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Sample records for aluminum tungstate matrix

  1. Photo- and electroluminescence properties of lanthanide tungstate-doped porous anodic aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staninski, Krzysztof; Piskuła, Zbigniew; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    A new cathode material for the potential use in light-emitting devices, based on porous anodic alumina (PAA), aluminum and ITO layers has been synthesized. Porous alumina samples with ordered pore arrays were prepared electrochemically from high purity Al sheet in H2SO4 and H3PO4. To be able to apply the matrix obtained in the electroluminescence cell, the thickness of the barrier layer of aluminum oxide was decreased by slow reduction of the anodization voltage to zero. The luminescence and electroluminescence (EL) properties of the Al2O3 matrix admixtured with Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions as well as europium and terbium tungstates, were determined. The particles of inorganic luminophore were synthesized on the walls of the matrix cylindrical nanopores in the two-step process of immersion in solutions of TbCl3 or EuCl3 and Na2WO4. The effect of the nanopores diameter and the thickness of the porous Al2O3 layer on the intensity and relative yield of electroluminescence was analyzed, the best results were obtained for 80-90 μm PAA layers with 140 nm nanopores.

  2. Study of brazeability of aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urena, A.; Salazar, J.M.G. de; Escalera, M.D.; Fernandez, M.I. [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica

    1997-02-01

    The brazeability of several aluminum matrix composites has been evaluated in the present paper. Tested materials were two different 6061 aluminum alloys, reinforced with 10 and 20% alumina particles, respectively, and a 7005 aluminum alloy containing 10% alumina also in the form of discrete particles. A drop formation test was selected to evaluate the brazeability of the studied composites, using a commercial filler metal (BAlSi4) generally used for brazing of aluminum alloys. Wettability of molten braze on the metal matrix composites (MMCs) was determined by measurement of the solidified contact angle i n sessile drop tests and determination of the spread area. The wettability and spreading increase with the brazing temperature in the studied range (550--625 C, 1,022--1,157 F), and decrease when the reinforcement proportion is increased. Both properties are also influenced by the type of the composite aluminum matrix being enhanced in the Al-Zn-Mg reinforced alloy. This study was completed with the microstructural characterization of the drop test specimens and of real brazed joints made on T-shaped specimens.

  3. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the latest efforts to develop aluminum nanocomposites with enhanced damping and mechanical properties and good workability. The nanocomposites exhibited high strength, improved damping behavior and good ductility, making them suitable for use as wires. Since the production of metal matrix nanocomposites by conventional melting processes is considered extremely problematic (because of the poor wettability of the nanoparticles), different powder metallurgy routes were investigated, including high-energy ball milling and unconventional compaction methods. Special attention was paid to the structural characterization at the micro- and nanoscale, as uniform nanoparticle dispersion in metal matrix is of prime importance. The aluminum nanocomposites displayed an ultrafine microstructure reinforced with alumina nanoparticles produced in situ or added ex situ. The physical, mechanical and functional characteristics of the materials produced were evaluated using different mechanical tests and micros...

  4. Spin Forming of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An exploratory effort between NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and SpinCraft, Inc., to experimentally spin form cylinders and concentric parts from small and thin sheets of aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC), successfully yielded good microstructure data and forming parameters. MSFC and SpinCraft will collaborate on the recent technical findings and develop strategy to implement this technology for NASA's advanced propulsion and airframe applications such as pressure bulkheads, combustion liner assemblies, propellant tank domes, and nose cone assemblies.

  5. Synthesis of gels with basis of titanium tungstates as matrixes of radioactive generators; Sintesis de geles a base de titanio tungstenatos como matrices de generadores radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galico C, L

    2005-07-01

    The heteropolyanions, compounds formed by the union of molybdates or tungstates polyanions with atoms of metals like zirconium, titanium, cerium, thorium, tin, etc., have been used as generator matrixes of {sup 99m} Tc or {sup 188} Re. Particularly they have been studied and produced successfully in our laboratory, generators of {sup 99} Mo/ {sup 99}m Tc at basis of gels zirconium molybdates and titanium molybdates. Considering that the molybdenum and tungsten, as well as the technetium and the rhenium, its belong to the same groups of transition metals, it is feasible that gels can be synthesized at basis of titanium tungstates, continuing a methodology similar to that of the gels titanium molybdates or zirconium molybdates, to produce generators {sup 188} W/ {sup 188} Re. The {sup 188} Re possess nuclear characteristics that make it attractive for therapeutic applications, since, it emits {beta}{sup -} particles of a great energy (2.12 MeV); joined to the possibility of being able to unite to different ligands (bifunctional agents) and biomolecules (antibodies or fragments of proteins), as it makes the {sup 99m} Tc, useful in radioimmunotherapy. Commercially the {sup 188} Re generators use a chromatographic column loaded with alumina where the {sup 188} Re, it is adsorbed and eluted the {sup 188} ReO{sub 4}{sup -} by means of a saline solution The alumina adsorbs around 0.2% of the {sup 188} Re, situation that forces to use {sup 188} Re of a high specific activity. The use of the gels technology, allows to work with medium or low specific activities of {sup 188} Re, opening the possibility of their production in countries whose nuclear capacity is medium or low. In particular, the synthesized gels with basis of titanium offer the possibility of being synthesized with non active material, for later on to be irradiated and directly produce the generator, since, the titanium {sup 51} Ti, unique radioisotope produced by the titanium, has a half life of 5.79 min. This

  6. Effect of alumina particle additions on the aging kinetics of 2014-aluminum matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Christopher Paul

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release: Distribution is unlimited Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was conducted on 2014 aluminum, 2014 aluminum reinforced with 10 and 15 percent by volume of alumina particles, 2024 aluminum, and a A1/4%Cu alloy. Electrical resistivity and matrix micro-hardness measurements were conducted on the 2014 aluminum alloy and the metal matrix composites (MMC) during isothermal aging. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and DSC were used to identify the metastable ...

  7. Numerical analysis on thermal drilling of aluminum metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Maheshwaran, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    The work-material deformation is very large and both the tool and workpiece temperatures are high in thermal drilling. Modeling is a necessary tool to understand the material flow, temperatures, stress, and strains, which are difficult to measure experimentally during thermal drilling. The numerical analysis of thermal drilling process of aluminum metal matrix composite has been done in the present work. In this analysis the heat flux of different stages is calculated. The calculated heat flux is applied on the surface of work piece and thermal distribution is predicted in different stages during the thermal drilling process.

  8. Development of a Precipitation-Strengthened Matrix for Non-quenchable Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nhon Q.; Sorensen, Jim; Klier, Eric M.; Sanaty-Zadeh, Amirreza; Bayansan, Davaadorj; Seidman, David N.; Dunand, David C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in metal matrix composite-encapsulated ceramic armor show promise in lightweight armor technology. The system contains ceramic tiles, such as alumina, sandwiched between unreinforced aluminum or aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC), which has a better toughness compared to the ceramic tiles. The sandwich structures should not be quenched during the fabrication, as the large mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the ceramic tiles and the unreinforced aluminum or Al-MMC creates internal stresses high enough to fracture the ceramic tiles. However, slow cooling of most commercial alloys creates large precipitates making solute unavailable for the formation of fine precipitates during aging. Here, we develop a non-quenched, high-strength metal matrix utilizing dilute Al-Sc-Zr alloys. We demonstrate that the dilute Al-0.09 Sc-0.045 Zr at.% alloy and the same alloy containing 0-4 vol.% alumina short fibers do not result in precipitation upon slow cooling from a high temperature, and can thereafter be aged to increase their strength. They exhibit a moderate strength, but improved ductility and toughness as compared to common armor aluminum alloys, such as AA5083-H131, making them attractive as armor materials and hybrid armor systems.

  9. Corrosion control of cement-matrix and aluminum-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiangyuan

    Corrosion control of composite materials, particularly aluminum-matrix and cement-matrix composites, was addressed by surface treatment, composite formulation and cathodic protection. Surface treatment methods studied include anodization in the case of aluminum-matrix composites and oxidation treatment (using water) in the case of steel rebar for reinforcing concrete. The effects of reinforcement species (aluminum nitride (AIN) versus silicon carbide (SiC) particles) in the aluminum-matrix composites and of admixtures (carbon fibers, silica fume, latex and methylcellulose) in concrete on the corrosion resistance of composites were addressed. Moreover, the effect of admixtures in concrete and of admixtures in mortar overlay (as anode on concrete) on the efficiency of cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete was studied. For SiC particle filled aluminum, anodization was performed successfully in an acid electrolyte, as for most aluminum alloys. However, for AlN particle filled aluminum, anodization needs to be performed in an alkaline (0.7 N NaOH) electrolyte instead. The concentration of NaOH in the electrolyte was critical. It was found that both silica fume and latex improved the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete in both Ca(OH)sb2 and NaCl solutions, mainly because these admixtures decreased the water absorptivity. Silica fume was more effective than latex. Methylcellulose improved the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete a little in Ca(OH)sb2 solution. Carbon fibers decreased the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete, but this effect could be made up for by either silica fume or latex, such that silica fume was more effective than latex. Surface treatment in the form of water immersion for two days was found to improve the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete. This treatment resulted in a thin uniform layer of black iron oxide (containing Fesp{2+}) on the entire rebar surface except on the cross-sectional surface. Prior to the

  10. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal matrix composites scrap by salt flux addition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Ravi; R M Pillai; B C Pai; M Chakraborty

    2007-08-01

    Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcements from pure Al–SiCp composite scrap by salt flux addition has been theoretically predicted using interface free energies. Experiments performed confirm the theoretical prediction. Complete separation of matrix aluminum and reinforcement from metal matrix composites (MMCs) scrap has been achieved by addition of 2.05 wt% of equimolar mixture of NaCl–KCl salt flux with a metal and particle yield of 84 and 50%, respectively. By adding 5 wt% of NaF to equimolar mixture of NaCl–KCl, metal and particle yield improved to 91 and 73%, respectively. Reusability of both the matrix aluminum and the SiC separated from Al–SiCp scraps has been analysed using XRD, SEM and DTA techniques. The matrix alloy separated from Al–SiCp scraps can be used possibly as a low Si content Al–Si alloy. However, the interfacial reaction that occurred during the fabrication of the composites had degraded the SiC particles.

  11. The Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on Mechanical Properties of a Cast 6061 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Conference Proceedings, 1990 19. Lewandowski, J. J. et al., "Effects of Casting Conditions and Deformation Processing on A356 Aluminum and A356 -20 Vol...CAST 6061 ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE by Werner Fletcher Hoyt December 1993 Thesis Advisor: Terry R. McNelley Approved for public release...Security Classification) THE EFFECT OF THERMOMECHANICAL PROCESSING ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A CAST 6061 ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE 12. PERSONAL

  12. Aluminum-matrix composite materials with shungite rock fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, I. E.; Kovalevski, V. V.; Chernyshova, T. A.; Bolotova, L. K.

    2010-11-01

    A method is proposed for the introduction of shungite rocks into aluminum melts by mechanical mixing with carriers, namely, aluminum granules and reactive titanium powders taking part in exothermic in situ reactions. The structures of composite materials with shungite rock additions are studied, and a stabilizing effect of these additions on dry sliding friction is revealed.

  13. CMS lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    These crystals are made from lead tungstate, a crystal that is as clear as glass yet with nearly four times the density. They have been produced in Russia to be used as scintillators in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the CMS experiment, part of the LHC project at CERN. When an electron, positron or photon passes through the calorimeter it will cause a cascade of particles that will then be absorbed by these scintillating crystals, allowing the particle's energy to be measured.

  14. Nano and hybrid aluminum based metal matrix composites: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muley Aniruddha V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs are potential light weight engineering materials with excellent properties. AMCs find application in many areas including automobile, mining, aerospace and defence, etc. Due to technological advancements, it is possible to use nano sized reinforcement in Al matrix. Nano sized reinforcements enhance the properties of Al matrix compared to micro sized reinforcements. Hybrid reinforcement imbibe superior properties to aluminium matrix composites as compared with Al composites having single reinforcement. This paper is focused on overview of development in the field of Al based metal matrix with nano and hybrid aluminium based composites.

  15. Effect of alumina particle additions of the aging kinetics of 6061 aluminum matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Susan Marie.

    1990-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was conducted using a monolithic 6061 aluminum material and two 6061 aluminum matrix composite materials. The composite materials were reinforced with 10 volume percent and 15 volume percent alumina particles. Electrical resistivity and hardness measurements during isothermal aging treatments were also conducted. The effects of prior aging and alumina particle additions on the growth kinetics and...

  16. Wear-resistance of Aluminum Matrix Microcomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kandeva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is developed for the study of wear of aluminum alloys AlSi7 obtained by casting, reinforced by TiC microparticles, before and after heat treatment. Tribological study is realized under conditions of friction on counterbody with fixed abrasive. Experimental results were obtained for mass wear, wear rate, wear intensity and wear-resistance of the alloys with different wt% of microparticles.

  17. High-Temperature Fatigue of a Hybrid Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. T.; Sanders, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    An aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) brake drum was tested in fatigue at room temperature and extreme service temperatures. At room temperature, the hybrid composite did not fail and exceeded estimated vehicle service times. At higher temperatures (62 and 73 pct of the matrix eutectic), fatigue of a hybrid particle/fiber MMC exhibited failure consistent with matrix overloading. Overaging of the A356 matrix coupled with progressive fracture of the SiC particles combined to create the matrix overload condition. No evidence of macro-fatigue crack initiation or growth was observed, and the matrix-particle interface appeared strong with no debonding, visible matrix phases, or porosity. An effective medium model was constructed to test the hypothesis that matrix overloading was the probable failure mode. The measured particle fracture rate was fit using realistic values of the SiC Weibull strength and modulus, which in turn predicted cycles to failure within the range observed in fatigue testing.

  18. In Situ Synthesis Aluminum Borate Whiskers Reinforced TiB2 Matrix Composites for Application in Aluminum Reduction Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Yang, Jianhong

    2013-11-01

    The TiB2 matrix ceramics reinforced by aluminum borate whiskers (Al18B4O33 w) had been prepared by the pressureless sintering method. The mechanical properties and densification behavior of the TiB2 matrix ceramics were investigated. The results showed that Al18B4O33 w was in situ synthesized by the reaction of boehmite (AlOOH) and TiB2 powders during the sintering process. Increasing the sintering temperature had benefited for densification of the TiB2 matrix ceramics. Al18B4O33 w could increase the flexural strength and Vicker's hardness. It is obtained that the maximum value Vicker's hardness with 1.81 GPa and flexural strength with 82 MPa for samples sintered at 1600°C.

  19. Fabrication of aluminum matrix composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1.0 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced 2024A1 matrix composite was fabricated by cold isostatic press and subsequent hot extrusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the composite were measured by a tensile test. Meanwhile, the fracture surfaces were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that CNTs are dispersed homogeneously in the composite and that the interfaces of the Al matrix and the CNT bond well. Although the tensile strength and the Young's modulus of the composite are enhanced markedly, the elongation does not decrease when compared with the matrix material fabricated under the same process. The reasons for the increments may be the extraordinary mechanical properties of CNTs, and the bridging and pulling-out role of CNTs in the Al matrix composite.

  20. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Fumio; Masuda, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  1. Evaluation of Johnson-Cook model constants for aluminum based particulate metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfi, H.; Brar, N. S.

    1996-05-01

    High strain rate and high temperature response of three types of aluminum based particulate metal matrix ceramic composites is investigated by performing split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The composites are: NGP-2014 (15% SiC), NGT-6061 (15% SiC), and NGU-6061 (15% Al2O3), in which all the reinforcement materials are percentage by volume. Johnson-Cook constitutive model constants are evaluated from the high strain rate/high temperature data and implemented in a two dimensional finite element computer code (EPIC-2D) to simulate the penetration of an ogive nose tungsten projectile (23 grams) at a velocity 1.17 km/sec into the base 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and the composite NGU-6061. The simulated penetrations in the composite and in 6061-T6 aluminum agree with in 2%, in both materials, with the measured values.

  2. Tribological performance of self-lubricating aluminum matrix nanocomposites: Role of graphene nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Tabandeh-Khorshid

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, aluminum matrix nanocomposites reinforced by graphene nanoplatelets were synthesized by powder metallurgy method. The microstructure of the Al-Graphene nanoplatelets sample was investigated by TEM. The hardness measurements of these samples were investigated using a Rockwell hardness tester. To investigate the tribological behavior of aluminum matrix composites reinforced by graphene nanoplatelets and pure aluminum, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted on the prepared samples. In the experiments, the influence of reinforcement, volume fraction, normal load, and sliding velocity on the tribological performance was investigated. Results showed that the wear rate of Al-1wt.% GNP is increased with increasing normal loads. However, the coefficient of friction (COF of the Al-1wt.% GNP decreased with increasing normal loads. Formation of graphene film on the worn surface of Al-1wt.% GNP sample and morphology of the worn surfaces of aluminum and composite samples were analyzed by Optical Microscope (OM and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. It was found that the graphene nanoplatelets reinforced nano-composites showed superior tribological properties and demonstrated the ability of the self-lubricating nature of the composite during tribological conditions.

  3. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  4. Dry sliding wear studies of aluminum matrix hybrid composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Monikandan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, hybrid composites are fabricated with self-lubricating characteristics to make them as resource-efficient materials. AA6061-10 wt. % B4C–MoS2 hybrid composites reinforced with 2.5, 5 and 7.5 wt. % concentration of MoS2 particles are produced using stir casting technique, and mechanical and tribological properties are evaluated. Microstructural characterization of the hybrid composites revealed the uniform distribution of reinforcement (B4C and MoS2 particles in the matrix material. Hardness and fracture toughness of the hybrid composites are decreased monotonously with an increase in the addition of MoS2 particles. Dry sliding tribological studies conducted using a pin-on-disk tribotester under atmospheric conditions revealed the formation of MoS2-lubricated tribolayer on the worn pin surface which significantly influenced the tribological properties. The addition of MoS2 particles decreased the friction coefficient and wear rate of the hybrid composites. Delamination and abrasion are observed to be the controlling wear mechanisms and material in the form of platelet-shaped debris, and flow-type chip debris is formed, and a long and shallow crater on the worn pin surface of the hybrid composite is also observed.

  5. Aluminum and bone: Review of new clinical circumstances associated with Al(3+) deposition in the calcified matrix of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappard, D; Bizot, P; Mabilleau, G; Hubert, L

    2016-06-01

    Several decades ago, aluminum encephalopathy associated with osteomalacia has been recognized as the major complication of chronic renal failure in dialyzed patients. Removal of aluminum from the dialysate has led to a disappearance of the disease. However, aluminum deposit occurs in the hydroxyapatite of the bone matrix in some clinical circumstances that are presented in this review. We have encountered aluminum in bone in patients with an increased intestinal permeability (coeliac disease), or in the case of prolonged administration of aluminum anti-acid drugs. A colocalisation of aluminum with iron was also noted in cases of hemochromatosis and sickle cell anemia. Aluminium was also identified in a series of patients with exostosis, a frequent benign bone tumor. Corrosion of prosthetic implants composed of grade V titanium (TA6V is an alloy containing 6% aluminum and 4% vanadium) was also observed in a series of hip or knee revisions. Aluminum can be identified in undecalcified bone matrix stained by solochrome azurine, a highly specific stain allowing the detection of 0.03 atomic %. Colocalization of aluminum and iron does not seem to be the fruit of chance but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Histochemistry is superior to spectroscopic analyses (EDS and WDS in scanning electron microscopy).

  6. Aluminum Matrix Composites Strengthened with CuZrAgAl Amorphous Atomized Powder Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jan; Rogal, Łukasz; Wajda, Wojciech; Kukuła-Kurzyniec, Agata; Coddet, Christian; Dembinski, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    The Al-matrix composites were prepared by hot pressing in vacuum of an aluminum powder with 20 and 40 wt.% addition of the amorphous Cu43Zr43Ag7Al7 alloy (numbers indicate at.%) obtained using gas atomization method. The amorphous structure of the powder was confirmed using x-ray diffraction, DSC, and TEM. The average size of mostly spherical particles was 100 μm, so the powder was sieved to obtain maximum size of 60 μm. The composites were prepared using uniaxial cold pressing in vacuum and at a temperature of 400 °C. The composites of hardness from 43 to 53 HV were obtained for both additions of the amorphous phase. They reached compression strength of 150 MPa for 20% of amorphous phase and 250 MPa for the higher content. The modest hardening effect was caused by crack initiation at Al/amorphous interfaces. The amorphous phase was only partially crystallized in the hot-pressed composites, what did not cause hardness decrease. The application of nanocrystalline aluminum powders obtained by high-energy ball milling for the matrix of composites allowed obtaining nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites of size near 150 nm, strengthened with the amorphous powders, whose compression strength was near 550 MPa for the composite containing 40% of the amorphous phase and slightly lower for the composite containing 20% of the phase. They showed much higher ductility of 23% in comparison with 7% for the composite containing 40% amorphous phase. The distribution of the strengthening phase in the nanocrystalline matrix was not homogeneous; the amorphous particles formed bands, where majority of cracks nucleated during compression test.

  7. Enhancement of the mechanical properties of an aluminum metal matrix nanocomposite by the hybridization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalidindi Sita Rama Raju

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the matrix plays a prominent role in improving the composite strength. In the present investigation, two types of launching vehicles, such as aluminum powder (primary and CNTs (secondary, are considered to uniformly carry and launch ultra-fine nanoparticles (13 nm into molten metal. The use of a secondary launching vehicle is identified to promote strengthening compared to a regular primary vehicle, as indicated by the good distribution observed from electron micrographs. CNTs are responsible for hybridizing the composite and also assist strengthening by anchoring to the matrix through the destroyed outer-walls and their axial orientation with the matrix. These results help us in attaining a strength of 197 MPa and a hardness of 93 BHN, with a minimal loss in ductility for the H-3 sample.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  9. Graphene-reinforced aluminum matrix composites prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-ming Tian; Song-mei Li; Bo Wang; Xin Chen; Jian-hua Liu; Mei Yu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-reinforced 7055 aluminum alloy composites with different contents of graphene were prepared by spark plasma sinter-ing (SPS). The structure and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Testing results show that the hardness, compressive strength, and yield strength of the composites are improved with the addition of 1wt% graphene. A clean, strong interface is formed between the metal matrix and graphene via metallurgical bonding on atomic scale. Harmful aluminum carbide (Al4C3) is not formed during SPS processing. Further addition of graphene (above 1wt%) results in the deterioration in mechanical properties of the composites. The agglomeration of graphene plates is exacerbated with increasing graphene content, which is the main reason for this deterioration.

  10. Processing and mechanical properties of 2024 aluminum matrix composites containing Tungsten and Tantalum prepared by PM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN Youyun; YANG Zhimin; YANG Jian; MAO Changhui

    2006-01-01

    The 2024 Al composites containing W, Ta were fabricated by powder metallurgy for their potential use as shielding material.W, Ta powders and gas-atomized 2024 Al aluminum powders were mixed by a ball mixer.The mixtures were consolidated by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) and then hot-extruded into full-density bars.The extruded bars were heat treated in T6 conditions.The microstructure and its relationship with the mechanical properties were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The results show that the particles of nonuniform size and irregular shape randomly disperse in the 2024 aluminum alloy matrix.The tensile tests show that an increase of tensile strength and decrease of elongation to failure of the heat treated composites compared with the extruded composites.

  11. Mechanism of laser welding of SiC reinforced LD2 aluminum metal matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the mechanism of SiCP/LD2 aluminum matrix composites during laser welding was investigated. The emphasis was laid on the study of the distribution of aluminum carbides in whole welds. The joint can be divided into three regions both in depth and in width. The depth is divided into severe reaction region, partial reaction region, and no reaction region. In these regions, the extent of interfacial reaction varies gradually, the shape of reactants varies from long to fine. In width it can also be divided into severe reaction region, partial reaction region, and initial reaction region from the center of the weld to about the welding junction. In the initial reaction region, nucleation and growth of the reaction products on the surface of SiC particles can be observed by using TEM. The investigation showed that the quantity and size of SiC are relative to the temperature gradient in the molten pool.

  12. Solid-State Laser Cooling of Ytterbium-Doped Tungstate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KGW but with a slightly higher cooling figure-of-merit,13 and zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum- sodium fluoride glass ( ZBLAN ). This figure shows...namely the heavy metal fluoride glass ZBLAN and yttrium aluminum garnet. Favorable properties of the ytterbium-tungstates include exceptionally high...had shown net cooling was an ytterbium-doped heavy metal fluoride glass . Reasons for the lack of success with other materials include energy transfer

  13. Separation of the Martensite in TiNi Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjun ZHENG; Lishan CUI; Yan LI; Dazhi YANG

    2004-01-01

    The reverse martensitic transformation of TiNi shape memory alloy fibers embedded in a pure aluminum matrix was studied in this paper. Results showed that the phase composition of the TiNi alloy fibers prior to prestraining at the room temperature had a significant influence on the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results of the composites. By a comparison to the high temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, it was confirmed that the martensite was divided into two groups: the selfaccommodating martensite (SAM) and the preferentially oriented martensite (POM). The evolving process of the separation of martensite was discussed.

  14. An Investigation of Laser Assisted Machining of Al_2O_3 Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Al 2O 3 particles reinforced aluminum matrix composite (Al 2O 3p/Al) are more and more widely used for their excellent physical and chemical properties. However, their poor machinability leads to severe tool wear and bad machined surface. In this paper laser assisted machining is adopted in machining Al 2O 3p/Al composite and good result was obtained. The result of experiment shows in machining Al 2O 3p/Al composites the cutting force is reduced in 30%~50%, the tool wear is reduced in 20%~30% an...

  15. Mechanical properties study of particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites by micro-indentation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhanwei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By using instrumental micro-indentation technique, the microhardness and Young’s modulus of SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites were investigated with micro-compression-tester (MCT. The micro-indentation experiments were performed with different maximum loads, and with three loading speeds of 2.231, 4.462 and 19.368 mN/s respectively. During the investigation, matrix, particle and interface were tested by micro-indentation experiments. The results exhibit that the variations of Young’s modulus and microhardness at particle, matrix and interface were highly dependent on the loading conditions (maximum load and loading speed and the locations of indentation. Micro-indentation hardness experiments of matrix show the indentation size effects, i.e. the indentation hardness decreased with the indentation depth increasing. During the analysis, the effect of loading conditions on Young’s modulus and microhardness were explained. Besides, the elastic–plastic properties of matrix were analyzed. The validity of calculated results was identified by finite element simulation. And the simulation results had been preliminarily analyzed from statistical aspect.

  16. Jet Electrochemical Machining of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites with Different Neutral Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Martin, A.; Schubert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional mechanical machining of particle reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) is challenging because the hard ceramic particles in the soft aluminum matrix lead to an increased tool wear. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal impact during conventional machining affects the microstructure of the AMCs. Electrochemical machining (ECM) is an alternative method to machine AMCs. Based on anodic dissolution, ECM has a slight influence on the work piece material structure and is independent of material strength and hardness. So the microstructure of the work piece remains unaffected. One method of ECM is electrochemical machining with continuous electrolytic free jet (Jet-ECM). Hereby the electrochemical removal is localized by the geometry of the electrolyte jet. By moving the electrolyte jet micro-structures and microgeometries can be generated quickly and flexibly in metallic parts [1]. Another advantage of Jet-ECM is the low consumption of electrolyte which allows an easy and inexpensive change of electrolyte for investigations with different types of electrolyte. In this study AMCs reinforced with different amounts of SiC-particles are machined with two pH-neutral electrolytes using Jet-ECM. The results provide information about the suitability of the selected electrolytes for the machining of AMCs. In addition, the influence of the particle content on the electrochemical removal result will be evaluated.

  17. Development of quartz particulate reinforced AA6063 aluminum matrix composites via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joyson Abraham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP has been accepted as a potential method to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs without the drawbacks of liquid metallurgy methods. The present work focuses on the development of AMCs reinforced with quartz (SiO2 particles using FSP. Grooves with various dimensions were machined on AA6063 plates and compacted with quartz particles. A single pass FSP was carried out using a combination of optimized process parameters. The volume fraction of quartz particles in the AMCs was varied from 0 to 18 vol.% in steps of 6 vol.%. The developed AA6063/Quartz AMCs were characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The quartz particles were distributed uniformly in the aluminum matrix irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The grains of the AA6063 were extensively refined by the combination of thermomechanical effect of FSP and the pinning effect of quartz particles. The dispersion of the quartz particles improved the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMCs. The role of quartz particles on the worn surface and wear debris is reported.

  18. Elevated temperature strength, aging response and creep of aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, R.B.; Amateau, M.F.; House, M.B.; Meinert, K.C.; Nisson, P. (Pennsylvania State University, State College (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The effect of reinforcement on the high-temperature performance of aluminum matrix composites was investigated using samples of 6061 aluminum alloy reinforced with planar-random graphite fibers, SiC whiskers, or alumina particles, which were aged at 150 and 200 C for up to 500 hrs. As indicated by the results of microhardness tests, all specimens exhibited accelerated aging response, with the response depending on the characteristics of the reinforcement. Both the graphite-fiber- and SiC-whisker-reinforced composites showed a substantially increased strengths over that of the wrought 6061 Al at all temperatures. The graphite-fiber- and the SiC-whisker-reinforced composites were found to retain their tensile strength and stiffness in the overaged condition of the matrix. The whisker-reinforced composite showed significant resistance to creep at temperatures between 232 and 350 C under stresses of up to 100 MPa, while the particulate composite had a moderate increase in creep resistance. 51 refs.

  19. The influence of microstructure on the tensile behavior of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Michael J.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between tensile properties and microstructure of a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy, 2009 was examined. The alloy was investigated both unreinforced and reinforced with 15 v/o SiC whiskers or 15 v/o SiC particulate to form a discontinuous metal matrix composite (MMC). The materials were investigated in the as-fabricated condition and in three different hot-rolled sheet thicknesses of 6.35, 3.18, and 1.8 mm. Image analysis was used to characterize the morphology of the reinforcements and their distributions within the matrix alloy. Fractographic examinations revealed that failure was associated with the presence of microstructural inhomogeneities which were related to both the matrix alloy and to the reinforcement. The results from these observations together with the matrix tensile data were used to predict the strengths and moduli of the MMC's using relatively simple models. The whisker MMC could be modeled as a short fiber composite and an attempt was made to model the particulate MMC as a dispersion/dislocation hardened alloy.

  20. Characterization of hybrid aluminum matrix composites for advanced applications – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswinder Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid aluminum matrix composites (HAMCs are the second generation of composites that have potential to substitute single reinforced composites due to improved properties. This paper investigates the feasibility and viability of developing low cost-high performance hybrid composites for automotive and aerospace applications. Further, the fabrication characteristics and mechanical behavior of HAMCs fabricated by stir casting route have also been reviewed. The optical micrographs of the HAMCs indicate that the reinforcing particles are fairly distributed in the matrix alloy and the porosity levels have been found to be acceptable for the casted composites. The density, hardness, tensile behavior and fracture toughness of these composites have been found to be either comparable or superior to the ceramic reinforced composites. It has been observed from the literature that the direct strengthening of composites occurs due to the presence of hard ceramic phase, while the indirect strengthening arises from the thermal mismatch between the matrix alloy and reinforcing phase during solidification. Based on the database for material properties, the application area of HAMCs has been proposed in the present review. It has been concluded that the hybrid composites offer more flexibility and reliability in the design of possible components depending upon the reinforcement's combination and composition.

  1. Hot deformation behavior of an aluminum-matrix hybrid nanocomposite fabricated by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-25

    A fine-grained aluminum-matrix hybrid nanocomposite reinforced with TiO{sub 2}, MgO and Al{sub 3}Ti nanoparticles was prepared via reactive friction stir processing (FSP) of an Al–Mg sheet with pre-placed TiO{sub 2} particles (50 nm; 3.1 vol%). The microstructure of the hybrid nanocomposite comprises high-angle grain boundaries (~90%) with an average size of 2 µm and hard inclusions with sizes in the range of 30–50 nm. Evaluation of the hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite by uniaxial tensile testing at different temperatures (300–450 °C) and strain rates (0.001–0.1 s{sup −1}) shows that the deformation apparent activation energy of the nanocomposite is 137 kJ mol{sup −1} at ≤300 °C. The values of the activation energy for the Al–Mg alloy before and after FSP at this temperature range are about 105 and 135 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. This observation highlights the role of ultrafine hard particles and the structural changes induced by FSP on the deformation process. At the higher temperatures, the deformation activation energy for the aluminum alloy without and with the reinforcing particles is 303 and 456 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Detailed microstructural analysis by electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy suggests that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the deformation behavior at the elevated temperatures. Meanwhile, the presence of the hard nanoparticles operates as a grain growth inhibitor improving the thermal stability of the fine-grained aluminum alloy.

  2. Effects of Complex Structured Anodic Oxide Dielectric Layer Grown in Pore Matrix for Aluminum Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin-Ha; Yun, Sook Young; Lee, Chang Hyoung; Park, Hwa-Sun; Suh, Su-Jeong

    2015-11-01

    Anodization of aluminum is generally divided up into two types of anodic aluminum oxide structures depending on electrolyte type. In this study, an anodization process was carried out in two steps to obtain high dielectric strength and break down voltage. In the first step, evaporated high purity Al on Si wafer was anodized in oxalic acidic aqueous solution at various times at a constant temperature of 5 degrees C. In the second step, citric acidic aqueous solution was used to obtain a thickly grown sub-barrier layer. During the second anodization process, the anodizing potential of various ranges was applied at room temperature. An increased thickness of the sub-barrier layer in the porous matrix was obtained according to the increment of the applied anodizing potential. The microstructures and the growth of the sub-barrier layer were then observed with an increasing anodizing potential of 40 to 300 V by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An impedance analyzer was used to observe the change of electrical properties, including the capacitance, dissipation factor, impedance, and equivalent series resistance (ESR) depending on the thickness increase of the sub-barrier layer. In addition, the breakdown voltage was measured. The results revealed that dielectric strength was improved with the increase of sub-barrier layer thickness.

  3. The effects of volume percent and aspect ratio of carbon fiber on fracture toughness of reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, H. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Azadi Square, P.O. Box 91775-1111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zebarjad, S.M. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Azadi Square, P.O. Box 91775-1111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Zebarjad@ferdowsi.um.ac.ir; Sajjadi, S.A. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Azadi Square, P.O. Box 91775-1111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites are used as advanced materials in aerospace and electronic industries. In order to investigate role of aspect ratio of carbon fiber on fracture toughness of aluminum matrix composite, the composite was produced using stir casting. Al-8.5%Si-5%Mg selected as a matrix. The samples were prepared with three volume fractions (1, 2 and 3) and three aspect ratios (300, 500 and 800). Three-point bending test was performed on the specimens to evaluate the fracture toughness of the materials. The results showed that the fracture toughness of composites depends on both fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to elucidate the fracture behavior and crack deflection of composites. The study also, showed that the toughening mechanism depends strongly on fiber volume fraction, aspect ratio and the degree of wetting between fiber and matrix.

  4. Local elasticity mapping of aluminum matrix composites using scanning acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordatou, T. Z.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Matikas, T. E.

    2017-04-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy uses a focused acoustic beam to investigate local elastic properties on the surface of a material. The measurement is based on the difference in propagation time between the direct reflection and the Rayleigh wave. This work deals with the development of a fully automated acoustic microscopy method in order to determine the near-surface elastic property and map sub-surface features in metallic and composite materials. This method allows for the detection and analysis of Rayleigh waves, which are sensitive to subtle changes in the material's local elasticity. Via this process, the periodicity of the V(Z) curve can be initially assessed and the local Rayleigh velocity of the material is determined. In this work, the automated acoustic microscopy method was applied for the assessment of aluminum and Al-SiC metal matrix composites.

  5. Fabrication of single crystalline diamond reinforced aluminum matrix composite by powder metallurgy route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Silvain, Jean-François; Kawasaki, Akira

    2011-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated highly densified aluminum (Al)-diamond composite materials by a simple hot press method. The thermal conductivity of the Al-diamond composite materials was measured. These materials had different types, sizes and fractions of diamond. These obtained values were discussed based on theoretically calculated values. The thermal conductivity of the composite materials, measured by Laser-Flash method, was found to have slightly increased compared to that of pure bulk Al. The obtained microstructures of the composite materials showed a lot of cleavage existing in the interface between the Al matrix and the diamond particles, which led to the low increment of the thermal conductivity. Moreover, Al-diamond bulk materials with different sintering temperatures in solid state, liquid phase, and transient region between solid and liquid of Al, have been synthesized.

  6. Mechanical characterization of particulate aluminum foams. Strain-rate, density and matrix alloy versus adhesive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmhus, Dirk [ISIS Sensorial Materials Scientific Centre, University of Bremen (Germany); Baumeister, Joachim; Stutz, Lennart; Stoebener, Karsten [Fraunhofer IFAM Bremen (Germany); Schneider, Eduard [University of Bremen (Germany); Avalle, Massimiliano; Peroni, Lorenzo; Peroni, Marco [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Torino Vercelli (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The study evaluates mechanical properties of APM particulate aluminum foams built up from adhesively bonded Al foam spheres. Foams of matrix alloy AlSi10 are compared, with PM AlSi7 foams used as reference. The influence of density is studied both for quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading in a range from {proportional_to}0.35 to 0.71 g cm{sup -3}. The effect of varying the bonding agent is evaluated for a single density and both strain rate levels by replacing the standard, high-strength epoxy-based adhesive with a polyamide of greatly increased ductility. The result is a clear shift of fracture events to higher strain levels, as well as the introduction of a strain-rate dependency of strength. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Investigation on microstructural and mechanical properties of B4C–aluminum matrix composites prepared by microwave sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasali

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available B4C reinforced aluminum composites were fabricated by microwave heating of the mixture of B4C (10, 15 and 20 wt% and aluminum powders at 650, 750, 850 and 950 °C. The effect of different amounts of B4C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum matrix was examined. The maximum bending (238 ± 10 MPa and compressive strength (330 ± 10 MPa values were measured for composites sintered at 950 and 750 °C, respectively. The maximum hardness (112 Vickers was measured for Al–20 wt% B4C composite sintered at 850 °C. XRD investigations showed the decomposition of boron carbide and also the formation of Al3BC by heating the composites at 850 °C. SEM micrographs showed uniform distribution of reinforcement particles in Al matrix.

