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Sample records for aluminum tungstate matrix

  1. Synthesis of gels with basis of titanium tungstates as matrixes of radioactive generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galico C, L.

    2005-01-01

    The heteropolyanions, compounds formed by the union of molybdates or tungstates polyanions with atoms of metals like zirconium, titanium, cerium, thorium, tin, etc., have been used as generator matrixes of 99m Tc or 188 Re. Particularly they have been studied and produced successfully in our laboratory, generators of 99 Mo/ 99 m Tc at basis of gels zirconium molybdates and titanium molybdates. Considering that the molybdenum and tungsten, as well as the technetium and the rhenium, its belong to the same groups of transition metals, it is feasible that gels can be synthesized at basis of titanium tungstates, continuing a methodology similar to that of the gels titanium molybdates or zirconium molybdates, to produce generators 188 W/ 188 Re. The 188 Re possess nuclear characteristics that make it attractive for therapeutic applications, since, it emits β - particles of a great energy (2.12 MeV); joined to the possibility of being able to unite to different ligands (bifunctional agents) and biomolecules (antibodies or fragments of proteins), as it makes the 99m Tc, useful in radioimmunotherapy. Commercially the 188 Re generators use a chromatographic column loaded with alumina where the 188 Re, it is adsorbed and eluted the 188 ReO 4 - by means of a saline solution The alumina adsorbs around 0.2% of the 188 Re, situation that forces to use 188 Re of a high specific activity. The use of the gels technology, allows to work with medium or low specific activities of 188 Re, opening the possibility of their production in countries whose nuclear capacity is medium or low. In particular, the synthesized gels with basis of titanium offer the possibility of being synthesized with non active material, for later on to be irradiated and directly produce the generator, since, the titanium 51 Ti, unique radioisotope produced by the titanium, has a half life of 5.79 min. This synthesis method avoids the manipulation of radioactive material during the synthesis of the gels, process

  2. Corrosion of Graphite Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    cathodic protection of G/AI MMCs resulted in overprotection 13. Overprotection resulted from a local increase in pH near cathodic sites during...34Cathodic Overprotection of SiC/6061-T6 and G/6061- T6 Aluminum Alloy Metal Matrix Composites," Scripta Metallurgica, 22 (1988) 413-418. 14. R

  3. Electrometallurgical treatment of aluminum-matrix fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willit, J.L.; Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; McPheeters, C.C.; Laidler, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The electrometallurgical treatment process described in this paper builds on our experience in treating spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). The work is also to some degree, a spin-off from applying electrometallurgical treatment to spent fuel from the Hanford single pass reactors (SPRs) and fuel and flush salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) in treating EBR-II fuel, we recover the actinides from a uranium-zirconium fuel by electrorefining the uranium out of the chopped fuel. With SPR fuel, uranium is electrorefined out of the aluminum cladding. Both of these processes are conducted in a LiCl-KCl molten-salt electrolyte. In the case of the MSRE, which used a fluoride salt-based fuel, uranium in this salt is recovered through a series of electrochemical reductions. Recovering high-purity uranium from an aluminum-matrix fuel is more challenging than treating SPR or EBR-II fuel because the aluminum- matrix fuel is typically -90% (volume basis) aluminum

  4. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the latest efforts to develop aluminum nanocomposites with enhanced damping and mechanical properties and good workability. The nanocomposites exhibited high strength, improved damping behavior and good ductility, making them suitable for use as wires. Since the production of metal matrix nanocomposites by conventional melting processes is considered extremely problematic (because of the poor wettability of the nanoparticles), different powder metallurgy routes were investigated, including high-energy ball milling and unconventional compaction methods. Special attention was paid to the structural characterization at the micro- and nanoscale, as uniform nanoparticle dispersion in metal matrix is of prime importance. The aluminum nanocomposites displayed an ultrafine microstructure reinforced with alumina nanoparticles produced in situ or added ex situ. The physical, mechanical and functional characteristics of the materials produced were evaluated using different mechanical tests and micros...

  5. Exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (LM6/TIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum matrix composites (LM6/TiC) is a mix of excellent properties of aluminum ... ABAQUS/CAE software has been successfully employed for Modeling and ... Experimental results show that, many mechanical properties are improved and ...

  6. exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (lm6/tic)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lanez

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Aluminum matrix composites (LM6/TiC) is a mix of excellent properties of aluminum casting alloy (LM6), and particles of (TiC) which make it the first choice in many applications like airplane and marine industries. During this research the extrudability and mechanical specifications of this composite ...

  7. Microstructure, Friction and Wear of Aluminum Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, R. M.

    2018-06-01

    MMCs are made by dispersing a reinforcing material into a metal matrix. They are prepared by casting, although several technical challenges exist with casting technology. Achieving a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement within the matrix is one such challenge, and this affects directly on the properties and quality of composite. The aluminum alloy composite materials consist of high strength, high stiffness, more thermal stability, more corrosion and wear resistance, and more fatigue life. Aluminum alloy materials found to be the best alternative with its unique capacity of designing the materials to give required properties. In this work a composite is developed by adding silicon carbide in Aluminum metal matrix by mass ratio 5%, 10% and 15%. Mechanical tests such as hardness test and microstructure test are conducted.

  8. Synthesis of gels with basis of titanium tungstates as matrixes of radioactive generators; Sintesis de geles a base de titanio tungstenatos como matrices de generadores radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galico C, L

    2005-07-01

    The heteropolyanions, compounds formed by the union of molybdates or tungstates polyanions with atoms of metals like zirconium, titanium, cerium, thorium, tin, etc., have been used as generator matrixes of {sup 99m} Tc or {sup 188} Re. Particularly they have been studied and produced successfully in our laboratory, generators of {sup 99} Mo/ {sup 99}m Tc at basis of gels zirconium molybdates and titanium molybdates. Considering that the molybdenum and tungsten, as well as the technetium and the rhenium, its belong to the same groups of transition metals, it is feasible that gels can be synthesized at basis of titanium tungstates, continuing a methodology similar to that of the gels titanium molybdates or zirconium molybdates, to produce generators {sup 188} W/ {sup 188} Re. The {sup 188} Re possess nuclear characteristics that make it attractive for therapeutic applications, since, it emits {beta}{sup -} particles of a great energy (2.12 MeV); joined to the possibility of being able to unite to different ligands (bifunctional agents) and biomolecules (antibodies or fragments of proteins), as it makes the {sup 99m} Tc, useful in radioimmunotherapy. Commercially the {sup 188} Re generators use a chromatographic column loaded with alumina where the {sup 188} Re, it is adsorbed and eluted the {sup 188} ReO{sub 4}{sup -} by means of a saline solution The alumina adsorbs around 0.2% of the {sup 188} Re, situation that forces to use {sup 188} Re of a high specific activity. The use of the gels technology, allows to work with medium or low specific activities of {sup 188} Re, opening the possibility of their production in countries whose nuclear capacity is medium or low. In particular, the synthesized gels with basis of titanium offer the possibility of being synthesized with non active material, for later on to be irradiated and directly produce the generator, since, the titanium {sup 51} Ti, unique radioisotope produced by the titanium, has a half life of 5.79 min. This

  9. Interfacial reaction effects on erosion of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, J.P.; Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima; Matsumura, M.

    1999-01-01

    Alumina borate (A 18 B 4 O 33 ) whisker reinforced aluminum composites have attracted interest because of their high specific strength, high modulus and low cost. An obvious feature of the microstructure in A 18 B 4 O 33 /Al composite is that an interfacial reaction exists between the whisker and the aluminum alloy. In order to discuss the influence of interface interaction between the whisker and matrix on the erosion resistance of composites, two reaction treatments are conducted. From the results of the treated composites, it can be obtained about the erosion characteristics of the composite materials under steady-state conditions

  10. Structural study of thin films prepared from tungstate glass matrix by Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, Bianca; Barbosa, Anne J.; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.; Messaddeq, Younes [Departamento de Quimica Geral e Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, CP 355, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Poirier, Gael [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, UNIFAL-MG, CEP 37130-000 Alfenas, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: gael@unifal-mg.edu.br; Li, Maximo S. [Instituto de Fisica, USP, CP 369, CEP 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-06-30

    Thin films were prepared using glass precursors obtained in the ternary system NaPO{sub 3}-BaF{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} and the binary system NaPO{sub 3}-WO{sub 3} with high concentrations of WO{sub 3} (above 40% molar). Vitreous samples have been used as a target to prepare thin films. Such films were deposited using the electron beam evaporation method onto soda-lime glass substrates. Several structural characterizations were performed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the tungsten L{sub I} and L{sub III} absorption edges. XANES investigations showed that tungsten atoms are only sixfold coordinated (octahedral WO{sub 6}) and that these films are free of tungstate tetrahedral units (WO{sub 4}). In addition, Raman spectroscopy allowed identifying a break in the linear phosphate chains as the amount of WO{sub 3} increases and the formation of P-O-W bonds in the films network indicating the intermediary behavior of WO{sub 6} octahedra in the film network. Based on XANES data, we suggested a new attribution of several Raman absorption bands which allowed identifying the presence of W-O{sup -} and W=O terminal bonds and a progressive apparition of W-O-W bridging bonds for the most WO{sub 3} concentrated samples (above 40% molar) attributed to the formation of WO{sub 6} clusters.

  11. Composite superconductors with copper-aluminum stabilizing matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keilin, V.E.; Anashkin, O.P.; Krivikh, A.V.; Kiriya, I.V.; Kovalev, I.A.; Dolgosheev, P.I.; Rychagov, A.V.; Sytnikov, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    A new type of composite superconductors has been developed. They consist of one or several (cabled) multifilamentary wires with low Cu-to-Sc ratio which are embedded and soldered into grooves made in matrix of rectangular cross-section. The latter consists of aluminum core metallurgically plated with a thin copper sheath. Such conductors combine the advantages of both aluminum and copper as stabilizing materials. They have low density, exhibit almost not magnetoresistance, are relatively cheap and can be produced in very long pieces. Copper plating offers the possibility of soft soldering thus ensuring good electrical and thermal contact between superconducting wires and stabilizing matrix, and helping to join pieces to each other. the properties of two Nb-Ti conductors (3.5 x 2 mm 2 and 7x4 mm 2 ) are described in more detail. The first is used in SC coils for whole-body magnetoresonance tomography, and the second will be used in a open-quotes thinclose quotes coil for charged particles detector. The influence of aluminum purity on SC magnet behavior is also briefly discussed

  12. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Kawasaki, Akira; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al 4 C 3 ) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al 4 C 3 . Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al 4 C 3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials. (paper)

  13. Laser Surface Treatment and Modification of Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbass, Muna Khethier

    2018-02-01

    The present work aimed to study the laser surface treatment and modification of Al-4.0%Cu-1.0%Mg alloy matrix composite reinforced with 10%SiC particles produced by stir casting. The specimens of the base alloy and composite were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser of 1000 mJ, 1064 nm and 3 Hz . Dry wear test using the pin-on -disc technique at different sliding times (5-30 min) at a constant applied load and sliding speed were performed before and after laser treatment. Micro hardness and wear resistance were increased for all samples after laser hardening treatment. The improvement of these properties is explained by microstructural homogenization and grain refinement of the laser treated surface. Modification and refinement of SiC particles and grain refinement in the microstructure of the aluminum alloy matrix (α-Al) were observed by optical and SEM micrographs. The highest increase in hardness was 21.4% and 26.2% for the base alloy and composite sample respectively.

  14. Micro structural analysis of nanocomposite of metallic matrix of aluminum reinforced by 2% of NTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Fabio Saldanha; LavaredaCarlos Romulo; Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Queiroz, Jennyson Luz

    2016-01-01

    The study of based on aluminum materials has a high importance level, mainly when is intense wanted in automobile and aerospace industry to transform in light and high perform parts. Aluminum has low specific weight and easiness to join with other materials and these qualities can supply excellent properties and lots of technological applications. Components based on aluminum represents good examples to develop optimized micro structures during the fabrication process that can be basic on properties mechanical performance. As a result this work analyses the micro structure's composites with metallic matrix reinforced by 2% of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes manufactured by aluminum splinters mixed to CNT (author)

  15. CMS lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    These crystals are made from lead tungstate, a crystal that is as clear as glass yet with nearly four times the density. They have been produced in Russia to be used as scintillators in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the CMS experiment, part of the LHC project at CERN. When an electron, positron or photon passes through the calorimeter it will cause a cascade of particles that will then be absorbed by these scintillating crystals, allowing the particle's energy to be measured.

  16. The solidification of aluminum production waste in geopolymer matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 84, DEC 1 (2014), s. 657-662 ISSN 0959-6526 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : aluminum waste * solidification * recycling * geopolymer Subject RIV: DM - Solid Waste and Recycling Impact factor: 3.844, year: 2014

  17. Theoretical and experimental investigation of wear characteristics of aluminum based metal matrix composites using RSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Rajasekar, E.

    2015-01-01

    The tribological properties such as wear rate, hardness of the aluminum-fly ash composite synthesized by stir casting were investigated by varying the weight % of fly ash from 5 to 20 with constant weight % of zinc and magnesium metal powder. A mathematical model was developed to predict the wear rate of aluminum metal matrix composites and the adequacy of the model was verified using analysis of variance. Scanning electron microscopy was used for the microstructure analysis which showed a uniform distribution of fly ash in the metal matrix. Energy - dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used for the elemental analysis or chemical characterization of a sample. The results showed that addition of fly ash to aluminum based metal matrix improved both the mechanical and tribological properties of the composites. The fly ash particles improved the wear resistance of the metal matrix composites because the hardness of the samples taken increased as the fly ash content was increased.

  18. Wear-resistance of Aluminum Matrix Microcomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kandeva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is developed for the study of wear of aluminum alloys AlSi7 obtained by casting, reinforced by TiC microparticles, before and after heat treatment. Tribological study is realized under conditions of friction on counterbody with fixed abrasive. Experimental results were obtained for mass wear, wear rate, wear intensity and wear-resistance of the alloys with different wt% of microparticles.

  19. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  20. Creep and threshold tension in aluminum-matrix composite with short fibers obtained by hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, M.F; Gonzalez Oliver, C.R.J

    2004-01-01

    An aluminum matrix composite reinforced with 5% vol. of short fibers of silicon carbide and un-reinforced matrix, produced by pulvimetallurgy (PM) were studied using creep compression at different deformation speeds and in the range of 300 o C to 500 o C. The creep curve of both materials showed the typical behavior of a material with threshold tension τ 0 ; with an estimate value of 6.31MPa for the matrix at 400 o C and 6.43, 8.76 and 11MPa at 350, 400 and 450 o C respectively for the composite. The τ 0 was shown to obey a thermally activated mechanism whose energy is about 17 kJ/mol. Nanometric particles of aluminum oxide were scattered throughout the matrix and the composite, arising from the inevitable film of oxides and hydroxides formed in the metallic powder. The exponent of power-law creep occurs in the values of n = 4.3 to 4.85 by reducing the tension to an effective value τ-τ 0 , corresponding to a drilling fault in both materials. In the composite, the activation energy was estimated at 167 to 125 kJ/mol, close to the self- diffusion enthalpy of the pure aluminum at 143.4 kJ/mol so that the creep process in the composite is controlled exclusively by the deformation of the matrix (CW)

  1. Influence of short-term aluminum exposure on demineralized bone matrix induced bone formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, A.R. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology); Haut, C.F.; Firling, C.E. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Biology); Huntley, T.E. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)

    1992-12-01

    The effects of aluminum exposure on bone formation employing the demineralized bone matrix (DBM) induced bone development model were studied using 4-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats injected with a saline (control) or an aluminum chloride (experimental) solution. After 2 weeks of aluminum treatment, 20-mg portions of rat DBM were implanted subcutaneously on each side in the thoracic region of the control and experimental rats. Animals were killed 7, 12, or 21 days after implantation of the DBM and the developing plaques removed. No morphological, histochemical, or biochemical differences were apparent between plaques from day 7 control and experimental rats. Plaques from day 12 control and experimental rats exhibited cartilage formation and alkaline phosphatase activity localized in osteochondrogenic cells, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and extracellular matrix. Unlike the plaques from control rats that contained many osteoblastic mineralizing fronts, the plaques from the 12-day experimental group had a preponderance of cartilaginous tissue, no evidence of mineralization, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase activity, and a reduced calcium content. Plaques developing for 21 days in control animals demonstrated extensive new bone formation and bone marrow development, while those in the experimental rats demonstrated unmineralized osteoid-like matrix with poorly developed bone marrow. Alkaline phosphatase activity of the plaques continued to remain high on day 21 for the control and experimental groups. Calcium levels were significantly reduced in the experimental group. These biochemical changes correlated with histochemical reductions in bone calcification. Thus, aluminum administration to rats appears to alter the differentiation and calcification of developing cartilage and bone in the DBM-induced bone formation model and suggests that aluminum by some mechanism alters the matrix calcification in growing bones. (orig.).

  2. Production of NbC reinforced aluminum matrix composites by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Katia Regina; Travessa, Dilermando Nagle

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum and their alloys are key materials for the automotive and aerospace industries. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix produces lightweight composites with interesting properties, as environmental resistance, high specific strength and stiffness, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and good wear resistance, encouraging their technological use. Powder metallurgy techniques like mechanical alloying (MA) are very attractive to design metal matrix composites, as they are able to achieve a homogeneous distribution of well dispersed particles inside the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of Niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. NbC is frequently used as a grain growth inhibitor in micro-alloyed steel due to their low solubility in austenite. In the present work, NbC is expected to act as a reinforcing phase by its fine dispersion into the aluminum matrix, produced by MA. Composite powders produced after different milling times (up to 50h), with 10 and 20% (volume) of NbC were characterized by diffraction laser particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray diffraction (DRX), in order to establish a relationship between the milling time and the characteristics of the powder produced, as size and morphology, crystallite size and reinforcement distribution. This characterization is important in defining the MA process for production of composites for further consolidation by hot extrusion process. (author)

  3. Production of NbC reinforced aluminum matrix composites by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Katia Regina; Travessa, Dilermando Nagle, E-mail: dilermando.travessa@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia

    2014-07-01

    Aluminum and their alloys are key materials for the automotive and aerospace industries. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix produces lightweight composites with interesting properties, as environmental resistance, high specific strength and stiffness, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and good wear resistance, encouraging their technological use. Powder metallurgy techniques like mechanical alloying (MA) are very attractive to design metal matrix composites, as they are able to achieve a homogeneous distribution of well dispersed particles inside the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of Niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. NbC is frequently used as a grain growth inhibitor in micro-alloyed steel due to their low solubility in austenite. In the present work, NbC is expected to act as a reinforcing phase by its fine dispersion into the aluminum matrix, produced by MA. Composite powders produced after different milling times (up to 50h), with 10 and 20% (volume) of NbC were characterized by diffraction laser particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray diffraction (DRX), in order to establish a relationship between the milling time and the characteristics of the powder produced, as size and morphology, crystallite size and reinforcement distribution. This characterization is important in defining the MA process for production of composites for further consolidation by hot extrusion process. (author)

  4. Friction Stir Processing of Copper-Coated SiC Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we proposed a novel friction stir processing (FSP to produce a locally reinforced aluminum matrix composite (AMC by stirring copper-coated SiC particulate reinforcement into Al6061 alloy matrix. Electroless-plating process was applied to deposit the copper surface coating on the SiC particulate reinforcement for the purpose of improving the interfacial adhesion between SiC particles and Al matrix. The core-shell SiC structure provides a layer for the atomic diffusion between aluminum and copper to enhance the cohesion between reinforcing particles and matrix on one hand, the dispersion of fine copper in the Al matrix during FSP provides further dispersive strengthening and solid solution strengthening, on the other hand. Hardness distribution and tensile results across the stir zone validated the novel concept in improving the mechanical properties of AMC that was realized via FSP. Optical microscope (OM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM investigations were conducted to investigate the microstructure. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA, and X-ray diffraction (XRD were explored to analyze the atomic inter-diffusion and the formation of intermetallic at interface. The possible strengthening mechanisms of the AMC containing Cu-coated SiC particulate reinforcement were interpreted. The concept of strengthening developed in this work may open a new way of fabricating of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites.

  5. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  6. Evaluation of dry sliding wear behavior of silicon particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Li Guobin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the wear property of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites 9Si/Al-Cu-Mg. A on rock wear-testing machine is used to evaluate the wear property of the composites, in which a GCrl5 steel ring is used as the counter face material. The wear behavior of the composites under different conditions is studied. The optical microscope and scanning electron microscope are used to analyze the worn surfaces and the subsurface of the composites in order to research the wear mechanism of the composites. Results indicate that the weight loss of the composite were lower than that of the matrix alloy

  7. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Luo, Xiangwei [Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Niu, Jitai, E-mail: niujitai@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe-Ni-Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn-Cd-Ag-Cu) with a melting point of about 400 Degree-Sign C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)-Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al-SiC composite.

  8. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao; Luo, Xiangwei; Niu, Jitai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. ► The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. ► Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. ► Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. ► High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al–SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe–Ni–Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn–Cd–Ag–Cu) with a melting point of about 400 °C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)–Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al–SiC composite.

  9. Aluminum and bone: Review of new clinical circumstances associated with Al(3+) deposition in the calcified matrix of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappard, D; Bizot, P; Mabilleau, G; Hubert, L

    2016-06-01

    Several decades ago, aluminum encephalopathy associated with osteomalacia has been recognized as the major complication of chronic renal failure in dialyzed patients. Removal of aluminum from the dialysate has led to a disappearance of the disease. However, aluminum deposit occurs in the hydroxyapatite of the bone matrix in some clinical circumstances that are presented in this review. We have encountered aluminum in bone in patients with an increased intestinal permeability (coeliac disease), or in the case of prolonged administration of aluminum anti-acid drugs. A colocalisation of aluminum with iron was also noted in cases of hemochromatosis and sickle cell anemia. Aluminium was also identified in a series of patients with exostosis, a frequent benign bone tumor. Corrosion of prosthetic implants composed of grade V titanium (TA6V is an alloy containing 6% aluminum and 4% vanadium) was also observed in a series of hip or knee revisions. Aluminum can be identified in undecalcified bone matrix stained by solochrome azurine, a highly specific stain allowing the detection of 0.03 atomic %. Colocalization of aluminum and iron does not seem to be the fruit of chance but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Histochemistry is superior to spectroscopic analyses (EDS and WDS in scanning electron microscopy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Graphene-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites: A Review of Synthesis Methods and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Gupta, Nikhil; Behera, Rakesh K.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2018-06-01

    Graphene-reinforced aluminum (Gr-Al) matrix nanocomposites (NCs) have attracted strong interest from both research and industry in high-performance weight-sensitive applications. Due to the vastly different bonding characteristics of the Al matrix (metallic) and graphene (in-plane covalent + inter-plane van der Waals), the graphene phase has a general tendency to agglomerate and phase separate in the metal matrix, which is detrimental for the mechanical and chemical properties of the composite. Thus, synthesis of Gr-Al NCs is extremely challenging. This review summarizes the different methods available to synthesize Gr-Al NCs and the resulting properties achieved in these NCs. Understanding the effect of processing parameters on the realized properties opens up the possibility of tailoring the synthesis methods to achieve the desired properties for a given application.

  11. Enhancement of the mechanical properties of an aluminum metal matrix nanocomposite by the hybridization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalidindi Sita Rama Raju

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the matrix plays a prominent role in improving the composite strength. In the present investigation, two types of launching vehicles, such as aluminum powder (primary and CNTs (secondary, are considered to uniformly carry and launch ultra-fine nanoparticles (13 nm into molten metal. The use of a secondary launching vehicle is identified to promote strengthening compared to a regular primary vehicle, as indicated by the good distribution observed from electron micrographs. CNTs are responsible for hybridizing the composite and also assist strengthening by anchoring to the matrix through the destroyed outer-walls and their axial orientation with the matrix. These results help us in attaining a strength of 197 MPa and a hardness of 93 BHN, with a minimal loss in ductility for the H-3 sample.

  12. Graphene-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites: A Review of Synthesis Methods and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Gupta, Nikhil; Behera, Rakesh K.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2018-03-01

    Graphene-reinforced aluminum (Gr-Al) matrix nanocomposites (NCs) have attracted strong interest from both research and industry in high-performance weight-sensitive applications. Due to the vastly different bonding characteristics of the Al matrix (metallic) and graphene (in-plane covalent + inter-plane van der Waals), the graphene phase has a general tendency to agglomerate and phase separate in the metal matrix, which is detrimental for the mechanical and chemical properties of the composite. Thus, synthesis of Gr-Al NCs is extremely challenging. This review summarizes the different methods available to synthesize Gr-Al NCs and the resulting properties achieved in these NCs. Understanding the effect of processing parameters on the realized properties opens up the possibility of tailoring the synthesis methods to achieve the desired properties for a given application.

  13. Graphene-reinforced aluminum matrix composites prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-ming Tian; Song-mei Li; Bo Wang; Xin Chen; Jian-hua Liu; Mei Yu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-reinforced 7055 aluminum alloy composites with different contents of graphene were prepared by spark plasma sinter-ing (SPS). The structure and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Testing results show that the hardness, compressive strength, and yield strength of the composites are improved with the addition of 1wt% graphene. A clean, strong interface is formed between the metal matrix and graphene via metallurgical bonding on atomic scale. Harmful aluminum carbide (Al4C3) is not formed during SPS processing. Further addition of graphene (above 1wt%) results in the deterioration in mechanical properties of the composites. The agglomeration of graphene plates is exacerbated with increasing graphene content, which is the main reason for this deterioration.

  14. Role of manufacturing process parameters on the characteristics of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2003-01-01

    Metal matrix composites, (MMC), are engineered combinations of two or more materials (one of which is a metal) in which tailored properties are achieved by systematic combinations consisting of continuous or discontinuous fibers, whiskers, or particles in a metal result in combinations of very high specific strength. Furthermore, systematic design and procedures can be developed to achieve unique combinations of engineering properties such as high elevated-temperature strengths, damping or electrical properties. In this paper, the theory and practice of MMC are reviewed and discussed. The different techniques used in the manufacturing of MMC in general and aluminum matrix composites in particular e.g. unidirectional solidification, squeeze casting, vortex method and compocasting are presented and discussed. The parameters involved in these techniques and their effects on the characteristics of MMC product are also given and discussed. These include: crucible size and shape, melt temperature, size and shape of the impeller, stirring speed, rate of addition of the particles, the degree of agitation and cooling rate. Furthermore, the effect of these parameters on the mechanical strength and machinability are also presented and discussed. Finally, recent research results in aluminum matrix composites and their future developments are outlined and discussed. (author)

  15. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  16. Mechanical properties study of particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites by micro-indentation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhanwei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By using instrumental micro-indentation technique, the microhardness and Young’s modulus of SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites were investigated with micro-compression-tester (MCT. The micro-indentation experiments were performed with different maximum loads, and with three loading speeds of 2.231, 4.462 and 19.368 mN/s respectively. During the investigation, matrix, particle and interface were tested by micro-indentation experiments. The results exhibit that the variations of Young’s modulus and microhardness at particle, matrix and interface were highly dependent on the loading conditions (maximum load and loading speed and the locations of indentation. Micro-indentation hardness experiments of matrix show the indentation size effects, i.e. the indentation hardness decreased with the indentation depth increasing. During the analysis, the effect of loading conditions on Young’s modulus and microhardness were explained. Besides, the elastic–plastic properties of matrix were analyzed. The validity of calculated results was identified by finite element simulation. And the simulation results had been preliminarily analyzed from statistical aspect.

  17. Development of quartz particulate reinforced AA6063 aluminum matrix composites via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joyson Abraham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP has been accepted as a potential method to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs without the drawbacks of liquid metallurgy methods. The present work focuses on the development of AMCs reinforced with quartz (SiO2 particles using FSP. Grooves with various dimensions were machined on AA6063 plates and compacted with quartz particles. A single pass FSP was carried out using a combination of optimized process parameters. The volume fraction of quartz particles in the AMCs was varied from 0 to 18 vol.% in steps of 6 vol.%. The developed AA6063/Quartz AMCs were characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The quartz particles were distributed uniformly in the aluminum matrix irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The grains of the AA6063 were extensively refined by the combination of thermomechanical effect of FSP and the pinning effect of quartz particles. The dispersion of the quartz particles improved the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMCs. The role of quartz particles on the worn surface and wear debris is reported.

  18. Thin films prepared from tungstate glass matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, B.; Ribeiro, S.J.L.; Messaddeq, Y. [Departamento de Quimica Geral e Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, CP 355, CEP 14800-900, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Li, M.S. [Instituto de Fisica, USP, CP 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Poirier, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, UNIFAL-MG, CEP 37130-000, Alfenas-MG (Brazil)], E-mail: gael@unifal-mg.edu.br

    2008-01-30

    Vitreous samples containing high concentrations of WO{sub 3} (above 40% M) have been used as a target to prepare thin films. Such films were deposited using the electron beam evaporation method onto soda-lime glass substrates. These films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), perfilometry, X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), M-Lines and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. In this work, experimental parameters were established to obtain stable thin films showing a chemical composition close to the glass precursor composition and with a high concentration of WO{sub 3}. These amorphous thin films of about 4 {mu}m in thickness exhibit a deep blue coloration but they can be bleached by thermal treatment near the glass transition temperature. Such bleached films show several guided modes in the visible region and have a high refractive index. Controlled crystallization was realized and thus it was possible to obtain WO{sub 3} microcrystals in the amorphous phase.

  19. Characterization of hybrid aluminum matrix composites for advanced applications – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswinder Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid aluminum matrix composites (HAMCs are the second generation of composites that have potential to substitute single reinforced composites due to improved properties. This paper investigates the feasibility and viability of developing low cost-high performance hybrid composites for automotive and aerospace applications. Further, the fabrication characteristics and mechanical behavior of HAMCs fabricated by stir casting route have also been reviewed. The optical micrographs of the HAMCs indicate that the reinforcing particles are fairly distributed in the matrix alloy and the porosity levels have been found to be acceptable for the casted composites. The density, hardness, tensile behavior and fracture toughness of these composites have been found to be either comparable or superior to the ceramic reinforced composites. It has been observed from the literature that the direct strengthening of composites occurs due to the presence of hard ceramic phase, while the indirect strengthening arises from the thermal mismatch between the matrix alloy and reinforcing phase during solidification. Based on the database for material properties, the application area of HAMCs has been proposed in the present review. It has been concluded that the hybrid composites offer more flexibility and reliability in the design of possible components depending upon the reinforcement's combination and composition.

  20. Exploiting elastic anharmonicity in aluminum nitride matrix for phase-synchronous frequency reference generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatge, Mayur; Tabrizian, Roozbeh

    2018-03-01

    A matrix of aluminum-nitride (AlN) waveguides is acoustically engineered to realize electrically isolated phase-synchronous frequency references through nonlinear wave-mixing. AlN rectangular waveguides are cross-coupled through a periodically perforated plate that is engineered to have a wide acoustic bandgap around a desirable frequency ( f1≈509 MHz). While the coupling plate isolates the matrix from resonant vibrations of individual waveguide constituents at f1, it is transparent to the third-order harmonic waves (3f1) that are generated through nonlinear wave-mixing. Therefore, large-signal excitation of the f1 mode in a constituent waveguide generates acoustic waves at 3f1 with an efficiency defined by elastic anharmonicity of the AlN film. The phase-synchronous propagation of the third harmonic through the matrix is amplified by a high quality-factor resonance mode at f2≈1529 MHz, which is sufficiently close to 3f1 (f2 ≅ 3f1). Such an architecture enables realization of frequency-multiplied and phase-synchronous, yet electrically and spectrally isolated, references for multi-band/carrier and spread-spectrum wireless communication systems.

  1. Processing of aluminum matrix composites by electroless plating and melt infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, C.A.; Bourassa, A.-M.; Drew, R.A.L.

    2000-01-01

    Reduction of the SiC/ Al interaction and enhancement of wetting between reinforcements and molten aluminum was obtained by modifying the ceramic surface with deposition of nickel and copper coatings. The preparation of nickel- and copper-coated ceramic particles as precursors for MMC fabrication was studied. Al 2 O 3 and SiC powders were successfully coated with Ni and Cu using electroless metal plating. Uniform and continuous metal films were deposited on both, alumina and silicon carbide powders XRD showed that the Ni-P deposit was predominantly amorphous, while the copper deposit was essentially polycrystalline. Infiltration results showed that the use of the coated powders enhances the wettability between the matrix and ceramic phase when processing particulate MMCs by a vacuum infiltration technique, giving a porosity-free composite with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterpart samples XRD microstructural analysis of the composites indicates the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2 , in the case of copper coating, and NiAl and NiAl 3 when nickel-coated powders are infiltrated. Metallization of the ceramics minimizes the interfacial reaction of the SiC/Al composites and promotes wetting of Al 2 O 3 reinforcements with liquid aluminum. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  2. Influence of Boron on the Creep Behavior and the Microstructure of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Siebeck

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The reinforcement of aluminum alloys with particles leads to the enhancement of their mechanical properties at room temperature. However, the creep behavior at elevated temperatures is often negatively influenced. This raises the question of how it is possible to influence the creep behavior of this type of material. Within this paper, selected creep and tensile tests demonstrate the beneficial effects of boron on the properties of precipitation-hardenable aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. The focus is on the underlying microstructure behind this effect. For this purpose, boron was added to AMCs by means of mechanical alloying. Comparatively higher boron contents than in steel are investigated in order to be able to record their influence on the microstructure including the formation of potential new phases as well as possible. While the newly formed phase Al3BC can be reliably detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD, it is difficult to obtain information about the phase distribution by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM investigations. An important contribution to this is finally provided by the investigation using Raman microscopy. Thus, the homogeneous distribution of finely scaled Al3BC particles is detectable, which allows conclusions about the microstructure/property relationship.

  3. Effects of Complex Structured Anodic Oxide Dielectric Layer Grown in Pore Matrix for Aluminum Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin-Ha; Yun, Sook Young; Lee, Chang Hyoung; Park, Hwa-Sun; Suh, Su-Jeong

    2015-11-01

    Anodization of aluminum is generally divided up into two types of anodic aluminum oxide structures depending on electrolyte type. In this study, an anodization process was carried out in two steps to obtain high dielectric strength and break down voltage. In the first step, evaporated high purity Al on Si wafer was anodized in oxalic acidic aqueous solution at various times at a constant temperature of 5 degrees C. In the second step, citric acidic aqueous solution was used to obtain a thickly grown sub-barrier layer. During the second anodization process, the anodizing potential of various ranges was applied at room temperature. An increased thickness of the sub-barrier layer in the porous matrix was obtained according to the increment of the applied anodizing potential. The microstructures and the growth of the sub-barrier layer were then observed with an increasing anodizing potential of 40 to 300 V by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An impedance analyzer was used to observe the change of electrical properties, including the capacitance, dissipation factor, impedance, and equivalent series resistance (ESR) depending on the thickness increase of the sub-barrier layer. In addition, the breakdown voltage was measured. The results revealed that dielectric strength was improved with the increase of sub-barrier layer thickness.

  4. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  5. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  6. Processing of Aluminum-Graphite Particulate Metal Matrix Composites by Advanced Shear Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekar, N.; Tzamtzis, S.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Patel, J.; Hari Babu, N.; Fan, Z.

    2009-12-01

    To extend the possibilities of using aluminum/graphite composites as structural materials, a novel process is developed. The conventional methods often produce agglomerated structures exhibiting lower strength and ductility. To overcome the cohesive force of the agglomerates, a melt conditioned high-pressure die casting (MC-HPDC) process innovatively adapts the well-established, high-shear dispersive mixing action of a twin screw mechanism. The distribution of particles and properties of composites are quantitatively evaluated. The adopted rheo process significantly improved the distribution of the reinforcement in the matrix with a strong interfacial bond between the two. A good combination of improved ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and tensile elongation (ɛ) is obtained compared with composites produced by conventional processes.

  7. Parametric study for graphene reinforced aluminum matrix composites production using Box Behnken design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Bhagya Lakshmi; Nouri, Jamshid M.; Brabazon, Dermot; Naher, Sumsun

    2017-10-01

    The production of graphene reinforced aluminum matrix composite through powder metallurgical route requires optimization of process parameters to obtain better performance characteristics. One of the advanced method available for statistical analysis of parameters is Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The statistical analysis was carried out with three parameters, weight percentage of graphene reinforcement Wg (0.05%, 0.1% and 0.2%), stirring time ST(1h, 2h and 3h) and compaction pressure Pc(16T, 17T and 19T) while sintering temperature T kept constant. The performance of the Box Behnken design was analyzed and optimized using Design Expert software for the effective production of composites. From the results obtained from the analysis, the best set of parameters were considered for the future production of composites.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of nanophased silver tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nanoparticles were examined with scanning electron microscope (A Lieca Stereoscan. 440 model SEM) at an ... SEM image of rod-like nanocrystalline silver tungstate. Figure 3. ... Thermal analysis shows that the compound is thermally stable ...

  9. Microstructural analysis and mechanical characterization of aluminum matrix nanocomposites reinforced with uncoated and Cu-coated alumina particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beygi, H., E-mail: hossein.beygi@stu-mail.um.ac.ir; Sajjadi, S.A.; Zebarjad, S.M.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum matrix composites used in the aerospace, military and automotive industries are typically fabricated by a stir casting method. However, when nanoparticles are used for reinforcement, fabrication of composite materials by this method leads to the formation of a large number of structural defects. In this study, copper coating of alumina reinforcement particles is investigated as a technique for improving the structure of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites. Microstructural investigations by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the alumina particles were coated uniformly with copper shells. Copper coating of the reinforcing particles significantly increased their wettability in the molten aluminum alloy, strengthened the matrix-particle interfaces and improved the distribution of reinforcing particles within the matrix. Due to these microstructural improvements, the hardness, compressive strength, yield stress, tensile strength and elongation of the composites were enhanced by copper coating of the alumina particles.

  10. Microstructural analysis and mechanical characterization of aluminum matrix nanocomposites reinforced with uncoated and Cu-coated alumina particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beygi, H.; Sajjadi, S.A.; Zebarjad, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum matrix composites used in the aerospace, military and automotive industries are typically fabricated by a stir casting method. However, when nanoparticles are used for reinforcement, fabrication of composite materials by this method leads to the formation of a large number of structural defects. In this study, copper coating of alumina reinforcement particles is investigated as a technique for improving the structure of Al-Al 2 O 3 composites. Microstructural investigations by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the alumina particles were coated uniformly with copper shells. Copper coating of the reinforcing particles significantly increased their wettability in the molten aluminum alloy, strengthened the matrix-particle interfaces and improved the distribution of reinforcing particles within the matrix. Due to these microstructural improvements, the hardness, compressive strength, yield stress, tensile strength and elongation of the composites were enhanced by copper coating of the alumina particles

  11. Microstructure and wear characterization of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with industrial waste fly ash particulates synthesized by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Nelson, R., E-mail: nelson.90.mech@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641114, Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph.2001@gmail.com [Center for Research in Metallurgy, School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641114, Tamil Nadu (India); Akinlabi, E.T., E-mail: etakinlabi@uj.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa)

    2016-08-15

    Fly ash (FA) is a waste product of coal combustion in thermal power plants which is available in massive quantities all over the world causing land pollution. This paper reports the characterization of AA6061 aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with FA particles synthesized using friction stir processing (FSP). The volume fraction of FA particles was varied from 0 to 18 in steps of 6. The prepared AMCs were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscattered diagram (EBSD). The wear rate was estimated using a pin-on-disc wear apparatus. FA particles were observed to be distributed homogeneously in the AMC irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The EBSD micrographs revealed remarkable grain refinement in the AMC. The incorporation of FA particles enhanced the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMC. The strengthening mechanisms of the AMC were discussed and correlated to the observed microstructures. The wear mechanisms were identified by characterizing the wear debris and worn surfaces. - Highlights: •Industrial waste fly ash was used to produce aluminum matrix composites. •Friction stir processing was used to produce AA6061/Fly Ash composite. •Fly ash particles refined the grains of aluminum matrix. •Fly ash particles enhanced the hardness and wear resistance. •Successful utilization of fly ash to make aluminum composites reduces land pollution.

  12. Microstructural Evaluation of Inductively Sintered Aluminum Matrix Nanocomposites Reinforced with Silicon Carbide and/or Graphene Nanoplatelets for Tribological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad; Khalid, Yasir; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Almajid, Abdulhakim A.; Achour, Amine; Dunn, Theresa J.; Akram, Aftab; Anwar, Saqib

    2018-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles (NP) and/or graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) were incorporated into the aluminum matrix through colloidal dispersion and mixing of the powders, followed by consolidation using a high-frequency induction heat sintering process. All the nanocomposite samples exhibited high densification (> 96 pct) with a maximum increase in Vickers microhardness by 92 pct relative to that of pure aluminum. The tribological properties of the samples were determined at the normal frictional forces of 10 and 50 N. At relatively low load of 10 N, the adhesive wear was found to be the predominant wear mechanism, whereas in the case of a 50 N normal load, there was significant contribution from abrasive wear possibly by hard SiC NP. From wear tests, the values for the coefficient of friction (COF) and the normalized wear rate were determined. The improvement in hardness and wear resistance may be attributed to multiple factors, including high relative density, uniform SiC and GNP dispersion in the aluminum matrix, grain refinement through GNP pinning, as well as inhibition of dislocation movement by SiC NP. The nanocomposite sample containing 10 SiC and 0.5 GNP (by wt pct) yielded the maximum wear resistance at 10 N normal load. Microstructural characterization of the nanocomposite surfaces and wear debris was performed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The synergistic effect of the GNP and SiC nanostructures accounts for superior wear resistance in the aluminum matrix nanocomposites.

  13. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%

  14. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, A; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M; Lehnert, N; Götze, U; Herold, F; Schmidt, A; Meichsner, G

    2016-01-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control. (paper)

  15. Laser direct marking applied to rasterizing miniature Data Matrix Code on aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia-Shuang; He, Wei-Ping; Lei, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Gai-Fang; Zhang, Teng-Yun; Yue, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Precise miniaturization of 2D Data Matrix (DM) Codes on Aluminum alloy formed by raster mode laser direct part marking is demonstrated. The characteristic edge over-burn effects, which render vector mode laser direct part marking inadequate for producing precise and readable miniature codes, are minimized with raster mode laser marking. To obtain the control mechanism for the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code by raster laser marking process, the temperature field model of long pulse laser interaction with material is established. From the experimental results, laser average power and Q frequency have an important effect on the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code, and the threshold of laser average power and Q frequency for an identifiable miniature DM code are respectively 3.6 W and 110 kHz, which matches the model well within normal operating conditions. In addition, the empirical model of correlation occurring between laser marking parameters and module size is also obtained, and the optimal processing parameter values for an identifiable miniature DM code of different but certain data size are given. It is also found that an increase of the repeat scanning number effectively improves the surface finish of bore, the appearance consistency of modules, which has benefit to reading. The reading quality of miniature DM code is greatly improved using ultrasonic cleaning in water by avoiding the interference of color speckles surrounding modules.

  16. Theoretical analysis of deformation behavior of aluminum matrix composites in laser forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.R.; Chan, K.C.; Tang, C.Y.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the deformation behavior of the SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite in laser forming was investigated. A 2KW Nd:YAG laser was used to deform the composite at different laser powers, scanning speeds, numbers of irradiation passes and beam diameters. It was found that the bending angle increases with an increase in laser power, and a decrease in scanning speed and beam diameter. A relatively linear relationship between bending angle and number of irradiation passes was observed, and the effect of microstructural changes on the deformation behavior was discussed. An analytical model based on the Vollertsen's two-layer model was developed to predict the bending angle of the composite. The trends of the predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of reinforcements on deformation behavior of the composite was further theoretically investigated. By modeling the changes of physical, thermal and mechanical properties including yield stress, elastic modulus, surface absorption coefficient and thermal conductivity of the material incorporated with SiC particles, the effect of reinforcement on laser bending angle was analyzed, and it was found that it would result in a larger bending angle. The significance of the findings will be discussed in the paper

  17. Aluminum Chloride Pretreatment of Elastin Inhibits Elastolysis by Matrix Metalloproteinases and Leads to Inhibition of Elastin-Oriented Calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Michael; Xiao, Hui; Ogle, Matthew; Vyavahare, Naren

    2001-01-01

    Calcification of elastin occurs in many pathological cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. We have previously shown that purified elastin when subdermally implanted in rats undergoes severe calcification and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) pretreatment of elastin inhibits calcification. In the present study we investigated whether matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) binding to elastin and elastin degradation is prevented by AlCl3 pretreatment. Subdermal implantation of AlCl3-pretreated elas...

  18. Lead-Tungstate Crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The photon spectrometer (PHOS) is designed to measure the temperature of collisions by detecting photons emerging from them. It will be made of lead tungstate crystals like these. When high-energy photons strike lead tungstate, they make it glow, or scintillate, and this glow can be measured. Lead tungstate is extremely dense (denser than iron), stopping most photons that reach it.

  19. Vanadate, molybdate and tungstate for orthomolecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, J

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that oxyanions, such as vanadate (V) or vanadyl (IV), cause insulin-like effects on rats by stimulating the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Tungstate (VI) and molybdate (VI) show the same effects on rat adipocytes and hepatocytes. Results of uncontrolled trials on volunteers accumulated in Japan also suggest that tungstate effectively regulates diabetes mellitus without detectable side effects. Since these oxyanions naturally exist in organisms, oxyanion therapy, the oral administration of vanadate, vanadyl, molybdate, or tungstate, can be considered to be orthomolecular medicine. Therefore, these oxyanions may provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy. Many diseases in addition to diabetes mellitus might also be treated since the implication of these results is that tyrosine kinases are involved in a variety of diseases.

