xu, W.; Frey, M.R.; Moats, R.; Pardo, A.; Selman, M.; Warburton, D.

    2015-01-01

    The causes underlying the self-perpetuating nature of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive and usually lethal disease, remain unknown. We hypothesized that alveolar soluble Annexin V contributes to lung fibrosis, based on the observation that human IPF BALF containing high Annexin V levels promoted fibroblast involvement in alveolar epithelial wound healing that was reduced when Annexin V was depleted from the BALF.

  18. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process...

  19. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  20. Classification of alveolar bone destruction patterns on maxillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The defective diagnosis of alveolar structures is one of most serious handicaps when assessing available periodontal treatment options for the prevention of tooth loss. The aim of this research was to classify alveolar bone defects in the maxillary molar region which is a challenging area for dental implant ...

  1. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a child from an informal settlement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical, histopathological, biochemical and genetic data.[3]. Surfactant homeostasis is critical for lung function and is tightly regulated, in part by pulmonary granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which is required for surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophage maturation.

  2. Alveolar ridge preservation and biologic width management for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alveolar bone atrophy is a chronically progressive, irreversible process which results in bone loss in both the buccal, lingual and apico-coronal region. Without bone preservation measures, bone resorption is experienced and continues for life. Preservation of alveolar ridge is indicated when a tooth-supported fixed partial ...

  3. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a young woman with systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely reported complication of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). A young woman diagnosed SLE, with a previously normal plain chest radiograph, developed acute onset cough, dyspnoea and hemoptysis. The repeat urgent chest radiograph revealed alveolar opacities. The triad ...

  4. Brain injury in combination with tacrolimus promotes the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ze He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both brain injury and tacrolimus have been reported to promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. In this study, before transection of rat sciatic nerve, moderate brain contusion was (or was not induced. After sciatic nerve injury, tacrolimus, an immunosuppressant, was (or was not intraperitoneally administered. At 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, Masson's trichrome, hematoxylin-eosin, and toluidine blue staining results revealed that brain injury or tacrolimus alone or their combination alleviated gastrocnemius muscle atrophy and sciatic nerve fiber impairment on the experimental side, simultaneously improved sciatic nerve function, and increased gastrocnemius muscle wet weight on the experimental side. At 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, brain injury induction and/or tacrolimus treatment increased action potential amplitude in the sciatic nerve trunk. Horseradish peroxidase retrograde tracing revealed that the number of horseradish peroxidase-positive neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord was greatly increased. Brain injury in combination with tacrolimus exhibited better effects on repair of injured peripheral nerves than brain injury or tacrolimus alone. This result suggests that brain injury in combination with tacrolimus promotes repair of peripheral nerve injury.

  5. Chitosan-film associated with mesenchymal stem cells enhanced regeneration of peripheral nerves: A rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moattari, Mehrnaz; Kouchesfehani, Homa Mohseni; Kaka, Gholamreza; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Naghdi, Majid; Mansouri, Korosh

    2018-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries comprise significant portion of the nervous system injuries. Although peripheral nerves show some capacity of regeneration after injury, but the extent of regeneration is not remarkable. Regeneration might be through the activity of the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can release growth factors or extracellular matrix components or by the therapeutic effect of some material with the MSCs. The present study aimed to evaluate the regeneration of transected sciatic nerve by a therapeutic value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) associated with chitosan-film (Cs) in rat. Male Wistar rats (n=42, 180-200g) were randomly divided into intact; control; sham; Cs; MSCs; MSCs + Cs groups. Functional recovery was evaluated at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after surgery using sciatic functional index (SFI), hot water paw immersion test, electrophysiological, histological analyses. The rats in the MSCs+Cs group showed significant decrease in SFI and hot water paw immersion test during the 2nd to 8th weeks after surgery. Electrophysiological findings showed a significant decrease in latency time in the MSCs +Cs group. Amplitude of the nerve impulses also increased. Number of nerve fibers with more than 6 μm diameters increased significantly in MSCs+Cs. The number of nerve fibers with less than 4 μm diameters also increased significantly in MSCs+Cs group. Taken together, mesenchymal stem cells associated with Cs could improve functional and histomorphological properties of the sciatic nerve after injury which may have some clinical outcomes as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical anatomy of the maxillary nerve in the zygomatic region Anatomia cirúrgica do nervo maxilar na região zigomática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizandra Paccola Moretto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Anatomic knowledge on the zygomatic fossa is of primary importance to improve the regional anesthetic technique of the maxillary nerve. Few reports in the literature have addressed the trajectory of the maxillary nerve and its branches in this region; thus, this study aimed at presenting information about the trajectory of these nerves. Thirty human half-heads of both genders were fixed in 10% formalin and demineralized in 5% nitric acid, and the maxillary nerve was dissected since its origin on the pterygopalatine fossa until penetration into the inferior orbital fissure. It was observed that the maxillary nerve sends one to three posterior superior alveolar branches and tuberal descendent branches, which supply the soft tissue structures of the region. The posterior superior alveolar nerves are inferiorly oriented near the maxillary tuberosity, where they penetrate the alveolar canals with the posterior superior alveolar artery and send small nerve branches that continue in an extraosseous trajectory. This study found that nearly 2/3 of the trajectory of the maxillary nerve is located in the zygomatic region, with a short segment (1/3 in the pterygopalatine fossa.O conhecimento anátomo-cirúrgico da região zigomática é fundamental para o aprimoramento de técnicas anestésicas tronculares do nervo maxilar. A literatura pouco se refere à trajetória do nervo maxilar e seus ramos nessa região, portanto, o presente estudo tem como objetivo esclarecer o percurso desses nervos. Foram dissecadas ao microscópio cirúrgico MC900 (D.F.Vasconcelos, 30 hemicabeças humanas, de ambos os sexos, que foram previamente formolizadas a 10% e desmineralizadas em ácido nítrico a 5%. Observou-se que o nervo maxilar, desde sua origem na fossa pterigopalatina até penetrar na fissura orbital inferior, emite de um a três ramos alveolares superiores posteriores e ramos tuberais descendentes que vão para estruturas moles da região. Os nervos alveolares

  7. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves...

  8. Contemporary Approaches in the Repair of Alveolar Clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Tatli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. The repair of the alveolar clefts is an important part of the treatment for patients with cleft lip and palate. The treatment concepts of alveolar bone grafting are still controversial. The corresponding controversial issues are; timing of alveolar bone grafting, graft materials, and timing of the orthodontic expansion. In the present article, aforementioned controversial issues and contemporary treatment modalities of the maxillary alveolar clefts were reviewed in the light of current literature. In conclusion, the most suitable time for alveolar bone grafting is mixed dentition period. Grafting procedure may be performed in the early or late phases of this period depending on some clinical features. Adjunct orthodontic expansion procedures should be performed before and/or after grafting depending on the patient's current features. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 563-574

  9. The efficacy of a scaffold-free Bio 3D conduit developed from human fibroblasts on peripheral nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Yurie

    Full Text Available Although autologous nerve grafting is the gold standard treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, several alternative methods have been developed, including nerve conduits that use supportive cells. However, the seeding efficacy and viability of supportive cells injected in nerve grafts remain unclear. Here, we focused on a novel completely biological, tissue-engineered, scaffold-free conduit.We developed six scaffold-free conduits from human normal dermal fibroblasts using a Bio 3D Printer. Twelve adult male rats with immune deficiency underwent mid-thigh-level transection of the right sciatic nerve. The resulting 5-mm nerve gap was bridged using 8-mm Bio 3D conduits (Bio 3D group, n = 6 and silicone tube (silicone group, n = 6. Several assessments were conducted to examine nerve regeneration eight weeks post-surgery.Kinematic analysis revealed that the toe angle to the metatarsal bone at the final segment of the swing phase was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (-35.78 ± 10.68 versus -62.48 ± 6.15, respectively; p < 0.01. Electrophysiological studies revealed significantly higher compound muscle action potential in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (53.60 ± 26.36% versus 2.93 ± 1.84%; p < 0.01. Histological and morphological studies revealed neural cell expression in all regions of the regenerated nerves and the presence of many well-myelinated axons in the Bio 3D group. The wet muscle weight of the tibialis anterior muscle was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (0.544 ± 0.063 versus 0.396 ± 0.031, respectively; p < 0.01.We confirmed that scaffold-free Bio 3D conduits composed entirely of fibroblast cells promote nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

  10. MR imaging of cord transection without skeletal injury: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, Seon Kwan; Choi, See Sung; Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Chang Guhn; Won, Jong Jin

    1997-01-01

    Spinal cord transection in children may occur following severe trauma such as a motor vehicle accident, and often without evidence of underlying skeletal injury. We report one case which showed cervical cord transection, where no evidence of underlying skeletal injury was seen on MR imaging, four weeks after trauma. When a neurologic deficit is present despite normal routine plain radiographs, further MR imaging is warranted to exclude a cord transection, as demonstrated in our patient

  11. 4. The transectional structure of society: the basic societal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    For the purposes of research and/or evaluation, a society is organised into 13 basic societal functions (BSFs) within an overall Coordination and Control system. This organisation facilitates transectional descriptions of society or a component of a society for assessment at any given time across the longitudinal phases of a disaster. An assessment results in a picture or description of function(s) limited to the point in time of the assessment. Together with simultaneous assessments of the functional status of all, some, or one of the other BSFs, such assessments deliver a transectional picture of the situation of a society. Since no function operates in isolation from the other functions, information of the concomitant status of several BSFs is crucial to gain a better understanding of functional losses and of the effects and side effects of an intervention. The 13 BSFs include: (1) Public Health (dominantly preventive); (2) Medical Care (dominantly curative); (3) Water and Sanitation; (4) Shelter and Clothing; (5) Food and Nutrition; (6) Energy Supplies; (7) Public Works and Engineering; (8) Social Structure; (9) Logistics And Transportation; (10) Security; (11) Communications; (12); Economy; and (13) Education. These BSFs relate with each other through the Coordination and Control function. Many functions of the BSFs and their respective subfunctions and elements overlap (they share some common subfunctions and elements). However, for the purposes of research/evaluation, it is necessary to assign subfunctions and elements to only one of the BSFs. Just as in the practice of clinical medicine, the sum of assessments provides the transectional description of the status of each of these BSFs at a given time. From this information, compared to the pre-event description of the society, interventions are selected that are likely to meet the defined objectives and their overarching goal(s), and respective plans are developed and implemented. The effects of each

  12. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, ... eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These muscles move the eye up and down, right and ... nerve 4th cranial nerve 6th ...

  13. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    rodents as a function of time after surgery. As predicted, those animals in the negative control group (no repair following nerve deficit injury ...80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve damage, typically involve large segmental nerve deficits. Standard repair uses...technology for repair of peripheral nerve injuries involving significant neural deficit with improved functional outcomes for the wounded warrior. The

  14. Radial to axillary nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Martínez-Gómez, Deborah; Vanaclocha, Leyre

    2018-01-01

    Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE .

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival sof...

  16. Hemorragia alveolar associada a nefrite lúpica Alveolar hemorrhage associated with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga Teixeira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemorragia alveolar, como causa de insuficiência respiratória, é pouco freqüente, com diversas etiologias possíveis. Entre elas, o lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, que se apresenta geralmente como síndrome pulmão-rim, possui alta morbimortalidade. Acredita-se que a patogênese da microangiopatia, tanto renal como pulmonar, esteja associada ao depósito de imunocomplexos, que ativariam as vias de apoptose celular. Relatam-se dois casos de pacientes com nefrite lúpica que evoluíram com hemorragia alveolar associada à insuficiência respiratória necessitando de ventilação mecânica com evoluções totalmente distintas frente às terapias farmacológicas. O achado de anticorpos antimembrana basal em um dos casos evidencia a multiplicidade de mecanismos fisiopatológicos possivelmente envolvidos, que poderiam justificar as respostas heterogêneas frente aos tratamentos disponíveis.Alveolar hemorrhage leading to respiratory failure is uncommon. Various etiologies have been reported, including systemic lupus erythematosus, which generally presents as pulmonary-renal syndrome. It is believed that the pathogenesis of microangiopathy is related to deposits of immune complexes that lead to activation of cellular apoptosis. The authors report two cases of alveolar hemorrhage and respiratory failure, both requiring mechanical ventilation. The two cases had opposite outcomes after pharmacological therapy. The presence of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies in one of the cases demonstrates the multiplicity of physiopathological mechanisms that may be involved. This multiplicity of mechanisms provides a possible explanation for the heterogeneous responses to the available treatments.