  8. Study on Non-interlayer Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding for SiCp/ZL101 Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei GUO; Jitai NIU; Jinfan ZHAI; Changli WANG; Jie YU; Guangtao ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    Through the vacuum diffusion bonding for SiCp/ZLl01 aluminum matrix composite, the influence of bonding parameters on the joint properties was reported, with the aim to obtain optimal bonding parameters. The microstructureof joints was analyzed by means o

  9. Aluminum and iron can be deposited in the calcified matrix of bone exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappard, Daniel; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Moukoko, Didier; Henric, Nicolas; Steiger, Vincent; Le Nay, Patrick; Frin, Jean-Marie; De Bodman, Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    Exostosis (or osteochondroma) is the most common benign bone tumor encountered in children and adults. Exostoses may occur as solitary or multiple tumors (in the autosomal syndromes of hereditary multiple exostoses). Exostoses are composed of cortical and medullary bone covered by an overlying hyaline cartilage cap. We have searched iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) in the matrix of cortical and trabecular bone of 30 patients with exostosis. Al(3+) and Fe(3+) are two cations which can substitute calcium in the hydroxyapatite crystals of the bone matrix. The bone samples were removed surgically and were studied undecalcified. Perls' Prussian blue staining (for Fe) and solochrome azurine B (for Al) were used on the histological sections of the tumors. Al(3+) was detected histochemically in 21/30 patients as linear bands deposited by the osteoblasts. Fe(3+) was detected in 10 out of these 21 patients as linear bands in the same locations. Fe(3+) and Al(3+) were not identified in the bone matrix of a control group of 20 osteoporotic patients. Energy X-ray Dispersive Spectrometry failed to identify Fe and Al in bone of these tumors due to the low sensitivity of the method. Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry identified them but the concentrations were very low. Histochemistry appears a very sensitive method for Fe(3+) and Al(3+) in bone.The presence of these two metals in the exostoses advocates for a disturbed metabolism of osteoblasts which can deposit these metals into the bone matrix, similar to which is observed in case of hemochromatosis with Fe(3+).

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nanophased silver tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thresiamma George; Sunny Joseph; Suresh Mathew

    2005-11-01

    Silver tungstate (Ag2WO4) nanoparticles in two different morphologies are prepared by controlling the reaction kinetics of aqueous precipitation. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the silver tungstate nanoparticles are in the -phase. SEM images show the rod-like and fiber-like morphologies of the nanoparticles with high aspect ratios. The TGA and DTA studies show the high thermal stability of the nanorods. The average crystallite sizes (20–30 nm) of the rod-like silver tungstate estimated from TEM is consistent with the XRD results.

  11. Optimization of CNC Turning Parameters on Aluminum 7015 Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite Using Taguchi Robust Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SENTHIL KUMAR. M.P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Aluminum Hybrid Metal Matrix Composites (Al-HMMC are finding numerous applications in many areas like Automobile, Piston and Cylinder and Aerospace, etc. Adding a third element into the metal matrix composite makes it hybrid. The Reinforcement of SiC and Graphite used in this Al-HMMC improves its strength. The present investigation is to find the optimum machining parameter of CNC turning centre on Al-HMMC. The main objective is to find the optimum cutting parameters to achieve low value of surface roughness and high Material Removal Rate (MRR. The cutting parameters considered in this experimental investigation are cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. Taguchi L27 orthogonal array was chosen to conduct the experiments. Signal to Noise ratio (S/N and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA were used to analyze the effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness and MRR. The contribution by each cutting parameter to surface roughness and MRR was also determined.

  12. Localized Corrosion Behavior of Al-Si-Mg Alloys Used for Fabrication of Aluminum Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Canul, M. A.; Giridharagopal, R.; Pech-Canul, M. I.; Coral-Escobar, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between microstructure and localized corrosion behavior in neutral aerated chloride solutions was investigated with SEM/EDAX, conventional electrochemical techniques, and with scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) for two custom-made alloys with Si/Mg molar ratios of 0.12 and 0.49. In this order, Al3Fe, Al3Mg2, and Mg2Si intermetallics were identified in the first alloy and Al(FeMn)Si and Mg2Si particles in the second one. Anodic polarization curves and corrosion morphology showed that the alloy with higher Si/Mg molar ratio exhibited a better corrosion performance and evidence was shown that it had a more corrosion-resistant passive film. The corrosion process for both alloys in aerated 0.1 M NaCl solutions was localized around the Fe-rich intermetallics. They acted as local cathodes and produced dissolution of the aluminum matrix surrounding such particles. Mg2Si and Al3Mg2 exhibited anodic behavior. SKPFM was successfully used to map the Volta potential distribution of main intermetallics. The localized corrosion behavior was correlated with a large Volta potential difference between the Fe-rich intermetallics and the matrix. After immersion in the chloride solution, such Volta potential difference decreased.

  13. Lattice dynamics of strontium tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabhatasree Goel; R Mittal; S L Chaplot; A K Tyagi

    2008-11-01

    We report here measurements of the phonon density of states and the lattice dynamics calculations of strontium tungstate (SrWO4). At ambient conditions this compound crystallizes to a body-centred tetragonal unit cell (space group I41/a) called scheelite structure. We have developed transferable interatomic potentials to study the lattice dynamics of this class of compounds. The model parameters have been fitted with respect to the experimentally available Raman and infra-red frequencies and the equilibrium unit cell parameters. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in the triple-axis spectrometer at Dhruva reactor. The measured phonon density of states is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations, thus validating the inter-atomic potential developed.

  14. Fracture behavior of reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites using thermal imaging tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdelidis, N. P.; Exarchos, D.; Vazquez, P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Maldague, X. P. V.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-05-01

    In this work the influence of the microstructure at the vicinity of the interface on the fracture behavior of particulate-reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites (Al/SiCp composites) is studied by using thermographic tools. In particular, infrared thermography was used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of the materials. The deformation of solid materials is almost always accompanied by heat release. When the material becomes deformed or is damaged and fractured, a part of the energy necessary to initiate and propagate the damage is transformed in an irreversible way into heat. The thermal camera detects the heat wave, generated by the thermo-mechanical coupling and the intrinsic dissipated energy during mechanical loading of the sample. By using an adapted detector, thermography records the two dimensional "temperature" field as it results from the infrared radiation emitted by the object. The principal advantage of infrared thermography is its noncontact, non-destructive character. This methodology is being applied to characterise the fracture behavior of the particulate composites. Infrared thermography is being used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of such materials. Furthermore, an innovative approach to use microscopic measurements using IR microscopic lenses was attempted, in order to enable smaller features (in the micro scale) to be imaged with accuracy and assurance.

  15. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, A.; Götze, U.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Herold, F.; Meichsner, G.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control.

  16. MOORA-Based Tribological Studies on Red Mud Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of an experimental investigation on the effects of applied load, sliding velocity, wt.% of reinforcement and hardness of the counterface material in dry sliding wear studies performed on red mud-based aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC. The specific wear rate and the coefficient of friction are considered as the output quality characteristics. Taguchi-based L9 orthogonal array has been used to accomplish the objective of the experimental study. Analysis of variance (ANOVA is employed to find the optimal setting and the effect of each parameter on the output performance characteristics. It has been observed that optimal factor setting for each output performance is different. In order to minimize the two responses simultaneously, multiobjective optimization based on ratio analysis (MOORA is adopted. MOORA revealed that the optimal combination of the dry sliding wear parameters for the multiperformance characteristics of the red mud based aluminium is the set normal load at 20 N, sliding velocity 3 m/s, % of reinforcement 20%, and counterface hardness of the material 58 HRC.

  17. Microstructure and properties of mechanical alloying particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites prepared by semisolid stirring pouring method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-qiang Si

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with mechanical alloying particles (SiCp were fabricated by the semisolid stirring pouring method. The influence of mechanical alloying particles and Mg on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites was investigated by means of optical microscopy (OM, X-ray diffraction scanning (XRD, electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Results show that the addition of Mg converts the agglomerate mechanical alloying particles in ZL101 matrix composites into dispersed distribution in ZL101-Mg matrix composites, large matrix grains into fine equiaxed matrix grains, and eutectic phase into fine particles. So the mechanical properties of ZL101-Mg matrix composites are better than those of ZL101 matrix composites. The mechanical properties of ZL101/ZL101-Mg matrix composites are gradually increased with the increase of the volume fraction of mechanical alloying particles. When the volume fraction of mechanical alloying particles is 3%, the Vickers hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the ZL101/ZL101-Mg matrix composites reach their maximum values.

  18. Developing scandium and zirconium containing aluminum boron carbide metal matrix composites for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jing

    The study presented in this thesis focuses on developing castable, precipitation-strengthened Al--B4C metal matrix composites (MMCs) for high temperature applications. In the first part, B4C plates were immersed in liquid aluminum alloyed with Sc, Zr and Ti to investigate the interfacial reactions between B4C and liquid aluminum The influences of Sc, Zr and Ti on the interfacial microstructure in terms of individual and combined additions were examined. Results reveal that all three elements reacted with B4C and formed interfacial layers that acted as a diffusion barrier to limit the decomposition of B4C in liquid aluminum. The interfacial reactions and the reaction products in each system were identified. With the combined addition of Sc, Zr and Ti, most of the Ti was found to enrich at the interface, which not only offered appropriate protection of the B4C but also reduced the consumption of Sc and Zr at the interface. In the second part, Sc and Zr were introduced into Al-15vol.% B 4C composites presaturated by Ti, and eight experimental composites with different Sc and Zr levels were prepared via a conventional casting technique. It was found that Sc was involved in the interfacial reactions with B 4C that partially consume Sc. The Sc addition yielded considerable precipitation strengthening in the as-cast and peak aged conditions. To achieve an equivalent strengthening effect of Sc in binary Al-Sc alloys, approximately double the amount of Sc is required in Al-B4C composites. On the contrary, no major Zr reaction products were found at the interfaces and the major part of Zr remained in the matrix for the precipitation strengthening. The combination of Sc and Zr enhanced sthe precipitation strengthening. Two kinds of nanoscale precipitates, Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr), were found in the as-cast microstructure and contributed to the increase in the matrix hardness. In the third part, all the experimental composites were isothermally aged at 300, 350, 400 and 450

  19. Characterization of Aluminum-Based-Surface Matrix Composites with Iron and Iron Oxide Fabricated by Friction Stir Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam R. I. Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface composite layers were successfully fabricated on an A 1050-H24 aluminum plate by dispersed iron (Fe and magnetite (Fe3O4 particles through friction stir processing (FSP. Fe and Fe3O4 powders were packed into a groove of 3 mm in width and 1.5 mm in depth, cut on the aluminum plate, and covered with an aluminum sheet that was 2-mm thick. A friction stir processing (FSP tool of square probe shape, rotated at a rate of 1000–2000 rpm, was plunged into the plate through the cover sheet and the groove, and moved along the groove at a travelling speed of 1.66 mm/s. Double and triple passes were applied. As a result, it is found that the Fe particles were homogenously distributed in the whole nugget zone at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm after triple FSP passes. Limited interfacial reactions occurred between the Fe particles and the aluminum matrix. On the other hand, the lower rotation speed (1000 rpm was not enough to form a sound nugget when the dispersed particles were changed to the larger Fe3O4. The Fe3O4 particles were dispersed homogenously in a sound nugget zone when the rotation speed was increased to 1500 rpm. No reaction products could be detected between the Fe3O4 particles and the aluminum matrix. The saturation magnetization (Ms of the Fe-dispersed nugget zone was higher than that of the Fe3O4-dispersed nugget zone. Moreover, there were good agreement between the obtained saturation magnetization values relative to that of pure Fe and Fe3O4 materials and the volume content of the dispersed particles in the nugget zone.

  20. Lead-Tungstate Crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The photon spectrometer (PHOS) is designed to measure the temperature of collisions by detecting photons emerging from them. It will be made of lead tungstate crystals like these. When high-energy photons strike lead tungstate, they make it glow, or scintillate, and this glow can be measured. Lead tungstate is extremely dense (denser than iron), stopping most photons that reach it.

  1. Thermal structural properties of calcium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Hoelzel, Markus [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science; Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz FRM-II; Hansen, Thomas [Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Vasylechko, Leonid [Lviv Polytechnic National Univ. (Ukraine). Semiconductor Electronics Dept.; Mikhailik, Vitaliy [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot (United Kingdom); Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kraus, Hans [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Ehrenberg, Helmut [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science; IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The results of in-situ temperature-resolved powder diffraction studies of CaWO{sub 4} scheelite using both synchrotron radiation and neutron scattering are reported. The studies performed over a broad temperature range of 5-1773 K confirm the scheelite type of structure for calcium tungstate over the whole temperature range. The anisotropy of thermal expansion in calcium tungstate as well as the rigidity of WO{sub 4} complexes have been analysed in terms of bond distances, interatomic angles and anisotropic displacement parameters. The WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} complex anions showed a remarkable robustness in the whole studied temperature range, thus pointing out that the layered structure formed by two-dimensional CsCl-type arrangements of Ca cations and WO{sub 4} complexes is the primary reason for the anisotropy of thermal expansion in calcium tungstate. (orig.)

  2. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  3. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  4. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  5. Improved light yield of lead tungstate scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Hofstäetter, A; Korzhik, M V; Ligun, V; Lecoq, P; Missevitch, O V; Novotny, R; Peigneux, J P

    2000-01-01

    The application at medium and low energies of lead tungstate scintillators, so far optimized for the ECAL calorimeter of CMS for the future LHC, is strongly limited by their poor light yield. Suitable dopants like molybdenum and terbium can help to overcome this problem. Concepts, results, advantages and drawbacks of this approach are discussed. (11 refs).

  6. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  7. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of hybrid aluminum matrix composite containing boron carbide and Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahmood; Zulfaqar, Muhammad; Ali, Fahad; Subhani, Tayyab

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid aluminum matrix composites containing particles of boron carbide and quasicrystals were manufactured to explore the combined effect of reinforcements on microstructural evolution and mechanical performance of the composites. The particles were incorporated at a loading of 6 wt% each making a total of 12 wt% reinforcement in pure aluminum. For comparison, two composites containing individually reinforced 12 wt% particles were also prepared along with a reference specimen of pure aluminum. Ball milling technique was employed to mix the composite constituents. The green bodies of composite powders were prepared by uniaxial pressing at room temperature followed by consolidation by pressureless sintering under inert atmosphere. The microstructural characterization was performed using scanning electron microscopy while phase identification was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The mechanical characterization was performed by Vickers hardness and compression tests. Hybrid composites showed increased compressive properties while the composites containing solely quasicrystals demonstrated improved hardness. The increase in mechanical performance was related to the microstructural evolution due to the presence and uniform dispersion of binary particles.

  8. In-situ fabrication of particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites under high-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic field is generated when imposing pulse signal on high-frequency magnetic field. Distribution of the inner magnetic intensity in induction coils tends to be uniform. Furthermore oscillation and disturbance phenomena appear in the melt. Insitu Al2O3 and Al3Zr particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites have been synthesized by direct melt reaction using Al-Zr(CO3)2 components under a foreign field. The size of reinforced particulates is 2-3 μm. They are well distributed in the matrix.Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis show that high-frequency pulsed magnetic field accelerates heat and mass transfer processes and improves the kinetic condition of in-situ fabrication.

  9. In-situ deformation studies of an aluminum metal-matrix composite in a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Tensile specimens made of a metal-matrix composite (cast and extruded aluminum alloy-based matrix reinforced with Al2O3 particulate) were tested in situ in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a deformation stage, to directly monitor the crack propagation phenomenon. The in situ SEM observations revealed the presence of microcracks both ahead of and near the crack-tip region. The microcracks were primarily associated with cracks in the alumina particles. The results suggest that a region of intense deformation exists ahead of the crack and corresponds to the region of microcracking. As the crack progresses, a region of plastically deformed material and associated microcracks remains in the wake of the crack.

  10. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  11. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  12. Comparing addition of ZrO II particles in micron and nano scale on microstructure and mechanical behavior of aluminum-matrix composites produced by vortex route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghchesara, M. A.; Karimi, M.; Abdizadeh, H.; Baharvandi, H. R.

    2007-07-01

    Aluminum matrix composites are important engineering materials in automotive, aerospace and other applications because of their low weight, high specific strength and better physical and mechanical properties compared to pure aluminum. ZrO II particles as reinforcement were selected to add aluminum with micron and nano size. Al/ZrO II composites were produced by direct incorporation (vortex method) in different temperatures and 5 volume percents of ZrO II particles. Microstructure of the samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition of the phases was studied by XRD. Hardness, and density of these composites were also measured. The microstructure and mechanical properties tests of composites and study the effect of particle size, resulted the better properties compared to matrix aluminum. Homogeneous dispersion of the reinforcement particles in the matrix aluminum was observed. The results show enhancing the composites properties for all samples compared to the monolithic alloy. However there are some differences in results because of particle size of ceramics and therefore differences between particles surface area. Maximum volume percent that can be added to A356 aluminum alloy is 5 vol.%, for nano ZrO II particles, but it seems that is more than 5 vol.% for micron particles. Increasing of viscosity, porosities and much more defects are caused by increasing volume percents and using smaller particles. The casting processing is difficult in these conditions. Furthermore, optimum temperatures of casting for micron and nano zirconia particles are not the same.

  13. The Influence of ScF3 Nanoparticles on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of New Metal Matrix Composites Based on A356 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorozhtsov, S.; Zhukov, I.; Promakhov, V.; Naydenkin, E.; Khrustalyov, A.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of the aerospace and automotive industries demands the development of aluminum alloys and composites reinforced with new nanoparticles. In this work, metal matrix composites (MMC) with an A356 aluminum alloy matrix reinforced with 0.2 wt.% and 1 wt.% of ScF3 nanoparticles were produced by ultrasonic dispersion of nanoparticles in the melt followed by casting in a metallic mold. Structure as well as physical and mechanical properties of the cast samples were examined using electron and optical microscopy, hardness and tensile testing. It is shown that nanoparticles clusters are formed during the solidification at grain boundaries and silicon inclusions. Increasing nanoparticles content significantly reduced the grain size in the MMC and increased the mechanical properties—ultimate tensile strength, elongation and hardness. The contribution of different strengthening mechanisms is discussed. It is suggested that the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the nanoparticles ScF3 and the aluminum matrix is a dominant strengthening mechanism.

  14. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR) Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF) Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azlan; Lajis, Mohd Amri

    2017-01-01

    Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future. PMID:28925963

  15. Application prospects of cadmium-containing crystals based on tungstates and double tungstates

    CERN Document Server

    Nagornaya, L; Apanasenko, A; Tupitsyna, I; Chernikov, V; Vostretsov, V

    2002-01-01

    Tungstate and double tungstate crystals of high scintillation efficiency and detectors based on them are applied widely in the medical imaging and radiation monitoring because of their high sensitivity to the ionizing radiation, small radiation length, high radiation hardness, low afterglow level. In this work a possibility to broaden the application field of CWO crystals have been investigated by improvement of their spectrometric quality and decreasing of their afterglow level. CWO crystals with improved characteristics have been obtained (resolution for sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs <8%, afterglow <0.02% after 20 ms). A possibility is considered to use these crystals for spectrometry of thermal and resonance neutrons, which is possible due to the presence of nuclei with large cross-section for these neutrons in the crystal lattice. Compounds of a new type based on Cd, La-containing double tungstates doped with rare earth elements have been synthesized, and their luminescent characteristics have been studied. ...

  16. Modeling and multi-objective optimization of powder mixed electric discharge machining process of aluminum/alumina metal matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangadharudu Talla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Low material removal rate (MRR and high surface roughness values hinder large-scale application of electro discharge machining (EDM in the fields like automobile, aerospace and medical industry. In recent years, however, EDM has gained more significance in these industries as the usage of difficult-to-machine materials including metal matrix composites (MMCs increased. In the present work, an attempt has been made to fabricate and machine aluminum/alumina MMC using EDM by adding aluminum powder in kerosene dielectric. Results showed an increase in MRR and decrease in surface roughness (Ra compared to those for conventional EDM. Semi empirical models for MRR and Ra based on machining parameters and important thermo physical properties were established using a hybrid approach of dimensional and regression analysis. A multi response optimization was also performed using principal component analysis-based grey technique (Grey-PCA to determine optimum settings of process parameters for maximum MRR and minimum Ra within the experimental range. The recommended setting of process parameters for the proposed process has been found to be powder concentration (Cp = 4 g/l, peak current (Ip = 3 A, pulse on time (Ton = 150 μs and duty cycle (Tau = 85%.

  17. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, David C. [Eck Industreis, Inc.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  18. Hot Extrusion of A356 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Carbon Nanotube/Al2O3 Hybrid Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. H.; Babu, J. S. S.; Kang, C. G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, the attention of material scientists and engineers has shifted from conventional composite materials to nanocomposite materials for the development of light weight and high-performance devices. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), many researchers have tried to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) with CNT reinforcements. However, CNTs exhibit low dispersibility in metal melts owing to their poor wettability and large surface-to-volume ratio. The use of an array of short fibers or hybrid reinforcements in a preform could overcome this problem and enhance the dispersion of CNTs in the matrix. In this study, multi-walled CNT/Al2O3 preform-based aluminum hybrid composites were fabricated using the infiltration method. Then, the composites were extruded to evaluate changes in its mechanical properties. In addition, the dispersion of reinforcements was investigated using a hardness test. The required extrusion pressure of hybrid MMCs increased as the Al2O3/CNT fraction increased. The deformation resistance of hybrid material was over two times that of the original A356 aluminum alloy material due to strengthening by the Al2O3/CNTs reinforcements. In addition, an unusual trend was detected; primary transition was induced by the hybrid reinforcements, as can be observed in the pressure-displacement curve. Increasing temperature of the material can help increase formability. In particular, temperatures under 623 K (350 °C) and over-incorporating reinforcements (Al2O3 20 pct, CNTs 3 pct) are not recommended owing to a significant increase in the brittleness of the hybrid material.

  19. Calorimetric studies of 7000 series aluminum alloys. I - Matrix precipitate characterization of 7075. II - Comparison of 7075, 7050, and RX720 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P. N.

    1977-01-01

    Correlation between differential scanning calorimetry and high temperature transmission electron microscopy for the characterization of preexisting matrix precipitates in the highest-strength and overaged tempers of 7075 aluminum was demonstrated. The solid state reactions undergone by these tempers in the 20-500 C temperature range were elucidated and expressed in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. The dissolution parameters for each phase are distinguishable and serve as guidelines for a rapid characterization of the matrix microstructure of these alloys.

  20. Hardness and wear resistance of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum-copper matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwang; Cha, Seung Il; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Jong Kook; Park, Hoon Mo; Park, Hyun Dal; Hong, Hyung

    2014-12-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted to reinforcement of composite materials due to their extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Many researchers have attempted to develop CNT reinforced metal composites with various fabrication methods and have shown possibilities for structural and functional applications. Among them, CNT reinforced Al matrix composites have become very attractive due to their huge structural application in industry. In this study, CNT reinforced Al-Cu matrix composites with a microstructure of homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al-Cu matrix are investigated. The CNT/Al-Cu composites are fabricated by mixing of CNT/Cu composite powders and Al powders by high energy ball mill process followed by hot extrusion process. The hardness and wear resistance of the CNT/Al-Cu composites are enhanced by 1.4 and 3 times, respectively, compared to those values for the Al-Cu matrix. This remarkable enhancement mainly originates from the homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in Al-Cu matrix and self-lubricant effect of CNTs.

  1. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  2. An Experimental Study Of Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composite Reinforced SiC Made By Hot Pressing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suśniak M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the possibility of using powder metallurgy processing for producing a metal matrix composite. Materials were prepared from AlSi5Cu2 chips with reinforcement of 10, 15, 20 wt. % silicon carbide. Aluminum alloy chips were milled with SiC powder in a high-energy ball mill by 40 hours. Mechanical alloying process lead to obtain an uniform distribution of hard SiC particles in the metallic matrix and refine the grain size. The consolidation of composite powders was performed by vacuum hot pressing at 450°C, under pressure of 600 MPa by 10 min. The results shows that the addition of SiC particles has a substantial influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties of composite powder as well as consolidated material. Hot pressing is an effective consolidation method which leads to obtain dense AlSi5Cu2/SiC composite with homogeneous structure and advanced mechanical properties.

  3. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  4. Studies On Fracture Toughness Behavior of Hybrid Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun C Dixit U

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The limited mechanical properties of Al and its alloys adversely affect its applications in automobile and aerospace industries. This remains one of the major concern in the fabrication to suit its application in recent days. The main aim of the present work is to improve the fracture toughness of the Al matrix composite . A composite with Al 6061 alloy as matrix and Zirconium Oxide as reinforcement is fabricated by stir casting process. The specimens were prepared according to ASTM standards and fracture toughness, tensile and hardness tests were performed and the properties were investigated. Zirconium oxide is selected as a reinforcement because of its ability to influence the microstructure of the Al 6061 alloy to improve the fracture toughness. The fracture toughness is highest at 6% reinforcement of ZrO2 and hardness is found to be more at 4% reinforcement

  5. Sol-gel coatings as active barriers to protect ceramic reinforcement in aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rams, J.; Urena, A.; Campo, M. [Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica, Ambiental y de los Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos C/ Tulipan s/nMostoles 28933 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    Silica obtained through a sol-gel process is used as a coating for ceramic reinforcements (SiC) in aluminium matrix composite materials. The interaction between molten aluminium and the coated particles during material casting can be controlled by means of the thermal treatment given to the coating. Wettability is increased because the coating reacts with molten aluminium, and the formation of the degrading aluminium carbide is inhibited. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. In situ formation of ZrB2 particulates and their influence on microstructure and tensile behavior of AA7075 aluminum matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Raja Selvam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In situ synthesis of aluminum matrix composites (AMCs has become a popular method due to several advantages over conventional stir casting method. In the present study, AA7075/ZrB2 AMCs reinforced with various content of ZrB2 particulates (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 wt.% were synthesized by the in situ reaction of molten aluminum with inorganic salts K2ZrF6 and KBF4. The composites were characterized using XRD, OM, SEM, EBSD and TEM. The XRD patterns revealed the formation of ZrB2 particulates without the presence of any other compounds. The formation of ZrB2 particulates refined the grains of aluminum matrix extensively. Most of the ZrB2 particulates were located near the grain boundaries. The ZrB2 particulates exhibited various morphologies including spherical, cylindrical and hexagonal shapes. The size of the ZrB2 particulates was in the order of nano, sub micron and micron level. A good interfacial bonding was observed between the aluminum matrix and the ZrB2 particulates. The in situ formed ZrB2 particulates enhanced the mechanical properties such as microhardness and the ultimate tensile strength. Various strengthening mechanisms were identified.

  7. IN-SITU SYNTHETIC TiB2 PARTICULATE REINFORCED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE COATING ON AA2024 ALUMINUM ALLOY BY LASER CLADDING TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    JIANG XU; YIDE KAN; WENJIN LIU

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of aluminum alloy, in-situ synthesized TiB2 and Ti3B4 peritectic composite particulate reinforced metal matrix composite, formed on a 2024 aluminum alloy by laser cladding with a powder mixture of Fe-coated Boron, Ti and Al, was successfully achieved using 3-KW CW CO2 laser. The chemical composition, microstructure and phase structure of the composite clad coating were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), SEM, AFM and XRD. The typical...

  8. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Yttria Coated-Alumina Particulates Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqiang YU; Gaohui WU; Longtao JIANG; Dongli SUN

    2005-01-01

    The liquid-phase coating method was used to deposit Y2O3 ceramic on the surface of α-Al2O3. The coatedAl2O3p/6061Al composites were produced using squeeze casting technology. The microstructure and tensile properties of the composites were analysed and studied. The results showed that the coated Al2O3 particles are able to disperse homogeneously in the aluminum liquid. The microstructure of the composites is more even in comparison with that of as-received powders. The tensile testing indicated that mechanical properties of the coated-Al2O3p/6061Alcomposites are better than those of uncoated particles. In the composite with 30% volume fraction, the tensile strength, yield strength as well as elongation is increased by 29.8%, 38.4% and 10.3%, respectively. The SEM analysis of fracture indicated that the dimples of the coated-Al2O3p/6061Al composites are more even.

  9. Wear Behavior of Aluminum Matrix Hybrid Composites Fabricated through Friction Stir Welding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Halil Ibrahim KURT; Murat ODUNCUOGLU; Ramazan ASMATULU

    2016-01-01

    Effects of friction stir processing (FSP)parameters and reinforcements on the wear behavior of 6061-T6 based hybrid composites were investigated.A mathematical formulation was derived to calculate the wear volume loss of the composites.The experimental results were contrasted with the results of the proposed model.The influ-ences of sliding distance,tool traverse and rotational speeds,as well as graphite (Gr)and titanium carbide (TiC) volume fractions on the wear volume loss of the composites were also investigated using the prepared formulation. The results demonstrated that the wear volume loss of the composites significantly increased with increasing sliding distance,tool traverse speed,and rotational speed;while the wear volume loss decreased with increasing volume fraction of the reinforcements.A minimum wear volume loss for the hybrid composites with complex reinforcements was specified at the inclusion ratio of 50% TiC+50% Al2 O3 because of improved lubricant ability,as well as resist-ance to brittleness and wear.New possibilities to develop wear-resistant aluminum-based composites for different in-dustrial applications were proposed.

  10. Microhardness studies of nanocrystalline calcium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandakumar, V.M. [Department of Physics, Mahatma Gandhi College, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Khadar, M.A. [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2008-02-15

    Nanocrystals of calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) of three different grain sizes were synthesized through chemical precipitation technique and the grain sizes and crystal structure were determined using the broadening of X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy. The microhardness of compacted pellets of nanocrystalline calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) with different grain sizes were measured using a Vickers microhardness tester for various applied loads ranging from 0.049 N to 1.96 N. The values of microhardness showed significant reverse indentation size effect at low indentation loads. The microhardness data obtained for samples of different grain sizes showed grain size dependent strengthening obeying normal Hall-Petch relation. The dependence of compacting pressure and annealing temperature on microhardness of the nanostructured sample with grain size of 13 nm were also studied. The samples showed significant increase in microhardness as the compacting pressure and annealing time were increased. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Effect of Spark-Plasma-Sintering Conditions on Tensile Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Imai, H.; Umeda, J.; Takahashi, M.; Kondoh, K.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) matrix composites containing 2 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated by powder metallurgy using high-energy ball milling (HEBM), spark plasma sintering (SPS), and subsequent hot extrusion. The effect of SPS conditions on the tensile properties of CNT/Al composites was investigated. The results showed that composites with well-dispersed CNTs and nearly full-density CNT/Al can be obtained. During HEBM, CNTs were shortened, inserted into welded Al powder particles, bonded to Al, and still stable without CNT-Al reaction. After consolidation, Al4C3 phases formed in composites under different sintering conditions. With the increase of sintering temperature and holding time, the strength decreased. Conversely, the ductility and toughness noticeably increased. As a result, a good balance between strength (367 MPa in ultimate tensile strength) and ductility (13% in elongation) was achieved in the as-extruded CNT/Al composite sintered at 630°C with a holding time of 300 min.

  12. Erosion Characteristics of Aluminum-based Metal Matrix Composites in Slurry Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tu Jiangping

    2000-01-01

    The erosion resistance of the Al18B4O33 whisker reinforced AC4C Al composites in water and saline slurry were investigated using a jet-in-slit rig. Erosion tests were performed at slurry velocities between 6.4 m/s to 15.2 m/s and at normal impact angle. The detachment of flake and dislodgement of whisker were identified as the major mechanisms of material removal in slurry environments. The composites showed better erosion resistance due to the protection of the matrix by the whisker at low slurry velocities. Because of reduced fracture strain, the erosion rates of the composites were generally greater than that of the unreinforced alloy at high slurry velocities. Owing to interfacial reaction which resulted in decrease in hardness and fracture strain,the T6 treatment for the composites had a deleterious influence on the erosion resistance. By considering the material removal processes in the water slurry, a simple rationalization of the inverse dependence of slurry erosion rate on Hεf was obtained. In the saline slurry, there exists a strong synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion. The volume loss of the composites was enhanced through cracking of flakes and detaching of whisker induced by stress and corrosion.

  13. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi, E-mail: rahiminasrabadi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh [Islamic Azad University, Varamin Pishva Branch, Varamin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Ismail [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiWO{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition and structural properties of NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO{sub 4} particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO{sub 4} were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV

  14. Effects of MgO Nano Particles on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite prepared via Powder Metallurgy Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghchesara, Mohammad Amin; Abdizadeh, Hossein; Baharvandi, Hamid Reza

    The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructural and mechanical properties of Al/nano MgO composite prepared via powder metallurgy method. Pure atomized aluminum powder with an average particle size of 1μm and MgO particulate with an average particle size between 60 to 80 nm were used. Composites containing 1.5, 2.5 and 5 percent of volume fraction of MgO were prepared by powder metallurgy method. The specimens were pressed by Cold Isostatic Press machine (CIP), subsequently were sintered at 575, 600 and 625°C. After sintering and preparing the samples, mechanical properties were measured. The results of microstructure, compression and hardness tests indicated that addition of MgO particulates to aluminum matrix composites improves the mechanical properties.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Vacuum Hot Pressed P/M Short Steel Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, S.; K. Chandra; Agarwala, V

    2014-01-01

    Commercial purity aluminum powder of irregular shape and ligamental morphology having average particle size of 75 µm was blended with medium carbon steel short fibers having average diameter of 100 µm and maximum length up to 1000 µm. The green compacts of pure aluminum and reinforced compositions were hot-pressed in 10−3 torr vacuum, at 723 K, 773 K, and 823 K for 5, 10, and 15 min durations under 50 MPa axial stress on Gleeble 3800 simulator. Microstructures of the sintered composites have ...

  16. Spark Plasma Sintering of Aluminum-Magnesium-Matrix Composites with Boron Carbide and Tungsten Nano-powder Inclusions: Modeling and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvilis, E. S.; Khasanov, O. L.; Gulbin, V. N.; Petyukevich, M. S.; Khasanov, A. O.; Olevsky, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Spark-plasma sintering (SPS) is used to fabricate fully-dense metal-matrix (Al/Mg) composites containing hard ceramic (boron carbide) and refractory metal (tungsten) inclusions. The study objectives include the modeling (and its experimental verification) of the process of the consolidation of the composites consisted of aluminum-magnesium alloy AMg6 (65 wt.%), B4C powder (15 wt.%), and W nano-powder (20 wt.%), as well as the optimization of the composite content and of the SPS conditions to achieve higher density. Discrete element modeling of the composite particles packing based on the particle size distribution functions of real powders is utilized for the determination of the powder compositions rendering maximum mixture packing densities. Two models: a power-law creep model of the high temperature deformation of powder materials, and an empirical logarithmic pressure-temperature-relative density relationship are successfully applied for the description of the densification of the aluminum-magnesium metal matrix powder composite subjected to spark-plasma sintering. The elastoplastic properties of the sintered composite samples are assessed by nanoindentation.

  17. Simulation of the strain rate sensitive flow behavior of SiC-particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Tirtom, İsmail; Güden, Mustafa; Yıldız, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    Strain rate dependent compression mechanical behavior of an SiC-particulate reinforced Al (2024-O) metal matrix composite (MMC) with different particle volume fractions was numerically investigated at various strain rates. Calculations were performed using axisymmetric finite element unit cell model, in which an elastic SiC particle was embedded inside a strain rate sensitive viscoplastic Al matrix. Stress–strain curves of Al matrix material were derived from Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar expe...

  18. Preparation Methods for Aluminum Matrix Composite%铝基复合材料的制备方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪增磊; 王爱琴; 田可庆

    2011-01-01

    The pressureless infiltration process for the preparation of high volume fraction SiC/Al composite, vacuum canning hot-extrusion process and spray deposition technology process for the preparation of high-silicon aluminum composite were reviewed. The development trends for the preparation of aluminum composite material were looked forward.%综述了无压浸渗法制备高体积分数SiC/Al复合材料,以及粉末真空包套热挤压和喷射沉积工艺制备高硅含量铝基复合材料的方法,同时展望了制备铝基复合材料的发展趋势.

  19. Preparation, characterization, dielectric properties and diffusion studies of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasna, V. C.; Ramesan, M. T.

    2017-06-01

    Nanocomposites based on SBR with different content of manganous tungstate nanoparticles were prepared and characterized by FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, TGA, DSC and impedance analysis. The interaction between nanoparticles and the elastomer was clear from the shift in peaks of UV and FTIR. XRD and SEM analysis showed the uniform arrangement of nanoparticles in SBR matrix. Glass transition temperature, thermal stability and dielectric properties of composites were enhanced by the addition of nanoparticles. Sorption studies of nanocomposites were done in aromatic solvents at different temperature. Sorption data obtained were used to estimate the thermodynamic properties.

  20. Synthesis and analysis of nanocrystalline β1-Cu3Al and β2-NiAl intermetallic-reinforced aluminum matrix composite by high energy ball milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong-Hai; Nguyen, Minh-Thuyet; Kim, Won Joo; Kim, Jin-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline β1-Cu3Al and β2-NiAl intermetallic compounds were in-situ reinforced in the aluminum matrix with the atomic composition of Al67Cu20Ni13 by the mechanical alloying of elemental powders. Both β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases that can be only co-synthesized in Cu base alloys have been obtained after 15h milling in this study. The phase evolution during milling process was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases were metastable with further milling time up to 40 h. Specially, unreacted Al matrix has been totally transformed to amorphous state in the final powder. A remarkable crystalline size of 6.5 nm was reached after 15 h milling time. Thermal stability of the milled powder was also studied by differential thermal analysis. It is shown that β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases were stable up to higher than 550 °C. Moreover, the inter-diffusion between Al matrix and Cu3Al within the temperature range of 620-740 °C led to the formation of superstructure ζ1-Al3Cu4 phase.

  1. Investigation into the Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of A356 Aluminum Alloy-Based ZrO2-Particle-Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdizadeh, H.; Baghchesara, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, an investigation has been carried out into the influence of ZrO2 content and casting temperature on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of A356 Al/ZrO2 composites. A356 aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced with 5, 10 and 15 vol.% ZrO2 were fabricated at 750, 850, and 95 0°C via the stir-casting method. Based on the results obtained, the optimum amount of reinforcement and casting temperature were determined by evaluating the density and mechanical properties of the composites through the use of hardness and tensile tests. The fracture surfaces of composite specimens were also studied to identify the main fracture mechanisms of the composites. The results obtained indicated that all samples fractured due to the interdendritic cracking of the matrix alloy. Reinforcing the Al matrix alloy with ZrO2 particles increased the hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the alloy to the maximum values of 70 BHN and 232 MPa, respectively. The best mechanical properties were obtained for the specimens with 15 vol.% of ZrO2 produced at 75 0°C.

  2. Carbon Fiber with Ni-coating Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites%电镀镍碳纤维增强铝基复合材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩变华; 罗天骄; 梁春林; 姚广春; 刘宜汉

    2006-01-01

    提出一种碳纤维表面电镀镍的方法,通过正交实验优化了电镀镍配方及工艺条件,并研究了镀层的显微组织及镀液的成分、电流密度、电镀时间等工艺条件对沉镍速率和镀层质量的影响,并探讨了沉镍机理.用镀镍碳纤维制备铝基复合材料,观测碳纤维与铝的复合效果.%This paper introduces the process of electroplating with nickel on carbon fiber, and the technical conditions of nickel plating are obtained by orthogonal experiment. Microscopic structure of nickel coating and the effect of nickel plating rate and coating structure with the solution composition, current density and electroplating time are studied. The principle of nickel plating is also researched. The aluminum matrix composites is reinforced by carbon fiber with nickel coating, and the compound effect between aluminum and carbon fiber is observed.