  20. Characterization of molybdenum particles reinforced Al6082 aluminum matrix composites with improved ductility produced using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvakumar, S., E-mail: lathaselvam1963@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nehru Institute of Technology, Coimbatore 641105, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Palanivel, R., E-mail: rpalanivelme@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Ganesh Babu, B., E-mail: profbgb@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Roever College of Engineering and Technology, Perambalur 621212, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-03-15

    Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with various ceramic particles suffer a loss in ductility. Hard metallic particles can be used as reinforcement to improve ductility. The present investigation focuses on using molybdenum (Mo) as potential reinforcement for Mo(0,6,12 and 18 vol.%)/6082Al AMCs produced using friction stir processing (FSP). Mo particles were successfully retained in the aluminum matrix in its elemental form without any interfacial reaction. A homogenous distribution of Mo particles in the composite was achieved. The distribution was independent upon the region within the stir zone. The grains in the composites were refined considerably due to dynamic recrystallization and pinning effect. The tensile test results showed that Mo particles improved the strength of the composite without compromising on ductility. The fracture surfaces of the composites were characterized with deeply developed dimples confirming appreciable ductility. - Highlights: •Molybdenum particles used as reinforcement for aluminum composites to improve ductility. •Molybdenum particles were retained in elemental form without interfacial reaction. •Homogeneous dispersion of molybdenum particles were observed in the composite. •Molybdenum particles improved tensile strength without major loss in ductility. •Deeply developed dimples on the fracture surfaces confirmed improved ductility.

  1. Characterization of molybdenum particles reinforced Al6082 aluminum matrix composites with improved ductility produced using friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Dinaharan, I.; Palanivel, R.; Ganesh Babu, B.

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with various ceramic particles suffer a loss in ductility. Hard metallic particles can be used as reinforcement to improve ductility. The present investigation focuses on using molybdenum (Mo) as potential reinforcement for Mo(0,6,12 and 18 vol.%)/6082Al AMCs produced using friction stir processing (FSP). Mo particles were successfully retained in the aluminum matrix in its elemental form without any interfacial reaction. A homogenous distribution of Mo particles in the composite was achieved. The distribution was independent upon the region within the stir zone. The grains in the composites were refined considerably due to dynamic recrystallization and pinning effect. The tensile test results showed that Mo particles improved the strength of the composite without compromising on ductility. The fracture surfaces of the composites were characterized with deeply developed dimples confirming appreciable ductility. - Highlights: •Molybdenum particles used as reinforcement for aluminum composites to improve ductility. •Molybdenum particles were retained in elemental form without interfacial reaction. •Homogeneous dispersion of molybdenum particles were observed in the composite. •Molybdenum particles improved tensile strength without major loss in ductility. •Deeply developed dimples on the fracture surfaces confirmed improved ductility.

  2. Effects of SiO2 nano-particles on tribological and mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composites by different dispersion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Mahboobeh; Zolfaghari, Mehrdad; Rezanezhad, Saeid; Azadi, Mohammad

    2018-05-01

    This study has been presented with mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composites, reinforced by SiO2 nano-particles. The stir casting method was employed to produce various aluminum matrix composites. Different composites by varying the SiO2 nano-particle content (including 0.5 and 1 weight percents) and two dispersion methods (including ball-milling and pre-heating) were made. Then, the density, the hardness, the compression strength, the wear resistance and the microstructure of nano-composites have been studied in this research. Besides, the distribution of nano-particles in the aluminum matrix for all composites has been also evaluated by the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Obtained results showed that the density, the elongation and the ultimate compressive strength of various nano-composites decreased by the presence of SiO2 nano-particles; however, the hardness, the wear resistance, the yield strength and the elastic modulus of composites increased by auditioning of nano-particles to the aluminum alloy. FESEM images indicated better wetting of the SiO2 reinforcement in the aluminum matrix, prepared by the pre-heating dispersion method, comparing to ball-milling. When SiO2 nano-particles were added to the aluminum alloy, the morphology of the Si phase and intermetallic phases changed, which enhanced mechanical properties. In addition, the wear mechanism plus the friction coefficient value were changed for various nano-composites with respect to the aluminum alloy.

  3. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  4. In-situ deformation studies of an aluminum metal-matrix composite in a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Tensile specimens made of a metal-matrix composite (cast and extruded aluminum alloy-based matrix reinforced with Al2O3 particulate) were tested in situ in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a deformation stage, to directly monitor the crack propagation phenomenon. The in situ SEM observations revealed the presence of microcracks both ahead of and near the crack-tip region. The microcracks were primarily associated with cracks in the alumina particles. The results suggest that a region of intense deformation exists ahead of the crack and corresponds to the region of microcracking. As the crack progresses, a region of plastically deformed material and associated microcracks remains in the wake of the crack.

  5. Polarization Behavior of Squeeze Cast Al2O3 Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, S. H.; Kang, Y. C.; Cho, K. M.; Park, I. M.

    1992-01-01

    Electrochemical polarization behavior of squeeze cast Al 2 O 3 short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composites was investigated for the basic understanding of the corrosion properties of the composites. The composites were fabricated with variations of fiber volume fraction and matrix alloys. It was found that the reinforced composites are more susceptible to corrosion attack than the unreinforced matrix alloys in general. Corrosion resistance shows decreasing tendency with increasing Al 2 O 3 fiber volume fraction in AC8A matrix. Effect of the matrix alloys revealed that the AC8A Al matrix composite is less susceptible to corrosion attack than the 2024 and 7075 Al matrix composites. Effect of plastic deformation on electrochemical polarization behavior of the squeeze cast Al/Al 2 O 3 composites was examined after extrusion of AC8A-10v/o Al 2 O 3 . Result shows that corrosion resistance is deteriorated after plastic deformation

  6. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  7. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  8. Application prospects of cadmium-containing crystals based on tungstates and double tungstates

    CERN Document Server

    Nagornaya, L; Apanasenko, A; Tupitsyna, I; Chernikov, V; Vostretsov, V

    2002-01-01

    Tungstate and double tungstate crystals of high scintillation efficiency and detectors based on them are applied widely in the medical imaging and radiation monitoring because of their high sensitivity to the ionizing radiation, small radiation length, high radiation hardness, low afterglow level. In this work a possibility to broaden the application field of CWO crystals have been investigated by improvement of their spectrometric quality and decreasing of their afterglow level. CWO crystals with improved characteristics have been obtained (resolution for sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs <8%, afterglow <0.02% after 20 ms). A possibility is considered to use these crystals for spectrometry of thermal and resonance neutrons, which is possible due to the presence of nuclei with large cross-section for these neutrons in the crystal lattice. Compounds of a new type based on Cd, La-containing double tungstates doped with rare earth elements have been synthesized, and their luminescent characteristics have been studied. ...

  9. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR) Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF) Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azlan; Lajis, Mohd Amri; Yusuf, Nur Kamilah

    2017-09-19

    Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future.

  10. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future.

  11. Effects of Surface Nitrification on Thermal Conductivity of Modified Aluminum Oxide Nanofibers-Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byungjoo; Bae, Kyongmin; An, Kayhyeok; Park, Soojin

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) nanofibers were treated thermally under an ammonia (NH 3 ) gas stream balanced by nitrogen to form a thin aluminum nitride (AlN) layer on the nanofibers, resulting in the enhancement of thermal conductivity of Al 2 O 3 /epoxy nanocomposites. The micro-structural and morphological properties of the NH 3 -assisted thermally-treated Al 2 O 3 nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AEM), respectively. The surface characteristics and pore structures were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Zeta-potential and N 2 /77 K isothermal adsorptions. From the results, the formation of AlN on Al 2 O 3 nanofibers was confirmed by XRD and XPS. The thermal conductivity (TC) of the modified Al 2 O 3 nanofibers/epoxy composites increased with increasing treated temperatures. On the other hand, the severely treated Al 2 O 3 /epoxy composites showed a decrease in TC, resulting from a decrease in the probability of heat-transfer networks between the filler and matrix in this system due to the aggregation of nanofiber fillers

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites synthesized via equal-channel angular pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hassan [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahedi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.jahedi@unh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Meratian, Mahmoud [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Knezevic, Marko [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    In this work, 2 vol% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composites of superior microstructural homogeneity are successfully synthesized using Bc equal-channel angular extrusion (ECAP) route. The key step in arriving at high level of homogeneous distribution of CNTs within Al was preparation of the powder using simultaneous attrition milling and ultra-sonication processes. Microstructure as revealed by electron microscopy and absence of Vickers hardness gradients across the material demonstrate that the material reached the homogeneous state in terms of CNT distribution, porosity distribution, and grain structure after eight ECAP passes. To facilitate comparison of microstructure and hardness, samples of Al were processed under the same ECAP conditions. Significantly, the composite containing only 2 vol% exhibits 20% increase in hardness relative to the Al samples.

  13. Particle-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMCs—Selected Results of an Integrated Technology, User, and Market Analysis and Forecast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Schmidt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The research and development of new materials such as particle-reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs will only result in a successful innovation if these materials show significant advantages not only from a technological, but also from an economic point of view. Against this background, in the Collaborative Research Center SFB 692, the concept of an integrated technology, user, and market analysis and forecast has been developed as a means for assessing the technological and commercial potential of new materials in early life cycle stages. After briefly describing this concept, it is applied to AMCs and the potential field of manufacturing aircraft components. Results show not only technological advances, but also considerable economic potential—the latter one primarily resulting from the possible weight reduction being enabled by the increased yield strength of the new material.

  14. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  15. Products of tungstate ion interaction with primary aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Sejfullina, I.I.; Purich, A.N.; Babinets, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    Using the methods of conductometric titration, IR-spectroscopic and thermographic analyses precipitates formed in the process of interaction of diluted aqueous solutions of sodium tungstate with alcoholic solutions of dodecyl-, tetradecyl- and octadecylamine have been studied. It is shown that as a result of interaction tungstates of corresponding amines are formed. The structure and thermal stability of singled out products are determined

  16. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, David C. [Eck Industreis, Inc.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  17. Surface-modified anodic aluminum oxide membrane with hydroxyethyl celluloses as a matrix for bilirubin removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Maoqiang; Ling, Yisheng; Wu, Guisen; Liu, Xin; Ge, Dongtao; Shi, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Microporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were modified by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to produce terminal epoxy groups. These were used to covalently link hydroxyethyl celluloses (HEC) to amplify reactive groups of AAO membrane. The hydroxyl groups of HEC-AAO composite membrane were further modified with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to link arginine as an affinity ligand. The contents of HEC and arginine of arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membrane were 52.1 and 19.7mg/g membrane, respectively. As biomedical adsorbents, the arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membranes were tested for bilirubin removal. The non-specific bilirubin adsorption on the unmodified HEC-AAO composite membranes was 0.8mg/g membrane. Higher bilirubin adsorption values, up to 52.6mg/g membrane, were obtained with the arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membranes. Elution of bilirubin showed desorption ratio was up to 85% using 0.3M NaSCN solution as the desorption agent. Comparisons equilibrium and dynamic capacities showed that dynamic capacities were lower than the equilibrium capacities. In addition, the adsorption mechanism of bilirubin and the effects of temperature, initial concentration of bilirubin, albumin concentration and ionic strength on adsorption were also investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In situ formation of ZrB2 particulates and their influence on microstructure and tensile behavior of AA7075 aluminum matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Raja Selvam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In situ synthesis of aluminum matrix composites (AMCs has become a popular method due to several advantages over conventional stir casting method. In the present study, AA7075/ZrB2 AMCs reinforced with various content of ZrB2 particulates (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 wt.% were synthesized by the in situ reaction of molten aluminum with inorganic salts K2ZrF6 and KBF4. The composites were characterized using XRD, OM, SEM, EBSD and TEM. The XRD patterns revealed the formation of ZrB2 particulates without the presence of any other compounds. The formation of ZrB2 particulates refined the grains of aluminum matrix extensively. Most of the ZrB2 particulates were located near the grain boundaries. The ZrB2 particulates exhibited various morphologies including spherical, cylindrical and hexagonal shapes. The size of the ZrB2 particulates was in the order of nano, sub micron and micron level. A good interfacial bonding was observed between the aluminum matrix and the ZrB2 particulates. The in situ formed ZrB2 particulates enhanced the mechanical properties such as microhardness and the ultimate tensile strength. Various strengthening mechanisms were identified.

  19. Effect of Spark-Plasma-Sintering Conditions on Tensile Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Imai, H.; Umeda, J.; Takahashi, M.; Kondoh, K.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) matrix composites containing 2 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated by powder metallurgy using high-energy ball milling (HEBM), spark plasma sintering (SPS), and subsequent hot extrusion. The effect of SPS conditions on the tensile properties of CNT/Al composites was investigated. The results showed that composites with well-dispersed CNTs and nearly full-density CNT/Al can be obtained. During HEBM, CNTs were shortened, inserted into welded Al powder particles, bonded to Al, and still stable without CNT-Al reaction. After consolidation, Al4C3 phases formed in composites under different sintering conditions. With the increase of sintering temperature and holding time, the strength decreased. Conversely, the ductility and toughness noticeably increased. As a result, a good balance between strength (367 MPa in ultimate tensile strength) and ductility (13% in elongation) was achieved in the as-extruded CNT/Al composite sintered at 630°C with a holding time of 300 min.

  20. Evidence of organic luminescent centers in sol-gel-synthesized yttrium aluminum borate matrix leading to bright visible emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burner, Pauline; Salauen, Mathieu; Ibanez, Alain; Gautier-Luneau, Isabelle [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, Grenoble (France); Sontakke, Atul D.; Viana, Bruno [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech - CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (France); Bardet, Michel [Universite Grenoble Alpes, CEA, CNRS, INAC, MEM, Grenoble (France); Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Gambarelli, Serge; Maurel, Vincent [Universite Grenoble Alpes, CEA, CNRS, INAC, SyMMES, Grenoble (France); Barra, Anne-Laure [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses, UPR CNRS 3228, Universite Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France); Ferrier, Alban [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech - CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (France); Sorbonne Universites UPMC Universites Paris 06, Paris (France)

    2017-11-06

    Yttrium aluminum borate (YAB) powders prepared by sol-gel process have been investigated to understand their photoluminescence (PL) mechanism. The amorphous YAB powders exhibit bright visible PL from blue emission for powders calcined at 450 C to broad white PL for higher calcination temperature. Thanks to {sup 13}C labelling, NMR and EPR studies show that propionic acid initially used to solubilize the yttrium nitrate is decomposed into aromatic molecules confined within the inorganic matrix. DTA-TG-MS analyses show around 2 wt % of carbogenic species. The PL broadening corresponds to the apparition of a new band at 550 nm, associated with the formation of aromatic species. Furthermore, pulsed ENDOR spectroscopy combined with DFT calculations enables us to ascribe EPR spectra to free radicals derived from small (2 to 3 rings) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). PAH molecules are thus at the origin of the PL as corroborated by slow afterglow decay and thermoluminescence experiments. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: NiWO 4 nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: ► NiWO 4 spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. ► Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. ► Composition and structural properties of NiWO 4 nanoparticles were characterized. ► EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV–vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. ► Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO 4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO 4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO 4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  2. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi, E-mail: rahiminasrabadi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh [Islamic Azad University, Varamin Pishva Branch, Varamin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Ismail [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiWO{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition and structural properties of NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO{sub 4} particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO{sub 4} were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV

  3. Electro-thermo-mechanical coupling analysis of deep drawing with resistance heating for aluminum matrix composites sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaifeng; Zhang, Tuoda; Wang, Bo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, electro-plastic forming to be a focus of attention in materials hot processing research area, because it is a sort of energy-saving, high efficient and green manufacturing technology. An electro-thermo-mechanical model can be adopted to carry out the sequence simulation of aluminum matrix composites sheet deep drawing via electro-thermal coupling and thermal-mechanical coupling method. The first step of process is resistance heating of sheet, then turn off the power, and the second step is deep drawing. Temperature distribution of SiCp/2024Al composite sheet by resistance heating and sheet deep drawing deformation were analyzed. During the simulation, effect of contact resistances, temperature coefficient of resistance for electrode material and SiCp/2024Al composite on temperature distribution were integrally considered. The simulation results demonstrate that Sicp/2024Al composite sheet can be rapidly heated to 400° in 30s using resistances heating and the sheet temperature can be controlled by adjusting the current density. Physical properties of the electrode materials can significantly affect the composite sheet temperature distribution. The temperature difference between the center and the side of the sheet is proportional to the thermal conductivity of the electrode, the principal cause of which is that the heat transfers from the sheet to the electrode. SiCp/2024Al thin-wall part can be intactly manufactured at strain rate of 0.08s-1 and the sheet thickness thinning rate is limited within 20%, which corresponds well to the experimental result.

  4. Synthesis of cadmium tungstate films via sol-gel processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennstrom, Kirk; Limmer, Steven J.; Cao Guozhong

    2003-06-23

    Cadmium tungstate is a scintillator material with excellent intrinsic photoluminescent properties. It is highly resistant to gamma radiation, has an almost non-existent afterglow and is highly efficient. Cadmium tungstate is also non-hydroscopic, unlike the more prevalent thallium-doped alkali halide scintillators. In order to create thin films of cadmium tungstate with precise stoichiometric control, a sol-gel processing technique has been applied to produce this material for the first time. In addition to lower processing temperatures, sol-gel-derived cadmium tungstate is cheaper and easier than other technologies, particularly for thin films. Furthermore, it has the potential to produce nanostructured materials with good optical quality. X-Ray diffraction results of sol-gel-derived materials fired at various temperatures imply crystallization of cadmium tungstate without the intermediate formation of either tungsten oxide or cadmium oxide. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows the formation of nano-sized particles prior to heat treatment, which form meso-sized particles after the heat treatment. Photoluminesce analysis indicates emission of derived films at 480 nm, which agrees with other published data. Finally, the efficiency of derived films was approximately 6%{+-}1.8%.

  5. Automatic generation of 2D micromechanical finite element model of silicon–carbide/aluminum metal matrix composites: Effects of the boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element (FE) simulations of the deformation and damage evolution of Silicon–Carbide (SiC) particle reinforced aluminum alloy composite including interphase are carried out for different microstructures and particle volume fractions of the composites. A program is developed...... for the automatic generation of 2D micromechanical FE-models with randomly distributed SiC particles. In order to simulate the damage process in aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles, a damage parameter based on the stress triaxial indicator and the maximum principal stress criterion based elastic brittle damage...... model are developed within Abaqus/Standard Subroutine USDFLD, respectively. An Abaqus/Standard Subroutine MPC, which allows defining multi-point constraints, is developed to realize the symmetric boundary condition (SBC) and periodic boundary condition (PBC). A series of computational experiments...

  6. Highly phosphorescent hollow fibers inner-coated with tungstate nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pui Fai; Bai, Gongxun; Si, Liping; Lee, Ka I.; Hao, Jianhua; Xin, John H.; Fei, Bin

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop luminescent microtubes from natural fibers, a facile biomimetic mineralization method was designed to introduce the CaWO4-based nanocrystals into kapok lumens. The structure, composition, and luminescence properties of resultant fibers were investigated with microscopes, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and fluorescence spectrometry. The yield of tungstate crystals inside kapok was significantly promoted with a process at high temperature and pressure—the hydrothermal treatment. The tungstate crystals grown on the inner wall of kapok fibers showed the same crystal structure with those naked powders, but smaller in crystal size. The resultant fiber assemblies demonstrated reduced phosphorescence intensity in comparison to the naked tungstate powders. However, the fibers gave more stable luminescence than the naked powders in wet condition. This approach explored the possibility of decorating natural fibers with high load of nanocrystals, hinting potential applications in anti-counterfeit labels, security textiles, and even flexible and soft optical devices.

  7. Synchrotron-based far-infrared spectroscopy of nickel tungstate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinko, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Roy, P.; Evarestov, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclinic antiferromagnetic NiWO 4 was studied by far-infrared (30-600 cm -1 ) absorption spectroscopy in the temperature range of 5-300 K using the synchrotron radiation from SOLEIL source. Two isomorphous CoWO 4 and ZnWO 4 tungstates were investigated for comparison. The phonon contributions in the far-infrared range of tungstates were interpreted using the first-principles spin-polarized linear combination of atomic orbital calculations. No contributions from magnetic excitations were found in NiWO 4 and CoWO 4 below their Neel temperatures down to 5 K.

  8. On surface reactions of iron tungstate with ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrubov, V.A.; Shchukin, V.P.; Averbukh, A.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Results of investigation of ethane oxidation reaction upon iron tungstate are presented. It is shown that catalytic oxidation of ethane is accompanied by the surface reaction of the catalyst reduction. Maximum reduction of surface depends upon temperature and considerably affects the direction of ethane oxidation process. Activation energies of ethane oxidation reactions and surface reaction of iron tungstate reduction depend on the surface actual state and at its reduction up to 5% from monolayer change in the limits 36.0-46.0 and 53.0-66.0 kcal/mol respectively

  9. Particles geometry influence in the thermal stress level in an SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite considering the material non-linear behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Carlos A. de J.; Libardi, Rosani M.P.; Boari, Zoroastro de M.

    2009-01-01

    An analytical methodology was developed to predict the thermal stress level that occurs in a metallic matrix composite reinforced with SiC particles, when the temperature decreases from 600 deg C to 20 deg C during the fabrication process. This analytical development is based on the Eshelby method, dislocation mechanisms, and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution model. The material was assumed to have a linear elastic behavior. The analytical results from this formulation were verified against numerical linear analyses that were performed over a set of random non-uniform distribution of particles that covers a wide range of volumetric ratios. To stick with the analytical hypothesis, particles with round geometry were used. Each stress distribution, represented by the isostress curves at ΔT=-580 deg C, was analyzed with an image analyzer. A statistical procedure was applied to obtain the most probable thermal stress level. Analytical and numerical results compared very well. Plastic deformation as well as particle geometry can alter significantly the stress field in the material. To account for these effects, in this work, several numerical analyses were performed considering the non-linear behavior for the aluminum matrix and distinct particle geometries. Two distinct sets of data with were used. To allow a direct comparison, the first set has the same models (particle form, size and distribution) as used previously. The second set analyze quadrilateral particles and present very tight range of volumetric ratio, closer to what is found in actual SiC composites. A simple and fast algorithm was developed to analyze the new results. The comparison of these results with the previous ones shows, as expected, the strong influence of the elastic-plastic behavior of the aluminum matrix on the composite thermal stress distribution due to its manufacturing process and shows, also, a small influence of the particles geometry and volumetric ratio. (author)

  10. Studies on Preparation and Characterization of Aluminum Nitride-Coated Carbon Fibers and Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Hye Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work; the effects of an aluminum nitride (AlN ceramic coating on the thermal conductivity of carbon fiber-reinforced composites were studied. AlN were synthesized by a wet-thermal treatment (WTT method in the presence of copper catalysts. The WTT method was carried out in a horizontal tube furnace at above 1500 °C under an ammonia (NH3 gas atmosphere balanced by a nitrogen using aluminum chloride as a precursor. Copper catalysts pre-doped enhance the interfacial bonding of the AlN with the carbon fiber surfaces. They also help to introduce AlN bonds by interrupting aluminum oxide (Al2O3 formation in combination with oxygen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM; Transmission electron microscopy (TEM; and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to analyze the carbon fiber surfaces and structures at each step (copper-coating step and AlN formation step. In conclusion; we have demonstrated a synthesis route for preparing an AlN coating on the carbon fiber surfaces in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  11. Aluminum powder size and microstructure effects on properties of boron nitride reinforced aluminum matrix composites fabricated by semi-solid powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cunguang; Guo, Leichen; Luo, Ji; Hao, Junjie; Guo, Zhimeng; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2015-01-01

    Al matrix composite reinforced by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with nearly full densification was successfully fabricated by the semi-solid powder metallurgy technique. The h-BN/Al composites were synthesized with elemental pure Al powder size of d_5_0=35, 12 and 2 μm. The powder morphology and the structural characteristics of the composites were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The density, Brinell hardness and compressive behavior of the samples were characterized. Density measurement of the Al composites revealed that the composite densification can be effectively promoted by plenty of embedded liquid phase under pressure. Composites prepared using Al powder with varying granularity showed different grain characteristics, and in situ recrystallization occurred inside the original grains with 35 μm Al powder. A sharp interface consisting of Al/Al_2O_3/h-BN was present in the composites. Both the compressive strength and the fracture strain of the investigated composites increased with the decrease of the Al powder size, along with the Brinell hardness. The composite with 2 μm Al powder exhibited the highest relative density (99.3%), Brinell harness (HB 128), compressive strength (763 MPa) and fracture strain (0.299).

  12. Transport kinetics of hydrogen permeable lanthanum tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, Andreas

    2017-01-24

    The electrical conductivity relaxation technique is a widely used method to determine the oxygen transport parameters of mixed ionic-electronic conductors. In recent years, it has been modified to investigate the hydration behavior of proton conducting mixed conductors, giving access to up to four transport parameters in a single relaxation experiment, the diffusion coefficients and surface reaction rates of hydrogen and oxygen. In this work, the transport properties of the fluorite type protonic conductor lanthanum tungstate have been investigated by means of electrical conductivity relaxation. The experiments were performed in a temperature range from 650 C to 950 C, in a pO{sub 2} range from 3 mbar to 100 mbar and in a pH{sub 2}O range from 10 mbar to 100 mbar and in dry atmosphere. At high temperatures, the conductivity relaxation curve follows the expected two-fold non-monotonic behavior upon hydration. At low temperatures, however, the contribution of the fast hydrogen kinetic decreases and by a further decrease of the temperature, the relaxation shows two-fold monotonic behavior. The power factors - the contribution of each single fold relaxation curve to the resulting two-fold relaxation curve, which is a superposition - have been derived to explain the behavior mentioned above. The activation energy of the oxygen incorporation is rather low. Hence, oxidation experiments were performed in dry atmospheres in order to investigate if the origin of the oxygen species is relevant. The results revealed higher activation energies, which was expected, but also higher absolute values of the surface reaction rate and the diffusion coefficient. Oxidation experiments with increasing humidity revealed that the increased diffusivity cannot be attributed to the total concentrations of electron holes and proton interstitials. First experiments using spectroscopic relaxation, which is dependent on the concentration of hydroxy-anions only, were performed. Absorption bands

  13. Endurance in Al Alloy Melts and Wear Resistance of Titanium Matrix Composite Shot-Sleeve for Aluminum Alloy Die-casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bong-Jae; Kim, Young-Jig; Sung, Si-Young

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the endurance against Al alloy melts and wear resistance of an in-situ synthesized titanium matrix composite (TMC) sleeve for aluminum alloy die-casting. The conventional die-casting shot sleeve material was STD61 tool steel. TMCs have great thermal stability, wear and oxidation resistance. The in-situ reaction between Ti and B4C leads to two kinds of thermodynamically stable reinforcements, such as TiBw and TiCp. To evaluate the feasibility of the application to a TMCs diecasting shot sleeve, the interfacial reaction behavior was examined between Al alloys melts with TMCs and STD61 tool steel. The pin-on-disk type dry sliding wear test was also investigated for TMCs and STD61 tool steel.

  14. Microwave combustion synthesis of in situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Heguo, E-mail: zhg1200@sina.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Nano Materials and Technology, Jiangsu Province Higher Education Institutions, 210094 (China); Synergetic Center for Advanced Materials Research, Jiangsu Province Higher Education Institutions, 210094 (China); Hua, Bo; Cui, Tao; Huang, Jiewen; Li, Jianliang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Xie, Zonghan, E-mail: zonghan.xie@adelaide.edu.au [School of Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites were fabricated from Al and ZrO{sub 2} powders by SiC assisted microwave combustion synthesis. The microstructure and reaction pathways were analyzed by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the heating rate during microwave synthesis was very high and the entire process took several minutes and that the ignition temperature of the reaction was much lower than that of conventional methods. In addition, the resulting microstructure was found to be finer than that prepared by the conventional methods and no cracks can be seen in the Al{sub 3}Zr reinforcements. As such, the newly developed composites have potential for safety-critical applications where catastrophic failure is not tolerated.

  15. Advance on Al2O3 Particulates Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (Al-MMCs Manufactured by the Power Metallurgy(PM Methods- Improved PM Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs with Al2O3 particulates as reinforcement fabricated by the power metallurgy (PM methods have gained much attention due to their unique characteristics of the wide range of Al2O3 particles addition, easy-operating process and effectiveness. The improved PM techniques, such as the high energy ball milling, powder extruder and high pressure torsion were applied to further strengthening the properties or/and diminishing the agglomeration of strength particles. The formation of liquid phase assisted densification of compacts to promote the sintering of composites. Complex design of Al2O3 particles with other particles was another efficient method to tailor the properties of Al-MMCs.

  16. Development of empirical relationships for prediction of mechanical and wear properties of AA6082 aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Processing (FSP has been established as a potential solid state production method to prepare aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. FSP was effectively applied to produce AA6082 AMCs reinforced with various ceramic particles such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC in this work. Empirical relationships were estimated to predict the influence of FSP process parameters on the properties such as area of stir zone, microhardness and wear rate of AMCs. FSP experiments were executed using a central composite rotatable design consisting of four factors and five levels. The FSP parameters analyzed were tool rotational speed, traverse speed, groove width and type of ceramic particle. The effect of those parameters on the properties of AMCs was deduced using the developed empirical relationships. The predicted trends were explained with the aid of observed macro and microstructures.

  17. Investigation of Wear Behavior of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Al2O3 and Produced by Hot Pressing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil ARIK

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Al powder produced by gas atomization technique has 72.06 µm average particle size and 99 % purity was mixed with as a reinforcement Al2O3 has 99.52% purity and 45 submicron particle size in a high energy ball mill for two hours. In order to obtain disk samples with 30 mm diameter and 6 mm thick mixed powders, after the characterization of particle size and morphology, were compacted in a single action press. Compaction process were carried out from mixed powders by hot pressing at 200 MPa pressure and 550 °C temperature for two hours. Then microstructural analysis, hardness and density measurements of powder metal composite parts were performed. After, the characterization of samples abrasion wear tests were performed according to ASTM-G99-05 by using TRIBOMETER T10/20 ball-on-disk abrasive wearing device. After the abrasive wear test of aluminum and composite powder metal parts produced under the identical test parameters, test results were compared and effect of Al2O3 on the wear properties of composite materials was exhibited. The test results showed that the composite parts have 62 % extra harness and better abrasion wear performance according to aluminum powder metal parts produced and tested under the identical conditions

  18. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; 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Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  19. Lead tungstate crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    A consignment of 500 lead tungstate crystals arrived at CERN from the northern Russian town of Apatity in May. Destined for the ALICE heavy-ion experiment in preparation for the Large Hadron Collider, each crystal is an 18 cm long rod with a 2.2 cm square section, and weighs some 750 g. A total of 17 000 crystals will make up the experiment's photon spectrometer.

  20. Dual-Readout Calorimetry with Lead Tungstate Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Akchurin, N.

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented of beam tests in which a small electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of lead tungstate crystals was exposed to 50 GeV electrons and pions. This calorimeter was backed up by the DREAM Dual-Readout calorimeter, which measures the scintillation and \\v{C}erenkov light produced in the shower development, using two different media. The signals from the crystal calorimeter were analyzed in great detail in an attempt to determine the contributions from these two types of light ...

  1. Effect of clustering on the mechanical properties of SiC particulate-reinforced aluminum alloy 2024 metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soon-Jik; Kim, Hong-Moule; Huh, Dae; Suryanarayana, C.; Chun, Byong Sun

    2003-01-01

    Al 2024-SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) powders produced by centrifugal atomization were hot extruded to investigate the effect of clustering on their mechanical properties. Fracture toughness and tension tests were conducted on specimens reinforced with different volume fractions of SiC. A model was proposed to suggest that the strength of the MMCs could be estimated from the load transfer model approach that takes into consideration the extent of clustering. This model has been successful in predicting the experimentally observed strength and fracture toughness values of the Al 2024-SiC MMCs. On the basis of experimental observations, it is suggested that the strength of particulate-reinforced MMCs may be calculated from the relation: σ y =σ m V m +σ r (V r -V c )-σ r V c , where σ and V represent the yield strength and volume fraction, respectively, and the subscripts m, r, and c represent the matrix, reinforcement, and clusters, respectively

  2. An analysis of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the tensile deformation of aluminum-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Llorca, J.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of superposed hydrostatic pressure on the tensile deformation of particle-reinforced Al-matrix composites was analyzed using a self-consistent approximation. The composite was represented in terms of an interpenetrating network of randomly distributed spheres, which stand for the intact and damaged regions in the composite. Each sphere contained an intact or broken ceramic particle at the center, and the model assumed that the fraction of damaged spheres increased during deformation. The load partitioning between intact and damaged regions in the composite as well as the stress redistribution due to damage was computed through a self-consistent scheme. It was shown that the tensile stresses in the ceramic particles, and thus the fraction of broken particles, were reduced as the hydrostatic pressure increased. This led to a moderate improvement in the composite flow stress but more significant gains were achieved in the strain at the onset of plastic instability. Both magnitudes increased with the hydrostatic pressure until a saturation stress was reached. Particle fracture was completely inhibited at this point, and higher pressures did not have any influence on the composite behavior, which was equivalent to that of the undamaged phase in the absence of hydrostatic pressure. Using reasonable values for the matrix and reinforcement properties, the model predictions for the composite strength and strain at the onset of plastic instability were in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature for high strength Al alloys reinforced with SiC and Al 2 O 3 particles

  3. Seven up. The incorporation of Li{sup +} cations in yttrium tungstate and silicate tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, Katharina V.; Schustereit, Tanja; Strobel, Sabine; Hartenbach, Ingo [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-12-13

    Lithium yttrium(III) oxidotungstate(VI), LiY{sub 5}W{sub 8}O{sub 32}, was synthesized by solid-state reaction of a mixture of lithium chloride, yttrium sesquioxide, and tungsten trioxide. It crystallizes monoclinically in space group C2/c (a = 1908.34(5) pm, b = 561.80(1) pm, c = 1147.22(3) pm, β = 111.255(2) , Z = 2). The structure comprises one mixed Li{sup +}/Y{sup 3+} cationic position (molar ratio Li:Y1 = 1:1) and one cationic position exclusively occupied by Y{sup 3+} cations. All W{sup 6+} cations are surrounded by six O{sup 2-} anions, forming distorted octahedral coordination polyhedra, which are mutually linked by both edges and vertices to cascaded {sup 2}{sub ∞}{[W_4O_1_6]"8"-} layers. Lithium yttrium(III) oxidosilicate(IV) oxidotungstate(VI), LiY{sub 5}[SiO{sub 4}]{sub 2}[WO{sub 4}]{sub 4}, was obtained as by-product in the synthesis of YF[WO{sub 4}] by sintering a mixture of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, YF{sub 3}, and WO{sub 3} with lithium chloride as fluxing agent in sealed silica ampoules. It crystallizes orthorhombically in space group Pban (a = 512.08(4) pm, b = 1673.35(12) pm, c = 493.68(4) pm, Z = 1) bearing one mixed crystallographic position occupied by Li{sup +} and Y{sup 3+} cations in a molar ratio of 1:3 and one exclusive Y{sup 3+} position in its structure. The coordination polyhedra around the Si{sup 4+} and W{sup 6+} cations are isolated tetrahedra built up by four O{sup 2-} anions each. The crystal structure of this silicate tungstate can be derived from the scheelite-type structure by inserting anionic {sup 2}{sub ∞}{(Y2[SiO_4])"-} layers between cationic {sup 2}{sub ∞}{[(Li/Y1)_2[WO_4]_2]"+} double layers. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Testing the radiation hardness of lead tungstate scintillating crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, M; Li Chuan; Chen, H; Xu, Z Z; Wang, Z M

    2000-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider operation will produce a high radiation background. PbWO/sub 4/ crystals are selected as scintillators for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter. To reach the precise requirement for energy measurements, a strict requirement for the radiation hardness is needed. In this paper, we present a method for evaluating the radiation hardness and its measurement. Results for several full size (23 cm length) lead tungstate crystals under Co/sup 60/ gamma - ray irradiation are given, investigating the light yield loss and its longitudinal uniformity. (8 refs).

  5. Superconductivity and thermal property of MgB2/aluminum matrix composite materials fabricated by 3-dimensional penetration casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Kenji; Saeki, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Katsuhiko; Ikeno, Susumu; Mori, Katsunori; Yabumoto, Yukinobu

    2006-01-01

    Superconductive MgB 2 /Al composite material with low and high volume fractions of particles were fabricated by our special pre-packing technique and 3-dimensional penetration casting method. The composite material showed homogeneous distribution of MgB 2 particles in the Al-matrix with neither any aggregation of particles nor defects such as cracks or cavities. The critical temperature of superconducting transition (T C ) was determined by electrical resistivity and magnetization to be about 37-39 K. Specific heat measurements further supported these T C findings. The Meissner effect was also verified in the liquid He, in which a piece of the composite floated above a permanent magnet. The thermal conductivity of the MgB 2 /Al composite material was about 25 W/K·m at 30K, a value much higher than those found for NbTi or Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires normally used in practice, which are 0.5 and 0.2 W/K·m at 10 K, respectively. A billet of the superconducting material was successfully hot-extruded, forming a rod. The same as the billet sample, the rod showed an onset T C of electrical resistivity of 39 K. (author)

  6. Double tungstates of metals of scandium and ammonium subgroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksin, V I [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Kolloidnoj Khimii i Khimii Vody

    1980-06-01

    The methods of pH-potentiometry, conductometry, determination of residual concentrations of liquid phases and precipitations, selected by chemical analysis have been used for investigation R(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/-(NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/WO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O systems, (where R=Sc, Y, La). The formation of double tungstates NH/sub 4/R(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/xnH/sub 2/O is established. The NH/sub 4/Sc(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/x4.5H/sub 2/O, NH/sub 4/Yx(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/x3H/sub 2/O, NH/sub 4/La(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/x1.5H/sub 2/O compounds are synthesized in individual form. Precipitation conditions (pH, concentration ratio) and composition of the solid phase are determined. The behaviour of synthesized slats at thermolysis up to 880 deg C is studied. Physicochemical properties (color, solubility of the simple and double tungstates of scandium, yttrium and lanthanum with ammonium) is studied. IR spectra and X-ray diffraction analysis give idea about double salts structural transformations.

  7. Tungstate adsorption onto Italian soils with different characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    The study of tungsten in the environment is currently of considerable interest because of the growing concerns resulting from its possible toxicity and carcinogenicity. Adsorption reactions are some of the fundamental processes governing the fate and transport of tungsten compounds in soil. This paper reports data on the adsorption of tungstate ions in three different Italian soils, which are characteristic of the Mediterranean region. The results show that pH is the most important factor governing the adsorption of tungstate in these soils. The data interpreted according to the Langmuir equation show that the maximum value of adsorption is approximately 30 mmol kg -1 for the most acidic soil (pH = 4.50) and approximately 9 mmol kg -1 for the most basic soil (pH = 7.40). In addition, soil organic matter is shown to play a fundamental role in adsorption processes, which are favored in soils with a higher organic matter content. The data could contribute to a better understanding of the behavior of tungsten compounds in Italian soils for which current knowledge is very scarce, also in view of environmental regulations, which are currently lacking.

  8. Interaction of cadmium and indium nitrate mixture with sodium tungstate in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousova, E E; Krivobok, V I; Gruba, A I [Donetskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of the mixture of cadmium and indium nitrates with sodium tungstate in aqueous solution is studied using the methods of ''residual concentrations'', pH potentiometry and conductometry. Independent of the ratio of components in the initial solution a mixture of coprecipitated normal tungstates of cadmium and indium is formed in the system. Heat treatment of the precipitates at 800 deg C for 50 hrs with subsequent hardening results in the formation of solid solutions on the basis of normal cadmium and indium tungstates.

  9. Incipient crystallization of transition-metal tungstates under microwaves probed by Raman scattering and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Kisla P. F.; Dias, Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Microwave synthesis was used to produce nanosized transition-metal tungstates in environmentally friendly conditions not yet reported by the literature: 110 and 150 °C, for times of 10 and 20 min. X-ray diffraction evidenced incipient crystallized materials, while transmission electron microscopy indicates nanostructured regions of about 2–5 nm inside an amorphous matrix. Raman spectroscopy was used to probe short-range ordering in the achieved samples and also to obtain a reliable set of spectra containing all the Raman-active bands predicted by group-theory calculations. The vibrational spectra showed no extra feature, indicating that the microwave processing was able to produce short-range ordered materials without tetrahedral distortions. These distortions are frequently reported when commercially modified kitchen microwave units are employed. In this work, the syntheses were conducted in a commercial apparatus especially designed for fully controlled temperature–time–pressure conditions.

  10. Ion-exchange properties of microporous tungstates: novel adsorbents for nuclear waste management applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, C.S.; Luca, V.; Eddowes, R.C.; Keegan, E.A.; Scales, N.

    2003-01-01

    A hydrothermally prepared tungsten oxide-based phase, ATS-1 (ANSTO Tungstate Sorbent), of nominal composition, Na 0.3 Mo 0.1 W 0.9O3 .χH 2 O, has been shown to display promising selectivity for both Cs + and Sr 2+ cations from acidic simulant, indicative of the Intermediate Level Liquid Waste (ILLW) produced from 99 Mo radioisotope production at the ANSTO site. The development of an inorganic ion-exchanger that displays such selectivity for both Cs + and Sr 2+ in acidic solutions has previously eluded researchers in the field of inorganic ion-exchangers. The ATS-1 adsorbent also displays exquisite selectivity for lead (and polonium) in low to high acidity solutions, and as such is being further investigated as a method to reduce the radiological hazard from 210 Pb and 210 Po during the processing of uranium ore bodies. The adsorption of Cs + , Sr 2+ and Pb 2+ cations by ATS-1 has been extensively investigated with respect to the kinetics of adsorption, capacity and the effect of competing cations viz. Na + , K + . The ATS-1 adsorbent has also been successfully granulated with an inert, organic matrix, which has consequently allowed the study of cation adsorption using more application-based, column separations. The results of these investigations suggest that these materials have potential application in several nuclear waste management issues in Australia at the present

  11. Performance of an electromagnetic calorimeter with lead-tungstate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, R.; Sugitate, T.; Sugita, N.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Toyoda, D.; Homma, K.; Yamazaki, H.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of an electromagnetic calorimeter with lead-tungstate (PWO) crystals was tested by using 1 GeV photons. The calorimeter consisted of nine crystals of 20 x 20 x 200 mm in size arranged in a 3 x 3 array. The energy resolution was obtained to be σ E /E = (2.50 ± 0.75%) / √E + (1.25 ± 0.34%) with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) reading all signals. Another setup, reading the central cell with an avalanche photo diode (APD) and the surrounding 8 cells with the PMT, was also studied, however, its energy resolution was not scaled with the stochastic function and we found the resolution of about 10% around 1 GeV. (author)

  12. Luminescence spectra of lead tungstate, spodumene and topaz crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, Vasuki

    2002-01-01

    A detailed set of thermoluminescence, cathodoluminescence and radioluminescence (TL, CLTL and RLTL) data of lead tungstate, Spodumene and Topaz have been reported for the first time over a wide temperature range from 25 to 500K. Lead tungstate (PbWO 4 ), a widely known scintillating material, gives TL glow peaks which are related to complex defect centres. Doping of this crystal with trivalent rare earth ions (La 3+ , Y 3+ ) reduces the slow component of the emission thereby making it more suitable for its applications. The pentavalent dopants on the other hand, enhance the green emission and quench the blue emission at temperatures 100K. The origin and the irradiation temperature definitely have an effect on the spectrum. No strong relationship could be derived from the dose dependence data. Two less studied minerals, Spodumene and Topaz have also been investigated with the luminescence techniques. The glow peak near 250degC is thought to have originated from Mn 2+ centres. As there are no ESR data available, the assignment of defect centres is rather difficult. Cr + acts as the quencher in green spodumene. Topaz had the same treatment as the other two sets of samples and the defect centre characterisation looks complex as each coloured sample gave different patterns of glow peaks. Cathodoluminescence whilst heating (CLTL) of all these samples showed some unusual features in the form of a luminescence intensity step which is believed to have originated from the presence of ice. Water, in nanoparticle size quantities, is present as a contaminant in the lattice and undergoes a phase transition at 170K from hexagonal to cubic structures. This phase change influences the luminescence efficiency of the host material and is reflected in the spectrum as a discontinuity in intensity. (author)

  13. Phosphorylation events implicating p38 and PI3K mediate tungstate-effects in MIN6 beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquer, Sandra; Barcelo-Batllori, Silvia; Julia, Marta; Marzo, Nuria; Nadal, Belen; Guinovart, Joan J.; Gomis, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. Several lines of evidence indicate the pancreatic beta cell as one of the targets of tungstate action. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism by which this compound exerts its effects on the beta cell line MIN6. Tungstate treatment induced phosphorylation and subsequent activation of p38 and PI3K which in turn are implicated in tungstate PDX-1 nuclear localization and activation. Although no effect was observed in glucose-induced insulin secretion we found that tungstate activates basal insulin release, a process driven, at least in part, by activation of p38. These results show a direct involvement of p38 and PI3K phosphorylation in the mechanism of action of tungstate in the beta cell

  14. Aluminum Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  15. Tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels tunes ERK phosphorylation and cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Fernández-Mariño

    Full Text Available Despite the substantial knowledge on the antidiabetic, antiobesity and antihypertensive actions of tungstate, information on its primary target/s is scarce. Tungstate activates both the ERK1/2 pathway and the vascular voltage- and Ca2+-dependent large-conductance BKαβ1 potassium channel, which modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation and function, respectively. Here, we have assessed the possible involvement of BKαβ1 channels in the tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation and its relevance for VSMC proliferation. Western blot analysis in HEK cell lines showed that expression of vascular BKαβ1 channels potentiates the tungstate-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Gi/o protein-dependent manner. Tungstate activated BKαβ1 channels upstream of G proteins as channel activation was not altered by the inhibition of G proteins with GDPβS or pertussis toxin. Moreover, analysis of Gi/o protein activation measuring the FRET among heterologously expressed Gi protein subunits suggested that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes G protein activation. Single channel recordings on VSMCs from wild-type and β1-knockout mice indicated that the presence of the regulatory β1 subunit was essential for the tungstate-mediated activation of BK channels in VSMCs. Moreover, the specific BK channel blocker iberiotoxin lowered tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation by 55% and partially reverted (by 51% the tungstate-produced reduction of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-induced proliferation in human VSMCs. Our observations indicate that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes activation of PTX-sensitive Gi proteins to enhance the tungstate-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and inhibits PDGF-stimulated cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle.