  17. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  18. Optic Nerve Drusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve. Ocular ultrasound, CT scan and/or fundus photography can also aid in the diagnosis. Drusen can ... Medical Disclaimer Search Site ▶ AAPOS Headquarters 655 Beach Street San Francisco, CA 94109-1336 Phone: (415) 561- ...

  19. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you do certain activities such as public speaking, singing or exercising, or when you're eating if ... of life. Research is still mixed on the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of ...

  20. Laryngeal nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms include: Difficulty speaking Difficulty swallowing Hoarseness Injury to the left and right laryngeal nerves at the same time can cause a breathing problem. This can be an urgent medical problem.

  1. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  2. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  3. Place Mapping – transect walks in Arctic urban landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hemmersam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates how experimental forms of urban mapping can reveal the particularity of places in non-standard urban situations with the intention of moving beyond the reductivism of still-dominant modernist modes of mapping and associated forms of planning. In order to do so, it reports on the emergence of a methodology involving transect walks, with the purpose of mapping the peculiarities of cultural landscapes. The study is located in cities and communities in the Arctic that are undergoing rapid transformation and are in urgent need of new conceptual approaches capable of enabling future thinking and strategic action. The article specifically asks how such a methodology works to includes the ephemeral and emergent, but also digital, dimensions of urban landscapes, and results in a complex reflexive method of critically reading and writing, of moving and locating, of seeing and picturing place mapping.

  4. [Massive alveolar haemorrhage in Wegener's granulomatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Roldán, J; Nuñez-Castillo, D; Fernández-Fígares, C; López-Leiva, I

    2014-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a systemic vasculitis with involvement of primary granulomatous upper and lower respiratory tract, glomerulonephritis and vasculitis of small vessels. The lung disease ranges from asymptomatic pulmonary nodules to pulmonary infiltrates and fulminant alveolar haemorrhage. The prognosis is poor due to kidney and respiratory failure, although the data are changing due to new treatments with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide. We report a case with severe lung disease, which after appropriate anamnesis, multiple tests, and optimal sequential action, the patient was diagnosed with Wegener's granulomatosis. This disease has a low incidence in the Emergency Department, where the patient history supported by the appropriate additional provides a diagnostic suspicion. It is important that the Emergency Department has the skills to manage the stability in these patients in order to resolve their symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  6. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  7. Accelerated orthodontics with alveolar decortication and augmentation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezdani, A Arif

    2012-01-01

    This case report reiterates the fact that selective alveolar decortication in conjunction with periodontal alveolar augmentation with a bone graft indubitably and efficaciously produces rapid orthodontic tooth movement. A 29-year-old woman presented with a Class I malocclusion and increased bidentoalveolar protrusion with increased spacing between the maxillary and mandibular incisors. She readily agreed to selective alveolar decortication in conjunction with periodontal alveolar augmentation with a bone graft when presented with the proposal that her malocclusion could be corrected in one-third the treatment time required for conventional orthodontics. A preadjusted edgewise appliance (Roth prescription, 0.022 x 0.028-inch slot) was placed prior to the surgical procedure. One week later, full-thickness labial and lingual flaps were reflected in the maxillary and mandibular arches. The alveolar bone was selectively decorticated and periodontally augmented with a bone graft. Starting 1 week postsurgically, orthodontic adjustments were carried out every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the entire orthodontic treatment took 7 months. The rapid orthodontic tooth movement was attributed to the regional acceleratory phenomenon, triggered by selective alveolar decortication. The subsequent periodontal alveolar augmentation with the bone graft repaired the bony dehiscences and enhanced the bone volume and dramatically improved the patient's soft tissue profile.

  8. A novel augmented reality system for displaying inferior alveolar nerve bundles in maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Fei; Chai, Gang; Pan, Jun J; Jiang, Taoran; Lin, Li; Xin, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qingfeng

    2017-02-15

    Augmented reality systems can combine virtual images with a real environment to ensure accurate surgery with lower risk. This study aimed to develop a novel registration and tracking technique to establish a navigation system based on augmented reality for maxillofacial surgery. Specifically, a virtual image is reconstructed from CT data using 3D software. The real environment is tracked by the augmented reality (AR) software. The novel registration strategy that we created uses an occlusal splint compounded with a fiducial marker (OSM) to establish a relationship between the virtual image and the real object. After the fiducial marker is recognized, the virtual image is superimposed onto the real environment, forming the "integrated image" on semi-transparent glass. Via the registration process, the integral image, which combines the virtual image with the real scene, is successfully presented on the semi-transparent helmet. The position error of this navigation system is 0.96 ± 0.51 mm. This augmented reality system was applied in the clinic and good surgical outcomes were obtained. The augmented reality system that we established for maxillofacial surgery has the advantages of easy manipulation and high accuracy, which can improve surgical outcomes. Thus, this system exhibits significant potential in clinical applications.

  9. Virtual Surgical Planning and Piezoelectric Surgery in Tumor Extirpative Surgery Aimed at Inferior Alveolar Nerve Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Chung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A myriad of extirpative surgical protocols for the management of benign tumors of the jaws have been presented in the literature. Through significant advancements in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology and surgical instrumentation, today surgeons have at their disposal robust technology-driven techniques that are aimed at improving surgical outcomes. Our goal is to investigate the benefits of implementing virtual surgical planning (VSP in conjunction with piezoelectric surgery (PES to ensure success while minimizing the risk of complications during extirpation of tumors of the mandible. This case report describes the successful extirpation of an ossifying fibroma of the mandible in an adult patient using both VSP and PES.

  10. Coronectomy of the mandibular third molar: Respect for the inferior alveolar nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenberg, A. J.; Stroy, L. P. P.; Rijt, E. D. Vree-V. D.; Mensink, G.; Gooris, P. J. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of coronectomy as an alternative surgical procedure to complete removal of the impacted mandibular third molar in patients with a suspected close relationship between the tooth root(s) and the mandibular canal. A total of 151 patients underwent

  11. High resolution computed tomography of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feifel, H.; Riediger, D.; Gustorf-Aeckerle, R.

    1994-01-01

    Coronal and axial high resolution computed tomography of the mandible extends facilities in dentoalveolar surgery. Preoperatively the relationship between the mandibular canal and the roots of deeply displaced third molars can be determined precisely. After surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth iatrogenic defects of the lingual cortical bone can be detected. The additional information obtained when compared with conventional radiographs is demonstrated in case descriptions. Indications for this technique, radiation exposure and implications for surgery are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of panoramic radiography in determining relationship between inferior alveolar nerve and mandibular third molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieh, Momen A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of panoramic radiographic markers in the detection of the relationship between the mandibular canal and third molar roots. A literature search of electronic databases, Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, National Research Register, conference proceedings, and abstracts was performed to identify studies that had investigated the diagnostic accuracy of the 3 panoramic radiographic markers (ie, darkening of the root, interruption of the radiopaque borders, and diversion of the mandibular canal). RevMan, version 5.0, and Meta-DiSc software programs were used for the pooled analyses and the construction of a summary receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 5 studies were included, involving 894 observations. The overall pooled sensitivity and specificity for darkening of the root was calculated as 51.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 42% to 60%) and 89% (95% CI 87% to 90%), respectively. The interruption of radiopaque borders showed a pooled sensitivity of 53.5% (95% CI 78.1% to 81.8%) and a pooled specificity of 80% (95% CI 78.1% to 81.8%). The diversion of the canal criterion had a pooled sensitivity of 29.4% (95% CI 21.8% to 38.1%) and a pooled specificity of 94.7% (95% CI 93.6% to 95.7%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 70% to 77%. The results of this meta-analysis suggest a reasonable diagnostic accuracy for panoramic radiography in the preoperative evaluation of the relationship between third molars and the canal. Additional studies are needed to examine a more accurate, accessible, and cost-effective initial radiographic technique before third molar surgery.

  13. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  14. Assessment of vascularization and myelination following peripheral nerve repair using angiographic and polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ahhyun S.; Chico-Calero, Isabel; Easow, Jeena M.; Villiger, Martin; Welt, Jonathan; Winograd, Jonathan M.; Randolph, Mark A.; Redmond, Robert W.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2017-02-01

    A severe traumatic injury to a peripheral nerve often requires surgical graft repair. However, functional recovery after these surgical repairs is often unsatisfactory. To improve interventional procedures, it is important to understand the regeneration of the nerve grafts. The rodent sciatic nerve is commonly used to investigate these parameters. However, the ability to longitudinally assess the reinnervation of injured nerves are limited, and to our knowledge, no methods currently exist to investigate the timing of the revascularization in functional recovery. In this work, we describe the development and use of angiographic and polarization-sensitive (PS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) to visualize the vascularization, demyelination and remyelination of peripheral nerve healing after crush and transection injuries, and across a variety of graft repair methods. A microscope was customized to provide 3.6 cm fields of view along the nerve axis with a capability to track the nerve height to maintain the nerve within the focal plane. Motion artifact rejection was implemented in the angiography algorithm to reduce degradation by bulk respiratory motion in the hindlimb site. Vectorial birefringence imaging methods were developed to significantly enhance the accuracy of myelination measurements and to discriminate birefringent contributions from the myelin and epineurium. These results demonstrate that the OCT platform has the potential to reveal new insights in preclinical studies and may ultimately provide a means for clinical intra-surgical assessment of peripheral nerve function.

  15. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  16. Horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation using autologous press fit bone cylinders and micro-lag-screw fixation: technical note and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streckbein, Philipp; Kähling, Christopher; Wilbrand, Jan-Falco; Malik, Christoph-Yves; Schaaf, Heidrun; Howaldt, Hans-Peter; Streckbein, Roland

    2014-07-01

    The use of autologous block bone grafts for horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation in dental implantology is a common surgical procedure. Typically, bone grafts are individually moulded. The aim of this paper is to introduce an innovative procedure in lateral bone augmentation, where the recipient side is adjusted to the graft, not vice versa as in common procedures. Our initial clinical experience of twenty-five consecutive cases is presented. Adjusted trephine drills were used to harvest partly cylindrical grafts from the retromolar region of the mandible. After preparing the recipient site with accurately fitting grinding drills, the bone grafts were transplanted. The horizontally compromised alveolar ridges were successfully augmented and treated with dental implants. No major complication occurred during transplantation, the healing period, and subsequent implant therapy in our experimental setting with 25 patients and 38 augmentation procedures. One out of twenty-five patients presented with temporary dysaesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve. The new method presented is an effective treatment option for horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation prior to single implant installation. Further studies should evaluate the donor site morbidity and long-term outcome on a larger population. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Composition and diversity of tree species in transects of location lowland evergreen forest of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Caranqui A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in 9 transects 1000m2 of lowland evergreen forest, located in two locations on the coast and one in eastern Ecuador. It was to contribute to knowledge of the diversity and composition of woody plants over 10 cm diameter at breast height (DBH plus infer the state of conservation of forests based on the composition, the number of species, indices diversity and importance value (IV, found in 9 transects of 1000 m² of forest: 156 species, 107 genera and 39 families distributed in 9 transects, in each one the Simpson diversity index is of 0.92 to 0.95, in this case are diversity because all approaches 1. Most were found species aren´t present in all transects, the index value in each transect does not exceed 40%. Grouping transects match three locations exception made to transect 5 and 8 were conducted in disturbed sites, the most transects are intermediate disturbance that their high levels of diversity.