  3. Study of the Matrix Effect on the Plasma Characterization of Six Elements in Aluminum Alloys using LIBS with a Portable Echelle Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Volume 2 PROGRESS IN PHYSICS April, 2007 Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to perform a study of the matrix effect on the plasma characterization of Fe, Mg, Be, Si, Mn, and Cu in aluminum alloy targets. The generated plasma emissions due to focusing of a 100 mj Nd: YAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm at the target surface were detected using a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density N e and electron temperature T e assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The obtained average values of T e and N e were 7600 K and 3 × 10 17 cm − 3 , respectively, for the six elements in the aluminum alloy samples. The electron density increases with the element concentration while the plasma temperature does not has significance change with concentration. For industrial applications, LIBS with the portable Echelle spectrometer could be applied in the on-line production control that following up elemental concentration in metals and pharmaceuticals by only measuring N e.

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY IN THE PASSIVE FORCE AND CUTTING TORQUE IN THE MILLING PROCESS OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES AND ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Ciecieląg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to investigate the passive force and cutting torque during the milling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics saturated with epoxy resin and two aluminum alloys: AlSi21CuNi (AK 20 and 7075 (PA 9. The milling process was conducted using end mills with diamond inserts. The machining parameters were changed equally for each material as a result of which the passive force and cutting torque during the milling of these materials could be compared.

  5. Development of empirical relationships for prediction of mechanical and wear properties of AA6082 aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Processing (FSP has been established as a potential solid state production method to prepare aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. FSP was effectively applied to produce AA6082 AMCs reinforced with various ceramic particles such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC in this work. Empirical relationships were estimated to predict the influence of FSP process parameters on the properties such as area of stir zone, microhardness and wear rate of AMCs. FSP experiments were executed using a central composite rotatable design consisting of four factors and five levels. The FSP parameters analyzed were tool rotational speed, traverse speed, groove width and type of ceramic particle. The effect of those parameters on the properties of AMCs was deduced using the developed empirical relationships. The predicted trends were explained with the aid of observed macro and microstructures.

  6. Assessment Of Usability Of Molten Salt Mixtures In Metallurgy Of Aluminum Alloys And Recycling Of Composite Materials Based On The Matrix Of Al Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackowski J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of the slags used in metallurgy of aluminum alloys and in recycling of composite materials containing these alloys depends on their surface properties at the phase boundaries they are in contact with. An index of surface properties of molten mixtures of slag-forming salts has been formulated. Its calculated values are compared with measured results of surface tension (liquid – atmosphere and interfacial tension (liquid – liquid in the considered systems. It was found that the index can be helpful for purposes of proper choice of the mixtures of slag-forming salts used both in Al alloys metallurgy and in recycling of composite materials based on the matrix of Al alloys.

  7. Tungstate and Carbonate Ions Sorption Using Anion Exchangers AV-17-8 and Purolite A400

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chegrintsev S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper shows the results of tungstate and carbonate ion sorption using strongly basic anion exchangers AV-17-8 and Purolite A400. It has been established that anion exchanger AV-17-8 in the chloride form with parameters of 168 g of tungstate ion and 157 g of carbonate ion per 1 kg of anion exchanger has the maximum capacity for the tungstate and carbonate ions.

  8. Coating of 6028 Aluminum Alloy Using Aluminum Piston Alloy and Al-Si Alloy-Based Nanocomposites Produced by the Addition of Al-Ti5-B1 to the Matrix Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labban, Hashem F.; Abdelaziz, M.; Mahmoud, Essam R. I.

    2014-10-01

    The Al-12 pctSi alloy and aluminum-based composites reinforced with TiB2 and Al3Ti intermetallics exhibit good wear resistance, strength-to-weight ratio, and strength-to-cost ratio when compared to equivalent other commercial Al alloys, which make them good candidates as coating materials. In this study, structural AA 6028 alloy is used as the base material. Four different coating materials were used. The first one is Al-Si alloy that has Si content near eutectic composition. The second, third, and fourth ones are Al-6 pctSi-based reinforced with TiB2 and Al3Ti nano-particles produced by addition of Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy with different weight percentages (1, 2, and 3 pct). The coating treatment was carried out with the aid of GTAW process. The microstructures of the base and coated materials were investigated using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX analyzer. Microhardness of the base material and the coated layer were evaluated using a microhardness tester. GTAW process results in almost sound coated layer on 6028 aluminum alloy with the used four coating materials. The coating materials of Al-12 pct Si alloy resulted in very fine dendritic Al-Si eutectic structure. The interface between the coated layer and the base metal was very clean. The coated layer was almost free from porosities or other defects. The coating materials of Al-6 pct Si-based mixed with Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy with different percentages (1, 2, and 3 pct), results in coated layer consisted of matrix of fine dendrite eutectic morphology structure inside α-Al grains. Many fine in situ TiAl3 and TiB2 intermetallics were precipitated almost at the grain boundary of α-Al grains. The amounts of these precipitates are increased by increasing the addition of Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy. The surface hardness of the 6028 aluminum alloy base metal was improved with the entire four used surface coating materials. The improvement reached to about 85 pct by the first type of

  9. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, T.; Tsud, N.; Stetsovych, V.; Mysliveček, J.; Matolín, V.

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed.

  10. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; 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Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; 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    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  11. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

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Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  12. Luminescence of lead-containing tungstates with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, K.C.; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    The luminescence of perovskites with formula Sr1-xPbxLaLiWO6 and Ba2-xPbxMgWO6 is reported. The lower-energy emission in the lead-containing compounds is ascribed to a transition within a centre consisting of a tungstate octahedron with lead-ion neighbours. The presence of Bi3+ is SrLaLiWO6 causes a

  13. Positorn annihilation study on point defects in lead tungstate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A study on point defects in lead tungstate (PbWO4) by using positron annihilation lifetime method is presented. The measurement was carried out for the cases of untreated, vacuum-annealed, oxygen- annealed and La-doped PbWO4 crystals. It was found that the components T2, which reflect the positron annihilation in point defects, are different from each other for each case. Some tentative models for the defects are discussed.

  14. Lead tungstate crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    A consignment of 500 lead tungstate crystals arrived at CERN from the northern Russian town of Apatity in May. Destined for the ALICE heavy-ion experiment in preparation for the Large Hadron Collider, each crystal is an 18 cm long rod with a 2.2 cm square section, and weighs some 750 g. A total of 17 000 crystals will make up the experiment's photon spectrometer.

  15. Luminescence of lead-containing tungstates with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, K.C.; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    The luminescence of perovskites with formula Sr1-xPbxLaLiWO6 and Ba2-xPbxMgWO6 is reported. The lower-energy emission in the lead-containing compounds is ascribed to a transition within a centre consisting of a tungstate octahedron with lead-ion neighbours. The presence of Bi3+ is SrLaLiWO6 causes a

  16. Rare-earth-ion-doped double-tungstate waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been recognized that the monoclinic double tungstates KY(WO4)2, KGd(WO4)2, and KLu(WO4)2 possess a high potential as rare-earth-ion-doped solid-state laser materials, partly due to the high absorption and emission cross-sections of rare-earth ions when doped into these materials. Besides, the

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanocrystalline Zirconium (IV Tungstate Semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manoj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline zirconium (IV tungstate is prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid as the templating agent. Elemental composition is determined by EDS. The characteristic bonding position is identified using FTIR. XRD is used to find the theoritical value of size and phase identification using JCPDS. Morphology is examined using SEM and HRTEM. UV absorption at 260 nm corresponds to an energy gap of 4.48 eV, characteristic of semiconducting nanoparticles.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanocrystalline Zirconium (IV) Tungstate Semiconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj, S.; Beena, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconium (IV) tungstate is prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid as the templating agent. Elemental composition is determined by EDS. The characteristic bonding position is identified using FTIR. XRD is used to find the theoritical value of size and phase identification using JCPDS. Morphology is examined using SEM and HRTEM. UV absorption at 260 nm corresponds to an energy gap of 4.48 eV, characteristic of semiconducting nanopar...

  19. The corrosion behaviour of the aluminum alloy 7075/SiCp metal matrix composite prepared by spray deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Y.L.; Chen, Z.H.; Wu, H.L.; Wang, H.M. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha (China)

    2007-04-15

    Aluminum alloy 7075 and 7075/SiCp (MMC) were prepared by multi-layer spray deposition method and the corrosion behaviour of them were studied by electrochemical measurements to study the effect of the addition of silicon carbide on the corrosion behaviour of the MMC. The electrochemical noise result shows that the amplitude of the potential noise of the composite is lower than that of the spray deposited 7075 alloy. The potentiodynamic polarization curves results show that both the cathodic oxygen reduction current density and the anodic dissolution current density of the 7075/SiCp MMC are less than those of the 7075 alloy. Thus, the addition of SiC particles increases the corrosion resistance of the MMC. This may be due to that the microstructure of the spray deposited MMC is compact and SiC particles are nonmetallic material, the addition of it minimizes the real corrosion area of the alloy. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Local structure of nanosized tungstates revealed by evolutionary algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timoshenko, Janis; Anspoks, Andris; Kuzmin, Alexei [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Kalinko, Alexandr [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Synchrotron SOLEIL, l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured tungstates, such as CoWO{sub 4} and CuWO{sub 4}, are very promising catalytic materials, particularly for photocatalytic oxidation of water. The high catalytic activity of tungstate nanoparticles partially is a result of their extremely small sizes, and, consequently, high surface-to-volume ratio. Therefore their properties depend strongly on the atomic structure, which differ significantly from that of the bulk material. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique to address the challenging problem of the local structure determination in nanomaterials. In order to fully exploit the structural information contained in X-ray absorption spectra, in this study we employ a novel evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the interpretation of the Co and Cu K-edges as well as the W L{sub 3}-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of nanosized CoWO{sub 4} and CuWO{sub 4}. The combined EA-EXAFS approach and simultaneous analysis of the W L{sub 3} and Co(Cu) K-edge EXAFS spectra allowed us for the first time to obtain a 3D structure model of the tungstate nanoparticles and to explore in details the effect of size, temperature and transition metal type. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Simulation of light collection in the CMS lead tungstate crystals with the program Litrani: coating and surface effects

    CERN Document Server

    Chipaux, Rémi

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of the lead tungstate electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment under construction at CERN relies, among other things, on the correction of the calibration parameter from variations dues to crystal ageing. This ageing will be measured by a so-called monitoring system, but the relation between monitoring and calibration parameter variations is not so trivial, and depends much on the overall optical characteristics of crystal and photodetector. We present here simulations done with the program Litrani based on real ageing data for a realistic CMS crystal with a defined surface quality (optically polished, with or without one lateral face slightly depolished), covered by coatings of various characteristics, from totally absorbing to nominal aluminum or diffusing medium. The correlation coefficient between monitoring and scintillation signals depends greatly o n these characteristics, and varies between about 1.3 and more than 10 (the optimum being one). Submitted to or Presented at: Contact ...

  2. 高阻尼铝基复合材料在海水中的腐蚀行为%Corrosion behavior of the high damping aluminum alloy metal matrix composite in seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘维镐; 陈电玲

    2001-01-01

    研究了高阻尼铝基复合材料在海水中的腐蚀行为,本实验所用高阻尼铝基复合材料是以 6061 铝合金为基体,加入 SiC颗粒和石墨粉,用粉末冶金方法制备的。测定了高阻尼铝基复合材料在海 水中的腐蚀速度、电极电位和极化曲线,并通过与基体金属的对比来描述它的腐蚀特性。实验表明, 在海水介质中,高阻尼铝基复合材料的耐蚀性能比 6061铝合金差,孔蚀倾向大。在海水介质中使用 高阻尼铝基复合材料必须加以保护。%Corrosion behavior of the high damping 6061 aluminum alloy metal matrix composites contain- ing silicon carbide particulate and crystalline flake graphite powder reinforcements fabricated by powder metallurgy was investigated experimentally in seawater. The corrosion rate, electrode potential and polari- zation curves of the 6061 aluminum alloy and the high damping 6061 aluminum alloy metal matrix com- posites were measured in seawater. It shows that the corrosion resistance of the composites is inferior to that of 6061 aluminum alloy, pitting corrosion tendency of the composites is far larger than that of 6061 aluminum alloy in seawater. The protection measures are essential for the high damping 6061 aluminum alloy metal matrix composites serving in marine environment.

  3. Energy transfer between octahedral tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, A.C. van der; Hair, J.Th.W. de; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    Energy transfer between tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure is reported. The critical distance for this process is about 25 Å. Evidence is given for energy transfer between tungstate groups. In this case the critical distance is estimated to be about 8 Å.

  4. Temperature-dependent absorption and emission of potassium double tungstates with high ytterbium content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yong, Yean Sheng; Aravazhi, S.; Vázquez-Córdova, Sergio Andrés; Carvajal, J.J.; Diaz, F.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic properties of thin films of potassium ytterbium gadolinium double tungstates, KYb0.57Gd0.43(WO4)2, and potassium ytterbium lutetium double tungstates, KYb0.76Lu0.24(WO4)2, specifically at the central absorption line near 981 nm wavelength, which is important for amplifiers

  5. Energy transfer between octahedral tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, A.C. van der; Hair, J.Th.W. de; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    Energy transfer between tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure is reported. The critical distance for this process is about 25 Å. Evidence is given for energy transfer between tungstate groups. In this case the critical distance is estimated to be about 8 Å.

  6. The growth units and hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元如林; 施尔畏; 李汶军; 郑燕青; 吴南春; 仲维卓

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of lead tungstate (PbWO4) can be regarded as ordered combination of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons (WO4) and lead ions (Pb2+). According to the growth unit model, the growth units of lead tungstate are the aggregations of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons and lead cations with various geometry configurations. It is suggested that the favorable growth units of lead tungstate crystal are pyramidal, tetragonal prism and quadrangular units corresponding to geometric orientations of the simple forms of the crystal. Under low restricted growth conditions, the growth form of lead tungstate crystallites is the aggregation of the geometric configurations of these favorable growth units. The above conclusions are completely confirmed by the experiment on hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate crystallites.

  7. The growth units and hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of lead tungstate (PbWO4) can be regarded as ordered combination of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons (WO4) and lead ions (Pb2+). According to the growth unit model, the growth units of lead tungstate are the aggregations of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons and lead cations with various geometry configurations. It is suggested that the favorable growth units of lead tungstate crystal are pyramidal, tetragonal prism and quadrangular units corresponding to geometric orientations of the simple forms of the crystal. Under low restricted growth conditions, the growth form of lead tungstate crystallites is the aggregation of the geometric configurations of these favorable growth units. The above conclusions are completely confirmed by the experiment on hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate crystallites.

  8. Development of metal tungstate alloys for photoelectrochemical water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, D.; Chong, M.; Chang, Y.; Sarker, P.; Huda, M. N.; Gaillard, N.

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report our efforts on the development of metal tungstate alloys for efficient and economical photoelectrochemical water splitting. As suggested by density functional theory (DFT), the addition of copper to the host tungsten trioxide improves the visible light absorption. Past studies at the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute have demonstrated that water splitting with co-sputtered and spray-deposited CuWO4 with 2.2 eV band gap was feasible, although the efficiency of the process was severely limited by charge carrier recombination. Density functional theory calculation showed that CuWO4 contains unfilled mid-gap states and high electron effective mass. To improve transport properties of CuWO4, we hypothesized that copper tungstate (CuWO4) hollow nanospheres could improve holes transfer to the electrolyte and reduce recombination, improving the water splitting efficiency. Nanospheres were synthesized by sonochemical technique in which the precursors used were copper acetate, ammonium meta-tungstate and thiourea (used as a fuel to complete the reaction). All chemicals undergo a high-energy sonication by using ethylene glycol as a solvent. Preliminary linear scan voltammetry (LSV) performed for annealed CuWO4 under front side and back side simulated AM-1.5 illumination demonstrated that the CuWO4 hollow nanospheres were photoactive. Subsequent scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy studies revealed the clear formation of nano sized hollow spherical shaped CuWO4 particles. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a clear formation of triclinic CuWO4 structure during the sonochemical process.

  9. Dual-Readout Calorimetry with Lead Tungstate Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, N; Cardini, A; Ferrari, R; Gaudio, G; Hauptman, J; Kim, H; La Rotonda, L; Livan, M; Meoni, E; Paar, H; Penzo, Aldo L; Pinci, D; Policicchio, Antonio; Popescu, S; Susinno, G; Roh, Y; Vandelli, W; Wigmans, R

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented of beam tests in which a small electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of lead tungstate crystals was exposed to 50 GeV electrons and pions. This calorimeter was backed up by the DREAM Dual-Readout calorimeter, which measures the scintillation and \\v{C}erenkov light produced in the shower development, using two different media. The signals from the crystal calorimeter were analyzed in great detail in an attempt to determine the contributions from these two types of light to the signals, event by event. This information makes it possible to eliminate the dominating source of fluctuations and thus achieve an important improvement in hadronic calorimeter performance.

  10. Luminescence spectra of lead tungstate, spodumene and topaz crystals Thermoluminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, V

    2002-01-01

    A detailed set of thermoluminescence, cathodoluminescence and radioluminescence (TL, CLTL and RLTL) data of lead tungstate, Spodumene and Topaz have been reported for the first time over a wide temperature range from 25 to 500K. Lead tungstate (PbWO sub 4), a widely known scintillating material, gives TL glow peaks which are related to complex defect centres. Doping of this crystal with trivalent rare earth ions (La sup 3 sup + , Y sup 3 sup +) reduces the slow component of the emission thereby making it more suitable for its applications. The pentavalent dopants on the other hand, enhance the green emission and quench the blue emission at temperatures 100K. The origin and the irradiation temperature definitely have an effect on the spectrum. No strong relationship could be derived from the dose dependence data. Two less studied minerals, Spodumene and Topaz have also been investigated with the luminescence techniques. The glow peak near 250degC is thought to have originated from Mn sup 2 sup + centres. As th...

  11. Anti-obesity sodium tungstate treatment triggers axonal and glial plasticity in hypothalamic feeding centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Amigó-Correig

    Full Text Available This study aims at exploring the effects of sodium tungstate treatment on hypothalamic plasticity, which is known to have an important role in the control of energy metabolism.Adult lean and high-fat diet-induced obese mice were orally treated with sodium tungstate. Arcuate and paraventricular nuclei and lateral hypothalamus were separated and subjected to proteomic analysis by DIGE and mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging were also performed.Sodium tungstate treatment reduced body weight gain, food intake, and blood glucose and triglyceride levels. These effects were associated with transcriptional and functional changes in the hypothalamus. Proteomic analysis revealed that sodium tungstate modified the expression levels of proteins involved in cell morphology, axonal growth, and tissue remodeling, such as actin, CRMP2 and neurofilaments, and of proteins related to energy metabolism. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies confirmed results for some targets and further revealed tungstate-dependent regulation of SNAP25 and HPC-1 proteins, suggesting an effect on synaptogenesis as well. Functional test for cell activity based on c-fos-positive cell counting also suggested that sodium tungstate modified hypothalamic basal activity. Finally, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed that tungstate treatment can affect neuronal organization in the hypothalamus.Altogether, these results suggest that sodium tungstate regulates proteins involved in axonal and glial plasticity. The fact that sodium tungstate could modulate hypothalamic plasticity and networks in adulthood makes it a possible and interesting therapeutic strategy not only for obesity management, but also for other neurodegenerative illnesses like Alzheimer's disease.

  12. A new ion-selective electrode based on aluminium tungstate for Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mu Naushad

    2008-12-01

    An inorganic cation exchanger, aluminum tungstate (AT), has been synthesized by adding 0.1 M sodium tungstate gradually into 0.1 M aluminium nitrate at pH 1.2 with continuous stirring. The ion exchange capacity for Na+ ion and distribution coefficients of various metal ions was determined on the column of aluminium tungstate. The distribution studies of various metal ions showed the selectivity of Fe(III) ions by this cation exchange material. So, a Fe(III) ion-selective membrane electrode was prepared by using this cation exchange material as an electroactive material. The effect of plasticizers viz. dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctylphthalate (DOP), di-(butyl) butyl phosphate (DBBP) and tris-(2-ethylhexylphosphate) (TEHP), has also been studied on the performance of membrane sensor. It was observed that the membrane containing the composition AT: PVC: DBP in the ratio 2 : 20 : 15 displayed a useful analytical response with excellent reproducibility, low detection limit, wide working pH range (1–3.5), quick response time (15 s) and applicability over a wide concentration range of Fe(III) ions from 1 × 10-7 M to 1 × 10-1 M with a slope of 20 ± 1 mV per decade. The selectivity coefficients were determined by the mixed solution method and revealed that the electrode was selective for Fe(III) ions in the presence of interfering ions. The electrode was used for atleast 5 months without any considerable divergence in response characteristics. The constructed sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Fe(III) ions against EDTA and Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample. The results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained by using conventional methods.

  13. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Ammonium cis-Dioxo Dibenzilato Tungstate (VI) Dihydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong; JIANG Ya-Qi; ZHANG Hui; ZHOU Zhao-Hui

    2004-01-01

    A mononuclear tungsten-benzilate, (NH4)2[WO2(Ph2COCOO)2]·2H2O was ob- tained by the reaction of ammonium tungstate(VI) with excess benzilic acid in ethanol solution at pH 5~6. The title compound crystallizes in monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a = 8.1078(5), b = 25.797(2), c = 13.6815(8) (A。), β = 91.001(1)°, V = 2861.1(3) (A。)3, Dc = 1.719 g/cm3, F(000) = 1472, C28H32N2O10W, Mr = 740.41,μ(MoKα) = 4.097 mm-1 and Z = 4. The full-matrix least-squares refinement resulted in R = 0.033 and Rw = 0.068 for 3974 observed reflections with I >2σ(I). The tungsten atom is six-coordinated by two cis-oxo groups and two bidentate benzilate ligands through deprotonated α-alkoxyl and α-carboxyl groups, forming a stable five-membered chelate ring. The compound has a distorted octahedral geometry, which is mainly attributable to the bulky ligand-ligand repulsions.

  14. Potassium double tungstate waveguides with high ytterbium concentration for optical amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yong, Yean-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, the research work concerning high ytterbium concentration potassium double tungstate waveguides catered for optical amplification purpose is presented. The scope of the research work includes the investigation of spectroscopic and optical gain properties in epitaxy layers with

  15. Investigation of the structure/property relationship of spray-formed 7XXX series high-strength aluminum alloys and their metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Judd, Malavika M.

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify the structure/property relationship of spray formed 7XXX series alloys. High solute, ultra-high strength 7XXX series aluminum alloys with solute contents close to equilibrium solid solubility limits of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system have been produced by rapid solidification using spray deposition. The process yields massive preforms directly from the liquid state. Various elements, including chromium, manganese, silver, zirconium and scandium, were incorporated to produce a variety of microstructures and mechanical properties. SiC particulate was added to these same alloy compositions to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs). The resulting extruded products in the T6 and T7 conditions were evaluated and compared. Under peak-aged conditions in the unreinforced materials, strengths in excess of 860 MPa were achieved, with one alloy exceeding 900 MPa. Apart from the elongation to failure, the mechanical properties of the composite materials were equal to or superior to those of their unreinforced counterparts. The superior strength properties of the spray formed alloys were attributed to two major substructures with different scale; nanometer sized eta ' metastable precipitates and slightly larger, but finely distributed dispersoids. The large volume fraction of plate-like eta' precipitates (average size 58A, ranging up to 73 A in diameter) were identified as having a hexagonal structure with lattice parameters a = 0.488 nm and c = 1.376. The remarkable strengthening is predominantly attributed to precipitation hardening. The enhanced mechanical properties of the MMC materials are attributed to the increased dislocation density, and thus, a higher concentration of structural particles compared to the unreinforced materials. Higher gas-to-metal ratios of 4.45, as opposed to lower gas-to-metal ratios of 1.95 produced a refined grain structure with an evenly distributed second phase. In both unreinforced and MMC materials

  16. Raman studies of A2MWO6 tungstate double perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R L; Heyns, A M; Woodward, P M

    2015-06-21

    The Raman spectra of seven A(2)MWO(6) tungstate double perovskites are analysed. Ba(2)MgWO(6) is a cubic double perovskite with Fm3[combining macron]m symmetry and its Raman spectrum contain three modes that can be assigned in a straightforward manner. A fourth mode, the asymmetric stretch of the [WO(6)](6-) octahedron, is too weak to be observed. The symmetry of Ba(2)CaWO(6) is lowered to tetragonal I4/m due to octahedral tilting, but the distortion is sufficiently subtle that the extra bands predicted to appear in the Raman spectrum are not observed. The remaining five compounds have additional octahedral tilts that lower the symmetry to monoclinic P2(1)/n. The further reduction of symmetry leads to the appearance of additional lattice modes involving translations of the A-site cations and librations of the octahedra. Comparing the Raman spectra of fourteen different A(2)MWO(6) tungstate double perovskites shows that the frequency of the symmetric stretch (ν(1)) of the [WO(6)](6-) octahedron is relatively low for cubic perovskites with tolerance factors greater than one due to underbonding of the tungsten and/or M cation. The frequency of this mode increases rapidly as the tolerance factor drops below one, before decreasing gradually as the octahedral tilting gets larger. The frequency of the oxygen bending mode (ν(5)) is shown to be dependent on the mass of the A-site cation due to coupling of the internal bending mode with external A-site cation translation modes.

  17. Comparison of Absorption and Desorption of Cryomill Process Control Agents and Their Effect on Compressive Behavior of Trimodal Aluminum Metal-Matrix-Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    temperature. Powder was consolidated 3 through cold isostatic pressing followed by high-strain rate extrusion, which was carried out on a Dynapak press with...Comparison of Absorption and Desorption of Cryomill Process Control Agents and Their Effect on Compressive Behavior of Trimodal Aluminum Metal...Comparison of Absorption and Desorption of Cryomill Process Control Agents and Their Effect on Compressive Behavior of Trimodal Aluminum Metal

  18. Development of a new electrolyte matrix for MCFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, I.; Higaki, K.; Terada, S.; Suemitsu, T. [Akashi Technical Institute (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To prolong the life of cell is one of the most important issues for MCFC to be brought into actual application. In this respect, investigators have been proposing the addition of tungstate salt such as K2WO4 into MCFC electrolyte, which is supposed effectively to reduce the sintering of anode probably by precipitates formed through the reduction of tungstate with dissolved hydrogen near the anode surface. In this research, such effect upon sintering of anode was quantitatively examined by out-of-cell tests and the validity of above assumption for the mechanism was confirmed. Also other effects of tungstate salt addition into electrolyte, such upon corrosion of separator, solubility of cathode, stability of matrix substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}) were investigated.

  19. Biospeciation of tungsten in the serum of diabetic and healthy rats treated with the antidiabetic agent sodium tungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros; Rodríguez-Fariñas, Nuria; Cañas-Montalvo, Benito; Domínguez, Jorge; Guinovart, Joan; Cámara-Rica, Carmen

    2011-05-30

    It is known that oral administration of sodium tungstate preserves the pancreatic beta cell function in diabetic rats. Healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with sodium tungstate for one, three or six weeks, after which the species of W in serum, were analysed. An increase in serum W with treatment time was observed. After six weeks, the serum W concentration in diabetic rats (70 mg L(-1)) was about 4.6 times higher than in healthy specimens. This different behaviour was also observed for Cu accumulation, while the Zn pattern follows the contrary. The patterns observed in the retention of Cu and Zn may be attributable to a normalization of glycaemia. The speciation analysis of W was performed using 2D separations, including an immunoaffinity packing and a SEC (Size Exclusion Chromatography) column coupled to an ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) for elemental detection. Ultrafiltration data together with SEC-ICP-MS results proved that around 80% of serum W was bound to proteins, the diabetic rats registering a higher W content than their healthy counterparts. Most of the protein-bound W was due to a complex with albumin. An unknown protein with a molecular weight higher than 100 kDa was also found to bind a small amount of W (about 2%). MALDI-TOF (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight) analysis of the desalted and concentrated chromatographic fractions confirmed albumin as the main protein bound to tungstate in rat serum, while no binding to transferrin (Tf) was detected. The interaction between glutathione and W was also evaluated using standard solutions; however, the formation of complexes was not observed. The stability of the complexes between W and proteins when subjected to more stringent procedures, like those used in proteomic methodologies (denaturing with urea or SDS, boiling, sonication, acid media, reduction with β-mercaptoethanol (BME) or DTT (dithiotreitol) and alkylation with

  20. SiCp/Al复合材料焊接技术的研究现状与展望%Development and Outlook in Welding of SiC Particle Enhanced Aluminum Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国庆; 甄公博; 冯吉才

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the common problems and corresponding solutions in welding the SiC particle enhanced aluminum (PEA) matrix composites.Then,the development of PEA welding in China and abroad is summarized.Afterward,the future prospect for the development of the PEA welding is discussed.%阐述了SiCp/Al复合材料(PEA)焊接过程中的常见问题及相应的解决措施.对国内外PEA焊接的研究进展进行了综述及评价,并且对其发展前景进行了展望.

  1. Simultaneous determination of some trace metal impurities in high-purity sodium tungstate using coprecipitation and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiaoguo; KUANG Tongchun; LIU Qianjun

    2004-01-01

    A method based on the combination of coprecipitation with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spec trometry (ICP-AES) was developed for the determination of impurities in high-purity sodium tungstate. Six elements (Co,Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb) were coprecipitated by lanthanum hydroxide so as to be concentrated and separated from the tungsten matrix. Effects of some factors on the recoveries of the analytes and on the residual amount of sodium tungstate were investigated, and the optimum conditions for the coprecipitation were proposed. Matrix-matching calibration curve method was used for the analysis. It is shown that the elements mentioned above can be quantitatively recovered. The detection limits for Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb are 0.07, 0.4, 0.2, 0.1, 0.6, and 1.3 μg.g-1, respectively. The recoveries vary from 92.5% to 108%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) are in the range of 3.1%-5.5%.

  2. Study on wear properties of Al3 Ti/7075 aluminum matrix composites%Al3Ti/7075铝基复合材料磨损性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩; 闫洪; 胡志; 杨素梅

    2011-01-01

    研究了超声原位制备的Al3 Ti/7075铝基复合材料在不同载荷和滑动摩擦速度下的干摩擦磨损性能.采用SEM对磨损面和磨屑显微组织进行观察与分析,讨论了不同载荷下材料的磨损机制.结果表明:基体和复合材料磨损质量损失随着滑动摩擦速度和载荷的增加而增加.基体和复合材料都是从轻微磨损向严重磨损转化.当载荷为10~30N时,基体和复合材料表现为擦伤磨损的特征;当载荷为120N时,基体和复合材料表现为剥层磨损的特征,基体的磨损质量损失与铝基复合材料相比尤为严重;在此条件下,复合材料与基体相比磨损性能增加了14.6%~18%.%The dry sliding friction and wear properties for ultrasound in situ prepared Al3Ti/7075 aluminum matrix composites were studied at different loads and sliding speeds. Using SEM to observe and analyse the microstructure of wear surface and wear debris, the wear mechanism of materials under different loads was discussed. The results show that the wear quality loss of matrix and composite material with sliding friction speed and load is increased. The matrix and composite material are transformed from mild wear to severe wear abrasion. When the load is 10 - 30 N, the matrix and composite material are characterized by scouring abrasion; when the load is 120 N, the matrix and composite material are characterized by delamination wear, and the wear quality loss of matrix is particularly serious compared with a-luminum matrix composites. Under these conditions, the wear performance of composites increases by 14. 6%- 18% compared to the matrix.

  3. Synergistic Effect of Tungstate and Benzotriazole on Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel in Solutions Containing Cl-

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; XI Dan-li; LU Zhu

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of tungstate, benzotriazole (BTA) and their combination in solutions containing Cl- was studied by electrochemical techniques. The results indicated that the inhibition efficiency of tungstate was higher than that of BTA. The efficiency increased with increasing concentration of tungstate or BTA. In the studies of synergistic effect of tungstate and BTA, it had been found that in Ph 9.0 solution, the largest Rt could be obtained with the concentration ratio of tungstate / BTA being 1:1. Lowering the Ph value of solution would reduce the efficiency of inhibitors, especially in binary inhibitors. Increasing the concentration of Cl- accelerated the corrosion of carbon steel in the solutions with various inhibitors, but the influence of Cl- on corroding rate in binary inhibitors was not so strong as in single component. The results of surface analysis showed that W, C, N, O and Fe elements existed in the protecting film formed with binary inhibitors. The thickness of the film was about 12-15nm.

  4. Automatic generation of 2D micromechanical finite element model of silicon–carbide/aluminum metal matrix composites: Effects of the boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element (FE) simulations of the deformation and damage evolution of Silicon–Carbide (SiC) particle reinforced aluminum alloy composite including interphase are carried out for different microstructures and particle volume fractions of the composites. A program is developed...

  5. Synthesis of lanthanum tungstate interconnecting nanoparticles by high voltage electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keereeta, Yanee, E-mail: ynkeereeta@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Titipun, E-mail: ttpthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Somchai [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} as one of semiconducting materials. • H.V. electrospinning was used to synthesize La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} interconnecting nanoparticles. • A promising material for photoemission. - Abstract: Lanthanum tungstate (La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}) interconnecting nanoparticles in the shape of fibers were successfully synthesized by electrospinning in combination with high temperature calcination. In this research, calcination temperature for the synthesis of the fibers evidently influenced the diameter, morphology and crystalline degree. The crystalline monoclinic La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} fibers with 200–700 nm in diameter, two main Raman peaks at 945 and 927 cm{sup −1}, FTIR stretching modes at 936 and 847 cm{sup −1}, 2.02 eV energy gap and 415–430 nm blue emission were synthesized by calcination of inorganic/organic hybrid fibers at 750 °C for 5 h, characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The surface of the composite fibers before calcination was very smooth. Upon calcination the composite fibers at 750 °C for 5 h, they were transformed into nanoparticles join together in the shape of fibers with rough surface.

  6. Combustion synthesis of tungsten powder from sodium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Guojian, E-mail: guojianjiang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Technology, 120 Caobao Road, Shanghai 200235 (China); Xu Jiayue [Shanghai Institute of Technology, 120 Caobao Road, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhuang Hanrui; Li Wenlan [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: > Phase compositions of the combustion products synthesized at different mole ratios of Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}. > Phase compositions of combustion products synthesized at different relative densities. > Phase compositions of combustion product after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing. > Morphology of the combustion product after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing. - Abstract: Tungsten powders were prepared by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS) method directly from hitherto unreported system: sodium tungstate (Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}) and magnesium (Mg). The adiabatic temperatures of self-propagating combustion reactions with different amount of Mg in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} + Mg system were calculated. The influences of different starting conditions (molar ratios of Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and relative densities of samples) on the compositions and microstructure of reaction products were investigated. It shown that, the complete reduction of WO{sub 3} required a 60% excess of magnesium over the stoichiometric molar ratio Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} of 3. The amount of the impurities is minimal at appropriate relative density. At last, tungsten powders can be obtained after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing.

  7. Fascinating morphologies of lead tungstate nanostructures by chimie douce approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Thresiamma; Joseph, Sunny; Sunny, Anu Tresa; Mathew, Suresh [Mahatma Gandhi University, School of Chemical Sciences (India)], E-mail: smathew_mgu@yahoo.com

    2008-04-15

    Lead tungstate occurs in nature as tetragonal stolzite of scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) type and monoclinic raspite. In this work, we report, the typical growth of snowflake-like tetragonal stolzite and bamboo-leaf-like monoclinic raspite nanocrystals of PbWO{sub 4} via a simple aqueous precipitation method and a polyol (polyethylene glycol-200) mediated precipitation method at room temperature (27 deg. C). The synthesised PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were characterised by XRD, SEM, EDAX and TGA-DTA. The UV-Vis absorption and photoluminescence studies of PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals in the two morphologies were performed. The nuclei of PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals in aqueous medium self-assemble in a tetragonal manner to form the snowflake-like crystals. In polyol medium, PbWO{sub 4} nuclei preferentially grow by oriented attachment process to form the bamboo-leaf-like morphology. The specific morphology of the regularly assembled PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals in the two phases finds applications in nanoelectronics and photonics. Compared to other well-known scintillators, PbWO{sub 4} is most attractive for high-energy physics applications, because of its high density, short decay time and high irradiation damage resistance.

  8. A comparative study of the proton transport properties of metal (IV) tungstates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alpana Parikh; Uma Chudasama

    2003-02-01

    Tetravalent metal acid (TMA) salts are cation exchangers due to the presence of structural hydroxyl groups. The presence of protons makes the TMA salt, a potential candidate for solid state protonic conduction. In the present endeavour, amorphous inorganic ion exchangers of the class of TMA salts, tin tungstate (SnW), titanium tungstate (TiW) and zirconium tungstate (ZrW) have been synthesized and characterized for elemental analysis, thermal analysis (TGA, DSC), FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray analysis. Chemical resistivity of these materials have been assessed in various acidic, basic and organic media. Ion exchange capacity has been determined and effect of heating on ion exchange capacity has been studied. The proton conduction behaviour of these materials has been studied by measuring specific conductance () at different temperatures in the range 30-175°C using HP 4192 A impedance analyzer. The specific conductance values for the three materials have been compared.

  9. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Enviromental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2015-11-01

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO{sub 2})(W{sub 2}O{sub 7})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1) and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(W{sub 2}O{sub 8})F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) {sup circle}. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sup -6} or [UO{sub 2}FO{sub 4}]{sup -5}, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  10. Solid state synthesis of copper tungstate nanoparticles and its electrochemical detection of 4-chlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthamizh, S.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Manigandan, R.; Kumar, S. Praveen; Munusamy, S.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2014-04-01

    Copper tungstate (CuWO4) nanoparticles were prepared by Solid state synthesis. The CuWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of copper chloride and sodium tungstate. The XRD pattern reveals that the synthesized CuWO4 has anorthic (triclinic) structure. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD data. The FT-IR analysis confirm the presence of Cu-O and W-O bonds in CuWO4 nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of CuWO4 nanoparticles towards 4-chlorophenol was investigated using cyclic voltammetry.