  16. Ammonium-tungstate-promoted growth of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Songfeng; Li, Chaowei; Li, Taotao; Geng, Renjie; Li, Qiulong; Lu, Weibang; Yao, Yagang

    2018-05-01

    Ammonium tungstate ((NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O) is a kind of oxygen-containing ammonium salt. The following study proves that it can be successfully used as a metal oxide alternative to produce boron oxide (B2O2) by oxidizing boron (B) in a traditional boron oxide chemical vapor deposition (BOCVD) process. This special oxidant promotes the simplistic fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in a conventional horizontal tube furnace, an outcome which may have resulted from its strong oxidizability. The experimental results demonstrate that the mole ratio of B and (NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O is a key parameter in determining the formation, quality and quantity of BNNTs when stainless steel is employed as a catalyst. We also found that Mg(NO3)2 and MgO nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as catalysts to grow BNNTs with the same precursor. The BNNTs obtained from the Mg(NO3)2 catalyst were straighter than those obtained from the MgO NP catalyst. This could have been due to the different physical forms of the catalysts that were used.

  17. Synthesis of lanthanum tungstate interconnecting nanoparticles by high voltage electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keereeta, Yanee, E-mail: ynkeereeta@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Titipun, E-mail: ttpthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Somchai [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} as one of semiconducting materials. • H.V. electrospinning was used to synthesize La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} interconnecting nanoparticles. • A promising material for photoemission. - Abstract: Lanthanum tungstate (La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}) interconnecting nanoparticles in the shape of fibers were successfully synthesized by electrospinning in combination with high temperature calcination. In this research, calcination temperature for the synthesis of the fibers evidently influenced the diameter, morphology and crystalline degree. The crystalline monoclinic La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} fibers with 200–700 nm in diameter, two main Raman peaks at 945 and 927 cm{sup −1}, FTIR stretching modes at 936 and 847 cm{sup −1}, 2.02 eV energy gap and 415–430 nm blue emission were synthesized by calcination of inorganic/organic hybrid fibers at 750 °C for 5 h, characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The surface of the composite fibers before calcination was very smooth. Upon calcination the composite fibers at 750 °C for 5 h, they were transformed into nanoparticles join together in the shape of fibers with rough surface.

  18. Investigation of behaviour of iron (3) microimpurity in ammonium tungstate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, M.A.; Taushkanov, V.P.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Andronov, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    To determine the purification optimum conditions of ammonium tungstate concentrated solutions from iron(3) microimpurities the behaviour of iron(3) with 10 -5 -10 -4 mol/l concentration in these solutions is studied. Concentration of hydrolyzed iron forms has been determined by spectrophotometric and radiometric methods. It is stated, that the processes of hydrolysis and aggregation of dispersed-colloid iron particles in tungstate solutions is generally over during the first 50 hours. It is shown, that a part of iron hydroxide particles of dimension less than 200 A increases with ammonium tungstate concentration increasing. Residual iron concentration also increases under the same conditions. The increasing of efficiency of solution purification is due to decreasing of carbon dispersion, applied for this purpose, and also modification of their surface by hydroxides of multivalent metas as zirconium for example

  19. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Enviromental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2015-11-01

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO{sub 2})(W{sub 2}O{sub 7})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1) and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(W{sub 2}O{sub 8})F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) {sup circle}. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sup -6} or [UO{sub 2}FO{sub 4}]{sup -5}, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  20. Periodic Sorption of Tungstate Ions on Anionite AV-17-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’yachenko Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple sorption of sodium tungstate resulting from the autoclave-soda digestion of a tungsten-bearing concentrate was studied using anion-exchange resin AV-17-8. The choice of ion exchange resin was carried out under static conditions using highly basic anionites. The sorption and desorption plots for tungstate and carbonate ions were demonstrated under dynamic conditions. The total dynamic capacity of the resin was estimated for each species of the ions in three sorption cycles. The applicability of the AV-17-8 resin as a sorbent in the autoclave-soda process flowsheet was determined.

  1. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Ruiz R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rebeca Fernández-Ruiz,1,2 Marc Pino,3 Begoña Hurtado,4 Pablo García de Frutos,4 Carolina Caballo,3 Ginés Escolar,3 Ramón Gomis,1,2,5 Maribel Diaz-Ricart3 1Diabetes and Obesity Research Laboratory, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Rosellón, Barcelona, 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas, Barcelona, 3Hemotherapy–Hemostasis, Hospital Clínic, Universidad de Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Villarroel, Barcelona, 4Institutode Investigaciones Biomédicas de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer, Rosellón, Barcelona, 5Hospital Clinic, Universitat de Barcelona, Villarroel, Barcelona, Spain Purpose: Platelet inhibition is a key strategy in the management of atherothrombosis. However, the large variability in response to current strategies leads to the search for alternative inhibitors. The antiplatelet effect of the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (Na2O4W, a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B inhibitor, has been investigated in this study.Methods: Wild-type (WT and PTP1B knockout (PTP1B-/- mice were treated for 1 week with Na2O4W to study platelet function with the platelet function analyzer PFA-100, a cone-and-plate analyzer, a flat perfusion chamber, and thrombus formation in vivo. Human blood aliquots were incubated with Na2O4W for 1 hour to measure platelet function using the PFA-100 and the annular perfusion chamber. Aggregometry and thromboelastometry were also performed.Results: In WT mice, Na2O4W treatment prolonged closure times in the PFA-100 and decreased the surface covered (%SC by platelets on collagen. Thrombi formed in a thrombosis mice model were smaller in animals treated with Na2O4W (4.6±0.7 mg vs 8.9±0.7 mg; P<0.001. Results with Na2O4W were similar to those in untreated PTP1B-/- mice (5.0±0.3 mg. Treatment of the PTP1B-/- mice with Na2O4W modified only

  2. Sodium Tungstate for Promoting Mesenchymal Stem Cell Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Ateka; Sherman, Lauren S; Rameshwar, Pranela; Arinzeh, Treena L

    2016-12-15

    Articular cartilage has a limited ability to heal. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the bone marrow have shown promise as a cell type for cartilage regeneration strategies. In this study, sodium tungstate (Na 2 WO 4 ), which is an insulin mimetic, was evaluated for the first time as an inductive factor to enhance human MSC chondrogenesis. MSCs were seeded onto three-dimensional electrospun scaffolds in growth medium (GM), complete chondrogenic induction medium (CCM) containing insulin, and CCM without insulin. Na 2 WO 4 was added to the media leading to final concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mM. Chondrogenic differentiation was assessed by biochemical analyses, immunostaining, and gene expression. Cytotoxicity using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCS) was also investigated. The chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs was enhanced in the presence of low concentrations of Na 2 WO 4 compared to control, without Na 2 WO 4 . In the induction medium containing insulin, cells in 0.01 mM Na 2 WO 4 produced significantly higher sulfated glycosaminoglycans, collagen type II, and chondrogenic gene expression than all other groups at day 28. Cells in 0.1 mM Na 2 WO 4 had significantly higher collagen II production and significantly higher sox-9 and aggrecan gene expression compared to control at day 28. Cells in GM and induction medium without insulin containing low concentrations of Na 2 WO 4 also expressed chondrogenic markers. Na 2 WO 4 did not stimulate PBMC proliferation or apoptosis. The results demonstrate that Na 2 WO 4 enhances chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, does not have a toxic effect, and may be useful for MSC-based approaches for cartilage repair.

  3. The effects of tungstate on skin lesions caused by PPD in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Cho, Hyun-Gug; Lee, Sang-Il

    2008-04-01

    P-phenylenediamine (PPD) has been used as one of the ingredients in hair dye. The purpose of this study is to investigate the skin toxicity of PPD application in a tungstate-induced xanthine oxidase (XO) deficient animal model. PPD (2.5% PPD in 2% NH4OH) was applied to rat skin (25 mg/16.5 cm2) five times every other day in rats fed a standard diet (SD) or a tungstate supplemented diet (TD). The skin structure in the SD and the TD group was intact, whereas XO activity was not detected in the TD group during experimental periods. Furthermore, there were no differences between the SD and the TD group in dermal reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes. In these experimental conditions, although XO activity was not detected in the applied PPD rats fed a tungstate supplemented diet (PTD) group, it showed more severe tissue damage compared with the applied PPD rats fed a standard diet (PSD) group. In addition, the PTD group showed higher increased rates of ROS scavenging enzyme activity and lipid peroxide (LPO) content, and decreased glutathione (GSH) content than in the PSD group. In conclusion, the increase of PPD dermal toxicity in tungstate-induced XO deficient animals may be due to excessive ROS via ROS imbalance during PPD skin application.

  4. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2?) and tungstate (WO4 2?). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  5. Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Ralph P; Snoha, Daniel J; Hawthorn, George; Hihara, Lloyd H

    2008-01-01

    The Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory collaborated to prepare, environmentally expose for up to 2 years, and evaluate multivariant sets of metal matrix composites (MMCs...

  6. Tungstate-Targeting of BKαβ1 Channels Tunes ERK Phosphorylation and Cell Proliferation in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    López López, José Ramón; Fernández Mariño, Ana Isabel; Cidad, Pilar; Zafra, Delia; Nocito, Laura; Domínguez, Jorge; Oliván Viguera, Aida; Köhler, Ralf; Pérez García, María Teresa; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Guinovart, Joan J.; Fernández Fernández, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Producción Científica Despite the substantial knowledge on the antidiabetic, antiobesity and antihypertensive actions of tungstate, information on its primary target/s is scarce. Tungstate activates both the ERK1/2 pathway and the vascular voltage- and Ca2+-dependent large-conductance BKαβ1 potassium channel, which modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and function, respectively. Here, we have assessed the possible involvement of BKαβ1 channels in the tungstate-induced...

  7. A measure of the interfacial shear strength between SiC(CVD)/B(CVD) filament--aluminum matrix by fragmentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Y.Q.; Chen, X.J.; Yang, D.M.; Fei, X.; Pan, J.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile specimens used are of dog-bone shape and consist of single axial SiC (CVD) /B (CVD) filament processed by CVD and embedded in a LD-2 aluminum alloy. Model composite specimens have been fabricated by a high pressure squeeze casting technique. This paper describes the application of an Acoustic Emission Technique for locating the position of fiber breaks and thus determining the length distribution of fiber fragments resulting when a composite specimen containing a single fiber is loaded to failure. The critical lengths (minimal lengths) are checked by Corrosion Method

  8. A general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures using plasma electrolytic oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yanan; Liu, Baodan; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Bing; Liu, Lusheng; Jiang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A general strategy for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructure has been developed based on plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology (up). Using this method, ZnWO 4 and NiWO 4 nanostructures with controllable morphologies and superior crystallinity can be easily obtained (down), showing obvious advantage in comparison with conventional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. - Highlights: • Plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) method has been used for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructures. • ZnWO 4 nanoplates have strong mechanical adhesion with porous TiO 2 film substrate. • The morphology and dimensional size of ZnWO 4 nanostructures can be selectively tailored by controlling the annealing temperature and growth time. • The PEO method can be widely applied to the growth of various metal oxides. - Abstract: A new method based on conventional plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology has been developed for the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures. Using this method, ZnWO 4 and NiWO 4 nanostructures with controllable morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets and microsheets) and superior crystallinity have been synthesized. It has been found that the morphology diversity of ZnWO 4 nanostructures can be selectively tailored through tuning the electrolyte concentration and annealing temperatures, showing obvious advantages in comparison to traditional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. Precise microscopy analyses on the cross section of the PEO coating and ZnWO 4 nanostructures confirmed that the precursors initially precipitated in the PEO coating and its surface during plasma discharge process are responsible for the nucleation and subsequent growth of metal tungstate nanostructures by thermal annealing. The method developed in this work represents a general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures and the formation mechanism of metal tungstate nanostructures fabricated by

  9. A general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures using plasma electrolytic oxidation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yanan; Liu, Baodan, E-mail: baodanliu@imr.ac.cn; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Bing; Liu, Lusheng; Jiang, Xin, E-mail: xjiang@imr.ac.cn

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: A general strategy for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructure has been developed based on plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology (up). Using this method, ZnWO{sub 4} and NiWO{sub 4} nanostructures with controllable morphologies and superior crystallinity can be easily obtained (down), showing obvious advantage in comparison with conventional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. - Highlights: • Plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) method has been used for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructures. • ZnWO{sub 4} nanoplates have strong mechanical adhesion with porous TiO{sub 2} film substrate. • The morphology and dimensional size of ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures can be selectively tailored by controlling the annealing temperature and growth time. • The PEO method can be widely applied to the growth of various metal oxides. - Abstract: A new method based on conventional plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology has been developed for the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures. Using this method, ZnWO{sub 4} and NiWO{sub 4} nanostructures with controllable morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets and microsheets) and superior crystallinity have been synthesized. It has been found that the morphology diversity of ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures can be selectively tailored through tuning the electrolyte concentration and annealing temperatures, showing obvious advantages in comparison to traditional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. Precise microscopy analyses on the cross section of the PEO coating and ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures confirmed that the precursors initially precipitated in the PEO coating and its surface during plasma discharge process are responsible for the nucleation and subsequent growth of metal tungstate nanostructures by thermal annealing. The method developed in this work represents a general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures and the formation mechanism of

  10. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  11. Manufacturing of aluminum composite material using stir casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokhio, M.H.; Panhwar, M.I.; Unar, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing of aluminum alloy based casting composite materials via stir casting is one of the prominent and economical route for development and processing of metal matrix composites materials. Properties of these materials depend upon many processing parameters and selection of matrix and reinforcements. Literature reveals that most of the researchers are using 2, 6 and 7 xxx aluminum matrix reinforced with SiC particles for high strength properties whereas, insufficient information is available on reinforcement of 'AI/sub 2/O/sub 3/' particles in 7 xxx aluminum matrix. The 7 xxx series aluminum matrix usually contains Cu-Zn-Mg; Therefore, the present research was conducted to investigate the effect of elemental metal such as Cu-Zn-Mg in aluminum matrix on mechanical properties of stir casting of aluminum composite materials reinforced with alpha 'AI/sub 2/O/sub 3/' particles using simple foundry melting alloying and casting route. The age hardening treatments were also applied to study the aging response of the aluminum matrix on strength, ductility and hardness. The experimental results indicate that aluminum matrix cast composite can be manufactured via conventional foundry method giving very good responses to the strength and ductility up to 10% 'AI/sub 2/O/sub 3/' particles reinforced in aluminum matrix. (author)

  12. Manufacturing of Aluminum Composite Material Using Stir Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hayat Jokhio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of aluminum alloy based casting composite materials via stir casting is one of the prominent and economical route for development and processing of metal matrix composites materials. Properties of these materials depend upon many processing parameters and selection of matrix and reinforcements. Literature reveals that most of the researchers are using 2, 6 and 7xxx aluminum matrix reinforced with SiC particles for high strength properties whereas, insufficient information is available on reinforcement of \\"Al2O3\\" particles in 7xxx aluminum matrix. The 7xxx series aluminum matrix usually contains Cu-Zn-Mg. Therefore, the present research was conducted to investigate the effect of elemental metal such as Cu-Zn-Mg in aluminum matrix on mechanical properties of stir casting of aluminum composite materials reinforced with alpha \\"Al2O3\\" particles using simple foundry melting alloying and casting route. The age hardening treatments were also applied to study the aging response of the aluminum matrix on strength, ductility and hardness. The experimental results indicate that aluminum matrix cast composite can be manufactured via conventional foundry method giving very good responses to the strength and ductility up to 10% \\"Al2O3\\" particles reinforced in aluminum matrix.

  13. Enhanced structural and optical properties of the polyaniline-calcium tungstate (PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, N. Aloysius; Francis, Xavier; Anjaly, Jose; Sankararaman, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we report the synthesis and characterization of polyaniline-calcium tungstate nanocomposite, a novel material for potential applications. The PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite was prepared by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of CaWO4 nanoparticles dispersed in ethanol. Investigations using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the nanocomposite of PANI with CaWO4 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy revealed almost uniform distribution of CaWO4 nanoparticles in the polyaniline matrix. These studies also confirmed electronic structure modification as a result of incorporating CaWO4 nanoparticles in PANI. Composite formation resulted in large decrease in the optical band gap and enhanced photoluminescence. The augmented structural, optical and photoluminescence properties of the PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite can be used to explore potential applications in micro- and optoelectronics. This is the first report presenting synthesis and characterization of the PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite.

  14. Studies of lead tungstate crystal matrices in high energy beams for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, G; Baillon, Paul; Barney, D; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Bateman, E; Bell, K W; Benhammou, Ya; Bloch, P; Bomestar, D; Borgia, B; Bourotte, J; Burge, S R; Cameron, W; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, D J A; Connolly, J; Dafinei, I; Denes, P; Depasse, P; Deiters, K; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; El-Mamouni, H; Faure, J L; Felcini, Marta; Finger, M H; Flügel, T; Gautheron, F; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, S N; Godinovic, N; Graham, D J; Guillaud, J P; Guschin, E; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hillemanns, H; Hofer, H; Ille, B; Jääskeläinen, S; Katchanov, V A; Kennedy, B W; Kirn, T; Korzhik, M V; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebrun, P; Lecoq, P; Lecoeur, Gérard; Lecomte, P; Leonardi, E; Locci, E; Loos, R; Ma, D; Martin, F; Mendiburu, J P; Musienko, Yu V; Nédélec, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newbold, D; Newman, H; Oukhanov, M; Pacciani, L; Peigneux, J P; Pirro, S; Popov, S; Puljak, I; Purves, C; Renker, D; Rondeaux, F; Rosso, E; Rusack, R W; Rykaczewski, H; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Schwenke, J; Seez, Christopher J; Semeniouk, I N; Shagin, P M; Shevchenko, S; Shi, X; Sillou, D; Simohand, D; Singovsky, A V; Soric, I; Smith, B; Stephenson, R; Verrecchia, P; Vialle, J P; Virdee, Tejinder S; Zhu, R Y

    1997-01-01

    Using matrices of lead tungstate crystals energy resolutions better than 0.6% at 100 GeV have been achieved in the test beam in 1995. It has been demonstrated that a lead tungstate electromagnetic calorimeter read out by avalanche photodiodes can consistently achieve the excellent energy resolutions necessary to justify its construction in the CMS detector. The performance achieved has been understood in terms of the properties of the crystals and photodetectors.

  15. Reactive magnetron sputtering deposition of bismuth tungstate onto titania nanoparticles for enhancing visible light photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratova, Marina, E-mail: marina_ratova@hotmail.com [Surface Engineering Group, School of Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Kelly, Peter J.; West, Glen T. [Surface Engineering Group, School of Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Tosheva, Lubomira; Edge, Michele [School of Science and the Environment, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Bismuth tungstate coatings were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. • Oscillating bowl was introduced to the system to enable coating of nanopartulates. • Deposition of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} enhanced visible light activity of titania nanoparticles. • The best results were obtained for coating with Bi:W ratio of approximately 2:1. • Deposition of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} onto TiO{sub 2} resulted in more efficient electron-hole separation. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide − bismuth tungstate composite materials were prepared by pulsed DC reactive magnetron sputtering of bismuth and tungsten metallic targets in argon/oxygen atmosphere onto anatase and rutile titania nanoparticles. The use of an oscillating bowl placed beneath the two magnetrons arranged in a co-planar closed field configuration enabled the deposition of bismuth tungstate onto loose powders, rather than a solid substrate. The atomic ratio of the bismuth/tungsten coatings was controlled by varying the power applied to each target. The effect of the bismuth tungstate coatings on the phase, optical and photocatalytic properties of titania was investigated by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an acetone degradation test. The latter involved measurements of the rate of CO{sub 2} evolution under visible light irradiation of the photocatalysts, which indicated that the deposition of bismuth tungstate resulted in a significant enhancement of visible light activity, for both anatase and rutile titania particles. The best results were achieved for coatings with a bismuth to tungsten atomic ratio of 2:1. In addition, the mechanism by which the photocatalytic activity of the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was enhanced by compounding it with bismuth tungstate was studied by microwave cavity perturbation. The results of these

  16. Nickel tungstate (NiWO4) nanoparticles/graphene composites: preparation and photoelectrochemical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyyedamirhossein; Farsi, Hossein; Moghiminia, Shokufeh; Zubkov, Tykhon; Lightcap, Ian V.; Riley, Andrew; Peters, Dennis G.; Li, Zhihai

    2018-05-01

    Nickel tungstate/graphene composite was synthesized in various compositions with application of a hydrothermal method. Chemical composition and morphology of each sample was studied via application of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy techniques. In the continuous, a photosystem was obtained by deposition of composite sample on a fluorine-doped tin oxide electrode with application of electrophoretic method. Electrode morphology was studied by employment of atomic force microscopy and SEM techniques. Eventually, light conversion properties and involved mechanism of fabricated photosystem was studied with application of the Mott–Schottky method. Our results confirmed that the optimum ratio between graphene and nickel tungstate is in the regime of 1:1.

  17. Distribution of tungstate in pregnant mice and effects on embryonic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wide, M.; Danielsson, B.R.G.; Dencker, L.

    1986-01-01

    Whole-body autoradiography and impulse counting experiments were used to study the distribution and retention of radioactivity in the pregnant mouse after administration of [ 185 W]tungstate. A rapid uptake was found in a number of tissues - skeleton, red pulp of the spleen, adrenal, liver, thyroid, pituitary, and ovary - and in the intestine and kidneys, through which it was rapidly excreted. 185 W was also readily transported from mother to fetus, although more in late than in early gestation. The largest metal retention was found in the maternal skeleton, kidneys, and spleen and in visceral yolk sac epithelium and the skeleton of the fetus. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity experiments showed inhibition by tungstate of cartilage production in limb bud mesenchymal cultures at concentrations similar to those found in vivo

  18. High-power Yb- and Tm-doped double tungstate channel waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalfsen, Koop; Geskus, D.; Ay, F.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus

    The potassium double tungstates KGd(WO4)2, KY(WO4)2, and KLu(WO4)2 are excellent candidates for solid-state lasers because of their high refractive index of ~2.0-2.1, the large transition cross-sections of rare-earth (RE3+) ions doped into these hosts, and a reasonably large thermal conductivity of

  19. Mechanism of chlorination of some actinide and fission product phosphates and tungstates in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukova, A.I.; Chernikov, A.A.; Skiba, O.V.; Kazantsev, G.N.

    1989-01-01

    Results of kinetic studies on the chlorination of crystalline phosphates and tungstates of uranium, cerium, zirconium, and plutonium by gaseous carbon tetrachloride in melts of alkali metal chlorides at 973-1073 degree K are analyzed. A mathematical model of the process is proposed. Analysis of regression models allowed solution of the problem by statistical evaluation of the effective factors and prediction within the limits of the factors studied of the optimal conditions for the process

  20. Investigating aluminum alloy reinforced by graphene nanoflakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.J., E-mail: shaojiuyan@126.com [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Dai, S.L.; Zhang, X.Y.; Yang, C.; Hong, Q.H.; Chen, J.Z. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Lin, Z.M. [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2014-08-26

    As one of the most important engineering materials, aluminum alloys have been widely applied in many fields. However, the requirement of enhancing their mechanical properties without sacrificing the ductility is always a challenge in the development of aluminum alloys. Thanks to the excellent physical and mechanical properties, graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) have been applied as promising reinforcing elements in various engineering materials, including polymers and ceramics. However, the investigation of GNFs as reinforcement phase in metals or alloys, especially in aluminum alloys, is still very limited. In this study, the aluminum alloy reinforced by GNFs was successfully prepared via powder metallurgy approach. The GNFs were mixed with aluminum alloy powders through ball milling and followed by hot isostatic pressing. The green body was then hot extruded to obtain the final GNFs reinforced aluminum alloy nanocomposite. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis show that GNFs were well dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix and no chemical reactions were observed at the interfaces between the GNFs and aluminum alloy matrix. The mechanical properties' testing results show that with increasing filling content of GNFs, both tensile and yield strengths were remarkably increased without losing the ductility performance. These results not only provided a pathway to achieve the goal of preparing high strength aluminum alloys with excellent ductilitybut they also shed light on the development of other metal alloys reinforced by GNFs.

  1. Aluminum Matrix Composite (AlSi7Mg2Sr0.03/SiCp) Pistons Obtained by Mechanical Mixing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Metal matrix composites are undoubtedly a group of advanced engineering materials. Compared to unreinforced matrix material, they are characterized by increased strength, greater stiffness, increased wear resistance, better mechanical properties and dimensional stability at elevated temperatures as well as lower density. Due to its very favorable tribological properties for many years research has been conducted on the application of MMC in friction node. The article presents important technological aspects related to the production and properties of composite pistons. Under industrial conditions, a composite suspension (AlSi7Mg2Sr0.03/SiCp 10 vol %) was prepared to allow casting of the semi-finished pistons series. Machining parameters of the working surfaces of the piston were selected on the basis of the turning test made on PCD, PCNM and uncoated carbide tools. The tribological properties of the composite pistons were determined on the basis of the pin-on-disc and the abrasion wear. The scuffing tests carried out under real operating conditions have confirmed the possibility of using composite pistons in air compressors. PMID:29283419

  2. Aluminum Matrix Composite (AlSi7Mg2Sr0.03/SiCp Pistons Obtained by Mechanical Mixing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Dyzia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites are undoubtedly a group of advanced engineering materials. Compared to unreinforced matrix material, they are characterized by increased strength, greater stiffness, increased wear resistance, better mechanical properties and dimensional stability at elevated temperatures as well as lower density. Due to its very favorable tribological properties for many years research has been conducted on the application of MMC in friction node. The article presents important technological aspects related to the production and properties of composite pistons. Under industrial conditions, a composite suspension (AlSi7Mg2Sr0.03/SiCp 10 vol % was prepared to allow casting of the semi-finished pistons series. Machining parameters of the working surfaces of the piston were selected on the basis of the turning test made on PCD, PCNM and uncoated carbide tools. The tribological properties of the composite pistons were determined on the basis of the pin-on-disc and the abrasion wear. The scuffing tests carried out under real operating conditions have confirmed the possibility of using composite pistons in air compressors.

  3. Introduction of Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Particles in Aluminum Metal Matrix Hardfaced by MIG/TIG Processes on Precoated Flux Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kamburov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate an aluminium metal matrix surface layer hardfaced by shielded gas metal arc welding processes applying either metal inert gas (MIG or tungsten inert gas (TIG, with standard wire filler onto the precoated flux layer - a baked resistant film containing electroless nickel coated micro/nano SiC particles. During baking, the components of the flux (MgCl2, NaCl, KCl and Na3AlF6 form a low melting eutectic, which: protects the hardfaced surface from oxidation, provides electrical conductance and keeps the particles on the surface during welding, as well as facilitates particles wettability and their interfacial bonding with the molten metal into the weld puddle.

  4. Modeling of the behavior under fuel dispersed irradiation of U-Mo with aluminum matrix from the thermal point of view and its interrelationship with the interdiffusion phase fuel / matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscarda, Maria V.; Taboada, Horacio H.; Rest, J.

    2009-01-01

    Results from postirradiation examinations of U-Mo / Al dispersion fuels plates denotes a strong interrelation and feedback between the fuel-matrix interaction and the fuel temperature, bringing undesired consequences on the total swelling and behavior under irradiation. The present work approaches this problem, modeling the profile of temperatures moment by moment to be able to evaluate the increase of this interaction. The Fast Dart program is used, optimized version of program Dart, developed by Dr. J. Rest in collaboration with Dr. H. Taboada. A subroutine of thermal calculation was implemented in this code, which allowed to calculate the evolution of the interaction between the fuel and the matrix. The results of simulations are compared with the results of postirradiation examinations realized by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors International Program. In particular, a good adjustment in the calculation of the depth of interdiffusion U-Mo/Al is observed, demonstrating a right estimation of the profile of temperatures on the fuel plate. It is considered necessary the inclusion of a model that describes the phases that form in the zone of interaction, denoting its thermal dependency and effects due to the radiation damage. (author)

  5. Tungstate-induced color-pattern modifications of butterfly wings are independent of stress response and ecdysteroid effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Joji M; Ogasawara, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Haruhiko

    2005-06-01

    Systemic injections of sodium tungstate, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) inhibitor, to pupae immediately after pupation have been shown to efficiently produce characteristic color-pattern modifications on the wings of many species of butterflies. Here we demonstrated that the tungstate-induced modification pattern was entirely different from other chemically-induced ones in a species of nymphalid butterfly Junonia (Precis) orithya. In this species, the systemic injections of tungstate produced characteristic expansion of black area and shrinkage of white area together with the move of parafocal elements toward the wing base. Overall, pattern boundaries became obscure. In contrast, an entirely different modification pattern, overall darkening of wings, was observed by the injections of stress-inducing chemicals, thapsigargin, ionomycin, or geldanamycin, to pupae under the rearing conditions for the adult summer form. On the ventral wings, this darkening was due to an increase of the proportion of peppered dark scales, which was reminiscent of the natural fall form of this species. Under the same rearing conditions, the injections of ecdysteroid, which is a well-known hormone being responsible for the seasonal polyphenism of nymphalid butterflies, yielded overall expansion of orange area especially around eyespots. Taken together, we conclude that the tungstate-induced modifications are clearly distinguishable from those of stress response and ecdysteroid effect. This conclusion then suggests that the putative PTPase signaling pathway that is sensitive to tungstate uniquely contributes to the wing-wide color-pattern development in butterflies.

  6. Revisiting the Aluminum Trimesate-based MOF (MIL-96): from Structure Determination to the Processing of Mixed Matrix Membranes for CO2 Capture.

    KAUST Repository

    Benzaqui, Marvin; S. Pillai, Renjith; Sabetghadam, Anahid; Benoit, Virginie; Normand, Pé rine; Marrot, Jerome; Menguy, Nicolas; Montero, David; Shepard, William; Tissot, Antoine; Martineau-Corcos, Charlotte; Sicard, Clé mence; Mihaylov, Mihail; Carn, Florent; Beurroeis, Isabelle; Llewellyn, Philip L.; De Weireld, Guy; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Maurin, Guillaume; Steunou, Nathalie; Serre, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A microporous Al trimesate-based metal-organic framework (MOF), denoted MIL-96-(Al), was selected as a porous hybrid filler for the processing of mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) for CO2/N-2 postcombustion separation. First, the structural model of MIL-96-(Al) initially reported was revisited using a combination of synchrotron-based single-crystal X-ray diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In a second step, pure MIL-96-(Al) crystals differing by their size and aspect ratio, including anisotropic hexagonal platelets and nanoparticles of about 70 nm in diameter, were prepared. Then, a combination of in situ IR spectroscopy, single-gas, and CO2/N-2 coadsorption experiments, calorimetry, and molecular simulations revealed that MIL-96-(Al) nanoparticles show a relatively high CO2 affinity over N-2 owing to strong interactions between CO2 molecules and several adsorption sites such as Al3+ Lewis centers, coordinated water, and hydroxyl groups. Finally, the high compatibility between MIL-96-(Al) nanoparticles and the 6FDA-DAM polymer allowed the processing of homogeneous and defect-free MMMs with a high MOF loading (up to 25 wt %) that outperform pure polymer membranes for CO2/N-2 separation.

  7. Revisiting the Aluminum Trimesate-based MOF (MIL-96): from Structure Determination to the Processing of Mixed Matrix Membranes for CO2 Capture.

    KAUST Repository

    Benzaqui, Marvin

    2017-11-08

    A microporous Al trimesate-based metal-organic framework (MOF), denoted MIL-96-(Al), was selected as a porous hybrid filler for the processing of mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) for CO2/N-2 postcombustion separation. First, the structural model of MIL-96-(Al) initially reported was revisited using a combination of synchrotron-based single-crystal X-ray diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In a second step, pure MIL-96-(Al) crystals differing by their size and aspect ratio, including anisotropic hexagonal platelets and nanoparticles of about 70 nm in diameter, were prepared. Then, a combination of in situ IR spectroscopy, single-gas, and CO2/N-2 coadsorption experiments, calorimetry, and molecular simulations revealed that MIL-96-(Al) nanoparticles show a relatively high CO2 affinity over N-2 owing to strong interactions between CO2 molecules and several adsorption sites such as Al3+ Lewis centers, coordinated water, and hydroxyl groups. Finally, the high compatibility between MIL-96-(Al) nanoparticles and the 6FDA-DAM polymer allowed the processing of homogeneous and defect-free MMMs with a high MOF loading (up to 25 wt %) that outperform pure polymer membranes for CO2/N-2 separation.

  8. Zirconium tungstate/polymer nanocomposites: Challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Cora; Kozy, Leah C. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Toledo, 2801W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Coleman, Maria R.; Sharma, Gayathri R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Toledo, 2801W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) oxides are interesting materials for use in controlled thermal expansion composites. Cubic ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} is one of the most promising candidates due to its strong, isotropic NTE behaviour over a large temperature range. It is easily accessible from a hydrated precursor, ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}. 2H{sub 2}O, which enables control of particle size and morphology during the topotactic conversion to the NTE phase. The preparation of high quality composites poses a number of challenges like compatibility of NTE material and composite matrix, stability of the NTE phase and particle morphology and size, which affect mixing and homogeneity. For ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}/polymer composites, surface modification is necessary to enhance interactions between the polymer matrix and the filler particles. In addition, small particle sizes are crucial to avoid settling of filler particles during polymer processing. This review presents results on the optimization of routes to nano-ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}, particle modification to achieve compatibility with polymers, preparation of NTE/polyimide composites and potential problems that can interfere with composite formation. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. TupA: A Tungstate Binding Protein in the Periplasm of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Otrelo-Cardoso

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The TupABC system is involved in the cellular uptake of tungsten and belongs to the ABC (ATP binding cassette-type transporter systems. The TupA component is a periplasmic protein that binds tungstate anions, which are then transported through the membrane by the TupB component using ATP hydrolysis as the energy source (the reaction catalyzed by the ModC component. We report the heterologous expression, purification, determination of affinity binding constants and crystallization of the Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 TupA. The tupA gene (locus tag Dde_0234 was cloned in the pET46 Enterokinase/Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC expression vector, and the construct was used to transform BL21 (DE3 cells. TupA expression and purification were optimized to a final yield of 10 mg of soluble pure protein per liter of culture medium. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out showing that TupA binds both tungstate and molybdate ions and has no significant interaction with sulfate, phosphate or perchlorate. Quantitative analysis of metal binding by isothermal titration calorimetry was in agreement with these results, but in addition, shows that TupA has higher affinity to tungstate than molybdate. The protein crystallizes in the presence of 30% (w/v polyethylene glycol 3350 using the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals diffract X-rays beyond 1.4 Å resolution and belong to the P21 space group, with cell parameters a = 52.25 Å, b = 42.50 Å, c = 54.71 Å, β = 95.43°. A molecular replacement solution was found, and the structure is currently under refinement.

  10. Investigation into interaction of mixture of zinc and neodymium nitrates with sodium tungstates in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozantsev, G M; Krivobok, V I [Donetskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1978-09-01

    The methods of residual concentrations, pH-potentiometry, and conductometry have been used for studying interaction between the mixture of zinc and neodymium nitrates with sodium tungstate in aqueous solutions. It has been established that independent of the ratio between the components the reaction product is a mixture of simultaneously precipitated zinc and neodymium orthotungstates. Thermal treatment of such mixtures at 650-700 deg C for 40 h and subsequent hardening yields solid solution of the structure ..cap alpha..-Eu/sub 2/(WO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ within the concentration range 85-100 mol % of Nd/sub 2/(WO/sub 4/)/sub 3/.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of ceramic powders of pure and doped with trivalent erbium barium tungstate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, R.B. de; Nascimento, V.A. do; Matos, J. M.E. de; Santos, M.R.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This research proposes the synthesis and characterization of pure and doped with Er"3"+ (1 and 2 %) barium tungstate powders prepared by the coprecipitation method. In order to characterize the obtained powders were used X-Ray Diffractometry, Raman Spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. According to the standard XRD spectra, the crystals exhibited the presence of tetragonal scheelite structure without the presence of secondary phases. Raman spectra showed the presence of eleven vibrational modes and two modes were observed in the infrared spectra. The synthesized oxides showed good crystallinity and structurally ordered at short and long-range. (author)

  12. Optical lines in europium-terbium double activated calcium tungstate phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, M.V. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tsukerblat, B.S. [Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: tsuker@bgumail.bgu.ac.il; Popovici, E.-J. [' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Jeon, D.Y. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-20

    The Letter is devoted to the problem of the optical anisotropy of the rare-earth ions occupying low-symmetry positions in crystals. The crystal field multiplets arising from LSJ terms of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions in the crystal field of calcium tungstate scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) are analyzed with regard to the experimental data on the low temperature photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra. The selection rules as well as an angular (polarization) dependence of the two-photon absorption are discussed.

  13. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K; Boyes, E D; Gai, P L; Shiju, N R; Brown, D R

    2010-01-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 A = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  14. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K; Boyes, E D; Gai, P L [York JEOL Nanocentre (United Kingdom); Shiju, N R; Brown, D R, E-mail: pgb500@york.ac.u [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 A = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  15. Corrosion evaluation of zirconium doped oxide coatings on aluminum formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajat, Jelena; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Vasilić, Rastko; Stojadinović, Stevan

    2014-01-01

    The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of aluminum in sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O) and Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O doped with Zr was analyzed in order to obtain oxide coatings with improved corrosion resistance. The influence of current density in PEO process and anodization time was investigated, as well as the influence of Zr, with the aim to find out how they affect the chemical content, morphology, surface roughness, and corrosion stability of oxide coatings. It was shown that the presence of Zr increases the corrosion stability of oxide coatings for all investigated PEO times. Evolution of EIS spectra during the exposure to 3% NaCl, as a strong corrosive agent, indicated the highest corrosion stability for PEO coating formed on aluminum at 70 mA/cm(2) for 2 min in a zirconium containing electrolyte.

  16. Study on preparation of ultrafine lead tungstate for radiation protection and γ-ray shielding of the gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Licheng; He Ping; Zhou Yuanlin; Song Kaiping; Yang Kuihua

    2012-01-01

    Lead tungstate combines the radiation shielding properties of tungsten and lead, and it is quite distinctive to manufacture lead tungstate with ultra-fine granularity to enhance its capacity of radiation shielding. The grain size of lead tungstate has direct impact on the ability of its protection from radioactive materials. the smaller the grain size and more uniform dispersion of lead tungstate, the better protective ability it is going to be. In this paper, soft-template synthesis was introduced to prepare ultra-fine PbWO 4 . Rigorous experiment conditions are settled to ensure the access to obtain ultra-fine, homogeneous lead tungstate product, and it is better than other physical and chemical preparation methods. The surface-active agent for the soft template, with S-60 for the water system W/O microemulsion zone, was used to synthesize successfully ultra-fine PbWO 4 . It was shown that dispersing agent S-60 in the soft template method produced ultra-fine PbWO 4 with uniform granularity distribution. By using orthogonal experimental method, the best experimental conditions were obtained as follows: S-60 as surfactant dispersant with diluted 30 times concentration, solutions with pH9, 0.01 mol/L concentration of reactant, 1300 rpm of stirring speed and slowly adding drops of Na 2 WO 4 solution into Pb (Ac) 2 solution. Based on the optimal experimental conditions, the product of ultra-fine product for the anti-radiation protection filler has been made. The fine packing for the preparation of tungsten the gamma rays on the gloves is an average capacity of 5% or so. (authors)

  17. Synthesis of Aluminum-Aluminum Nitride Nanocomposites by a Gas-Liquid Reaction II. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, Cecilia; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2016-04-01

    In situ fabrication of the reinforcing particles in the metal matrix is an answer to many of the challenges encountered in manufacturing aluminum matrix nanocomposites. In this method, the nanoparticles are formed directly within the melt by means of a chemical reaction between a specially designed aluminum alloy and a gas. In this publication, we describe a process for synthesizing aluminum-aluminum nitride nanocomposites by reacting a nitrogen-containing gas with a molten aluminum-lithium alloy. We quantify the effect of the process parameters on the average particle size and particle distribution, as well as on the tendency of the particles to cluster in the alloy matrix, is quantified. Also in this publication, we present the measured room temperature and elevated temperature tensile properties of the nanocomposite material as well as its measured room temperature impact toughness.

  18. High strength corrosion-resistant zirconium aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulson, E.M.; Cameron, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A zirconium-aluminum alloy is described possessing superior corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. This alloy, preferably 7.5-9.5 wt% aluminum, is cast, worked in the Zr(Al)-Zr 2 Al region, and annealed to a substantially continuous matrix of Zr 3 Al. (E.C.B.)

  19. Melting, growth, and faceting of lead precipitates in aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gråbæk, L.; Bohr, J.; Andersen, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum single crystals cut in the direction were implanted with 2 x 10(20) m-2 Pb+ ions at 75 or 150 keV. The implanted insoluble lead precipitated as epitaxially oriented crystallites in the aluminum matrix. The precipitates were studied by x-ray diffraction at Riso, DESY, and Brookhaven...

  20. Vanadia-based SCR Catalysts Supported on Tungstated and Sulfated Zirconia: Influence of Doping with Potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Boghosian, Soghomon; Kustov, Arkadii

    2007-01-01

    A series of vanadium-based SCR catalysts supported on sulfated or tungstated ZrO2 were synthesized and characterized by means of N2-BET, XRD, NH3-TPD and in situ Raman spectroscopy. The effect of potassium doping on the properties of vanadia species is studied in detail. A number of catalyst...... and morphology, the surface composition and the molecular configuration of the dispersed vanadates. It was observed that poisoning with potassium had a negligible effect on the surface vanadate species (especially the V=O stretching frequency observed by in situ Raman spectroscopy) if supported on the sulfated...... the observed decrease in V=O stretching frequency and the higher proportion of dimers and higher polymers through coordination between K+ and two neighbouring V=O. The results suggest an increased resistance towards potassium doping for the vanadia-based catalysts supported on sulfated zirconia....

  1. Synthesis and characterization of rare-earth-doped calcium tungstate nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneeta, P.; Rajesh, Ch.; Ramana, M. V.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we report synthesis and characterization of rare-earth-ion-doped calcium tungstate (CaWO4) nanocrystals (NCs). Rare-earth ions, such as gadolinium (Gd), neodymium (Nd), praseodymium (Pr), samarium (Sm) and holmium (Ho), were successfully doped in the CaWO4 NCs by changing the synthesis conditions. The adopted synthesis route was found to be fast and eco-friendly. Structural characterizations, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and compositional analysis, were performed using energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) on as-synthesized NCs. The results indicate the size of the NCs ranging between 47 to 68nm and incorporation of rare-earth ions in CaWO4 NCs.

  2. Tungstated zirconia as promising carrier for DeNOx catalysts with improved resistance towards alkali poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Kustov, Arkadii; Rasmussen, Søren Birk

    2006-01-01

    Use of biomass as an alternative to fossil fuels has achieved increasing interest since it is considered neutral regarding CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere. The by far most energy-efficient use of solid bio-resources in energy production is combustion in combined biomass and coal or oilfired...... of new alternative catalysts that are more resistant towards poisoning with potassium. Vanadia-based catalysts supported on traditional and tungstated zirconia has been prepared and tested in selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia. All prepared catalysts were characterized using N2-BET, XRD......, and NH3-TPD methods. The influence of calcination temperature of zirconia modified with tungsten oxide on the textural characteristics, acidity and catalytic performance was studied. The resistance of the catalysts towards model poisoning with potassium was found to depend dramatically...

  3. Integrated lasers in crystalline double tungstates with focused-ion-beam nanostructured photonic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ay, F; Iñurrategui, I; Geskus, D; Aravazhi, S; Pollnau, M

    2011-01-01

    Deeply etched Bragg gratings were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in KGd x Lu 1-x (WO 4 ) 2 :Yb 3+ to obtain photonic cavity structures. By optimizing parameters such as dose per area, dwell time and pixel resolution the redeposition effects were minimized and grating structures more than 4 μm in depth with an improved sidewall angle of ∼ 5° were achieved. Fabry-Perot microcavities were defined and used to assess the optical performance of the grating structures at ∼ 1530 nm. An on-chip integrated laser cavity at ∼ 980 nm was achieved by defining a FIB reflective grating and FIB polished waveguide end-facet. With this cavity, an on-chip integrated waveguide laser in crystalline potassium double tungstate was demonstrated

  4. Experimental Study of the Lead Tungstate Scintillator Proton-Induced Damage and Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Singovski , A

    2011-01-01

    Lead tungstate (PbWO4, or PWO) scintillating crystals are used by two of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): 75848 in CMS and 17920 in ALICE. For the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter, one of the most important crystal properties is its radiation hardness. With the increase of luminosity, the radiation level will increase drastically, particularly in the high pseudorapidity regions of the calorimeter. Beside the effects of color-centre formation caused by gamma-radiation, additional measurable effect originated by hadron irradiation could appear, which will further deteriorate the optical transmission of the crystals and therefore their efficiency. In this paper, we will present results of the proton-induced damage in PWO and a study of optical transmission recovery at different temperatures and under different light-induced "bleaching" conditions for proton-irradiated crystals.