  18. Alveolar cleft closure with iliac bone graft: A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tichvy Tammama

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The timing of alveolar bone grafting usually associated with the state of the developing of dentition. Post operative management is important to get a good result, and to prevent any complications.

  19. Radionuclide study of the action of cadmium on alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reulet, Maryse.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental toxicity of cadmium was studied on the lung, using cadmium sulfate, cadmium acetate and the radioactive isotope cadmium 109 in chloride or acetate form. The results are given in the following order: part one is devoted to the results of investigations on chronic cadmium poisoning and the role of alveolar macrophages in this poisoning; in part two the uptake of cadmium on alveolar macrophages is studied with cadmium 109, administered intraperitoneally; in part three the action of cadmium on the phospholipid metabolism of alveolar macrophages is examined. The cadmium, as sulfate or acetate, is administered in several ways: by intraperitoneal injection; or by inhalation of cadmium dusts or aerosols. The effect of cadmium on the oxidative metabolism of alveolar macrophages is studied in part four. This work is carried out 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' after cadmium oxide dusting of the air [fr

  20. Horizontal alveolar bone loss: A periodontal orphan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attempts to successfully regenerate lost alveolar bone have always been a clinician′s dream. Angular defects, at least, have a fairer chance, but the same cannot be said about horizontal bone loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of horizontal alveolar bone loss and vertical bone defects in periodontal patients; and later, to correlate it with the treatment modalities available in the literature for horizontal and vertical bone defects. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. Part I was the radiographic evaluation of 150 orthopantomographs (OPGs (of patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and seeking periodontal care, which were digitized and read using the AutoCAD 2006 software. All the periodontitis-affected teeth were categorized as teeth with vertical defects (if the defect angle was ≤45° and defect depth was ≥3 mm or as having horizontal bone loss. Part II of the study comprised search of the literature on treatment modalities for horizontal and vertical bone loss in four selected periodontal journals. Results: Out of the 150 OPGs studied, 54 (36% OPGs showed one or more vertical defects. Totally, 3,371 teeth were studied, out of which horizontal bone loss was found in 3,107 (92.2% teeth, and vertical defects were found only in 264 (7.8% of the teeth, which was statistically significant (P<.001. Search of the selected journals revealed 477 papers have addressed the treatment modalities for vertical and horizontal types of bone loss specifically. Out of the 477 papers, 461 (96.3% have addressed vertical bone loss, and 18 (3.7% have addressed treatment options for horizontal bone loss. Two papers have addressed both types of bone loss and are included in both categories. Conclusion: Horizontal bone loss is more prevalent than vertical bone loss but has been sidelined by researchers as very few papers have been published on the subject of regenerative treatment

  1. Chemogenetic enhancement of functional recovery after a sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Poonam B; English, Arthur W

    2017-05-01

    Designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) are chemogenetic tools used to modulate neuronal excitability. We hypothesized that activation of excitatory (Gq) DREADD by its designer ligand, clozapine-N-oxide (CNO), would increase the excitability of neurons whose axons have been transected following peripheral nerve injury, and that this increase will lead to an enhanced functional recovery. The lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle of adult female Lewis rats was injected unilaterally with AAV9- hsyn- hM3Dq-mCherry (7.6 × 10 9 viral genomes/μL) to transduce Gq-DREADD expression in LG neurons. The contralateral LG muscle served as an uninjected control. No significant changes in either spontaneous EMG activity or electrically evoked direct muscle (M) responses were found in either muscle after injection of CNO (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The amplitude of monosynaptic H-reflexes in LG was increased after CNO treatment exclusively in muscles previously injected with virus, suggesting that Gq-DREADD activation increased neuronal excitability. After bilateral sciatic nerve transection and repair, additional rats were treated similarly with CNO for up to three days after injury. Electrophysiological data were collected at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after injury. Evoked EMG responses were observed as early as 2 weeks after injury only in Gq-DREADD expressing virus injected LG muscle. By 4 weeks after injury, both M-response and H-reflex amplitudes were significantly greater in muscles previously injected with viral vector than contralateral, uninjected muscles. Increases in the excitability of injured neurons produced by this novel use of Gq-DREADD were sufficient to promote an enhancement in functional recovery after a sciatic nerve injury. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  3. Soft tissue healing in alveolar socket preservation technique: histologic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Gaia; Rasperini, Giulio; Obot, Gregory; Farronato, Davide; Dellavia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    After tooth extraction, 14 alveolar sockets were grafted with porous bovine bone mineral particles and covered with non-cross-linked collagen membrane (test group), and 14 alveolar sockets were left uncovered. At 5 and 12 weeks, microvascular density (MVD), collagen content, and amount of lymphocytes (Lym) T and B were analyzed in soft tissue. At 5 weeks, MVD was significantly lower and Lym T was significantly higher in tests than in controls (P healing process of the soft tissue.

  4. Dynamic thermal performance of alveolar brick construction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracia, A. de; Castell, A.; Medrano, M.; Cabeza, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Even though U-value does not measure thermal inertia, it is the commonly used parameter. → The thermal performance analysis of buildings must include the evaluation of transient parameters. → Transient parameters of alveolar brick constructive system show good agreement with its low energy consumption. -- Abstract: Alveolar bricks are being introduced in building sector due to the simplicity of their construction system and to the elimination of the insulation material. Nevertheless, it is not clear if this new system is energetically efficient and which is its thermal behaviour. This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study to evaluate the thermal behaviour of the alveolar brick construction system, compared with a traditional Mediterranean brick system with insulation. The experimental study consists of measuring the thermal performance of four real house-like cubicles. The thermal transmittance in steady-state, also known as U-value, is calculated theoretically and experimentally for each cubicle, presenting the insulated cubicles as the best construction system, with differences around 45% in comparison to the alveolar one. On the other hand, experimental results show significantly smaller differences on the energy consumption between the alveolar and insulated construction systems during summer period (around 13% higher for the alveolar cubicle). These values demonstrate the high thermal efficiency of the alveolar system. In addition, the lack of agreement between the measured energy consumption and the calculated U-values, guides the authors to analyze the thermal inertia of the different building components. Therefore, several transient parameters, extracted from the heat transfer matrix and from experimental data, are also evaluated. It can be concluded that the alveolar brick construction system presents higher thermal inertia than the insulated one, justifying the low measured energy consumption.

  5. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process of...... of the mandible. Light microscopic evaluation revealed fibrous encapsulation, a few multinuclear giant cells, little inflammatory reaction, and no osteoinduction. It was concluded that no osteoinduction took place in goats....

  6. Postextraction Alveolar Ridge Preservation: Biological Basis and Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Pagni, Giorgio; Pellegrini, Gaia; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Following tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge undergoes an inevitable remodeling process that influences implant therapy of the edentulous area. Socket grafting is a commonly adopted therapy for the preservation of alveolar bone structures in combination or not with immediate implant placement although the biological bases lying behind this treatment modality are not fully understood and often misinterpreted. This review is intended to clarify the literature support to socket grafting in ord...

  7. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2009-06-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  8. Long-nerve grafts and nerve transfers demonstrate comparable outcomes for axillary nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Johnsen, Parker H; Lee, Steve K; Feinberg, Joseph H

    2014-07-01

    To compare the functional and EMG outcomes of long-nerve grafts to nerve transfers for complete axillary nerve palsy. Over a 10-year period at a single institution, 14 patients with axillary nerve palsy were treated with long-nerve grafts and 24 patients were treated with triceps-to-axillary nerve transfers by the same surgeon (S.W.W.). Data were collected prospectively at regular intervals, beginning before surgery and continuing up to 11 years after surgery. Prior to intervention, all patients demonstrated EMG evidence of complete denervation of the deltoid. Deltoid recovery (Medical Research Council [MRC] grade), shoulder abduction (°), improvement in shoulder abduction (°), and EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation were compared between cohorts. There were no significant differences between the long-nerve graft cohort and the nerve transfer cohort with respect to postoperative range of motion, deltoid recovery, improvement in shoulder abduction, or EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation. These data demonstrate that outcomes of long-nerve grafts for axillary nerve palsy are comparable with those of modern nerve transfers and question a widely held belief that long-nerve grafts do poorly. When healthy donor roots or trunks are available, long-nerve grafts should not be overlooked as an effective intervention for the treatment of axillary nerve injuries in adults with brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  10. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors controlling floc settling velocity along a longitudinal estuarine transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, A.J.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    A 147 km longitudinal transect of flocculated cohesive sediment properties in San Francisco Bay (SFB) was conducted on June 17th, 2008. Our aim was to determine the factors that control floc settling velocity along the longitudinal axis of the estuary. The INSSEV-LF video system was used to measure floc diameters and settling velocities at 30 stations at a distance of 0.7 m above the estuary bed. Floc sizes (D) ranged from 22 μm to 639 μm and settling velocities (Ws) ranged between 0.04 mm·s− 1 and 15.8 mm·s− 1 during the longitudinal transect. Nearbed turbulent shear stresses throughout the transect duration were within the 0.2–0.5 Pa range which typically stimulates flocculation growth. The individual D–Ws–floc density plots suggest the suspended sediments encountered throughout SFB were composed of both muddy cohesive sediment and mixed sediments flocs. Mass-weighted population mean settling velocity (Wsmass) ranged from 0.5 mm·s− 1 to 10 mm·s− 1. The macrofloc and microfloc (demarcation at 160 μm) sub-populations demonstrated parameterised settling velocities which spanned nearly double the range of the sample mean settling velocities (Wsmean). The macroflocs tended to dominate the suspended mass (up to 77% of the ambient suspended solid concentration; SSC) from San Pablo Bay to Carquinez Strait (the vicinity of the turbidity maximum zone). Microfloc mass was particularly significant (typically 60–100% of the SSC) in the northern section of South Bay and most of Central Bay. The transect took eleven hours to complete and was not fully synoptic. During slack tide, larger and faster settling flocs deposited, accounting for most of the longitudinal variability. The best single predictor of settling velocity was water velocity 39 min prior to sampling, not suspended-sediment concentration or salinity. Resuspension and settling lags are likely responsible for the lagged response of settling velocity to water velocity. The distribution of

  12. Circum-Arctic lithospheric transects from onshore to offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, V.; Coakley, B.; Faleide, J. I.; Jokat, W.; Miller, E. L.; Stephenson, R.; Meisling, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of the lithosphere over time involves the integration and interpretation of geological and geophysical data, combined with good knowledge of the physical processes at work in the lithosphere giving rise to past and present structures. Tectonic activity related to the rifting process created the present-day structure of today's Arctic basins and bathymetric highs, and in the process modified older structures and architecture of the crust and lithosphere. The correlation of circum-Arctic terranes and orogens help to not only reconstruct paleogeography but to also define the role and determine the nature of the lithospheric processes that were active in the complex tectonic evolution of the Arctic. CALE (Circum Arctic Lithosphere Evolution), an international and multidisciplinary effort involving c. 35 geologists and geophysicists from ten different countries working to link the onshore and offshore regions across the circum-Arctic region, is a scientific network in it's last year of a 5-year program. Sedimentary cover and crust to mantle cross-sections from onshore to offshore have been created integrating the latest scientific knowledge and data sets available for the Arctic. The project's principal Arctic transects include: Ellesmere-Canada Basin, Pacific Ocean-Lomonosov Ridge through the Bering Strait, across the Laptev Sea rift to the DeLong Islands, Barents and Kara regions across Timan-Pechora and Taimyr. These sections, the culmination of the CALE project, and their principle findings will be presented for the first time with discussion of outstanding issues yet to be resolved.