  11. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Ruiz R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rebeca Fernández-Ruiz,1,2 Marc Pino,3 Begoña Hurtado,4 Pablo García de Frutos,4 Carolina Caballo,3 Ginés Escolar,3 Ramón Gomis,1,2,5 Maribel Diaz-Ricart3 1Diabetes and Obesity Research Laboratory, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Rosellón, Barcelona, 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas, Barcelona, 3Hemotherapy–Hemostasis, Hospital Clínic, Universidad de Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Villarroel, Barcelona, 4Institutode Investigaciones Biomédicas de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer, Rosellón, Barcelona, 5Hospital Clinic, Universitat de Barcelona, Villarroel, Barcelona, Spain Purpose: Platelet inhibition is a key strategy in the management of atherothrombosis. However, the large variability in response to current strategies leads to the search for alternative inhibitors. The antiplatelet effect of the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (Na2O4W, a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B inhibitor, has been investigated in this study.Methods: Wild-type (WT and PTP1B knockout (PTP1B-/- mice were treated for 1 week with Na2O4W to study platelet function with the platelet function analyzer PFA-100, a cone-and-plate analyzer, a flat perfusion chamber, and thrombus formation in vivo. Human blood aliquots were incubated with Na2O4W for 1 hour to measure platelet function using the PFA-100 and the annular perfusion chamber. Aggregometry and thromboelastometry were also performed.Results: In WT mice, Na2O4W treatment prolonged closure times in the PFA-100 and decreased the surface covered (%SC by platelets on collagen. Thrombi formed in a thrombosis mice model were smaller in animals treated with Na2O4W (4.6±0.7 mg vs 8.9±0.7 mg; P<0.001. Results with Na2O4W were similar to those in untreated PTP1B-/- mice (5.0±0.3 mg. Treatment of the PTP1B-/- mice with Na2O4W modified only

  12. 关于TiC/7075铝基复合材料的制备工艺研究%Preparation Techniques of TiC/7075 Aluminum Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓飞; 鲁玉梅

    2012-01-01

    采用原位反应近液相线铸造方法制备含有少量原位TiC颗粒的7075铝基复合材料,通过电子显微镜分析研究TiC/7075铝基复合材料的组织形貌。研究了固溶和时效处理工艺对制备的TiC/7075铝基复合材料显微组织的影响。%The 7075 aluminum matrix com posite with a small amount of in situ TiC particales is made by in-situ-reaction near-liquidus casting and the microstructure of the TiC/7075 composite is analyzed and studied with electronic microscopes.The effects of solid solution and aging on the microstructure are studied.

  13. Manufacturing of Aluminum Composite Material Using Stir Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hayat Jokhio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of aluminum alloy based casting composite materials via stir casting is one of the prominent and economical route for development and processing of metal matrix composites materials. Properties of these materials depend upon many processing parameters and selection of matrix and reinforcements. Literature reveals that most of the researchers are using 2, 6 and 7xxx aluminum matrix reinforced with SiC particles for high strength properties whereas, insufficient information is available on reinforcement of \\"Al2O3\\" particles in 7xxx aluminum matrix. The 7xxx series aluminum matrix usually contains Cu-Zn-Mg. Therefore, the present research was conducted to investigate the effect of elemental metal such as Cu-Zn-Mg in aluminum matrix on mechanical properties of stir casting of aluminum composite materials reinforced with alpha \\"Al2O3\\" particles using simple foundry melting alloying and casting route. The age hardening treatments were also applied to study the aging response of the aluminum matrix on strength, ductility and hardness. The experimental results indicate that aluminum matrix cast composite can be manufactured via conventional foundry method giving very good responses to the strength and ductility up to 10% \\"Al2O3\\" particles reinforced in aluminum matrix.

  14. Direct Hydrothermal Precipitation of Pyrochlore-Type Tungsten Trioxide Hemihydrate from Alkaline Sodium Tungstate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobin; Li, Jianpu; Zhou, Qiusheng; Peng, Zhihong; Liu, Guihua; Qi, Tiangui

    2012-04-01

    Pyrochlore-type tungsten trioxide hemihydrate (WO3·0.5H2O) powder with the average particle size of 0.5 μm was prepared successfully from the weak alkaline sodium tungstate solution by using organic substances of sucrose or cisbutenedioic acid as the acidification agent. The influences of solution pH and acidification agents on the precipitation process were investigated. The results showed that organic acidification agents such as sucrose and cisbutenedioic acid could improve the precipitation of pyrochlore WO3·0.5H2O greatly from sodium tungstate solution compared with the traditional acidification agent of hydrochloric acid. In addition, the pH value of the hydrothermal system played a critical role in the precipitation process of WO3·0.5H2O, and WO3·0.5H2O precipitation mainly occured in the pH range of 7.0 to 8.5. The precipitation rate of tungsten species in the sodium tungstate solution could reach up to 98 pct under the optimized hydrothermal conditions. This article proposed also the hydrothermal precipitation mechanism of WO3·0.5H2O from the weak alkaline sodium tungstate solution. The novel method reported in this study has a great potential to improve the efficiency of advanced tungsten trioxide-based functional material preparation, as well as for the pollution-reducing and energy-saving tungsten extractive metallurgy.

  15. Rare-earth activated potassium double tungstate waveguide amplifiers and lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Geskus, D.; van Dalfsen, Koop; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus

    Several fields, including optical communications, bio-sensing, health, and safety, will greatly benefit from on-chip high-gain amplifiers and high-power, compact, efficient, tunable or short-pulse lasers in channel waveguide geometry. The rare-earth (RE) doped potassium double tungstates KY(WO4)2,

  16. The construction of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter: lead-tungstate (PWO) crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    APD (Avalanche PhotoDiodes) photodetectors are being glued onto the rear face of PWO (lead tungstate, PbWO4) crystals ready for assembly. Fig. 2 shows a PWO crystal and Fig. 3 five crystals put on a tray to feed the automatic measurement machine. Two APDs are shown on pictures n. 4 and 5.

  17. Efficient channel waveguide lasers in monoclinic double tungstates: towards further integration with on-chip mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalfsen, Koop; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Dijkstra, Mindert; Aravazhi, S.; Bernhardi, Edward; García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus

    2012-01-01

    By varying the thulium concentration in the range of 1.5 – 8.0 at.% in thulium- gadolinium-lutetium-yttrium-co-doped monoclinic double tungstate channel waveguides, a maximum laser slope efficiency of 70% with respect to the absorbed pump power was obtained. Further integration of these channel

  18. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, Kaspar; Comellas-Bigler, Mireia; Bevers, Loes E; Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Locher, Kaspar P

    2009-06-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO(4) (2-)) and tungstate (WO(4) (2-)). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across the cell membrane. We have recently reported a crystal structure of the molybdate/tungstate binding protein ModA/WtpA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which revealed an octahedrally coordinated central metal atom. By contrast, the previously determined structures of three bacterial homologs showed tetracoordinate molybdenum and tungsten atoms in their binding pockets. Until then, coordination numbers above four had only been found for molybdenum/tungsten in metalloenzymes where these metal atoms are part of the catalytic cofactors and coordinated by mostly non-oxygen ligands. We now report a high-resolution structure of A. fulgidus ModA/WtpA, as well as crystal structures of four additional homologs, all bound to tungstate. These crystal structures match X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements from soluble, tungstate-bound protein, and reveal the details of the distorted octahedral coordination. Our results demonstrate that the distorted octahedral geometry is not an exclusive feature of the A. fulgidus protein, and suggest distinct binding modes of the binding proteins from archaea and bacteria.

  19. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.-L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2−) and tungstate (WO4 2−). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across th

  20. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.-L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2−) and tungstate (WO4 2−). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  1. A comparative study of proton transport properties of metal (IV) tungstates and their organic derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heemanshu Patel; Alpana Parikh; Uma Chudasama

    2005-04-01

    New hybrid inorgano–organic materials were synthesized by anchoring organic moieties, ortho chlorophenol and para chlorophenol onto metal (IV) tungstates viz. tin tungstate (SnW), titanium tungstate (TiW) and zirconium tungstate (ZW) to give SnWoCP, SnWpCP, TiWoCP, TiWpCP, ZWoCP and ZWpCP, respectively. The materials were characterized for elemental analysis, thermal analysis (TGA, DSC), X-ray analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Chemical resistivity of these materials were assessed in several acidic, basic and organic media. Further, the study of transport properties of these materials has been explored by measuring proton conductivity at different temperatures in the range 30–175°C using HP4192A impedance analyser over a frequency range 5 Hz–13 MHz at a signal level below 1 V. Based on the specific conductance data and Arrhenius plots, a suitable mechanism was proposed and conductance performance of derivatized and nonderivatized materials compared.

  2. Reactive magnetron sputtering deposition of bismuth tungstate onto titania nanoparticles for enhancing visible light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratova, Marina; Kelly, Peter J.; West, Glen T.; Tosheva, Lubomira; Edge, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide - bismuth tungstate composite materials were prepared by pulsed DC reactive magnetron sputtering of bismuth and tungsten metallic targets in argon/oxygen atmosphere onto anatase and rutile titania nanoparticles. The use of an oscillating bowl placed beneath the two magnetrons arranged in a co-planar closed field configuration enabled the deposition of bismuth tungstate onto loose powders, rather than a solid substrate. The atomic ratio of the bismuth/tungsten coatings was controlled by varying the power applied to each target. The effect of the bismuth tungstate coatings on the phase, optical and photocatalytic properties of titania was investigated by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an acetone degradation test. The latter involved measurements of the rate of CO2 evolution under visible light irradiation of the photocatalysts, which indicated that the deposition of bismuth tungstate resulted in a significant enhancement of visible light activity, for both anatase and rutile titania particles. The best results were achieved for coatings with a bismuth to tungsten atomic ratio of 2:1. In addition, the mechanism by which the photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 nanoparticles was enhanced by compounding it with bismuth tungstate was studied by microwave cavity perturbation. The results of these tests confirmed that such enhancement of the photocatalytic properties is due to more efficient photogenerated charge carrier separation, as well as to the contribution of the intrinsic photocatalytic properties of Bi2WO6.

  3. 纤维增强铝基复合材料热残余应力细观力学模型%Micromechanics model of the thermo-residual stress for fiber reinfoced aluminum matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛莉莎; 胡齐阳; 施惠基

    2001-01-01

    从复合材料内部组分的细观力学关系入手,建立了基底/涂层/纤维三层力学模型。该核型能够分析有涂层的连续纤维增强金属基复合材料在温度和机械载荷同时变化下的应力应变关系,并可用于计算铝基复合材料的制造热残余应力状态。算例分析表明:涂层的物理性能对复合材料的整体力学性能有很大影响。在涂层上,有些残余应力分量远高于基底和纤维处的状况。涂层的弹性模量不同,对材料的横向应力影响最大。%In view of the different parts of composition, a three-layer micromechanical model of matrix/coat/fiber is established. It can be used to analyze the stress-strain relationship of fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites with coating material under a superposition of thermal and mechanical loads. In this paper the model is applied to calculate the themo-residual stress in production of a fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite. The physic behavior of the coating material plays an important role in the total mechanical characteristics. Some components of the residual stress in the coat is much greater than that in the matrix and fiber. The transversal stress is obviously influenced by varying the axial modulus of elasticity of the coating material.

  4. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  5. Application of fractional factorial design and Doehlert matrix in the optimization of experimental variables associated with the ultrasonic-assisted acid digestion of chocolate samples for aluminum determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, Nusrat; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jamali, Muhammad Khan; Arain, Muhammad Balal; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Sheerazi, Syed T; Ansari, Rehana

    2007-01-01

    A simple and rapid method based on ultrasound energy is described for the determination of aluminum (AI) in complex matrixes of chocolate and candy samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimization strategy was carried out using multivariate methodologies. Five variables (temperature of the ultrasonic bath; exposure time to ultrasound energy; volumes of 2 acid mixtures, HNO3-H2SO4-H2O2 (1 + 1 + 1) and HNO3-H2O2 (1 + 1); and sample mass) were considered as factors in the optimization process. Interactions between analytical factors and their optimal levels were investigated using fractional factorial and Doehlert matrix designs. Validation of the ultrasonic-assisted acid digestion procedure was performed against standard reference materials, milk powder (SRM 8435) and wheat flour (SRM 1567a). The proposed procedure allowed Al determination with a detection limit of 2.3 microg/L (signal-to-noise = 3) and a precision, calculated as relative standard deviation, of 2.2% for a set of 10 measurements of certified samples. The recovery of Al by the proposed procedure was close to 100%, and no significant difference at the 95% confidence level was found between determined and certified values of Al. The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of Al in chocolate and candy samples. The results indicated that cocoa-based chocolates have higher contents of Al than milk- and sugar-based chocolates and candies.

  6. Enhanced structural and optical properties of the polyaniline-calcium tungstate (PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, N. Aloysius; Francis, Xavier; Anjaly, Jose; Sankararaman, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we report the synthesis and characterization of polyaniline-calcium tungstate nanocomposite, a novel material for potential applications. The PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite was prepared by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of CaWO4 nanoparticles dispersed in ethanol. Investigations using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the nanocomposite of PANI with CaWO4 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy revealed almost uniform distribution of CaWO4 nanoparticles in the polyaniline matrix. These studies also confirmed electronic structure modification as a result of incorporating CaWO4 nanoparticles in PANI. Composite formation resulted in large decrease in the optical band gap and enhanced photoluminescence. The augmented structural, optical and photoluminescence properties of the PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite can be used to explore potential applications in micro- and optoelectronics. This is the first report presenting synthesis and characterization of the PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite.

  7. Time- and energy-efficient solution combustion synthesis of binary metal tungstate nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abegayl; Janáky, Csaba; Samu, Gergely F; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Liu, J Ping; van Nguyen, Vuong; Wang, Evelyn H; Schug, Kevin A; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2015-05-22

    In the search for stable and efficient photocatalysts beyond TiO2 , the tungsten-based oxide semiconductors silver tungstate (Ag2 WO4 ), copper tungstate (CuWO4 ), and zinc tungstate (ZnWO4 ) were prepared using solution combustion synthesis (SCS). The tungsten precursor's influence on the product was of particular relevance to this study, and the most significant effects are highlighted. Each sample's photocatalytic activity towards methyl orange degradation was studied and benchmarked against their respective commercial oxide sample obtained by solid-state ceramic synthesis. Based on the results herein, we conclude that SCS is a time- and energy-efficient method to synthesize crystalline binary tungstate nanomaterials even without additional excessive heat treatment. As many of these photocatalysts possess excellent photocatalytic activity, the discussed synthetic strategy may open sustainable materials chemistry avenues to solar energy conversion and environmental remediation.

  8. Studies of lead tungstate crystal matrices in high energy beams for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, G; Baillon, Paul; Barney, D; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Bateman, E; Bell, K W; Benhammou, Ya; Bloch, P; Bomestar, D; Borgia, B; Bourotte, J; Burge, S R; Cameron, W; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, D J A; Connolly, J; Dafinei, I; Denes, P; Depasse, P; Deiters, K; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; El-Mamouni, H; Faure, J L; Felcini, Marta; Finger, M H; Flügel, T; Gautheron, F; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, S N; Godinovic, N; Graham, D J; Guillaud, J P; Guschin, E; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hillemanns, H; Hofer, H; Ille, B; Jääskeläinen, S; Katchanov, V A; Kennedy, B W; Kirn, T; Korzhik, M V; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebrun, P; Lecoq, P; Lecoeur, Gérard; Lecomte, P; Leonardi, E; Locci, E; Loos, R; Ma, D; Martin, F; Mendiburu, J P; Musienko, Yu V; Nédélec, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newbold, D; Newman, H; Oukhanov, M; Pacciani, L; Peigneux, J P; Pirro, S; Popov, S; Puljak, I; Purves, C; Renker, D; Rondeaux, F; Rosso, E; Rusack, R W; Rykaczewski, H; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Schwenke, J; Seez, Christopher J; Semeniouk, I N; Shagin, P M; Shevchenko, S; Shi, X; Sillou, D; Simohand, D; Singovsky, A V; Soric, I; Smith, B; Stephenson, R; Verrecchia, P; Vialle, J P; Virdee, Tejinder S; Zhu, R Y

    1997-01-01

    Using matrices of lead tungstate crystals energy resolutions better than 0.6% at 100 GeV have been achieved in the test beam in 1995. It has been demonstrated that a lead tungstate electromagnetic calorimeter read out by avalanche photodiodes can consistently achieve the excellent energy resolutions necessary to justify its construction in the CMS detector. The performance achieved has been understood in terms of the properties of the crystals and photodetectors.

  9. Aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  10. Tungstated zirconia as promising carrier for DeNOx catalysts with improved resistance towards alkali poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Kustov, Arkadii; Rasmussen, Søren Birk;

    2006-01-01

    Use of biomass as an alternative to fossil fuels has achieved increasing interest since it is considered neutral regarding CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere. The by far most energy-efficient use of solid bio-resources in energy production is combustion in combined biomass and coal or oilfired po......, and NH3-TPD methods. The influence of calcination temperature of zirconia modified with tungsten oxide on the textural characteristics, acidity and catalytic performance was studied. The resistance of the catalysts towards model poisoning with potassium was found to depend dramatically...... on the crystallinity of the zirconia and on the surface acidity. Vanadia supported on tungstated zirconia calcined at 700 8C revealed superior catalytic performance and resistance towards alkali poisoning in comparison with a traditional catalyst. The improved poisoning resistance of the samples based on tungstated...

  11. Preliminary testing of NiFe2O4-NiO as ceramic matrix of cermet inert anode in aluminum electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦庆伟; 赖延清; 肖劲; 李劼; 刘业翔

    2003-01-01

    Sintered samples of nickel ferrite-nickel oxide ceramic, usually used as the ceramic phase of cermet inert anode in aluminum electrolysis, were prepared and characterized. The solubilities of NiFe2O4-NiO ceramics were measured using an equilibration technique in the Na3AlF6-10%AlF3-5%CaF2-5 %Al2O3 melts at 960 ℃. Electrical resistivity was also measured for NiFe2O4-NiO ceramic samples prepared using the usual ceramic technique as function of temperature and content of NiO with an improved pyroconductivity test device, consisting of a specially constructed closed furnace and a Potentiostat/Galvanostat, based on the conventional direct current four-probe technique. Results show that, under the experimental conditions, the solubility of Fe from NiFe2O4 is 0.06% and Ni from NiFe2O4 is 0.008%. The solubility of Fe and Ni from NiFe2O4-NiO ceramic is inversely related to each other. The solubility of Ni increases but overall solubility of NiFe2O4-NiO ceramics decreases with increasing NiO content. The studied ceramic samples have a semiconductor behavior where electrical resistivity ρ decreases with increasing temperature and the resistivity ρ increases with increasing porosity. The resistivity ρ of NiFe2O4-NiO ceramic shows a minimum with increasing the content of NiO at various temperatures.

  12. Studies of the effect of charged hadrons on lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Scintillating crystals are used for calorimetry in several high-energy physics experiments. For some of them, performance has to be ensured in difficult operating conditions, like a high radiation environment, very large particle fluxes and high collision rates. Results are presented here from a thorough series of measurements concerning mainly the effect of charged hadrons on lead tungstate. It is also shown how these results can be used to predict the effect on crystals due to a given flux of particles.

  13. Study of Radiation Damage in Lead Tungstate Crystals Using Intense High Energy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Batarin, V; Butler, J; Cheung, H; Datsko, V S; Davidenko, A; Derevshchikov, A A; Dzhelyadin, R I; Fomin, Y; Frolov, V; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Khroustalev, K; Konoplyannikov, A K; Konstantinov, A S; Kravtsov, V; Kubota, Y; Leontiev, V M; Lukanin, V S; Maisheev, V; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Mikhalin, N; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V; Morozov, D A; Mountain, R; Nogach, L V; Pikalov, V A; Ryazantsev, A; Semenov, P A; Shestermanov, K E; Soloviev, L; Solovyanov, V L; Stone, S; Ukhanov, M N; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A; Yakutin, A; Yarba, J V

    2003-01-01

    We report on the effects of radiation on the light output of lead tungstate crystals. The crystals were irradiated by pure, intense high energy electron and hadron beams as well as by a mixture of hadrons, neutrons and gammas. The crystals were manufactured in Bogoroditsk, Apatity (both Russia), and Shanghai (China). These studies were carried out at the 70-GeV proton accelerator in Protvino.

  14. Study of radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals using intense high-energy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batarin, V.A.; Brennan, T.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Datsko, V.S.; Davidenko, A.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Dzhelyadin, R.I.; Fomin, Y.V.; Frolov, V.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Y.; Khroustalev, K.; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Leontiev, V.M.; Lukanin, V.S.; Maisheev, V.A.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Melnick, Y.M.; Meschanin, A.P.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Minaev, N.G.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Mountain, R.; Nogach, L.V.; Pikalov, V.A.; Ryazantsev, A.V.; Semenov, P.A. E-mail: semenov@mx.ihep.su; Shestermanov, K.E.; Soloviev, L.F.; Solovianov, V.L.; Stone, S.; Ukhanov, M.N.; Uzunian, A.V.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Yakutin, A.E.; Yarba, J

    2003-10-21

    We report on the effects of radiation on the light output of lead tungstate crystals. The crystals were irradiated by pure, intense high-energy electron and hadron beams as well as by a mixture of hadrons, neutrons and gammas. The crystals were manufactured in Bogoroditsk, Apatity (both Russia), and Shanghai (China). These studies were carried out at the 70-GeV proton accelerator in Protvino.

  15. High-power Yb- and Tm-doped double tungstate channel waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalfsen, van K.; Geskus, D.; Ay, F.; Wörhoff, K.; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, M.

    2011-01-01

    The potassium double tungstates KGd(WO4)2, KY(WO4)2, and KLu(WO4)2 are excellent candidates for solid-state lasers because of their high refractive index of ~2.0-2.1, the large transition cross-sections of rare-earth (RE3+) ions doped into these hosts, and a reasonably large thermal conductivity of

  16. Tungstate decreases weight gain and adiposity in obese rats through increased thermogenesis and lipid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Corominola, Helena; Canals, Ignasi; Saura, Josep; Barcelo-Batllori, Silvia; Guinovart, Joan J; Gomis, Ramon

    2005-10-01

    The increasing worldwide incidence of obesity and the limitations of current treatments raise the need for finding novel therapeutic approaches to treat this disease. The purpose of the current study was first to investigate the effects of tungstate on body weight and insulin sensitivity in a rat model of diet-induced obesity. Second, we aimed to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying its action. Oral administration of tungstate significantly decreased body weight gain and adiposity without modifying caloric intake, intestinal fat absorption, or growth rate in obese rats. Moreover, the treatment ameliorated dislipemia and insulin resistance of obese rats. These effects were mediated by an increase in whole-body energy dissipation and by changes in the expression of genes involved in the oxidation of fatty acids and mitochondrial uncoupling in adipose tissue. Furthermore, treatment increased the number of small adipocytes with a concomitant induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that tungstate treatment may provide the basis for a promising novel therapy for obesity.

  17. Specific adsorption of tungstate by cell surface display of the newly designed ModE mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    By cell surface display of ModE protein that is a transcriptional regulator of operons involved in the molybdenum metabolism in Escherichia coli, we have constructed a molybdate-binding yeast (Nishitani et al., Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 86:641-648, 2010). In this study, the binding specificity of the molybdate-binding domain of the ModE protein displayed on yeast cell surface was improved by substituting the amino acids involved in oxyanion binding with other amino acids. Although the displayed S126T, R128E, and T163S mutant proteins adsorbed neither molybdate nor tungstate, the displayed ModE mutant protein (T163Y) abolished only molybdate adsorption, exhibiting the specific adsorption of tungstate. The specificity of the displayed ModE mutant protein (T163Y) for tungstate was increased by approximately 9.31-fold compared to the displayed wild-type ModE protein at pH 5.4. Therefore, the strategy of protein design and its cell surface display is effective for the molecular breeding of bioadsorbents with metal-specific adsorption ability based on a single species of microorganism without isolation from nature.

  18. Influence of Waste Glass Grain on Mechanical Properties of Glass-aluminum Metal Matrix Composite%废玻璃颗粒对铝基复合材料力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雷; 张记市; 孙可伟

    2011-01-01

    采用搅拌铸造法制备玻璃颗粒增强铝基废物复合材料,利用SEM、XRD等手段观察和分析了玻璃颗粒在复合材料制备中的变化情况,研究了玻璃颗粒含量对复合材料抗拉强度和耐磨强度的影响.结果表明,玻璃颗粒较均匀地分布于基体中,界面结合良好;与基体相比,复合材料耐磨性能提高了4.62倍,抗拉强度提高并不明显;玻璃颗粒表面发生熔融,裂纹在铝液中能够自我修复,从而提高复合材料的力学性能.%The glass/aluminum metal matrix composite was prepared by stirring cast. The surface change of the grains was studied by SEM and XRD. The influnce of glass grain on the tensile strength and abrasive resistance of the composite was studied. The results show that glass grains could scatter and suspend well in melt; compared with matrix alloy, the abrasive resistanc of the composite is improved by 4.62 times, but the increase of tensile strength of the composite is not obvious; when glass grains scattering and suspending in alloy, the melting phenomenon occurs on grain surface, and the crack in aluminium liquid can self-heal, meanwhile, the mechanical property of the composite improves.

  19. Rheocasting Al Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girot, F. A.; Albingre, L.; Quenisset, J. M.; Naslain, R.

    1987-11-01

    Aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced by SiC short fibers (or whiskers) can be prepared by rheocasting, a process which consists of the incorporation and homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement by stirring within a semi-solid alloy. Using this technique, composites containing fiber volume fractions in the range of 8-15%, have been obtained for various fibers lengths (i.e., 1 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm for SiC fibers). This paper attempts to delineate the best compocasting conditions for aluminum matrix composites reinforced by short SiC (e.g Nicalon) or SiC whiskers (e.g., Tokamax) and characterize the resulting microstructures.

  20. Fabrication of aluminum-alumina metal matrix composites via cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure followed by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodder, K.J.; Izadi, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, 7th Floor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Research Facility, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada); McDonald, A.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, 4-9 Mechanical Engineering Building, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Gerlich, A.P., E-mail: agerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2012-10-30

    Cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure (1 MPa gage or 150 psig) was used to fabricate Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings onto 6061 Al alloy. The powder contained Al powder admixed with -10 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in fractions up to 90 wt.%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Vickers microhardness testing, and image analysis were conducted to determine the microstructure, properties, and volume fraction of reinforcing particles in the coatings. The coatings were then friction-stir processed (FSP) at tool rotation speeds of 894 or 1723 RPM using a flat cylindrical tool. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and hardness of the final MMC coatings increased with increasing fractions of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in the feedstock powder, resulting in a maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of 48 wt.% and a hardness of 85 HV of the as-sprayed coating when 90 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used in the feed powder blend. After FSP, the hardness of the MMC increased to a maximum of 137 HV. The as-sprayed coatings contained Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles that were segregated between the Al particles, and FSP was effective in dispersing these Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and decreasing their mean free path. It was suggested that this re-distribution and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle size refinement during FSP improved the hardness of the MMC coatings.

  1. EFFECTS OF TUNGSTATE ON THE GROWTH OF DESULFOVIBRIO-GIGAS NCIMB-9332 AND OTHER SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA WITH ETHANOL AS A SUBSTRATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENSGENS, CMH; NIENHUISKUIPER, ME; HANSEN, TA

    1994-01-01

    Growth of Desulfovibrio gigas NCIMB 9332 in mineral, vitamin-supplemented media with ethanol as substrate was strongly stimulated by the addition of tungstate (optimal level approximately 10(-7) M). At suboptimal tungstate concentrations, up to 1.0 mM acetaldehyde was detected in the culture superna

  2. Polarization properties of real aluminum mirrors; I. Influence of the aluminum oxide layer

    CERN Document Server

    van Harten, G; Keller, C U

    2009-01-01

    In polarimetry it is important to characterize the polarization properties of the instrument itself to disentangle real astrophysical signals from instrumental effects. This article deals with the accurate measurement and modeling of the polarization properties of real aluminum mirrors, as used in astronomical telescopes. Main goals are the characterization of the aluminum oxide layer thickness at different times after evaporation and its influence on the polarization properties of the mirror. The full polarization properties of an aluminum mirror are measured with Mueller matrix ellipsometry at different incidence angles and wavelengths. The best fit of theoretical Mueller matrices to all measurements simultaneously is obtained by taking into account a model of bulk aluminum with a thin aluminum oxide film on top of it. Full Mueller matrix measurements of a mirror are obtained with an absolute accuracy of ~1% after calibration. The determined layer thicknesses indicate logarithmic growth in the first few hou...

  3. 强脉冲磁场冲击处理对铝基复合材料塑性的影响机制∗%Mechanism of high pulsed magnetic field treatment of the plasticity of aluminum matrix comp osites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏明; 李沛思; 郑瑞; 李桂荣; 袁雪婷

    2015-01-01

    For aluminum matrix composite, the introduced particles will strengthen the matrix, but as the obstacles, the heterogeneous particles will hinder the dislocation movement, generate uneven material structure, and may become a source of stress concentration. Therefore, they are detrimental severely to the elongation and plasticity of composite. It is known that dislocations exhibit a paramagnetic behavior because they contain paramagnetic centers including localized electrons, holes, triplet excitons, ion radicals, etc. The initial radical pair of the dislocation-obstacle S (spin angular momentum)=± 1/2 is in a singlet state, and the total spin of the radical pair is 0 and in the antiparallel spin direction, offsetting a magnetism of the radical pair. The magnetic field can change the spin direction from singlet state to triplet state. In the triplet state the electron spin is 1 and in the same spin direction. A strong bond of the dislocation-obstacle is formed only in the singlet state when the spins of the two electrons are antiparallel. So an obstacle is able to pin a dislocation only if the radical pair is in the singlet state. Under the condition of high pulsed magnetic field treatment (HPMFT) the conversion of electronic spin will be a fundamental cause of dislocation motion along a glide plane. The movement of pinned dislocations will change the material microstructure and influence the performance of material. By comparing the microstructural evolutions and the residual stresses of samples subjected to HPMFT with different values of magnetic induced density (B), the positive influence of magnetoplastic effect on the plasticity of aluminum matrix composite is investigated in this paper. The results show that the dislocation density is significantly increased when B changes from 2 T to 4 T. When B = 4 T the dislocation density is enhanced by 3.1 times compared with that of the sample without HPMFT. Moreover, the residual stress is reduced apparently from 41

  4. Phase equilibria diagrams, crystal growth peculiarities and Raman investigations of lead and sodium-bismuth tungstate-molybdate solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Andrei V.; Avanesov, Samvel A.; Yunalan, Tyliay M.; Klimenko, Valeriy A.; Ignatyev, Boris V.; Isaev, Vladislav A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a comprehensive study of lead and sodium-bismuth tungstate-molybdate solid solutions was carried out, including the clarification of their structural peculiarities and phase diagrams of PbMoO4-PbWO4 and NaBi(MoO4)2-NaBi(WO4)2 systems, the study of spontaneous Raman spectra of these compounds, as well as preliminary experiments on single crystals growth of lead tungstate-molybdate. The linewidths, peak and integral intensities of the totally symmetric Raman vibrations of solid solutions were estimated in comparison with known SRS-active crystals. The conditions of the Czochralski growth of optically transparent lead tungstate-molybdate mixed crystals were found and SRS effect was observed in these crystals when pumping by 12 ns 1064 nm laser pulses.

  5. Rheology of suspensions with aluminum nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Teipel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale aluminum particles are innovative materials increasingly used in energetic formulations. In this contribution, the rheological behavior of suspensions with either paraffin oil or HTPB as the matrix fluid and nano-scale aluminum (ALEX as the dispersed phase is described and discussed. The paraffin oil/aluminum suspensions exhibit non-Newtonian flow behavior over a wide range of concentrations, whereas the HTPB/aluminum suspensions exhibitNewtonian behavior (i.e. the viscosity is independent of shear stress up to a concentration of 50 vol.% aluminum. Both systems have unusual viscoelastic properties in that their elastic moduli are independent of the solids concentration.

  6. The Preparation and Properties of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite%碳纤维增强铝基复合材料的制备及其拉伸性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德庆; 石子源; 高宏

    2000-01-01

    The tensile test specimen of the continuous carbon fiber reinforced aluminum matrix com- posites were prepared by using squeeze casting under three different solidification conditions. The tensile test was also conducted. The tensile strength and elastic modulus of the composite are in- creased with the increase in the carbon fiber content. The tensile strength of the composite with 48 Vol.% carbon fiber is 50% higher than that of the matrix material. However, the plasticities of the composite are decreased dramatically with the increase in the carbon content. When the carbon fiber content is small, the solodification conditions have greater effect on tensile strength but smaller on elastic modulus of the composite, while large amount of carbon fibers are added, solidification condi- tions affect elastic modulus more and tensile strength less.%利用挤压铸造方法,采用三种不同的凝固条件,制备了连续长碳纤维增强铝基复合材料的拉伸试样,并对其拉伸性能进行了试验.试验结果表明,该复合材料的抗拉强度和弹性模量皆随碳纤维的体积含量增加而增加.含48%碳纤维的复合材料比基体材料的拉伸强度高50%以上.但塑性指标随碳纤维含量的增加而显著降低.当连续碳纤维的体积含量较小时,凝固条件对该复合材料的抗拉强度影响较大,对弹性模量的影响较小;当碳纤维的体积含量较大时,凝固条件对该复合材料的抗拉强度影响较小,而对弹性模量的影响较大.

  7. A damage and recovery study for lead tungstate crystal samples from BTCP and SIC

    CERN Document Server

    Jianming, Chen; Li Yuan Zhang; Ren Yuan Zhu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an in depth study on radiation damage and recovery in lead tungstate crystals produced at BTCP and SIC. Correlations were observed between initial light output and initial longitudinal transmittance at 360 nm, between the loss of longitudinal transmittance at 440 nm and the amplitude of radiation damage, and between radiation damage levels at different dose rates. Excellent linearity was observed between the variations of crystal's light output and its longitudinal transmittance at 440 nm in repeated cycles of irradiation at a dose rate up to 400 rad/h followed by recovery, indicating these PWO crystals can be monitored in situ at LHC.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and application of an inorgano organic material: -chlorophenol anchored onto zirconium tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Beena Pandit; Uma Chudasama

    2001-06-01

    Tetravalent metal acid (TMA) salt zirconium tungstate (ZW) has been synthesized, followed by its derivatization using para-chlorophenol (CP). The resulting compound is abbreviated as ZWCP. ZWCP has been characterized for elemental analysis, spectral analysis (FTIR), X-ray analysis and thermal analysis (TGA). Its chemical stability has been assessed in various mineral acids, bases and organic solvents. Ion exchange capacity (IEC) has been determined and distribution behaviour towards several metal ions in different electrolyte solutions with varying concentrations has been studied and a few binary separations achieved.

  9. Piezo- and elasto-optic coefficients for calcium tungstate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytsyk, B G; Demyanyshyn, N M; Solskii, I M; Sakharuk, O M

    2016-11-10

    A general equation describing the rotation of an optical indicatrix of tetragonal crystals (4, 4¯, 4/m symmetry classes) around the X3 axis (optical axis) depending on the direction of uniaxial pressure in the plane perpendicular to crystal optical axis is written. Partial cases of the general equation, when pressure is acting along the X1 (X2) axis or along the diagonal between the X1 and X2 axes, are received. The values of piezo-optic coefficients (POCs) π61, π16, and π45 are determined by the conoscopic method on the basis of the appropriate equations. Other POCs πim are determined by the interferometric method. All components of the matrix of elasto-optic coefficients are also determined as pin=πimCmn. These results are being compared to the ones received on the basis of wave-mechanical calculations. Objective pin values are necessary to build indicative surfaces of the elasto-optic effect and to find maximums of these surfaces and appropriate maximum values of acousto-optic quality coefficients.

  10. Adsorptional removal of methylene blue by guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate hybrid cationic exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Pathania, Deepak; Singh, Pardeep; Kumar, Amit; Rathore, B S

    2014-01-30

    Guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate nanocomposite (GG/CTNC) cationic exchanger was synthesized using simple sol gel method. The GG/CTNC was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer (EDX). The XRD studies confirmed amorphous and fibrous in nature of GG/CTNC. The high percentage of oxygen in the nanocomposite material confirmed the functionality tungstate (WO4(-)). The ion exchange capacity of GG/CTNC for Na(+) ion was observed to be 1.30 mequivg(-1). The hybrid exchanger was used as potential adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous system. The correlation coefficients value indicated a good fit of monolayer Langmuir model to the adsorption of methylene blue onto GG/CTNC. The adsorption kinetic study revealed that the adsorption process followed the pseudo second order kinetic. The Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values confirmed the spontaneous nature of adsorption process.

  11. DTA/TG, IR, EPR and XPS studies of some praseodymium(III) tungstates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, S.M., E-mail: skaczmarek@zut.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Al. Piastow 17, 70-310 Szczecin (Poland); Tomaszewicz, E. [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Al. Piastow 42, 71-065 Szczecin (Poland); Moszynski, D. [Institute of Chemical and Environment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Ul. Pulaskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin (Poland); Jasik, A.; Leniec, G. [Institute of Physics, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Al. Piastow 17, 70-310 Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-11-01

    The praseodymium(III) tungstates (Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Pr{sub 2}WO{sub 6}) have been prepared as polycrystalline powders by thermal treatments of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/WO{sub 3} mixtures in air. It was found the existence of only two polymorphic modification of Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9}. The low-temperature polymorph of Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9} undergoes reversible polymorphic transition at 1390 K. Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9} melts incongruently at 1462 K. Low-temperature modification of Pr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} is thermally stable up to 1773 K. EPR spectra had shown weak only interactions between tungstate W{sup 5+} ions that were confirmed also by XPS measurements. Hyperfine structure of W{sup 4+} ions was also recognized. The spectra characteristics for Pr{sup 4+} ions were not observed both in EPR and XPS experiments.

  12. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N. R.; Brown, D. R.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 Å = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  13. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K; Boyes, E D; Gai, P L [York JEOL Nanocentre (United Kingdom); Shiju, N R; Brown, D R, E-mail: pgb500@york.ac.u [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 A = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  14. Corrosion evaluation of zirconium doped oxide coatings on aluminum formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajat, Jelena; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Vasilić, Rastko; Stojadinović, Stevan

    2014-01-01

    The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of aluminum in sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O) and Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O doped with Zr was analyzed in order to obtain oxide coatings with improved corrosion resistance. The influence of current density in PEO process and anodization time was investigated, as well as the influence of Zr, with the aim to find out how they affect the chemical content, morphology, surface roughness, and corrosion stability of oxide coatings. It was shown that the presence of Zr increases the corrosion stability of oxide coatings for all investigated PEO times. Evolution of EIS spectra during the exposure to 3% NaCl, as a strong corrosive agent, indicated the highest corrosion stability for PEO coating formed on aluminum at 70 mA/cm(2) for 2 min in a zirconium containing electrolyte.

  15. Loss compensation in metal-loaded hybrid plasmonic waveguides using Yb3+ potassium double tungstate gain materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Sefünç, Mustafa; van Voorden, M.H.; Pollnau, Markus

    The compensation of propagation losses of plasmonic nanowaveguides will constitute an important milestone towards the widespread use of these structures as enabling components for highly dense, fast, on-chip nanophotonic circuitry. Rare-earth doped double tungstate gain materials can not only

  16. Ultra-high, broadband gain in a lattice-engineered, Yb-doped double tungstate channel waveguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geskus, D.; Aravazhi, S.; Bernhardi, E.H.; Agazzi, L.; García-Blanco, S.M.; Pollnau, M.