  5. Improvement of several properties of lead tungstate crystals with different doping ions

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Baccaro, Stefania; Cecilia, Angelica; Dafinei, Ioan; Diemoz, Marcella; Jarolímek, O; Korzhik, Mikhail; Lecoq, Paul; Nikl, M

    1998-01-01

    A very good radiation resistance of Lead Tungstate crystals is mandatory for their use in the high precision electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at LHC. Since the beginning of 1996 we have organised systematic investigations of the parameters influencing the radiation hardness of this crystal. Two classes of parameters have been particularly studied, the first one related to the control of the stoichiometry and structure associated defects, the second one connected with the suppression and the charge compensation of existing defects with different kinds of doping ions. This paper reports about the second part of this study and complements a first paper where the role of the stoichiometry was already discussed. Results of tests are given on a significant statistical sample of full size crystals ( 23cm) which show a considerable improvement in the optical properties and the radiation resistance of appropriately doped crystals.

  6. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan, Mohamad, E-mail: rizwan@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, Joliot-Curie Str.6, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-29

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  7. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Li Yuan; Zhu Ren Yuan; Liu Dun Can

    2000-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an inter calibration for CMS lead tungstate crystals in situ at LHC, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's sub percent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS ECAL monitoring light source and high level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of Y doped PbWO//4 crystals were investigated, and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of the wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. 29 Refs.

  8. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Liang Ying; Zhu, R Y; Liu, D T

    2001-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an intercalibration for Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) lead tungstate crystals in situ at the Large Hadronic Collider, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's subpercent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter monitoring light source and high-level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of yttrium-doped PbWO/sub 4/ crystals were investigated and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. (12 refs).

  9. Properties of complex tungstates, niobates, translated with fluorite-like structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetkina, S.N.; Zolin, V.F.; Sirotinkin, V.P.; Smirnov, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra of ternary tungstates, niobates and tantalates (MeLa 2 WO 7 , La 3 TO 7 ; Me=Ba, Sr; T=Ta, Nb) related to the layered fluorite group are analyzed. The laser pumping and time resolved luminescence are used for selecting spectra of unequivalent centers. The symmetry of the first center is near to the distorted cubic one. The vibrational spectra of europium in Eu 3 NbO 7 and SrLa 2 WO 7 are due to the chain-like structure of niobates and to the net-like structure of tantalates. The stimulated emission of Nd 3+ in powders of BaLa 2 WO 7 and La 3 NbO 7 is observed at wavelengths of 1.07 and 1.063 μm, respectively

  10. Reduction of tungstates and molybdates by hydrogen and thermodynamic properties of these salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, Ya.I.; Rezukhina, T.N.; Simanov, Yu.P.; Vasil'eva, I.A.; Kurshakova, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Study of thermodynamic properties of a series of tungstates of bivalent metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Co, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) as well as of some molybdates- of Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba is carried out. The obtained values are compared with magnetic characteristics of compounds and parameters of their crystal lattices. Thermodynamic properties were studied by measuring constants of their reduction with hydrogen in the 500-1350 deg C temperature range. It is concluded that dependence of thermodynamic values on geometric parameters of the lattice is not definitive. Comparison of salt formation atomic entropies with deviations of salt magnetic moments from theoretical ionic moments points to the fact of existence of some accordance between these two series of values. 25 refs.; 10 figs.; 6 tabs

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin (IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Sadanandan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tin (IV tungstate, a tetravalent metal acid salt was synthesized in the nanoform by chemical coprecipitation method using EDTA as capping agent. The material was found to be stable in mineral acids, bases and organic solvents except  in HF and aquaregia. The material was characterized using EDS, TG/DTA, FTIR, XRD, SEM, HRTEM and BET surface area measurement. The molecular formula of the compound is 2SnO2 3WO3.5H2O determined from elemental analysis using TG/DTA. Surface morphology and particle size were obtained using SEM and HRTEM. The surface area was found to be 205-225m2/g. The Na+ exchange capacity found to be 3.8 meq/g, indicates the presence of surface hydroxyl group and hence the presence of Bronsted acid sites. The catalytic activity of the material was tested by using esterification and oxidation as model reactions. For the esterification of different alcohols, the percentage yield was found to be high for n-alcohol compared to isomeric alcohols. Oxidation of benzyl alcohol gives benzaldehyde and benzoic acid as the only products. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 12nd June 2012, Revised: 23rd July 2012, Accepted: 29th July 2012[How to Cite: S. Manoj, R. Beena, (2012. Synthesis and Characterization of tin(IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (2: 105-111. doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111] [How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111 ] | View in 

  12. Novel rattling of K atoms in aluminium-doped defect pyrochlore tungstate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoko, Elvis; Kearley, Gordon J; Peterson, Vanessa K; Thorogood, Gordon J; Mutka, Hannu; Koza, Michael M; Yamaura, Jun-ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2014-01-01

    Rattling dynamics have been identified as fundamental to superconductivity in defect pyrochlore osmates and aluminium vanadium intermetallics, as well as low thermal conductivity in clathrates and filled skutterudites. Combining inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we use a new approach to investigate rattling in the Al-doped defect pyrochlore tungstates: AAl 0.33 W 1.67 O 6 (A = K, Rb, Cs). We find that although all the alkali metals rattle, the rattling of the K atoms is unique, not only among the tungstates but also among the analogous defect osmates, KOs 2 O 6 and RbOs 2 O 6 . Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories reveals that two unique features set the K dynamics apart from the rest, namely, (1) quasi one-dimensional local diffusion within a cage, and (2) vibration at a range of frequencies. The local diffusion is driven by strongly anharmonic local potentials around the K atoms exhibiting a double-well structure in the direction of maximum displacement, which is also the direction of local diffusion. On the other hand, vibration at a range of frequencies is a consequence of the strong anisotropy in the local potentials around the K atoms as revealed by directional magnitude spectra. We present evidence to show that it is the smaller size rather than the smaller mass of the K rattler which leads to the unusual dynamics. Finally, we suggest that the occurrence of local diffusion and vibration at a range of frequencies in the dynamics of a single rattler, as found here for the K atoms, may open new possibilities for phonon engineering in thermoelectric materials. (paper)

  13. Tungstate-based glass-ceramics for the immobilization of radio cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabarek, Elizabeth; McLeod, Terry I.; Hanna, John V.; Griffith, Christopher S.; Luca, Vittorio

    2009-02-01

    The preparation of tungstate-containing glass-ceramic composites (GCC) for the potential immobilization of radio cesium has been considered. The GCC materials were prepared by blending two oxide precursor compositions in various proportions. These included a preformed Cs-containing hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phase (Cs 0.3Ti 0.2W 0.8O 3, P6 3/ mcm) and a blend of silica and other oxides. The use of the HTB phase was motivated on the assumption that a HTB-based adsorbent could be used to remove cesium directly from aqueous high level liquid waste feeds. In the absence of the HTB, glass-ceramics were relatively easily prepared from the Cs-containing glass-forming oxide blend. On melting the mixture a relative complex GCC phase assemblage formed. The principal components of this phase assemblage were determined using X-ray powder diffraction, 133Cs MAS-NMR, and cross-sectional SEM and included glass, various zeolites, scheelite (CaWO 4) and a range of other oxide phases and Cs-containing aluminosilicate. Importantly, under no circumstance was cesium partitioned into the glass phase irrespective of whether or not the composition included the preformed Cs-containing HTB compound. For compositions containing the HTB, cesium was partitioned into one of four major phases including zeolite; Cs-silica-tungstate bronze, pollucite (CsAlSi 2O 6), and an aluminosilicate with an Al/Si ratio close to one. The leach resistance of all materials was evaluated and related to the cesium distribution within the GCC phase assemblages. In general, the GCCs prepared from the HTB had superior durability compared with materials not containing tungsten. Indeed the compositions in many cases had leach resistances comparable to the best ceramics or glass materials.

  14. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T e and N e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T e and N e for aluminum in aluminum alloys as a marker for the correct alloying using an optical fiber probe.

  15. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T(e and N(e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T(e and N(e for the aluminum in aluminum alloys using an optical fiber probe.

  16. Correlation of beam electron and LED signal losses under irradiation and long-term recovery of lead tungstate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batarin, V.A.; Butler, J.; Davidenko, A.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Kachanov, V.A.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Lukanin, V.S.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Melnick, Y.M.; Meschanin, A.P.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Minaev, N.G.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Nogach, L.V.; Ryazantsev, A.V.; Semenov, P.A.; Semenov, V.K.; Shestermanov, K.E.; Soloviev, L.F.; Stone, S.; Uzunian, A.V.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Yakutin, A.E.; Yarba, J.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals reduces their transparency. The calibration that relates the amount of light detected in such crystals to incident energy of photons or electrons is of paramount importance to maintaining the energy resolution the detection system. We report on tests of lead tungstate crystals, read out by photomultiplier tubes, exposed to irradiation by monoenergetic electron or pion beams. The beam electrons themselves were used to measure the scintillation light output, and a blue light emitting diode (LED) was used to track variations of crystals transparency. We report on the correlation of the LED measurement with radiation damage by the beams and also show that it can accurately monitor the crystal recovery from such damage

  17. Solvent-Free Biginelli Condensation using Tungstate Sulfuric Acid: a Powerful and Reusable Catalyst for Selective Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Rezaee Nasab

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungstate sulfuric acid (TSA has been prepared and used as a recyclable catalyst for the Biginelli syn-thesis of some biologically active quinazolinones/thiones under solvent-free conditions. This method has advantages such as the avoidance of organic solvents, high yield of pure products, short reaction times, and operational simplicity.  © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rightsReceived: 28th April 2014; Revised: 15th May 2014; Accepted: 26th May 2014[ How to Cite: Nasab, R.R., Karami, B., Khodabakhshi, S. (2014. Selective Solvent‐free Biginelli Condensation using Tungstate Sulfuric Acid as Powerful and Reusable Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (2: 142-154. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6794.148-154][ Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6794.148-154

  18. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  19. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan, S.; Auffray, E.; Battaglieri, M.; Buchanan, E.; Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A.; Colaneri, L.; D`Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Dormenev, V.; Fanchini, E.; Lanza, L.; Novotny, R. W.; Parodi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Sokhan, D.; Tarasov, I.; Zonta, I.

    2015-07-01

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  20. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegan, S., E-mail: fegan@ge.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Auffray, E. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Battaglieri, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Buchanan, E. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Colaneri, L.; D' Angelo, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Vita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dormenev, V. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Fanchini, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lanza, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Novotny, R.W. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); and others

    2015-07-21

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  1. Regularities of the chlorination process of phosphates and tungstates of some actinide and fission elements in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukova, A.I.; Chernikov, A.A.; Skiba, O.V.; Kazantsev, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    Results of kinetic studies of chlorination process of crystal phosphates and tungstates of uranium, cerium, zirconium, plutonium by vapours of carbon tetrachloride in the melts of alkali element chlorides at of 973-1073 K have been analyzed. Mathematical models for the process description are suggested. Analysis of adequate models of regression type permitted to solve the problem of statistical evaluation of affecting factors and to predict within factor space studied the conditions for the optimal process course

  2. The roles of phosphate and tungstate species in surface acidities of TiO2-ZrO2 binary oxides - A comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Manchal; Shen, Po-fan; Chang, Sue-min

    2018-05-01

    Porous tungstated and phosphated TiO2-ZrO2 (TZ) binary oxides with high and strong acidity were successfully prepared by means of sol-gel or impregnation approaches. In addition, the influences of the two types of modifiers on the microstructures and acidity were systematically examined, compared, and clarified. The TZ oxide derived from a surfactant-templating method exhibited a high surface area of 195 m2/g with a pore size of 6.3 nm. Moreover, it had a high acidity of 859 μmol/g with a density of 4.4 μmol/nm2 because of defective surface. Phosphation significantly increased the acidity to 1547 μmol/g and showed the highest acid density of 6.7 μmol/nm2 at a surface P density of 22.7P/nm2. On the other hand, tungstated compounds just showed the highest acidity of 972 μmol/g and the highest acid density of 4.8 μmol/nm2 at 4.7 W/nm2. Compared to tungstate species, phosphate anions are more capable of promoting the acidity because they are able to distort the host network and inhibit elemental rearrangement. While Lewis acidity prevailed in the tungstated compounds, Brønsted acidity was dominant in the phosphated oxides. The Wdbnd O and Psbnd OH groups were responsible for strong acidity in the modified compounds. Phosphated compounds formed strong Brønsted acid sites on the Psbnd OH groups with a particular strength, and tungstation produced Lewis acid sites with a continuous strength on the metal ions adjacent to the tungstate moieties. Cyclic NH3 adsorption-desorption processes revealed that the active sites for NH3 adsorption were stable in both the tungstate and phosphate modified compounds, revealing that these solid acids are promising as the adsorbents for removal of base gases.

  3. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolucci, Stephen F.; Paras, Joseph; Rafiee, Mohammad A.; Rafiee, Javad; Lee, Sabrina; Kapoor, Deepak; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. → Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. → Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. → The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  4. Tungsten Trioxide/Zinc Tungstate Bilayers: Electrochromic Behaviors, Energy Storage and Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Huige; Ding, Daowei; Yan, Xingru; Guo, Jiang; Shao, Lu; Chen, Haoran; Sun, Luyi; Colorado, Henry A.; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten oxide and zinc tungstate bilayers have been prepared via a facile sol-gel method for integrated applications of electrochromic behaviors and energy storage;. • Electron transfer behaviors between the semiconductor bilayer films have been found dependent on the bilayer assembly sequence;. • Methylene blue (MB) has been employed for the first time as an indicator to study the electron transfer phenomenon in the bilayer films. - Abstract: Pair-sequentially spin-coated tungsten trioxide (WO 3 ) and zinc tungstate (ZnWO 4 ) bilayer films onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slides have been prepared via sol-gel methods followed by annealing. The bilayers (ZnWO 4 /WO 3 denoting the bilayer film with the inner layer of ZnWO 4 and the outer layer of WO 3 on the ITO while WO 3 /ZnWO 4 standing for the bilayer film with the inner layer of WO 3 and the outer layer of ZnWO 4 on the ITO) exhibit integrated functions of electrochromic and energy storage behaviors as indicated by the in situ spectroelectrochemistry and cyclic voltammetry (CV) results. Accordingly, blue color was observed for the bilayer films at -1 V in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 solution. An areal capacitance of 140 and 230 μF/cm 2 was obtained for the ZnWO 4 /WO 3 , and WO 3 /ZnWO 4 film, respectively, at a scan rate of 0.05 V/s in the CV measurements. The CV results also unveiled the electron transfer behavior between the semiconductor films in the oxidation process, suggesting a sequence-dependent electrochemical response in the bilayer films. Meanwhile, methylene blue (MB) was used as an indicator to study the electron transfer phenomenon during the reduction process at negative potentials of -0.4 and -0.8 V, in 0.5 M Na 2 SO 4 . The results indicated that the electrons transfer across the bilayers was enhanced at more negative potentials

  5. Effect of TiAl_3 on distribution of TiC particles in aluminum matrix and nucleation of α(Al) grain%TiAl_3对TiC粒子在铝基体中分布及α(Al)晶粒形核的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏天东; 丁万武; 赵文军; 王晓军; 徐仰涛

    2009-01-01

    研究TiC和TiAl_3细化工业纯铝时TiAl_3的存在对TiC在铝基体中分布及α(Al)晶粒形核的影响,分析Al-Ti-C晶粒细化机制.结果表明:TiC单独作为工业纯铝的晶粒细化剂时,大量TiC被α(Al)晶粒推向树枝晶的晶界处,从而限制了TiC的异质形核作用;当TiC和TiAl_3共同作为晶粒细化剂时,在α(Al)晶粒内部出现了大量TiC粒子,大量的TiC粒子成为了α(Al)的结晶核心,并且在TiC颗粒和铝基体的界面处存在"富Ti过渡区";TiAl_3在铝熔体中分解释放出Ti原子并向TiC粒子周围偏聚,形成的"TiC/铝熔体界面富Ti过渡区" 改善了TiC与α(Al)的结构适应性,降低了TiC粒子的表面张力,促进了TiC粒子在铝熔体中的均匀分布,提高了其形核能力.%The effect of TiAl_3 on the distribution of TiC particles in aluminum matrix and nucleation of α(Al) grain was studied when the TiC and TiAl_3 refining industry aluminum, and the nucleation mechanism of Al-Ti-C grain refiner were discussed. The results show that when TiC alone is used as the nucleation phase, most of the TiC is pushed into the grain boundaries by the α(Al) dendrites and the nucleation of TiC is restricted. On the other hand, when TiC and TiAl_3 refine the industry aluminum together, most of the TiC particles are found within the α(Al) grains and nucleation occurs on TiC particles, and there is a Ti transition zone between TiC and aluminum interface. TiAl_3 releases Ti atoms in aluminum melt, Ti atoms congregate to the TiC surface, and ultimately forming TiC/aluminum interface Ti transition zone, which not only improves the structure of adaptability and wettability between TiC and Al , but also reduces the surface tension of TiC particles, which making a lot of TiC particles can be uniformly distributed in the aluminum melt, which advance α(Al) core and heterogeneous nucleation in the aluminum melt solidification.

  6. Synthesis of alkaline-earth metal tungstates in melts of [NaNO3-M(NO3)2]eut-Na2WO4 (M=Ca, Sr, Ba) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurdumov, G.K.; Shurdumova, Z.V.; Cherkesov, Z.A.; Karmokov, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis of alkaline earth metal tungstates in melts of eutectics of NaNO 3 -M(NO 3 ) 2 ] (M=Ca, Sr, Ba) is done. Synthesis is based in exchange reaction of calcium, strontium, and barium nitrates with sodium tungstate [ru

  7. Elevated gamma-rays shielding property in lead-free bismuth tungstate by nanofabricating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Quan-Ping; Sun, Nan; Zhao, Yang; Shi, Rui; Zhou, Yuan-Lin; Zheng, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Radiation shielding materials have attracted much attention across academia and industry because of the increasing of nuclear activities. To achieve the materials with low toxicity but good protective capability is one of the most significant goals for personal protective articles. Here, bismuth tungstate nanostructures are controllably fabricated by a versatile hydrothermal treatment under various temperatures. The crystals structure and morphology of products are detailedly characterized with X-ray diffraction, electron microscope and specific surface area. It is noteworthy that desired Bi2WO6 nanosheets treated with 190 °C show the higher specific surface area (19.5 m2g-1) than that of the other two products. Importantly, it has a close attenuating property to lead based counterpart for low energy gamma-rays. Due to the less toxicity, Bi2WO6 nanosheets are more suitable than lead based materials to fabricate personal protective articles for shielding low energy radiations and have great application prospect as well as market potential.

  8. Sonochemical synthesis of terbium tungstate for developing high power supercapacitors with enhanced energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani-Nasab, Ali; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Pourmohamadian, Vafa; Ahmadi, Farhad; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2018-07-01

    Sonochemically prepared nanoparticles of terbium tungstate (TWNPs) were evaluated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy, and the optimal products were further characterized in terms of their electrochemical properties using conventional and continuous cyclic voltammetry (CV, and CCV), galvanostatic charge/discharge technique, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The CV studies indicated the TWNPs to have specific capacitance (SC) values of 336 and 205 F g -1 at 1 and 200 mV s -1 , and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests revealed the SC of the TWNP-based electrodes to be 300 F g -1 at 1 Ag -1 . Also continuous cyclic voltammetry evaluations proved the sample as having a capacitance retention value of 95.3% after applying 4000 potential cycles. In the light of the results TWNPs were concluded as favorable electrode materials for use in hybrid vehicle systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan, Pethan N.; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V.R., E-mail: kvrchary@iict.res.in

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol–gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO{sub 3}) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH{sub 3} TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  10. redox reactions of uranium in the presence of potassium 2-phospho-17-tungstate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, L.P.; Rykov, A.G.; Sirotinkina, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The redox reactions of uranium in the presence of potassium 2-phospho-17-tungstate (17W2P) - K 10 P 2 W 17 O 61 - were studied by the methods of spectrophotometry and potentiometry. It was established that in the presence of 17W2P the UO /SUP 2/2/ + ion is reduced by iron(II) to uranium(IV) as a result of the binding of U(IV) into a strong complex with composition (U(p 2 W 17 O 61 ) 2 ) 16- . The peculiarities of the coordination of uranium(IV) by voluminous 17W2P ligands are the cause of the different nature of its interaction with various types of oxidizing agents. It was established that under the action of oxidizing agents (K 2 Cr 2 O 7 , KMnO 4 ), the reduced form of which is a complex with 17W2P, there is a conversion of the complex of uranium(IV) to the corresponding complex of uranium(V), evidently with conservation of a structure analogous to that for uranium(IV). It was also shown that uranium(IV) in complex with 17W2P is practically not oxidized in the cold by persulfate ions which react according to a radical mechanism, whereas weaker oxidizing agents, for example, H 2 O 2 , oxidize it to the UO /SUP 2/2/ + ion. Hypotheses are advanced on the possible mechanisms of the occurrence of the corresponding reactions

  11. Compton profiles and Mulliken’s populations of cobalt, nickel and copper tungstates: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meena, B.S. [Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Heda, N.L. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324010, Rajasthan (India); Kumar, Kishor; Bhatt, Samir; Mund, H.S. [Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-03-01

    We present the first ever studies on Compton profiles of AWO{sub 4} (A=Co, Ni and Cu) using 661.65 keV γ-rays emitted by {sup 137}Cs source. The experimental momentum densities have been employed to validate exchange and correlation potentials within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Density functional theory (DFT) with local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation and also the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT (B3LYP and PBE0) have been considered under LCAO scheme. The LCAO-B3LYP scheme is found to be in better agreement with the experimental data than other approximations considered in this work, suggesting applicability of B3LYP approach in predicting the electronic properties of these tungstates. The Mulliken’s population (MP) data show charge transfer from Co/Ni/Cu and W to O atoms. The experimental profiles when normalized to same area show almost similar localization of 3d electrons (in real space) of Ni and Cu which is lower than that of Co in their AWO{sub 4} environment.

  12. Efficient photo-catalytic degradation of malachite green using nickel tungstate material as photo-catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helaïli, N; Boudjamaa, A; Kebir, M; Bachari, K

    2017-03-01

    The present study focused on the evaluation of photo-catalytic and photo-electrochemical properties of the photo-catalyst based on nickel tungstate material prepared by a nitrate method through the degradation of malachite green (MG) dye's. The effect of catalyst loading and dye concentration was examined. Physico-chemical, optical, electrical, electrochemical, and photo-electrochemical properties of the prepared material were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), BET analysis, optical reflectance diffuse (DR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), electrical conductivity, cyclic voltammetry (CV), current intensity, mott-shottky, and nyquist. XRD revealed the formation of monoclinic structure with a small particle size. BET surface area of the sample was around 10 m 2 /g. The results show that the degradation of MG was more than 80%, achieved after 3 h of irradiation at pH 4.6 and with a catalyst loading of 75 mg. Also, it was found that the dye photo-degradation obeyed the pseudo-first order kinetic via Langmuir Hinshelwood model.

  13. Investigation on the photophysical properties of tungsten trioxide and tungstate based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, G.; Pazhanivel, T.

    2018-04-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3), Metal tungstates (SrWO4, Cr2WO6), WO3/SrWO4 and WO3/Cr2WO6 nanocomposites were successfully prepared by microwave irradiation method at relatively low temperature (500 °C). The synthesized samples were subjected to different investigation techniques, to know the materials physical and chemical properties. The structural and phase change formation of nanoparticles were investigated through XRD analysis. It shows that, the nanoparticles have highly crystalline nature. The shape and composition of the prepared nanoparticles were investigated through SEM and EDAX analysis. The optical properties of the synthesized samples were verified by Ultraviolet-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectrometer. The emission intensity maximum of WO3 nanoparticle was red shifted when compared to composites. It may be due to the effect of delocalized electrons in the parent material. Simultaneously, the emission intensity was decreased because of trap states occurred on the surface of the composite nanoparticles. The photoluminescence spectra of the synthesized samples exhibit different emission (violet and blue) behavior. Hence, it may be useful for light emitting diode (LED) applications.

  14. Transport and dielectric studies on silver based molybdo-tungstate quaternary superionic conducting glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.S.S.; Radhakrishna, S.

    1988-01-01

    The molybdo-tungstate (MoO 3 -WO 3 ) combination of glass formers with silver oxide (Ag 2 O) as glass modifier and silver iodide (AgI) as ionic conductor were prepared to study the transport and dielectric properties of 60% AgI-40% (x Ag 2 O-y(WO 3 -MoO 3 )) for x/y=0.33 to 3.0 and establish the feasibility of using these glasses as electrolytes in the fabrication and characterisation of solid state batteries and potential memory devices. The details of the preparation of glasses and methods of measurement of their capacitance, dielectric loss factor and ac conductivity in the frequency range 100 Hz - 100 kHz from 30-120 C have been reported. The electronic contribution to the total conductivity, the ionic and electronic transport numbers were determined using Wagners dc polarisation technique. The observed high ionic and low electronic conductivities were attributed to the formation of ionic clusters in the glass and the effect of mixing two glass formers. The observed total ionic conductivity and its temperature dependence was explained using Arrhenius relation σ=σ 0 /T exp(-E/RT) and the measured dielectric constant and dielectric loss were explained on the basis of Jonschers theory. The frequency dependence of dielectric constant obeys the theory based on the polarisation of ions. 25 refs.; 8 figs

  15. Some peculiarities of zirconium tungstate synthesis by thermal decomposition of hydrothermal precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubanov, Alexander I.; Dedova, Elena S.; Plyusnin, Pavel E.; Filatov, Eugeny Y.; Kardash, Tatyana Y.; Korenev, Sergey V.; Kulkov, Sergey N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of ZrW 2 O 8 using hydrothermal method. • On hydrothermal synthesis optimal conc. of HCl in the reaction mixture is 2.3 M. • Thermal decomposition of ZrW 2 O 7 ((OH) 1.5 ,Cl 0.5 )·2H 2 O begins are 200 °S. • Amorphous intermediate crystallizes into cubic single-phase ZrW 2 O 8 above 550 °S. • ZrW 2 O 8 destructed at temperatures above 700 °S. - Abstract: This article discusses some peculiarities of the synthesis of ZrW 2 O 8 (1) using thermal decomposition of the precursor ZrW 2 O 7 ((OH) 1.5 ,Cl 0.5 )·2H 2 O (2) prepared by hydrothermal method. On hydrothermal synthesis of 2 the optimal concentration of hydrochloric acid in the reaction mixture is about 2.3 M. TG approach to determine the chemical composition of the precursor was suggested. It has been found that the precursor for the synthesis of zirconium tungstate has chemical formula 2. Thermal decomposition of the precursor 2 begins at 200 °S and affords an amorphous intermediate, which crystallizes as a cubic phase 1 above 550 °S with an exoeffect. The temperature of the beginning of the transition from amorphous to the crystalline state is 350 ± 25 °S

  16. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan N., Pethan; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V. R.

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol-gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO3) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  17. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan, Pethan N.; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V.R.

    2014-01-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol–gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO 3 ) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH 3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  18. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalise the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy diphoton resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This paper describes how the monitoring system is operated, how the corrections are obtained, and the resulting ECAL performance.

  19. An investigation on the preparation of nanocrystalline hydrous zirconia from zirconium tungstate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, M.; Perottoni, C. A.; Gouvêa, D.; Machado, G.; Zorzi, J. E.

    2018-02-01

    Hydrous nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared from an unusual precursor—the bimetallic oxide zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8)—in alkaline medium. Different experimental conditions (NaOH concentration, time and temperature) were used to investigate the effects on crystallographic, morphological, chemical and thermal characteristics of the products. The resulting materials are composed of particles with a crystal structure similar to that of cubic ZrO2 (or a mixture of tetragonal and cubic phases, depending on the synthesis conditions), with particle size around 5 nm and crystallites around 3 nm in diameter. These particles form high surface area agglomerates, exhibiting mesoporosity and capacity for adsorption of water and carbon dioxide. The synthesis mechanism appears to be constituted, first, by a chemical substitution reaction between the WO4 tetrahedra and hydroxyl ions, with subsequent solubilization of the structure. Indeed, excess hydroxyls in the medium form colloidal zirconium ions which polymerize/condense, generating crystalline nuclei in a process facilitated by heterogeneous nucleation and supersaturation. The presence of residual tungsten in all samples appears to be a key element for stabilizing the size and crystalline structure of the materials produced.

  20. Zirconium tungstate/epoxy nanocomposites: effect of nanoparticle morphology and negative thermal expansivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongchao; Rogalski, Mark; Kessler, Michael R

    2013-10-09

    The ability to tailor the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a polymer is essential for mitigating thermal residual stress and reducing microcracks caused by CTE mismatch of different components in electronic applications. This work studies the effect of morphology and thermal expansivity of zirconium tungstate nanoparticles on the rheological, thermo-mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, and dielectric properties of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites. Three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles were synthesized under different hydrothermal conditions and their distinct properties were characterized, including morphology, particle size, aspect ratio, surface area, and CTE. Nanoparticles with a smaller particle size and larger surface area led to a more significant reduction in gel-time and glass transition temperature of the epoxy nanocomposites, while a higher initial viscosity and significant shear thinning behavior was found in prepolymer suspensions containing ZrW2O8 with larger particle sizes and aspect ratios. The thermo- and dynamic-mechanical properties of epoxy-based nanocomposites improved with increasing loadings of the three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. In addition, the introduced ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not negatively affect the dielectric constant or the breakdown strength of the epoxy resin, suggesting potential applications of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites in the microelectronic insulation industry.

  1. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  2. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  3. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  4. Use of Biomass as a Sustainable and Green Fuel with Alkali-Resistant DeNOx Catalysts based on Sulfated or Tungstated Zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Christensen, Claus H.

    poisons is the use of supports with highly acidic properties, which would interact stronger with potassium than the vanadium species. Among those, sulfated and tungstated zirconica appears very attractive, since their surface acidity can be tuned in a wide range by varying the preparation procedure, WOX......, sulfated, and tungstated zirconia were prepared and tested. The influence of potassium additives on the acidity and activity was studied and the results were compared with traditional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Resistance of the catalysts towards poisoning with potassium was found to depend dramatically...... on the crystallinity and surface acidity of the support used. Better resistance of the samples based on sulfated and tungstated zirconia seems to be connected with the fact that a significant part of the potassium on the surface of the catalyst preferentially interact with strong acid sites of the support thus...

  5. Proton magnetic resonance in hydrates of tungstates of 2-4th group elements of D.I. Mendeleev periodic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitsyuga, V.T.; Potarskaya, L.A.; Mokhosoev, M.V.

    1979-01-01

    By the methods of PMR and infrared-spectroscopy studied are the tungstate hydrates of Mg, Li, Cd, Al, Ge, In, Ti, Ln, Hf. The PMR spectra have been taken for air-dry and partly hydrated samples in the temperature range from 93 to 295 K. In tungstate hydrates of the 2nd and 4th groups found are the distorted moleculas of H 2 O with the intermolecular interproton distances different from 1.53 A, namely, increased up to 2.69 A and decreased to 1.38 A. Determined is the quantitative content of OH - groups and H 2 O moleculas, with different interproton distance. A formula content of the compounds studied is proposed. In tungstates of the 3d group the distorted moleculas are found only in compounds with H - /Me 2 O distortion is confirmed by the data of infrared spectr. The process of dehydration of distorted H 2 O moleculas is studied

  6. Studies in crystal structure and luminescence properties of Eu3+-doped metal tungstate phosphors for white LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Kang, Shinhoo

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between the crystal structure and luminescent properties of Eu 3+ -doped metal tungstate phosphors for white LEDs was investigated. Red-emitting A 4-3x (WO 4 ) 2 :Eu x 3+ (A=Li, Na, K) and B (4-3x)/2 (WO 4 ) 2 :Eu x 3+ (B=Mg, Ca, Sr) phosphors were synthesized by solid-state reactions. The findings confirmed that these phosphors exhibited a strong absorption in the near UV to green range, due to the intra-configurational 4f-4f electron transition of Eu 3+ ions. The high doping concentration of Eu 3+ enhanced the absorption of near UV light and red emission without any detectable concentration quenching. Based on the results of a Rietveld refinement, it was attributed to the unique crystal structure. In the crystal structure of the Eu 3+ -doped metal tungstate phosphor, the critical energy transfer distance is larger than 5 A so that exchange interactions between Eu 3+ ions would occur with difficulty, even at a high doping concentration. The energy transfer between Eu 3+ ions, which causes a decrease in red emission with increasing concentration of Eu 3+ , appears to be due to electric multi-polar interactions. In addition, the Eu-O distance in the host lattice affected the shape of emission spectrum by splitting of emission peak at the 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 transition of Eu 3+ . - Highlights: → Eu 3+ -doped metal tungstate was synthesized as a red phosphor for white LEDs. → Crystal structure is tetragonal with a space group of I4 1 /c. → A strong absorption in the near UV to green range was observed. → High doping of Eu 3+ enhanced the absorption of near UV light and red emission.

  7. Luminescence investigation of R{sup 3+}-doped alkaline earth tungstates prepared by a soft chemistry method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Helliomar P. [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kai, Jiang [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Química, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil (Brazil); Silva, Ivan G.N.; Rodrigues, Lucas C.V. [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felinto, Maria C.F.C. [Centro de Química e Meio Ambiente, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hölsä, Jorma [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Department of Chemistry, University of Turku,FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf), Turku (Finland); Malta, Oscar L. [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Brito, Hermi F., E-mail: hefbrito@iq.usp.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    Highly luminescent rare earth (R{sup 3+}) doped alkaline-earth tungstates MWO{sub 4}:R{sup 3+} (M{sup 2+}: Ca, Sr and Ba, R{sup 3+}: Eu, Tb, Gd) were prepared with a room temperature coprecipitation method. The phosphors were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), thermal analysis (TG), infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV excited photoluminescence. The as-prepared MWO{sub 4}:R{sup 3+} particles belong to the tetragonal scheelite phase, and are well crystallized and are of the average size of 16–48 nm. The excitation and emission spectra of the materials were recorded at 300 and 77 K temperatures. The luminescent materials exhibit intense red (Eu{sup 3+}) and green (Tb{sup 3+}) colors under UV excitation. The excitation spectra of the Eu{sup 3+} doped materials show broad bands arising from the ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions (O{sup 2−}→W{sup VI} and O{sup 2−}→Eu{sup 3+}) as well as narrow bands from 4f–4f intraconfigurational transitions of Eu{sup 3+}. 4f–4f emission data of the Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} in the MWO{sub 4} host matrices as well as the values of emission quantum efficiencies of the {sup 5}D{sub 0} level and the 4f–4f experimental intensity parameters of Eu{sup 3+} ion are presented and discussed. - Highlights: • Highly red Europium and green Terbium doped tungstate under UV excitation. • Efficient energy transfer process from tungstate to R{sup 3+} ion. • Promising candidates for a red (Eu{sup 3+}) and green (Tb{sup 3+}) emitting phosphors. • Ligand Metal charge transfer to R{sup 3+} ion. • Charge compensation with Na{sup +}.

  8. Determination of aluminum by four analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, T.J.; Smetana, K.M.

    1975-11-01

    Four procedures have been developed for determining the aluminum concentration in basic matrices. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) was the routine method of analysis. Citrate was required to complex the aluminum and eliminate matrix effects. AAS was the least accurate of the four methods studied and was adversely affected by high aluminum concentrations. The Fluoride Electrode Method was the most accurate and precise of the four methods. A Gran's Plot determination was used to determine the end point and average standard recovery was 100% +- 2%. The Thermometric Titration Method was the fastest method for determining aluminum and could also determine hydroxide concentration at the same time. Standard recoveries were 100% +- 5%. The pH Electrode Method also measures aluminum and hydroxide content simultaneously, but is less accurate and more time consuming that the thermal titration. Samples were analyzed using all four methods and results were compared to determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. On the basis of these comparisons, conclusions were drawn concerning the application of each method to our laboratory needs

  9. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are…

  10. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  11. Beam tests of lead tungstate crystal matrices and a silicon strip preshower detector for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Barney, D; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benhammou, Ya; Blick, A M; Bloch, P; Bonamy, P; Bourotte, J; Buiron, L; Cavallari, F; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, D J A; Dafinei, I; Davies, G; Depasse, P; Deiters, K; Diemoz, M; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Donskov, S V; Mamouni, H E; Ercoli, C; Faure, J L; Felcini, Marta; Gautheron, F; Géléoc, M; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, S N; Godinovic, N; Graham, D J; Guillaud, J P; Guschin, E; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hillemanns, H; Hofer, H; Ille, B; Inyakin, A V; Jääskeläinen, S; Katchanov, V A; Kirn, T; Kloukinas, Kostas C; Korzhik, M V; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebrun, P; Lecoq, P; Lecoeur, Gérard; Lecomte, P; Leonardi, E; Locci, E; Loos, R; Longo, E; MacKay, C K; Martin, E; Mendiburu, J P; Musienko, Yu V; Nédélec, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Organtini, G; Paoletti, S; Pansart, J P; Peigneux, J P; Puljak, I; Qian, S; Reid, E; Renker, D; Rosowsky, A; Rosso, E; Rusack, R W; Rykaczewski, H; Schneegans, M; Seez, Christopher J; Semeniouk, I N; Shagin, P M; Sillou, D; Singovsky, A V; Sougonyaev, V; Soric, I; Verrecchia, P; Vialle, J P; Virdee, Tejinder S; Zhu, R Y

    1998-01-01

    Tests of lead tungstate crystal matrices carried out in high-energy electron beams in 1996, using new crystals, new APDs and an improved test set-up, confirm that an energy resolution of better than 0 .6% at 100 GeV can be obtained when the longitudinal uniformity of the struck crystal is adequate. Light loss measurements under low dose irradiation are reported. It is shown that there is no loss of energy resolution after irradiation and that the calibration change due to light loss can be tracked with a precision monitoring system. Finally, successuful tests with a preshower device, equipped wi th silicon strip detector readout, are described.

  12. Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites: Characterization, mechanical and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Abdu Raheem V., P.; Jayakrishnan, P.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposites of NBR with manganous-tungstate nanoparticles were prepared through vulcanization process. The extent of interaction of nanoparticles with the polymer was studied by FTIR, SEM, XRD, TGA and AC conductivity. FTIR and XRD ascertain the interaction of NBR with MnWO4 nanoparticles. SEM analysis established that the nanopartilces were well dispersed in the macromolecular chain of NBR. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were studied as a function of filler loading. The nanocomposites exhibited enhanced thermal stability as seen in TGA. Conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites increase with increase in concentration of MnWO4 nanoparticles (7phr) and thereafter the value decreases.

  13. Effect of tungstate on acetate and ethanol production by the electrosynthetic bacterium Sporomusa ovata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammam, Fariza; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Lizak, Dawid Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    successfully converted to their corresponding alcohols 1-propanol and 1-butanol by S. ovata during gas fermentation. Increasing tungstate concentration enhanced conversion efficiency for both propionate and butyrate. Gene expression analysis suggested that tungsten-containing aldehyde ferredoxin...... oxidoreductases (AORs) and a tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were involved in the improved biosynthesis of acetate, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. AORs and FDH contribute to the fatty acids re-assimilation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, respectively. This study presented here shows...

  14. Test results from a prototype lead tungstate crystal calorimeter with vacuum phototriode readout for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollonio, M; Barber, G; Bell, K; Britton, D; Brooke, J; Brown, R; Bourotte, J; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D; Davies, G; Devitsin, E; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Goussev, Y; Grafstroem, P; Haguenauer, M; Head, R; Heath, H; Hobson, P; Inyakin, A; Katchanov, V; Kirsanov, M; Lintern, L; Lodge, A; Mcleod, E; Nash, S; Newbold, D; Ukhanov, M; Postoev, V; Patalakha, D; Presland, A; Probert, M; Seez, C; Semeniouk, I; Seliverstov, D; Smith, B; Sproston, M; Tapper, R; Tchuiko, B

    2002-05-21

    Tests of a prototype for the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the compact muon solenoid experiment (CMS) at the large hadron collider are described. The basic unit for the endcap ECAL in CMS is a 'supercrystal' of 25 lead tungstate crystals. Results are presented from tests of the first full-sized supercrystal in electron beams and in a 3 T magnetic field. The supercrystal was exposed to electron beams with energies from 25 to 180 GeV. An energy resolution ({sigma}{sub E}/E) of (0.48{+-}0.01)% was measured at 180 GeV.

  15. The aluminum smelting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite (HAp) for binder tungstate in 188W/188Re generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eni Hartati; Yati B Yuliyati; Duyeh Setiawan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the synthesis of hydroxyapatite has been carried out through a process of precipitation of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH) 2 ) with phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) based on acid base reaction process that produce crystalline solid and then it will be used for binder tungstate in 188 W/ 188 Re generator system. The purpose of this study were to characterize the results of synthesized hydroxyapatite and to determine the optimum conditions on generator 188 W/ 188 Re performance such as activation of the heating hydroxyapatite, pH of Na 2 WO 4 , reaction temperature, distribution coefficient and the adsorption capacity (adsorption coefficient) of hydroxyapatite. The characterization of synthesized hydroxyapatite was done using FTIR, XRD and SEM-EDAX, while the determination of the optimum condition of each parameters based on distribution coefficient and adsorption capacity hydroxyapatite using spectrophotometric method. The FTIR results of hydroxyapatite (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ) showed the appearance of peaks in the O-H stretching wave number (υ) and 3434.9 cm -1 and 563.8 cm -1 , while the group PO 4 -3 is shown by the P-O bond in (υ) 1033.8 cm -1 . The XRD results indicate that hydroxyapatite had three peaks at 2θ region is 31,875° , 32,205° and 33,080°. Characterization by SEM showed columnar morphology with a particle size of 200 nm. The optimum conditions of each parameter obtained at hydroxyapatite heating temperature 100 °C, Na 2 WO 4 solution pH 3, and the reaction temperature of 60 °C, which gave result on distribution coefficients of 193.74 mL/g and adsorption capacity (adsorption coefficient) of 5.20 mg W/g HAp. (author)

  17. On tungstates of divalent cations (II). Polymorphy of Pb{sub 2}WO{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantz, Stephan G.; Dialer, Marwin; Hoeppe, Henning A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperchemie, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Pielnhofer, Florian [Abteilung Nanochemie, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-12-13

    The phase transition from the low temperature form Pb{sub 2}[WO{sub 5}] to its high temperature form Pb{sub 2}O[WO{sub 4}] was monitored by means of temperature dependent powder XRD. Single-crystals of Pb{sub 2}[WO{sub 5}], suitable for a structure determination by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, were obtained by quenching a sample from 500 C to room temperature. The low-temperature phase Pb{sub 2}[WO{sub 5}] comprises the structural motive of infinite zigzag chains built by cornersharing WO{sub 6} octahedra, known from the tungstates M{sub 2}[WO{sub 5}] (M = Sr, Ba), but crystallizes in a new structure type [C2/c, a = 14.0996(4) Aa, b = 5.8579(2) Aa, c = 12.6877(4) Aa, β = 114.3569(13) , Z = 8, R{sub int} = 0.042, R{sub 1} = 0.040, wR{sub 2} = 0.068]. The crystal structure of the high-temperature phase Pb{sub 2}O[WO{sub 4}] [C2/m, a = 14.2126(4) Aa, b = 5.80150(10) Aa, c = 7.3477(2) Aa, β = 113.9402(7) , Z = 4, R{sub 1} = 0.035, wR{sub 2} = 0.055] is revised, based on single-crystal XRD data. Furthermore spectroscopic data (IR, Raman and UV/Vis spectra) are presented. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Some peculiarities of zirconium tungstate synthesis by thermal decomposition of hydrothermal precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubanov, Alexander I., E-mail: gubanov@niic.nsc.su [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Dedova, Elena S. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademicheskii 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Plyusnin, Pavel E.; Filatov, Eugeny Y. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kardash, Tatyana Y. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Korenev, Sergey V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kulkov, Sergey N. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademicheskii 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • Synthesis of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} using hydrothermal method. • On hydrothermal synthesis optimal conc. of HCl in the reaction mixture is 2.3 M. • Thermal decomposition of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}((OH){sub 1.5},Cl{sub 0.5})·2H{sub 2}O begins are 200 °S. • Amorphous intermediate crystallizes into cubic single-phase ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} above 550 °S. • ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} destructed at temperatures above 700 °S. - Abstract: This article discusses some peculiarities of the synthesis of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} (1) using thermal decomposition of the precursor ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}((OH){sub 1.5},Cl{sub 0.5})·2H{sub 2}O (2) prepared by hydrothermal method. On hydrothermal synthesis of 2 the optimal concentration of hydrochloric acid in the reaction mixture is about 2.3 M. TG approach to determine the chemical composition of the precursor was suggested. It has been found that the precursor for the synthesis of zirconium tungstate has chemical formula 2. Thermal decomposition of the precursor 2 begins at 200 °S and affords an amorphous intermediate, which crystallizes as a cubic phase 1 above 550 °S with an exoeffect. The temperature of the beginning of the transition from amorphous to the crystalline state is 350 ± 25 °S.