  13. Alveolar socket healing: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Mauricio G; Silva, Cléverson O; Misawa, Mônica; Sukekava, Flavia

    2015-06-01

    Tooth extraction induces a series of complex and integrated local changes within the investing hard and soft tissues. These local alterations arise in order to close the socket wound and to restore tissue homeostasis, and are referred to as '"socket healing". The aims of the present report were twofold: first, to describe the socket-healing process; and, second, to discuss what can be learned from the temporal sequence of healing events, in order to improve treatment outcomes. The socket-healing process may be divided into three sequential, and frequently overlapping, phases: inflammatory; proliferative; and modeling/remodeling. Several clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that the socket-healing process promotes up to 50% reduction of the original ridge width, greater bone resorption at the buccal aspect than at the lingual/palatal counterpart and a larger amount of alveolar bone reduction in the molar region. In conclusion, tooth extraction, once a simple and straightforward surgical procedure, should be performed in the knowledge that ridge reduction will follow and that further clinical steps should be considered to compensate for this, when considering future options for tooth replacement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Inferior alveolar canal course: a radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Xia, Bing; Gu, Zhiyuan

    2009-11-01

    To describe the morphology and course of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) as it appears in digital panoramic radiographs. Three hundred and eighty-six digital rotational panoramic radiographs (OPG) were studied using the Clinview Software (6.1.3.7 version, Instrumentarium). Among the 386 radiographs, 86 radiographs with 5-mm steel balls were used to calculate the magnification. The average magnification of radiographs in this study was 7.24+/-7.55%. The course of IAC as seen in the panoramic radiograph may be classified into four types: (1) linear curve, 12.75%, (2) spoon-shaped curve, 29.25%, (3) elliptic-arc curve, 48.5%, and (4) turning curve, 9.5%. On panoramic radiographs, the IAC appeared closest to the inferior border of the mandible in the region of the first molar. In relation to the teeth, on panoramic radiographs, the IAC appeared closest to the distal root tip of the third molar and furthest from the mesial root tip of the first molar. In the OPG, there are four types of IAC: linear, spoon shape, elliptic-arc, and turning curve. The data found in the study may be useful for dental implant, mandibule surgery, and dental anesthesia. The limitations of the panoramic radiograph in depicting the true three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the IAC are recognized, computed tomography (CT) and cone beam (CB)3D imaging being more precise.

  15. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piarroux, Martine; Piarroux, Renaud; Knapp, Jenny; Bardonnet, Karine; Dumortier, Jérôme; Watelet, Jérôme; Gerard, Alain; Beytout, Jean; Abergel, Armand; Bresson-Hadni, Solange

    2013-01-01

    During 1982–2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84–117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21–464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88–18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82–10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups. PMID:23647623

  16. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped according to where they leave the spinal column. There are eight pairs of neck (cervical) nerves, 12 pairs of upper back (thoracic) nerves, five pairs of lower back (lumbar) nerves, five pairs of pelvis (sacral) nerves and ...

  18. Podisus distinctus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) females are lighter feeding on Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) pupae subjected to ventral nerve cord transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The movement observed in the Tenebrio molitor L., 1758 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) pupae can be a type of defense strategy. This makes it significant to study the development and reproduction of the predatory stinkbugs Asopinae with the immobilized pupae of this prey. The aim was to evaluate the per...

  19. Force Characteristics of the Rat Sternomastoid Muscle Reinnervated with End-to-End Nerve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Sobotka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to establish force data for the rat sternomastoid (SM muscle after reinnervation with nerve end-to-end anastomosis (EEA, which could be used as a baseline for evaluating the efficacy of new reinnervation techniques. The SM muscle on one side was paralyzed by transecting its nerve and then EEA was performed at different time points: immediate EEA, 1-month and 3-month delay EEA. At the end of 3-month recovery period, the magnitude of functional recovery of the reinnervated SM muscle was evaluated by measuring muscle force and comparing with the force of the contralateral control muscle. Our results demonstrated that the immediately reinnervated SM produced approximately 60% of the maximal tetanic force of the control. The SM with delayed nerve repair yielded approximately 40% of the maximal force. Suboptimal recovery of muscle force after EEA demonstrates the importance of developing alternative surgical techniques to treat muscle paralysis.

  20. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  1. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  2. The use of laminin modified linear ordered collagen scaffolds loaded with laminin-binding ciliary neurotrophic factor for sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiani; Sun, Changkai; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Gao, Jian; Zheng, Tiezheng; Wu, Wei; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Jingyu; Dai, Jianwu

    2011-06-01

    Nerve conduit provides a promising strategy for nerve injury repair in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). However, simply bridging the transected nerve with an empty conduit is hard to satisfy functional recovery. The regenerated axons may disperse during regeneration in the empty lumen, limiting the functional recovery. Our previous work had reported that linear ordered collagen scaffold (LOCS) could be used as a nerve guidance material. Here we cross-linked LOCS fibers with laminin which was a major component of the extracellular matrix in nervous system. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plays a critical role in peripheral nerve regeneration. But the lack of efficient CNTF delivery approach limits its clinical applications. To retain CNTF on the scaffold, a laminin binding domain (LBD) was fused to the N-terminal of CNTF. Compared with NAT-CNTF, LBD-CNTF exhibited specific laminin-binding ability and comparable neurotrophic bioactivity. We combined LBD-CNTF with the laminin modified LOCS fibers to construct a double-functional bio-scaffold. The functional scaffold was filled in silicon conduit and tested in the rat sciatic nerve transection model. Results showed that this functional biomaterial could guide the axon growth, retain more CNTF on the scaffolds and enhance the nerve regeneration as well as functional recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  4. Nerve Transfer versus Interpositional Nerve Graft Reconstruction for Posttraumatic, Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Agrawal, Nikhil A; Seruya, Mitchel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes between nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures in the setting of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries. A systematic review was performed using the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases to identify all cases of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries in patients aged 18 years or older. Patients who underwent axillary nerve reconstruction were included and categorized by technique: graft or transfer. Demographics were recorded, including age, time to operation, and presence of concomitant injuries. Functional outcomes were evaluated, including British Medical Research Council strength and range of motion for shoulder abduction. Ten retrospective studies met criteria, for a total of 66 patients (20 nerve grafts and 46 nerve transfers). Median time from injury to operation was equivalent across the nerve graft and nerve transfer groups (8.0 months versus 7.0 months; p = 0.41). Postoperative follow-up was 24.0 months for nerve grafting versus 18.5 months for nerve transfer (p = 0.13). Clinically useful shoulder abduction, defined as British Medical Research Council grade M3 or greater, was obtained in 100 percent of nerve graft patients versus 87 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.09). Grade M4 or better strength was obtained in 85 percent of nerve graft patients and 73.9 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.32). Significant differences in functional outcomes between nerve graft and transfer procedures for posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries are not apparent at this time. Prospective outcomes studies are needed to better elucidate whether functional differences do exist. Therapeutic, IV.

  5. Comparative evaluation of effect of preoperative alprazolam and diclofenac potassium on the success of inferior alveolar, Vazirani-Akinosi, and Gow-Gates techniques for teeth with irreversible pulpitis: Randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shetkar, Pratibha; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Mittal, Priya; Surapaneni, Saikalyan; Kalra, Dheeraj; Sakri, Mohan; Basavaprabhu, A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : In teeth with irreversible pulpitis, successful local anesthesia is hard to achieve irrespective of the amount of local anesthesia and technique used. Such cases can be managed by concoction of pre-medications like anxiolytics, analgesics and effective local anesthesia. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study was planned to evaluate the effect of oral administration of alprazolam and diclofenac potassium on the success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB), Gow-Gates...

  6. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  7. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  8. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  9. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have...

  10. Anterior loop of the mental nerve, mental foramen and incisive nerve emergency: tridimensional assessment and surgical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Salinas-Goodier, Carmen; Manchón, Ángel; Rojo, Rosa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and length of the anterior loop (AL), the distance from this landmark to the alveolar crest and its relation with the shape of the foramen and emergency pattern in the Spanish population on helical computed tomography scan (helical CT scan) through tridimensional reconstructions. Helical CT scan images of 41 patients aged 65 or older were analyzed. A total of 82 human hemi-mandibles were examined in this study. A tridimensional reconstruction of each mandible and Inferior Alveolar Nerve canal was created in AMIRA ® software (AMIRA, Mercury Computer Systems, Berlin, Germany). Prevalence, length and distance between the AL, mental foramen and alveolar ridge were measured. This retrospective observational study was performed according to the STROBE guidelines. Prevalence of the AL was 53.7 % (n = 44) and the mean length was 1.3 ± 0.64 mm. The mean distance from the highest point of the loop to the alveolar ridge was 13.4 ± 2.8 mm. The mean diameter of the mental foramen was 3.5 ± 0.65 mm and the proportion of the oval-shaped was 62.2 % (n = 51) and round-shaped was 37.8 % (n = 31). The study found that patients with type 1 pattern emergency pattern had a higher prevalence of the AL (p = 0.03). Prevalence, location and length of the anterior loop can be overlooked if only two-dimensional pre-surgical studies are performed. Therefore, three-dimensional imaging and modeling of anatomic structures should be used for the pre-operative examination of the interforaminal area. Given the wide variability of the emergency pattern of the mental nerve and the prevalence and location of the anterior loop, it should be studied in every patient individually.

  11. Distracción osteogénica alveolar como método de aumento del reborde alveolar Alveolar osteogenic distraction as method to increase the alveolar ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denia Morales Navarro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La distracción osteogénica alveolar, como proceso biológico de neoformación de hueso alveolar, nos motivó a la realización de la presente revisión bibliográfica, con el objetivo enfatizar en el análisis de las variables: antecedentes históricos en Cuba, clasificación de los distractores, fases de la distracción (latencia, distracción y consolidación, indicaciones, contraindicaciones, ventajas, desventajas y complicaciones. Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica mediante la consulta de bases de datos de los sistemas referativos, como MEDLINE y PubMed con la utilización de descriptores "alveolar distraction" y "osteogenic distraction". Se consultaron las fuentes bibliográficas publicadas fundamentalmente en los últimos 5 años, lo que reveló que esta técnica es una excelente alternativa para la formación de huesos y tejidos blandos en zonas de atrofia alveolar, que consta de tres etapas: latencia, distracción y consolidación; un método previsible y con bajas tasas de reabsorción ósea en comparación con otras técnicas de aumento del reborde alveolar. Tiene su principal indicación en la terapia de implantes al proveer volumen óseo. Debemos individualizar cada caso y usar el método más adecuado según las características clínicas y personales del paciente. Una adecuada selección de los casos y una mejor comprensión de la técnica son los puntales para lograr exitosos resultados mediante la distracción osteogénica alveolar. En Cuba se ha aplicado poco la distracción alveolar, por lo que ha sido necesario ampliar los estudios sobre esta temática.The alveolar osteogenic distraction, as a biological process of alveolar bone neoformation, motivates us to make the bibliographic review whose objective was to emphasize in analysis the following variables: historical backgrounds in Cuba, distraction classification, distraction phases (latency, distraction and consolidation, indications, contraindications, advantages

  12. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  13. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  14. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Peerooz; Rootman, Jack; Nugent, Robert A.; White, Valerie A.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Koornneef, Leo

    2003-01-01

    To study the natural history and growth of optic nerve sheath meningiomas and evaluate their management outcome. Clinicopathologic retrospective noncomparative case series. A retrospective study of 88 patients who were treated between 1976 and 1999 at the University of British Columbia and the

  15. Proteinose alveolar pulmonar: série de quatro casos Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Thompson

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar a evolução de quatro casos de proteinose alveolar pulmonar atendidos na Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Estadual de Londrina, enfocando a importância da lavagem pulmonar total como tratamento de escolha. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo de quatro pacientes, sendo três do gênero feminino, com idades de 22 a 34 anos, e histórias semelhantes de dispnéia progressiva e tosse seca. O diagnóstico final foi realizado por biópsia pulmonar a céu aberto. A lavagem pulmonar total foi realizada em três pacientes em centro cirúrgico, com anestesia geral e sonda de duplo lúme. RESULTADOS: Um paciente apresentou regressão espontânea da proteinose alveolar pulmonar, não sendo necessária a lavagem pulmonar. Nos outros três casos, o número de lavagens variou: uma única lavagem unilateral com remissão completa do quadro bilateralmente, três lavagens sem melhora significativa e quatro procedimentos intercalados com períodos de melhora. CONCLUSÃO: Constatamos em nossa casuística que a lavagem pulmonar se mostrou eficiente, apesar de alguns pacientes apresentarem certa resistência ao procedimento, enquanto que outros podem ter remissão completa da doença.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to present the evolution of four patients presenting pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and treated at the State University of Londrina School of Medicine. We focus on the importance of whole-lung lavage as the treatment of choice. METHODS: A retrospective study of four patients, three females and one male, 22 to 34 years old, presenting similar histories of progressive dyspnea and dry cough. The final diagnosis was established through open-lung biopsy. Three of the patients underwent whole-lung lavage in the Department of Surgery. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia and using a double-lumen endotracheal tube. RESULTS: One patient presented spontaneous regression of the pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