    2012-01-01

    150 dB/cm gain over 55 nm wavelength range between 977-1032 nm is obtained in a 47.5% Yb-doped potassium double tungstate waveguide amplifier. The dependence of luminescence lifetime and gain on Yb concentration is investigated.

  17. Synthesis of Aluminum-Aluminum Nitride Nanocomposites by a Gas-Liquid Reaction II. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, Cecilia; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2016-04-01

    In situ fabrication of the reinforcing particles in the metal matrix is an answer to many of the challenges encountered in manufacturing aluminum matrix nanocomposites. In this method, the nanoparticles are formed directly within the melt by means of a chemical reaction between a specially designed aluminum alloy and a gas. In this publication, we describe a process for synthesizing aluminum-aluminum nitride nanocomposites by reacting a nitrogen-containing gas with a molten aluminum-lithium alloy. We quantify the effect of the process parameters on the average particle size and particle distribution, as well as on the tendency of the particles to cluster in the alloy matrix, is quantified. Also in this publication, we present the measured room temperature and elevated temperature tensile properties of the nanocomposite material as well as its measured room temperature impact toughness.

  18. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    A novel analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Linear gradient elution from 100% water to 100% 0.7 M NaCl was applied for chromatographic separation of metal species. In standard aqueous solution at neutral pH molybdate, tungstate and vanadate exist in several aqueous species, while chromate is present as a single CrO4(2-) species. Consequently, only chromate can be separated from this solution in a sharp chromatographic peak. For obtaining sharp chromatographic peaks for molybdate, tungstate and vanadate, the pH of aqueous standard solutions was raised to 12. At highly alkaline conditions single CrO4(2-), MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) are present and were eluted in sharp chromatographic peaks, while VO4(3-) species, which predominates at pH 12 was eluted in slightly broaden peak. In a mixture of aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate were eluted at retention times from 380 to 420 s, 320 to 370 s, 300 to 350 s and 240 to 360 s, respectively. Eluted species were simultaneously detected on-line by ICP-MS recording m/z 52, 95, 182 and 51. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of leachable concentrations of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in alkaline extracts (2% NaOH+3% Na2CO3) of manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes loaded on filters. Good repeatability and reproducibility of measurement (RSD±3.0%) for the investigated species were obtained in both aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) and in alkaline extracts of welding fumes. Low limits of detection (LODs) were found for chromate (0.02 ng Cr mL(-1)), molybdate (0.1 ng Mo mL(-1)), tungstate (0.1 ng W mL(-1)) and vanadate (0.2 ng V mL(-1)). The accuracy of analytical procedure for the determination of chromate was checked by analysis of

  19. Melting, growth, and faceting of lead precipitates in aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gråbæk, L.; Bohr, J.; Andersen, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum single crystals cut in the direction were implanted with 2 x 10(20) m-2 Pb+ ions at 75 or 150 keV. The implanted insoluble lead precipitated as epitaxially oriented crystallites in the aluminum matrix. The precipitates were studied by x-ray diffraction at Riso, DESY, and Brookhaven...

  20. Aluminum/steel wire composite plates exhibit high tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Composite plate of fine steel wires imbedded in an aluminum alloy matrix results in a lightweight material with high tensile strength. Plates have been prepared having the strength of titanium with only 85 percent of its density.

  1. Opportunities for aluminum-based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, H.

    2017-07-01

    High performance aluminum alloys are conventionally made by heat treating alloys containing a variety of alloying elements in solid solution. Key performance attributes are controlled at the microstructural level by tailoring sizes and morphology of nano-sized second phases. This enabled the successful development of aluminum alloys having properties optimized in strength, damage tolerance and corrosion resistance. However, this process is naturally limited by the solubility of alloying elements in the aluminum matrix. In real world products, significant effort is deployed to achieve a homogeneous distribution of the alloying elements both at the macro and micro scales. Despite these efforts, heat treatable alloys can exhibit chemical gradients at grain boundaries, resulting in sub-optimized properties. Additionally, due to the very nature of the strengthening mechanisms, the properties of heat-treatable alloys are decreasing when exposed to elevated temperatures. To step outside the boundaries given by the solubility of alloying elements in the aluminum matrix, the extrinsic addition of nano-sized particles to the aluminum matrix is being evaluated.

  2. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  3. Development of Alcoa aluminum foam products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, J.D.; Crowley, M.D.; Wang, W.; Wilhelmy, D.M.; Hunter, D.E. [Alcoa Technical Center, Alcoa Center, PA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A new lightweight aluminum foam product was described. The foam was made through the controlled decomposition of carbonate powders within molten aluminum and was able to resist both coalescence and drainage. The fine-celled aluminum foam derived its physical and mechanical properties from the properties of the aluminum alloy matrix from which they were produced. The rheology of the molten aluminum was modified to provide a superior mesostructure. Stabilization was achieved by creating a solid-gas-liquid suspension initiated by the addition of carbonates into an aluminum alloy melt. A cascade of chemical reactions then occurred within the melt to create a foamable suspension. Carbon monoxide (CO) was generated to initiate an additional sequence of chemical reactions which resulted in the formation of solid particles within the liquid metal. CO reacted with liquid Al to form graphite. The graphite then reacted with Al to form aluminum carbide (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}). The microstructural, mesostructural, and mechanical character of the foams produced under different processing conditions were examined. Details of experimental test procedures were also described. It was concluded that the specific crush energy absorption was as high as 20 kJ/kg. The foam exhibited a bending stiffness that was approximately 20 to 30 times higher than balsa and polymer foams. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  4. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T(e and N(e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T(e and N(e for the aluminum in aluminum alloys using an optical fiber probe.

  5. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T e and N e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T e and N e for aluminum in aluminum alloys as a marker for the correct alloying using an optical fiber probe.

  6. Improvement of several properties of lead tungstate crystals with different doping ions

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Baccaro, Stefania; Cecilia, Angelica; Dafinei, Ioan; Diemoz, Marcella; Jarolímek, O; Korzhik, Mikhail; Lecoq, Paul; Nikl, M

    1998-01-01

    A very good radiation resistance of Lead Tungstate crystals is mandatory for their use in the high precision electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at LHC. Since the beginning of 1996 we have organised systematic investigations of the parameters influencing the radiation hardness of this crystal. Two classes of parameters have been particularly studied, the first one related to the control of the stoichiometry and structure associated defects, the second one connected with the suppression and the charge compensation of existing defects with different kinds of doping ions. This paper reports about the second part of this study and complements a first paper where the role of the stoichiometry was already discussed. Results of tests are given on a significant statistical sample of full size crystals ( 23cm) which show a considerable improvement in the optical properties and the radiation resistance of appropriately doped crystals.

  7. The pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate: a precursor to decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Akhilesh K [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sastry, V S [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sahu, P Ch [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mary, T A [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2004-02-25

    In contrast to widely accepted view that pressure-induced amorphization arises due to kinetic hindrance of equilibrium phase transitions, here we provide evidence that the metastable pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate is a precursor to decomposition of the compound into a mixture of simple oxides. This is from the volume collapse {delta}V across amorphization, which is obtained for the first time by measuring linear dimensions of irreversibly amorphized samples during their recovery to the original cubic phase upon isochronal annealing up to 1000 K. The anomalously large {delta}V of 25.7 {+-} 1.2% being the same as that expected for the decomposition indicates that this amorphous state is probably a precursor to kinetically hindered decomposition. A P-T diagram of the compound is also proposed.

  8. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Liang Ying; Zhu, R Y; Liu, D T

    2001-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an intercalibration for Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) lead tungstate crystals in situ at the Large Hadronic Collider, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's subpercent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter monitoring light source and high-level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of yttrium-doped PbWO/sub 4/ crystals were investigated and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. (12 refs).

  9. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Li Yuan Zhang; Ren Yuan Zhu; Duncan, Liu

    2000-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an inter calibration for the CMS lead tungstate crystals in situ at LHC, which is crucial for maintaining the crystal calorimeter's sub percent constant term in energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS ECAL monitoring light source and high level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of Y doped PbWO/sub 4/ crystals were investigated, and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of the wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. (13 refs).

  10. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L; Wei, Q; Zhu, R Y; Liu, D T

    2002-01-01

    Light monitoring will track variations of the calibration of the CMS lead tungstate crystals in situ at LHC, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's subpercent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS ECAL monitoring light source and high level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of yttrium doped PbWO/sub 4/ crystals were investigated, and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. (13 refs).

  11. Vanadia-based SCR Catalysts Supported on Tungstated and Sulfated Zirconia: Influence of Doping with Potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Boghosian, Soghomon; Kustov, Arkadii

    2007-01-01

    A series of vanadium-based SCR catalysts supported on sulfated or tungstated ZrO2 were synthesized and characterized by means of N2-BET, XRD, NH3-TPD and in situ Raman spectroscopy. The effect of potassium doping on the properties of vanadia species is studied in detail. A number of catalyst...... and morphology, the surface composition and the molecular configuration of the dispersed vanadates. It was observed that poisoning with potassium had a negligible effect on the surface vanadate species (especially the V=O stretching frequency observed by in situ Raman spectroscopy) if supported on the sulfated...... the observed decrease in V=O stretching frequency and the higher proportion of dimers and higher polymers through coordination between K+ and two neighbouring V=O. The results suggest an increased resistance towards potassium doping for the vanadia-based catalysts supported on sulfated zirconia....

  12. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan, Mohamad, E-mail: rizwan@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, Joliot-Curie Str.6, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-29

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  13. Anodic oxides on InAlP formed in sodium tungstate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleiman, A. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.skeldon@manchester.ac.uk; Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Echeverria, F. [Corrosion and Protection Group, University of Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Graham, M.J.; Sproule, G.I.; Moisa, S.; Quance, T. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Montreal Road, Ottawa K1A 0R6 (Canada); Habazaki, H. [Graduate Engineering School, Hokkaido University, N13 W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Amorphous anodic oxide films on InAlP have been grown at high efficiency in sodium tungstate electrolyte. The films are shown to comprise an outer layer containing indium species, an intermediate layer containing indium and aluminium species and an inner layer containing indium, aluminium and phosphorus species{sub .} The layering correlates with the influence on cation migration rates of the energies of In{sup 3+}-O, Al{sup 3+}-O and P{sup 5+}-O bonds, which increase in this order. The film surface becomes increasingly rough with increase of the anodizing voltage as pores develop in the film, which appear to be associated with generation of oxygen gas.

  14. Specific directions of ultrasound propagation in double potassium tungstates for light modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, M M; Mazur, L I; Pozhar, V E

    2017-01-01

    Acousto-optical characteristics of double potassium tungstates are analyzed and specific directions for light modulation are found. First, an important subgroup of elasto-optic coefficients of KYb(WO4)2 and KLu(WO4)2 crystals are calculated with use of experimental data. It is revealed that with proper choice of ultrasound direction the acousto-optical figure-of-merit approximately 2 times exceeds the maximum value detected in previous experiments. Another unique direction is determined, which permits modulation of randomly polarized light. The elasto-optic characteristics of KYb(WO4)2 and KLu(WO4)2 crystals are compared to those of previously investigated materials of the same crystal group: KY(WO4)2, KGd(WO4)2.

  15. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Li Yuan; Zhu Ren Yuan; Liu Dun Can

    2000-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an inter calibration for CMS lead tungstate crystals in situ at LHC, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's sub percent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS ECAL monitoring light source and high level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of Y doped PbWO//4 crystals were investigated, and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of the wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. 29 Refs.

  16. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers and LEDs to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalize the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy di-photon resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This talk describes how the monitoring system ...

  17. Experimental Study of the Lead Tungstate Scintillator Proton-Induced Damage and Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Singovski , A

    2011-01-01

    Lead tungstate (PbWO4, or PWO) scintillating crystals are used by two of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): 75848 in CMS and 17920 in ALICE. For the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter, one of the most important crystal properties is its radiation hardness. With the increase of luminosity, the radiation level will increase drastically, particularly in the high pseudorapidity regions of the calorimeter. Beside the effects of color-centre formation caused by gamma-radiation, additional measurable effect originated by hadron irradiation could appear, which will further deteriorate the optical transmission of the crystals and therefore their efficiency. In this paper, we will present results of the proton-induced damage in PWO and a study of optical transmission recovery at different temperatures and under different light-induced "bleaching" conditions for proton-irradiated crystals.

  18. Comparison between high-energy proton and charged pion induced damage in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pauss, F; Renker, D

    2007-01-01

    A Lead Tungstate crystal produced for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the LHC was cut into three equal-length sections. The central one was irradiated with 290 MeV/c positive pions up to a fluence of (5.67 +- 0.46)x10^13 /cm^2, while the other two were exposed to a 24 GeV/c proton fluence of (1.17 +- 0.11) x 10^13/ cm^2. The damage recovery in these crystals, stored in the dark at room temperature, has been followed over two years. The comparison of the radiation-induced changes in light transmission for these crystals shows that damage is proportional to the star densities produced by the irradiation.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin (IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Sadanandan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tin (IV tungstate, a tetravalent metal acid salt was synthesized in the nanoform by chemical coprecipitation method using EDTA as capping agent. The material was found to be stable in mineral acids, bases and organic solvents except  in HF and aquaregia. The material was characterized using EDS, TG/DTA, FTIR, XRD, SEM, HRTEM and BET surface area measurement. The molecular formula of the compound is 2SnO2 3WO3.5H2O determined from elemental analysis using TG/DTA. Surface morphology and particle size were obtained using SEM and HRTEM. The surface area was found to be 205-225m2/g. The Na+ exchange capacity found to be 3.8 meq/g, indicates the presence of surface hydroxyl group and hence the presence of Bronsted acid sites. The catalytic activity of the material was tested by using esterification and oxidation as model reactions. For the esterification of different alcohols, the percentage yield was found to be high for n-alcohol compared to isomeric alcohols. Oxidation of benzyl alcohol gives benzaldehyde and benzoic acid as the only products. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 12nd June 2012, Revised: 23rd July 2012, Accepted: 29th July 2012[How to Cite: S. Manoj, R. Beena, (2012. Synthesis and Characterization of tin(IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (2: 105-111. doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111] [How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111 ] | View in 

  20. Complex oxide with negative thermal expansion for producing ceramic matrix composites with invar effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedova, Elena S.; Pertushina, Mariya U.; Kondratenko, Anton I.; Gorev, Mikhail V.; Kulkov, Sergei N.

    2016-11-01

    The article investigates the phase composition of (Al2O3-20 wt % ZrO2)-ZrW2O8 ceramic composites obtained by cold-pressing and sintering processes. Using X-ray analysis it has been shown that composites mainly have monoclinic modification of zirconium dioxide and orthorhombic phase of aluminum oxide. After adding zirconium tungstate the phase composition of sintered ceramics changes, followed by the formation of tungsten-aluminates spinel such as Alx(WOy)z. It has been shown that thermal expansion coefficient of material decreases approximatly by 30%, as compared with initial ceramics.

  1. Modeling dissolution in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Tracie Lee

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are used in many aspects of modern life, from soda cans and household foil to the automobiles and aircraft in which we travel. Aluminum alloy systems are characterized by good workability that enables these alloys to be economically rolled, extruded, or forged into useful shapes. Mechanical properties such as strength are altered significantly with cold working, annealing, precipitation-hardening, and/or heat-treatments. Heat-treatable aluminum alloys contain one or more soluble constituents such as copper, lithium, magnesium, silicon and zinc that individually, or with other elements, can form phases that strengthen the alloy. Microstructure development is highly dependent on all of the processing steps the alloy experiences. Ultimately, the macroscopic properties of the alloy depend strongly on the microstructure. Therefore, a quantitative understanding of the microstructural changes that occur during thermal and mechanical processing is fundamental to predicting alloy properties. In particular, the microstructure becomes more homogeneous and secondary phases are dissolved during thermal treatments. Robust physical models for the kinetics of particle dissolution are necessary to predict the most efficient thermal treatment. A general dissolution model for multi-component alloys has been developed using the front-tracking method to study the dissolution of precipitates in an aluminum alloy matrix. This technique is applicable to any alloy system, provided thermodynamic and diffusion data are available. Treatment of the precipitate interface is explored using two techniques: the immersed-boundary method and a new technique, termed here the "sharp-interface" method. The sharp-interface technique is based on a variation of the ghost fluid method and eliminates the need for corrective source terms in the characteristic equations. In addition, the sharp-interface method is shown to predict the dissolution behavior of precipitates in aluminum

  2. Aluminum extraction from aluminum industrial wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Aluminum dross tailings, an industrial waste from the Egyptian Aluminum Company (Egyptalum), was used to produce two types of alums: aluminum sulfate alum (Al2(SO4)3·12H2O) and ammonium aluminum alum {(NH4)2SO4AL2 (SO4)3·24H2O}. This was carried out in two processes. The first involves leaching the impurities using diluted H2SO4 with different solid/liquid ratios at different temperatures to dissolve the impurities present in the starting material in the form of aluminum sulfates. The second process is the extraction of aluminum (as aluminum sulfate) from the purified aluminum dross tailings thus produced. This was carried out in an autoclave. The effects of temperature, time of reaction, and acid concentration on pressure leaching and extraction processes were studied in order to specify the optimum conditions to be applied in the bench scale production as well as the kinetics of leaching process.

  3. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01

    A aluminum matrix-W rod/wire structural material in support of DARPA initiative BAA 08-23 was developed and its density and mechanical strength ascertained, both being part of the DARPA matrices. Aluminum tubes and four 90 degree cross-ply tungsten fiber layers were arranged such that under extreme static pressure conditions the aluminum would viscoplastically flow into the tungsten arrangement to create a metal matrix composite. It was found that a cold isostatic process induced "Brazilian" ...

  4. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  5. A visualization of the damage in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals after exposure to high-energy hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pauss, F.; Wallny, R.; Spikings, R.; Van der Lelij, R.; Arnau Izquierdo, G.

    2012-01-01

    The anticipated performance of calorimeter crystals in the environment expected after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN has to be well understood, before informed decisions can be made on the need for detector upgrades. Throughout the years of running at the HL-LHC, the detectors will be exposed to considerable fluences of fast hadrons that have been shown to cause cumulative transparency losses in Lead Tungstate scintillating crystals. In this study, we present direct evidence of the main underlying damage mechanism. Results are shown from a test that yields a direct insight into the nature of the hadron-specific damage in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals exposed to 24 GeV/c protons.

  6. Expanded Industrial Experiments of Free-alkali Recovery from Sodium Tungstate Solution by the Membrane Electrolysis Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉岭; 古海云; 檀柏梅; 桑建新

    2001-01-01

    The expanded industrial experiments were conducted with practical industrial liquor to separate free alkali from sodium tungstate solution by electrolysis with cation-exchange membrane. Experimental results show that on the condition that the temperature is 50-55 ℃ and the current:density is 1000 A/m2, the single electrolysis cell is operated stably and 80% free-alkali in mass fraction is separated from the anode feed liquor of sodium tungstate, with electric ef ficiency up to more than 88% and the unit energy consumption E lower than 1900 kWh/t; while three electrolysis cells in series are operated, under the condition that the temperature is 60-65 ℃ and the current density is 1000 A/m2, the elec tric efficiency can reach higher than 88% and the unit energy consumption E can be lower than 2250 kWh/t.

  7. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegan, S., E-mail: fegan@ge.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Auffray, E. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Battaglieri, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Buchanan, E. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Colaneri, L.; D' Angelo, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Vita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dormenev, V. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Fanchini, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lanza, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Novotny, R.W. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); and others

    2015-07-21

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  8. Effect of TiAl_3 on distribution of TiC particles in aluminum matrix and nucleation of α(Al) grain%TiAl_3对TiC粒子在铝基体中分布及α(Al)晶粒形核的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏天东; 丁万武; 赵文军; 王晓军; 徐仰涛

    2009-01-01

    研究TiC和TiAl_3细化工业纯铝时TiAl_3的存在对TiC在铝基体中分布及α(Al)晶粒形核的影响,分析Al-Ti-C晶粒细化机制.结果表明:TiC单独作为工业纯铝的晶粒细化剂时,大量TiC被α(Al)晶粒推向树枝晶的晶界处,从而限制了TiC的异质形核作用;当TiC和TiAl_3共同作为晶粒细化剂时,在α(Al)晶粒内部出现了大量TiC粒子,大量的TiC粒子成为了α(Al)的结晶核心,并且在TiC颗粒和铝基体的界面处存在"富Ti过渡区";TiAl_3在铝熔体中分解释放出Ti原子并向TiC粒子周围偏聚,形成的"TiC/铝熔体界面富Ti过渡区" 改善了TiC与α(Al)的结构适应性,降低了TiC粒子的表面张力,促进了TiC粒子在铝熔体中的均匀分布,提高了其形核能力.%The effect of TiAl_3 on the distribution of TiC particles in aluminum matrix and nucleation of α(Al) grain was studied when the TiC and TiAl_3 refining industry aluminum, and the nucleation mechanism of Al-Ti-C grain refiner were discussed. The results show that when TiC alone is used as the nucleation phase, most of the TiC is pushed into the grain boundaries by the α(Al) dendrites and the nucleation of TiC is restricted. On the other hand, when TiC and TiAl_3 refine the industry aluminum together, most of the TiC particles are found within the α(Al) grains and nucleation occurs on TiC particles, and there is a Ti transition zone between TiC and aluminum interface. TiAl_3 releases Ti atoms in aluminum melt, Ti atoms congregate to the TiC surface, and ultimately forming TiC/aluminum interface Ti transition zone, which not only improves the structure of adaptability and wettability between TiC and Al , but also reduces the surface tension of TiC particles, which making a lot of TiC particles can be uniformly distributed in the aluminum melt, which advance α(Al) core and heterogeneous nucleation in the aluminum melt solidification.

  9. Synthesis of Aluminum-Aluminum Nitride Nanocomposites by Gas-Liquid Reactions I. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, Cecilia; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2016-10-01

    In-situ fabrication of the reinforcing particles directly in the metal matrix is an answer to many of the challenges encountered in manufacturing metal matrix nanocomposite materials. In this method, the nanosized particles are formed directly within the melt by means of a chemical reaction between a specially designed metallic alloy and a reactive gas. The thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of this chemical reaction dictate the particle size and distribution in the matrix alloy, as well as the nature of the particle/matrix interface, and consequently, they govern many of the material's mechanical and physical properties. This article focuses on aluminum-aluminum-nitride nanocomposite materials that are synthesized by injecting a nitrogen-bearing gas into a molten aluminum alloy. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process are modeled, and the detrimental role of oxygen is elucidated.

  10. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. (Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  11. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  12. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  13. Zirconium tungstate/epoxy nanocomposites: effect of nanoparticle morphology and negative thermal expansivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongchao; Rogalski, Mark; Kessler, Michael R

    2013-10-09

    The ability to tailor the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a polymer is essential for mitigating thermal residual stress and reducing microcracks caused by CTE mismatch of different components in electronic applications. This work studies the effect of morphology and thermal expansivity of zirconium tungstate nanoparticles on the rheological, thermo-mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, and dielectric properties of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites. Three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles were synthesized under different hydrothermal conditions and their distinct properties were characterized, including morphology, particle size, aspect ratio, surface area, and CTE. Nanoparticles with a smaller particle size and larger surface area led to a more significant reduction in gel-time and glass transition temperature of the epoxy nanocomposites, while a higher initial viscosity and significant shear thinning behavior was found in prepolymer suspensions containing ZrW2O8 with larger particle sizes and aspect ratios. The thermo- and dynamic-mechanical properties of epoxy-based nanocomposites improved with increasing loadings of the three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. In addition, the introduced ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not negatively affect the dielectric constant or the breakdown strength of the epoxy resin, suggesting potential applications of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites in the microelectronic insulation industry.

  14. ROLE OF TUNGSTEN IN THE AQUEOUS PHASE HYDRODEOXYGENATION OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL ON TUNGSTATED ZIRCONIA SUPPORTED PALLADIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin-Flores, Oscar G.; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-15

    The focus of the present work was specifically on the elucidation of the role played by tungsten on the catalytic activity and selectivity of tungstated zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mWZ) for the aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation (APHDO) of ethylene glycol (EG). Zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mZ) was used as reference. The catalysts were prepared via incipient wet impregnation and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), CO pulse chemisorption, CO-DRIFTS, ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and pyridine adsorption. The presence of W results in larger Pd particles on supported Pd catalysts, i.e., 0.9 and 6.1 nm Pd particles are for Pd-mZ and Pd-mWZ, respectively. For comparison purposes, the activity of the catalytic materials used in this work was obtained using a well-defined set of operating conditions. The catalytic activity measurements show that the overall intrinsic activity of Pd particles on mWZ is 1.9 times higher than on mZ. APHDO process appears to be highly favored on Pd-mWZ whereas Pd-mZ exhibits a higher selectivity for reforming. This difference in terms of selectivity seems to be related to the high concentration of Brønsted acid sites and electron-deficient Pd species present on Pd-mWZ.

  15. Efficient photodegradation of methylthioninium chloride dye in aqueous using barium tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShehri, Saad M.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Ahamad, Tansir; Almaswari, Basheer M.; Khan, Aslam

    2017-08-01

    BaWO4 nanoparticles were successfully used as the photocatalysts in the degradation of methylthioninium chloride (MTC) dye at different pH levels of aqueous solution. Pure phase of barium tungstate (BaWO4) nanoparticles was synthesized by modified molten salt process at 500 °C for 6 h. Structural and morphological characterizations of BaWO4 nanoparticles (average particle size of 40 nm) were studied in details using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, Raman, energy-dispersive, electron microscopic, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Direct band gap energy of BaWO4 nanoparticles was found to be 3.06 eV from the UV-visible absorption spectroscopy followed by Tauc's model. Photocatalytic properties of the nanoparticles were also investigated systematically for the degradation of MTC dye solution in various mediums. BaWO4 nanoparticles claim the significant enhancement of the photocatalytic degradation of aqueous MTC dye to non-hazardous inorganic constitutes under alkaline, neutral, and acidic mediums. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of silver tungstate/iron phthalocyanine nanocomposite for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedevi, Aikkara; Priyanka, Karathan Parakkandi; Babitha, Kurup Kuniyil; Sankararaman, Sankaranarayana Iyer; Thomas, Varghese

    2017-06-01

    Silver tungstate/iron phthalocyanine nanocomposite (Ag2WO4/FePc) was prepared by simple solvent evaporation method. Thermodynamic stability of the synthesized nanocomposite was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The nanocomposite was structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results confirm the formation of Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite. The size and morphology of the prepared nanocomposite were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical properties were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. UV-visible absorption studies indicate that Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite has extended visible absorption in the wavelength range 662 to 782 nm. The nanocomposite shows high emission intensity and greenish-blue emission when excited with near-ultraviolet light. The resistivity of the sample was measured at different temperatures. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity values were measured in the frequency range 100 Hz-20 MHz. The results obtained from thermal, structural, optical and electrical characterization suggests that the synthesized Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite can be used as a potential material for varied optoelectronic and solid state applications. The present study constitutes the first report for the synthesis and characterization of Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite.

  17. Infrared spectroscopic and laser characterization of Tm in disordered double tungstates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano-Torres, J.M.; Han, X.; Garcia-Cortes, A.; Serrano, M.D. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, c/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Zaldo, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, c/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: cezaldo@icmm.csic.es; Valle, F.J. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, c/Kelsen 5, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Mateos, X.; Rivier, S.; Griebner, U.; Petrov, V. [Max-Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, 2A Max-Born-Street, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The relative energy and characteristics of the Tm{sup 3+} levels in tetragonal double tungstate (DT) and double molybdate (DMo) crystals are investigated by low temperature optical spectroscopy with special emphasis on NaLa(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}. In this host the transition bandwidths are intermediate between those found in ordered monoclinic DT and in other disordered tetragonal DT and DMo crystals. This allows for better band resolution of the S{sub 4} site symmetry features in the disordered scheelite-like structure. The potential of such Tm-doped crystals for building infrared tunable lasers is discussed on the basis of the calculated cross sections and their comparison with the experimental photoluminescence. Information on the crystal growth and Tm{sup 3+} spectroscopic details are provided. Tm:NaLa(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} laser operation with the available sample is more efficient for {sigma}-polarized configuration. Up to 200 mW of output power was obtained at {lambda} = 1888 nm and laser tunability extends from 1789 to 1950 nm.

  18. Two molybdate/tungstate ABC transporters that interact very differently with their substrate binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonsky, Elena; Ovcharenko, Elena; Lewinson, Oded

    2013-04-02

    In all kingdoms of life, ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters participate in many physiological and pathological processes. Despite the diversity of their functions, they have been considered to operate by a largely conserved mechanism. One deviant is the vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD that has been shown to operate by a distinct mechanism. However, it is unknown if this deviation is an exotic example, perhaps arising from the nature of the transported moiety. Here we compared two ABC importers of identical substrate specificity (molybdate/tungstate), and find that their interactions with their substrate binding proteins are utterly different. One system forms a high-affinity, slow-dissociating complex that is destabilized by nucleotide and substrate binding. The other forms a low-affinity, transient complex that is stabilized by ligands. The results highlight significant mechanistic divergence among ABC transporters, even when they share the same substrate specificity. We propose that these differences are correlated with the different folds of the transmembrane domains of ABC transporters.

  19. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan N., Pethan; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V. R.

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol-gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO3) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  20. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan, Pethan N.; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V.R., E-mail: kvrchary@iict.res.in

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol–gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO{sub 3}) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH{sub 3} TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  1. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-12-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalise the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy diphoton resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This paper describes how the monitoring system is operated, how the corrections are obtained, and the resulting ECAL performance.

  2. Characterization of CALET prototype TASC lead tungstate calorimeter using CERN beam test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Amir

    2013-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a high-energy cosmic ray experiment that will be placed on the International Space Station in 2014. The primary goals of CALET are to measure the cosmic ray electron spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, gamma rays from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and protons and nuclei from 10 GeV up to 1000 TeV. The detector consists of three main components: a Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). The TASC consists of 192 lead tungstate (PbWO4) logs arranged in 12 layers. An understanding of the major characteristics of the TASC is important for accurately determining the incident particle shower energy deposition. In September 2012, a prototype CALET detector was exposed to electron, muon, and proton beams from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. Muon beams can be used to determine the detector response to minimum ionizing particles (MIP). In the present paper, we discuss the response of the TASC logs to muon beams as a function of position, and signal attenuation during propagation. Included is a discussion of parameterizations of position-dependent muon energy deposition and signal attenuation functions for the TASC logs based on the CERN beam test data.

  3. Photocatalytic generation of syngas using combustion-synthesized silver bismuth tungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tacconi, Norma R; Timmaji, Hari Krishna; Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Janáky, Csaba; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2012-08-27

    Silver bismuth tungstate (AgBiW(2)O(8)) nanoparticles were prepared for the first time by solution combustion synthesis by using the corresponding metal nitrates as the precursor and urea as the fuel. These nanoparticles were subsequently modified with Pt catalyst islands using a photocatalytic procedure and used for the photogeneration of syngas (CO+H(2)). Formic acid was used for this purpose for the in situ generation of CO(2) and its subsequent reduction to CO. In the absence of Pt modification, H(2) was not obtained in the gas products evolved. These results were compared with those obtained with acetic acid in place of formic acid. The combustion process was simulated by thermogravimetry and the synthesized powder was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tauc plots derived from the diffuse reflectance data yielded an optical band gap of 2.74 eV. The photocatalytic activity of these nanoparticles was superior to a sample prepared by solid-state synthesis. Mechanistic aspects are finally presented, as are structural models and electronic calculations, using density functional theory (DFT).

  4. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    OpenAIRE

    Lidsky, Theodore I.

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed w...

  5. High energy density aluminum battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  6. High energy density aluminum battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  7. Determination of aluminum by four analytical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, T.J.; Smetana, K.M.

    1975-11-01

    Four procedures have been developed for determining the aluminum concentration in basic matrices. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) was the routine method of analysis. Citrate was required to complex the aluminum and eliminate matrix effects. AAS was the least accurate of the four methods studied and was adversely affected by high aluminum concentrations. The Fluoride Electrode Method was the most accurate and precise of the four methods. A Gran's Plot determination was used to determine the end point and average standard recovery was 100% +- 2%. The Thermometric Titration Method was the fastest method for determining aluminum and could also determine hydroxide concentration at the same time. Standard recoveries were 100% +- 5%. The pH Electrode Method also measures aluminum and hydroxide content simultaneously, but is less accurate and more time consuming that the thermal titration. Samples were analyzed using all four methods and results were compared to determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. On the basis of these comparisons, conclusions were drawn concerning the application of each method to our laboratory needs.

  8. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidsky, Theodore I

    2014-05-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust.

  9. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are…

  10. Engineering wear-resistant surfaces in automotive aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavorkijan, V.

    2003-02-01

    Inadequate wear resistance and low seizure loads prevent the direct use of aluminum alloys in automotive parts subject to intensive friction combined with high thermal and mechanical loading, such as brake discs, pistons, and cylinder liners. To enable the use of aluminum alloys in the production of automotive brake discs and other wear-resistant products, the insertion of a monolithic friction cladding rather than surface coating has been considered in this work. Three experimental approaches, two based on the pressure-less infiltration of porous ceramic preforms and one based on the subsequent hot rolling of aluminum and metal-matrix composite strips, are currently under investigation.

  11. The aluminum smelting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development.

  12. Effect of tungstate on acetate and ethanol production by the electrosynthetic bacterium Sporomusa ovata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammam, Fariza; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Lizak, Dawid Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    successfully converted to their corresponding alcohols 1-propanol and 1-butanol by S. ovata during gas fermentation. Increasing tungstate concentration enhanced conversion efficiency for both propionate and butyrate. Gene expression analysis suggested that tungsten-containing aldehyde ferredoxin...... oxidoreductases (AORs) and a tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were involved in the improved biosynthesis of acetate, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. AORs and FDH contribute to the fatty acids re-assimilation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, respectively. This study presented here shows...

  13. Beam tests of lead tungstate crystal matrices and a silicon strip preshower detector for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Barney, D; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benhammou, Ya; Blick, A M; Bloch, P; Bonamy, P; Bourotte, J; Buiron, L; Cavallari, F; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, D J A; Dafinei, I; Davies, G; Depasse, P; Deiters, K; Diemoz, M; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Donskov, S V; Mamouni, H E; Ercoli, C; Faure, J L; Felcini, Marta; Gautheron, F; Géléoc, M; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, S N; Godinovic, N; Graham, D J; Guillaud, J P; Guschin, E; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hillemanns, H; Hofer, H; Ille, B; Inyakin, A V; Jääskeläinen, S; Katchanov, V A; Kirn, T; Kloukinas, Kostas C; Korzhik, M V; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebrun, P; Lecoq, P; Lecoeur, Gérard; Lecomte, P; Leonardi, E; Locci, E; Loos, R; Longo, E; MacKay, C K; Martin, E; Mendiburu, J P; Musienko, Yu V; Nédélec, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Organtini, G; Paoletti, S; Pansart, J P; Peigneux, J P; Puljak, I; Qian, S; Reid, E; Renker, D; Rosowsky, A; Rosso, E; Rusack, R W; Rykaczewski, H; Schneegans, M; Seez, Christopher J; Semeniouk, I N; Shagin, P M; Sillou, D; Singovsky, A V; Sougonyaev, V; Soric, I; Verrecchia, P; Vialle, J P; Virdee, Tejinder S; Zhu, R Y

    1998-01-01

    Tests of lead tungstate crystal matrices carried out in high-energy electron beams in 1996, using new crystals, new APDs and an improved test set-up, confirm that an energy resolution of better than 0 .6% at 100 GeV can be obtained when the longitudinal uniformity of the struck crystal is adequate. Light loss measurements under low dose irradiation are reported. It is shown that there is no loss of energy resolution after irradiation and that the calibration change due to light loss can be tracked with a precision monitoring system. Finally, successuful tests with a preshower device, equipped wi th silicon strip detector readout, are described.

  14. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase interactions with decaniobate, decavanadate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, Gil; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few decades there has been increasing interest in oxometalate and polyoxometalate applications to medicine and pharmacology. This interest arose, at least in part, due to the properties of these classes of compounds as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic agents, and also for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, among others. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action would be improved if biological models could be used to clarify potential toxicological effects in main cellular processes. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, containing a large amount of Ca(2+)-ATPase, an enzyme that accumulates calcium by active transport using ATP, have been suggested as a useful model to study the effects of oxometalates on calcium homeostasis. In the present article, it is shown that decavanadate, decaniobate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate, all inhibited SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, with the following IC(50) values: 15, 35, 50, 400 μM and 45 mM, respectively. Decaniobate (Nb(10)), is the strongest P-type enzyme inhibitor, after decavanadate (V(10)). Atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis, indicates that decavanadate binds to the protein with a 1:1 decavanadate:Ca(2+)-ATPase stoichiometry. Furthermore, V(10) binds with similar extension to all the protein conformations, which occur during calcium translocation by active transport, namely E1, E1P, E2 and E2P, as analysed by AAS. In contrast, it was confirmed that the binding of monomeric vanadate (H(2)VO(4)(2-); V(1)) to the calcium pump is favoured only for the E2 and E2P conformations of the ATPase, whereas no significant amount of vanadate is bound to the E1 and E1P conformations. Scatchard plot analysis, confirmed a 1:1 ratio for decavanadate-Ca(2+)-ATPase, with a dissociation constant, k(d) of 1 μM(-1). The interaction of decavanadate V(10)O(28)(6-) (V(10)) with Ca(2+)-ATPase is prevented by the isostructural and isoelectronic decaniobate Nb(10)O(28)(6-) (Nb(10)), whereas no significant effects were

  15. Structural, microstructural and vibrational analyses of the monoclinic tungstate BiLuWO{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Ahsaine, H. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106 Cité Dakhla, Agadir (Morocco); Taoufyq, A. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106 Cité Dakhla, Agadir (Morocco); Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); Patout, L. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); Ezahri, M.; Benlhachemi, A.; Bakiz, B. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106 Cité Dakhla, Agadir (Morocco); Villain, S.; Guinneton, F. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); Gavarri, J.-R., E-mail: gavarri.jr@univ-tln.fr [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    The bismuth lutetium tungstate phase BiLuWO{sub 6} has been prepared using a solid state route with stoichiometric mixtures of oxide precursors. The obtained polycrystalline phase has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. In the first step, the crystal structure has been refined using Rietveld method: the crystal cell was resolved using monoclinic system (parameters a, b, c, β) with space group A2/m. SEM images showed the presence of large crystallites with a constant local nominal composition (BiLuW). TEM analyses showed that the actual local structure could be better represented by a superlattice (a, 2b, c, β) associated with space groups P2 or P2/m. The Raman spectroscopy showed the presence of vibrational bands similar to those observed in the compounds BiREWO{sub 6} with RE=Y, Gd, Nd. However, these vibrational bands were characterized by large full width at half maximum, probably resulting from the long range Bi/Lu disorder and local WO{sub 6} octahedron distortions in the structure. - Graphical abstract: The average structure of BiLuWO{sub 6} determined from X-ray diffraction data can be represented by A2/m space group. Experimental Electron Diffraction patterns along the [0vw] zone axes of the monoclinic structure and associated simulated patterns show the existence of a monoclinic superstructure with space group P2 or P2/m. - Highlights: • A new monoclinic BiLuWO{sub 6} phase has been elaborated from solid-state reaction. • The space group of the monoclinic disordered average structure should be A2/m. • Transmission electron microscopy leads to a superlattice with P2/m space group. • Raman spectroscopy suggests existence of local disorder.