  19. Optimization of the scintillation parameters of the lead tungstate crystals for their application in high precision electromagnetic calorimetry; Optimisation des parametres de scintillation des cristaux de tungstate de plomb pour leur application dans la calorimetrie electromagnetique de haute precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobychev, G

    2000-04-12

    In the frame of this dissertation work scintillation properties of the lead tungstate crystals (PWO) and possibilities of their use were studied foreseeing their application for electromagnetic calorimetry in extreme radiation environment conditions of new colliders. The results of this work can be summarized in the following way. 1. A model of the scintillations origin in the lead tungstate crystals which includes processes influencing on the crystals radiation hardness and presence of slow components in scintillations was developed. 2. An analysis of the influences of the PWO scintillation properties changes on the parameters of the electromagnetic calorimeter was done. 3. Methods of the light collection from the large scintillation elements of complex shape made of the birefringent scintillation crystal with high refraction index and low light yield in case of signal registration by a photodetector with sensitive surface small in compare with the output face of scintillator were Studied. 4. Physical principles of the methodology of the scintillation crystals certification during their mass production foreseeing their installation into a calorimeter electromagnetic were developed. Correlations between the results of measurements of the PWO crystals parameters by different methods were found. (author)

  20. Progress in the Development of the Lead Tungstate Crystals for EM-Calorimetry in High-Energy Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, R. W.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Borisevich, A.; Dormenev, V.; Houzvicka, J.; Korjik, M.; Zaunick, H.-G.

    2017-11-01

    Even at present time there is a strong interest and demand for high quality lead tungstate crystals (PbWO4, PWO) for electromagnetic (EM) calorimetry. PWO is implemented into the EM calorimeter of the CMS-ECAL detector at LHC [1] and required for the completion of the PANDA EMC [2] and various ongoing detector projects at Jefferson Lab. The successful mass production of PWO using the Czochralski method was stopped after bankruptcy of the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP) in Russia as major producer so far. The Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science (China) was considered as an alternative producer using the modified Bridgman method. The company CRYTUR (Turnov, Czech Republic) with good experience in the development and production of different types of inorganic oxide crystals has restarted at the end of 2014 the development of lead tungstate for mass production based on the Czochralski method. An impressive progress was achieved since then. The growing technology was optimized to produce full size samples with the quality meeting the PANDA-EMC specifications for PWO-II. We will present a detailed progress report on the research program in collaboration with groups at Orsay and JLab. The full size crystals will be characterized with respect to optical performance, light yield, kinetics and radiation hardness.

  1. Optimization of the scintillation parameters of the lead tungstate crystals for their application in high precision electromagnetic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobychev, G.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of this dissertation work scintillation properties of the lead tungstate crystals PWO) and possibilities of their use were studied foreseeing their application for electromagnetic calorimetry in extreme radiation environment conditions of new colliders. The results of this work can be summarized in the following way. 1. A model of the scintillations origin in the lead tungstate crystals which includes processes influencing on the crystals radiation hardness and presence of slow components in scintillations was developed. 2. An analysis of the influences of the PWO scintillation properties changes on the parameters of the electromagnetic calorimeter was done. 3. Methods of the light collection from the large scintillation elements of complex shape made of the birefringent scintillation crystal with high refraction index and low light yield in case of signal registration by a photodetector with sensitive surface small in compare with the output face of scintillator were Studied. 4. Physical principles of the methodology of the scintillation crystals certification during their mass production foreseeing their installation into a calorimeter electromagnetic were developed. Correlations between the results of measurements of the PWO crystals parameters by different methods were found. (author)

  2. A comparative study of ion exchange properties of antimony (III) tungstoselenite with those of antimony (III) tungstate and antimony (III) selenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardanan, C.; Nair, S.M.K.

    1996-01-01

    A new inorganic ion exchanger, antimony (III) tungstoselenite, has been prepared and characterised. Its exchange capacity and distribution coefficients for various metal ions and the effects of temperature and electrolyte concentrations on ion exchange capacity have been compared with antimony (III) tungstate and antimony (III) selenite. Six binary separations using the exchanger have been carried out. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab

  3. Low-temperature flux growth of sulfates, molybdates, and tungstates of Ca, Sr, and Ba and investigation of doping with Mn6+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romanyuk, Y.E.; Ehrentraut, D.; Pollnau, Markus; Garcia-Revilla, S.; Valiente, R.

    The growth of undoped and $Mn^{6+}$-doped molybdates and tungstates of alkali-earth metals and BaSO4 has been investigated. Single crystals were grown by the flux method within the temperature range of 600–475 °C, using the ternary NaCl–KCl–CsCl solvent. Sizes of undoped crystals increase within the

  4. Design and length optimization of an adiabatic coupler for on-chip vertical integration of rare-earth-doped double tungstate waveguide amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, Jinfeng; Sefünç, Mustafa; García Blanco, Sonia Maria

    2014-01-01

    The integration of rare-earth doped double tungstate waveguide amplifiers onto passive technology platforms enables the on-chip amplification of very high bit rate signals. In this work, a methodology for the optimized design of vertical adiabatic couplers between a passive Si3N4 waveguide and the

  5. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  6. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  7. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  8. Laser micromachining of cadmium tungstate scintillator for high energy X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Sion Andreas

    Pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a method for the creation of thick segmented scintillator arrays for high-energy X-ray radiography. Thick scintillators are needed to improve the X-ray absorption at high energies, while segmentation is required for spatial resolution. Monte-Carlo simulations predicted that reflections at the inter-segment walls were the greatest source of loss of scintillation photons. As a result of this, fine pitched arrays would be inefficient as the number of reflections would be significantly higher than in large pitch arrays. Nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser ablation was investigated as a method to segment cadmium tungstate (CdWO_4). The effect of laser parameters on the ablation mechanisms, laser induced material changes and debris produced were investigated using optical and electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for both types of lasers. It was determined that nanosecond ablation was unsuitable due to the large amount of cracking and a heat affected zone created during the ablation process. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation was found to induce less damage. The optimised laser parameters for a 1028 nm laser was found to be a pulse energy of 54 μJ corresponding to a fluence of 5.3 J cm. -2 a pulse duration of 190 fs, a repetition rate of 78.3 kHz and a laser scan speed of 707 mm s. -1 achieving a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. A serpentine scan pattern was found to minimise damage caused by anisotropic thermal expansion. Femtosecond pulsed ablation was also found to create a layer of tungsten and cadmium sub-oxides on the surface of the crystals. The CdWO_4 could be cleaned by immersing the CdWO_4 in ammonium hydroxide at 45°C for 15 minutes. However, XPS indicated that the ammonium hydroxide formed a thin layer of CdCO_3 and Cd(OH)_2 on the surface. Prototype arrays were shown to be able to resolve features as small as 0.5 mm using keV energy X-rays. The most

  9. Structural and optical characterization of porous anodic aluminum oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galca, Aurelian C.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Wormeester, Herbert; Salm, Cora; Leca, Victor; Rector, Jan H.; Poelsema, Bene

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) experiments are employed to characterize porous aluminum oxide obtained by anodization of thin aluminum films. Rutherford backscattering spectra and x-ray diffraction experiments provide information on the composition and the structure of the samples. Results on our thin film samples with a well-defined geometry show that anodization of aluminum is reproducible and results in a porous aluminum oxide network with randomly distributed, but perfectly aligned cylindrical pores perpendicular to the substrate. The ellipsometry spectra are analyzed using an anisotropic optical model, partly based on the original work by Bruggeman. The model adequately describes the optical response of the anodized film in terms of three physically relevant parameters: the film thickness, the cylinder fraction, and the nanoporosity of the aluminum oxide matrix. Values of the first two quantities, obtained from fitting the spectra, are in perfect agreement with SEM results, when the nanoporosity of the aluminum oxide matrix is taken into account. The validity of our optical model was verified over a large range of cylinder fractions, by widening of the pores through chemical etching in phosphoric acid. While the cylinder fraction increases significantly with etch time and etchant concentration, the nanoporosity remains almost unchanged. Additionally, based on a simple model considering a linear etch rate, the concentration dependence of the etch rate was determined

  10. Aluminum industry options paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    In 1990, Canada's producers of aluminum (third largest in the world) emitted 10 million tonnes of carbon dioxide and equivalent, corresponding to 6.4 tonnes of greenhouse gas intensity per tonne of aluminum. In 2000, the projection is that on a business-as-usual (BAU) basis Canadian producers now producing 60 per cent more aluminum than in 1990, will emit 10.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide and equivalent, corresponding to a GHG intensity of 4.2 tonnes per tonne of aluminum. This improvement is due to production being based largely on hydro-electricity, and partly because in general, Canadian plants are modern, with technology that is relatively GHG-friendly. The Aluminum Association of Canada estimates that based on anticipated production, and under a BAU scenario, GHG emissions from aluminum production will rise by 18 per cent by 2010 and by 30 per cent by 2020. GHG emissions could be reduced below the BAU forecast first, by new control and monitoring systems at some operations at a cost of $4.5 to 7.5 million per smelter. These systems could reduce carbon dioxide equivalent emissions by 0.8 million tonnes per year. A second alternative would require installation of breaker feeders which would further reduce perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions by 0.9 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. Cost of the breakers feeders would be in the order of $200 million per smelter. The third option calls for the the shutting down of some of the smelters with older technology by 2015. In this scenario GHG emissions would be reduced by 2010 by 0.8 million tonnes per year of carbon dioxide equivalent. However, the cost in this case would be about $1.36 billion. The industry would support measures that would encourage the first two sets of actions, which would produce GHG emissions from aluminum production in Canada of about 10.2 million tonnes per year of carbon dioxide equivalent, or about two per cent above 1990 levels with double the aluminum production of 1990. Credit for

  11. Mesoporous aluminum phosphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Haskouri, Jamal; Perez-Cabero, Monica; Guillem, Carmen; Latorre, Julio; Beltran, Aurelio; Beltran, Daniel; Amoros, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    High surface area pure mesoporous aluminum-phosphorus oxide-based derivatives have been synthesized through an S + I - surfactant-assisted cooperative mechanism by means of a one-pot preparative procedure from aqueous solution and starting from aluminum atrane complexes and phosphoric and/or phosphorous acids. A soft chemical extraction procedure allows opening the pore system of the parent as-prepared materials by exchanging the surfactant without mesostructure collapse. The nature of the pore wall can be modulated from mesoporous aluminum phosphate (ALPO) up to total incorporation of phosphite entities (mesoporous aluminum phosphite), which results in a gradual evolution of the acidic properties of the final materials. While phosphate groups in ALPO act as network building blocks (bridging Al atoms), the phosphite entities become basically attached to the pore surface, what gives practically empty channels. The mesoporous nature of the final materials is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The materials present regular unimodal pore systems whose order decreases as the phosphite content increases. NMR spectroscopic results confirm the incorporation of oxo-phosphorus entities to the framework of these materials and also provide us useful information concerning the mechanism through which they are formed. - Abstract: TEM image of the mesoporous aluminum phosphite showing the hexagonal disordered pore array that is generated by using surfactant micelles as template. Also a scheme emphasizing the presence of an alumina-rich core and an ALPO-like pore surface is presented.

  12. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  13. Influence of La/W ratio on electrical conductivity of lanthanum tungstate with high La/W ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, Gen; Shono, Yohei; Ushiyama, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yoshito; Otomo, Junichiro

    2017-01-01

    The proton-conducting properties of lanthanum tungstates (LWOs) with high La/W ratios were investigated using electrochemical measurements and quantum chemical calculations. Single phases of LWOs with high La/W ratios (6.3≤La/W≤6.7) were synthesized by high-temperature sintering at around 1700 °C. The electrical conductivity of LWO increased with increasing La/W ratio in the single-phase region. The LWO synthesized at the optimum sintering temperature and time, and with the optimum La/W ratio gave the maximum conductivity, i.e., 2.7×10 −3 S cm −1 with La/W=6.7 at 500 °C. Density functional theory calculations, using the nudged elastic band method, were performed to investigate the proton diffusion barrier. The results suggest that the proton diffusion paths around La sites have the lowest proton diffusion barrier. These findings improve our understanding of LWO synthesis and the proton-conducting mechanism and provide a strategy for improving proton conduction in LWOs. - Graphical abstract: The LWOs with high La/W ratios were synthesized for the first time. The optimum La/W ratio gave the maximum conductivity with La/W=6.7 at 500 °C. The proton diffusion paths were also considered with density functional theory calculations. - Highlights: • The proton-conducting properties of lanthanum tungstates (LWOs) were investigated. • Single phase LWOs with high La/W ratios (6.3≤La/W≤6.7) were synthesized successfully. • LWOs with the high La/W ratios showed high proton conductivity. • The DFT calculation suggested the lowest proton diffusion barrier in the path around La sites.

  14. Structural characterization of hydrogen separating membranes based on lanthanide-tungstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherb, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The global energy supply is currently the most controversial issue discussed in our society. Despite the increasing importance of renewable energies, the largest portion of electrical energy has its origin in fossil fuels. CO 2 , emitted during combustion in power plants is known to be one of the greenhouse gases that contributes significantly to global climate change. The development of technologies for environmentally friendly power generation from coal and gas is an area of significant interest. One possibility is the capture and long-term storage of CO 2 from the exhaust stream of fossil fuel power plants. In the pre-combustion process, CO 2 and H 2 can be separated after gasification of the fossil fuel. For this purpose gas-tight ceramic membranes with mixed electronic-protonic conductivity can be used. However, these materials have high requirements due to the extreme conditions in power plants. Mixed electronic-protonic conducting lanthanide tungstates (Ln 6 WO 12 Ln = lanthanide or yttrium) are promising materials, which are stable in CO 2 -containing harsh environments. This work presents a study on structure-property relationships of Ln 6 WO 12 . The structural analysis was performed by the use of neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods for three exemplary systems (Ln = La, Nd, Y). Samples were prepared via solid state reaction (SSR), and also via a sol-gel approach (Pechini). For the systems LaWO and NdWO, new structural models were developed by combined Rietveld analysis and Fourier density maps. The latter was applied to determine the electron and nuclear density distribution. LaWO with a La/W ratio from 5.3 to 5.7 crystallizes with the space group F-43m and forms a superstructure due to a partially ordered arrangement of cations. On Wyckoff site 48h, up to 4.6 % W can be substituted by La. The oxygen atoms around tungsten are highly delocalized and 6 out of 24 possible split positions are occupied. Thus, W has an octahedral coordination

  15. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  16. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  17. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  18. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of aluminum reinforced with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, R.; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Caudillo, R.; Garcia-Gutierrez, D.I.; Marquez-Lucero, A.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Mendoza-Ruiz, D.C.; Jose Yacaman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of pure aluminum with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag-C NP) of 10 nm in size were prepared by the mechanical milling process. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the Ag-C NP are homogeneously dispersed into the Al matrix, silver nanoparticles do not coalesce, grow or dissolve in the aluminum matrix due the carbon shell. The values of yield strength (σ y ), maximum strength (σ max ) and micro-hardness Vickers (HVN) of the composites were evaluated and reported as a function of Ag-C NP content. It has been found that the introduction of this type of particles in aluminum strengthen it, increasing all the previous parameters

  19. [Analysis of tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake in foods by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiding; Chang, Cuilan; Guo, Qilei; Cao, Hong; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-04-01

    A novel analytical method for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was studied. The pigments contained in the color lakes were successfully separated from the aluminum matrix in the pre-treatment process, which included the following steps: dissolve the color lakes in 0.1 mol/L H2SO4, adjust the pH of the solution to 5.0, then mix it with the solution of EDTA x 2Na and heat it in a water bath, then use polyamide powder as the stationary phase of solid phase extraction to separate the pigments from the solution, and finally elute the pigments with 0.1 mol/L NaOH. The CZE conditions systematically optimized for tartrazine aluminum lake were: 48.50 cm of a fused silica capillary with 40.00 cm effective length and 50 microm i. d., the temperature controlled at 20.0 degrees C, 29.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.015 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 263 nm. The conditions for sunset yellow aluminum lake were: the same capillary and temperature, 25.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.025 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 240 nm. The limits of detection were 0.26 mg/L and 0.27 mg/L, and the linear ranges were 0.53-1.3 x 10(2) mg/L and 0.54-1.4 x 10(2) mg/L for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. The RSDs were 4.3% and 5.7% (run to run, n = 6), 5.6% and 6.0% (day to day, n = 6) for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. Further developments for this method could make it a routinely used method analyzing color lakes in foods.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of silicon in silumin matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Papu; Pandey, K.L.; Kumar, Pradeep; Bagchi, A.C.; Abdulla, K.K.

    2015-01-01

    In dispersion fuel, fissile material is dispersed in inert matrix. Aluminum-silicon-nickel (silumin) alloy is employed as inert matrix owing to its high thermal conductivity, high castability, high corrosion resistance. All these properties depend on the chemical composition and the structure of silumin. Silicon is stringent specification in silumin. A spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of silicon content in silumin matrix. Silumin matrix was fused with LiOH and subsequent dissolution in water along with few drops of conc. sulphuric acid. The molybodo-silicic formed by the addition of ammonium molybdate is reduced to molybdenum blue by ascorbic acid in the presence of antimony. The absorbance was measured at 810 nm. Aluminum and nickel were found to be non-interfering with the silicon determination. (author)

  1. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  2. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  3. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study

  4. Aluminum concentration in hydrangeas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagawa, M.; Haruyama, Y.; Saito, M.

    2008-01-01

    We have been trying to measure concentration of aluminum in Ajisai, Hydrangea macrophylla for these days. But due to bad luck, we have encountered detector trouble for two years in a low. Thus, we have few data to analyze and obtained quite limited results. (author)

  5. Borated aluminum alloy manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Kajihara, Katsura; Aruga, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Borated aluminum alloy is used as the basket material of cask because of its light weight, thermal conductivity and superior neutron absorbing abilities. Kobe Steel has developed a unique manufacturing process for borated aluminum alloy using a vacuum induction melting method. In this process, aluminum alloy is melted and agitated at higher temperatures than common aluminum alloy fabrication methods. It is then cast into a mold in a vacuum atmosphere. The result is a high quality aluminum alloy which has a uniform boron distribution and no impurities. (author)

  6. Local pharmacological effects of tungstate on the color-pattern determination of butterfly wings: a possible relationship between the eyespot and parafocal element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, Bidur; Otaki, Joji M

    2009-11-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns can be changed by the application of a temperature shock or pharmacological agents such as tungstate, producing a distinctive type of elemental modification called the TS (temperature shock) type. Heterochronic uncoupling between the signaling and reception steps during the color-pattern determination process has been proposed as a mechanism for TS-type changes. As an extension of this hypothesis, both the parafocal element (PFE) and the eyespot in the same wing compartment are considered to be determined by morphogenic signal(s) emitted from the same eyespot focus. However, these models need to be examined with additional experimental data. Furthermore, there is controversy as to whether the action of tungstate on wing color patterns is direct or Indirect. Using a species of nymphalid butterfly (Junonia orithya), we have devised a simple method for the local application of pharmacological agents directly on developing wings of pupae. Local tungstate application resulted in reduced eyespots and circular dislocated PFEs in the eyespot-less compartments only on the treated wing, demonstrating that tungstate directly induces color-pattern changes on wings. We further examined the eyespot-PFE relationship in normal and cold-shocked Individuals, showing that an eyespot can be superimposed on a PFE and vice versa, probably depending on the timing of their fate determination. Taken together, we propose a two-morphogen model for the normal color-pattern determination, in which the morphogenic signals for the eyespot and PFE are different from each other despite their Identical origin. This two-morphogen model is compatible with the heterochronic uncoupling model for TS-type changes.

  7. Evidence of sub-10 nm aluminum-oxygen precipitates in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutanabbir, Oussama; Isheim, Dieter; Mao, Zugang; Seidman, David N

    2016-01-01

    In this research, ultraviolet laser-assisted atom-probe tomography (APT) was utilized to investigate precisely the behavior at the atomistic level of aluminum impurities in ultrathin epitaxial silicon layers. Aluminum atoms were incorporated in situ during the growth process. The measured average aluminum concentration in the grown layers exceeds by several orders of magnitude the equilibrium bulk solubility. Three-dimensional atom-by-atom mapping demonstrates that aluminum atoms precipitate in the silicon matrix and form nanoscopic precipitates with lateral dimensions in the 1.3 to 6.2 nm range. These precipitates were found to form only in the presence of oxygen impurity atoms, thus providing clear evidence of the long-hypothesized role of oxygen and aluminum-oxygen complexes in facilitating the precipitation of aluminum in a silicon lattice. The measured average aluminum and oxygen concentrations in the precipitates are ∼10 ± 0.5 at.% and ∼4.4 ± 0.5 at.%, respectively. This synergistic interaction is supported by first-principles calculations of the binding energies of aluminum-oxygen dimers in silicon. The calculations demonstrate that there is a strong binding between aluminum and oxygen atoms, with Al-O-Al and O-Al-Al as the energetically favorable sequences corresponding to precipitates in which the concentration of aluminum is twice as large as the oxygen concentration in agreement with APT data. (paper)

  8. Yttrium aluminum garnet coating on glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Camila M.A.; Freiria, Gabriela S.; Faria, Emerson H. de; Rocha, Lucas A.; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Nassar, Eduardo J., E-mail: eduardo.nassar@unifran.edu.br

    2016-02-15

    Thin luminescent films have seen great technological advances and are applicable in the production of a variety of materials such as sensors, solar cells, photovoltaic devices, optical magnetic readers, waveguides, lasers, and recorders. Systems that contain yttrium aluminum oxide are important hosts for lanthanide ions and serve as light emission devices. This work deals with the deposition of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) film doped with Eu{sup 3+} onto a glass substrate obtained by the sol–gel methodology. Spray pyrolysis furnished the yttrium aluminum oxide powder. Dip-coating at a withdrawal speed of 10 mm min{sup −1} and evaporation led to deposition of different numbers of layers of the YAG:Eu{sup 3+} film onto the glass substrate from a YAG:Eu{sup 3+} powder suspension containing ethanol, water, and tetraethylorthosilicate. Photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transparency measurements aided film characterization. The emission spectra revealed that the number of layers influenced film properties. - Highlights: • The spray pyrolysis was used to obtain luminescent YAG:Eu{sup 3+}. • The matrix was deposited as transparent films. • The YAG:Eu{sup 3+} was deposited by sol–gel process onto glass substrate.

  9. Yttrium aluminum garnet coating on glass substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Camila M.A.; Freiria, Gabriela S.; Faria, Emerson H. de; Rocha, Lucas A.; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Nassar, Eduardo J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin luminescent films have seen great technological advances and are applicable in the production of a variety of materials such as sensors, solar cells, photovoltaic devices, optical magnetic readers, waveguides, lasers, and recorders. Systems that contain yttrium aluminum oxide are important hosts for lanthanide ions and serve as light emission devices. This work deals with the deposition of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) film doped with Eu 3+ onto a glass substrate obtained by the sol–gel methodology. Spray pyrolysis furnished the yttrium aluminum oxide powder. Dip-coating at a withdrawal speed of 10 mm min −1 and evaporation led to deposition of different numbers of layers of the YAG:Eu 3+ film onto the glass substrate from a YAG:Eu 3+ powder suspension containing ethanol, water, and tetraethylorthosilicate. Photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transparency measurements aided film characterization. The emission spectra revealed that the number of layers influenced film properties. - Highlights: • The spray pyrolysis was used to obtain luminescent YAG:Eu 3+ . • The matrix was deposited as transparent films. • The YAG:Eu 3+ was deposited by sol–gel process onto glass substrate.

  10. Comprehensive Investigation of Silver Nanoparticle/Aluminum Electrodes for Copper Indium Sulfide/Polymer Hybrid Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arar, Mario; Pein, Andreas; Haas, Wernfried

    2012-01-01

    ,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PSiF-DBT) nanocomposite solar cells, which improves the fill factor compared to pure aluminum electrodes. A comprehensive structural investigation was performed by means of transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry revealing the presence of silver...... nanoparticles in an aluminum oxide matrix between the absorber layer and the aluminum cathode. In combination with complementary optical investigations, the origin of the improvement is ascribed to a facilitated charge extraction....

  11. Melt quality induced failure of electrical conductor (EC grade aluminum wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliq A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure of electrical conductor grade (EC aluminum during wire drawing process was investigated. The fractured aluminum wires were subjected to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX analyses for an initial examination. Thermodynamic analyses of molten aluminum interaction with refractories was also carried out using FactSage at 710°C to predict the stable phases. The SEM/EDX analyses has revealed the inclusions in aluminum matrix. The typical inclusions observed were Al2O3, Al3C4 (Al-Carbide and oxides of refractories elements (Al, Mg, Si and O that have particle size ranging up to 5 μm. The transition metal boride particles were not identified during SEM/EDX analyses these might be too fine to be detected with this microscope. The overall investigation suggested that the possible cause of this failure is second phase particles presence as inclusions in the aluminum matrix, and this was associated with the poor quality of melt. During wire drawing process, these inclusions were pulled out of the aluminum matrix by the wiredrawing forces to produce micro-voids which led to ductile tearing and final fracture of wires. It was recommended to use ceramic foam filters to segregate inclusions from molten aluminum.

  12. The influence on intrinsic light emission of calcium tungstate and molybdate powders by multivalence Pr codoping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Fang; Xiao, Zhisong; Yan, Lu; Zhang, Feng; Huang, Anping

    2010-01-01

    For trivalent praseodymium (Pr 3+ ) and quadrivalent praseodymium (Pr 4+ ) codoped CaMO 4 (M = W, Mo) powders, the luminescence propriety of matrix is obviously influenced by carrier concentration. The light emission intensity of CaWO 4 matrix decreases exponentially with increasing of Pr concentration because oxygen-deficient (WO 3 .V O ) obtains an electron supplied by Pr 3+ (5d). However, the light emission intensity of CaMoO 4 is enhanced by Pr codoping because the quasi-free electrons increase the probability of radiative combination. The difference of photoluminescence properties in the two materials are attributed to the bonding character of M and O in the CaMO 4 structure. (orig.)

  13. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum. It...

  14. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  15. Aluminum fin-stock alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, R.M.; Mutasher, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum alloys have long been used in the production of heat exchanger fins. The comparative properties of the different alloys used for this purpose has not been an issue in the past, because of the significant thickness of the finstock material. However, in order to make fins lighter in weight, there is a growing demand for thinner finstock materials, which has emphasized the need for improved mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance. The objective of this project is to determine the effect of iron, silicon and manganese percentage increment on the required mechanical properties for this application by analyzing four different aluminum alloys. The four selected aluminum alloys are 1100, 8011, 8079 and 8150, which are wrought non-heat treatable alloys with different amount of the above elements. Aluminum alloy 1100 serve as a control specimen, as it is commercially pure aluminum. The study also reports the effect of different annealing cycles on the mechanical properties of the selected alloys. Metallographic examination was also preformed to study the effect of annealing on the precipitate phases and the distribution of these phases for each alloy. The microstructure analysis of the aluminum alloys studied indicates that the precipitated phase in the case of aluminum alloys 1100 and 8079 is beta-FeAI3, while in 8011 it is a-alfa AIFeSi, and the aluminum alloy 8150 contains AI6(Mn,Fe) phase. The comparison of aluminum alloys 8011 and 8079 with aluminum alloy 1100 show that the addition of iron and silicon improves the percent elongation and reduces strength. The manganese addition increases the stability of mechanical properties along the annealing range as shown by the comparison of aluminum alloy 8150 with aluminum alloy 1100. Alloy 8150 show superior properties over the other alloys due to the reaction of iron and manganese, resulting in a preferable response to thermal treatment and improved mechanical properties. (author)

  16. New-Generation Aluminum Composite with Bottom Ash Industrial Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A. K.; Sinha, O. P.

    2018-06-01

    Industrial waste bottom ash (BA) from a pulverized coal combustion boiler containing hard wear-resistant particles was utilized in this study to form an aluminum composite through a liquid metallurgy route. Composites comprising 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% bottom ash were characterized for their physiochemical, microstructural, mechanical, as well as tribological properties, along with pure aluminum. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microstructure revealed uniform distribution of BA particles throughout the matrix of the composite, whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed presence of aluminosilicate phase. Addition of 10 wt.% BA improved the Brinell hardness number (BHN) from 13 to 19 and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) from 71 MPa to 87 MPa, whereas ductility was adversely reduced after 5% BA addition. Incorporation of BA particles resulted in reduced dry sliding wear rates examined up to 80 N load compared with aluminum. Hence, such composites having lower cost could be applied as significantly hard, wear-resistant materials in applications in the automotive industry.

  17. New-Generation Aluminum Composite with Bottom Ash Industrial Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A. K.; Sinha, O. P.

    2018-02-01

    Industrial waste bottom ash (BA) from a pulverized coal combustion boiler containing hard wear-resistant particles was utilized in this study to form an aluminum composite through a liquid metallurgy route. Composites comprising 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% bottom ash were characterized for their physiochemical, microstructural, mechanical, as well as tribological properties, along with pure aluminum. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microstructure revealed uniform distribution of BA particles throughout the matrix of the composite, whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed presence of aluminosilicate phase. Addition of 10 wt.% BA improved the Brinell hardness number (BHN) from 13 to 19 and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) from 71 MPa to 87 MPa, whereas ductility was adversely reduced after 5% BA addition. Incorporation of BA particles resulted in reduced dry sliding wear rates examined up to 80 N load compared with aluminum. Hence, such composites having lower cost could be applied as significantly hard, wear-resistant materials in applications in the automotive industry.

  18. Quality inspection of anisotropic scintillating lead tungstate (PbWO 4) crystals through measurement of interferometric fringe pattern parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozzella, N.; Lebeau, M.; Majni, G.; Paone, N.; Rinaldi, D.

    2001-08-01

    Scintillating crystals are widely used as detectors in radiographic systems, computerized axial tomography devices and in calorimeters employed in high-energy physics. This paper results from a project motivated by the development of the CMS calorimeter at CERN, which will make use of a large number of scintillating crystals. In order to prevent crystals from breaking because of internal residual stress, a quality control system based on optic inspection of interference fringe patterns was developed. The principle of measurement procedures was theoretically modelled, and then a dedicated polariscope was designed and built, in order to observe the crystals under induced stresses or to evaluate the residual internal stresses. The results are innovative and open a new perspective for scintillating crystals quality control: the photoelastic constant normal to the optic axis of the lead tungstate crystals (PbWO 4) was measured, and the inspection procedure developed is applicable to mass production, not only to optimize the crystal processing, but also to establish a quality inspection procedure.

  19. Decoration of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide with cobalt tungstate nanoparticles for use in high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Hamid Reza; Sobhani-Nasab, Ali; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-11-01

    A composite of cobalt tungstate nanoparticles coated on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (CoWO4/NRGO) was prepared through an in situ sonochemical approach. The composite was next evaluated as an electrode material for use supercapacitors electrodes. The characterization of the various CoWO4/NRGO nanocomposite samples was carried out through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and Raman spectroscopy. Complementary studies were also performed through cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and continues cyclic voltammetry (CCV). The electrochemical evaluations were carried out in a 2 M H2SO4 solution as the electrolyte. The electrochemical evaluations on the nano-composite samples indicated that CoWO4/NRGO-based electrodes reveal enhanced supercapacitive characteristics (i.e. a high specific capacitance (SC) of 597 F g-1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s-1, an energy density (ED) value of 67.9 W h kg-1, and high rate capability). CCV studies indicated that CoWO4/NRGO-based electrodes keep 97.1% of their original capacitance after 4000 cycles. The results led to the conclusion that CoWO4/NRGO effectively merge the merits of CoWO4 and CoWO4/RGO in one new nanocomposite material.

  20. Quality inspection of anisotropic scintillating lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystals through measurement of interferometric fringe pattern parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocozzella, N.; Lebeau, M.; Majni, G.; Paone, N.; Rinaldi, D.

    2001-01-01

    Scintillating crystals are widely used as detectors in radiographic systems, computerized axial tomography devices and in calorimeters employed in high-energy physics. This paper results from a project motivated by the development of the CMS calorimeter at CERN, which will make use of a large number of scintillating crystals. In order to prevent crystals from breaking because of internal residual stress, a quality control system based on optic inspection of interference fringe patterns was developed. The principle of measurement procedures was theoretically modelled, and then a dedicated polariscope was designed and built, in order to observe the crystals under induced stresses or to evaluate the residual internal stresses. The results are innovative and open a new perspective for scintillating crystals quality control: the photoelastic constant normal to the optic axis of the lead tungstate crystals (PbWO 4 ) was measured, and the inspection procedure developed is applicable to mass production, not only to optimize the crystal processing, but also to establish a quality inspection procedure

  1. Photoluminescence in solid solutions and thin films of tungstates CaWO{sub 4}-CdWO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoufyq, A.; Mauroy, V.; Guinneton, F.; Valmalette, J-C. [University of Toulon, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, La Garde, (France); Fiorido, T. [Aix Marseille University, IM2NP, UMR CNRS, 7334, Marseille, (France); Benlhachemi, A. [IBN ZOHR University, Faculty of sciences, Environment and Materials Laboratory, Agadir, (Morocco); Lyoussi, A. [CEA of Cadarache, DEN, Departement of reactors studies, experimental physics, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, (France); Nolibe, G. [Cesigma society, signals and systems, La Garde, (France); Gavarri, J-R. [University of Toulon, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, La Garde, (France)

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we present two types of studies on the luminescence properties under UV and X-ray excitations of solid solutions Ca{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}WO{sub 4} and of thin layers of CaWO{sub 4} and CdWO{sub 4}. These tungstate based solid solutions are susceptible to be integrated into new radiation sensors, in order to be used in different fields of applications such as reactor measurements, safeguards, homeland security, nuclear nondestructive assays, LINAC emission radiation measurement. However these complex materials were rarely investigated in the literature. One first objective of our studies was to establish correlations between luminescence efficiency, chemical substitution and the degree of crystallization resulting from elaboration conditions. A second objective will be to determine the efficiency of luminescence properties of thin layers of these materials. In the present work, we focus our attention on the role of chemical substitution on photon emissions under UV and X-ray irradiations. The luminescence spectra of Ca{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}WO{sub 4} polycrystalline materials have been investigated at room temperature as a function of composition (0≤x≤1). In addition, we present a preliminary study of the luminescence of CaWO{sub 4} and CdWO{sub 4} thin layers: oscillations observed in the case of X-ray excitations in the luminescence spectra are discussed. (authors)

  2. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  3. Applied Electrochemistry of Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Qiu, Zhuxian

    Electrochemistry of aluminum is of special importance from both theoretical and technological point of view. It covers a wide range of electrolyte systems from molten fluoride melts at around 1000oC to room temperature molten salts, from aqueous to various organic media and from liquid to solid...... electrolytes. The book is an updated review of the technological advances in the fields of electrolytic production and refining of metals, electroplating, anodizing and other electrochemical surface treatments, primary and secondary batteries, electrolytic capacitors; corrosion and protection and others....

  4. Helium trapping in aluminum and sintered aluminum powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Rossing, T.

    1975-01-01

    The surface erosion of annealed aluminum and of sintered aluminum powder (SAP) due to blistering from implantation of 100-keV 4 He + ions at room temperature has been investigated. A substantial reduction in the blistering erosion rate in SAP was observed from that in pure annealed aluminum. In order to determine whether the observed reduction in blistering is due to enhanced helium trapping or due to helium released, the implanted helium profiles in annealed aluminum and in SAP have been studied by Rutherford backscattering. The results show that more helium is trapped in SAP than in aluminum for identical irradiation conditions. The observed reduction in erosion from helium blistering in SAP is more likely due to the dispersion of trapped helium at the large Al-Al 2 O 3 interfaces and at the large grain boundaries in SAP than to helium release

  5. Alkaline corrosion properties of laser-clad aluminum/titanium coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerbeck, Martin; Herbreteau, Alexis; Rombouts, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to study the use of titanium as a protecting element for aluminum in alkaline conditions. Design/methodology/approach - Aluminum coatings containing up to 20 weight per cent Ti6Al4V were produced using laser cladding and were investigated using light optical...... microscope, scanning electron microscope - energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, together with alkaline exposure tests and potentiodynamic measurements at pH 13.5. Findings - Cladding resulted in a heterogeneous solidification microstructure containing an aluminum matrix...... with supersaturated titanium ( (1 weight per cent), Al3Ti intermetallics and large partially undissolved Ti6Al4V particles. Heat treatment lowered the titanium concentration in the aluminum matrix, changed the shape of the Al3Ti precipitates and increased the degree of dissolution of the Ti6Al4V particles. Corrosion...

  6. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  7. Metal Matrix Composite Enchanced Aluminum Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research pursues a path for reducing structural weight, increasing structural performance, and reducing fabrication cost while also minimizing...

  8. Metal Matrix Composite Enchanced Aluminum Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research pursues a path for reducing structural weight, increasing structural performance, and reducing fabrication cost while also minimizing...

  9. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    on the fuel consumption and emission, which have forced the automotive manufacturers ... scrap and reuse them individually is an alternate approach. The energy ... followed by experimental validation. Further, the ... mixtures at atomic level.

  10. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  11. Reaction of unirradiated high-density fuel with aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Meyer, M.K.; Prokofiev, I.G.; Keiser, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    Excellent dispersion fuel performance requires that fuel particles remain stable and do not react significantly with the surrounding aluminum matrix. A series of high-density fuels, which contain uranium densities >12 g/cm 3 , have been fabricated into plates. As part of standard processing, all of these fuels were subjected to a blister anneal of 1 h at 485 deg. C. Changes in plate thickness were measured and evaluated. From these results, suppositions about the probable irradiation properties of these fuels have been proposed. In addition, two fuels, U-10 wt% Mo and U 2 Mo, were subjected to various heat treatments and were found to be very stable in an aluminum matrix. On the basis of the experimental data, hypotheses of the irradiation behavior of these fuels are presented. (author)

  12. Normal coordinate treatment and Raman intensity analysis of yttrium vanadate and calcium tungstate crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budha Addepalli, V; Kumar, S P; Padma, V A; Rajeswara Rao, N [Osmania Univ., Hyderabad (India). Dept. of Physics

    1976-09-01

    Raman scattering tensors of crystalline YVO/sub 4/ and CaWO/sub 4/ are derived. Using the spectra of YVO/sub 4/, the intensities are substituted in the formulae. They are used to determine the polarizability derivatives of V-O bond. Substituting them back into the intensity formulae, a number of equations involving the L elements are obtained. Supplementing them with the matrix equation LL' = G, and using L'FL = ..gamma.., a-l the F-elements are determined. It is observed that the force constants relating to the translations of the group YVO/sub 4/ are quite high, explaining the high melting point of the crystal.

  13. Photoconductivity of Germanium Nanowire Arrays Incorporated in Anodic Aluminum Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, B; Prikulis, J; Grigorjeva, L; Millers, D; Daly, B; Holmes, J D; Erts, D

    2007-01-01

    Photoconductivity of germanium nanowire arrays of 50 and 100 nm diameter incorporated into Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) membranes illuminated with visible light is investigated. Photocurrent response to excitation radiation with time constants faster than 10 -4 s were governed by absorption of incident light by nanowires, while photokinetics with time constants of the order of 10 -3 s originates from the photoluminescence of the AAO matrix. Possible applications of nanowire arrays inside AAO as photoresistors are discussed

  14. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  15. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  16. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  17. Microstructure and tensile properties of bulk nanostructured aluminum/graphene composites prepared via cryomilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.L., E-mail: ljlhpu123@163.com; Xiong, Y.C.; Wang, X.D.; Yan, S.J.; Yang, C.; He, W.W.; Chen, J.Z.; Wang, S.Q.; Zhang, X.Y.; Dai, S.L.

    2015-02-25

    In order to develop high strength metal–matrix composites with acceptable ductility, bulk nanostructured aluminum–matrix composites reinforced with graphene nanoflakes were fabricated by cryomilling and hot extrusion processes. Microstructure and mechanical properties were characterized and determined using transmission electron microscopy, electron dispersion spectroscopy, as well as static tensile tests. The results show that, with an addition of only 0.5 wt% graphene nanoflakes, the bulk nanostructured aluminum/graphene composite exhibited increased strength and unsubdued ductility over pure aluminum. Besides, the mechanical properties of the composites with higher content of graphene nanoflakes were also measured and investigated. Above 1.0 wt% of graphene nanoflakes, however, this strengthening effect sharply dropped due to the clustering of graphene nanoflakes. Furthermore, the optimal addition of graphene nanoflakes into the nanocrystalline aluminum matrix was calculated and discussed.

  18. Aluminum anode for aluminum-air battery - Part I: Influence of aluminum purity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Joo; Park, In-Jun; Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-03-01

    2N5 commercial grade aluminum (99.5% purity) leads to the lower aluminum-air battery performances than 4N high pure grade aluminum (99.99% purity) due to impurities itself and formed impurity complex layer which contained Fe, Si, Cu and others. The impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al declines the battery voltage on standby status. It also depletes discharge current and battery efficiency at 1.0 V which is general operating voltage of aluminum-air battery. However, the impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al is dissolved with decreasing discharge voltage to 0.8 V. This phenomenon leads to improvement of discharge current density and battery efficiency by reducing self-corrosion reaction. This study demonstrates the possibility of use of 2N5 grade Al which is cheaper than 4N grade Al as the anode for aluminum-air battery.

  19. The potential reproductive, neurobehavioral and systemic effects of soluble sodium tungstate exposure in Sprague-Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturf, S.M.; Bekkedal, M.Y.V.; Wilfong, E.; Arfsten, D.; Chapman, G.; Gunasekar, P.G.

    2011-01-01

    The debate on tungsten (W) is fostered by its continuous usage in military munitions. Reports demonstrate W solubilizes in soil and can migrate into drinking water supplies and, therefore, is a potential health risk to humans. This study evaluated the reproductive, systemic and neurobehavioral effects of sodium tungstate (NaW) in rats following 70 days of daily pre-and postnatal exposure via oral gavage to 5, 62.5 and 125 mg/kg/day of NaW through mating, gestation and weaning (PND 0-20). Daily administration of NaW produced no overt evidence of toxicity and had no apparent effect on mating success or offspring physical development. Distress vocalizations were elevated in F 1 offspring from the high dose group, whereas righting reflex showed unexpected sex differences where males demonstrated faster righting than females; however, the effects were not dose-dependent. Locomotor activity was affected in both low and high-dose groups of F 1 females. Low-dose group showed increased distance traveled, more time in ambulatory movements and less time in stereotypic behavior than controls or high dose animals. The high-dose group had more time in stereotypical movements than controls, and less time resting than controls and the lowest exposure group. Maternal retrieval was not affected by NaW exposure. Tungsten analysis showed a systemic distribution of NaW in both parents and offspring, with preferential uptake within the immune organs, including the femur, spleen and thymus. Histopathological evidence suggested no severe chronic injury or loss of function in these organs. However, the heart showed histological lesions, histiocytic inflammation from minimal to mild with cardiomyocyte degeneration and necrosis in several P 0 animals of 125 mg NaW dose group. The result of this study suggests that pre and postnatal exposure to NaW may produce subtle neurobehavioral effects in offspring related to motor activity and emotionality.

  20. On halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) and -tungstates(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleid, Thomas; Hartenbach, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) have been investigated comprehensively over the last decade comprising the halogens fluorine, chlorine, and bromine. Iodide-containing compounds are so far unknown. The simple composition REXMoO 4 (RE=rare-earth element, X=halogen) is realized for X=F almost throughout the complete lanthanide series as well as for yttrium. While ytterbium and lutetium do not form any fluoride derivative, for lanthanum, only a fluoride-deprived compound with the formula La 3 FMo 4 O 16 is realized. Moreover, molybdenum-rich compounds with the formula REXMo 2 O 7 are also known for yttrium and the smaller lanthanoids. For X=Cl the composition REClMoO 4 is known for yttrium and the whole lanthanide series, although, four different structure types were identified. Almost the same holds for X=Br, however, only two different structure types are realized in this class of compounds. In the case of halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidotungstates(VI) the composition REXWO 4 is found for chlorides and bromides only, so far. Due to the similar size of Mo 6+ and W 6+ cations, the structures found for the tungstates are basically the same as for the molybdates. With the larger lanthanides, the representatives for both chloride and bromide derivates exhibit similar structural motifs as seen in the molybdates, however, the crystal structure cannot be determined reliably. In case of the smaller lanthanoids, the chloride derivatives are isostructural with the respective molybdates, although the existence ranges differ slightly. The same is true for rare-earth metal(III) bromide oxidotungstates(VI).

  1. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish for an integ......Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish...... for an integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  2. Oxidation of zirconium-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1967-10-01

    Examination of the processes occurring during the oxidation of Zr-1% A1, Zr-3% A1, and Zr-1.5% A1-0.5% Mo alloys has shown that in steam rapid oxidation occurs predominantly around the Zr 3 A1 particles, which at low temperatures appear to be relatively unattacked. The unoxidised particles become incorporated in the oxide, and become fully oxidised as the film thickens. This rapid localised oxidation is preceded by a short period of uniform film growth, during which the oxide film thickness does not exceed ∼200A-o. Thus the high oxidation rates can probably be ascribed to aluminum in solution in the zirconium matrix, although its precise mode of operation has not been determined. Once the solubility limit of aluminum is exceeded, the size, distribution and number of intermetallic particles affects the oxidation rate merely by altering the distribution of regions of metal giving high oxidation rates. The controlling process during the early stages of oxidation is electron transport and not ionic transport. Thus, the aluminum in the oxide film is presumably increasing the ionic conductivity more than the electronic. The oxidation rates in atmospheric pressure steam are very high and their irregular temperature dependence suggests that the oxidation rate will be pressure dependent. This was confirmed, in part, by a comparison with oxidation in moist air. It was found that the rate of development of white oxide around intermetallic particles was considerably reduced by the decrease in the partial pressure of H 2 O; the incubation period was not much different, however. (author)

  3. Selection of a mineral binder with potentialities for the stabilization/solidification of aluminum metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C., E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/MAR/DTCD/SPDE, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Lambertin, D.; Lahalle, H.; Antonucci, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/MAR/DTCD/SPDE, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Cannes, C.; Delpech, S. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Binders capable of reducing the pore solution pH compared with Portland cements are reviewed. • The binders are then tested against aluminum corrosion. • Corrosion of aluminum metal is minimal with magnesium phosphate cement. • The H{sub 2} release can be reduced still further by adding LiNO{sub 3} to the mixing solution. • Electrochemical characterizations show that aluminum tends to a passive state. - Abstract: In a strongly alkaline medium, such as that encountered in conventional cementitious materials based on Portland cement, aluminum metal is corroded, with continued production of hydrogen. In order to develop a mineral matrix having enhanced compatibility with aluminum, a literature review was first undertaken to identify binders capable of reducing the pore solution pH compared with Portland cement. An experimental study was then carried out to measure the hydrogen production resulting from corrosion of aluminum metal rods encapsulated in the different selected cement pastes. The best results were achieved with magnesium phosphate cement, which released very little hydrogen over the duration of the study. This production could be reduced still further by adding a corrosion inhibitor (lithium nitrate) to the mixing solution. Open circuit potential measurement and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of aluminum electrode encapsulated in two pastes based on Portland cement and magnesium phosphate cement showed different redox behaviors. In the Portland cement paste, the electrochemical data confirmed the corrosion of aluminum whereas this latter tended to a passive state in the magnesium phosphate binder.