  16. Spatial patterns of preconsolidation pressure and soil moisture along transects in two directions under coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivoney Gontijo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Information on the spatial structure of soil physical and structural properties is needed to evaluate the soil quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the spatial behavior of preconsolidation pressure and soil moisture in six transects, three selected along and three across coffee rows, at three different sites under different tillage management systems. The study was carried out on a farm, in Patrocinio, state of Minas Gerais, in the Southeast of Brazil (18 º 59 ' 15 '' S; 46 º 56 ' 47 '' W; 934 m asl. The soil type is a typic dystrophic Red Latosol (Acrustox and consists of 780 g kg-1 clay; 110 g kg-1 silt and 110 g kg-1 sand, with an average slope of 3 %. Undisturbed soil cores were sampled at a depth of 0.10-0.13 m, at three different points within the coffee plantation: (a from under the wheel track, where equipment used in farm operations passes; (b in - between tracks and (c under the coffee canopy. Six linear transects were established in the experimental area: three transects along and three across the coffee rows. This way, 161 samples were collected in the transect across the coffee rows, from the three locations, while 117 samples were collected in the direction along the row. The shortest sampling distance in the transect across the row was 4 m, and 0.5 m for the transect along the row. No clear patterns of the preconsolidation pressure values were observed in the 200 m transect. The results of the semivariograms for both variables indicated a high nugget value and short range for the studied parameters of all transects. A cyclic pattern of the parameters was observed for the across-rows transect. An inverse relationship between preconsolidation pressure and soil moisture was clearly observed in the samples from under the track, in both directions.

  17. Salidroside promotes peripheral nerve regeneration based on tissue engineering strategy using Schwann cells and PLGA: in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lv, Peizhen; Zhu, Yongjia; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Fuben; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Salidriside (SDS), a phenylpropanoid glycoside derived from Rhodiola rosea L, has been shown to be neuroprotective in many studies, which may be promising in nerve recovery. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of SDS on engineered nerve constructed by Schwann cells (SCs) and Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were studied in vitro. We further investigated the effect of combinational therapy of SDS and PLGA/SCs based tissue engineering on peripheral nerve regeneration based on the rat model of nerve injury by sciatic transection. The results showed that SDS dramatically enhanced the proliferation and function of SCs. The underlying mechanism may be that SDS affects SCs growth through the modulation of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF and CNTF). 12 weeks after implantation with a 12 mm gap of sciatic nerve injury, SDS-PLGA/SCs achieved satisfying outcomes of nerve regeneration, as evidenced by morphological and functional improvements upon therapy by SDS, PLGA/SCs or direct suture group assessed by sciatic function index, nerve conduction assay, HE staining and immunohistochemical analysis. Our results demonstrated the significant role of introducing SDS into neural tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration.

  18. 17β-Estradiol Promotes Schwann Cell Proliferation and Differentiation, Accelerating Early Remyelination in a Mouse Peripheral Nerve Injury Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen induces oligodendrocyte remyelination in response to demyelination in the central nervous system. Our objective was to determine the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on Schwann cell function and peripheral nerve remyelination after injury. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were used to prepare the sciatic nerve transection injury model and were randomly categorized into control and E2 groups. To study myelination in vitro, dorsal root ganglion (DRG explant culture was prepared using 13.5-day-old mouse embryos. Primary Schwann cells were isolated from the sciatic nerves of 1- to 3-day-old Sprague–Dawley rats. Immunostaining for myelin basic protein (MBP expression and toluidine blue staining for myelin sheaths demonstrated that E2 treatment accelerates early remyelination in the “nerve bridge” region between the proximal and distal stumps of the transection injury site in the mouse sciatic nerve. The 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation assay revealed that E2 promotes Schwann cell proliferation in the bridge region and in the primary culture, which is blocked using AKT inhibitor MK2206. The in vitro myelination in the DRG explant culture determined showed that the MBP expression in the E2-treated group is higher than that in the control group. These results show that E2 promotes Schwann cell proliferation and myelination depending on AKT activation.

  19. Partial pulmonary embolization disrupts alveolarization in fetal sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Stuart B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is closely associated with an arrest of alveolar development and pulmonary capillary dysplasia, it is unknown whether these two features are causally related. To investigate the relationship between pulmonary capillaries and alveolar formation, we partially embolized the pulmonary capillary bed. Methods Partial pulmonary embolization (PPE was induced in chronically catheterized fetal sheep by injection of microspheres into the left pulmonary artery for 1 day (1d PPE; 115d gestational age; GA or 5 days (5d PPE; 110-115d GA. Control fetuses received vehicle injections. Lung morphology, secondary septal crests, elastin, collagen, myofibroblast, PECAM1 and HIF1α abundance and localization were determined histologically. VEGF-A, Flk-1, PDGF-A and PDGF-Rα mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. Results At 130d GA (term ~147d, in embolized regions of the lung the percentage of lung occupied by tissue was increased from 29 ± 1% in controls to 35 ± 1% in 1d PPE and 44 ± 1% in 5d PPE fetuses (p VEGF and Flk-1, although a small increase in PDGF-Rα expression at 116d GA, from 1.00 ± 0.12 in control fetuses to 1.61 ± 0.18 in 5d PPE fetuses may account for impaired differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts and alveolar development. Conclusions PPE impairs alveolarization without adverse systemic effects and is a novel model for investigating the role of pulmonary capillaries and alveolar myofibroblasts in alveolar formation.

  20. Asymmetric [14C]albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, 14 C-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, [ 14 C]albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space

  1. Alveolar ridge sockets preservation with bone grafting--review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Sergio; Koening, Bruno; Allegrini, Marcia Rivellino Facci; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Gedrange, Tomasz; Fanghaenel, Jochen; Lipski, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Alveolar bone seems to play a key role in providing support to the teeth, which are anchored to the bone by desmodontal fibers. The progressive alveolar bone resorption process occurs due to a loss of anatomic, biologic and mechanical factors. Mechanical stimulation of alveolar bone during mastication is crucial in keeping the teeth and underlying bone healthy. Tooth extraction leads to typical bone deficiency of ridge width and height of alveolar crest and reduces the possibility of placing screw titanium implants. When tooth extraction is necessary, trauma should be minimized during the procedure and bone preservation should receive careful attention. The literature has shown that early bone loss can be significantly reduced by socket grafting. The process of socket grafting requires an understanding of wound healing and an appreciation of the biological properties of the products available for socket grafting. Augmentative measures may, thus, be required to guarantee optimal prosthetic replacement of the lost tissue. Success or failure of augmentation procedures is dependent on revascularization and remodelling of the grafted bone into a vital, load bearing bone. In contrast to a visible three-dimensional change, the concept of remodelling refers to the internal turnover of bone, which is a coupled process where osteoclastic resorption and osteoblastic formation are more or less balanced. To restore alveolar bone loss and support efficient placement of dental implants, many different bone substitute such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, synthetic biomaterials and osteoactive agents have been proposed. In order to avoid harvesting an autograft, and thereby eliminating additional surgical procedures and risks, bone grafting materials and substitutes are alternative filler materials to be used for ridge augmentation. To present a literature review about biomaterials applicable in alveolar ridge sockets preservation to future implants insertion. The

  2. CONDUCTO ALVEOLAR INFERIOR. CORRELATO ANATOMO-IMAGENOLOGICO E IMPLICANCIA EN LOS PROCEDIMIENTOS QUIRURGICOS DE MANDIBULA. Inferior alveolar canal. Imaginological anatomical correlation and implication in jaw surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés C Limardo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Las lesiones iatrogénicas del nervio dentario inferior son complicaciones documentadas de diversos procedimientos quirúrgicos en la mandíbula. Debido a ello se justifica una descripción más detallada con referencias morfométricas de dicho conducto, como así también una correlación con imágenes. Materiales y métodos: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo observacional con una muestra de 44 hemimandíbulas secas y 100 tomografías computadas de mandíbulas de pacientes al azar. Se realizaron mediciones del foramen mandibular y mentoniano con respecto a bordes mandibulares. Se hicieron cortes en la rama y el cuerpo con sus respectivas mediciones. Se utilizaron Tomografías Computadas Cone Beam 3D de 100 pacientes las cuales fueron procesadas por el programa Compudent Navigator 3D®. Utilizando este programa se pudieron realizar las mismas mediciones que en los preparados anatómicos, como así también la reconstrucción del conducto. En una segunda etapa se realizó una correlación entre los valores morfométricos del estudio anatómico y se comparó con los estudios por imágenes (TC con reconstrucción 3D Dental Scan. Resultados: Se expresaron en tablas con diversas variables. Discusión: Los textos clásicos de anatomía y los libros de cirugía de la especialidad describen en detalle el recorrido y las relaciones del CAI, y presentan datos morfométricos pero no lo hacen en poblaciones locales. Como conclusión podemos afirmar que, tomando como punto de partida la anatomía y correlacionándola con la imagenologia, podemos llegar a evitar lesiones del nervio alveolar inferior en el transcurso de diversos procedimientos realizados en la mandíbula. Introduction: Iatrogenic inferior alveolar nerve injuries are documented complications of different surgical procedures in the jaw. It should justify a more detailed description with morphometric references of the duct and a correlation with images. Materials and method: A

  3. Comparação do nível álgico no bloqueio do nervo alveolar inferior através de duas técnicas distintas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marcos Rodrigues de ARAGÃO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blockade of the inferior alveolar nerve is among the most used and important anesthesia in dentistry, but there are no studies that compare the electronic anesthesia (Morpheus and traditional manual anesthesia, using a syringe Carpule. Objective To evaluate and compare two anesthesia systems with respect to pain sensitivity during and after anesthesia with lidocaine 2% associated with epinephrine 1: 100,000 in anesthetic techniques for inferior alveolar nerve. Material and method This clinical trial was performed in a randomized, crossover, double-blind, involving 30 volunteers, who required dental treatment and who underwent blockade of the lower alveolar nerve, using the syringe type Carpule in the first session and the gun controlled speed Morpheus, where it was held in two sessions, with an interval of at least two weeks between each session. At the end of each session was applied to Visual Analogue Scale (VAS to assess pain sensitivity to injection. Result A comparison between the conventional methods revealed that induce showed higher values than the EVA Morpheus. The chi -square for expected equal proportions showed that the technique with Morpheus had a higher (p = 0.0062 preference than conventional. Conclusion Taken together, the data show that the technique employing the Morpheus was superior to conventional in 3 times. The implementation of anesthesia performed with Morpheus proved to be more comfortable, have greater acceptance and preference for volunteers.

  4. A Ligurian (Western Mediterranean Sea) geophysical transect revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrucci, I.; Nercessian, A.; Béthoux, N.; Mauffret, A.; Pascal, G.