  16. Some peculiarities of zirconium tungstate synthesis by thermal decomposition of hydrothermal precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubanov, Alexander I., E-mail: gubanov@niic.nsc.su [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Dedova, Elena S. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademicheskii 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Plyusnin, Pavel E.; Filatov, Eugeny Y. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kardash, Tatyana Y. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Korenev, Sergey V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kulkov, Sergey N. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademicheskii 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • Synthesis of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} using hydrothermal method. • On hydrothermal synthesis optimal conc. of HCl in the reaction mixture is 2.3 M. • Thermal decomposition of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}((OH){sub 1.5},Cl{sub 0.5})·2H{sub 2}O begins are 200 °S. • Amorphous intermediate crystallizes into cubic single-phase ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} above 550 °S. • ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} destructed at temperatures above 700 °S. - Abstract: This article discusses some peculiarities of the synthesis of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} (1) using thermal decomposition of the precursor ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}((OH){sub 1.5},Cl{sub 0.5})·2H{sub 2}O (2) prepared by hydrothermal method. On hydrothermal synthesis of 2 the optimal concentration of hydrochloric acid in the reaction mixture is about 2.3 M. TG approach to determine the chemical composition of the precursor was suggested. It has been found that the precursor for the synthesis of zirconium tungstate has chemical formula 2. Thermal decomposition of the precursor 2 begins at 200 °S and affords an amorphous intermediate, which crystallizes as a cubic phase 1 above 550 °S with an exoeffect. The temperature of the beginning of the transition from amorphous to the crystalline state is 350 ± 25 °S.

  17. Optimization of the scintillation parameters of the lead tungstate crystals for their application in high precision electromagnetic calorimetry; Optimisation des parametres de scintillation des cristaux de tungstate de plomb pour leur application dans la calorimetrie electromagnetique de haute precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobychev, G

    2000-04-12

    In the frame of this dissertation work scintillation properties of the lead tungstate crystals (PWO) and possibilities of their use were studied foreseeing their application for electromagnetic calorimetry in extreme radiation environment conditions of new colliders. The results of this work can be summarized in the following way. 1. A model of the scintillations origin in the lead tungstate crystals which includes processes influencing on the crystals radiation hardness and presence of slow components in scintillations was developed. 2. An analysis of the influences of the PWO scintillation properties changes on the parameters of the electromagnetic calorimeter was done. 3. Methods of the light collection from the large scintillation elements of complex shape made of the birefringent scintillation crystal with high refraction index and low light yield in case of signal registration by a photodetector with sensitive surface small in compare with the output face of scintillator were Studied. 4. Physical principles of the methodology of the scintillation crystals certification during their mass production foreseeing their installation into a calorimeter electromagnetic were developed. Correlations between the results of measurements of the PWO crystals parameters by different methods were found. (author)

  18. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  19. Advances in aluminum pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudour, Michel; Maintier, Philippe [PPG Industries France, 3 Z.A.E. Les Dix Muids, B.P. 89, F-59583 Marly (France); Simpson, Mark [PPG Industries Inc., 1200 Piedmont Troy, Michigan 48083 (United States); Quaglia, Paolo [PPG Industries Italia, Via Garavelli 21, I-15028 Quattordio (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    As automotive manufacturers continue to look for ways to reduce vehicle weight, aluminum is finding more utility as a body panel component. The substitution of cold-rolled steel and zinc-coated substrates with aluminum has led to new challenges in vehicle pretreatment. As a result, changes to traditional pretreatment chemistries and operating practices are necessary in order to produce an acceptable coating on aluminum body panels. These changes result in increased sludging and other undesirable characteristics. In addition to the chemistry changes, there are also process-related problems to consider. Many existing automotive pretreatment lines simply were not designed to handle aluminum and its increased demands on filtration and circulation equipment. To retrofit such a system is capital intensive and in addition to requiring a significant amount of downtime, may not be totally effective. Thus, the complexities of pre-treating aluminum body panels have actually had a negative effect on efforts to introduce more aluminum into new vehicle design programs. Recent research into ways of reducing the negative effects has led to a new understanding of the nature of zinc phosphate bath -aluminum interactions. Many of the issues associated with the pretreatment of aluminum have been identified and can be mitigated with only minor changes to the zinc phosphate bath chemistry. The use of low levels of soluble Fe ions, together with free fluoride, has been shown to dramatically improve the efficiency of a zinc phosphate system processing aluminum. Appearance of zinc phosphate coatings, coating weights and sludge are all benefited by this chemistry change. (authors)

  20. Alkaline corrosion properties of laser-clad aluminum/titanium coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerbeck, Martin; Herbreteau, Alexis; Rombouts, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    with supersaturated titanium ( (1 weight per cent), Al3Ti intermetallics and large partially undissolved Ti6Al4V particles. Heat treatment lowered the titanium concentration in the aluminum matrix, changed the shape of the Al3Ti precipitates and increased the degree of dissolution of the Ti6Al4V particles. Corrosion...... testing showed significant localized dissolution of the aluminum matrix. Research limitations/implications – Increased titanium concentration and heat treatment gave improved alkaline corrosion properties. At pH 13.5, the Al3Ti phases were protected, while the aluminum matrix corroded. Practical...... implications – For alkaline corrosion-protection of aluminum in the automobile industry, titanium might be useful at pH values below 13.5 or by using other coating techniques. Originality/value – This is the first study testing the use of titanium as a protective element of aluminum in stringent alkaline...

  1. Tungstate as a synergist to phosphonate-based formulation for corrosion control of carbon steel in nearly neutral aqueous environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B V Appa Rao; M Venkateswara Rao; S Srinivasa Rao; B Sreedhar

    2010-07-01

    Synergistic inhibition of corrosion of carbon steel in low chloride aqueous medium using tungstate as a synergist in combination with ,-(phosphonomethyl) glycine (BPMG) and zinc ions is presented. The synergistic action of tungstate has been established through the present studies. The new ternary inhibitor formulation is effective in neutral and slightly acidic as well as slightly alkaline media. Potentiodynamic polarisation studies inferred that the formulation functions as a mixed inhibitor. Impedance studies of the metal/solution interface revealed that the surface film is highly protective. Characterisation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the surface film formed in presence of the inhibitor revealed the presence of iron, phosphorus, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon, zinc and tungsten in the surface film. The chemical shifts in the binding energies of these elements inferred that the surface film is composed of iron oxides/hydroxides, zinc hydroxide, heteropolynuclear complex [Fe(III), Zn(II)-BPMG] and WO3. Reflection absorption FTIR spectroscopic studies also supported the presence of these compounds in the surface film. Morphological features of the metal surface studied in the absence and presence of the inhibitor by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are also presented. Based on all these results, a plausible mechanism of corrosion inhibition is proposed.

  2. Structural characterization of bismuth rare earth tungstates obtained by fast microwave-assisted solid-state synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, G.N.; Melo, L.F.L. [Grupo de Química de Materiais Avançados (GQMAT), Departamento de Química Analítica e Físico-Química, Universidade Federal do Ceará – UFC, Campus do Pici, CP 12100, CEP 60451-970 Fortaleza – CE (Brazil); Castro, M.C.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará (Brazil); Menezes, A.S. de [Departamento de Física – CCET, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Campus do Bacanga, 65085-580 São Luís, MA (Brazil); Fechine, P.B.A., E-mail: fechine@ufc.br [Grupo de Química de Materiais Avançados (GQMAT), Departamento de Química Analítica e Físico-Química, Universidade Federal do Ceará – UFC, Campus do Pici, CP 12100, CEP 60451-970 Fortaleza – CE (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    A new synthetic route was used to obtain bismuth rare earth tungstates: BiREWO{sub 6}, where RE = Y, Gd and Nd. These materials were obtained by microwave radiation in air at 900–1100 °C for 10 min, depend on the rare earth composition in the ceramic. Structural characterization was performed by X-ray powder diffraction, Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that all samples are isostructural materials with monoclinic phase with space group A12/m1 and member of the Aurivillius family, as Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} ferroelectric phase. It was observed moderated values for dielectric measurements (14<ε{sub r}{sup ′}>19 and 0.018 < tg δ > 0.079) at microwaves frequencies, which can be used as Dielectric Resonator Antenna or for size reduction of the electric device. - Highlights: ► New synthetic route to obtain bismuth rare earth tungstates by microwave radiation. ► Vibration spectroscopy was based in Group Theory and observed in FTIR and Raman. ► BiGdWO{sub 6} presented simultaneously higher ε{sub r}{sup ′} and smaller tg δ values at microwaves frequencies. ► The samples can be used as a DRA or for size reduction of the electric device.

  3. A Novel Technique for the Deposition of Bismuth Tungstate onto Titania Nanoparticulates for Enhancing the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ratova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel powder handling technique was used to allow the deposition of bismuth tungstate coatings onto commercial titanium dioxide photocatalytic nanoparticles. The coatings were deposited by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering in an argon/oxygen atmosphere. The use of an oscillating bowl with rotary particle propagation, positioned beneath two closed-field planar magnetrons, provided uniform coverage of the titania particle surfaces. The bismuth/tungsten atomic ratio of the coatings was controlled by varying the power applied to each target. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Photocatalytic properties under visible light irradiation were assessed using an acetone degradation test. It was found that deposition of bismuth tungstate onto titania nanoparticles resulted in significant increases in visible light photocatalytic activity, compared to uncoated titania. Of the coatings studied, the highest photocatalytic activity was measured for the sample with a Bi/W atomic ratio of 2/1.

  4. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  5. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  6. Novel Inducers of the Envelope Stress Response BaeSR in Salmonella Typhimurium: BaeR Is Critically Required for Tungstate Waste Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Patrick, Elaine; J. Sullivan, Matthew; Alston, Mark J.; Field, Sarah J.; AbuOun, Manal; Anjum, Muna F.; Rowley, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The RpoE and CpxR regulated envelope stress responses are extremely important for SalmonellaTyphimurium to cause infection in a range of hosts. Until now the role for BaeSR in both the Salmonella Typhimurium response to stress and its contribution to infection have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate stationary phase growth, iron and sodium tungstate as novel inducers of the BaeRregulon, with BaeR critically required for Salmonella resistance to sodium tungstate. We show that functional overlap between the resistance nodulation-cell division (RND) multidrug transporters, MdtA, AcrD and AcrB exists for the waste disposal of tungstate from the cell. We also point to a role for enterobactinsiderophores in the protection of enteric organisms from tungstate, akin to the scenario in nitrogen fixing bacteria. Surprisingly, BaeR is the first envelope stress response pathway investigated in S. Typhimurium that is not required for murine typhoid in either ityS or ityR mouse backgrounds. BaeR is therefore either required for survival in larger mammals such as pigs or calves, an avian host such as chickens, or survival out with the host altogether where Salmonella and related enterics must survive in soil and water. PMID:21886814

  7. Novel inducers of the envelope stress response BaeSR in Salmonella Typhimurium: BaeR is critically required for tungstate waste disposal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Appia-Ayme

    Full Text Available The RpoE and CpxR regulated envelope stress responses are extremely important for Salmonella Typhimurium to cause infection in a range of hosts. Until now the role for BaeSR in both the Salmonella Typhimurium response to stress and its contribution to infection have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate stationary phase growth, iron and sodium tungstate as novel inducers of the BaeRregulon, with BaeR critically required for Salmonella resistance to sodium tungstate. We show that functional overlap between the resistance nodulation-cell division (RND multidrug transporters, MdtA, AcrD and AcrB exists for the waste disposal of tungstate from the cell. We also point to a role for enterobactinsiderophores in the protection of enteric organisms from tungstate, akin to the scenario in nitrogen fixing bacteria. Surprisingly, BaeR is the first envelope stress response pathway investigated in S. Typhimurium that is not required for murine typhoid in either ity(S or ity(R mouse backgrounds. BaeR is therefore either required for survival in larger mammals such as pigs or calves, an avian host such as chickens, or survival out with the host altogether where Salmonella and related enterics must survive in soil and water.

  8. Low-temperature flux growth of sulfates, molybdates, and tungstates of Ca, Sr, and Ba and investigation of doping with $Mn^{6+}$

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romanyuk, Y.E.; Ehrentraut, D.; Pollnau, M.; Garcia-Revilla, S.; Valiente, R.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of undoped and $Mn^{6+}$-doped molybdates and tungstates of alkali-earth metals and BaSO4 has been investigated. Single crystals were grown by the flux method within the temperature range of 600–475 °C, using the ternary NaCl–KCl–CsCl solvent. Sizes of undoped crystals increase within the

  9. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  10. Effect of thermomechanical treatments on the aging response of centrifugally cast silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    OpenAIRE

    May, Christopher William

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Differential scanning calorimetry was conducted using centrifugally cast monolithic A3356 aluminum material and 26 volume present silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced A356 aluminum matrix composite material in as-cast, cast and rolled, and cast and extruded conditions. Electrical resistivity and matrix micro-hardness measurements during isothermal aging treatments were also conducted. The effects of thermo-mechanical processing ...

  11. Effect of thermomechanical treatments on the aging response of centrifugally cast silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    OpenAIRE

    May, Christopher William

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Differential scanning calorimetry was conducted using centrifugally cast monolithic A3356 aluminum material and 26 volume present silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced A356 aluminum matrix composite material in as-cast, cast and rolled, and cast and extruded conditions. Electrical resistivity and matrix micro-hardness measurements during isothermal aging treatments were also conducted. The effects of thermo-mechanical processing ...

  12. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  13. Lightweight Aluminum/Nano composites for Automotive Drive Train Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Knoth, Edward A.; Schumaker, Edward J.

    2012-12-14

    During Phase I, we successfully processed air atomized aluminum powders via Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) pressing and subsequent sintering to produce parts with properties similar to wrought aluminum. We have also showed for the first time that aluminum powders can be processed without lubes via press and sintering to 100 % density. This will preclude a delube cycle in sintering and promote environmentally friendly P/M processing. Processing aluminum powders via press and sintering with minimum shrinkage will enable net shape fabrication. Aluminum powders processed via a conventional powder metallurgy process produce too large a shrinkage. Because of this, sinter parts have to be machined into specific net shape. This results in increased scrap and cost. Fully sintered aluminum alloy under this Phase I project has shown good particle-to-particle bonding and mechanical properties. We have also shown the feasibility of preparing nano composite powders and processing via pressing and sintering. This was accomplished by dispersing nano silicon carbide (SiC) powders into aluminum matrix comprising micron-sized powders (<100 microns) using a proprietary process. These composite powders of Al with nano SiC were processed using DMC press and sinter process to sinter density of 85-90%. The process optimization along with sintering needs to be carried out to produce full density composites.

  14. Lightweight Aluminum/Nano composites for Automotive Drive Train Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Knoth, Edward A.; Schumaker, Edward J.

    2012-12-14

    During Phase I, we successfully processed air atomized aluminum powders via Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) pressing and subsequent sintering to produce parts with properties similar to wrought aluminum. We have also showed for the first time that aluminum powders can be processed without lubes via press and sintering to 100 % density. This will preclude a delube cycle in sintering and promote environmentally friendly P/M processing. Processing aluminum powders via press and sintering with minimum shrinkage will enable net shape fabrication. Aluminum powders processed via a conventional powder metallurgy process produce too large a shrinkage. Because of this, sinter parts have to be machined into specific net shape. This results in increased scrap and cost. Fully sintered aluminum alloy under this Phase I project has shown good particle-to-particle bonding and mechanical properties. We have also shown the feasibility of preparing nano composite powders and processing via pressing and sintering. This was accomplished by dispersing nano silicon carbide (SiC) powders into aluminum matrix comprising micron-sized powders (<100 microns) using a proprietary process. These composite powders of Al with nano SiC were processed using DMC press and sinter process to sinter density of 85-90%. The process optimization along with sintering needs to be carried out to produce full density composites.

  15. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  16. Aluminum nanocomposites for elevated temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, C.; Apelian, D.; Makhlouf, M. M.

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum casting alloys conventionally used in the automotive and aerospace industries (i.e., Al-Zn-Mg, and Al-Cu-Mg systems) are able to achieve excellent tensile strength at room temperature. At high temperatures, such alloys lose dimensional stability and their mechanical properties rapidly degrade. Aluminum-based nanocomposites show the potential for enhanced performance at high temperatures. The manufacturing process, however, is difficult; a viable and effective method for large-scale applications has not been developed. In the current study, an innovative and cost-effective approach has been adopted to manufacture Al/AlN composites. A nitrogen-bearing gas is injected into the melt and AlN particles synthesize in-situ via chemical reaction. In a preliminary stage, a model able to predict the amount of reinforcement formed has been developed. AlN dispersoids have been succesfully synthesized in the matrix and the model has been experimentally validated.

  17. Fabrication of aluminum foam from aluminum scrap Hamza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Osman1 ,

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the optimum parameters affecting the preparation of aluminum foam from recycled aluminum were studied, these parameters are: temperature, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as foaming agent, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as thickening agent, and stirring time. The results show that, the optimum parameters are the temperature ranged from 800 to 850oC, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 5%, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 3% and stirring time was 45 second with stirring speed 1200 rpm. The produced foam apparent densities ranged from 0.40-0.60 g/cm3. The microstructure of aluminum foam was examined by using SEM, EDX and XRD, the results show that, the aluminum pores were uniformly distributed along the all matrices and the cell walls covered by thin oxide film.

  18. [Analysis of tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake in foods by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiding; Chang, Cuilan; Guo, Qilei; Cao, Hong; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-04-01

    A novel analytical method for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was studied. The pigments contained in the color lakes were successfully separated from the aluminum matrix in the pre-treatment process, which included the following steps: dissolve the color lakes in 0.1 mol/L H2SO4, adjust the pH of the solution to 5.0, then mix it with the solution of EDTA x 2Na and heat it in a water bath, then use polyamide powder as the stationary phase of solid phase extraction to separate the pigments from the solution, and finally elute the pigments with 0.1 mol/L NaOH. The CZE conditions systematically optimized for tartrazine aluminum lake were: 48.50 cm of a fused silica capillary with 40.00 cm effective length and 50 microm i. d., the temperature controlled at 20.0 degrees C, 29.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.015 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 263 nm. The conditions for sunset yellow aluminum lake were: the same capillary and temperature, 25.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.025 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 240 nm. The limits of detection were 0.26 mg/L and 0.27 mg/L, and the linear ranges were 0.53-1.3 x 10(2) mg/L and 0.54-1.4 x 10(2) mg/L for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. The RSDs were 4.3% and 5.7% (run to run, n = 6), 5.6% and 6.0% (day to day, n = 6) for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. Further developments for this method could make it a routinely used method analyzing color lakes in foods.

  19. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  20. Tungstate Oxide for Absorbing Near Infrared Light%新型纳米氧化钨的近红外吸收性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐磊; 夏海平

    2012-01-01

    采用化学沉淀法制备纳米氧化钨粉体,并用氢氮混合气对其进行还原处理,分析了还原处理温度对氧化钨化学组成的影响,用 X 射线粉末衍射仪表征了纳米氧化钨粒子的晶相与化学组成,采用扫描电子显微镜观察了该粒子还原处理前后的晶相形貌,并测定了由该纳米颗粒还原前后制得的胶状液体从可见光到近红外波长范围内的吸收光谱和透过光谱。研究表明:还原后的氧化钨纳米粒子对 1400~1600nm 和 1900~2200nm 波段的近红外光具有显著的吸收增强效应,同时对可见光具有很高的透过性,这种具有特殊光学吸收特性的纳米氧化钨可望在新型太阳能热屏蔽器件的设计中得到应用。%A nano-powder of tungstate oxide was firstly prepared by a chemical precipitation process, and then the powder was reduced in H2/N2 gases at a high temperature. The phase and chemical composition of tungstate oxide before and after reduction were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. The morphology of tungstate oxide before and after reduction was observed by scanning electron microscope. The absorption and transmittance spectra of tungstate oxide in a sol state from visible to near infrared wavelength were determined. The results indicated that the tungstate oxide after reduction had a high absorbance in 1 400-1 600 nm and 1 900-2 200 nm wave band for near infrared light and a high transmittance for visible light. It is suggested that the nano-powder of tungstate oxide with the special absorbing characteristics may be promising to be applied in the design for novel solar heat shielding.

  1. China’s Aluminum Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> The aluminum industry makes one of the keyindustries in China’s industrial and agriculturalmodernization and features a high degree ofrelevance with all industries.Of all the 124existing industries in China,113 use aluminum,representing an industrial relevance rate of91%.The consumption of aluminum is also ofhigh relevance with China’s GDP.

  2. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  3. Effect of Rare Earth Element Ce on Microstructure and Properties of Aluminum Rod for Electrical Purpose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Pengfei; Wang Yunli; Gao Xizhu; Wang Zaiyun

    2004-01-01

    The effect of rare earth element Ce on microstructure, electrical conductivity and mechanical properties was studied.Using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer, the microstructure and phase composition of aluminum rod for electrical purpose were measured and analyzed.The results indicate that rare earth element Ce can considerably refine grain size of aluminum rod for electrical purpose,improve the regular distribution pattern of the impurity, such as silicon and iron which present in the aluminum matrix,form stable metal compound with pernicious impurity.This metal compound precipitates on the crystal boundary.As a result, the solid solubility of impurity in aluminum reduce, and the electrical conductivity of aluminum rod for electrical purpose is improved.It is found that the mechanical properties of aluminum rod for electrical purpose are improved by rare earth element in certain range of RE addition.

  4. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    for an integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  5. Aluminum for Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    in plasmon-enhanced light harvesting,14 photocatalysis ,511 surface- enhanced spectroscopies,1216 optics-based sensing,1722 nonlinear optics,2326...optical response of Al nanoparticles has appeared inconsistent relative to calculated spectra, even forwell-characterized geometries. Some studies have...model- ing their optical response. These results pro- vide a method for estimating the metallic purity of aluminum nanoparticles directly from their

  6. High Strength Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum For Rocket Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A. B.; Shah, S. R.; Shadoan, M.

    2003-01-01

    This study presents results on the development of a new aluminum alloy with very high strength and ductility. Five compositions of Al-Mg-Sc-Gd-Zr alloy were selected for this purpose. These alloys were also reinforced with 15 volume percent silicon-carbide and boron-carbide particles to produce Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum (DRA) materials. Matrix alloys and DRA were processed using a powder metallurgy process. The helium gas atomization produced very fine powder with cellular-dentritic microstructure. The microstructure of matrix alloys showed fine Al3Sc based precipitate which provides significant strengthening in these alloys. DRA showed uniform distribution of reinforcement in aluminum matrix. DRA materials were tested at -320 F, 75 F in air and 7S F in gaseous hydrogen environments and matrix alloys were tested at 75 F in air. DRA showed high strengths in the range of 89-111 ksi (614-697 MPa) depending on alloy compositions and test environments. Matrix alloys had a good combination of strength, 84-89 ksi (579-621 MPa) and ductility, 4.5-6.5%. The properties of these materials can further be improved by proper control of processing parameters.

  7. The damping performance of aluminum-based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Updike, C.A.; Bhagat, R.B.; Pechersky, M.J.; Amateau, M.F. (Harris Corp., Government Aerospace Systems Div., Melbourne, FL (USA) Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Metal-matrix-composites may offer better damping properties than unreinforced alloys. Because damping properties (and metal-matrix composites) are becoming important in airframe design, the damping capabilities of a number of aluminum-matrix composites were measured over a wide range of frequencies at low strain amplitudes, using a new laser vibrometer technique. Silicon carbide and alumina reinforcements resulted in a material with damping properties similar to that of unreinforced aluminum 6061-T6, but unidirectional and planar-random graphite continuous-fiber reinforcements increased the damping by 5 and 14 times, respectively. The increased damping of the continuous fiber composites is attributed to the absence of interfacial reaction resulting from the high-pressure infiltration method used for their manufacture. 25 refs.

  8. High-Strain-Rate Constitutive Characterization and Modeling of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-07

    impact fracture of carbon fiber reinforced 7075 -T6 aluminum matrix composite , Materials Transactions, Japan Institute of Metals, 41, 1055-1063...MODELING OF METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES Report Title The mechanical response of three different types of materials are examined: unidirectionally...conditions. This report also documents some of the highlights of the material response of Saffil filled aluminum matrix composite and a Nextel satin

  9. Wear performance of in-situ aluminum matrix composite after micro-arc oxidation%微弧氧化处理原位颗粒增强铝基复合材料的磨损性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaman ERARSLAN

    2013-01-01

    An attempt was made to modify the surface of in-situ aluminium matrix composite (AMC) by micro-arc oxidation (MAO).In the microstructure of AMC, CuAl2 reinforcements were generated by introducing 15% CuO into the aluminium melt.AMC was hot forged,homogenised,quenched and artificially aged before the MAO in a KOH,KF and Na2SiO3-containing electrolyte.After the MAO process the surface of the AMC was covered with Al2O3 coating having an effective thickness of about 15 μtm.Appearance of crack and/or delamination free zones at the periphery of the indent after the Rockwell C adhesion test indicated good adhesion between the composite and the Al2O3 coating.During dry sliding wear tests,this adherent Al2O3coating resisted the destructive action of the Al2O3 ball and provided about 15 times enhancement in wear resistance as compared to the original state.%采用微弧氧化工艺来改善原位颗粒增强铝基复合材料的表面性能.通过向铝熔体中加入15%CuO来制备CuAl2增强铝基复合材料.所制备的材料经过热压、均匀化处理、淬火和人工时效处理,然后在含KOH、KF和Na2SiO3的电解液中进行微弧氧化处理.经微弧氧化处理,复合材料的表面生成了有效厚度约15 μm的Al2O3膜层.洛氏硬度测试后,在压痕边缘部位没有出现裂纹或明显的剥离现象,表明Al2O3膜层与基底结合良好.干摩擦试验结果表明,Al2O3膜层对Al2O3球的破坏性作用具有明显的抑制,Al2O3膜层的磨损性能比基体提高15倍以上.

  10. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the constrained factorization problems of sparse principal components analysis (PCA) for gene expression modeling, low-rank matrix completion for recommender systems, and robust matrix factorization for video surveillance, this dissertation explores the modeling, methodology, and theory of matrix factorization.We begin by exposing the theoretical and empirical shortcomings of standard deflation techniques for sparse PCA and developing alternative methodology more suitable for def...

  11. High-temperature discontinuously reinforced aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedalis, M. S.; Bryant, J. D.; Gilman, P. S.; Das, S. K.

    1991-08-01

    High-temperature discontinuously reinforced aluminum (HTDRA) composites have been developed for elevated-temperature applications by incorporating SiC particulate reinforcement into a rapidly solidified, high-temperature Al-Fe-V-Si (alloy 8009) matrix. HTDRA combines the superior elevated-temperature strength, stability and corrosion resistance of the 8009 matrix with the excellent specific stiffness and abrasion resistance of the discontinuous SiC particulate reinforcement. On a specific stiffness basis, HTDRA is competitive with Ti-6-Al-4V and 17-4 PH stainless steel to temperatures approaching 480°C. Potential aerospace applications being considered for HTDRA include aircraft wing skins, missile bodies, and miscellaneous engine, spacecraft and hypersonic vehicle components.

  12. Melt quality induced failure of electrical conductor (EC grade aluminum wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliq A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure of electrical conductor grade (EC aluminum during wire drawing process was investigated. The fractured aluminum wires were subjected to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX analyses for an initial examination. Thermodynamic analyses of molten aluminum interaction with refractories was also carried out using FactSage at 710°C to predict the stable phases. The SEM/EDX analyses has revealed the inclusions in aluminum matrix. The typical inclusions observed were Al2O3, Al3C4 (Al-Carbide and oxides of refractories elements (Al, Mg, Si and O that have particle size ranging up to 5 μm. The transition metal boride particles were not identified during SEM/EDX analyses these might be too fine to be detected with this microscope. The overall investigation suggested that the possible cause of this failure is second phase particles presence as inclusions in the aluminum matrix, and this was associated with the poor quality of melt. During wire drawing process, these inclusions were pulled out of the aluminum matrix by the wiredrawing forces to produce micro-voids which led to ductile tearing and final fracture of wires. It was recommended to use ceramic foam filters to segregate inclusions from molten aluminum.

  13. Aluminum microstructures on anodic alumina for aluminum wiring boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2010-03-01

    The paper demonstrates simple methods for the fabrication of aluminum microstructures on the anodic oxide film of aluminum. The aluminum sheets were first engraved (patterned) either by laser beam or by embossing to form deep grooves on the surface. One side of the sheet was then anodized, blocking the other side by using polymer mask to form the anodic alumina. Because of the lower thickness at the bottom part of the grooves, the part was completely anodized before the complete oxidation of the other parts. Such selectively complete anodizing resulted in the patterns of metallic aluminum on anodic alumina. Using the technique, we fabricated microstructures such as line patterns and a simple wiring circuit-board-like structure on the anodic alumina. The aluminum microstructures fabricated by the techniques were embedded in anodic alumina/aluminum sheet, and this technique is promising for applications in electronic packaging and devices.

  14. Aluminum Alloy 7050 Extrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    Artificial Aging Conditions 250 A-l Fatigue Crack Growth Data for C5A Extruded Panel, 7050-T7351X, L-T Orientation, R=0.1 254 A-2 Fatigue...cooldd aluminum and steel bottom blocks (Figure 2) were fabricated for use with this tooling. Metal was melted in a 10,000-lb capacity open- hearth ...time factor, effects of heating through this temperature range to the maximum artificial agirg temperature are additive. The solution of the

  15. 湿法分解钨酸钴的热力学分析%Thermodynamic analysis of cobalt tungstate ’s hydrometallurgical decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易军; 曹才放

    2013-01-01

    When treating scraps WC-Co hard metal with oxygen or air, cobalt tungstate insoluble in water forms in the oxidation products. Thermodynamic equilibriums of Co-W-H 2O system and Co-W-C-H2O system were studied respectively obtaining a series of equilibrium diagrams to investigate issues related to hydrometallurgical decomposition of cobalt tungstate. The results show that cobalt tungstate is relatively stable in neutral solution. Cobalt tungstate can be decomposed by acid or alkali under certain conditions. Tungsten and cobalt can be separated at the same time. In addition, the decomposition reaction of cobalt tungstate with carbonate can be accomplished at lower excess coefficient of carbonate due to its strong thermodynamic tendency. Solution PH value has a remarkable effect on the reaction.%采用空气(或氧气)氧化法处理WC-Co硬质合金废料时,钴和钨将形成难溶于水的化合物钨酸钴。针对湿法分解钨酸钴的问题,分别对Co-W-H2O体系和Co-W-C-H2O体系进行了热力学分析,获得了一系列平衡关系图。结果表明,钨酸钴在中性溶液中可稳定存在,采用酸分解或碱分解的方式,均可使钨酸钴分解,并实现钨和钴的分离。碳酸盐分解钨酸钴的热力学趋势较大,分解反应可在较低的碳酸盐过量系数下完成。此外,溶液pH值对碳酸盐分解钨酸钴具有较大的影响。

  16. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  17. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry

  18. Extracting aluminum from dross tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, A. M.

    2002-11-01

    Aluminum dross tailings, an industrial waste, from the Egyptian Aluminium Company (Egyptalum) was used to produce two types of alums: aluminum-sulfate alum [itAl2(SO4)3.12H2O] and ammonium-aluminum alum [ (NH 4)2SO4AL2(SO4)3.24H2O]. This was carried out in two processes. The first process is leaching the impurities using diluted H2SO4 with different solid/liquid ratios at different temperatures to dissolve the impurities present in the starting material in the form of solute sulfates. The second process is the extraction of aluminum (as aluminum sulfate) from the purifi ed aluminum dross tailings thus produced. The effects of temperature, time of reaction, and acid concentration on leaching and extraction processes were studied. The product alums were analyzed using x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis techniques.

  19. Structure and properties of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkov, R.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. The dependence of porosity and mechanical characteristics of the material sintered at different temperatures was studied. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  20. Impact loading of an aluminum/alumina composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Gray, G.T. III

    1994-02-01

    The combined demands of increased strength and reduced weight in modern dynamic structural applications require improved understanding of composite materials subject to impact conditions. In order to isolate and identify individual contributions to composite material behavior under these conditions, an experimental and theoretical program was undertaken to examine dynamic behavior of an aluminum/alumina composite consisting of a 6061-T6 aluminum matrix containing elastic, spherical Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} inclusions (10 percent by volume, average diameter {approximately}25 microns). Parallel impact experiments are conducted on these composites and on pure 6061-T6 aluminum samples. This combination provides a direct and immediate qualitative picture of the effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} inclusions the dynamic response of the composite in compression, release, and spallation. Additional experimental information is provided by post-shock reload tests of shock-recovered samples at quasi-static and intermediate strain rates.

  1. Refractory Characteristics of Aluminum Dross-Kaolin Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Dada, M. O.

    2014-11-01

    The suitability of using aluminum dross waste and kaolin to produce refractory bricks is experimentally studied. Thirty brick samples of different blends are produced, dried at 30°C, dried further at 110°C, and fired at 1200°C. The firing temperature point, bulk density, apparent porosity, thermal conductivity, thermal shock, loss on ignition, permeability, shatter index, and shrinkage of the bricks blends are determined. The results show that some blend samples have good refractory characteristics with mixing ratio 4:1:2 (representing weight in grams of aluminum dross, plastic clay, and kaolin, respectively). The evaluations of studied properties reveal the possibility for aluminum dross waste to be used as matrix in refractory bricks.

  2. Laser assisted foaming of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathuria, Y.P. [Laser X Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Recently aluminum foams have evoked considerable interest as an alternative material owing to their wide range of applications ranging from microelectronics, through automobiles to aerospace industries. The manufacturing techniques and characterization methods for aluminum foams require further development to achieve effective and economical use of this material. In this communication the authors demonstrate the feasibility of unidirectional and localized expansion of the aluminum foam using the Nd-YAG/CO{sub 2} laser and powder metallurgy. (orig.)

  3. A role for tungsten in the biology of Campylobacter jejuni: tungstate stimulates formate dehydrogenase activity and is transported via an ultra-high affinity ABC system distinct from the molybdate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jonathan P; Cliff, Matthew J; Kelly, David J

    2009-11-01

    The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni possesses no known tungstoenzymes, yet encodes two ABC transporters (Cj0300-0303 and Cj1538-1540) homologous to bacterial molybdate (ModABC) uptake systems and the tungstate transporter (TupABC) of Eubacterium acidaminophilum respectively. The actual substrates and physiological role of these transporters were investigated. Tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry of the purified periplasmic binding proteins of each system revealed that while Cj0303 is unable to discriminate between molybdate and tungstate (K(D) values for both ligands of 4-8 nM), Cj1540 binds tungstate with a K(D) of 1.0 +/- 0.2 pM; 50 000-fold more tightly than molybdate. Induction-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy of single and double mutants showed that this large difference in affinity is reflected in a lower cellular tungsten content in a cj1540 (tupA) mutant compared with a cj0303c (modA) mutant. Surprisingly, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) activity was decreased approximately 50% in the tupA strain, and supplementation of the growth medium with tungstate significantly increased FDH activity in the wild type, while inhibiting known molybdoenzymes. Our data suggest that C. jejuni possesses a specific, ultra-high affinity tungstate transporter that supplies tungsten for incorporation into FDH. Furthermore, possession of two MoeA paralogues may explain the formation of both molybdopterin and tungstopterin in this bacterium.

  4. Self-Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic and White-Light Generation in a Biaxial Zinc Tungstate Single Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osewski, Pawel; Belardini, Alessandro; Petronijevic, Emilija; Centini, Marco; Leahu, Grigore; Diduszko, Ryszard; Pawlak, Dorota A; Sibilia, Concita

    2017-03-24

    Second-order nonlinear optical materials are used to generate new frequencies by exploiting second-harmonic generation (SHG), a phenomenon where a nonlinear material generates light at double the optical frequency of the input beam. Maximum SHG is achieved when the pump and the generated waves are in phase, for example through birefringence in uniaxial crystals. However, applying these materials usually requires a complicated cutting procedure to yield a crystal with a particular orientation. Here we demonstrate the first example of phase matching under the normal incidence of SHG in a biaxial monoclinic single crystal of zinc tungstate. The crystal was grown by the micro-pulling-down method with the (102) plane perpendicular to the growth direction. Additionally, at the same time white light was generated as a result of stimulated Raman scattering and multiphoton luminescence induced by higher-order effects such as three-photon luminescence enhanced by cascaded third-harmonic generation. The annealed crystal offers SHG intensities approximately four times larger than the as grown one; optimized growth and annealing conditions may lead to much higher SHG intensities.

  5. A Simulation Study on the Feasibility of Radio Enhancement Therapy with Calcium Tungstate and Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Sherck, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Herein is a simulation study on the radio enhancement potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO4) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) nanoparticles (NPs) relative to gold (Au) NPs. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" to which the novel materials can be compared. All three materials were investigated in-silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The aims are: (1) Do CaWO4 and HfO2 NPs function like Au?, and (2) if not, how else might they function to enhance radio therapy? Our investigations have found that HfO2 likely functions as Au, but not as effectively. CaWO4 likely does not function as Au, and we propose that CaWO4 may exhibit cancer killing traits through its intrinsic UV luminescence property.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and luminescence study of Eu(III) tungstates and molybdates nanotubes using carbon nanotubes as templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ziwei; Zhou, Liqun; Wang, Fen; Zhou, Lirong

    2009-03-01

    Eu(III) tungstates and molybdates nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by the solvothermal method using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as removable templates. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, thermogravimetric and differential thermalanalysis. It is demonstrated that CNTs are fully coated with an amorphous Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) layer, which is about 10nm thick and almost continuous and uniform. After the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo)/CNTs composites have been calcined at 700 degrees C, Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes are obtained by removing the CNTs templates. The diameter of the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes is 40-60 nm, which is consistent with that of CNTs. The luminescence properties of the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes calcined at various temperatures have been investigated. The result shows that the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes obtained from the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo)/CNTs composites calcined at 700 degrees C display a strong red emission peak at around 611 nm.