  4. Improving of Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloys by Removing Intermetallic Compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seri, Osami [Muroran it., Hokkaido (Japan)

    2008-06-15

    It is well known that iron is one of the most common impurity elements sound in aluminum and its alloys. Iron in the aluminum forms an intermetallic compounds such as FeAl{sub 3}. The FeAl{sub 3} particles on the aluminum surface are one of the most detrimental phases to the corrosion process and anodizing procedure for aluminum and its alloys. Trial and error surface treatment will be carried out to find the preferential and effective removal of FeAl{sub 3} particles on the surfaces without dissolution of aluminum matrix around the particles. One of the preferable surface treatments for the aim of getting FeAl{sub 3} free surface was an electrochemical treatment such as cathodic current density of -2 kAm{sup -2} in a 20-30 mass% HNO{sub 3} solution for the period of 300s. The corrosion characteristics of aluminum surface with FeAl{sub 3} free particles are examined in a 0.1 kmol/m{sup 3} NaCl solution. It is found that aluminum with free FeAl{sub 3} particles shows higher corrosion resistance than aluminum with FeAl{sub 3} particles.

  5. Improving of Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloys by Removing Intermetallic Compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seri, Osami

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that iron is one of the most common impurity elements sound in aluminum and its alloys. Iron in the aluminum forms an intermetallic compounds such as FeAl 3 . The FeAl 3 particles on the aluminum surface are one of the most detrimental phases to the corrosion process and anodizing procedure for aluminum and its alloys. Trial and error surface treatment will be carried out to find the preferential and effective removal of FeAl 3 particles on the surfaces without dissolution of aluminum matrix around the particles. One of the preferable surface treatments for the aim of getting FeAl 3 free surface was an electrochemical treatment such as cathodic current density of -2 kAm -2 in a 20-30 mass% HNO 3 solution for the period of 300s. The corrosion characteristics of aluminum surface with FeAl 3 free particles are examined in a 0.1 kmol/m 3 NaCl solution. It is found that aluminum with free FeAl 3 particles shows higher corrosion resistance than aluminum with FeAl 3 particles

  6. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  7. Aluminum hydroxide issue closure package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, T.B.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum hydroxide coatings on fuel elements stored in aluminum canisters in K West Basin were measured in July and August 1998. Good quality data was produced that enabled statistical analysis to determine a bounding value for aluminum hydroxide at a 99% confidence level. The updated bounding value is 10.6 kg per Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), compared to the previously estimated bounding value of 8 kg/MCO. Thermal analysis using the updated bounding value, shows that the MCO generates oxygen concentrate that are below the lower flammability limits during the 40-year interim storage period and are, therefore, acceptable

  8. Packaging material and aluminum. Hoso zairyo to aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itaya, T [Mitsubishi Aluminum Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1992-02-01

    The present paper introduces aluminum foil packaging materials among the relation between packing materials and aluminum. The characteristics of aluminum foil in the packaging area are in its barrier performance, non-toxicity, tastelessness and odorlessness. Its excellent functions and processibility suit best as functional materials for food, medicine and industrial material packaging. While an aluminum foil may be used as a single packing material as in foils used in homes, many of it as a packaging material are used in combination with adhesives, papers or plastic films, or coated or printed. It is used as composite materials laminated or coated with other materials according to their use for the purpose of complementing the aluminum foil as the base material. Representative method to laminate aluminum foils include the wet lamination, dry lamination, thermally dissolved lamination and extruded lamination. The most important quality requirement in lamination is the adhesion strength, which requires a close attention in selecting the kinds of adhesive, laminating conditions, and aging conditions. 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xingzhi

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this monograph is to report on recent developments in the field of matrix inequalities, with emphasis on useful techniques and ingenious ideas. Among other results this book contains the affirmative solutions of eight conjectures. Many theorems unify or sharpen previous inequalities. The author's aim is to streamline the ideas in the literature. The book can be read by research workers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

  10. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 26 000 lead-tungstate scintillation crystals for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 26 000 lead-tungstate scintillation crystals for the barrel part of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL). Following a CERN market survey (MS-2727/EP/CMS) carried out among seven firms in four Member States and two firms in two non-Member States, the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule in Z rich (ETHZ) published on 15 February 2001 an open call for tenders and, in addition, invited tenders from four firms in two non-Member States, including the two firms identified in the CERN market survey. By the closing date, the ETHZ had received one bid from a firm in a CERN Member State and three bids from three firms in two non-Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract to be placed by CERN, on behalf of the ETHZ, with the lowest bidder, SCIONIX (NL), for the supply of 26 000 lead-tungstate crystals for the barrel part of the CMS ECAL for a total amount of 9 392 000 US dollars (16 060 320 Swiss francs)...

  11. Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

  12. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  13. "Ripples" in an Aluminum Pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, James; Wang, Si-Yin; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2018-05-01

    Our motivation for this article is for students to realize that opportunities for discovery are all around them. Discoveries that can still puzzle present day researchers. Here we explore an observation by a middle school student concerning the production of what appears to be water-like "ripples" produced in aluminum foil when placed between two colliding spheres. We both applaud and explore the student's reasoning that the ripples were formed in a melted aluminum pool.

  14. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  15. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  16. Development of proton conducting materials and membranes based on lanthanum tungstate for hydrogen separation from gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, Janka

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanum tungstate La 6-x WO 12-δ (named LWO) is a ceramic material with mixed protonic electronic conductivity. Thereby it is a good candidate membrane material for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas in a fossil pre-combustion power plant. This work shows a material optimization by substitution targeted to clearly enhance the mixed conductivity and thereby the hydrogen flow through the LWO membrane. The first part of the work shows the synthesis and characterization of unsubstituted LWO. It points out that monophase LWO powder can be reproducibly synthesized. The La/W-ratio has to be considerably smaller than the nominal ratio of La/W = 6.0. It also depends on the used sintering conditions. Different relevant properties of LWO like stability in conditions close to application, thermal expansion, sintering behavior or microstructure were determined. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity of the material was investigated. LWO exhibits a prevailing protonic conductivity up to 750 C in wet atmospheres. Under dry atmospheres n-type conductivity was dominating. Oxygen ion and n-type conductivity dominated in wet and dry atmospheres above 750 C. The main part of the work is concerned with the development of new LWO based materials by substitutions. The aim is to achieve an improved mixed protonic electronic conductivity. Substitution elements for lanthanum side were Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ce, Nd, Tb, Y and Al, while for the tungsten side Mo, Re and Ir were used. The total conductivity of the developed materials was investigated and compared to that of the unsubstituted LWO. The substitution of lanthanum led to no appreciable enhancement of the conductivity whereas the substitution of tungsten with 20 mol% molybdenum or 20 mol% rhenium clearly improved it. This caused a hydrogen flow about seven times higher for 20 mol% molybdenum- and about ten times higher for 20 mol% rhenium-substituted LWO in comparison with the unsubstituted LWO at 700 C. In the last part of the

  17. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  18. Improved measurement of aluminum in irradiated fuel reprocessed at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. III.

    1991-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), irradiated fuel from research reactor operators or their contract fuel service companies is reprocessed in the H-Canyon Separations Facility. Final processing costs are based on analytical measurements of the amount of total metal dissolved. Shipper estimates for uranium and uranium-235 and measured values at SRS have historically agreed very well. There have occasionally been significant differences between shipper estimates for aluminum and the aluminum content determined at SRS. To minimize analytical error that might contribute to poor shipper-receiver agreement for the reprocessing of off-site fuel, a new analytical method to measure aluminum was developed by SRS Analytical Laboratories at the Central Laboratory Facilities. An EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) titration method, subject to dissolver matrix interferences, was previously used at SRS to measure aluminum in H-Canyon dissolver during the reprocessing of offsite fuel. The new method combines rapid ion exchange technology with direct current argon plasma spectrometry to enhance the reliability of aluminum measurements for off-site fuel. The technique rapidly removes spectral interferences such as uranium and significantly lowers gamma levels due to fission products. Aluminium is separated quantitatively by using an anion exchange technique that employs oxalate complexing, small particle size resin and rapid flow rates. The new method, which has eliminated matrix interference problems with these analyses and improved the quality of aluminum measurements, has improved the overall agreement between shipper-receiver values for offsite fuel processed SRS

  19. Gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Shuji; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-10-01

    As a part of study of leaching behavior for solidified dry low level radioactive waste, gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar was investigated, and a plan of our research was proposed. The effect of pH on corrosion rate of aluminum, corrosion product, time dependency of corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar, change of corrosion mechanism, the effects of Na, Ca and Cl ions on corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar and corrosion behavior of aluminum when aluminum was used as sacrificed anode in reinforced concrete were previously clarified. Study of the effects of environmental factors such as pH, kind of ions and temperature on gas evolution behavior of aluminum and the effect of aluminum/carbon steel surface ratio no gas evolution behavior of aluminum were planed. (author). 75 refs.

  20. Gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Shuji; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka

    1996-10-01

    As a part of study of leaching behavior for solidified dry low level radioactive waste, gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar was investigated, and a plan of our research was proposed. The effect of pH on corrosion rate of aluminum, corrosion product, time dependency of corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar, change of corrosion mechanism, the effects of Na, Ca and Cl ions on corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar and corrosion behavior of aluminum when aluminum was used as sacrificed anode in reinforced concrete were previously clarified. Study of the effects of environmental factors such as pH, kind of ions and temperature on gas evolution behavior of aluminum and the effect of aluminum/carbon steel surface ratio no gas evolution behavior of aluminum were planed. (author). 75 refs

  1. Matrix analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    1997-01-01

    A good part of matrix theory is functional analytic in spirit. This statement can be turned around. There are many problems in operator theory, where most of the complexities and subtleties are present in the finite-dimensional case. My purpose in writing this book is to present a systematic treatment of methods that are useful in the study of such problems. This book is intended for use as a text for upper division and gradu­ ate courses. Courses based on parts of the material have been given by me at the Indian Statistical Institute and at the University of Toronto (in collaboration with Chandler Davis). The book should also be useful as a reference for research workers in linear algebra, operator theory, mathe­ matical physics and numerical analysis. A possible subtitle of this book could be Matrix Inequalities. A reader who works through the book should expect to become proficient in the art of deriving such inequalities. Other authors have compared this art to that of cutting diamonds. One first has to...

  2. Plasticity and damage in aluminum syntactic foams deformed under dynamic and quasi-static conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balch, Dorian K. [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); O' Dwyer, John G. [Waterford Institute of Technology (Ireland); Davis, Graham R. [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Cady, Carl M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gray, George T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dunand, David C. [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)]. E-mail: dunand@northwestern.edu

    2005-01-25

    Syntactic foams were fabricated by liquid metal infiltration of commercially pure and 7075 aluminum into preforms of hollow ceramic microspheres. The foams exhibited peak strengths during quasi-static compression ranging from -100 to -230 MPa, while dynamic compression loading showed a 10-30% increase in peak strength magnitude, with strain rate sensitivities similar to those of aluminum-matrix composite materials. X-ray tomographic investigation of the post-compression loaded foam microstructures revealed sharp differences in deformation modes, with the unalloyed-Al foam failing initially by matrix deformation, while the alloy-matrix foams failed more abruptly through the formation of sharp crush bands oriented at about 45 deg. to the compression axis. These foams displayed pronounced energy-absorbing capabilities, suggesting their potential use in packaging applications or for impact protection; proper tailoring of matrix and microsphere strengths would result in optimized syntactic foam properties.

  3. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  4. Selection of a mineral binder for the stabilization - solidification of waste containing aluminum metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahalle, H.; Cau Dit Counes, C.; Lambertin, D.; Antonucci, P.; Delpech, S.

    2015-01-01

    The dismantling of nuclear facilities produces radioactive waste materials, some of which may contain aluminum metal. In a strongly alkaline medium, such as that encountered in conventional cementitious materials based on Portland cement, aluminum metal becomes corroded, with a continued production of dihydrogen. In order to develop a mineral matrix having enhanced compatibility with aluminum, a literature review was first undertaken to identify binders capable of reducing the pore solution pH compared with Portland cement. An experimental study was then carried out to measure the hydrogen production resulting from corrosion of aluminum metal rods encapsulated in the different selected cement pastes. The best results were achieved with magnesium phosphate cement, which released very little hydrogen over the duration of the study. This production could be reduced further by adding a corrosion inhibitor (lithium nitrate) to the mixing solution

  5. The Diametrically Loaded Cylinder For The Study Of Nanostructured Aluminum-Graphene And Aluminum-Alumina Nanocomposites Using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam eTabandeh Khorshid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact methods for characterization of metal matrix composites have the potential to accelerate the development and study of advanced composite materials. In this study, diametrical compression of small disk specimens was used to understand the mechanical properties of metal matrix micro and nano composites. Analysis was performed using an inverse method that couples digital image correlation and the analytical closed form formulation. This technique was capable of extracting the tension and compression modulus values in the metal matrix nanocomposite disk specimens. Specimens of aluminum and aluminum reinforced with either Al2O3 nanoparticles or graphene nanoplatelets (GNP were synthesized using a powder metallurgy approach that involved room temperature milling in ethanol, and low temperature drying followed by single action compaction. The elastic and failure properties of MMNC materials prepared using the procedure above are presented.

  6. Nitrate ({sup 13}NO{sub 3}{sup -}) flux studies and response to tungstate treatments in wild type barley and in an NR-deficient mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieneke, J.

    1994-07-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted with seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), comparing the wild type and an NR-deficient mutant (AZ 12/70), to monitor the NO{sub 3}{sup -} influx/efflux relations and the response to tungstate treatment using {sup 13}N-labelling. Upon treatment with the arginyl-residue-binding inhibitor phenylglyoxal both genotypes responded with an immediate depression of NO{sub 3}{sup -} influx. At low external NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations efflux was small (5-15% of the influx) and did not differ substantially between the two genotypes. Although the mutant was distinguished from the wild type by a thinner root system and a reduced shoot length, the total N distribution between roots and shoots and the N concentrations in the root and shoot tissues were fairly comparable. Substantially higher extractable NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration in the shoots (but not roots) of the mutant may indicate that the capacity to reduce NO{sub 3}{sup -} was restricted due to the very low but still detectable NR activity in the root and shoot tissue. Nevertheless, the mutant must have had supplementary means of assimilating considerable amounts of NO{sub 3}{sup -} over the experimental growth period. At the induced stage, both barley genotypes responded to tungstate treatments with a comparable but not complete depression of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} influx. Part of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} influx appears to be independent of the function of NR since an acceleration of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake capacity to almost half the level of the controls occurred in both cultivars upon induction in spite of pretreatment with 150 micromolar WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in a molybdenum-free solution prior to NO{sub 3}{sup -} induction. However, 600 micromolar tungstate treatment during the induction phase reduced NO{sub 3}{sup -} influx further (below 20%), but the plants of both cultivars were still able to recover almost completely. (author)

  7. Matrix pentagons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4) matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  8. Matrix pentagons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Belitsky

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4 matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  9. Irradiation behavior of uranium oxide - Aluminum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Rest, Jeffrey; Snelgrove, James L.

    1996-01-01

    An oxide version of the DART code has been generated in order to assess the irradiation behavior of UO 2 -Al dispersion fuel. The aluminum-fuel interaction models were developed based on U 3 O 8 -Al irradiation data. Deformation of the fuel element occurs due to fuel particle swelling driven by both solid and gaseous fission products and as a consequence of the interaction between the fuel particles and the aluminum matrix. The calculations show that, with the assumption that the correlations derived from U 3 O 8 are valid for UO 2 , the LEU UO 2 -Al with a 42% fuel volume loading (4 g U/cm 3 ) irradiated at fuel temperatures greater than 413 K should undergo breakaway swelling at core burnups greater than about 1.12 x 10 27 fissions m -3 (∼63% 235 U burnup). (author)

  10. Irradiation behavior of uranium oxide-aluminum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Rest, J.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    An oxide version of the DART code has been generated in order to assess the irradiation behavior of UO 2 -Al dispersion fuel. The aluminum-fuel interaction models were developed based on U 3 O 8 -Al irradiation data. Deformation of the fuel element occurs due to fuel particle swelling driven by both solid and gaseous fission products, as well as a consequence of the interaction between the fuel particles and the aluminum matrix. The calculations show, that with the assumption that the correlations derived from U 3 O 8 are valid for UO 2 , the LEU UO 2 -Al with a 42% fuel volume loading (4 gm/cc) irradiated at fuel temperatures greater than 413 K should undergo breakaway swelling at core burnups greater than about 1.12 x 10 27 fissions m -3 (∼ 63% 235 U burnup)

  11. Immobilization of industrial waste in cement–bentonite clay matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results of a series of experimental tests performed to determine the influence of matrix characteristics on the leaching mechanism of copper aluminum oxychloride immobilized into cement matrices are presented. The objective of this work was to investigate the leaching mechanism of copper as a constituent of copper ...

  12. Recrystallization in Commercially Pure Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bent; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    Recrystallization behavior in commercial aluminum with a purity of 99.4 pct was studied by techniques such as high voltage electron microscopy, 100 kV transmission electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Sample parameters were the initial grain size (290 and 24 microns) and the degree of defor......Recrystallization behavior in commercial aluminum with a purity of 99.4 pct was studied by techniques such as high voltage electron microscopy, 100 kV transmission electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Sample parameters were the initial grain size (290 and 24 microns) and the degree...... are discussed and compared with results from an earlier study1 covering the recrystallization behavior of commercial aluminum of the same purity deformed at higher degrees of deformation (50 to 90 pct reduction in thickness by cold-rolling)....

  13. In-situ reactions in hybrid aluminum alloy composites during incorporating silica sand in aluminum alloy melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin F. Schultz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain a better understanding of the reactions and strengthening behavior in cast aluminum alloy/silica composites synthesized by stir mixing, experiments were conducted to incorporate low cost foundry silica sand into aluminum composites with the use of Mg as a wetting agent. SEM and XRD results show the conversion of SiO2 to MgAl2O4 and some Al2O3 with an accompanying increase in matrix Si content. A three-stage reaction mechanism proposed to account for these changes indicates that properties can be controlled by controlling the base Alloy/SiO2/Mg chemistry and reaction times. Experimental data on changes of composite density with increasing reaction time and SiO2 content support the three-stage reaction model. The change in mechanical properties with composition and time is also described.

  14. Aluminum-air battery crystallizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimoni, A.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype crystallizer system for the aluminum-air battery operated reliably through simulated startup and shutdown cycles and met its design objectives. The crystallizer system allows for crystallization and removal of the aluminium hydroxide reaction product; it is required to allow steady-state and long-term operation of the aluminum-air battery. The system has to minimize volume and maintain low turbulence and shear to minimize secondary nucleation and energy consumption while enhancing agglomeration. A lamella crystallizer satisfies system constraints.

  15. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  16. Production of barium molybdate and tungstate on the base of ternary reciprocal Na, Ba long Cl, EhO4 (Eh - Mo, W) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garkushin, I.K.; Sechnoj, A.I.; Dibirov, M.A.; Trunin, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Possibilities of the syntnesis of barium molybdate and tungstate on the base of ternary reciprocal Na, Ba parallel Cl, EhO 4 (Eh=Mo, W) system state diagrams are under study. It is shown that on the basis of these reciprocal state diagrams syntnesis of not only BaO 4 but also of other suhstances is possible. Purity of obtained chemical agents is basically dependent on qualification of initial components. Synthesis temperature is decreased and time is reduced as compared to other known methods. For substance synthesis, state diagrams examination (reaction type confirmation and component crystallization fields separation from compound crystallization fields) is necessary along with the calculation of the conventional thermochemical effect

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure and luminescent properties of a new pyrochlore type tungstate CsGa0.333W1.667O6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Zhao, Ji; Fan, Yun-Chang; Ma, Zhao; Zhang, Rui-Juan; Liu, Bao-Zhong

    2018-06-01

    High temperature solution reaction leads to a new tungstate compound CsGa0.333W1.667O6, whose structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The results show that it crystallizes in pyrochlore structure with cubic space group Fd-3m and a = 10.2529 (13) Å. In this structure, Ga and W atoms are in a statistical disorder manner. The self-activated luminescent properties CsGa0.333W1.667O6 were studied. Under the excitation of 323 nm, the emission spectrum exhibits a blue emission centered at 466 nm with the chromaticity coordinates (0.1838, 0.1814).

  18. Properties of complex tungstates, niobates, translated with fluorite-like structure. Svojstva slozhnykh vol'framatov, niobatov, tantalatov s flyuoritopodobnoj strukturoj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetkina, S N; Zolin, V F; Sirotinkin, V P; Smirnov, S A

    1989-04-01

    Spectra of ternary tungstates, niobates and tantalates (MeLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7}, La{sub 3}TO{sub 7}; Me=Ba, Sr; T=Ta, Nb) related to the layered fluorite group are analyzed. The laser pumping and time resolved luminescence are used for selecting spectra of unequivalent centers. The symmetry of the first center is near to the distorted cubic one. The vibrational spectra of europium in Eu{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and SrLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7} are due to the chain-like structure of niobates and to the net-like structure of tantalates. The stimulated emission of Nd{sup 3+} in powders of BaLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7} and La{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} is observed at wavelengths of 1.07 and 1.063 {mu}m, respectively.

  19. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  20. Wear resistance analysis of the aluminum 7075 alloy and the nanostructured aluminum 7075 - silver nanoparticles composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrada-Ruiz R.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured composites of the aluminum 7075 alloy and carbon-coated silver nanoparticles were synthetized by the mechanical milling technique using a high-energy mill SPEX 8000M; the powders generated were compacted, sintered and hot-extruded to produce 1 cm-diameter bars. The composites were then subjected to a wear test using a pin-on-disc device to validate the hypothesis that second phase-ductile nanometric particles homogenously distributed throughout the metalmatrix improve the wear resistance of the material. It was found that silver nanoparticles prevent the wear of the material by acting as an obstacle to dislocations movement during the plastic deformation of the contact surface, as well as a solid lubricant when these are separated from the metal-matrix.

  1. The effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yougen; Lu, Lingbin; Roesky, Herbert W.; Wang, Laiwen; Huang, Baiyun

    Aluminum is an ideal material for batteries, due to its excellent electrochemical performance. Herein, the effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery, as an additive for aluminum alloy and electrolytes, has been studied. The results show that zinc can decrease the anodic polarization, restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  2. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-70,376] Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood Forge Division; Currently Known As Contech Forgings, LLC..., applicable to workers of Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division...

  3. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  4. [Determination of Arsenic in Food Package Aluminum by Ultrasound Assisted Solid Phase Extraction/ICP-AES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wen-xia; Gong, Qi; Li, Min; Deng, Li-xin; Mo, Li-shu; Li, Yan-lin

    2015-04-01

    Determination of arsenic in pure aluminum by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was interfered by aluminum matrix. The experiment showed that when the mass concentration of Al was greater than or equal to 5 000 times the As in the test solution, the measurement error was greater than 5%. In order to eliminate the interference, strong acid cation exchange fiber (SACEF) was used as solid phase extraction agent to adsorb Al(3+). The extraction conditions included amount of SACEF, extraction time, temperature and pH were investigated. The optimal extraction conditions were that 0.9000 g SACEF was used to extract the aluminum from the sample solution of pH 2.0 at 55 °C for 5 min with the ultrasonic assist, and in this case, the arsenic in the form of arsenic acid was not extracted and left in the solution for the determination. The results showed that after treating 10. 00 mL test solution containing 1.00 µg arsenic and 20.0 mg aluminum, arsenic did not lose. The mass concentration of residual aluminum in the raffinate was about 2,000 times the As, which had not interfered the determination of arsenic. The detection limit (3 s) was 0.027 µg · mL(-1) and quantification limit (10 s) was 0.0091 µg · mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to the separation and determination of arsenic in the synthetic samples, the aluminum cans and the barbecue aluminum foil. Recovery was in the range of 98.3%-105% and RSD (n = 3) was in the range of 0.1%-4.3%. The results showed that the content of arsenic in the aluminum cans and the aluminum barbecue foil was below the limited value of national standard (GB/T 3190-2008).

  5. 75 FR 80527 - Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ...)] Aluminum Extrusions From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling of... of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of aluminum extrusions, primarily provided... contained in Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Preliminary Determination of...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. Superplasticity in powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.S.; Bieler, T.R.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    Superplasticity in powder metallurgy Al alloys and composites has been reviewed through a detailed analysis. The stress-strain curves can be put into 4 categories: classical well-behaved type, continuous strain hardening type, continuous strain softening type and complex type. The origin of these different types of is discussed. The microstructural features of the processed material and the role of strain have been reviewed. The role of increasing misorientation of low angle boundaries to high angle boundaries by lattice dislocation absorption is examined. Threshold stresses have been determined and analyzed. The parametric dependencies for superplastic flow in modified conventional aluminum alloys, mechanically alloyed alloys and Al alloy matrix composites is determined to elucidate the superplastic mechanism at high strain rates. The role of incipient melting has been analyzed. A stress exponent of 2, an activation energy equal to that for grain boundary diffusion and a grain size dependence of 2 generally describes superplastic flow in modified conventional Al alloys and mechanically alloyed alloys. The present results agree well with the predictions of grain boundary sliding models. This suggests that the mechanism of high strain rate superplasticity in the above-mentioned alloys is similar to conventional superplasticity. The shift of optimum superplastic strain rates to higher values is a consequence of microstructural refinement. The parametric dependencies for superplasticity in aluminum alloy matrix composites, however, is different. A true activation energy of superplasticity in aluminum alloy matrix composites, however, is different. A true activation energy of 313 kJ/mol best describes the composites having SiC reinforcements. The role of shape of the reinforcement (particle or whisker) and processing history is addressed. The analysis suggests that the mechanism for superplasticity in composites is interface diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding

  10. Understanding of radiation effect on sink in aluminum base structure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-01-01

    In case of aluminum, a slightly different approach is needed for the evaluation of radiation damage. Unlikely other structure materials such as zirconium alloy and iron based alloy, aluminum generate not only matrix defect but also much transmutation. Quantitative analysis of radiation damage of aluminum have been done in two research method. First research method is calculation of radiation damage quantity in the matrix. In this research, quantity of transmutation and matrix damage are evaluated by KMC simulation from ENDF database of IAEA. Most recently, radiation damage such as defect and transmutation are calculated in the MNSR reactor environment. The second research method is evaluation of sink morphology change by irradiation, which research method focus on accumulating behavior of radiation defects. Matrix defect and transmutation are clustering or dissolved by thermal diffusion and energy statue. These clustering defect such as dislocation loop, void and bubble directly affect mechanical properties. In this research area, it is hard to using deterministic method because it should describe envious and various reaction module in detail. However, in case of probabilistic method, it could be explained without detail reaction module. Most recently, there was KMC modeling about vacancy and helium cluster. From this cluster modeling, transmutation is quantitatively analyzed. After that cluster effect on swelling are explained. Unfortunately, silicon, which is another transmutation of aluminum, effect are neglected. Also primary cluster, which is generated by cascade, effect are neglected. For the fundamental understanding of radiation effect on aluminum alloy, it is needed that more various parameter such as alloy element and primary cluster effect should be researched. However, until now there was not general modeling which include alloy element and primary cluster effect on aluminum. However, there was not specified KMC platform for the quantitative analysis of

  11. Characterization of ultrafine aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstrom, Mary M.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Mang, Joseph T.; Smith, Bettina L.; Son, Steven F.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum nanopowders with particle sizes ranging from ∼25 nm to 80 nm were characterized by a variety of methods. We present and compare the results from common powder characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), BET gas adsorption surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and low angle laser light scattering (LALLS). Aluminum nanoparticles consist of an aluminum core with an aluminum oxide coating. HRTEM measurements of both the particle diameter and oxide layer thickness tend to be larger than those obtained from BET and TGA. LALLS measurements show a large degree of particle agglomeration in solution; therefore, primary particle sizes could not be determined. Furthermore, results from small-angle scattering techniques (SAS), including small-angle neutron (SANS) and x-ray (SAXS) scattering are presented and show excellent agreement with the BET, TGA, and HRTEM. The suite of analytical techniques presented in this paper can be used as a powerful tool in the characterization of many types of nanosized powders.

  12. Aluminum break-point contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Martina; Groot, R.A. de

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics is used to study the contribution of a single Al atom to an aluminum breakpoint contact during the final stages of breaking and the initial stages of the formation of such a contact. A hysteresis effect is found in excellent agreement with experiment and the form of the

  13. Effect of addition of water-soluble salts on the hydrogen generation of aluminum in reaction with hot water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi-Tousi, S.S.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum powder was ball milled for different durations of time with different weight percentages of water-soluble salts (NaCl and KCl). The hydrogen generation of each mixture in reaction with hot water was measured. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the morphology, surfaces and cross sections of the produced particles. The results show that the presence of salts in the microstructure of the aluminum considerably increases the hydrogen generation rate. At shorter milling times, the salt covers the aluminum particles and becomes embedded in layers within the aluminum matrix. At higher milling durations, salt and aluminum phases form composite particles. A higher percentage of the second phase significantly decreases the milling time needed for activation of the aluminum particles. Based on the EDS results from cross sections of the milled particles, a mechanism for improvement of the hydrogen generation rate in the presence of salts is suggested. - Highlights: • Milling and water soluble salts have a synergic effect on hydrogen generation. • Salt and aluminum form composite particles by milling. • Salt is dissolved in water leaving aluminum with much fresh surfaces for the reaction. • The chemical effect of salt on the reaction is negligible compared to its structural effect.

  14. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy-SiCp composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baalasuburamaniam, R.; Cvetnic, C.; Ravindran, C.

    2002-01-01

    Metal matrix composites are a viable alternative to cast irons in automotive components with possible increase in strength-to-weight ratio. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy matrix composite containing 20 volume percent SiC was carried out at 690, 730, and 770 o C with a view to determining the effects of cooling rate on microstructure, particle distribution, microporosity and mechanical properties. These results were compared with those for the matrix material cast under similar conditions. The results and the correlations are of particular interest as there is no published literature on lost foam casting of composite materials. (author)

  15. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  16. Characterization of B4C-composite-reinforced aluminum alloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram; Rai, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    Dry sliding wear tests conducted on Pin-on-disk wear test machine. The rotational speed of disc is ranging from (400-600rpm) and under loads ranging from (30-70 N) the contact time between the disc and pin is constant for each pin specimen of composites is 15 minute. In all manufacturing industries the uses of composite materials has been increasing globally, In the present study, an aluminum 5083 alloy is used as the matrix and 5% of weight percentage of Boron Carbide (B4C) as the reinforcing material. The composite is produced using stir casting technique. This is cost effective method. The aluminum 5083 matrix can be strengthened by reinforcing with hard ceramic particles like silicon carbide and boron carbide. In this experiment, aluminum 5083 alloy is selected as one of main material for making parts of the ship it has good mechanical properties, good corrosion resistance and it is can welded very easily and does have good strength. The samples are tested for hardness and tensile strength. The mechanical properties like Hardness can be increased by reinforcing aluminum 5083alloy 5% boron carbide (B4C) particles and tensile strength. Finally the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis and EDS is done, which helps to study topography of composites and it produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons and the presence of composition found in the matrix.

  17. Thermal conductivity prediction of closed-cell aluminum alloy considering micropore effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of micro-scale pores are observed in the matrix of closed-cell aluminum alloy by scanning electron microscope, which indicates the dual-scale pore characteristics. Corresponding to this kind of special structural morphology, a new kind of dual-scale method is proposed to estimate its effective thermal conductivity. Comparing with the experimental results, the article puts forward the view that the prediction accuracy can be improved by the dual-scale method greatly. Different empirical formulas are also investigated in detail. It provides a new method for thermal properties estimation and makes preparation for more suitable empirical formula for closed-cell aluminum alloy.

  18. Physico Chemistry of the Chlorination of Aluminum Claddings in the Framework of HALOX Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Fabiola; De Micco, Georgina; Bohe, Ana; Pasquevich, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The conditioning of spent nuclear fuels from test and research reactors requires a previous physicochemical treatment to stabilize them chemically.A possible way of processing is through what was called in CNEA as Process HALOX (Halogenation and Oxidation).It consists of the selective separation of cladding by halogenation and the subsequent oxidation of the core, previously to insert it into a vitreous matrix.The halogenation aim is to transform the constituents of the 6061aluminum alloy into volatile halides.In this work we present preliminary results of the chlorination of two aluminum alloys: AA 6061 and a type of CuZnAl alloy

  19. Microstructure and orientation effects on properties of discontinuous silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Hoffman, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Composite panels containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous silicon carbide SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement in several aluminum matrices are commercially fabricated and the mechanical properties and microstructual characteristics are evaluated. The yield and tensile strengths and the ductility are controlled primarily by the matrix alloy, the temper condition, and the reinforcement content. Particulate and nodule reinforcements are as effective as whisker reinforcement. Increased ductility is attributed to purer, more uniform starting materials and to more mechanical working during fabrication. Comparing mechanical properties with those of other aluminum alloys shows that these low cost, lightweight composites demonstrate very good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  20. Valence electron structure analysis of refining mecha-nism of Sc and Ti additions on aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI PieJie; YE YiCong; HE LiangJu

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of the difference of refining effect between Sc and Ti adding to aluminum can not be explained substantially with traditional theory. Valence electron structures of AI-Ti and Al-Sc alloys have been studied by using the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET). The covalent bond electron numbers and interfacial electron density differences are calculated. The conclusion is that, in the two alloys, different covalent bond electron numbers of nucleation particles, and different electron densities on the interface between the second phase particles and the matrix, fundamentally lead to the difference of refining effect between Sc and Ti adding to aluminum.

  1. Aluminum precipitation from Hanford DSSF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgen, D.; Frazier, P.; Staton, G.

    1994-01-01

    A series of pilot scale tests using simulated Double Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) showed that well-settled aluminum precipitate can be produced in Hanford double shell tank (DST) high level waste by slow neutralization with carbon dioxide. This pretreatment could provide an early grout feed and free tank space, as well as facilitate downstream processes such as ion exchange by providing a less caustic feed. A total of eight test runs were completed using a 10-ft tall 3-in i.d. glass column. The 10-ft height corresponds to about one third of the vertical height of a DST, hence providing a reasonable basis for extrapolating the observed precipitate settling and compaction to the actual waste tank environment. Four runs (three with a simplified simulant and one with a chemically complete simulant) produced well settled precipitates averaging 1.5 to 2 feet high. Aluminum gel rather than settled precipitate resulted from one test where neutralization was too rapid

  2. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic, electrostaticdischarge- suppressing finishes: examples include silver impregnated anodized, black electroless nickel, black chrome, and black copper. In

  3. Infrared radiation properties of anodized aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohara, S. [Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Technology; Niimi, Y. [Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Technology

    1996-12-31

    The infrared radiation heating is an efficient and energy saving heating method. Ceramics have been used as an infrared radiant material, because the emissivity of metals is lower than that of ceramics. However, anodized aluminum could be used as the infrared radiant material since an aluminum oxide film is formed on the surface. In the present study, the infrared radiation properties of anodized aluminum have been investigated by determining the spectral emissivity curve. The spectral emissivity curve of anodized aluminum changed with the anodizing time. The spectral emissivity curve shifted to the higher level after anodizing for 10 min, but little changed afterwards. The infrared radiant material with high level spectral emissivity curve can be achieved by making an oxide film thicker than about 15 {mu}m on the surface of aluminum. Thus, anodized aluminum is applicable for the infrared radiation heating. (orig.)

  4. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Longtao, E-mail: longtaojiang@163.com [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Pingping [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiu, Ziyang [Skate Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Guoqin [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lin, Xiu [Heilongjiang Academy of Industrial Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond{sub (111)}/Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond{sub (100)}/Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond{sub (111)}/ aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond{sub (111)}/aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was analyzed by crystallography theory.

  5. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Longtao; Wang, Pingping; Xiu, Ziyang; Chen, Guoqin; Lin, Xiu; Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond (111) /Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond (100) /Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al 4 C 3 ) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond (111) / aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond (111) /aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al 4 C 3 was analyzed by crystallography theory

  6. Microstructure, mechanical analysis and optimal selection of 7075 aluminum alloy based composite reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezatpour, H.R.; Torabi Parizi, M.; Sajjadi, S.A.; Ebrahimi, G.R.; Chaichi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum metal-matrix nanocomposites (AMMNCs) fabricated by conventional stir-casting process usually show high porosity and poor distribution of nanoparticles within the matrix. In the current study, for the improvement of nanoparticles distribution in the aluminum matrix and enhancement of the mechanical properties, a mixture of Al/nano-Al 2 O 3 powders were injected by pure argon gas into the molten 7075 aluminum alloy and this mixture was extruded at high temperature. Mechanical behavior of the final product was investigated by tensile and compression tests, hardness measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Optical Microscopy. This nanocomposite exhibited some superior properties such as a fine grain microstructure and a reasonable uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the matrix. Mechanical experiments results confirmed that the addition of Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles and the extrusion process effectively improved ultimate tensile strength, compression strength and hardness. In next step, we used a Preference Selection Index (PSI) materials selection method to select best combination of strength and workability of Al7075−Al 2 O 3 nanocomposites. By this method, extruded Al7075/0.4 and 0.8 wt % Al 2 O 3 has best combination of strength and workability. - Highlights: • Injection Al/Al 2 O 3 powder is benefit way for improving nanoparticles distribution. • Nanocomposites present superior mechanical properties. • Extrusion process improved significantly mechanical properties of nanocomposites. • Preference Selection Index is a simple and benefit method in material selection.

  7. Strengthening mechanism in graphene nanoplatelets reinforced aluminum composite fabricated through spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisht, Ankita [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Srivastava, Mukul [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Nanomaterials and Applications Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Kumar, R. Manoj [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Lahiri, Indranil [Nanomaterials and Applications Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Lahiri, Debrupa, E-mail: dlahifmt@iitr.ac.in [Biomaterials and Multiscale Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India)

    2017-05-17

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) reinforced aluminum matrix composites, with ≤5 wt% GNP content, were synthesized by spark plasma sintering (SPS). GNPs were found to withstand severe conditions of high pressure and temperature during processing. Strength of composite was observed to be depending on the content and uniform dispersion of GNP in aluminum matrix, as verified by scanning electron micrographs. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that no reaction products exist at Al-GNP interface in significant amount. Instrumented indentation studies revealed improvement in hardness by 21.4% with 1 wt% GNP. This is due to the presence of stronger reinforcement, which provides high resistance to matrix against deformation. Improvement in yield strength and tensile strength was 84.5% and 54.8%, respectively, with 1 wt% GNP reinforcement. Properties deteriorated at higher concentration due to agglomeration of GNP. Reinforcing effect of GNPs, in terms of strengthening of composite, is found to be dominated by Orowan strengthening mechanism. Pinning of grains boundaries by GNPs led to uniform grain size distribution in the composites structure. Overall, graphene reinforcement has offered 86% improvement in specific strength of aluminum matrix.

  8. New electrolytes for aluminum production: Ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Kamavarum, Venkat; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2003-11-01

    In this article, the reduction, refining/recycling, and electroplating of aluminum from room-temperature molten salts are reviewed. In addition, the characteristics of several non-conventional organic solvents, electrolytes, and molten salts are evaluated, and the applicability of these melts for production of aluminum is discussed with special attention to ionic liquids. Also reviewed are electrochemical processes and conditions for electrodeposition of aluminum using ionic liquids at near room temperatures.

  9. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  10. An all aluminum alloy UHV components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugisaki, Kenzaburo

    1985-01-01

    An all aluminum components was developed for use with UHV system. Aluminum alloy whose advantage are little discharge gas, easy to bake out, light weight, little damage against radieactivity radiation is used. Therefore, as it is all aluminum alloy, baking is possible. Baking temperature is 150 deg C in case of not only ion pump, gate valve, angle valve but also aluminum components. Ion pump have to an ultrahigh vacuum of order 10 -9 torr can be obtained without baking, 10 -10 torr order can be obtained after 24 hour of baking. (author)

  11. Gut: An underestimated target organ for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignal, C; Desreumaux, P; Body-Malapel, M

    2016-06-01

    Since World War II, several factors such as an impressive industrial growth, an enhanced environmental bioavailability and intensified food consumption have contributed to a significant amplification of human exposure to aluminum. Aluminum is particularly present in food, beverages, some drugs and airbone dust. In our food, aluminum is superimposed via additives and cooking utensils. Therefore, the tolerable intake of aluminum is exceeded for a significant part of the world population, especially in children who are more vulnerable to toxic effects of pollutants than adults. Faced with this oral aluminum influx, intestinal tract is an essential barrier, especially as 38% of ingested aluminum accumulates at the intestinal mucosa. Although still poorly documented to date, the impact of oral exposure to aluminum in conditions relevant to real human exposure appears to be deleterious for gut homeostasis. Aluminum ingestion affects the regulation of the permeability, the microflora and the immune function of intestine. Nowadays, several arguments are consistent with an involvement of aluminum as an environmental risk factor for inflammatory bowel diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No. 555...

  13. Solidification processing of monotectic alloy matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frier, Nancy L.; Shiohara, Yuh; Russell, Kenneth C.

    1989-01-01

    Directionally solidified aluminum-indium alloys of the monotectic composition were found to form an in situ rod composite which obeys a lambda exp 2 R = constant relation. The experimental data shows good agreement with previously reported results. A theoretical boundary between cellular and dendritic growth conditions was derived and compared with experiments. The unique wetting characteristics of the monotectic alloys can be utilized to tailor the interface structure in metal matrix composites. Metal matrix composites with monotectic and hypermonotectic Al-In matrices were made by pressure infiltration, remelted and directionally solidified to observe the wetting characteristics of the alloys as well as the effect on structure of solidification in the constrained field of the fiber interstices. Models for monotectic growth are modified to take into account solidification in these constrained fields.

  14. Non-self-similar cracking in unidirectional metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, G.; Dharani, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the fracture behavior of unidirectional Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) show the presence of extensive matrix damage and non-self-similar cracking of fibers near the notch tip. These failures are primarily observed in the interior layers of an MMC, presenting experimental difficulties in studying them. Hence an investigation of the matrix damage and fiber fracture near the notch tip is necessary to determine the stress concentration at the notch tip. The classical shear lag (CLSL) assumption has been used in the present study to investigate longitudinal matrix damage and nonself-similar cracking of fibers at the notch tip of an MMC. It is seen that non-self-similar cracking of fibers reduces the stress concentration at the notch tip considerably and the effect of matrix damage is negligible after a large number of fibers have broken beyond the notch tip in a non-self-similar manner. Finally, an effort has been made to include non-self-similar fiber fracture and matrix damage to model the fracture behavior of a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite for two different matrices viz. a 6061-0 fully annealed aluminum matrix and a heat treated 6061-T6 aluminum matrix. Results have been drawn for several characteristics pertaining to the shear stiffnesses and the shear yield stresses of the two matrices and compared with the available experimental results

  15. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Dexter, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D 2 / = 1.9 x 10 -2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup -- 1 / 2 / s -1 cm -1 . The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  16. Efficiency criterion for teleportation via channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Wei Zha

    Full Text Available In this paper, three kinds of coefficient matrixes (channel matrix, measurement matrix, collapsed matrix associated with the pure state for teleportation are presented, the general relation among channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix is obtained. In addition, a criterion for judging whether a state can be teleported successfully is given, depending on the relation between the number of parameter of an unknown state and the rank of the collapsed matrix. Keywords: Channel matrix, Measurement matrix, Collapsed matrix, Teleportation

  17. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  18. Extended biorthogonal matrix polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Shehata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials for commutative matrices were first introduced by Varma and Tasdelen in [22]. The main aim of this paper is to extend the properties of the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials of Varma and Tasdelen and certain generating matrix functions, finite series, some matrix recurrence relations, several important properties of matrix differential recurrence relations, biorthogonality relations and matrix differential equation for the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k and K(A,B n (x, k are discussed. For the matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k, various families of bilinear and bilateral generating matrix functions are constructed in the sequel.