    2001-07-01

    Data from a new deep-penetration seismic reflection line (LISA cruise 1995), onland seismic recording (LISA) and marine ESPs (expanding spread profiles, CROC II cruise 1981) are integrated to study the crustal structure of the north Ligurian basin. The correlation of these different seismic data, located along an Antibes-Ile Rousse transect, provides accurate information on the nature of the crust. On the Provençal margin, the multichannel seismic (MCS) profile LISA01 shows a major step in the basement. This structure is associated with a crustal change, corresponding to the ocean boundary. On the Corsica margin, we do not observe such a structure and the ocean boundary is constrained by magnetic anomalies. These anomalies are identical to those observed on the Provençal margin above the main basement structure. On the MCS line, the Messinian salt and the bottom water multiple obscure the crustal image below 7s two-way traveltime (TWTT). Nevertheless, the ESPs provide information about the crust below 7s TWTT. These ESPs were reprocessed and analysed by matching traveltime and amplitude variations in the X-T and τ-p domains. The main result is the identification of a transitional zone on the continental margin (Provençal and Corsica margin) characterized by a layer with velocities of 7.2-7.3kms-1 in the lower crust. Recordings from land stations on the Corsica margin define the geometry of this layer. In the centre of the basin, the oceanic crust is about 6km thick. From the Corsica margin to the centre of the basin, the Moho depth decreases from 18 to 13km. The velocity model deduced from offshore data is consistent with the ESP velocity model and MCS line LISA01. The combined analysis of these data allows us to propose a new boundary of the oceanic crust in the north Ligurian basin.

  5. Aerobic Methane Oxidation in Alaskan Lakes Along a Latitudinal Transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, K. C.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Anthony, P.; Thalasso, F.

    2013-12-01

    Karla Martinez-Cruz* **, Armando Sepulveda-Jauregui*, Katey M. Walter Anthony*, Peter Anthony*, and Frederic Thalasso**. * Water and Environmental Research Center, Institute of Northern Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska. ** Biotechnology and Bioengineering Department, Cinvestav, Mexico city, D. F., Mexico. Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, after carbon dioxide and water vapor. Boreal lakes play an important role in the current global warming by contributing as much as 6% of global atmospheric CH4 sources annually. On the other hand, aerobic methane oxidation (methanotrophy) in lake water is a fundamental process in global methane cycling that reduces the amount of CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Several environmental factors affect aerobic methane oxidation in the water column both directly and indirectly, including concentration of CH4 and O2, temperature and carbon budgets of lakes. We analyzed the potential of aerobic methane oxidation (PMO) rates in incubations of water collected from 30 Alaskan lakes along a north-south transect during winter and summer 2011. Our findings showed an effect of CH4 and O2 concentrations, temperature and yedoma thawing permafrost on PMO activity in the lake water. The highest PMO rates were observed in summer by lakes situated on thawing yedoma permafrost, most of them located in the interior of Alaska. We also estimated that 60-80% of all CH4 produced in Alaskan lakes could be taken up by methanotrophs in the lake water column, showing the significant influence of aerobic methane oxidation of boreal lakes to the global CH4 budget.

  6. The PLOT (Paleolimnological Transect) Project in the Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromig, R.; Andreev, A.; Baumer, M.; Bolshiyanov, D.; Fedorov, G.; Frolova, L.; Krastel, S.; Lebas, E.; Ludikova, A.; Melles, M.; Meyer, H.; Nazarova, L.; Pestryakova, L.; Savelieva, L.; Shumilovskikh, L.; Subetto, D.; Wagner, B.; Wennrich, V.

    2017-12-01

    The joint Russian- German project 'PLOT - Paleolimnological Transec' aims to recover lake sediment sequences along a >6000 km long longitudinal transect across the Eurasian Arctic in order to investigate the Late Quaternary climatic and environmental history. The climate history of the Arctic is of particular interest since it is the region, which is experiencing major impact of the current climate change. The project is funded for three years (2015-2018) by the Russian and German Ministries of Research. Since 2013 extensive fieldwork, including seismic surveys, coring, and hydrological investigations, was carried out at lakes Ladoga (NW Russia, pilot study), Bolshoye Shuchye (Polar Urals), Emanda (Verkhoyansk Range, field campaign planned for August 2017), Levinson-Lessing and Taymyr (Taymyr Peninsula). Fieldwork at lakes Bolshoye Shuchye, Levinson-Lessing and Taymyr was conducted in collaboration with the Russian-Norwegian CHASE (Climate History along the Arctic Seaboard of Eurasia) project. A major objective of the PLOT project was to recover preglacial sediments. A multiproxy approach was applied to the analytical work of all cores, including (bio-)geochemical, sedimentological, geophysical, and biological analyses. First data implies the presence of preglacial sediments in the cores from all lakes so far visited. Age-depth models, based on radiocarbon dating, OSL dating, paleomagnetic measurements, identification of cryptotephra, and varve counting (where applicable), are in progress. Climate variability in the records shall be compared to that recorded at Lake Eĺgygytgyn (NE Russia), which represents the master record for the Siberian Arctic. The outcome of the PLOT project will be a better understanding of the temporal and spatial variability and development of the Arctic climate. Here, we present the major results and first key interpretations of the PLOT project, along with an outlook on the future strategy and foci. First results from lakes Ladoga

  7. NFκB signaling in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M. Cleary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS is a pediatric soft tissue cancer commonly associated with a chromosomal translocation that leads to the expression of a Pax3:Foxo1 or Pax7:Foxo1 fusion protein, the developmental underpinnings of which may give clues to its therapeutic approaches. In aRMS, the NFκB–YY1–miR-29 regulatory circuit is dysregulated, resulting in repression of miR-29 and loss of the associated tumor suppressor activity. To further elucidate the role of NFκB in aRMS, we first tested 55 unique sarcoma cell lines and primary cell cultures in a large-scale chemical screen targeting diverse molecular pathways. We found that pharmacological inhibition of NFκB activity resulted in decreased cell proliferation of many of the aRMS tumor cultures. Surprisingly, mice that were orthotopically allografted with aRMS tumor cells exhibited no difference in tumor growth when administered an NFκB inhibitor, compared to control. Furthermore, inhibition of NFκB by genetically ablating its activating kinase inhibitor, IKKβ, by conditional deletion in a mouse model harboring the Pax3:Foxo1 chimeric oncogene failed to abrogate spontaneous tumor growth. Genetically engineered mice with conditionally deleted IKKβ exhibited a paradoxical decrease in tumor latency compared with those with active NFκB. However, using a synthetic-lethal approach, primary cell cultures derived from tumors with inactivated NFκB showed sensitivity to the BCL-2 inhibitor navitoclax. When used in combination with an NFκB inhibitor, navitoclax was synergistic in decreasing the growth of both human and IKKβ wild-type mouse aRMS cells, indicating that inactivation of NFκB alone may not be sufficient for reducing tumor growth, but, when combined with another targeted therapeutic, may be clinically beneficial.

  8. Regenerated Sciatic Nerve Axons Stimulated through a Chronically Implanted Macro-Sieve Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Zellmer, Erik R; Wheeler, Jesse J; Burton, Harold; Moran, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Sieve electrodes provide a chronic interface for stimulating peripheral nerve axons. Yet, successful utilization requires robust axonal regeneration through the implanted electrode. The present study determined the effect of large transit zones in enhancing axonal regeneration and revealed an intimate neural interface with an implanted sieve electrode. Fabrication of the polyimide sieve electrodes employed sacrificial photolithography. The manufactured macro-sieve electrode (MSE) contained nine large transit zones with areas of ~0.285 mm 2 surrounded by eight Pt-Ir metallized electrode sites. Prior to implantation, saline, or glial derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) was injected into nerve guidance silicone-conduits with or without a MSE. The MSE assembly or a nerve guidance conduit was implanted between transected ends of the sciatic nerve in adult male Lewis rats. At 3 months post-operation, fiber counts were similar through both implant types. Likewise, stimulation of nerves regenerated through a MSE or an open silicone conduit evoked comparable muscle forces. These results showed that nerve regeneration was comparable through MSE transit zones and an open conduit. GDNF had a minimal positive effect on the quality and morphology of fibers regenerating through the MSE; thus, the MSE may reduce reliance on GDNF to augment axonal regeneration. Selective stimulation of several individual muscles was achieved through monopolar stimulation of individual electrodes sites suggesting that the MSE might be an optimal platform for functional neuromuscular stimulation.

  9. Preliminary investigation on use of high-resolution optical coherence tomography to monitor injury and repair in the rat sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebicki, Cara A; Lee, Alice D; Jung, Woonggyu; Li, Hongrui; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J

    2010-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used in limited settings to study peripheral nerve injury. The purpose of the study is to determine whether high-resolution OCT can be used to monitor nerve injury and regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve following crush injury, ligation, and transection with microsurgical repair. Forty-five rats were segregated into three groups. The right sciatic nerve was suture ligated (n = 15), cut then microsurgically repaired (n = 15), or crushed (n = 15). The left sciatic nerve served as the control; only surgical exposure and skin closure were performed. Each group was further divided into three subgroups where they were assigned survival durations of 4, 15, or 24 weeks. Following euthanasia, nerves were harvested, fixed in formalin, and imaged at the injury site, as well as proximal and distal ends. The OCT system resolution was approximately 7 microm in tissue with a 1,060 nm central wavelength. Control (uninjured) nerve tissue showed homogenous signal distribution to a relatively uniform depth; in contrast, damaged nerves showed irregular signal distribution and intensity. Changes in signal distribution were most significant at the injury site and distal regions. Increases in signal irregularity were evident during longer recovery times. Histological analysis determined that OCT imaging was limited to the surrounding perineurium and scar tissue. OCT has the potential to be a valuable tool for monitoring nerve injury and repair, and the changes that accompany wound healing, providing clinicians with a non-invasive tool to treat nerve injuries. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  11. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. (Royal Free Hospital, London (England))

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  12. Hypocapnic but Not Metabolic Alkalosis Impairs Alveolar Fluid Reabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrianthefs, Pavlos M.; Briva, Arturo; Lecuona, Emilia; Dumasius, Vidas; Rutschman, David H.; Ridge, Karen M.; Baltopoulos, George J.; Sznajder, Jacob Iasha

    2005-01-01

    Acid-base disturbances, such as metabolic or respiratory alkalosis, are relatively common in critically ill patients. We examined the effects of alkalosis (hypocapnic or metabolic alkalosis) on alveolar fluid reabsorption in the isolated and continuously perfused rat lung model. We found that alveolar fluid reabsorption after 1 hour was impaired by low levels of CO2 partial pressure (PCO2; 10 and 20 mm Hg) independent of pH levels (7.7 or 7.4). In addition, PCO2 higher than 30 mm Hg or metabolic alkalosis did not have an effect on this process. The hypocapnia-mediated decrease of alveolar fluid reabsorption was associated with decreased Na,K-ATPase activity and protein abundance at the basolateral membranes of distal airspaces. The effect of low PCO2 on alveolar fluid reabsorption was reversible because clearance normalized after correcting the PCO2 back to normal levels. These data suggest that hypocapnic but not metabolic alkalosis impairs alveolar fluid reabsorption. Conceivably, correction of hypocapnic alkalosis in critically ill patients may contribute to the normalization of lung ability to clear edema. PMID:15764729

  13. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh A. Seifeldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate (CL/P is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material.

  14. Electro-acupuncture promotes survival, differentiation of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as well as functional recovery in the spinal cord-transected rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying; Yan, Qing; Ruan, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Li, Yan; Dong, Hongxin; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the potential tools for treatment of the spinal cord injury; however, the survival and differentiation of MSCs in an injured spinal cord still need to be improved. In the present study, we investigated whether Governor Vessel electro-acupuncture (EA) could efficiently promote bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) survival and differentiation, axonal regeneration and finally, functional recovery in the transected spinal cord. Results The spinal cords of adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were completely transected at T10, five experimental groups were performed: 1. sham operated control (Sham-control); 2. operated control (Op-control); 3. electro-acupuncture treatment (EA); 4. MSCs transplantation (MSCs); and 5. MSCs transplantation combined with electro-acupuncture (MSCs+EA). After 2-8 weeks of MSCs transplantation plus EA treatment, we found that the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), cAMP level, the differentiation of MSCs, the 5-HT positive and CGRP positive nerve fibers in the lesion site and nearby tissue of injured spinal cord were significantly increased in the MSCs+EA group as compared to the group of the MSCs transplantation or the EA treated alone. Furthermore, behavioral test and spinal cord evoked potentials detection demonstrated a significantly functional recovery in the MSCs +EA group. Conclusion These results suggest that EA treatment may promote grafted MSCs survival and differentiation; MSCs transplantation combined with EA treatment could promote axonal regeneration and partial locomotor functional recovery in the transected spinal cord in rats and indicate a promising avenue of treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:19374777

  15. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  16. SAFARI 2000 AOT and Column Water Vapor, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The data presented here include the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and column water vapor measurements taken at sites along the Kalahari Transect using a...