  7. Self-Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic and White-Light Generation in a Biaxial Zinc Tungstate Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osewski, Pawel; Belardini, Alessandro; Petronijevic, Emilija; Centini, Marco; Leahu, Grigore; Diduszko, Ryszard; Pawlak, Dorota A.; Sibilia, Concita

    2017-01-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical materials are used to generate new frequencies by exploiting second-harmonic generation (SHG), a phenomenon where a nonlinear material generates light at double the optical frequency of the input beam. Maximum SHG is achieved when the pump and the generated waves are in phase, for example through birefringence in uniaxial crystals. However, applying these materials usually requires a complicated cutting procedure to yield a crystal with a particular orientation. Here we demonstrate the first example of phase matching under the normal incidence of SHG in a biaxial monoclinic single crystal of zinc tungstate. The crystal was grown by the micro-pulling-down method with the (102) plane perpendicular to the growth direction. Additionally, at the same time white light was generated as a result of stimulated Raman scattering and multiphoton luminescence induced by higher-order effects such as three-photon luminescence enhanced by cascaded third-harmonic generation. The annealed crystal offers SHG intensities approximately four times larger than the as grown one; optimized growth and annealing conditions may lead to much higher SHG intensities. PMID:28338074

  8. Synthesis of bismuth tungstate (Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}) nanoflakes and their field emission investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolhe, P. S.; Sonawane, K. M. [Department of Physics, Fergusson College, Pune 411 004 (India); Bankar, P. K.; Gavhane, D. S.; More, M. A., E-mail: mam@physics.unipune.ac.in [Center for Advanced Studies in materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411 00.7 (India); Maiti, N. [Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-05-23

    The nanoflakes of Bismuth Tungstate (Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}) were successfully synthesized by a one-step facile hydrothermal route without using any templates or surfactants and field emission investigations of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes emitter are reported. Structural and morphological analysis of as-synthesized Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes has been carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, the field emission characteristics of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes are found to be superior to the other semiconductor emitters. The synthesized Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes emitter delivers current density of ~222.35 μA/cm{sup 2} at an applied electric field of ~7.2 V/μm. The emission current stability investigated at pre-set value of ~2 μA is observed to be fairly good. These observed results demonstrate potential candidate of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} cathode as an electron source for practical applications in vacuum microelectronic device.

  9. Self-Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic and White-Light Generation in a Biaxial Zinc Tungstate Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osewski, Pawel; Belardini, Alessandro; Petronijevic, Emilija; Centini, Marco; Leahu, Grigore; Diduszko, Ryszard; Pawlak, Dorota A.; Sibilia, Concita

    2017-03-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical materials are used to generate new frequencies by exploiting second-harmonic generation (SHG), a phenomenon where a nonlinear material generates light at double the optical frequency of the input beam. Maximum SHG is achieved when the pump and the generated waves are in phase, for example through birefringence in uniaxial crystals. However, applying these materials usually requires a complicated cutting procedure to yield a crystal with a particular orientation. Here we demonstrate the first example of phase matching under the normal incidence of SHG in a biaxial monoclinic single crystal of zinc tungstate. The crystal was grown by the micro-pulling-down method with the (102) plane perpendicular to the growth direction. Additionally, at the same time white light was generated as a result of stimulated Raman scattering and multiphoton luminescence induced by higher-order effects such as three-photon luminescence enhanced by cascaded third-harmonic generation. The annealed crystal offers SHG intensities approximately four times larger than the as grown one; optimized growth and annealing conditions may lead to much higher SHG intensities.

  10. Photoluminescence in solid solutions and thin films of tungstates CaWO{sub 4}-CdWO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoufyq, A.; Mauroy, V.; Guinneton, F.; Valmalette, J-C. [University of Toulon, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, La Garde, (France); Fiorido, T. [Aix Marseille University, IM2NP, UMR CNRS, 7334, Marseille, (France); Benlhachemi, A. [IBN ZOHR University, Faculty of sciences, Environment and Materials Laboratory, Agadir, (Morocco); Lyoussi, A. [CEA of Cadarache, DEN, Departement of reactors studies, experimental physics, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, (France); Nolibe, G. [Cesigma society, signals and systems, La Garde, (France); Gavarri, J-R. [University of Toulon, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, La Garde, (France)

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we present two types of studies on the luminescence properties under UV and X-ray excitations of solid solutions Ca{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}WO{sub 4} and of thin layers of CaWO{sub 4} and CdWO{sub 4}. These tungstate based solid solutions are susceptible to be integrated into new radiation sensors, in order to be used in different fields of applications such as reactor measurements, safeguards, homeland security, nuclear nondestructive assays, LINAC emission radiation measurement. However these complex materials were rarely investigated in the literature. One first objective of our studies was to establish correlations between luminescence efficiency, chemical substitution and the degree of crystallization resulting from elaboration conditions. A second objective will be to determine the efficiency of luminescence properties of thin layers of these materials. In the present work, we focus our attention on the role of chemical substitution on photon emissions under UV and X-ray irradiations. The luminescence spectra of Ca{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}WO{sub 4} polycrystalline materials have been investigated at room temperature as a function of composition (0≤x≤1). In addition, we present a preliminary study of the luminescence of CaWO{sub 4} and CdWO{sub 4} thin layers: oscillations observed in the case of X-ray excitations in the luminescence spectra are discussed. (authors)

  11. Dynamic Property of Aluminum Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Irie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum in the foam of metallic foam is in the early stage of industrialization. It has various beneficial characteristics such as being lightweight, heat resistance, and an electromagnetic radiation shield. Therefore, the use of aluminum foam is expected to reduce the weight of equipment for transportation such as the car, trains, and aircraft. The use as energy absorption material is examined. Moreover aluminum foam can absorb the shock wave, and decrease the shock of the blast. Many researchers have reported about aluminum foam, but only a little information is available for high strain rates (103 s-1 or more. Therefore, the aluminum foam at high strain rates hasn't been not characterized yet. The purpose in this research is to evaluate the behavior of the aluminum form in the high-strain rate. In this paper, the collision test on high strain rate of the aluminum foam is investigated. After experiment, the numerical analysis model will be made. In this experiment, a powder gun was used to generate the high strain rate in aluminum foam. In-situ PVDF gauges were used for measuring pressure and the length of effectiveness that acts on the aluminum foam. The aluminum foam was accelerated to about 400 m/s from deflagration of single component powder and the foam were made to collide with the PVDF gauge. The high strain rate deformation of the aluminum form was measured at two collision speeds. As for the result, pressure was observed to go up rapidly when about 70% was compressed. From this result, it is understood that complete crush of the cell is caused when the relative volume is about 70%. In the next stage, this data will be compared with the numerical analysis.

  12. Neurofibrillary pathology and aluminum in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, R. W.; Lee, V.M.Y.; Trojanowski, J.Q.

    1995-01-01

    Since the first reports of aluminum-induced neurofibrillary degeneration in experimental animals, extensive studies have been performed to clarify the role played by aluminum in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additional evidence implicating aluminum in AD includes elevated levels of aluminum in the AD brain, epidemiological data linking aluminum exposure to AD, and interactions between aluminum and protein components in the pathological lesions o...

  13. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  14. Evaluation of Corrosion Protection Methods for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    and hot water sealed MMCs 75 5.9 Calculated Barrier Layer Thickness for AA6061, A356 and3 2009/20% SiCr 81 5.10 Comparison of Exposure test results...anodized and hot water sealed 2009/20% SiCr after exposure to 0.5 N NaCI for 2 hrs, 17 days and 28 days. 224 I II Ii I * xv Figure Page 5.48 Bode plots...28 1 20.o SiCr 28 3 6061/20% AI,0 3 28 7I resembles that for hot water scaling with the porous layer capacitance and pore impedance visible in the

  15. Low temperature aluminum soldering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterkort, W.G.

    1976-09-01

    The investigation of low temperature aluminum soldering included the collection of spread factor and dihedral angle data for several solder alloys and a study of flux effects on aluminum. Selected solders were subjected to environmental tests and evaluated on the basis of tensile strength, joint resistance, visual appearance, and metallurgical analysis. A production line method for determining adequate flux removal was developed.

  16. Ballistic Evaluation of 2060 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    experiments in Experimental Facilities (EFs) 108 and 106, as well as John Hogan of ARL/AMB, Hugh Walter of Bowhead Science and Technology, and David Handshoe...new aluminum (Al)-based monocoque armored-vehicle hulls such as those of the M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicles. Also in 2012 the Aluminum

  17. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Angulo Barrios

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (biosensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (biosensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs.

  18. Research progress of modification and application of bismuth tungstate photocatalyst%Bi2WO6光催化剂的改性及其应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗序燕; 赵东方; 黄瑞宇; 祝婷; 邓金梅; 谢小华

    2015-01-01

    Bi2WO6因其能吸收可见光、催化活性高,是一种非常有潜力的光催化剂。综述了Bi2WO6催化剂的制备、修饰改性以及在处理有机污水方面的应用,并对今后Bi2WO6光催化剂的研究方向进行了展望。%Bismuth tungstate is a promising photocatalyst because of narrow band gap and ability of absorbing visible light. In this paper, the preparation ,modification and application of sewage treatment of bismuth tungstate photocatalyst were reviewed. Finally, the direction of future development of bismuth tungstate photocatalyst was prospected.

  19. Kinetics of aluminum lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Ben A.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum lithium alloys are increasingly used in aerospace for their high strength-to-weight ratio. Additions of lithium, up to 4.2 wt% decrease the alloy density while increasing the modulus and yield strength. The metastable, second phase Al3Li or delta' is intriguing, as it remains spherical and coherent with the matrix phase, alpha, well into the overaged condition. Small interfacial strain energy allows these precipitates to remain spherical for volume fractions (VV ) of delta' less than 0.3, making this alloy system ideal for investigation of late-stage coarsening phenomena. Experimental characterization of three binary Al-Li alloys are presented as a critical test of diffusion screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy is used to image the precipitates directly using the centered dark-field technique. Images are analyzed autonomously within a novel Matlab function that determines the center and size of each precipitate. Particle size distribution, particle growth kinetics, and maximum particle size are used to track the precipitate growth and correlate with the predictions of screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. This project is the first extensive study of Al-Li alloys, in over 25 years, applying modern transmission electron microscopy and image analysis techniques. Previous studies sampled but a single alloy composition, and measured far fewer precipitates. This study investigates 3 alloys with volume fractions of the delta precipitates, VV =0.1-0.27, aged at 225C for 1 to 10 days. More than 1000 precipitates were sampled per aging time, creating more statistically significant data. Experimental results are used to test the predictions based on diffusion screening theory and multi-particle aging simulations. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  20. Matrix Thermalization

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Nguyen, Kévin

    2016-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  1. Wettability of Aluminum on Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Sarina; Tang, Kai; Kvithyld, Anne; Tangstad, Merete; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2011-12-01

    The wettability of molten aluminum on solid alumina substrate has been investigated by the sessile drop technique in a 10-8 bar vacuum or under argon atmosphere in the temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K (1000 °C to 1400 °C). It is shown that the reduction of oxide skin on molten aluminum is slow under normal pressures even with ultralow oxygen potential, but it is enhanced in high vacuum. To describe the wetting behavior of the Al-Al2O3 system at lower temperatures, a semiempirical calculation was employed. The calculated contact angle at 973 K (700 °C) is approximately 97 deg, which indicates that aluminum does not wet alumina at aluminum casting temperatures. Thus, a priming height is required for aluminum to infiltrate a filter. Wetting in the Al-Al2O3 system increases with temperature.

  2. Hot Extrusion of Aluminum Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekkaya, A. Erman; Güley, Volkan; Haase, Matthias; Jäger, Andreas

    The process of hot extrusion is a promising approach for the direct recycling of aluminum machining chips to aluminum profiles. The presented technology is capable of saving energy, as remelting of aluminum chips can be avoided. Depending on the deformation route and process parameters, the chip-based aluminum extradates showed mechanical properties comparable or superior to cast aluminum billets extruded under the same conditions. Using different metal flow schemes utilizing different extrusion dies the mechanical properties of the profiles extruded from chips can be improved. The energy absorption capacity of the profiles the rectangular hollow profiles extruded from chips and as-cast billets were analyzed using the drop hammer test set-up. The formability of the profiles extruded from chips and as-cast material were compared using tube bending tests in a three-roller-bending machine.

  3. Hualu Aluminum Will Construct Large Coal-Power-Aluminum Aluminum Processing Industrial Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The reporter learned from relevant departments of Baiyin City that in order to further push forward industrial upgrading,fulfill expansion and consolidation of the enterprise,Gansu Hualu Aluminum Co.,Ltd(Hualu Aluminum)will implement Out-Of-City-Into-Park project,

  4. Immunotoxic effects of sodium tungstate dihydrate on female B6C3F1/N mice when administered in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Rachel P; Smith, Matthew J; White, Kimber L; Elmore, Susan A; Herbert, Ron; Moore, Rebecca; Staska, Lauren M; Behl, Mamta; Hooth, Michelle J; Kissling, Grace E; Germolec, Dori R

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring, high-tensile strength element that has been used in a number of consumer products. Tungsten has been detected in soil, waterways, groundwater, and human tissue and body fluids. Elevated levels of tungsten in urine were reported for populations exposed to tungstate in drinking water in areas where natural tungsten formations were prevalent. Published reports indicated that sodium tungstate may modulate hematopoiesis, immune cell populations, and immune responses in rodent models. The objective of this study was to assess potential immunotoxicity of sodium tungstate dihydrate (STD), a drinking water contaminant. Female B6C3F1/N mice received 0-2000 mg STD/L in their drinking water for 28 d, and were evaluated for effects on immune cell populations in spleen and bone marrow, and humoral-mediated, cell-mediated, and innate immunity. Three different parameters of cell-mediated immunity were similarly affected at 1000 mg STD/L. T-cell proliferative responses against allogeneic leukocytes and anti-CD3 were decreased 32%, and 21%, respectively. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased at all effector:target cell ratios examined. At 2000 mg STD/L, the absolute numbers of CD3(+) T-cell progenitor cells in bone marrow were increased 86%, but the alterations in B-lymphocyte and other progenitor cells were not significant. There were no effects on bone marrow DNA synthesis or colony forming capabilities. STD-induced effects on humoral-mediated immunity, innate immunity, and splenocyte sub-populations were limited. Enhanced histopathology did not detect treatment-related lesions in any of the immune tissues. These data suggest exposure to STD in drinking water may adversely affect cell-mediated immunity.

  5. Decavanadate, decaniobate, tungstate and molybdate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase: quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation by vanadate but does not reverse ATPase inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Fraqueza, Gil; de Carvalho, Luís A. E. Batista; Marques, M. Paula M.; Maia, Luisa; Ohlin, C. André; Casey, William H.; Aureliano, M.

    2012-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated that the decavanadate (V10) ion is a stronger Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor than other oxometalates, such as the isoelectronic and isostructural decaniobate ion, and the tungstate and molybdate monomer ions, and that it binds to this protein with a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The V10 interaction is not affected by any of the protein conformations that occur during the process of calcium translocation (i.e. E1, E1P, E2 and E2P) (Fraqueza et al., J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012). In the p...

  6. Decavanadate, decaniobate, tungstate and molybdate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase: quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation by vanadate but does not reverse ATPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, Gil; Batista de Carvalho, Luís A E; Marques, M Paula M; Maia, Luisa; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-11-07

    Recently we demonstrated that the decavanadate (V(10)) ion is a stronger Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor than other oxometalates, such as the isoelectronic and isostructural decaniobate ion, and the tungstate and molybdate monomer ions, and that it binds to this protein with a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The V(10) interaction is not affected by any of the protein conformations that occur during the process of calcium translocation (i.e. E1, E1P, E2 and E2P) (Fraqueza et al., J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012). In the present study, we further explore this subject, and we can now show that the decaniobate ion, [Nb(10) = Nb(10)O(28)](6-), is a useful tool in deducing the interaction and the non-competitive Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition by the decavanadate ion [V(10) = V(10)O(28)](6-). Moreover, decavanadate and vanadate induce protein cysteine oxidation whereas no effects were detected for the decaniobate, tungstate or molybdate ions. The presence of the antioxidant quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation, but not ATPase inhibition, by vanadate or decavanadate. Definitive V(IV) EPR spectra were observed for decavanadate in the presence of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, indicating a vanadate reduction at some stage of the protein interaction. Raman spectroscopy clearly shows that the protein conformation changes that are induced by V(10), Nb(10) and vanadate are different from the ones induced by molybdate and tungstate monomer ions. Here, Mo and W cause changes similar to those by phosphate, yielding changes similar to the E1P protein conformation. The putative reduction of vanadium(V) to vanadium(IV) and the non-competitive binding of the V(10) and Nb(10) decametalates may explain the differences in the Raman spectra compared to those seen in the presence of molybdate or tungstate. Putting it all together, we suggest that the ability of V(10) to inhibit the Ca(2+)-ATPase may be at least in part due to the process of vanadate reduction and associated protein cysteine oxidation. These

  7. Development of radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators from enriched {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd to search for double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F. A.; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Mokina, V. M.; Nikolaiko, A. S.; Poda, D. V.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Tretyak, V. I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V. I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S. [INFN, Section of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy and Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Brudanin, V. B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Cappella, F.; Incicchitti, A. [INFN, Section of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy and Department of Physics, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V. [INFN, Gran Sasso National Laboratories, Assergi (Aq), Italy and Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); and others

    2013-08-08

    Cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators enriched in {sup 106}Cd up to 66% ({sup 106}CdWO{sub 4}) and in {sup 116}Cd up to 82% ({sup 116}CdWO{sub 4}) have been developed. The low radioactive contamination of the crystals measured on the level of ≤ 1.5 mBq/kg ({sup 40}K), ≤ 0.005 - 0.012 mBq/kg ({sup 226}Ra), 0.04 - 0.07 mBq/kg ({sup 228}Th) allows to carry out high sensitivity experiments to search for double beta processes in {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd.

  8. Selection of a mineral binder with potentialities for the stabilization/solidification of aluminum metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C., E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/MAR/DTCD/SPDE, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Lambertin, D.; Lahalle, H.; Antonucci, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/MAR/DTCD/SPDE, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Cannes, C.; Delpech, S. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Binders capable of reducing the pore solution pH compared with Portland cements are reviewed. • The binders are then tested against aluminum corrosion. • Corrosion of aluminum metal is minimal with magnesium phosphate cement. • The H{sub 2} release can be reduced still further by adding LiNO{sub 3} to the mixing solution. • Electrochemical characterizations show that aluminum tends to a passive state. - Abstract: In a strongly alkaline medium, such as that encountered in conventional cementitious materials based on Portland cement, aluminum metal is corroded, with continued production of hydrogen. In order to develop a mineral matrix having enhanced compatibility with aluminum, a literature review was first undertaken to identify binders capable of reducing the pore solution pH compared with Portland cement. An experimental study was then carried out to measure the hydrogen production resulting from corrosion of aluminum metal rods encapsulated in the different selected cement pastes. The best results were achieved with magnesium phosphate cement, which released very little hydrogen over the duration of the study. This production could be reduced still further by adding a corrosion inhibitor (lithium nitrate) to the mixing solution. Open circuit potential measurement and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of aluminum electrode encapsulated in two pastes based on Portland cement and magnesium phosphate cement showed different redox behaviors. In the Portland cement paste, the electrochemical data confirmed the corrosion of aluminum whereas this latter tended to a passive state in the magnesium phosphate binder.

  9. On halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) and -tungstates(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleid, Thomas; Hartenbach, Ingo [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Inorganic Chemistry

    2016-11-01

    Halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) have been investigated comprehensively over the last decade comprising the halogens fluorine, chlorine, and bromine. Iodide-containing compounds are so far unknown. The simple composition REXMoO{sub 4} (RE=rare-earth element, X=halogen) is realized for X=F almost throughout the complete lanthanide series as well as for yttrium. While ytterbium and lutetium do not form any fluoride derivative, for lanthanum, only a fluoride-deprived compound with the formula La{sub 3}FMo{sub 4}O{sub 16} is realized. Moreover, molybdenum-rich compounds with the formula REXMo{sub 2}O{sub 7} are also known for yttrium and the smaller lanthanoids. For X=Cl the composition REClMoO{sub 4} is known for yttrium and the whole lanthanide series, although, four different structure types were identified. Almost the same holds for X=Br, however, only two different structure types are realized in this class of compounds. In the case of halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidotungstates(VI) the composition REXWO{sub 4} is found for chlorides and bromides only, so far. Due to the similar size of Mo{sup 6+} and W{sup 6+} cations, the structures found for the tungstates are basically the same as for the molybdates. With the larger lanthanides, the representatives for both chloride and bromide derivates exhibit similar structural motifs as seen in the molybdates, however, the crystal structure cannot be determined reliably. In case of the smaller lanthanoids, the chloride derivatives are isostructural with the respective molybdates, although the existence ranges differ slightly. The same is true for rare-earth metal(III) bromide oxidotungstates(VI).

  10. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, A Dominic

    2015-07-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å(-1). The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter-atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter-leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra-hedra that are linked by chains of water mol-ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856-2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter-action involving one of the water mol-ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred 'linear' hydrogen bond.

  11. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  12. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, June H.

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels containing higher amounts of aluminum than conventional steels are ideal for structural automotive parts due to their mechanical properties. However, the aluminum tends to react with any processing environment at high temperatures and therefore presents significant challenges during manufacturing. One such challenge occurs during secondary cooling, reheating, and hot-rolling and is caused by a reaction with nitrogen-rich atmospheres wherein subsurface aluminum nitride forms in addition to internal and external oxides. The nitrides are detrimental to mechanical properties and cause surface cracks. It is important to understand how these nitrides and oxides form and their consequences for the quality of steel products. This study looks at model iron-aluminum (up to 8 wt.% aluminum) alloys and uses confocal laser scanning microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy to study the effect of various conditions on the growth and development of these precipitates in a subsurface oxygen-depleted region. By using model alloys and controlling the experimental atmosphere, this study is able to understand some of the more fundamental materials science behind aluminum nitride formation in aluminum-rich iron alloys and the relationship between internal nitride and oxide precipitation and external oxide scale morphology and composition. The iron-aluminum alloys were heated in N2 atmospheres containing oxygen impurities. It was found that nitrides formed when bulk aluminum content was below 8 wt.% when oxygen was sufficiently depleted due to the internal oxidation. In the samples containing 1 wt.% aluminum, the depth of the internal oxide and nitride zones were in agreement with a diffusion-based model. Increasing aluminum content to 3 and 5 wt% had the effects of modifying the surface-oxide scale composition and increasing its continuity

  13. Rapidly solidified aluminum alloy powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.S.; Chun, B.S.; Won, C.W.; Lee, B.S.; Kim, H.K.; Ryu, M. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Antolovich, S.D. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Miniaturization and weight reduction are becoming increasingly important in the fabrication of vehicles. In particular, aluminum-silicon alloys are the logical choice for automotive parts such as pistons and cylinders liners because of their excellent wear resistance and low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, it is difficult to produce aluminum-silicon alloys with silicon contents greater than 20 wt% via ingot metallurgy, because strength is drastically reduced by the coarsening of primary silicon particles. This article describes an investigation of rapid solidification powder metallurgy techniques developed in an effort to prevent coarsening of the primary silicon particles in aluminum-silicon alloys.

  14. Matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xingzhi

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this monograph is to report on recent developments in the field of matrix inequalities, with emphasis on useful techniques and ingenious ideas. Among other results this book contains the affirmative solutions of eight conjectures. Many theorems unify or sharpen previous inequalities. The author's aim is to streamline the ideas in the literature. The book can be read by research workers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

  15. Reactive-oxygen-species-mediated Cdc25C degradation results in differential antiproliferative activities of vanadate, tungstate, and molybdate in the PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Yan-Jun; Wang, Qin; Yang, Xiao-Gai; Wang, Kui

    2012-02-01

    The differential antiproliferative effects of vanadate, tungstate, and molybdate on human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 were compared and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. The results demonstrate that all of the three oxoanions can cause G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, which is evidenced by the increase in the level of phosphorylated Cdc2 at its inactive Tyr-15 site. Moreover, even if the difference in cellular uptake among the three oxoanions is excluded from the possible factors affecting their antiproliferative activity, vanadate exerted a much more potent effect in PC-3 cells than the other two oxoanions. Our results also reveal that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated degradation of Cdc25C rather than Cdc25A or Cdc25B is responsible for vanadate-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest. We propose a possible mechanism to clarify the differential effect of the three oxoanions in biological systems beyond just considering that they are structural analogs of phosphate. We suggest that ROS formation is unlikely to be involved in the biological function of tungstate and molybdate, whereas the redox properties of vanadium may be important factors for it to exert pharmacological effects. Further, given the evidence from epidemiology studies of the association between diabetes and prostate cancer, the possibility of vanadate as a good candidate as both an antidiabetic and an anticancer agent or a chemopreventive agent is indicated.

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of MWCNTs Reinforced A356 Aluminum Alloys Cast Nanocomposites Fabricated by Using a Combination of Rheocasting and Squeeze Casting Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abou Bakr Elshalakany; T. A. Osman; A. Khattab; B. Azzam; M. Zaki

    2014-01-01

    ...) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). This method remarkably facilitated a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within A356 aluminum alloy matrix as well as a refinement of grain size...

  17. Review paper: Role of aluminum in glass-ionomer dental cements and its biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, John W; Czarnecka, Beata

    2009-11-01

    The role of aluminum in glass-ionomers and resin-modified glass-ionomers for dentistry is reviewed. Aluminum is included in the glass component of these materials in the form of Al(2)O(3) to confer basicity on the glass and enable the glass to take part in the acid-base setting reactions. Results of studies of these reactions by FTIR and magic-angle spinning (MAS)-NMR spectroscopy are reported and the role of aluminum is discussed in detail. Aluminum has been shown to be present in the glasses in predominantly 4-coordination, as well as 5- and 6-coordination, and during setting a proportion of this is converted to 6-coordinate species within the matrix of the cement. Despite this, mature cements may contain detectable amounts of both 4- and 5-coordinate aluminum. Aluminum has been found to be leached from glass-ionomer cements, with greater amounts being released under acidic conditions. It may be associated with fluoride, with which it is known to complex strongly. Aluminum that enters the body via the gastro-intestinal tract is mainly excreted, and only about 1% ingested aluminum crosses the gut wall. Calculation shows that, if a glass-ionomer filling dissolved completely over 5 years, it would add only an extra 0.5% of the recommended maximum intake of aluminum to an adult patient. This leads to the conclusion that the release of aluminum from either type of glass-ionomer cement in the mouth poses a negligible health hazard.

  18. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish for an integ...... be obtained by shining light from the backside of the workpiece. When there is no light from the backside, the front surface seems totally untouched. This was achieved by laser ablation with ultra-short pulses.......Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish...... for an integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  19. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  20. Matrix analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    1997-01-01

    A good part of matrix theory is functional analytic in spirit. This statement can be turned around. There are many problems in operator theory, where most of the complexities and subtleties are present in the finite-dimensional case. My purpose in writing this book is to present a systematic treatment of methods that are useful in the study of such problems. This book is intended for use as a text for upper division and gradu­ ate courses. Courses based on parts of the material have been given by me at the Indian Statistical Institute and at the University of Toronto (in collaboration with Chandler Davis). The book should also be useful as a reference for research workers in linear algebra, operator theory, mathe­ matical physics and numerical analysis. A possible subtitle of this book could be Matrix Inequalities. A reader who works through the book should expect to become proficient in the art of deriving such inequalities. Other authors have compared this art to that of cutting diamonds. One first has to...

  1. Gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Shuji; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-10-01

    As a part of study of leaching behavior for solidified dry low level radioactive waste, gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar was investigated, and a plan of our research was proposed. The effect of pH on corrosion rate of aluminum, corrosion product, time dependency of corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar, change of corrosion mechanism, the effects of Na, Ca and Cl ions on corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar and corrosion behavior of aluminum when aluminum was used as sacrificed anode in reinforced concrete were previously clarified. Study of the effects of environmental factors such as pH, kind of ions and temperature on gas evolution behavior of aluminum and the effect of aluminum/carbon steel surface ratio no gas evolution behavior of aluminum were planed. (author). 75 refs.

  2. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  3. Effect of Tool Shoulder and Pin Probe Profiles on Friction Stirred Aluminum Welds - a Comparative Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. K. Mohanty; M. M. Mahapatra; P. Kumar; P. Biswas; N. R. Mandal

    2012-01-01

    In marine application,marine grade steel is generally used for haul and superstructures.However,aluminum has also become a good choice due to its lightweight qualities,while rusting of aluminum is minimal compared to steel.In this paper a study on friction stir welding of aluminum alloys was presented.The present investigation deals with the effects of different friction stir welding tool geometries on mechanical strength and the microstructure properties of aluminum alloy welds.Three distinct tool geometries with different types of shoulder and tool probe profiles were used in the investigation according to the design matrix.The effects of each tool shoulder and probe geometry on the weld was evaluated.It was also observed that the friction stir weld tool geometry has a significant effect on the weldment reinforcement,microhardness,and weld strength.

  4. Effect of Cerium on Mechanical Performance and Electrical Conductivity of Aluminum Rod for Electrical Purpose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effect of rare earth element Ce on mechanical performance and electrical conductivity of aluminum rod for electrical purpose were studied under industrial production condition. Using optical microscope, SEM, TEM, EDS and X-ray diffractometer, the microstructure and phase composition of aluminum rod were measured and analyzed. The results indicate that the content of rare earth element Ce is between 0.05%~0.16% in the aluminum rod for electrical purpose. Its tensile strength is enhanced to some extent. The research also discovers that the tensile strength is enhanced remarkably with impurity element Si content increases. Because influence of Si is big to the conductivity, the Si content should be controlled continuously strictly in the aluminum for electrical purpose. Adding rare earth element Ce reduces the solid solubility of Si in the aluminum matrix, and the negative effect of Si on the aluminum conductor reduces effectively. So the limit of in Si content in aluminum rod for electrical purpose can be relaxed moderately.

  5. The Diametrically Loaded Cylinder For The Study Of Nanostructured Aluminum-Graphene And Aluminum-Alumina Nanocomposites Using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam eTabandeh Khorshid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact methods for characterization of metal matrix composites have the potential to accelerate the development and study of advanced composite materials. In this study, diametrical compression of small disk specimens was used to understand the mechanical properties of metal matrix micro and nano composites. Analysis was performed using an inverse method that couples digital image correlation and the analytical closed form formulation. This technique was capable of extracting the tension and compression modulus values in the metal matrix nanocomposite disk specimens. Specimens of aluminum and aluminum reinforced with either Al2O3 nanoparticles or graphene nanoplatelets (GNP were synthesized using a powder metallurgy approach that involved room temperature milling in ethanol, and low temperature drying followed by single action compaction. The elastic and failure properties of MMNC materials prepared using the procedure above are presented.

  6. Matrix pentagons

    CERN Document Server

    Belitsky, A V

    2016-01-01

    The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multiparticle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unravelled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4) matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  7. Catalytic Behaviour of Mesoporous Cobalt-Aluminum Oxides for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Bordoloi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ordered mesoporous materials are promising catalyst supports due to their uniform pore size distribution, high specific surface area and pore volume, tunable pore sizes, and long-range ordering of the pore packing. The evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA process was applied to synthesize mesoporous mixed oxides, which consist of cobalt ions highly dispersed in an alumina matrix. The characterization of the mesoporous mixed cobalt-aluminum oxides with cobalt loadings in the range from 5 to 15 wt% and calcination temperatures of 673, 973, and 1073 K indicates that Co2+ is homogeneously distributed in the mesoporous alumina matrix. As a function of the Co loading, different phases are present comprising poorly crystalline alumina and mixed cobalt aluminum oxides of the spinel type. The mixed cobalt-aluminum oxides were applied as catalysts in CO oxidation and turned out to be highly active.

  8. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of aluminum reinforced with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Sanchez, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx; Reyes-Gasga, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Caudillo, R. [Texas Materials Institute and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States); Garcia-Gutierrez, D.I. [Texas Materials Institute and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States); Marquez-Lucero, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Estrada-Guel, I. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Mendoza-Ruiz, D.C. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Jose Yacaman, M. [Texas Materials Institute and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-07-12

    Composites of pure aluminum with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag-C NP) of 10 nm in size were prepared by the mechanical milling process. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the Ag-C NP are homogeneously dispersed into the Al matrix, silver nanoparticles do not coalesce, grow or dissolve in the aluminum matrix due the carbon shell. The values of yield strength ({sigma} {sub y}), maximum strength ({sigma} {sub max}) and micro-hardness Vickers (HVN) of the composites were evaluated and reported as a function of Ag-C NP content. It has been found that the introduction of this type of particles in aluminum strengthen it, increasing all the previous parameters.

  9. Development of a foaming process for particulate reinforced aluminum melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitlmeier, D. [ARC Leichtmetallkompetenzzentrum Ranshofen GmbH, Postfach 26, A-5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Degischer, H.P. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Inst. f. Werkstoffk. u. Materialpruefg., Karlsplatz 13/E308, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Flankl, H.J. [Huette Klein Reichenbach, Kleinreichenbach 25, A-3900 Schwarzenau (Austria)

    2002-10-01

    This paper reports on investigations by Huette Klein-Reichenbach and LKR in the course of the development of a new processing technique for cellular aluminum, to produce net shape parts of foamed aluminum via the melt route by gas injection. The foaming depends on the interaction between the blowing gas, the ceramic particles, and the melt. The stabilization of the foam by different particle contents in interaction with air, oxygen and nitrogen as blowing gas has been investigated for some matrix alloys with respect to the processing parameters. The resulting cell structure is characterized by computed X-ray tomography, light optical and scanning electron, as well as high resolution Auger electron microscopy. The microstructure of the cell walls is presented as well as the achieved pore size and the local mass density distribution. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Fabrication and aging behaviour of in-situ aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erarslan, Yaman [Yildiz Technical Univ., Instanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept.

    2011-07-01

    Commonly applied in situ procedures with the aim of producing alumina particles or whiskers include the reactions between a metal oxide and aluminum. The metal, reduced with the alumina formation reaction, afterwards generally reacts with Al and transforms into an intermetallic form which will act as a reinforcing member in the composition of the matrix. In this study, by adding CuO powder in ratios of 5, 10 and 15 wt.-% composite billets were produced by the in situ procedure of stir casting. XRD patterns and microstructures of the produced Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were examined by using optical and electron microscopy (SEM). Following the homogenization procedure on the composite material, hot deformation and thermal aging procedures were applied. The changes in the mechanical properties were compared with commercially pure Aluminum. (orig.)

  11. Microstructure and thermal properties of diamond/aluminum composites with TiC coating on diamond particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, H. [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, 127 Youyi Xilu, Xi' an 710072 (China); Yu, J.K., E-mail: jkyu@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, 127 Youyi Xilu, Xi' an 710072 (China); Tan, W. [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, 127 Youyi Xilu, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-11-01

    A titanium carbide coating on the surface of diamond particles was proposed to improve the interfacial bonding between diamond particles and aluminum alloy for diamond/aluminum composites. The diamond/aluminum composites with the TiC coating on diamond particles were fabricated by gas pressure infiltration. The composites were characterized with optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy and by measuring thermal properties, including thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. The results show that the interface adhesion between the diamond particles and the aluminum matrix is strengthened due to the existence of the TiC coating, and the fracture mechanism of the composites is a combination of matrix's ductile fracture and interfacial debonding. Improvements in thermal properties, including a reduced thermal expansion and a high thermal conductivity, have been achieved by the TiC coating on diamond particles to get the good interface.

  12. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  13. In-situ reactions in hybrid aluminum alloy composites during incorporating silica sand in aluminum alloy melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin F. Schultz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain a better understanding of the reactions and strengthening behavior in cast aluminum alloy/silica composites synthesized by stir mixing, experiments were conducted to incorporate low cost foundry silica sand into aluminum composites with the use of Mg as a wetting agent. SEM and XRD results show the conversion of SiO2 to MgAl2O4 and some Al2O3 with an accompanying increase in matrix Si content. A three-stage reaction mechanism proposed to account for these changes indicates that properties can be controlled by controlling the base Alloy/SiO2/Mg chemistry and reaction times. Experimental data on changes of composite density with increasing reaction time and SiO2 content support the three-stage reaction model. The change in mechanical properties with composition and time is also described.

  14. Environmental Control over the Primary Aluminum Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> To strengthen environmental control over theprimary aluminum industry,the State Environ-mental Protection Administration of China hasrecently issued a notice addressing the follow-ing points:Strengthening environmental control over theexisting primary aluminum companies

  15. Decreasing residual aluminum level in drinking water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志红; 崔福义

    2004-01-01

    The relativity of coagulant dosage, residual turbidity, temperature, pH etc. with residual aluminum concentration were investigated, and several important conclusions were achieved. Firstly, dosage of alum-coagulant or PAC1 influences residual aluminum concentration greatly. There is an optimal-dosage-to-aluminum, a bit less than the optimal-dosage-to-turbidity. Secondly, it proposes that decreasing residual aluminum concentration can be theoretically divided into two methods, either decreasing (even removing) the concentration of particulate aluminum component, or decreasing dissolved aluminum. In these tests there is an optimal value of residual turbidity of postprecipitation at 7.0 NTU. Thirdly, residual aluminum level will increase while water temperature goes higher. At the last, optimal pH value corresponds a minimum dissolved aluminum at a given turbidity. Data shows the optimal pH value decreases with water temperature's increasing.

  16. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely... additive, expressed as niacin, shall appear on the label of the food additive container or on that of...

  17. Wear resistance analysis of the aluminum 7075 alloy and the nanostructured aluminum 7075 - silver nanoparticles composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrada-Ruiz R.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured composites of the aluminum 7075 alloy and carbon-coated silver nanoparticles were synthetized by the mechanical milling technique using a high-energy mill SPEX 8000M; the powders generated were compacted, sintered and hot-extruded to produce 1 cm-diameter bars. The composites were then subjected to a wear test using a pin-on-disc device to validate the hypothesis that second phase-ductile nanometric particles homogenously distributed throughout the metalmatrix improve the wear resistance of the material. It was found that silver nanoparticles prevent the wear of the material by acting as an obstacle to dislocations movement during the plastic deformation of the contact surface, as well as a solid lubricant when these are separated from the metal-matrix.

  18. The effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yougen; Lu, Lingbin; Roesky, Herbert W.; Wang, Laiwen; Huang, Baiyun

    Aluminum is an ideal material for batteries, due to its excellent electrochemical performance. Herein, the effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery, as an additive for aluminum alloy and electrolytes, has been studied. The results show that zinc can decrease the anodic polarization, restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  19. OPTIMIZING AN ALUMINUM EXTRUSION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ali Hajeeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimizing the amount of scrap generated in an aluminum extrusion process. An optimizing model is constructed in order to select the best cutting patterns of aluminum logs and billets of various sizes and shapes. The model applied to real data obtained from an existing extrusion factory in Kuwait. Results from using the suggested model provided substantial reductions in the amount of scrap generated. Using sound mathematical approaches contribute significantly in reducing waste and savings when compared to the existing non scientific techniques.