  19. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2018-02-01

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of diffusion bonding in 6061 aluminum and development of future high-density fuels fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokofiev, I.G.; Wiencek, T.C.; McGann, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium alloys and silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the RERTR program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. Testing uses fuel miniplates to simulate standard fuel with cladding and matrix in plate-type configurations. In order to seal the dispersion fuel plates, a diffusion bond must be established between the aluminum cover plates that surround the fuel meat. Four different variations of the standard method for roll-bonding 6061 aluminum were studied: mechanical cleaning, addition of a getter material, modifications to the standard chemical etching, and modifications to welding. Aluminum test pieces were subjected to a bend test after each rolling pass. Results, based on 400 samples, indicate that a reduction in thickness of at least 70% is required to produce a diffusion bond with the standard roll-bonding method, versus a 60% reduction when using a method in which the assembly was 100% welded and contained empty 9 mm holes near the frame corners. (author)

  1. Solidification of metallic aluminum on magnesium phosphate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahalle, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste using cement. More particularly, it aims at assessing the chemical compatibility between metallic aluminum and mortars based on magnesium phosphate cement. The physical and chemical processes leading to setting and hardening of the cement are first investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TGA) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ("3"1P and "1"1B MAS-NMR) are first used to characterize the solid phases formed during hydration, while inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analysis (ICP-AES), electrical conductometry and pH measurements provide information on the pore solution composition. Then, the corrosion of metallic aluminum in magnesium phosphate mortars is studied by monitoring the equilibrium potential and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Magnesium phosphate cement is prepared from a mix of magnesium oxide (MgO) and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KH_2PO_4). In the presence of water, hydration occurs according to a dissolution - precipitation process. The main hydrate is K-struvite (MgKPO_4.6H_2O). Its precipitation is preceded by that of two transient phases: phosphorrosslerite (MgHPO_4.7H_2O) and Mg_2KH(PO_4)_2.15H_2O. Boric acid retards cement hydration by delaying the formation of cement hydrates. Two processes may be involved in this retardation: the initial precipitation of amorphous or poorly crystallized minerals containing boron and phosphorus atoms, and/or the stabilization of cations (Mg"2"+, K"+) in solution. As compared with a Portland cement-based matrix, corrosion of aluminum is strongly limited in magnesium phosphate mortar. The pore solution pH is close to neutrality and falls within the passivation domain of aluminum. Corrosion depends on several parameters: it is promoted by a water-to-cement ratio (w/c) significantly higher than the chemical water demand of cement (w/c = 0.51), and by the addition of boric

  2. Preparation of micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic film on aluminum plates using galvanic corrosion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruomei; Chao, Guang Hua; Jiang, Haiyun; Pan, Anqiang; Chen, Hong; Yuan, Zhiqing; Liu, Qilong

    2013-10-01

    A simple and novel approach has been developed to obtain a microporous film with compound nanoparticles on the surface of aluminum alloy substrate using the galvanic corrosion method. The wettability of the surface changes from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity after chemical modification with stearic acid (SA). The water contact angle (WCA) and sliding angle (WSA) of superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface (SAAS) are 154 degrees and 9 degrees, respectively. The roughness of the aluminum substrate increases after the oxidation reaction. The porous aluminum matrix surface is covered with irregularly shaped holes with a mean radius of about 15 microm, similar to the surface papillae of natural Lotus leaf, with villus-like nanoparticles array on pore surfaces. The superhydrophobic property is attributed to this special surface morphology and low surface energy SA. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) pattern and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) spectrum indicate that Al2O3, Al(OH)3 and AIO(OH) has been formed on the surface of aluminum substrate after the oxidation reaction. The Raman spectra indicate that C-H bond from SA and the Al-O are formed on the SAAS. The as-formed SAAS has good stability.

  3. Cadmium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Microspheres for Photocatalytic CO2Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Saliba, Daniel

    2016-03-30

    We report the synthesis of cadmium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) using the reaction-diffusion framework. As the hydroxide anions diffuse into an agar gel matrix containing the mixture of aluminum and cadmium salts at a given ratio, they react to give the LDH. The LDH self-assembles inside the pores of the gel matrix into a unique spherical-porous shaped microstructure. The internal and external morphologies of the particles are studied by electron microscopy and tomography revealing interconnected channels and a high surface area. This material is shown to exhibit a promising performance in the photoreduction of carbon dioxide using solar light. Moreover, the palladium-decorated version shows a significant improvement in its reduction potential at room temperature. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Cadmium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Microspheres for Photocatalytic CO2Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Saliba, Daniel; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Sougrat, Rachid; Khashab, Niveen M.; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of cadmium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) using the reaction-diffusion framework. As the hydroxide anions diffuse into an agar gel matrix containing the mixture of aluminum and cadmium salts at a given ratio, they react to give the LDH. The LDH self-assembles inside the pores of the gel matrix into a unique spherical-porous shaped microstructure. The internal and external morphologies of the particles are studied by electron microscopy and tomography revealing interconnected channels and a high surface area. This material is shown to exhibit a promising performance in the photoreduction of carbon dioxide using solar light. Moreover, the palladium-decorated version shows a significant improvement in its reduction potential at room temperature. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cadmium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Microspheres for Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Daniel; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Sougrat, Rachid; Khashab, Niveen M; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-04-21

    We report the synthesis of cadmium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) using the reaction-diffusion framework. As the hydroxide anions diffuse into an agar gel matrix containing the mixture of aluminum and cadmium salts at a given ratio, they react to give the LDH. The LDH self-assembles inside the pores of the gel matrix into a unique spherical-porous shaped microstructure. The internal and external morphologies of the particles are studied by electron microscopy and tomography revealing interconnected channels and a high surface area. This material is shown to exhibit a promising performance in the photoreduction of carbon dioxide using solar light. Moreover, the palladium-decorated version shows a significant improvement in its reduction potential at room temperature. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  7. Aluminum alloy and associated anode and battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarcy, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an aluminum alloy. It comprises: eutectic amounts of at least two alloying elements selected from the group consisting of bismuth, cadmium, scandium, gallium, indium, lead, mercury, thallium, tin, and zinc with the balance being aluminum and the alloying elements being about 0.01 to 3.0 percent by weight of the alloy

  8. Assessment of secondary aluminum reserves of nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maung, Kyaw Nyunt; Yoshida, Tomoharu; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    aluminum resources are accumulated in landfill sites. Understanding the sizes of primary and secondary aluminum reserves enables us to extend knowledge of efficient raw material sourcing from a narrow perspective of primary reserves alone to a broader perspective of both primary and secondary reserves...

  9. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely...

  10. Scientific Background for Processing of Aluminum Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononchuk, Olga; Alekseev, Alexey; Zubkova, Olga; Udovitsky, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    Changing the source of raw materials for producing aluminum and the emergence of a huge number of secondary alumina waste (foundry slag, sludge, spent catalysts, mineral parts of coal and others that are formed in various industrial enterprises) require the creation of scientific and theoretical foundations for their processing. In this paper, the aluminum alloys (GOST 4784-97) are used as an aluminum raw material component, containing the aluminum component produced as chips in the machine-building enterprises. The aluminum waste is a whole range of metallic aluminum alloys including elements: magnesium, copper, silica, zinc and iron. Analysis of the aluminum waste A1- Zn-Cu-Si-Fe shows that depending on the content of the metal the dissolution process of an aluminum alloy should be treated as the result of the chemical interaction of the metal with an alkaline solution. It is necessary to consider the behavior of the main components of alloys in an alkaline solution as applied to the system Na2O - Al2O3 - SiO2 - CO2 - H2O.

  11. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Theodore R.; Brown, Craig W.

    2002-07-16

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  12. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  13. Aluminum extrusion with a deformable die

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assaad, W.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum extrusion process is one of metal forming processes. In aluminum extrusion, a work-piece (billet) is pressed through a die with an opening that closely resembles a desired shape of a profile. By this process, long profiles with an enormous variety of cross-sections can be produced to

  14. Trends in the global aluminum fabrication industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subodh; Yin, Weimin

    2007-02-01

    The aluminum fabrication industry has become more vital to the global economy as international aluminum consumption has grown steadily in the past decades. Using innovation, value, and sustainability, the aluminum industry is strengthening its position not only in traditional packaging and construction applications but also in the automotive and aerospace markets to become more competitive and to face challenges from other industries and higher industrial standards. The aluminum fabrication industry has experienced a significant geographical shift caused by rapid growth in emerging markets in countries such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Market growth and distribution will vary with different patterns of geography and social development; the aluminum industry must be part of the transformation and keep pace with market developments to benefit.

  15. Aluminum-based metal-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Cody A.; Martinez, Jose Antonio Bautista

    2016-01-12

    Provided in one embodiment is an electrochemical cell, comprising: (i) a plurality of electrodes, comprising a fuel electrode that comprises aluminum and an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the aluminum is oxidized at the fuel electrode and oxygen is reduced at the air electrode, and (ii) an ionically conductive medium, comprising an organic solvent; wherein during non-use of the cell, the organic solvent promotes formation of a protective interface between the aluminum of the fuel electrode and the ionically conductive medium, and wherein at an onset of the discharge mode, at least some of the protective interface is removed from the aluminum to thereafter permit oxidation of the aluminum during the discharge mode.

  16. Aluminum phosphate shows more adjuvanticity than Aluminum hydroxide in recombinant hepatitis –B vaccine formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although a number of investigation have been carried out to find alternative adjuvants to aluminum salts in vaccine formulations, they are still extensively used due to their good track record of safety, low cost and proper adjuvanticity with a variety of antigens. Adsorption of antigens onto aluminum compounds depends heavily on electrostatic forces between adjuvant and antigen. Commercial recombinant protein hepatitis B vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant is facing low induction of immunity in some sections of the vaccinated population. To follow the current global efforts in finding more potent hepatitis B vaccine formulation, adjuvanticity of aluminum phosphate has been compared to aluminum hydroxide. Materials and methods: The adjuvant properties of aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate in a vaccine formulation containing a locally manufactured hepatitis B (HBs surface antigen was evaluated in Balb/C mice. The formulations were administered intra peritoneally (i.p. and the titers of antibody which was induced after 28 days were determined using ELISA technique. The geometric mean of antibody titer (GMT, seroconversion and seroprotection rates, ED50 and relative potency of different formulations were determined. Results: All the adjuvanicity markers obtained in aluminum phosphate formulation were significantly higher than aluminum hydroxide. The geometric mean of antibody titer of aluminum phosphate was approximately three folds more than aluminum hydroxide. Conclusion: Aluminum phosphate showed more adjuvanticity than aluminum hydroxide in hepatitis B vaccine. Therefore the use of aluminum phosphate as adjuvant in this vaccine may lead to higher immunity with longer duration of effects in vaccinated groups.

  17. Aluminum recovery as a product with high added value using aluminum hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, E.; Kopac, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Granular and compact aluminum dross were physically and chemically characterized. • A relationship between density, porosity and metal content from dross was established. • Chemical reactions involving aluminum in landfill and negative consequences are shown. • A processing method for aluminum recovering from aluminum dross was developed. • Aluminum was recovered as an value product with high grade purity such as alumina. -- Abstract: The samples of hazardous aluminum solid waste such as dross were physically and chemically characterized. A relationship between density, porosity and metal content of dross was established. The paper also examines the chemical reactions involving aluminum dross in landfill and the negative consequences. To avoid environmental problems and to recovery the aluminum, a processing method was developed and aluminum was recovered as an added value product such as alumina. This method refers to a process at low temperature, in more stages: acid leaching, purification, precipitation and calcination. At the end of this process aluminum was extracted, first as Al 3+ soluble ions and final as alumina product. The composition of the aluminum dross and alumina powder obtained were measured by applying the leaching tests, using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and chemical analysis. The mineralogical composition of aluminum dross samples and alumina product were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The method presented in this work allows the use of hazardous aluminum solid waste as raw material to recover an important fraction from soluble aluminum content as an added value product, alumina, with high grade purity (99.28%)

  18. Application of wetting to fabrication of boron nitride/aluminum composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hidetoshi; Nakae, Hideo; Okada, Koji

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the establishment of a cheap and easy method of manufacturing metal matrix composites by optimizing the wetting and structural properties of the materials used, (i.e. boron nitride/aluminum). Although aluminum is one of the most prominent metals in the fabrication of metal matrix composites, the oxidation of aluminum prevents us from precisely measuring the wetting of ceramics. Therefore, an improved sessile drop method was devised to prevent the oxidation of the aluminum. Using this method, the contact angle between h-BN (hexagonal-BN) and molten Al was measured in a purified He+3%H 2 atmosphere and in a very high vacuum in a temperature range of 1173-1373K. The contact angle progressed through four phases similar to typical ceramics. However, the contact angle became 0 degree in phase 4 at and over 1273K. This contact angle is extremely lower than the contact angles for typical ceramics and it indicates that h-BN is an ideal material for manufacturing a metal matrix composite from the viewpoint of wetting. It was also confirmed that AlN was produced at the solid/liquid interface and caused the contact angle to decrease to 0 degree. AlN has good structural properties whereas h-BN does not. Accordingly, it is suggested that h-BN particles, which have good wetting, be inserted into the Al melt. This will cause the surface of the h-BN to be converted into AlN which has good structural properties. Using this process, a metal matrix composite, which has good structural properties, should be produced. Further, since h-BN is lubricious, a material should be produced which has high wear resistance and good lubricating properties

  19. The Matrix Cookbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices.......Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices....

  20. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Larson, L. A.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitaton events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significantly alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  1. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  2. Application of powder metallurgy and hot rolling processes for manufacturing aluminum/alumina composite strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabihi, Majed, E-mail: m.zabihi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: toroghi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shafyei, Ali, E-mail: shafyei@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-10

    In this study, aluminum matrix composites (AMC) with 2, 4, 6 and 10 wt% alumina were produced using powder metallurgy (PM), mechanical milling (MM) and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) techniques; then, this was followed by the hot-rolling process. During hot rolling, AMCs with 6 and 10 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were fractured whereas strip composites with 2 and 4 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were produced successfully. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopes and tensile and hardness tests, respectively. Microscopic evaluations of the hot-rolled composites showed a uniform distribution of alumina particles in the aluminum matrix. It was found that with increasing alumina content in the matrix, tensile strength (TS) and hardness increased and the percentage of elongation also decreased. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate aluminum/alumina interfaces and fracture surfaces of the hot rolled specimens after tensile test. SEM observations demonstrated that the failure mode in the hot-rolled Al-2 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite strips is a typical ductile fracture, while the failure mode was shear ductile fracture with more flat surfaces in Al-4 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} strips.

  3. Microstructural and hardness behavior of graphene-nanoplatelets/aluminum composites synthesized by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Bustamante, R.; Bolaños-Morales, D.; Bonilla-Martínez, J.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Martínez-Sánchez, R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pure aluminum was reinforced with graphene-platelets by using mechanical milling. • The composites were studied after sintering condition. • Milling time and graphene-platelet enhance the mechanical behavior of the composites. - Abstract: Graphene can be considered as an ideal reinforcement for the production of composites due to its outstanding mechanical properties. These characteristics offer an increased opportunity for their study in the production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In this research, the studied composites were produced by mechanical alloying (MA). The employed milling times were of 1, 3 and 5 h. GNPs were added in 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 wt% into an aluminum powder matrix. Milled powders were cold consolidated and subsequently sintered. Composites were microstructurally characterized with Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hardness behavior in composites was evaluated with a Vickers micro-hardness test. A homogeneous dispersion of graphene during MA and the proper selection of sintering conditions were considered to produce optimized composites. The obtained results with electron microscopy indicate a homogeneous dispersion of GNPs into the aluminum matrix. Analyses showed GNPs edges where the structure of the graphene layers conserved after MA is observed

  4. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  5. Triangularization of a Matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of linear algebra is devoted to reducing a matrix (via similarity or unitary similarity) to another that has lots of zeros. The simplest such theorem is the Schur triangularization theorem. This says that every matrix is unitarily similar to an upper triangular matrix. Our aim here is to show that though it is very easy to prove it ...

  6. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80 0 C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V

  7. Oxidation dynamics of aluminum nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Aluminum nanorods (Al-NRs) are promising fuels for pyrotechnics due to the high contact areas with oxidizers, but their oxidation mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study thermally initiated burning of oxide-coated Al-NRs with different diameters (D = 26, 36, and 46 nm) in oxygen environment. We found that thinner Al-NRs burn faster due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio. The reaction initiates with the dissolution of the alumina shell into the molten Al core to generate heat. This is followed by the incorporation of environmental oxygen atoms into the resulting Al-rich shell, thereby accelerating the heat release. These results reveal an unexpectedly active role of the alumina shell as a “nanoreactor” for oxidation.

  8. Phase diagrams of KY(WO4)2-KEr(WO4)2, KGd(WO4)2-KEr(WO4)2 systems and single crystal growth for some tungstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudanova, L.I.; Pavlyuk, A.A.; Potapova, O.G.

    1992-01-01

    Phase diagrams of the KY(WO 4 ) 2 -KEr(WO 4 ) 2 , KGd(WO 4 ) 2 -KEr(WO 4 ) 2 systems were studied by differential thermal and X-ray diffraction analyses. Continuous variety of solid solutions are in the KY(WO 4 ) 2 -KEr(WO 4 ) 2 system. They occurred just as in the area of alphaso beta-modifications. Limited areas of the solid solutions based on components were in the KGd(WO 4 ) 2 -KEr(WO 4 ) 2 system. Monocrystals of potassium-yttrium and potassium-gadolinium tungstates activated by erbium were grown using modified low-gradient Czochralski method

  9. Use of combined ion exchangers on the basis of KU-23 and KM-2p cation exchangers for purification of ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions from phosphate, arsenate, and silicate impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.A.; Majorov, D.Yu.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Taushkanov, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Tracer technique ( 32 P) and elementary analysis, potentiality of using combined ionites on the basis of macroporous cation-exchange resins KU-23 or KM-2p and hydrated zirconium oxide for purification of concentrated solutions of ammonium molybdate and tungstate from phosphate-, arsenate-, and silicate-ions impurities was studied. High selectivity of the combined ionites towards impurity ions was ascertained, which permits reducing the content of impurities by a factor of 50-100 compared with the initial one [ru

  10. Decontamination and reuse of ORGDP aluminum scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

    1996-12-01

    The Gaseous Diffusion Plants, or GDPs, have significant amounts of a number of metals, including nickel, aluminum, copper, and steel. Aluminum was used extensively throughout the GDPs because of its excellent strength to weight ratios and good resistance to corrosion by UF 6 . This report is concerned with the recycle of aluminum stator and rotor blades from axial compressors. Most of the stator and rotor blades were made from 214-X aluminum casting alloy. Used compressor blades were contaminated with uranium both as a result of surface contamination and as an accumulation held in surface-connected voids inside of the blades. A variety of GDP studies were performed to evaluate the amounts of uranium retained in the blades; the volume, area, and location of voids in the blades; and connections between surface defects and voids. Based on experimental data on deposition, uranium content of the blades is 0.3%, or roughly 200 times the value expected from blade surface area. However, this value does correlate with estimated internal surface area and with lengthy deposition times. Based on a literature search, it appears that gaseous decontamination or melt refining using fluxes specific for uranium removal have the potential for removing internal contamination from aluminum blades. A melt refining process was used to recycle blades during the 1950s and 1960s. The process removed roughly one-third of the uranium from the blades. Blade cast from recycled aluminum appeared to perform as well as blades from virgin material. New melt refining and gaseous decontamination processes have been shown to provide substantially better decontamination of pure aluminum. If these techniques can be successfully adapted to treat aluminum 214-X alloy, internal and, possibly, external reuse of aluminum alloys may be possible

  11. Lead exposure from aluminum cookware in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D.; Kobunski, Peter A.; Kuepouo, Gilbert; Corbin, Rebecca W.; Gottesfeld, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Blood lead levels have decreased following the removal of lead from gasoline in most of the world. However, numerous recent studies provide evidence that elevated blood lead levels persist in many low and middle-income countries around the world at much higher prevalence than in the more developed countries. One potential source of lead exposure that has not been widely investigated is the leaching of lead from artisanal aluminum cookware, which is commonly used in the developing world. Twenty-nine samples of aluminum cookware and utensils manufactured by local artisans in Cameroon were collected and analyzed for their potential to release lead during cooking. Source materials for this cookware included scrap metal such as engine parts, radiators, cans, and construction materials. The lead content of this cookware is relatively low (< 1000 ppm by X-ray fluorescence), however significant amounts of lead, as well as aluminum and cadmium were released from many of the samples using dilute acetic acid extractions at boiling and ambient temperatures. Potential exposures to lead per serving were estimated to be as high as 260 μg, indicating that such cookware can pose a serious health hazard. We conclude that lead, aluminum and cadmium can migrate from this aluminum cookware during cooking and enter food at levels exceeding recommended public health guidelines. Our results support the need to regulate lead content of materials used to manufacture these pots. Artisanal aluminum cookware may be a major contributor to lead poisoning throughout the developing world. Testing of aluminum cookware in other developing countries is warranted. - Highlights: • Cookware is manufactured in Cameroon from scrap aluminum including car parts. • Twenty-nine cookware samples were evaluated for their potential to leach lead. • Boiling extractions to simulate the effects of cooking released significant lead. • Potential lead exposures per serving are estimated as high as 260 μg.

  12. Lead exposure from aluminum cookware in Cameroon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D.; Kobunski, Peter A. [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, 401 College Ave., Ashland University, Ashland, OH 44805 (United States); Kuepouo, Gilbert [Research and Education Centre for Development (CREPD), Yaounde (Cameroon); Corbin, Rebecca W. [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, 401 College Ave., Ashland University, Ashland, OH 44805 (United States); Gottesfeld, Perry, E-mail: pgottesfeld@okinternational.org [Occupational Knowledge International, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Blood lead levels have decreased following the removal of lead from gasoline in most of the world. However, numerous recent studies provide evidence that elevated blood lead levels persist in many low and middle-income countries around the world at much higher prevalence than in the more developed countries. One potential source of lead exposure that has not been widely investigated is the leaching of lead from artisanal aluminum cookware, which is commonly used in the developing world. Twenty-nine samples of aluminum cookware and utensils manufactured by local artisans in Cameroon were collected and analyzed for their potential to release lead during cooking. Source materials for this cookware included scrap metal such as engine parts, radiators, cans, and construction materials. The lead content of this cookware is relatively low (< 1000 ppm by X-ray fluorescence), however significant amounts of lead, as well as aluminum and cadmium were released from many of the samples using dilute acetic acid extractions at boiling and ambient temperatures. Potential exposures to lead per serving were estimated to be as high as 260 μg, indicating that such cookware can pose a serious health hazard. We conclude that lead, aluminum and cadmium can migrate from this aluminum cookware during cooking and enter food at levels exceeding recommended public health guidelines. Our results support the need to regulate lead content of materials used to manufacture these pots. Artisanal aluminum cookware may be a major contributor to lead poisoning throughout the developing world. Testing of aluminum cookware in other developing countries is warranted. - Highlights: • Cookware is manufactured in Cameroon from scrap aluminum including car parts. • Twenty-nine cookware samples were evaluated for their potential to leach lead. • Boiling extractions to simulate the effects of cooking released significant lead. • Potential lead exposures per serving are estimated as high as 260 μg.

  13. Corrosion and protection of aluminum alloys in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisancioglu Kemal [Department of Materials Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    The paper deals with pitting and uniform corrosion and effectiveness of cathodic protection in reducing these corrosion forms. In stagnant waters or presence of low flow rates, pitting may occur. However, pitting corrosion, driven by the Fe-rich cathodic intermetallic compounds, is often of superficial nature. The pits tend to passivate as a result of etching or passivation of the intermetallics with time. Cathodic protection is an effective way of preventing pitting. It also requires low current densities since the cathodic area, defined by the Fe-rich intermetallics, is small in contrast to steel, which is uniformly accessible to the cathodic reaction. Although thermodynamic calculations suggest possible instability of the oxide in slightly alkaline solutions, such as seawater, protective nature of the oxide in practice is attributed to the presence of alloying elements such as Mg and Mn. Thus, the passivity of both the aluminum matrix alloy (the anode) and the intermetallics (cathodes) have to be considered in evaluating the corrosion and protection of aluminum alloys. With increasing flow rate, the possibility of pitting corrosion reduces with increase in the rate of uniform corrosion, which is controlled by the flow dependent chemical dissolution of the oxide. Cathodic protection does not stop this phenomenon, and coatings have to be used. (authors)

  14. The characteristics of aluminum-scandium alloys processed by ECAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Rajinikanth, V.; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Xu Cheng; Langdon, Terence G.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum-scandium alloys were prepared having different scandium additions of 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 wt.% and these alloys were processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 473 K. The results show the grain refinement of the aluminum matrix and the morphology of the Al 3 Sc precipitates depends strongly on the scandium concentration. The tensile properties were evaluated after ECAP by pulling to failure at initial strain rates from 1.0 x 10 -3 to 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . The Al-1% Sc alloy exhibited the highest tensile strength of ∼250 MPa at a strain rate of 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . This alloy also exhibited a superior grain refinement of ∼0.4 μm after ECAP where this is attributed to a smaller initial grain size and an optimum volume fraction of dispersed Al 3 Sc precipitates having both micrometer and nanometer sizes.

  15. Influences of Temperature on the Conversion of Ammonium Tungstate Pentahydrate to Tungsten Oxide Particles with Controllable Sizes, Crystallinities, and Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Bayu Dani Nandiyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate influences of temperature on the conversion of ammonium tungstate pentahydrate (ATP powder to tungsten trioxide (WO3 particles with controllable sizes, crystallinities, and physicochemical properties. In this study, we used a simple thermal decomposition method. In the experimental procedure, we explored the effect of temperature on the physicochemical properties of ATP by testing various heating temperatures (from 100 to 900 °C. The heated ATP samples were then characterized by a physical observation (i.e. color and various analysis methods (i.e. a thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, an X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. Experimental results showed that increases in temperature had an impact to the decreases in particle size, the change in material crystallinity, and the change in physical properties (e.g. change of color from white, orange, to yellowish green. The relationships between the reaction temperatures and the physicochemical properties of the ATP were also investigated in detail along with the theoretical consideration and the proposal of the WO3 particle formation mechanism. In simplification, the phenomena can be described into three zones of temperatures. (1 Below 250 °C (release of water molecules and some ammonium ions.; (2 At 250-400 °C (release of water molecules and ammonium ions, restructurization of tungsten and oxygen elements, and formation of amorphous tungsten trioxide. (3 At higher than 400 °C (crystallization of tungsten trioxide. Since ATP possessed reactivity on temperature, its physicochemical properties changing could be observed easily, and the experimental procedure could be done easily. The present study will benefit not only for “chemistry and material science” but also potentially to be used as a model material for explaining the thermal behavior of material to undergraduate students (suitable

  16. Technical Note: A simulation study on the feasibility of radiotherapy dose enhancement with calcium tungstate and hafnium oxide nano- and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherck, Nicholas J; Won, You-Yeon

    2017-12-01

    To assess the radiotherapy dose enhancement (RDE) potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO 4 ) and hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) nano- and microparticles (NPs). A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to gauge their respective RDE potentials relative to that of the broadly studied gold (Au) NP. The study was warranted due to the promising clinical and preclinical studies involving both CaWO 4 and HfO 2 NPs as RDE agents in the treatment of various types of cancers. The study provides a baseline RDE to which future experimental RDE trends can be compared to. All three materials were investigated in silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE 2014) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" for a baseline. The key metric used in the evaluation of the materials was the local dose enhancement factor (DEF loc ). An additional metric used, termed the relative enhancement ratio (RER), evaluates material performance at the same mass concentrations. The results of the study indicate that Au has the strongest RDE potential using the DEF loc metric. HfO 2 and CaWO 4 both underperformed relative to Au with lower DEF loc of 2-3 × and 4-100 ×, respectively. The computational investigation predicts the RDE performance ranking to be: Au > HfO 2 > CaWO 4 . © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Fatigue analysis of aluminum drill pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ribeiro Plácido

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was performed to investigate the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of aluminum drill pipes. Initially, the fatigue properties were determined through small-scale tests performed in an optic-mechanical fatigue apparatus. Additionally, full-scale fatigue tests were carried out with three aluminum drill pipe specimens under combined loading of cyclic bending and constant axial tension. Finally, a finite element model was developed to simulate the stress field along the aluminum drill pipe during the fatigue tests and to estimate the stress concentration factors inside the tool joints. By this way, it was possible to estimate the stress values in regions not monitored during the fatigue tests.

  18. Fano resonance in anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao; Zhang, Yao; Yan, Peng; Xu, Shao Hui; Ouyang, Hao Miao; Zhang, Li De

    2014-01-08

    Anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals with periodic porous structure have been prepared using voltage compensation method. The as-prepared sample showed an ultra-narrow photonic bandgap. Asymmetric line-shape profiles of the photonic bandgaps have been observed, which is attributed to Fano resonance between the photonic bandgap state of photonic crystal and continuum scattering state of porous structure. And the exhibited Fano resonance shows more clearly when the sample is saturated ethanol gas than air-filled. Further theoretical analysis by transfer matrix method verified these results. These findings provide a better understanding on the nature of photonic bandgaps of photonic crystals made up of porous materials, in which the porous structures not only exist as layers of effective-refractive-index material providing Bragg scattering, but also provide a continuum light scattering state to interact with Bragg scattering state to show an asymmetric line-shape profile.

  19. Applicability of Solid Solution Heat Treatments to Aluminum Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rodríguez-Pérez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Present research work evaluates the influence of both density and size on the treatability of Aluminum-based (6000 series foam-parts subjected to a typical solid solution heat treatment (water quenching. The results are compared with those obtained for the bulk alloy, evaluating the fulfilment of cooling requirements. Density of the foams was modeled by tomography analysis and the thermal properties calculated, based on validated density-scaled models. With this basis, cooling velocity maps during water quenching were predicted by finite element modeling (FEM in which boundary conditions were obtained by solving the inverse heat conduction problem. Simulations under such conditions have been validated experimentally. Obtained results address incomplete matrix hardening for foam-parts bigger than 70 mm in diameter with a density below 650 kg/m3. An excellent agreement has been found in between the predicted cooling maps and final measured microhardness profiles.

  20. Nanshan Aluminum Reached Strategic Cooperation with CSR Corporation Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    As a key supplier of aluminum profiles and aluminum plate,sheet and trip products for CSR Corporation Limited,Nanshan Aluminum will join hands with CSR Corporation Limited to reach strategic cooperation.On January 5,Nanshan Aluminum signed strategic cooperation agreement with CSR Sifang Locomotive&Rolling; Stock Co.,Ltd,both

  1. 49 CFR 178.505 - Standards for aluminum drums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for aluminum drums. 178.505 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.505 Standards for aluminum drums. (a) The following are the identification codes for aluminum drums: (1) 1B1 for a non-removable head aluminum drum...

  2. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  3. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of Shipping...

  4. A simple aluminum gasket for use with both stainless steel and aluminum flanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed for making aluminum wire seal gaskets of various sizes and shapes for use with both stainless steel and aluminum alloy flanges. The gasket material used is 0.9999 pure aluminum, drawn to a diameter of 3 mm. This material can be easily welded and formed into various shapes. A single gasket has been successfully used up to five times without baking. The largest gasket tested to date is 3.5 m long and was used in the shape of a parallelogram. Previous use of aluminum wire gaskets, including results for bakeout at temperatures from 20 to 660{degree}C, is reviewed. A search of the literature indicates that this is the first reported use of aluminum wire gaskets for aluminum alloy flanges. The technique is described in detail, and the results are summarized. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Effect of aluminum oxide doping on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of zinc oxide (AOZO) nanofibers synthesized by electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotus, A.F.; Kang, Y.C.; Walker, J.I.; Ramsier, R.D.; Chase, G.G.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanofibers doped with aluminum oxide were prepared by sol-gel processing and electrospinning techniques using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), zinc acetate and aluminum acetate as precursors. The resulting nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-Vis spectroscopy, and current-voltage (I-V) properties. The nanofibers had diameters in the range of 60-150 nm. The incorporation of aluminum oxide resulted in a decrease in the crystallite sizes of the zinc oxide nanofibers. Aluminum oxide doped zinc oxide (AOZO) nanofibers exhibited lower bandgap energies compared to undoped zinc oxide nanofibers. However, as the aluminum content (Al/(Al + Zn) x 100%) was increased from 1.70 at.% to 3.20 at.% in the electrospinning solution, the bandgap energy increased resulting in lower conductivity. The electrical conductivity of the AOZO samples was found to depend on the amount of aluminum dopant in the matrix as reflected in the changes in oxidation state elucidated from XPS data. Electrospinning was found to be a productive, simple, and easy method for tuning the bandgap energy and conductivity of zinc oxide semiconducting nanofibers.

  6. Coordination Structure of Aluminum in Magnesium Aluminum Hydroxide Studied by 27Al NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The coordination structure of aluminum in magnesium aluminum hydroxide was studiedby 27Al NMR. The result showed that tetrahedral aluminum (AlⅣ) existed in magnesiumaluminum hydroxide, and the contents of AlⅣ increased with the increase of the ratio of Al/Mg andwith the peptizing temperature. AlⅣ originated from the so-called Al13 polymer with the structureof one Al tetrahedron surrounded by twelve Al octahedrons.

  7. Aluminum exclusion and aluminum tolerance in woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Ivano; Sperisen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The aluminum (Al) cation Al(3) (+) is highly rhizotoxic and is a major stress factor to plants on acid soils, which cover large areas of tropical and boreal regions. Many woody plant species are native to acid soils and are well adapted to high Al(3) (+) conditions. In tropical regions, both woody Al accumulator and non-Al accumulator plants occur, whereas in boreal regions woody plants are non-Al accumulators. The mechanisms of these adaptations can be divided into those that facilitate the exclusion of Al(3) (+) from root cells (exclusion mechanisms) and those that enable plants to tolerate Al(3) (+) once it has entered the root and shoot symplast (internal tolerance mechanisms). The biochemical and molecular basis of these mechanisms have been intensively studied in several crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis. In this review, we examine the current understanding of Al(3) (+) exclusion and tolerance mechanisms from woody plants. In addition, we discuss the ecology of woody non-Al accumulator and Al accumulator plants, and present examples of Al(3) (+) adaptations in woody plant populations. This paper complements previous reviews focusing on crop plants and provides insights into evolutionary processes operating in plant communities that are widespread on acid soils.

  8. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0075 The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters KIT BOWEN JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MD...2. REPORT TYPE Final Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30-09-2014 to 29-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Oxidation Products of Aluminum ...Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0324 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) KIT

  9. W-containing oxide layers obtained on aluminum and titanium by PEO as catalysts in thiophene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnev, V. S.; Lukiyanchuk, I. V.; Vasilyeva, M. S.; Morozova, V. P.; Zelikman, V. M.; Tarkhanova, I. G.

    2017-11-01

    W-containing oxide layers fabricated on titanium and aluminum alloys by Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) have been tested in the reaction of the peroxide oxidation of thiophene. Samples with two types of coatings have been investigated. Coatings I contained tungsten oxide in the matrix and on the surface of amorphous silica-titania or silica-alumina layers, while coatings II comprised crystalline WO3 and/or Al2(WO4)3. Aluminum-supported catalyst containing a smallest amount of transition metals in the form of tungsten oxides and manganese oxides in low oxidation levels showed high activity and stability.

  10. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5753 How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum...

  11. Electron-beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, Marcel; de Bony, Yves

    1980-08-15

    The objective of this article is to describe the status of the application of electron-beam welding to aluminum alloys. These alloys are widely employed in the aeronautics, space and nuclear industries.

  12. Electrometallurgical treatment of aluminum-based fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willit, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated aluminum electrorefining from a U-Al-Si alloy that simulates spent aluminum-based reactor fuel. The aluminum product contains less than 200 ppm uranium. All the results obtained have been in agreement with predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. We have also demonstrated the need for adequate stirring to achieve a low-uranium product. Most of the other process steps have been demonstrated in other programs. These include uranium electrorefining, transuranic fission product scrubbing, fission product oxidation, and product consolidation by melting. Future work will focus on the extraction of active metal and rare earth fission products by a molten flux salt and scale-up of the aluminum electrorefining

  13. Masking of aluminum surface against anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, G. B.; Thompson, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Masking material and a thickening agent preserve limited unanodized areas when aluminum surfaces are anodized with chromic acid. For protection of large areas it combines well with a certain self-adhesive plastic tape.

  14. Aluminum titanate crucible for molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    An improved crucible for molten uranium is described. The crucible or crucible liner is formed of aluminum titanate which essentially eliminates contamination of uranium and uranium alloys during molten states thereof. (U.S.)

  15. Interpretation of aluminum-alloy weld radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, P. C.; Risch, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Report proposes radiographic terminology standardization which allows scientific interpretation of radiographic films to replace dependence on individual judgement and experience. Report includes over 50 photographic pages where radiographs of aluminum welds with defects are compared with prepared weld sections photomacrographs.

  16. Recycling of aluminum to produce green energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Susana Silva; Lopez Benites, Wendy; Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62210 (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2005-07-15

    High-purity hydrogen gas was generated from the chemical reaction of aluminum with sodium hydroxide. Several molar relations of sodium hydroxide/aluminum were investigated in this study. The experimental results showed that hydrogen yields are acceptable and its purity was good enough to be used in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell to produce electricity. An estimation of the amount of energy produced from the reaction of 100 aluminum cans with caustic soda showed that the hydrogen production is feasible to be scaled up to reach up to 5kWh in a few hours. This study is environmentally friendly and also shows that green energy can be produced from aluminum waste at a low cost.

  17. Aluminum alloy excellent in neutron absorbing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Tetsuya; Tamamura, Tadao; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Ouchi, Ken-ichiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain structural materials made of aluminum alloys having favorable neutron absorbing performance and excellent in the performance as structural materials such as processability and strength. Constitution: Powder of Gd 2 O 3 as a gadolinium compound or metal gadolinium is uniformly mixed with the powder of aluminum or aluminum alloy. The amount of the gadolinium compound added is set to 0.1 - 30 % by weight. No sufficient neutron absorbing performance can be obtained if it is less than 0.1 % by weight, whereas the processability and mechanical property of the alloy are degraded if it exceeds 30 % by weight. Further, the grain size is set to less about 50 μm. Further, since the neutron absorbing performance varies greatly if the aluminum powder size exceeds 100 μm, the diameter is set to less than about 100 μm. These mixtures are molded in a hot press. This enables to obtain aimed structural materials. (Takahashi, M.)

  18. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  19. Inhibition of aluminum corrosion using Opuntia extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Etre, A.Y.

    2003-01-01

    The inhibitive action of the mucilage extracted from the modified stems of prickly pears, toward acid corrosion of aluminum, is tested using weight loss, thermometry, hydrogen evolution and polarization techniques. It was found that the extract acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for aluminum corrosion in 2.0 M HCl solution. The inhibition action of the extract was discussed in view of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. It was found that the adsorption of the extract on aluminum surface is a spontaneous process. The inhibition efficiency (IE) increases as the extract concentration is increased. The effect of temperature on the IE was studied. It was found that the presence of extract increases the activation energy of the corrosion reaction. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process were calculated. It was found also that the Opuntia extract provides a good protection to aluminum against pitting corrosion in chloride ion containing solutions

  20. Corrosion of aluminum components and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, S.T.; Khalique, A.; Malik, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum has versatile physical properties, mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, and is used in special applications like aerospace, automobiles and other strategic industries. The outdoor exposed structural components of aluminum have very good corrosion resistance due to the thick oxide layer (0.2 -0.4 micro). This study involves the corrosion of aluminum based components, though aluminum is protected by an oxide layer but due to extreme weather and environmental conditions the oxide layer was damaged. The corroded product was removed, pits or cavities formed due to the material removal were filled with epoxy resins and acrylic-based compounds containing fibreglass as reinforcement. Optimum results were obtained with epoxy resins incorporated with 5% glass fibers. The inner surface of the components was provided further protection with a cellulose nitrate compound. (author)

  1. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investment casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength

  2. Anodizing of aluminum with improved corrosion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, P.; Khan, I.U.

    2010-01-01

    Anodizing of aluminum was studied in sulphuric/oxalic/boric acid electroiyte system. The corrosion resistance of the anodic oxide coating of aluminum was determined by potentiodynamic polarization test and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology before and after corrosion test. It was found that the oxide coating obtained by this method showed better corrosion resistance with no significant difference in surface morphology. (author)

  3. The effects of ultrasonic solidification on aluminum

    OpenAIRE

    Đorđević Slavko 1

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound on characteristics of solidified aluminum was shown. An ultrasonic head and ultrasonic system for modification was designed and applied to the crystallizing aluminum melt. The ultrasonic generator allows power of 50-500 W, amplitude of oscillations 10-100 um.m and the operating frequency of 25 kHz. Ultrasonic modification was done by ultrasound introduced from above into the melt. Microstructure photographs show decreasing of the grain size more than five times.

  4. The effects of ultrasonic solidification on aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Slavko 1

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ultrasound on characteristics of solidified aluminum was shown. An ultrasonic head and ultrasonic system for modification was designed and applied to the crystallizing aluminum melt. The ultrasonic generator allows power of 50-500 W, amplitude of oscillations 10-100 um.m and the operating frequency of 25 kHz. Ultrasonic modification was done by ultrasound introduced from above into the melt. Microstructure photographs show decreasing of the grain size more than five times.

  5. Scientific Background for Processing of Aluminum Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kononchuk Olga

    2017-01-01

    of the aluminum waste A1- Zn-Cu-Si-Fe shows that depending on the content of the metal the dissolution process of an aluminum alloy should be treated as the result of the chemical interaction of the metal with an alkaline solution. It is necessary to consider the behavior of the main components of alloys in an alkaline solution as applied to the system Na2O - Al2O3 - SiO2 - CO2 - H2O.

  6. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  7. Parallelism in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Gallopoulos, Efstratios; Sameh, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended as a research monograph that could also be used in graduate courses for the design of parallel algorithms in matrix computations. It assumes general but not extensive knowledge of numerical linear algebra, parallel architectures, and parallel programming paradigms. The book consists of four parts: (I) Basics; (II) Dense and Special Matrix Computations; (III) Sparse Matrix Computations; and (IV) Matrix functions and characteristics. Part I deals with parallel programming paradigms and fundamental kernels, including reordering schemes for sparse matrices. Part II is devoted to dense matrix computations such as parallel algorithms for solving linear systems, linear least squares, the symmetric algebraic eigenvalue problem, and the singular-value decomposition. It also deals with the development of parallel algorithms for special linear systems such as banded ,Vandermonde ,Toeplitz ,and block Toeplitz systems. Part III addresses sparse matrix computations: (a) the development of pa...

  8. Neutrino mass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Given the many conflicting experimental results, examination is made of the neutrino mass matrix in order to determine possible masses and mixings. It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos is similar in form to those of the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed neutrino masses results from the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism. Analysis of masses and mixings for the neutrinos is performed using general structures for the Majorana mass matrix. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the neutrino masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. A very recent experimental neutrino mass result and its implications are discussed. Some general properties of matrices with structure similar to the Dirac mass matrices are discussed

  9. Random matrix theory and acoustic resonances in plates with an approximate symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Ellegaard, C.; Jackson, A.D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a random matrix model of systems with an approximate symmetry and present the spectral fluctuation statistics and eigenvector characteristics for the model. An acoustic resonator like, e.g., an aluminum plate may have an approximate symmetry. We have measured the frequency spectrum and...

  10. Research of plating aluminum and aluminum foil on internal surface of carbon fiber composite material centrifuge rotor drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiuqi; Dong Jinping; Dai Xingjian

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the corrosion resistance, thermal conductivity and sealability of the internal surface of carbon fiber/epoxy composite material centrifuge rotor drum, magnetron sputtering aluminum and pasting an aluminum foil on the inner wall of the drum are adopted to realize the aim. By means of XRD, SEM/EDS and OM, the surface topography of aluminum coated (thickness of 5 μm and 12 μm) and aluminum foil (12 μm) are observed and analyzed; the cohesion of between aluminum coated (or aluminum foil) and substrate material (CFRP) is measured by scratching experiment, direct drawing experiment, and shear test. Besides, the ultra-high-speed rotation experiment of CFRP ring is carried out to analyze stress and strain of coated aluminum (or aluminum foil) which is adhered on the ring. The results showed aluminum foil pasted on inner surface do better performance than magnetron sputtering aluminum on CFRP centrifuge rotor drum. (authors)

  11. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Aluminum neurotoxicity in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, S [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Ohashi, H; Nagai, H; Kakimi, S; Ogawa, Y; Iwata, Y; Ishii, K

    1993-12-31

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer`s disease, we administered aluminum to healthy rats and examined the aluminum uptake in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the rat brain and in isolated brain cell nuclei by PIXE analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the brain after 15 months of oral aluminum administration. Moreover, Al was detected in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei from the patients with Alzheimer`s disease. Silver impregnation studies revealed that spines attached to the dendritic processes of cortical nerve cells decreased remarkably after aluminum administration. Electron microscopy revealed characteristic inclusion bodies in the hippocampal nerve cells 75 days after the injection. These morphological changes in the rat brain after the aluminum administration were similar to those reportedly observed in the brain of Alzheimer`s disease patients. Our results indicate that Alzheimer`s disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminum in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells. (author).