  17. Benthic data from rapid assessment transects, 2001-2004, in the Hawaiian Islands (NODC Accession 0002464)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of CRAMP Rapid Assessment Transect surveys taken in 2001-2004 and includes quantitative estimates of substrate type and species. The types and...

  18. Marine geophysical studies along a transect across the continental margin off Bombay coast, west of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.; Ramana, M.V.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Ramprasad, T.

    Study of underway geophysical data along a transect of 415 km across the continental margin off Bombay, (Maharashtra, India), between 800 and 3600 m water depths reveals seven seismic sequences consisting of parallel and continuous wavy reflections...

  19. SAFARI 2000 Stem and Canopy Characterization, Kalahari Transect, 1995-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides species distribution, basal area, height, and crown cover of woody stems at 10 sites along the Kalahari Transect where a large gradient in...

  20. SAFARI 2000 Stem and Canopy Characterization, Kalahari Transect, 1995-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides species distribution, basal area, height, and crown cover of woody stems at 10 sites along the Kalahari Transect where a large...

  1. SWFSC/MMTD/ETP: Stenella Abundance Research - Line Transect and Ecosystem (STAR-LITE) 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Stenella Abundance Research Line Transect and Ecosystem (STAR-LITE) cruise is a process-oriented research project related to survey methodologies.

  2. SAFARI 2000 LAI Measurements at Kalahari Transect Sites, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign from March 3rd to March 18th,...

  3. SAFARI 2000 LAI Measurements at Kalahari Transect Sites, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign from March 3rd to March...

  4. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diffuse bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzolo, W; Zuliani, D; Pogliani, E; Caniatti, M; Bussadori, C

    2002-06-01

    An eight-year-old female German wirehaired pointer was presented with signs of respiratory distress. Clinical examination, laboratory results, thoracic radiography and echocardiography indicated the presence of a diffuse interstitial lung disease with secondary appropriate erythrocytosis, pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. Transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy of the lung suggested malignant epithelial neoplasia. A primary lung cancer with an unusually diffuse distribution of miliary/micronodular lesions was found at postmortem examination. Histological diagnosis was bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma. Bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma can occasionally occur in a diffuse fashion involving most or all of the lung parenchyma. In man, diffuse bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma is considered a great imitator of other, more common diffuse interstitial forms of lung disease. This case report indicates that it is also a differential diagnosis to consider in dogs.

  6. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  7. Bone resorption and complications in alveolar distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Tobias; Gerlach, Till; Schüsselbauer, Thomas; Gosau, Martin; Reichert, Torsten E; Driemel, Oliver

    2010-10-01

    Distraction osteogenesis presents an alternative procedure for augmentation of atrophic alveolar bone prior to inserting dental implants. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate complications of this method with specific focus on bone resorption during the consolidation period and the follow-up period after dental implant insertion into distracted bone. Thirty partially edentulous patients underwent a total of 36 vertical alveolar distractions with an extraosseous distraction system. Eleven devices were placed in the maxilla and 25 in the mandible. Eighty-two dental implants were inserted after a mean consolidation period of 4.5 months. Treatment results were evaluated by means of panoramic radiographs for distraction follow-up and periapical radiographs for implant follow-up. The mean length of the transport segment was 19 mm. The average alveolar height achieved was 6.4 mm with a mean resorption of 1.8 mm (21.1%) at the time of dental implant insertion. Main problems comprised oral displacement of the transport segment (n = 15) and inadequate soft tissue extension (n = 13). Eighty-two dental implants were inserted with an overall survival rate of 95.1% after 45.8 months. For periimplant marginal bone, an average resorption of 3.5 mm was recorded 50.4 months after implant insertion. Although alveolar distraction osteogenesis seems to be an effective tool to treat vertical defects of the alveolar ridge, it is not an uncomplicated procedure. A combination with vestibular augmentation of autogenous bone grafts should be considered. Overcorrection of 20% may compensate bone relapse during the consolidation period of the distracted alveolar bone. Further bone resorption after dental implantation is common.

  8. Alveolar bone width preservation after decoronation of ankylosed anterior incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Schwarz-Arad, Dvorah; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the alteration of alveolar ridge dimensions after decoronation procedures in children and adolescents at least 1 year after surgery. Twelve children who underwent decoronation of ankylosed maxillary anterior incisors with at least 1 year after surgery follow-up were recalled for reevaluation. All decoronations were performed when the ankylosed teeth were submerged 1-1.5 mm. During the recall appointment, impressions of the upper arch were obtained. The bucco-palatal alveolar dimensions of the decoronated teeth were measured on the cast at the mid-mesiodistal distance from the missing tooth and were compared with the distance from the contralateral healthy incisor. Overall, 12 children (9 male and 3 female) were reevaluated up to 82 months after decoronation (mean, 49.58 ± 24 months). The mean age of the patients at the time of trauma was 9.83 ± 2.8 years. The average bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge at the mid-decoronation area was 9 ± 1 mm compared with 10.17 ± 0.9 mm at the contralateral homologous tooth (difference of 1.67 ± 1.12, P = .004). The findings show a positive statistical correlation between the duration of the follow-up period and the bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge (P = .027). Although decoronation of ankylosed young permanent incisors resulted in a decrease in the bucco-palatal dimension with time, it did not prevent additional alveolar growth that occurs with age in a developing child and thus may help maintain the alveolar bone ridge width, height, and continuity and assist in future rehabilitation with less invasive ridge augmentation procedures required for implant placement. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The mental foramen and nerve: clinical and anatomical factors related to dental implant placement: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Gary; Tarnow, Dennis

    2006-12-01

    The mental foramen is a strategically important landmark during osteotomy procedures. Its location and the possibility that an anterior loop of the mental nerve may be present mesial to the mental foramen needs to be considered before implant surgery to avoid mental nerve injury. Articles that addressed the position, number, and size of the mental foramen, mental nerve anatomy, and consequences of nerve damage were evaluated for information pertinent to clinicians performing implant dentistry. The mental foramen may be oval or round and is usually located apical to the second mandibular premolar or between apices of the premolars. However, its location can vary from the mandibular canine to the first molar. The foramen may not appear on conventional radiographs, and linear measurements need to be adjusted to account for radiographic distortion. Computerized tomography (CT) scans are more accurate for detecting the mental foramen than conventional radiographs. There are discrepancies between studies regarding the prevalence and length of the loop of the mental nerve mesial to the mental foramen. Furthermore, investigations that compared radiographic and cadaveric dissection data with respect to identifying the anterior loop reported that radiographic assessments result in a high percentage of false-positive and -negatives findings. Sensory dysfunction due to nerve damage in the foraminal area can occur if the inferior alveolar or mental nerve is damaged during preparation of an osteotomy. To avoid nerve injury during surgery in the foraminal area, guidelines were developed based on the literature with respect to verifying the position of the mental foramen and validating the presence of an anterior loop of the mental nerve. These guidelines included leaving a 2 mm zone of safety between an implant and the coronal aspect of the nerve; observation of the inferior alveolar nerve and mental foramen on panoramic and periapical films prior to implant placement; use of CT

  10. Proximal alveolar bone loss in a longitudinal radiographic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, A.; Lavstedt, S.; Henrikson, C.O.; Frithiof, L.

    1986-01-01

    The difference in proximal alveolar bone height between 1970 and 1980, the ''ABD index'', has been measured longitudinally in radiographs from an unselected material. The group constitutes 406 individuals born in 1904 - 1952 in the county of Stockholm. 13 of 18 predictors determined in 1970 were significantly related to the ABD index in the simple correlation analyses. The predictor ''the alveolar bone loss 1970'' (ABL index 1970) had the strongest correlation to the ABD index. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis the predictor ABL index 1970 and three other predictors reached significant levels. These were age, number of lost teeth and Russell's Periodontal Index

  11. Postextraction alveolar ridge preservation: biological basis and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagni, Giorgio; Pellegrini, Gaia; Giannobile, William V; Rasperini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Following tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge undergoes an inevitable remodeling process that influences implant therapy of the edentulous area. Socket grafting is a commonly adopted therapy for the preservation of alveolar bone structures in combination or not with immediate implant placement although the biological bases lying behind this treatment modality are not fully understood and often misinterpreted. This review is intended to clarify the literature support to socket grafting in order to provide practitioners with valid tools to make a conscious decision of when and why to recommend this therapy.

  12. Repopulation of denuded tracheal grafts with alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Repopulation of denuded heterotopic tracheal grafts with populations of specific epithelial cell types is one approach to study the differentiation potential of various cell types. This technique has been adopted to delineate the differentiation pathways of alveolar type II cells isolated from rat lungs. Under the conditions of this experiment, the reestablished epithelial lining was alveolar-like, however, ultrastructural analysis of the cells showed them to be like Clara cells. These preliminary results suggest that the secretary cells of the lung parenchyma and terminal airways may share a common ancestry. (author)

  13. Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients......Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients...

  14. Secondary bone grafting for alveolar cleft in children with cleft lip or cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, Q.; Wu, G.; Deacon, S.A.; Chen, J.; Hu, H.; Zou, S.; Ye, Q.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary alveolar bone grafting has been widely used to reconstruct alveolar cleft. However, there is still some controversy. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness and safety of different secondary bone grafting methods. SEARCH STRATEGY: The final electronic and handsearches were

  15. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  16. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-12-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  17. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  18. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D₃ improves myelination and recovery after nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Chabas

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated i that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2 increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i to assess which form - ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol - and which dose were the most efficient and ii to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle, and compared to unlesioned rats (Control. Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day, cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral

  19. Allotransplanted neurons used to repair peripheral nerve injury do not elicit overt immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Liu

    Full Text Available A major problem hindering the development of autograft alternatives for repairing peripheral nerve injuries is immunogenicity. We have previously shown successful regeneration in transected rat sciatic nerves using conduits filled with allogeneic dorsal root ganglion (DRG cells without any immunosuppression. In this study, we re-examined the immunogenicity of our DRG neuron implanted conduits as a potential strategy to overcome transplant rejection. A biodegradable NeuraGen® tube was infused with pure DRG neurons or Schwann cells cultured from a rat strain differing from the host rats and used to repair 8 mm gaps in the sciatic nerve. We observed enhanced regeneration with allogeneic cells compared to empty conduits 16 weeks post-surgery, but morphological analyses suggest recovery comparable to the healthy nerves was not achieved. The degree of regeneration was indistinguishable between DRG and Schwann cell allografts although immunogenicity assessments revealed substantially increased presence of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ in Schwann cell allografts compared to the DRG allografts by two weeks post-surgery. Macrophage infiltration of the regenerated nerve graft in the DRG group 16 weeks post-surgery was below the level of the empty conduit (0.56 fold change from NG; p<0.05 while the Schwann cell group revealed significantly higher counts (1.29 fold change from NG; p<0.001. Major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I molecules were present in significantly increased levels in the DRG and Schwann cell allograft groups compared to the hollow NG conduit and the Sham healthy nerve. Our results confirmed previous studies that have reported Schwann cells as being immunogenic, likely due to MHC I expression. Nerve gap injuries are difficult to repair; our data suggest that DRG neurons are superior medium to implant inside conduit tubes due to reduced immunogenicity and represent a potential treatment strategy that could be preferable to the current gold

  20. Neurological complications in thyroid surgery: a surgical point of view on laryngeal nerves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMANUELA eVARALDO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified,the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a

  1. Development of regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces for motor control of neuroprosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Stephen W. P.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Cederna, Paul S.