  13. Aluminum neurotoxicity in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we administered aluminum to healthy rats and examined the aluminum uptake in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the rat brain and in isolated brain cell nuclei by PIXE analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the brain after 15 months of oral aluminum administration. Moreover, Al was detected in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei from the patients with Alzheimer's disease. Silver impregnation studies revealed that spines attached to the dendritic processes of cortical nerve cells decreased remarkably after aluminum administration. Electron microscopy revealed characteristic inclusion bodies in the hippocampal nerve cells 75 days after the injection. These morphological changes in the rat brain after the aluminum administration were similar to those reportedly observed in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. Our results indicate that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminum in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  14. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using 14 C autoradiography to measure the uptake of 14 C 2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 14 C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-μm resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The 14 C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of 14 C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10 9 Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of MWCNTs Reinforced A356 Aluminum Alloys Cast Nanocomposites Fabricated by Using a Combination of Rheocasting and Squeeze Casting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou Bakr Elshalakany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A356 hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys matrix composites reinforced by different contents of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were fabricated using a combination of rheocasting and squeeze casting techniques. A novel approach by adding MWCNTs into A356 aluminum alloy matrix with CNTs has been performed. This method is significant in debundling and preventing flotation of the CNTs within the molten alloy. The microstructures of nanocomposites and the interface between the aluminum alloy matrix and the MWCNTs were examined by using an optical microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. This method remarkably facilitated a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within A356 aluminum alloy matrix as well as a refinement of grain size. In addition, the effects of weight fraction (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt% of the CNT-blended matrix on mechanical properties were evaluated. The results have indicated that a significant improvement in ultimate tensile strength and elongation percentage of nanocomposite occurred at the optimal amount of 1.5 wt% MWCNTs which represents an increase in their values by a ratio of about 50% and 280%, respectively, compared to their corresponding values of monolithic alloy. Hardness of the samples was also significantly increased by the addition of CNTs.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV tungstate: A new and novel ‘organic–inorganic’ nano-composite material and its electro-analytical applications as Hg(II ion-selective membrane electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif A. Khan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An organic–inorganic nano-composite poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV tungstate was chemically synthesized by sol–gel mixing of the incorporation of organic polymer o-anisidine into the matrices of inorganic ppt of Sn(IV tungstate in different mixing volume ratios. This composite material has been characterized using various analytical techniques like XRD (X-ray diffraction, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared, SEM (Scanning electron microscopy, TEM (Transmission electron microscopy and simultaneous TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis studies. On the basis of distribution studies, the material was found to be highly selective for Hg(II. Using this nano-composite cation exchanger as electro-active material, a new heterogeneous precipitate based on ion-sensitive membrane electrode was developed for the determination of Hg(II ions in solutions. The membrane electrode was mechanically stable, with a quick response time, and can be operated within a wide pH range. The electrode was also found to be satisfactory in electrometric titrations.

  17. Spray rolling aluminum alloy strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Delplanque, J.-P.; Johnson, S.B.; Lavernia, E.J.; Zhou, Y.; Lin, Y

    2004-10-10

    Spray rolling combines spray forming with twin-roll casting to process metal flat products. It consists of atomizing molten metal with a high velocity inert gas, cooling the resultant droplets in flight and directing the spray between mill rolls. In-flight convection heat transfer from atomized droplets teams with conductive cooling at the rolls to rapidly remove the alloy's latent heat. Hot deformation of the semi-solid material in the rolls results in fully consolidated, rapidly solidified product. While similar in some ways to twin-roll casting, spray rolling has the advantage of being able to process alloys with broad freezing ranges at high production rates. This paper describes the process and summarizes microstructure and tensile properties of spray-rolled 2124 and 7050 aluminum alloy strips. A Lagrangian/Eulerian poly-dispersed spray flight and deposition model is described that provides some insight into the development of the spray rolling process. This spray model follows droplets during flight toward the rolls, through impact and spreading, and includes oxide film formation and breakup when relevant.

  18. Aluminum bioavailability from tea infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, Robert A; Florence, Rebecca L

    2008-12-01

    The objective was to estimate oral Al bioavailability from tea infusion in the rat, using the tracer (26)Al. (26)Al citrate was injected into tea leaves. An infusion was prepared from the dried leaves and given intra-gastrically to rats which received concurrent intravenous (27)Al infusion. Oral Al bioavailability (F) was calculated from the area under the (26)Al, compared to (27)Al, serum concentration x time curves. Bioavailability from tea averaged 0.37%; not significantly different from water (F=0.3%), or basic sodium aluminum phosphate (SALP) in cheese (F=0.1-0.3%), but greater than acidic SALP in a biscuit (F=0.1%). Time to maximum serum (26)Al concentration was 1.25, 1.5, 8 and 4.8h, respectively. These results of oral Al bioavailability x daily consumption by the human suggest tea can provide a significant amount of the Al that reaches systemic circulation. This can allow distribution to its target organs of toxicity, the central nervous, skeletal and hematopoietic systems. Further testing of the hypothesis that Al contributes to Alzheimer's disease may be more warranted with studies focusing on total average daily food intake, including tea and other foods containing appreciable Al, than drinking water.

  19. Fabrication of high quality anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) on low purity aluminum—A comparative study with the AAO produced on high purity aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalska-Domańska, Marta; Norek, Małgorzata; Stępniowski, Wojciech J.; Budner, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoporous alumina was fabricated by anodization in sulfuric acid solution with glycol. • The AAO manufacturing on low- and high-purity Al was compared. • The pores size was ranging between 30 and 50 nm. • No difference in the quality of the AAO fabricated on both Al types was observed. • The current vs. anodization time curves were recorded. -- Abstract: In this work the quality, arrangement, composition, and regularity of nanoporous AAO formed on the low-purity (AA1050) and high-purity aluminum during two-step anodization in a mixture of sulfuric acid solution (0.3 M), water and glycol (3:2, v/v), at various voltages (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 V) and at temperature of −1 °C, are investigated. The electrochemical conditions have allowed to obtain pores with the size ranging from 30 to 50 nm, which are much larger than those usually obtained by anodization in a pure sulfuric acid solution (<20 nm). The mechanism of the AAO growth is discussed. It was found that with the increase of applied anodizing voltage a number of incorporated sulfate ions in the aluminum oxide matrix increases, which was connected with the appearance of an unusual area in the current vs. time curves. On the surface of anodizing low- and high-purity aluminum, the formation of hillocks was observed, which was associated with the sulfate ions incorporation. The sulfate ions are replacing the oxygen atom/atoms in the AAO amorphous crystal structure and, consequently, the AAO template swells, the oxide cracks and uplifts causing the formation of hillocks. The same mechanism occurs for both low- and high-purity aluminum. Nanoporous AAO characterized by a very high regularity, not registered previously for low purity aluminum, was obtained. Furthermore, no significant difference in the regularity ratio between the AAO obtained on low- and high-purity aluminum, was observed. The electrochemical conditions applied in this study can be, thus, used for the fabrication of high quality

  20. Comparison of four methods for determining aluminum in highly radioactive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, T.J.

    1976-06-01

    Four methods for the accurate determination of aluminum in highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions were developed and the results were compared to determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. The solutions of interest contain aluminum in concentrations of 0.5 to 3.5 M and the hydroxide (OH - ) concentrations were greater than 1.0 M. The normal atomic absorption determination was highly inaccurate for these samples so citrate was used as a complexant to improve the results. A fluoride titration was carried out in an ethanol-water matrix using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. A thermometric titration proved successful in determining both the OH - and aluminum concentrations of the samples. Finally, a titrimetric method using a pH electrode to determine OH - d aluminum was checked and compared with the other methods. Samples were analyzed using all four methods and the agreement of the results was very good. For all four methods the accuracy was around 100 percent and the precision varied from approximately +-2 percent for the fluoride electrode determination to approximately +-10 percent for the atomic absorption determination. On the basis of the work performed, conclusions were drawn about the strengths and weaknesses of each method and whether or not the method was suitable for routine use in analytical laboratories

  1. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far

  2. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far.

  3. Casting Characteristics of High Cerium Content Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D; Rios, O R; Sims, Z C; McCall, S K; Ott, R T

    2017-09-05

    This paper compares the castability of the near eutectic aluminum-cerium alloy system to the aluminum-silicon and aluminum-copper systems. The alloys are compared based on die filling capability, feeding characteristics and tendency to hot tear in both sand cast and permanent mold applications. The castability ranking of the binary Al–Ce systems is as good as the aluminum-silicon system with some deterioration as additional alloying elements are added. In alloy systems that use cerium in combination with common aluminum alloying elements such as silicon, magnesium and/or copper, the casting characteristics are generally better than the aluminum-copper system. In general, production systems for melting, de-gassing and other processing of aluminum-silicon or aluminum-copper alloys can be used without modification for conventional casting of aluminum-cerium alloys.

  4. Patience of matrix games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    For matrix games we study how small nonzero probability must be used in optimal strategies. We show that for image win–lose–draw games (i.e. image matrix games) nonzero probabilities smaller than image are never needed. We also construct an explicit image win–lose game such that the unique optimal...

  5. Matrix comparison, Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Borlund, Pia

    2007-01-01

    The present two-part article introduces matrix comparison as a formal means for evaluation purposes in informetric studies such as cocitation analysis. In the first part, the motivation behind introducing matrix comparison to informetric studies, as well as two important issues influencing such c...

  6. Unitarity of CKM Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Saleem, M

    2002-01-01

    The Unitarity of the CKM matrix is examined in the light of the latest available accurate data. The analysis shows that a conclusive result cannot be derived at present. Only more precise data can determine whether the CKM matrix opens new vistas beyond the standard model or not.

  7. Microstructure, mechanical analysis and optimal selection of 7075 aluminum alloy based composite reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezatpour, H.R., E-mail: H.R.Ezatpour@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering, Sabzevar University of New Technology, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabi Parizi, M. [Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Semnan University of Semnan, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sajjadi, S.A. [Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, G.R. [Department of Materials and Polymer Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chaichi, A. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-01

    Aluminum metal-matrix nanocomposites (AMMNCs) fabricated by conventional stir-casting process usually show high porosity and poor distribution of nanoparticles within the matrix. In the current study, for the improvement of nanoparticles distribution in the aluminum matrix and enhancement of the mechanical properties, a mixture of Al/nano-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were injected by pure argon gas into the molten 7075 aluminum alloy and this mixture was extruded at high temperature. Mechanical behavior of the final product was investigated by tensile and compression tests, hardness measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Optical Microscopy. This nanocomposite exhibited some superior properties such as a fine grain microstructure and a reasonable uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the matrix. Mechanical experiments results confirmed that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and the extrusion process effectively improved ultimate tensile strength, compression strength and hardness. In next step, we used a Preference Selection Index (PSI) materials selection method to select best combination of strength and workability of Al7075−Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites. By this method, extruded Al7075/0.4 and 0.8 wt % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has best combination of strength and workability. - Highlights: • Injection Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder is benefit way for improving nanoparticles distribution. • Nanocomposites present superior mechanical properties. • Extrusion process improved significantly mechanical properties of nanocomposites. • Preference Selection Index is a simple and benefit method in material selection.

  8. Studies on {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc adsorption and elution behaviors using the inorganic sorbent ceric tungstate and conventional organic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sweify, Fatma H.; Fattah, Alaa El-Din A. Abdel; Aly, Shorouk M.; Ghamry, Mohamed A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Hot Laboratories Center; El-Sheikh, Ragaa [Zagazig Univ. (Egypt). Chemistry Dept.

    2017-09-01

    Adsorption behavior of {sup 99}Mo(VI) and {sup 99m}Tc(VII) was studied on ceric tungstate (CeW) and compared with the adsorption on the conventional cation and anion exchangers Dowex-50X8 and AG-2X8, respectively. The studies were carried out under static and dynamic conditions. The effect of contact time and pH on the adsorption was investigated under static conditions. High K{sub d}-values for sorption of {sup 99}Mo(VI) on (CeW) were obtained over the investigated pH range. {sup 99m}Tc was adsorbed with much lower K{sub d}-values. The K{sub d}-values were pH dependent. K{sub d}-values of {sup 99}Mo-adsorption on AG-2X8 were lower than those on (CeW) and vice versa for {sup 99m}Tc. Ionic species of both elements were not adsorbed on Dowex-50X8, indicating the absence of cationic species and the adsorption of both elements on AG-2X8 and (CeW) as anionic species. The loading and elution behaviors of {sup 99}Mo and {sup 99m}Tc on (CeW) were studied using different eluents. {sup 99}Mo remained strongly adsorbed under all conditions whereas {sup 99m}Tc was easily eluted. Adsorption of some fission products, i.e. {sup 95}Zr(IV) and {sup 95}Nb(V), in addition to {sup 123m}Te(IV) and {sup 75}Se(IV), as representatives of their corresponding fission product isotopes, as well as {sup 181}Hf, as probable radioactive contaminant was also studied. Solutions of the ionic species of those metals were loaded in mixtures together with {sup 99}Mo on (CeW) columns. Strong adsorption of those ionic species and {sup 99}Mo on (CeW) was found whereas {sup 99m}Tc was easily eluted. Different eluents were investigated for eluting {sup 99m}Tc from {sup 99}Mo-adsorbed on (CeW).

  9. Progress in Aluminum Electrolysis Control and Future Direction for Smart Aluminum Electrolysis Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Tianshuang; Li, Jie; Yang, Shuai; Zou, Zhong

    2017-02-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions. However, these conditions have restricted the measurement of key control parameters, making the control of aluminum reduction cells a difficult problem in the industry. Because aluminum electrolysis control systems have a significant economic influence, substantial research has been conducted on control algorithms, control systems and information systems for aluminum reduction cells. This article first summarizes the development of control systems and then focuses on the progress made since 2000, including alumina concentration control, temperature control and electrolyte molecular ratio control, fault diagnosis, cell condition prediction and control system expansion. Based on these studies, the concept of a smart aluminum electrolysis plant is proposed. The frame construction, key problems and current progress are introduced. Finally, several future directions are discussed.

  10. Mechanisms of de cohesion in cutting aluminium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichosz, Piotr; Karolczak, Pawel; Kuzinovski, Mikolaj

    2008-01-01

    In this paper properties and applications of aluminium matrix composites are presented with a composite reinforced with saffil fibres selected for topical study. Behavior of matrix and reinforcement during machining with a cutting tool is analyzed. The paper presents an explosive quick-stop device designed to obtain undisturbed machined surface for examination. Meso hardness measurements of deformed structure, resultant chips and built-up-edge were carried out. Scanning micrographs of machined surface are presented with morphology and types of chips analysed. Values of the fibrousness angle ψ and thickening index k h of chip are evaluated. The research performed has enabled the authors to define mechanisms of e cohesion during cutting aluminium matrix composites. The results received for composite material are compared with those pertinent to aluminum alloys.

  11. Fuzzy risk matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowski, Adam S.; Mannan, M. Sam

    2008-01-01

    A risk matrix is a mechanism to characterize and rank process risks that are typically identified through one or more multifunctional reviews (e.g., process hazard analysis, audits, or incident investigation). This paper describes a procedure for developing a fuzzy risk matrix that may be used for emerging fuzzy logic applications in different safety analyses (e.g., LOPA). The fuzzification of frequency and severity of the consequences of the incident scenario are described which are basic inputs for fuzzy risk matrix. Subsequently using different design of risk matrix, fuzzy rules are established enabling the development of fuzzy risk matrices. Three types of fuzzy risk matrix have been developed (low-cost, standard, and high-cost), and using a distillation column case study, the effect of the design on final defuzzified risk index is demonstrated

  12. Fuzzy vulnerability matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Jorge H.; Rivera, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    The so-called vulnerability matrix is used in the evaluation part of the probabilistic safety assessment for a nuclear power plant, during the containment event trees calculations. This matrix is established from what is knows as Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement. This matrix is usually established with numerical values obtained with traditional arithmetic using the set theory. The representation of this matrix with fuzzy numbers is much more adequate, due to the fact that the Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement are better represented with linguistic variables, such as 'highly probable', 'probable', 'impossible', etc. In the present paper a methodology to obtain a Fuzzy Vulnerability Matrix is presented, starting from the recommendations on the Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement. (author)

  13. Tensile and compressive behavior of Borsic/aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Viswanathan, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the mechanical behavior of Borsic/aluminum are presented. Composite laminates were tested in tension and compression for monotonically increasing load and also for variable loading cycles in which the maximum load was increased in each successive cycle. It is shown that significant strain-hardening, and corresponding increase in yield stress, is exhibited by the metal matrix laminates. For matrix dominated laminates, the current yield stress is essentially identical to the previous maximum stress, and unloading is essentially linear with large permanent strains after unloading. For laminates with fiber dominated behavior, the yield stress increases with increase in the previous maximum stress, but the increase in yield stress does not keep pace with the previous maximum stress. These fiber dominated laminates exhibit smaller nonlinear strains, reversed nonlinear behavior during unloading, and smaller permanent strains after unloading. Compression results from sandwich beams and flat coupons are shown to differ considerably. Results from beam specimens tend to exhibit higher values for modulus, yield stress, and strength.

  14. Synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles capped with copolymerizable epoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Brandon J. [Saint Louis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Bunker, Christopher E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Propulsion Directorate (United States); Guliants, Elena A. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States); Hayes, Sophia E. [Washington University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Kheyfets, Arthur [Saint Louis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Wentz, Katherine M. [Washington University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Buckner, Steven W., E-mail: buckners@slu.edu; Jelliss, Paul A., E-mail: jellissp@slu.edu [Saint Louis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We report on the synthesis of air-stable aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) capped with 1,2-epoxy-9-decene. Long-chain epoxides have proven to be effective capping agents for Al NPs as the epoxide ring is highly susceptible to ring-opening polymerization, leading to the formation of putative polyether loops on the nascent Al NP surface. However, these materials are observed to degrade within several hours to days following exposure to ambient air. By inducing polymerization of the additional terminal alkene functionality on the epoxide, we have produced Al NPs that exhibit both a shelf life of {approx}6 weeks and a high active Al content. Transmission electron microscopy confirms that these spherical nanostructures, {approx}25 nm in diameter, are embedded in a covalently bound polymer matrix that serves as a prophylactic barrier against water/air (H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}) degradation, and {sup 27}Al solid-state NMR is used to nondestructively confirm the presence of both metallic Al{sup 0} and oxidized Al{sup 3+}. In addition, we have induced polymerization of the epoxide terminal alkene functionality with a long-chain diene monomer, 1,13-tetradecadiene, leading to the formation of Al NPs protected by an extremely hydrophobic polymer matrix. These core-shell nanomaterials also have high active Al contents along with extremely long shelf lives (up to 6 months upon air exposure).

  15. Polarization and EIS studies to evaluate the effect of aluminum concentration on the corrosion behavior of SAC105 solder alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyana N. K.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on corrosion behavior of Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu-XAl (X = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 by means of polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results show that addition of aluminum into SAC105 shifts the corrosion current density and passivation current density towards more positive values. It is also found that with an increase in aluminum concentration in SAC105 solder alloy, the corrosion current density increases and polarization resistance decreases. This suggests that SAC105 with the highest concentration of Al has the lowest corrosion resistance. In this case, the corrosion behavior seems to be attributed to anodic dissolution of aluminum and Sn-matrix.

  16. Fabrication of novel fiber reinforced aluminum composites by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi, Saeed; Jahromi, Seyyed Ahmad Jenabali, E-mail: jahromi@shirazu.ac.ir; Javadpour, Sirus; Zebarjad, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2015-04-24

    In this study, chopped and attrition milled high strength carbon, E-glass, and S-glass fibers have been used as the reinforcing agents in an aluminum alloy (Al1100) considered as the matrix. The Surface Metal Matrix Composites (SMMCs) then are produced by Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Tensile and micro-hardness examinations represent a magnificent improvement in the hardness, strength, ductility and toughness for all of the processed samples. Scanning Electron Micrographs reveal a proper distribution of the reinforcements in the matrix and a change in the fracture behavior of the FSPed specimens. The synergetic effects of reinforcing by fibers and Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) lead to an extra ordinary improvement in the mechanical properties.

  17. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Electrochemically replicated smooth aluminum foils for anodic alumina nanochannel arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biring, Sajal; Tsai, K-T; Sur, Ujjal Kumar; Wang, Y-L

    2008-01-01

    A fast electrochemical replication technique has been developed to fabricate large-scale ultra-smooth aluminum foils by exploiting readily available large-scale smooth silicon wafers as the masters. Since the adhesion of aluminum on silicon depends on the time of surface pretreatment in water, it is possible to either detach the replicated aluminum from the silicon master without damaging the replicated aluminum and master or integrate the aluminum film to the silicon substrate. Replicated ultra-smooth aluminum foils are used for the growth of both self-organized and lithographically guided long-range ordered arrays of anodic alumina nanochannels without any polishing pretreatment

  19. Precision forging technology for aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Wang, Xinyun; Jin, Junsong; Xia, Juchen

    2018-03-01

    Aluminum alloy is a preferred metal material for lightweight part manufacturing in aerospace, automobile, and weapon industries due to its good physical properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good corrosion resistance. However, during forging processes, underfilling, folding, broken streamline, crack, coarse grain, and other macro- or microdefects are easily generated because of the deformation characteristics of aluminum alloys, including narrow forgeable temperature region, fast heat dissipation to dies, strong adhesion, high strain rate sensitivity, and large flow resistance. Thus, it is seriously restricted for the forged part to obtain precision shape and enhanced property. In this paper, progresses in precision forging technologies of aluminum alloy parts were reviewed. Several advanced precision forging technologies have been developed, including closed die forging, isothermal die forging, local loading forging, metal flow forging with relief cavity, auxiliary force or vibration loading, casting-forging hybrid forming, and stamping-forging hybrid forming. High-precision aluminum alloy parts can be realized by controlling the forging processes and parameters or combining precision forging technologies with other forming technologies. The development of these technologies is beneficial to promote the application of aluminum alloys in manufacturing of lightweight parts.

  20. The nuclear reaction matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenciglowa, E.M.; Kung, C.L.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Osnes, E.; and Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1976-01-01

    Different definitions of the reaction matrix G appropriate to the calculation of nuclear structure are reviewed and discussed. Qualitative physical arguments are presented in support of a two-step calculation of the G-matrix for finite nuclei. In the first step the high-energy excitations are included using orthogonalized plane-wave intermediate states, and in the second step the low-energy excitations are added in, using harmonic oscillator intermediate states. Accurate calculations of G-matrix elements for nuclear structure calculations in the Aapprox. =18 region are performed following this procedure and treating the Pauli exclusion operator Q 2 /sub p/ by the method of Tsai and Kuo. The treatment of Q 2 /sub p/, the effect of the intermediate-state spectrum and the energy dependence of the reaction matrix are investigated in detail. The present matrix elements are compared with various matrix elements given in the literature. In particular, close agreement is obtained with the matrix elements calculated by Kuo and Brown using approximate methods

  1. An examination of impact damage in glass-phenolic and aluminum honeycomb core composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.; Hodge, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of low velocity impact damage to glass-phenolic and aluminum core honeycomb sandwich panels with carbon-epoxy facesheets is presented. An instrumented drop weight impact test apparatus was utilized to inflict damage at energy ranges between 0.7 and 4.2 joules. Specimens were checked for extent of damage by cross sectional examination. The effect of core damage was assessed by subjecting impact-damaged beams to four-point bend tests. Skin-only specimens (facings not bonded to honeycomb) were also tested for comparison purposes. Results show that core buckling is the first damage mode, followed by delaminations in the facings, matrix cracking, and finally fiber breakage. The aluminum honeycomb panels exhibited a larger core damage zone and more facing delaminations than the glass-phenolic core, but could withstand more shear stress when damaged than the glass-phenolic core specimens.

  2. Wear Characterization of Aluminium/Basalt Fiber Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites - A Novel Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amuthakkannan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy based metal matrix composite participate have a wider applications in wear resistance applications. Attempt made in current study is that, basalt fiber reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite have been prepared using stir casting method. Different weight percentage of basalt fiber reinforced with Al (6061 metal matrix composites are used to study the wear resistance of the composites. For wear study, percentage of reinforcement, normal load and sliding velocity are the considered as important parameters. To study the effect of basalt fiber reinforcement on the dry sliding wear of Al6061 alloy composites the Pin On wear tester is used. Initially hardness of the composites was tested, it was found that increasing reinforcement in the composite hardness value of the composites also increased. Based on the Grey relation analysis (GRA the effects of wear resistance of the composites were studied.

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  4. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2005-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, and maximal tori.

  5. Elementary matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Eves, Howard

    1980-01-01

    The usefulness of matrix theory as a tool in disciplines ranging from quantum mechanics to psychometrics is widely recognized, and courses in matrix theory are increasingly a standard part of the undergraduate curriculum.This outstanding text offers an unusual introduction to matrix theory at the undergraduate level. Unlike most texts dealing with the topic, which tend to remain on an abstract level, Dr. Eves' book employs a concrete elementary approach, avoiding abstraction until the final chapter. This practical method renders the text especially accessible to students of physics, engineeri

  6. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  7. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1965-04-01

    Aluminum can be bonded to zirconium without difficulty even when a thin layer of oxide is present on the surface of the zirconium . No detectable diffusion takes place during the bonding process. The bond layer can be stretched as much. as 8% without affecting the bond. The bond can be heated for 1000 hours at 260 o C (500 o F), and can be water quenched from 260 o C (500 o F) without any noticeable change in the bond strength. An extrusion technique has been devised for making transition sections of aluminum bonded to zirconium which can then be used to join these metals by conventional welding. Welding can be done close to the bond zone without seriously affecting the integrity of the bond. This method of bonding aluminum to Zircaloy-2 is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965. (author)

  8. NASA-427: A New Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center researchers have developed a new, stronger aluminum alloy, ideal for cast aluminum products that have powder or paint-baked thermal coatings. With advanced mechanical properties, the NASA-427 alloy shows greater tensile strength and increased ductility, providing substantial improvement in impact toughness. In addition, this alloy improves the thermal coating process by decreasing the time required for heat treatment. With improvements in both strength and processing time, use of the alloy provides reduced materials and production costs, lower product weight, and better product performance. The superior properties of NASA-427 can benefit many industries, including automotive, where it is particularly well-suited for use in aluminum wheels.

  9. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-01-01

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  10. Aluminum phosphate ceramics for waste storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D

    2014-06-03

    The present disclosure describes solid waste forms and methods of processing waste. In one particular implementation, the invention provides a method of processing waste that may be particularly suitable for processing hazardous waste. In this method, a waste component is combined with an aluminum oxide and an acidic phosphate component in a slurry. A molar ratio of aluminum to phosphorus in the slurry is greater than one. Water in the slurry may be evaporated while mixing the slurry at a temperature of about 140-200.degree. C. The mixed slurry may be allowed to cure into a solid waste form. This solid waste form includes an anhydrous aluminum phosphate with at least a residual portion of the waste component bound therein.

  11. Study of aluminum-doped silicon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Shichang; Li Baoxing; Yang Jiansong

    2007-01-01

    Using full-muffin-tin-orbital molecular-dynamics (FP-LMTO-MD) method, we have investigated the effect of aluminum heteroatoms on the geometric structures and bond characteristics of Si n (n=5-10) clusters in detail. It is found that the geometric framework of the ground state structures for Si n (n=5-10) clusters change to some extent upon the substitution of Al atoms in some Si atoms. The effect of aluminum doping on the silicon clusters depends on the geometric structures of Si n (n=5-10) clusters. In particular, the calculations suggest that the aluminum doping would improve the bond strength of some Si-Si bonds in the mixed Si n - m Al m clusters

  12. Study on Explosive Forming of Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Iyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Now, the aluminum alloy is often used as auto parts, for example, body, engine. For example, there are the body, a cylinder block, a piston, a connecting rod, interior, exterior parts, etc. These are practical used the characteristic of a light and strong aluminum alloy efficiently. However, although an aluminum alloy is lighter than steel, the elongation is smaller than that. Therefore, in press forming, some problems often occur. We have proposed use of explosive forming, in order to solve this problem. In the explosive forming, since a blank is formed at high speed, a strain rate effect becomes large and it can be made the elongation is larger. Then, in order to clarify this feature, we carried out experimental research and numerical analysis. In this paper, these contents will be discussed.

  13. Synthesis of new metal-matrix Al-Al2O3-graphene composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshina, L. A.; Muradymov, R. V.; Kvashnichev, A. G.; Vichuzhanin, D. I.; Molchanova, N. G.; Pankratov, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism of formation of ceramic microparticles (alumina) and graphene in a molten aluminum matrix is studied as a function of the morphology and type of precursor particles, the temperature, and the gas atmosphere. The influence of the composition of an aluminum composite material (as a function of the concentration and size of reinforcing particles) on its mechanical and corrosion properties, melting temperature, and thermal conductivity is investigated. Hybrid metallic Al-Al2O3-graphene composite materials with up to 10 wt % alumina microparticles and 0.2 wt % graphene films, which are uniformly distributed over the metal volume and are fully wetted with aluminum, are synthesized during the chemical interaction of a salt solution containing yttria and boron carbide with molten aluminum in air. Simultaneous introduction of alumina and graphene into an aluminum matrix makes it possible to produce hybrid metallic composite materials having a unique combination of the following properties: their thermal conductivity is higher than that of aluminum, their hardness and strength are increased by two times, their relative elongation during tension is increased threefold, and their corrosion resistance is higher than that of initial aluminum by a factor of 2.5-4. We are the first to synthesize an in situ hybrid Al-Al2O3-graphene composite material having a unique combination of some characteristics. This material can be recommended as a promising material for a wide circle of electrical applications, including ultrathin wires, and as a structural material for the aerospace industry, the car industry, and the shipbuilding industry.

  14. Effect of Stress Ratio on Fatigue Crack Growth Rate at Notched Hole in 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy Under Biaxial Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-18

    Berezhnitski, L.T., and R.S. Gromyak. “Evaluation of Limiting State of Matrix in Vicinity of Sharp-Edge Rigid Inclusion.” Material Science, Volume 13...Effect of Surface Enhancement on the Corrosion Properties, Fatigue Strength, and Degradation Of Aircraft Aluminum.” Lambda Research, 2010. [38

  15. Study of diffusion bond development in 6061 aluminum and its relationship to future high density fuels fabrication.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofiev, I.; Wiencek, T.; McGann, D.

    1997-10-07

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium alloys and silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the RERTR program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. Testing is done with miniplate-type fuel plates to simulate standard fuel with cladding and matrix in plate-type configurations. In order to seal the dispersion fuel plates, a diffusion bond must exist between the aluminum coverplates surrounding the fuel meat. Four different variations in the standard method for roll-bonding 6061 aluminum were studied. They included mechanical cleaning, addition of a getter material, modifications to the standard chemical etching, and welding methods. Aluminum test pieces were subjected to a bend test after each rolling pass. Results, based on 400 samples, indicate that at least a 70% reduction in thickness is required to produce a diffusion bond using the standard rollbonding method versus a 60% reduction using the Type II method in which the assembly was welded 100% and contained open 9mm holes at frame corners.

  16. Porous and mesh alumina formed by anodization of high purity aluminum films at low anodizing voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-Elnaiem, Alaa M., E-mail: alaa.abd-elnaiem@science.au.edu.eg [KACST-Intel Consortium Center of Excellence in Nano-manufacturing Applications (CENA), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt); Mebed, A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Jouf University, Sakaka 2014 (Saudi Arabia); El-Said, Waleed Ahmed [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt); Abdel-Rahim, M.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt)

    2014-11-03

    Electrochemical oxidation of high-purity aluminum (Al) films under low anodizing voltages (1–10) V has been conducted to obtain anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with ultra-small pore size and inter-pore distance. Different structures of AAO have been obtained e.g. nanoporous and mesh structures. Highly regular pore arrays with small pore size and inter-pore distance have been formed in oxalic or sulfuric acids at different temperatures (22–50 °C). It is found that the pore diameter, inter-pore distance and the barrier layer thickness are independent of the anodizing parameters, which is very different from the rules of general AAO fabrication. The brand formation mechanism has been revealed by the scanning electron microscope study. Regular nanopores are formed under 10 V at the beginning of the anodization and then serve as a template layer dominating the formation of ultra-small nanopores. Anodization that is performed at voltages less than 5 V leads to mesh structured alumina. In addition, we have introduced a simple one-pot synthesis method to develop thin walls of oxide containing lithium (Li) ions that could be used for battery application based on anodization of Al films in a supersaturated mixture of lithium phosphate and phosphoric acid as matrix for Li-composite electrolyte. - Highlights: • We develop anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with small pore size and inter-pore distance. • Applying low anodizing voltages onto aluminum film leads to form mesh structures. • The value of anodizing voltage (1–10 V) has no effect on pore size or inter-pore distance. • Applying anodizing voltage less than 5 V leads to mesh structured AAO. • AAO can be used as a matrix for Li-composite electrolytes.

  17. Porous and mesh alumina formed by anodization of high purity aluminum films at low anodizing voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-Elnaiem, Alaa M.; Mebed, A.M.; El-Said, Waleed Ahmed; Abdel-Rahim, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of high-purity aluminum (Al) films under low anodizing voltages (1–10) V has been conducted to obtain anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with ultra-small pore size and inter-pore distance. Different structures of AAO have been obtained e.g. nanoporous and mesh structures. Highly regular pore arrays with small pore size and inter-pore distance have been formed in oxalic or sulfuric acids at different temperatures (22–50 °C). It is found that the pore diameter, inter-pore distance and the barrier layer thickness are independent of the anodizing parameters, which is very different from the rules of general AAO fabrication. The brand formation mechanism has been revealed by the scanning electron microscope study. Regular nanopores are formed under 10 V at the beginning of the anodization and then serve as a template layer dominating the formation of ultra-small nanopores. Anodization that is performed at voltages less than 5 V leads to mesh structured alumina. In addition, we have introduced a simple one-pot synthesis method to develop thin walls of oxide containing lithium (Li) ions that could be used for battery application based on anodization of Al films in a supersaturated mixture of lithium phosphate and phosphoric acid as matrix for Li-composite electrolyte. - Highlights: • We develop anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with small pore size and inter-pore distance. • Applying low anodizing voltages onto aluminum film leads to form mesh structures. • The value of anodizing voltage (1–10 V) has no effect on pore size or inter-pore distance. • Applying anodizing voltage less than 5 V leads to mesh structured AAO. • AAO can be used as a matrix for Li-composite electrolytes

  18. Air-Impregnated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Layers for Enhancing the Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Lee, Junghoon; Sheppard, Keith; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2015-10-13

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layers were fabricated on aluminum substrates with systematically varied pore diameters (20-80 nm) and oxide thicknesses (150-500 nm) by controlling the anodizing voltage and time and subsequent pore-widening process conditions. The porous nanostructures were then coated with a thin (only a couple of nanometers thick) Teflon film to make the surface hydrophobic and trap air in the pores. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate was evaluated by a potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution (saltwater). Results showed that the hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate compared to a hydrophilic oxide layer of the same nanostructures, to bare (nonanodized) aluminum with only a natural oxide layer on top, and to the latter coated with a thin Teflon film. The hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer with the largest pore diameter and the thickest oxide layer (i.e., the maximized air fraction) resulted in the best corrosion resistance with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of up to 99% for up to 7 days. The results demonstrate that the air impregnating the hydrophobic nanopores can effectively inhibit the penetration of corrosive media into the pores, leading to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance.

  19. Oxidation of nano-sized aluminum powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsov, A.B.; Lerner, M.; Rodkevich, N.; Nie, H.; Abraham, A.; Schoenitz, M.; Dreizin, E.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Weight gain measured in TG oxidation experiments was split between particles of different sizes. • Reaction kinetics obtained by isoconversion explicitly accounting for the effect of size distribution. • Activation energy is obtained as a function of oxide thickness for growth of amorphous alumina. • Oxidation mechanism for nanopowders remains the same as for coarser aluminum powders. - Abstract: Oxidation of aluminum nanopowders obtained by electro-exploded wires is studied. Particle size distributions are obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Thermo-gravimetric (TG) experiments are complemented by TEM and XRD studies of partially oxidized particles. Qualitatively, oxidation follows the mechanism developed for coarser aluminum powder and resulting in formation of hollow oxide shells. Sintering of particles is also observed. The TG results are processed to account explicitly for the particle size distribution and spherical shapes, so that oxidation of particles of different sizes is characterized. The apparent activation energy is obtained as a function of the reaction progress using model-free isoconversion processing of experimental data. A complete phenomenological oxidation model is then proposed assuming a spherically symmetric geometry. The oxidation kinetics of aluminum powder is shown to be unaffected by particle sizes reduced down to tens of nm. The apparent activation energy describing growth of amorphous alumina is increasing at the very early stages of oxidation. The higher activation energy is likely associated with an increasing homogeneity in the growing amorphous oxide layer, initially containing multiple defects and imperfections. The trends describing changes in both activation energy and pre-exponent of the growing amorphous oxide are useful for predicting ignition delays of aluminum particles. The kinetic trends describing activation energies and pre-exponents in a broader range of the oxide

  20. The Role of Friction Stir Processing (FSP Parameters on TiC Reinforced Surface Al7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe García-Vázquez

    Full Text Available Abstract: Aluminum alloys are very promising for structural applications in aerospace, military and transportation industries due to their light weight, high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent resistance to corrosion. In comparison to unreinforced aluminum alloys, aluminum/aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic phases exhibit higher strength and hardness, improved tribological characteristics. A novel surface modifying technique, friction stir processing (FSP, has been developed for fabrication of surface composite with an improved performance. The effect of FSP parameters such as number of passes, direction of each pass, sealed or unsealed groove on microstructure was investigated. In this work, nano-particles of TiC (2% in weight were added to aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 to produce a functional surface. Fixed parameters for this AA7075 alloy were used; rotation speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 300 mm/min and pin penetration of 2.8 mm. Optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of TiC particles and micro-hardness of the surface composites. Finally, in order to evaluate rate wear the pin on disk test was carried out.

  1. Thermally sprayed coatings: Aluminum on lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, S.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Zatorski, R.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the feasibility of thermally spraying aluminum on a lead substrate was initiated in support of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) Project for the US Department of Energy. The program consisted of two distinct parts: (1) the characterization of the thermally sprayed coatings, including microhardness testing, effects of heating, and microstructure and porosity determinations, and (2) effects of mercury doping and heat treatments on the thermally sprayed composite. The project determined that aluminum could successfully be thermally sprayed onto the lead. The coatings had a dense microstructure, with a Vicker's Pyramid Hardness (VPH) of about 60, and a maximum porosity (found in strips on the samples) of 12%

  2. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Jesse Norris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-16

    The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.

  3. Anodization process produces opaque, reflective coatings on aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Opaque, reflective coatings are produced on aluminum articles by an anodizing process wherein the anodizing bath contains an aqueous dispersion of finely divided insoluble inorganic compounds. These particles appear as uniformly distributed occlusions in the anodic deposit on the aluminum.

  4. Evaluation of aluminum migration into foodstuffs from aluminium cookware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Radi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the existence of aluminum in human diet as a food contaminant has attracted the concerns of many researchers. It seems that the cooking pans are common sources of aluminum exposure through foodstuffs in Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the migration of aluminum from cooking containers into foodstuffs. For this purpose, solutions with different concentrations of citric acid, sodium chloride, fat, protein and sugar were prepared and migration of aluminum into these solutions was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Results showed that salt and citric acid concentrations could enhance aluminum migration; whereas, acid concentration was more effective than salt due to its corrosive effect. The intensity of heat processing and the duration of heat treatment had direct relation with aluminum migration. The aluminum content of cooked foods in aluminum cooking pans was also significantly more than control samples.

  5. Low Mass, Aluminum NOFBX Combustion Chamber Development, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our team proposes to define a diffusion bonding process for aluminum as an enabling step to ultimately develop an innovative, lightweight, long life, aluminum...

  6. Effect of the aluminum flow pattern on the bonding of aluminum to oxidized Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Lambert, J.P.

    1965-04-01

    The bonds produced when hot aluminum is allowed to flow smoothly from an extrusion die to the oxidized surface of a heated tube of Zircaloy-2 are consistently inferior to those produced with back-extruded flow. The difference is believed to be due to the reduction in, or elimination of, the oxide layer on the aluminum that comes in contact with the surface of the Zircaloy-2. This method of bonding aluminum to Zircaloy-2 is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 1965. (author)

  7. Hacking the Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Michael; Spence, Jason R

    2017-01-05

    Recently in Nature, Gjorevski et al. (2016) describe a fully defined synthetic hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix to support in vitro growth of intestinal stem cells and organoids. The hydrogel allows exquisite control over the chemical and physical in vitro niche and enables identification of regulatory properties of the matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Matrix Organization Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattiker, Urs E.; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively).......This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively)....

  9. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, H.; Falsetta, M.L.; Klein, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Many infectious diseases in humans are caused or exacerbated by biofilms. Dental caries is a prime example of a biofilm-dependent disease, resulting from interactions of microorganisms, host factors, and diet (sugars), which modulate the dynamic formation of biofilms on tooth surfaces. All biofilms have a microbial-derived extracellular matrix as an essential constituent. The exopolysaccharides formed through interactions between sucrose- (and starch-) and Streptococcus mutans-derived exoenzymes present in the pellicle and on microbial surfaces (including non-mutans) provide binding sites for cariogenic and other organisms. The polymers formed in situ enmesh the microorganisms while forming a matrix facilitating the assembly of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures that encompass a series of microenvironments and are firmly attached to teeth. The metabolic activity of microbes embedded in this exopolysaccharide-rich and diffusion-limiting matrix leads to acidification of the milieu and, eventually, acid-dissolution of enamel. Here, we discuss recent advances concerning spatio-temporal development of the exopolysaccharide matrix and its essential role in the pathogenesis of dental caries. We focus on how the matrix serves as a 3D scaffold for biofilm assembly while creating spatial heterogeneities and low-pH microenvironments/niches. Further understanding on how the matrix modulates microbial activity and virulence expression could lead to new approaches to control cariogenic biofilms. PMID:24045647

  10. TiB2/Al2O3 ceramic particle reinforced aluminum fabricated by spray deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Yang Chengxiao; Guan Leding; Yan Biao

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum matrix ceramic particle reinforced composites (AMCs) is a kind of composite with great importance. Aluminum matrix composite reinforced with TiB 2 /Al 2 O 3 ceramic particles was successfully in situ synthesized in Al-TiO 2 -B 2 O 3 system in this paper, using spray deposition with hot-press treatment technique. Five groups of composites with different reinforcement volume contents were prepared and the comparisons of porosity, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), elongation and Brinell hardness (BH) between the composites with and without hot-press treating were carried out. The composite with 21.0% reinforcement volume content was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDS). The results revealed the formation and uniform distribution of fine reinforcements in the matrix after hot-press treating, while a new intermetallic phase Al 3 Ti was found besides TiB 2 /Al 2 O 3 ceramic phase

  11. Microstructural investigation of aluminum-graphene nano platelets composites prepared by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreearravind, M.; Peddavarapu, Sreehari; Raghuraman, S.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, Graphene has attracted a large variety of scientific communities due to its inimitable properties. Typically, Graphene Nanoplatelets (GNPs) are ideal reinforcements for the production of nanocomposites due to its excellent mechanical properties for strength enhancement. This paper reports the Aluminum-Graphene Nanoplatelets (Al/GNPs) composites synthesized through powder metallurgy method. The microstructural investigation was carried out to study the GNPs integration on the Al matrix. For this study, the samples Al-2wt% GNPs, Al-3wt% GNPs and Al- 4wt% GNPs are high-energy ball milled at 200rpm and sintered at 500°C,550°C, and 600°C. Microstructural characterization is carried out with optical microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy. Rockwell hardness test is conducted to evaluate the hardness behavior in Al/GNPs. Microstructural analysis revealed the homogeneous dispersion of GNPs in the Al matrix in all the samples. It is observed that the existence of the graphene nanoparticles and the rise of their concentrations in the aluminum matrix (2 wt.% to 4 wt.%) as reinforcement in addition to rising the sintering temperature (450°C to 600°C) greatly improve the mechanical properties of Al/GNPs composites.

  12. Transition of hydrated oxide layer for aluminum electrolytic capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Choong-Soo; Jeong, Yongsoo; Ahn, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Gu; Lee, Jun-Hee; Jang, Kyung-Wook; Oh, Han-Jun

    2007-01-01

    A hydrous oxide film for the application as dielectric film is synthesized by immersion of pure aluminum in hot water. From a Rutherford backscattering analysis, the ratio of aluminum to oxygen atoms was found to be 3:2 in the anodized aluminum oxide film, and 2:1 in the hydrous oxide layer. Anodization of the hydrous oxide layer was more effective for the transition of amorphous anodic oxides to the crystalline aluminum oxides

  13. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Morgan, Kenneth; Slack, Glen A; Rao, Shailaja P.; Gibb, Shawn Robert

    2017-09-26

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density.ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  14. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2

  15. Use of low-cost aluminum in electric energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuk, Andrey Z.; Sheindlin, Alexander E.; Kleymenov, Boris V.; Shkolnikov, Eugene I.; Lopatin, Marat Yu.

    Suppression of the parasitic corrosion while maintaining the electrochemical activity of the anode metal is one of the serious problems that affects the energy efficiency of aluminum-air batteries. The need to use high-purity aluminum or special aluminum-based alloys results in a significant increase in the cost of the anode, and thus an increase in the total cost of energy generated by the aluminum-air battery, which narrows the range of possible applications for this type of power source. This study considers the process of parasitic corrosion as a method for hydrogen production. Hydrogen produced in an aluminum-air battery by this way may be further employed in a hydrogen-air fuel cell (Hy-air FC) or in a heat engine, or it may be burnt to generate heat. Therefore, anode materials may be provided by commercially pure aluminum, commercially produced aluminum alloys, and secondary aluminum. These materials are much cheaper and more readily available than special anode alloys of aluminum and high-purity aluminum. The aim of present study is to obtain experimental data for comparison of energy and cost parameters of some commercially produced aluminum alloys, of high-purity aluminum, and of a special Al-ln anode alloy in the context of using these materials as anodes for an Al-air battery and for combined production of electrical power and hydrogen.

  16. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  17. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  18. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  19. Passivation of aluminum with alkyl phosphonic acids for biochip applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attavar, Sachin; Diwekar, Mohit; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Mark A.; Blair, Steve

    2010-09-01

    Self-assembly of decylphosphonic acid (DPA) and octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) was studied on aluminum films using XPS, ToF-SIMS and surface wettability. Modified aluminum films were tested for passivation against silanization and subsequent oligonucleotide attachment. Passivation ratios of at least 450:1 compared to unprotected aluminum were obtained, as quantified by attachment of radio-labeled oligos.

  20. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white, odorless...