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries suffered during amputation commonly results in debilitating neuropathic pain in the affected limb. Modern prosthetic technologies allow for intuitive, simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom. However, these state-of-the-art devices require separate, independent control signals for each degree of freedom, which is currently not possible. As a result, amputees reject up to 75% of myoelectric devices preferring instead to use body-powered artificial limbs which offer subtle sensory feedback. Without meaningful and intuitive sensory feedback, even the most advanced myoelectric prostheses remain insensate, burdensome, and are associated with enormous cognitive demand and mental fatigue. The ideal prosthetic device is one which is capable of providing intuitive somatosensory feedback essential for interaction with the environment. Critical to the design of such a bioprosthetic device is the development of a reliable biologic interface between human and machine. This ideal patient-prosthetic interface allows for transmission of both afferent somatosensory information and efferent motor signals for a closed-loop feedback system of neural control. Our lab has developed the Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interface (RPNI) as a biologic nerve interface designed for stable integration of a prosthetic device with transected peripheral nerves in a residual limb. The RPNI is constructed by surgically implanting the distal end of a transected peripheral nerve into an autogenous muscle graft. Animal experiments in our lab have shown recording of motor signals from RPNI's implanted into both rodents and monkeys. Here, we achieve high amplitude EMG signals with a high signal to noise (SNR) ratio.

  2. Acute changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local clearance of 125I from the periodontal ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwall, B.; Berg, J.O.; Gazelius, B.; Edwall, L.; Aars, H.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local 125 I clearance from the periodontal ligament (PDL) were monitored simultaneously in cats. Axial tooth movements, reflecting periodontal ligament volume changes, were measured with an ultrasonic transit time technique. Local blood flow changes in the PDL were studied indirectly by measuring the local clearance of 125 I. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk caused an intrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant reduction of the 125 I-clearance. Infusion of noradrenaline induced a similar respone. Stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve during systemic treatment with phentolamine caused an extrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant increase in the clearance of the tracer from the PDL. Intra-arterial infusion of the vasodilator substance P mimicked that response. Fization of the tooth to the jaw bone, thus preventing an intrusive movement, did not change the reductions in clearance seen on sympathetic stimulation, indicating that this blood flow reduction was not dependent on tooth movement. A qualitative relation between PDL blood flow (as measured by local 125 I clearance) and PDL volume (as measured by tooth position) in shown. The two variables measured are suggested to reflect two aspects of blood flow in the PDL

  3. The "Tracked Roaming Transect" and distance sampling methods increase the efficiency of underwater visual censuses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo J Irigoyen

    Full Text Available Underwater visual census (UVC is the most common approach for estimating diversity, abundance and size of reef fishes in shallow and clear waters. Abundance estimation through UVC is particularly problematic in species occurring at low densities and/or highly aggregated because of their high variability at both spatial and temporal scales. The statistical power of experiments involving UVC techniques may be increased by augmenting the number of replicates or the area surveyed. In this work we present and test the efficiency of an UVC method based on diver towed GPS, the Tracked Roaming Transect (TRT, designed to maximize transect length (and thus the surveyed area with respect to diving time invested in monitoring, as compared to Conventional Strip Transects (CST. Additionally, we analyze the effect of increasing transect width and length on the precision of density estimates by comparing TRT vs. CST methods using different fixed widths of 6 and 20 m (FW3 and FW10, respectively and the Distance Sampling (DS method, in which perpendicular distance of each fish or group of fishes to the transect line is estimated by divers up to 20 m from the transect line. The TRT was 74% more time and cost efficient than the CST (all transect widths considered together and, for a given time, the use of TRT and/or increasing the transect width increased the precision of density estimates. In addition, since with the DS method distances of fishes to the transect line have to be estimated, and not measured directly as in terrestrial environments, errors in estimations of perpendicular distances can seriously affect DS density estimations. To assess the occurrence of distance estimation errors and their dependence on the observer's experience, a field experiment using wooden fish models was performed. We tested the precision and accuracy of density estimators based on fixed widths and the DS method. The accuracy of the estimates was measured comparing the actual

  4. Nerve cross-bridging to enhance nerve regeneration in a rat model of delayed nerve repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    Full Text Available There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1 CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2 CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE, respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays.

  5. A novel semi-automatic segmentation protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Nard G.; Schreurs, Ruud; Bittermann, Gerhard K.P.; Borstlap, Wilfred A.; Koole, Ronald; Meijer, Gert J.; Maal, Thomas J.J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures is presented. Eleven cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) datasets of patients who underwent secondary alveolar cleft reconstructive surgery for a unilateral alveolar cleft were evaluated by two investigators. Residual

  6. A novel semi-automatic segmentation protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, N.G.; Schreurs, R.; Bittermann, G.K.P.; Borstlap, W.A.; Koole, R.A.; Meijer, G.J.; Maal, T.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures is presented. Eleven cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) datasets of patients who underwent secondary alveolar cleft reconstructive surgery for a unilateral alveolar cleft were evaluated by two investigators. Residual

  7. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rennis Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia.

  8. Common peroneal nerve entrapment with the communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatic nerve divides into tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve at the level of superior angle of popliteal fossa and variations in its branching pattern are common. The most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the lower limbs is common peroneal nerve entrapment at fibular head. Invariably it can also be trapped in ...

  9. Aplasia of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel C W; Man, Eric M W; Cheng, Sunny C S

    2015-08-01

    Aplasia of the optic nerve is an extraordinarily rare congenital anomaly that affects one or both optic nerves and is associated with the absence of the central retinal vessel and retinal ganglion cells. We report a case of unilateral optic nerve aplasia in a 4-month-old infant who was found to have left microphthalmos on routine postnatal checkup. Family history, antenatal history, and systemic evaluation were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging showed absent left optic nerve with left microphthalmos. The optic chiasm was present and slightly deviated towards the right side. The remaining cerebral and ocular structures were normal.

  10. Physical properties of rabbit articular cartilage after transection of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, R L; Yang, A S; Chen, A C; Hant, J J; Halili, R B; Yoshioka, M; Amiel, D; Coutts, R D

    1997-03-01

    The effect of unilateral transection of the anterior cruciate ligament on the confined compression and swelling properties of the distal femoral articular cartilage of skeletally mature rabbits at 9 weeks after surgery was determined. Gross morphological grading of the transected and contralateral control distal femora stained with India ink confirmed that cartilage degeneration had been induced by ligament transection. Osteochondral cores, 1.8 mm in diameter, were harvested from the medial femoral condyles. The modulus, permeability, and electrokinetic (streaming potential) coefficient of the articular cartilage of the osteochondral cores were assessed by confined compression creep experiments. The properties (mean +/- SD) of control cartilage were: confined compression modulus, 0.75 +/- 0.28 MPa; hydraulic permeability, 0.63 +/- 0.28 x 10(-15) m2/Pa*sec; and electrokinetic coefficient, 0.16 +/- 0.31 x 10(-9) V/Pa. In transected knees, the modulus was reduced by 18% (p = 0.04), while the permeability and electrokinetic coefficient were not detectably altered. The change in modulus was accompanied by a trend (p = 0.07) toward a decrease (-11%) in the glycosaminoglycan density within the tissue, a significant increase (p < 0.001) in the water content of the cartilage after equilibration in 1 x phosphate buffered saline from 70.3 +/- 4.1% in control knees to 75.2 +/- 4.0% in transected knees, and little further swelling after tissue equilibration in hypotonic saline. The compressive modulus of the cartilage from both control and transected knees was positively correlated with the density of tissue glycosaminoglycan. The alterations in the physical properties of the articular cartilage after transection of the anterior cruciate ligament in the rabbit show trends similar to those observed in human and other animal models of osteoarthritis and provide further support for the use of this model in the study of cartilage degeneration.

  11. Autochthonous human alveolar echinococcosis in a Hungarian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsényi, Balázs; Strausz, Tamás; Makrai, Zita; Csomor, Judit; Danka, József; Kern, Peter; Rezza, Giovanni; Barth, Thomas F E; Casulli, Adriano

    2017-02-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a zoonotic parasitic disease causing a severe clinical condition and is known as the most deadly of all helminth infections. Moreover, this disease is also an increasing concern in Northern and Eastern Europe due to its spread in the wildlife animal host. An asymptomatic 70-year-old woman from south-western Hungary was diagnosed with multiple liver lesions. Imaging techniques (ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging), serology (ELISA, indirect hemagglutination and Western blot), and conventional staining methods (hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff) were used for the detection of the disease. A histopathological re-evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin block by immunohistochemical staining with the monoclonal antibody Em2G11 definitively confirmed the diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed autochthonous case of human alveolar echinococcosis in Hungary. To what extent diagnostic difficulties may contribute to underestimate this zoonosis in Eastern Europe is unknown. Differential diagnosis with alveolar echinococcosis should be considered for patients with multiple, tumor-like cystic lesions of the liver, in countries where this parasite is emerging.

  12. Three‑dimensional Evaluation of Alveolar Bone Thickness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... mandibular anterior teeth are going to be retracted, mechanics for torque control should be preferred not to have uncontrolled tipping. In Class I, light orthodontic forces should be applied using elastic arch wires, and time must be allowed for the remodeling and healing of the alveolar bone in these patient ...

  13. Advanced Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Uterus: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma is an uncommon malignant soft tissue tumour rarely found in the female genital tract and carries a very poor prognosis especially in adults. A 44 year old premenopausal woman was evaluated for a lower abdominal mass, intermittent unprovoked vaginal bleeding and weight loss. Examination ...

  14. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: origin and prognostic implications of molecular findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Eguía-Aguilar

    2016-11-01

    The aggressive behavior of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma has been associated with the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins resulting from chromosomal translocations, particularly t(2;13 (q35;q14 PAX3/FOXO1, and t(1;13 (p36;q14 PAX7/FOXO1 which were present in this patient.

  15. Complications in alveolar distraction osteogenesis of the atrophic mandible.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdijk, F.B.T.; Meijer, G.J.; Strijen, P.J. van; Koole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the starting point for placement of dental implants, 45 patients suffering from atrophied edentulous mandibles, with a vertical height varying between 7.3 and 15.8mm, were treated by alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis (VDO). The mean follow-up period was 3 years, ranging from 1 to

  16. Alveolar pulmonary proteinosis: case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, Erika; Saenz, Alberto; Ojeda, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    We describe the case of a young women with primary alveolar proteinosis, with a short period of symptoms that are uncommon for this disease, without risk factors for this entity, the clinical evolution of the patient and some complications with the treatment. We review the literature for this entity.

  17. Alveolar Bone Housing- A Modified Wilkodontics Approach- A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Awasthi, Eshan; Sanjay, Kothamachu; Bhongade, ML; Shrivastav, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated orthodontic treatment is the need of the hour in current scenario as the conventional orthodontics is time taking. Corticotomy assisted orthodontics have been used for years to reduce the treatment duration by reducing the resistance provided by alveolar bone housing.

  18. Three‑dimensional evaluation of alveolar bone thickness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of this randomized study was to compare the alveolar bone thickness (ABT) of the mandibular incisor teeth of dental and skeletal Class I, II, and III adult patients at labial and lingual aspects of the bone and develop recommendations for the associated movements of teeth in this region, taking vertical facial type ...

  19. Alveolar ridge augmentation in rats by Bio-Oss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine if Bio-Oss initiated osteoinduction or osteoconduction when implanted into rats. Sintered and unsintered granules of the anorganic bovine bone Bio-Oss was implanted subperiosteally for alveolar ridge augmentation purposes and heterotopically in the abdominal...

  20. The Effect of Astragalus Extractive on Alveolar Bone Rebuilding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) is an estrogen deficiency condition that causes severe loss of bone mass in the vertebrae and long bones. We explored the effect and the possible underlying mechanism of the extracts of Astragalus (AE) on the tooth alveolar bone rebuilding progress of postmenopausal ...