  20. Excellent thermal conductivity and dielectric properties of polyimide composites filled with silica coated self-passivated aluminum fibers and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongcun; Bai, Yuanyuan; Yu, Ke; Kang, Yan; Wang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    A polymer based composite was prepared by using modified aluminum fibers and aluminum nanoparticles as fillers in polyimide matrix that resulted in the high thermal conductivity and low relative permittivity. It was found that silica coated aluminum fibers with the multilayer coating structures can significantly reduce the relative permittivity (about 19.6 at 1 MHz) of the composite while keeping lower dielectric loss (0.024 at 1 MHz). The thermal conductivity of composites was significantly increased to 15.2 W/m K. This work shows a useful way to choose proper modifier fillers to improve the composite properties for electronic packaging composite materials.

  1. Comprehensive Investigation of Silver Nanoparticle/Aluminum Electrodes for Copper Indium Sulfide/Polymer Hybrid Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arar, Mario; Pein, Andreas; Haas, Wernfried

    2012-01-01

    Electrode materials are primarily chosen based on their work function to suit the energy levels of the absorber materials. In this paper, we focus on the modification of aluminum cathodes with a thin silver interlayer (2 nm) in copper indium sulfide/poly[(2,7-silafluorene)-alt-(4,7-di-2-thienyl-2...... nanoparticles in an aluminum oxide matrix between the absorber layer and the aluminum cathode. In combination with complementary optical investigations, the origin of the improvement is ascribed to a facilitated charge extraction....

  2. Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum in Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hui; ZHU; Li-yang; LIN; Ru-shan; TAN; Hong-bin; HE; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum is one of cladding materials for nuclear fuel,it is important to investigate the electrolytic dissolution of aluminum in nitric acid.The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,polarization curve and cyclic voltammetry cure of anodic aluminum electrode in nitric acid under various conditions were collected(Fig.1).It turns out,under steady state,the thickness of the passivated film of aluminum

  3. A study of high-energy proton induced damage in Cerium Fluoride in comparison with measurements in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G; Luckey, D; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Otto, Th; Pauss, F; Roesler, S; Urscheler, Ch

    2010-01-01

    A Cerium Fluoride crystal produced during early R&D studies for calorimetry at the CERN Large Hadron Collider was exposed to a 24 GeV/c proton fluence Phi_p=(2.78 +- 0.20) x 10EE13 cm-2 and, after one year of measurements tracking its recovery, to a fluence Phi_p=(2.12 +- 0.15) x 10EE14 cm-2. Results on proton-induced damage to the crystal and its spontaneous recovery after both irradiations are presented here, along with some new, complementary data on proton-damage in Lead Tungstate. A comparison with FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation results is performed and a qualitative understanding of high-energy damage mechanism is attempted.

  4. A new method of making metal matrix fibre reinforced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaupp, J. (Inst. fuer Werkzeugmaschinen und Betriebstechnik, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)); Pruemmer, R. (Inst. fuer Werkzeugmaschinen und Betriebstechnik, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany) Ernst-Mach-Inst., Freiburg (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    MMC (metal matrix composites) made of ceramic fibres and metal matrix are suitable for high strength and high temperature applications. New types of ceramic fibres usually are incorporated into a metal matrix by means of liquid infiltration or by hot pressing techniques. The disadvantage of these methods is the chemical reaction sometimes occurring between fibre and matrix, resulting in an interlayer which is degrading the mechanical properties of the MMC. A new method is described starting with an arrangement of metal powder or metal foils with ceramic fibres. Dynamic pressures, released by detonation of proper explosives, are used for consolidation. At very high strain rates during plastic deformation of the powder or metal foils hydrodynamic flow of the matrix around the ceramic fibres allows a complete consolidation and to prevent cracking. Fibres made of SiC are embedded into a metal matrix of aluminum. (orig.).

  5. Overheating temperature of 7B04 high strength aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Feng-hua; LI Nian-kui; TIAN Ni; SUN Qiang; LIU Xian-dong; ZHAO Gang

    2008-01-01

    The microstructure and overheating characteristics of the direct chill semicontinuous casting ingot of 7B04 high strength aluminum alloy, and those after industrial homogenization treatment and multi-stage homogenization treatments, were studied by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC), optical microscopy(OM) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(SEM-EDX). The results show that the microstructure of direct chill semicontinuous casting ingot of the 7B04 alloy contains a large number of constituents in the form of dendritic networks that consist of nonequilibrium eutectic and Fe-containing phases. The nonequilibrium eutectic contains Al, Zn, Mg and Cu, and the Fe-containing phases include two kinds of phases, one containing Al, Fe, Mn and Cu, and the other having Al, Fe, Mn, Cr, Si and Cu. The melting point of the nonequilibrium eutectic is 478 ℃ for the casting ingot of the 7B04 alloy which is usually considered as its overheating temperature. During industrial homogenization treatment processing at 470 ℃, the nonequilibrium eutectic dissolves into the matrix of this alloy partly, and the remainder transforms into Al2CuMg phase that cannot be dissolved into the matrix at that temperature completely. The melting point of the Al2CuMg phase which can dissolve into the matrix completely by slow heating is about 490 ℃. The overheating temperature of this high strength aluminum alloy can rise to 500-520 ℃. By means of special multi-stage homogenization, the temperature of the homogenization treatment of the ingot of the 7B04 high strength aluminum alloy can reach 500 ℃ without overheating.

  6. Guangxi Aluminum Giant Made Investment in Changfeng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>A aluminum processing and supporting project (450,000 tons) of Hefei Guangyin Aluminum Company kicked off in Xiatang Town of Changfeng County recently. It is a project jointly invested by Guangxi Investment Group and Guangxi Baise Guangyin Aluminum in Xiatang Town of Changfeng County.

  7. Recovering aluminum from aluminum dross in a DC electric-arc rotary furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzonev, Tz.; Lucheva, B.

    2007-11-01

    The recycling of aluminum scrap and dross yields significant economic and energy savings, as well environmental benefits. The recovery of aluminum depends on many factors. The aim of this work is to experimentally investigate aluminum recovery under different conditions. In this study, aluminum dross was processed in a direct-current electric-arc rotary furnace. The presence of crushing refractory bodies during processing was found to increase the degree of aluminum recovery by about ten percent.

  8. Dynamic consolidation of aluminum-silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, B.H.; Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic consolidation was investigated as a potential method for producing P/M metal matrix composites. In this study, 2124 aluminum powders were mixed with silicon carbide particulate and consolidated using explosives. Numerical simulations were performed to provide insight into the consolidation process and to aid in the selection of experimental conditions. The microstructure of the as-consolidated product was dependent upon processing variables. Careful control of the shock parameters allowed full density, crack free composites to be achieved in cylindrical geometries. Although full density was obtained, low fracture strengths suggested a lack of interparticle bonding, probably resulting from the limited ability to redistribute surface oxides during consolidation. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminum/stainless steel composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Composites consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with various volume fractions of stainless steel wire were fabricated by hot die pressing under various conditions of temperature, time, and pressure. The composites were tested in plane bending to complete fracture under cycle loading, and the results were analyzed on a computer to obtain a statistically valid mathematical relationship between the low-cycle fatigue life and the fiber volume fraction of the composite. The fractured surfaces of the composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to identify the characteristic features of fatigue damage. Fatigue damage mechanisms are proposed and discussed.

  10. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  11. Aluminum break-point contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Martina; Groot, R.A. de

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics is used to study the contribution of a single Al atom to an aluminum breakpoint contact during the final stages of breaking and the initial stages of the formation of such a contact. A hysteresis effect is found in excellent agreement with experiment and the form of the

  12. Riemann Zeta Matrix Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kargın, Levent; Kurt, Veli

    2015-01-01

    In this study, obtaining the matrix analog of the Euler's reflection formula for the classical gamma function we expand the domain of the gamma matrix function and give a infinite product expansion of sinπxP.  Furthermore we define Riemann zeta matrix function and evaluate some other matrix integrals. We prove a functional equation for Riemann zeta matrix function.

  13. Aluminum-induced granulomas in a tattoo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFadden, N.; Lyberg, T.; Hensten-Pettersen, A.

    1989-05-01

    A patient who developed localized, granulomatous reactions in a tattoo is described. With the use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, both aluminum and titanium particles were found in the involved skin sections. Intradermal provocation testing with separate suspensions of aluminum and titanium induced a positive response only in the case of aluminum. Examination by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis of the provoked response established aluminum as the only nonorganic element present in the test site tissue. This is the first report of confirmed aluminum-induced, delayed-hypersensitivity granulomas in a tattoo.

  14. Characterization of commercially pure aluminum powder for research reactor fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, V.D. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Wiencek, T.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Aluminum powder is used as the matrix material in the production of uranium aluminide, oxide, and silicide dispersion fuel plates for research and test reactors. variability in the characteristics of the aluminum powder, such as moisture content and particle-size distribution, influences blending and compacting of the aluminum/fuel powder. A detailed study was performed to characterize the physical properties of three aluminum powder lots. An angle-of-shear test was devised to characterize the cohesiveness of the aluminum powder. Flow-rate measurements, apparent density determination, subsieve analysis, surface area measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were also used in the study. It was found that because of the various types of commercially available powders, proper specification of powder variables will ensure the receipt of consistent raw materials. Improved control of the initial powder will reduce the variability of fuel-plate production and will improve overall plate reproducibility. It is recommended that a standard specification be written for the aluminum powder and silicide fuel.

  15. Characterization of commercially pure aluminum powder for research reactor fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, V.D. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)); Wiencek, T.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum powder is used as the matrix material in the production of uranium aluminide, oxide, and silicide dispersion fuel plates for research and test reactors. variability in the characteristics of the aluminum powder, such as moisture content and particle-size distribution, influences blending and compacting of the aluminum/fuel powder. A detailed study was performed to characterize the physical properties of three aluminum powder lots. An angle-of-shear test was devised to characterize the cohesiveness of the aluminum powder. Flow-rate measurements, apparent density determination, subsieve analysis, surface area measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were also used in the study. It was found that because of the various types of commercially available powders, proper specification of powder variables will ensure the receipt of consistent raw materials. Improved control of the initial powder will reduce the variability of fuel-plate production and will improve overall plate reproducibility. It is recommended that a standard specification be written for the aluminum powder and silicide fuel.

  16. Machining studies of die cast aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornakumar, Thambu; Kathiresan, Marimuthu

    2010-10-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) with high specific stiffness, high strength, improved wear resistance, and thermal properties are being increasingly used in advanced structural, aerospace, automotive, electronics, and wear applications. Aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites were developed using a new combination of the vortex method and the pressure die-casting technique in the present work. Machining studies were conducted on the aluminum alloy-silicon carbide (SiC) composite work pieces using high speed steel (HSS) end-mill tools in a milling machine at different speeds and feeds. The quantitative studies on the machined work piece show that the surface finish is better for higher speeds and lower feeds. The surface roughness of the plain aluminum alloy is better than that of the aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites. The studies on tool wear show that flank wear increases with speed and feed. The end-mill tool wear is higher on machining the aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites than on machining the plain aluminum alloy.

  17. Multilayer Clad Plate of Stainless Steel/Aluminum/Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jiawei; PANG Yuhua; LI Ting

    2011-01-01

    The 3, 5, 20 layer clad plate from austenitic stainless steel, pure aluminum and aluminum alloy sheets were fabricated in different ways. The stretch and interface properties were measured. The result shows that 20 layer clad plate is better than the others. Well-bonded clad plate was successfully obtained in the following procedure: Basic clad sheet from 18 layer A11060/A13003sheets was firstly obtained with an initial rolling reduction of 44% at 450 ℃, followed by annealing at 300 ℃, and then with reduction of 50% at 550 ℃ from STS304 on each side. The best 20 layer clad plate was of 129 MPa bonding strength and 225 MPa stretch strength.

  18. Electrodeposition of aluminum on aluminum surface from molten salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenmao HUANG; Xiangyu XIA; Bin LIU; Yu LIU; Haowei WANG; Naiheng MA

    2011-01-01

    The surface morphology,microstructure and composition of the aluminum coating of the electrodeposition plates in AlC13-NaC1-KC1 molten salt with a mass ratio of 8:1:1 were investigated by SEM and EDS.The binding force was measured by splat-cooling method and bending method.The results indicate that the coatings with average thicknesses of 12 and 9 μm for both plates treated by simple grinding and phosphating are compacted,continuous and well adhered respectively. Tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC) can effectively prevent the growth of dendritic crystal,and the anode activation may improve the adhesion of the coating. Binding force analysis shows that both aluminum coatings are strongly adhered to the substrates.

  19. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  20. Valence electron structure analysis of refining mecha-nism of Sc and Ti additions on aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI PieJie; YE YiCong; HE LiangJu

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of the difference of refining effect between Sc and Ti adding to aluminum can not be explained substantially with traditional theory. Valence electron structures of AI-Ti and Al-Sc alloys have been studied by using the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET). The covalent bond electron numbers and interfacial electron density differences are calculated. The conclusion is that, in the two alloys, different covalent bond electron numbers of nucleation particles, and different electron densities on the interface between the second phase particles and the matrix, fundamentally lead to the difference of refining effect between Sc and Ti adding to aluminum.

  1. Thermal conductivity prediction of closed-cell aluminum alloy considering micropore effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of micro-scale pores are observed in the matrix of closed-cell aluminum alloy by scanning electron microscope, which indicates the dual-scale pore characteristics. Corresponding to this kind of special structural morphology, a new kind of dual-scale method is proposed to estimate its effective thermal conductivity. Comparing with the experimental results, the article puts forward the view that the prediction accuracy can be improved by the dual-scale method greatly. Different empirical formulas are also investigated in detail. It provides a new method for thermal properties estimation and makes preparation for more suitable empirical formula for closed-cell aluminum alloy.

  2. Novel Metal-Matrix Composites With Integrally-Bound Nanoscale Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    identical. 7.2 Aluminum Alloy 7075 We evaluated the tensile properties of AA7075 containing 0.84 wt%, 2.2 wt% and 4 wt% nanocarbon. The material ...Novel Metal-Matrix Composites with Integrally-Bound Nanoscale Carbon David R. Forrest*, Iwona Jasiuk**, CAPT Lloyd Brown***, Peter Joyce***, Azzam...test conditions. In aluminum, we observed a significant increase in electrical conductivity with nanocarbon, from 47 to 67% IACS. These materials

  3. Diffusion-bonded beryllium aluminum optical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapes, Thomas F.

    2003-12-01

    Beryllium aluminum material can present significant advantages for optical support structures. A likely advantage of beryllium aluminum compared to aluminum or titanium for such structures is its higher specific stiffness. However, beryllium aluminum material is significantly more expensive than most competing materials. The cost problem with beryllium aluminum is exacerbated if fabrication methods that result in near net shape parts are not used. Near net shape methods result in the least amount of material "thrown away" in the fabrication process. Casting is a primary example of near net shape manufacturing that is appropriate for some optical support structures. Casting aluminum, and other materials as well, is common. Casting of beryllium aluminum is very difficult, however, and has not had significant success. Diffusion bonding - a different approach for achieving near net shape beryllium aluminum optical support structures, was pursued and accomplished. Diffusion bonding is a term used to describe the joining of solid metal pieces under high temperature and pressure, but without melting. Three different optical support structures were designed and built of beryllium aluminum using diffusion bonding. Relatively small solid beryllium aluminum pieces were arranged together and then joined under hot isostatic pressure conditions. The resulting relatively large pressure bonded part was then machined to achieve the final product. Significant cost savings as compared to machining the part from a solid block were realized. Difficulties achieving diffusion bonds in complex joints were experienced and addressed.

  4. Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedveld, Gijs D; Pelletier, Emilien; St Louis, Richard; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2007-04-01

    High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinitesink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (-100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples.

  5. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic, electrostaticdischarge- suppressing finishes: examples include silver impregnated anodized, black electroless nickel, black chrome, and black copper. In

  6. Aluminum/air electrochemical cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; 王雷

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a very promising energy carrier given its high capacity and energy density, low cost, earth abundance and environmental benignity. The Al/air battery as a kind of metal/air electrochemical cell attracts tremendous attention. Traditional Al/air batteries suffer from the self-corrosion and related safety problems. In this work, three new approaches were investigated to tackle these challenges and to develop high-performance Al/air cells: (1) incorporate an additional hydrogen/a...

  7. Purification technology of molten aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宝德; 丁文江; 疏达; 周尧和

    2004-01-01

    Various purification methods were explored to eliminate the dissolved hydrogen and nonmetallic inclusions from molten aluminum alloys. A novel rotating impeller head with self-oscillation nozzles or an electromagnetic valve in the gas circuit was used to produce pulse gas currents for the rotary impeller degassing method. Water simulation results show that the size of gas bubbles can be decreased by 10%-20% as compared with the constant gas current mode. By coating ceramic filters or particles with active flux or enamels, composite filters were used to filter the scrap A356 alloy and pure aluminum. Experimental results demonstrate that better filtration efficiency and operation performance can be obtained. Based on numerical calculations, the separation efficiency of inclusions by high frequency magnetic field can be significantly improved by using a hollow cylinder-like separator or utilizing the effects of secondary flow of the melt in a square separator. A multi-stage and multi-media purification platform based on these methods was designed and applied in on-line processing of molten aluminum alloys. Mechanical properties of the processed scrap A356 alloy are greatly improved by the composite purification.

  8. Microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Chen, C Y; Wei, C B; Lin, Y T

    1996-11-01

    Several microbes were isolated from the contaminated fuel-oil in Taiwan and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy A356-T6 was tested by MIL-STD-810E test method. Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and Cladosporium resinac ATCC 22712 had significant adsorption and pitting on the surface of aluminum alloy, Pseudomonas acruginosa AM-B5 had weak adsorption and some precipitation in the bottom, and Candida sp. AM-Y1 had the less adsorption and few cavities formation on the surface. pH of the aqueous phase decreased 0.3 to 0.7 unit for 4 months of incubation. The corrosion of aluminum alloy was very significant in the cultures of Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and C. resinac ATCC 22712. The major metabolites in the aqueous phase with the inoculation of C. resinac were citric acid and oxalic acid, while succinic acid and fumaric acid were the minors.

  9. Optical Transmittance of Anodically Oxidized Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Shiga, Yasunori; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Wada, Kenji; Ono, Sachiko

    1995-06-01

    Optical transmittance and anisotropy of anodic oxide films that were made from pure aluminum and an aluminum alloy (A5052) were studied. The alloy oxide film exhibits an enhanced polarization function, particularly when anodization is carried out at a large current density. It was revealed by chemical analysis that the alloy oxide film contains a larger amount of unoxidized aluminum than the pure-aluminum oxide film. The polarization function can be elucidated by considering unoxidized aluminum particles that are arranged in the columnar structure of the alumina film. Electron microscope observation showed that many holes exist in the alloy oxide film, around which columnar cells are arranged irregularly. Such holes and irregular cell arrangement cause the increase in the amount of unoxidized aluminum, and consequently induces scattering loss.

  10. [Link between aluminum neurotoxicity and neurodegenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum is an old element that has been known for a long time, but some of its properties are only now being discovered. Although environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life; in fact, because of its specific chemical properties, aluminum inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and exerts various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. Aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin. It has been suggested that there is a relationship between exposure to aluminum and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, as well as Alzheimer' s disease: however, this claim remains to be verified. In this chapter, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity and the link between Alzheimer' s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, based on recent findings on metal-metal interactions and the functions of metalloproteins in synapses.

  11. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STEEL AND ALUMINUM STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Peko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined steel and aluminum variants of modern exhibition structures in which the main design requirements include low weight (increased span/depth ratio, transportation, and construction and durability (resistance to corrosion. This included a design situation in which the structural application of aluminum alloys provided an extremely convenient and practical solution. Viability of an aluminum structure depends on several factors and requires a detailed analysis. The overall conclusion of the study indicated that aluminum can be used as a structural material and as a viable alternative to steel for Croatian snow and wind load values and evidently in cases in which positive properties of aluminum are required for structural design. Furthermore, a structural fire analysis was conducted for an aluminum variant structure by using a zone model for realistic fire analysis. The results suggested that passive fire protection for the main structural members was not required in the event of areal fire with duration of 60 min.

  12. Fabrication and properties of Al matrix composites strengthened by in situ alumina particulates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    New aluminum matrix composites strengthened by Al2O3 particulates through stirring cast by adding NH4Al(SO4)2 to the molten aluminum have been fabricated. TEM observation shows that in-situ Al2O3 particulates are generally spherical and they are uniformly distributed in the Al matrix. Dry sliding wear test results show that the volume loss of the unreinforced Al matrix is about three times that of the Al2O3 reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) and the volume loss of the MMC fabricated by adding Al2O3 is larger than that of the MMC by adding NH4Al(SO4)2. Lubricating sliding wear test results show that the volume loss of the MMCs increases more slowly than that of the matrix with the increasing of the load.

  13. A study into light scattering and absorption by aluminum nanoparticles in PETN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aduev, B.; Nurmukhametov, D.; Zvekov, A.; Nikitin, A.

    2014-11-01

    The paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical research into nanopartides' optic properties in pentaerythritol tetranitrate (petn) matrix. A photometric sphere was applied for the transmittance and sum of transmittance and reflectance measurement of petn pressed pellets containing aluminum nanoparticles at the light wavelength 643 nm. The theory of light propagation in terms of spherical harmonics solution of radiative transfer equation in the slab geometry with Fresnel boundary conditions was developed. The properties of aluminum nanoparticles were evaluated in terms of Mie theory. The absorbed energy distribution inside the sample was calculated. It was shown that the Beer's type law is applicable approximately. The apparent light absorption cross section determined, which takes into account both scattering and absorption, is bigger than the geometrical one. The aluminum refractive index value, estimated during comparison of theory with the experimental data, agrees well with the handbook's data.

  14. Protection against Corrosion of Aluminum Alloy in Marine Environment by Lawsonia inermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Hajar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion performance of aluminum alloy 5083 (AA5083 was investigated in the splash zone area simulated in salt spray cabinet at ambient temperature. Three paint formulations were prepared in accordance with different percentages of henna extract. FTIR method was used to determine the constituent of henna while weight loss and electrochemical method were applied to investigate the inhibition behaviour. The findings show that corrosion rate of aluminum alloy decreased with the increases of henna extract in the coating formulation. The rise of charge transfer resistance (Rct value has contributed to the greater protection of the coated aluminum. The decrease in double layer capacitance value (Cdl is another indicator that a better protective barrier has been formed in the presence of henna in the coating matrix.

  15. Structure of Liquid Aluminum and Hydrogen Absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; DAI Yongbing; WANG Jun; SHU Da; SUN Baode

    2011-01-01

    The hydrogen content in aluminum melts at different temperature was detected. The structure in aluminum melts was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The first peak position of pair correlation function, atomic coordination number and viscosity of aluminum melts were calculated and they changed abnormally in the same temperature range. The mechanism of hydrogen absorption has been discussed. From molecular dynamics calculations, the interdependence between melt structural properties and hydrogen absorption were obtained.

  16. Prospecting sugarcane genes involved in aluminum tolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond Rodrigo D.; Guimarães Claudia T.; Felix Juliana; Ninamango-Cárdenas Fernando E.; Carneiro Newton P.; Paiva Edilson; Menossi Marcelo

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum is one of the major factors that affect plant development in acid soils, causing a substantial reduction in yield in many crops. In South America, about 66% of the land surface is made up of acid soils where high aluminum saturation is one of the main limiting factors for agriculture. The biochemical and molecular basis of aluminum tolerance in plants is far from being completely understood despite a growing number of studies, and in the specific case of sugarcane there are virtually...

  17. USE OF ALUMINUM TRIHYDRATE FILLER TO IMPROVE THE STRENGTH PROPERTIES OF CELLULOSIC PAPER EXPOSED TO HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic paper is thermolabile and its strength properties tend to decrease under high temperature conditions. In this work, the effects of aluminum trihydrate filler on the tensile and burst strength of paper prepared from bleached wood pulps were investigated. The use of aluminum trihydrate maintained the tensile and burst strength of paper sheet dried at 200 °C for 4 hours. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry gave the evidence that the maintainance of strength after drying associated with the use of aluminum trihydrate filler is possibly due to the increase in degradation temperature and heat absorption of cellulosic paper. The results regarding Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and the water retention value (WRV and crystallinity index of fibers indicated the alleviated degradation of fibers when aluminum trihydrate was incorporated into the paper matrix.

  18. A damage tolerance comparison of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy and IM7/977-2 carbon/epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Lance, David G.; Hodge, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    A comparison of low velocity impact damage between one of the strongest aluminum alloys, to a new, damage tolerant resin system as a matrix for high strength carbon fibers was examined in this study. The aluminum and composite materials were used as face sheets on a 0.13 g/cu cm aluminum honeycomb. Four levels of impact energy were used; 2.6 J, 5.3 J, 7.8 J and 9.9 J. The beams were compared for static strength and fatique life by use of the four-point bend flexure test. It was found that in the undamaged state the specific strength of the composite face sheets was about twice that of the aluminum face sheets. A sharp drop in strength was observed for the composite specimens impacted at the lowest (2.6J) energy level, but the overall specific strength was still higher than for the aluminum specimens. At all impact energy levels tested, the static specific strength of the composite face sheets were significantly higher than the aluminum face sheets. The fatigue life of the most severely damaged composite specimen was about 17 times greater than the undamaged aluminum specimens when cycled at 1 Hz between 20 percent and 85 percent of ultimate breaking load.

  19. The formation and structure of the oxide and hydroxide chemisorbed phases at the aluminum surface, and relevance to hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Michael; Kelly, Robert; Neurock, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum alloys used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) induced by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) (Gangloff and Ives 1990). Crack growth experiments have demonstrated a linear relation between the relative humidity of the environment and crack growth rates, indicating the importance of water (Speidel and Hyatt 1972). While the presence of water has been demonstrated to be necessary for EAC of aluminum, crack growth rates have been linked to the diffusivity of hydrogen in aluminum (Gangloff 2003) and hydrogen densities at the crack tip as high as Al2H have been observed (Young and Scully 1998). While the mechanism by which hydrogen embrittles aluminum is yet not well understood, without the entry of hydrogen into the aluminum matrix, embrittlement would not occur. While at the crack tip high hydrogen concentrations exist, the solubility of hydrogen in aluminum is normal near 1 ppm (Wolverton 2004). In this work combined first principles and kinetic Monte Carlo methods will be used to examine the oxide and hydroxide structure resulting from exposure of aluminum to H2O or O2 and relevance to hydrogen entry as well as EAC is discussed.

  20. Aluminum-stabilized NB3SN superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    An aluminum-stabilized Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  1. The Aluminum Deep Processing Project of North United Aluminum Landed in Qijiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On April 10,North United Aluminum Company respectively signed investment cooperation agreements with Qijiang Industrial Park and Qineng Electricity&Aluminum Co.,Ltd,signifying the landing of North United Aluminum’s aluminum deep processing project in Qijiang.

  2. Silicon reduces aluminum accumulation in rats: relevance to the aluminum hypothesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés, M; Sánchez, D J; Gómez, M; Corbella, J; Domingo, J L

    1998-06-01

    In recent years, a possible relation between the aluminum and silicon levels in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) has been established. It has been suggested that silicon may have a protective effect in limiting oral aluminum absorption. The present study was undertaken to examine the influence of supplementing silicon in the diet to prevent tissue aluminum retention in rats exposed to oral aluminum. Three groups of adult male rats were given by gavage 450 mg/kg/day of aluminum nitrate nonahydrate 5 days a week for 5 weeks. Concurrently, animals received silicon in the drinking water at 0 (positive control), 59, and 118 mg Si/L. A fourth group (-Al, - Si) was designated as a negative control group. At the end of the period of aluminum and silicon administration, urines were collected for 4 consecutive days, and the urinary aluminum levels were determined. The aluminum concentrations in the brain (various regions), liver, bone, spleen, and kidney were also measured. For all tissues, aluminum levels were significantly lower in the groups exposed to 59 and 118 mg Si/L than in the positive control group; significant reductions in the urinary aluminum levels of the same groups were also found. The current results corroborate that silicon effectively prevents gastrointestinal aluminum absorption, which may be of concern in protecting against the neurotoxic effects of aluminum.

  3. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  4. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  5. Evolution of aluminum iron silicide intermetallic particles during homogenization of aluminum alloy 6063

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claves, Steven R.

    As-cast 6xxx aluminum alloys contain beta-Al9Fe2Si 2 intermetallic particles that form at grain boundaries and interdendritic regions during solidification. This secondary phase has a considerable negative influence on the workability of the material during subsequent deformation processing; e.g. it has been linked to the extrusion pick-up defect. To lessen its deleterious effects, beta-Al9Fe2Si2 is transformed to alpha-Al8Fe2Si during the homogenization process, a typical heat treatment cycle at 540--580°C for 6--8 hours. The scientific objective of this Ph.D. research was to increase the understanding of morphological, chemical, and crystallographic aspects of the beta- to alpha-AlFeSi phase transformation. The two AlFeSi phases differ in size, shape, color, chemical composition, crystal structure, and bonding strength with the surrounding aluminum matrix. Various microscopy (optical and electron) techniques have been employed to examine these particle characteristics. This research investigates the particles' evolution during intermediate heat treatment conditions. Light optical microscopy was used to study the size, color, and two-dimensional shapes of AlFeSi particles. As homogenization progresses, microstructures contain long, charcoal-colored needles (beta-Al9Fe2Si 2), which slowly transform to shorter, gray spheroids (alpha-Al 8Fe2Si). Backscatter electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope was used for higher magnification micrographs and more detailed particle measurements. Due to the complex morphologies of the AlFeSi particles, planar imaging was insufficient to accurately describe their shape. Three-dimensional microstructures were obtained via serial sectioning performed on a dual-beam focused ion beam instrument. Particle-matrix interfaces from sequential images were extracted and compiled into isosurfaces. alpha-spheroids possess much lower surface area-to-volume ratios than beta-platelets. For intermediate homogenization times, the alpha

  6. Study of corrosion protection of the composite fdms on A356 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Huanhuan; WANG Hui; MENG Fanling

    2011-01-01

    Composite films were fabricated on A356 aluminum alloy by combined anodizing and rare earth deposition.The corrosion protection effect and corrosion behavior of the composite films in 3.5% NaC1 solution were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).SEM observation indicated that the rare earth Ce film completely sealed the porous structure of the anodic film,and the composite films composed of anodic film and Ce film were compact and integrated.According to the characteristics of EIS,the EIS plots of the composite films at different immersion times were simulated using the equivalent circuits of Rsol(QceRce)(QaRa),Rsol(QceRce)(QpRp)(QbRb) and Rsol(QpRp)(QbRb) models,respectively.The test results showed that the Ce film at the outer layer of the composite films had good protection effect at the initial stage of the immersion corrosion.It effectively helped the anodie film at the inner layer to prevent chloride irons from penetrating the aluminum alloy matrix.After 18 days,the Ce film lost its anticorrosive property,and the anodic film took the leading role of the corrosion protection.When the corrosion time was up to 42 days,the aluminum matrix was not corroded yet.Thus,the higher protection degree of the composite films for A356 aluminum alloy was attributed to the synergism effects of anodic film and rare earth Ce film.

  7. Crystallography and refining mechanism of (Ti, B)-contained salts in pure aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Heng-hua

    2008-01-01

    It is shown from experiment that the pure B contained salt exhibits little refining effect, while the pure Ti contained salt, especially the salt containing 5Ti/1B, shows obvious refining effect on the pure aluminum. Crystallographic study indicates that Al3Ti particle is a more suitable nucleation site for the aluminum matrix than (Ti, Al)B2 type particles (TiB2, AlB2 and (Ti,Al)B2), because there exist more coherent planes with aluminum matrix in the former. Thermodynamics estimation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM detection show that the refining mechanism of (Ti, B)-contained refiners is mainly contributed to the heterogeneous nuclei of fine Al3Ti particles dispersed in the melting, which comes from the reaction between the Ti and aluminum. (Al, Ti)B2 type particle shows little or no direct refining effect, but it will reduce the size of Al3Ti since the Al3Ti nucleates and grows along the (Al, Ti)B2 type particle interface.

  8. Selection of a mineral binder with potentialities for the stabilization/solidification of aluminum metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Lambertin, D.; Lahalle, H.; Antonucci, P.; Cannes, C.; Delpech, S.

    2014-10-01

    In a strongly alkaline medium, such as that encountered in conventional cementitious materials based on Portland cement, aluminum metal is corroded, with continued production of hydrogen. In order to develop a mineral matrix having enhanced compatibility with aluminum, a literature review was first undertaken to identify binders capable of reducing the pore solution pH compared with Portland cement. An experimental study was then carried out to measure the hydrogen production resulting from corrosion of aluminum metal rods encapsulated in the different selected cement pastes. The best results were achieved with magnesium phosphate cement, which released very little hydrogen over the duration of the study. This production could be reduced still further by adding a corrosion inhibitor (lithium nitrate) to the mixing solution. Open circuit potential measurement and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of aluminum electrode encapsulated in two pastes based on Portland cement and magnesium phosphate cement showed different redox behaviors. In the Portland cement paste, the electrochemical data confirmed the corrosion of aluminum whereas this latter tended to a passive state in the magnesium phosphate binder.

  9. Cadmium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Microspheres for Photocatalytic CO2Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Saliba, Daniel

    2016-03-30

    We report the synthesis of cadmium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) using the reaction-diffusion framework. As the hydroxide anions diffuse into an agar gel matrix containing the mixture of aluminum and cadmium salts at a given ratio, they react to give the LDH. The LDH self-assembles inside the pores of the gel matrix into a unique spherical-porous shaped microstructure. The internal and external morphologies of the particles are studied by electron microscopy and tomography revealing interconnected channels and a high surface area. This material is shown to exhibit a promising performance in the photoreduction of carbon dioxide using solar light. Moreover, the palladium-decorated version shows a significant improvement in its reduction potential at room temperature. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Cadmium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Microspheres for Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Daniel; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Sougrat, Rachid; Khashab, Niveen M; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-04-21

    We report the synthesis of cadmium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) using the reaction-diffusion framework. As the hydroxide anions diffuse into an agar gel matrix containing the mixture of aluminum and cadmium salts at a given ratio, they react to give the LDH. The LDH self-assembles inside the pores of the gel matrix into a unique spherical-porous shaped microstructure. The internal and external morphologies of the particles are studied by electron microscopy and tomography revealing interconnected channels and a high surface area. This material is shown to exhibit a promising performance in the photoreduction of carbon dioxide using solar light. Moreover, the palladium-decorated version shows a significant improvement in its reduction potential at room temperature.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Cu(II Substituted Hexa Tungstate and Molybdate of the Anderson Type Anion [Xn+M6O24]-(12-n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Dey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts of copper substituted heteropoly compounds having molecular formula Na10[CuIIWVI6O24].22H2O(1 and Na10[CuIIMoVI6O24]. 19H2O(2 analogous to the Anderson type anion [Xn+M6O24]─(12-n were synthesized according to the literature method. Compound(1 was synthesized from aqueous acidic solution containing sodium tungstate and copper chloride and compound(2 from sodium molybdate and copper chloride solution. The elemental analyses show 1:6 atomic ratio of the heteroatom to the addenda in both the compounds. The IR spectra for both the compounds are in good agreement with the reported formulae. A small deviation in IR spectra are observed than that established for Keggin anions. CuO6 acts as hetero group which replaces MO6 (M=W or Mo from the Anderson structure. The thermal analyses of the compounds show the loss of the peripheral water molecules. The molecular weight of the compound (1 and (2 have been found as 2212.5 and 1600.5 respectively.

  12. Aqueous-solution growth of GaP and InP nanowires: a general route to phosphide, oxide, sulfide, and tungstate nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yujie; Xie, Yi; Li, Zhengquan; Li, Xiaoxu; Gao, Shanmin

    2004-02-06

    A general synthetic route has been developed for the growth of metal phosphide, oxide, sulfide, and tungstate nanowires in aqueous solution. In detail, cetyltrimethylammonium cations (CTA(+)) can be combined with anionic inorganic species along a co-condensation mechanism to form lamellar inorganic-surfactant intercalated mesostructures, which serve as both microreactors and reactants for the growth of nanowires. For example, GaP, InP, gamma-MnO(2), ZnO, SnS(2), ZnS, CdWO(4), and ZnWO(4) nanowires have been grown by this route. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the synthesis of GaP and InP nanowires in aqueous solution has been achieved. This strategy is expected to extend to grow nanowires of other materials in solution or by vapor transport routes, since the nanowire growth of any inorganic materials can be realized by selecting an appropriate reaction and its corresponding lamellar inorganic-surfactant precursors.

  13. Use of sodium tungstate as a permanent chemical modifier for slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of indium in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Rivas, Ricardo E.; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel [University of Murcia, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Murcia (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    A number of chemical modifiers have been assessed for the direct determination of indium in soils using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and slurry sampling. The best results were obtained when the graphite atomizer was impregnated with sodium tungstate, which acts as a permanent chemical modifier. Slurries were prepared by suspending 100 mg sample in a solution containing 1% (v/v) concentrated nitric acid and 10% (v/v) concentrated hydrofluoric acid and then 15-{mu}L aliquots were directly introduced into the atomizer. Standard indium solutions prepared in the suspension medium in the range 4-80 {mu}g L{sup -1} indium were used for calibration. The relative standard deviation for ten consecutive measurements of a 40 {mu}g L{sup -1} indium solution was 2.8%. The limit of detection in soils was 0.1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The reliability of the procedures was confirmed by analysing two standard reference materials and by using an alternative procedure. (orig.)

  14. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  15. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  16. Aluminum extrusion with a deformable die

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assaad, W.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum extrusion process is one of metal forming processes. In aluminum extrusion, a work-piece (billet) is pressed through a die with an opening that closely resembles a desired shape of a profile. By this process, long profiles with an enormous variety of cross-sections can be produced to

  17. Sanmenxia strives to create aluminum industrial base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Contradiction between rich alumina resource and relatively weak electrolytic aluminum production capacity is the "bottleneck" inhibiting development of aluminum industry in San-menxia. During the period of "11th Five-Year Development", Sanmenxia will relay on its

  18. Wilson's disease; increased aluminum in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, M; Yoshimasu, F; Yase, Y; Uebayashi, Y

    1979-01-01

    Interaction of trace metal metabolism was studied in a patient with Wilson's dease. Atomic absorption analysis showed markedly increased urinary excretion of copper and aluminum and an increased aluminum content was found in the biopsied liver by neutron activation analysis. These findings suggest a complicated pathogenetic mechanism involving other metals besides copper in the Wilson's disease.

  19. Research on Semisolid Microstructural Evolution of 2024 Aluminum Alloy Prepared by Powder Thixoforming

    OpenAIRE

    Pubo Li; Tijun Chen; Suqing Zhang; Renguo Guan

    2015-01-01

    A novel method, powder thixoforming, for net-shape forming of the particle-reinforced Aluminum matrix composites in semi-solid state has been proposed based on powder metallurgy combining with thixoforming technology. The microstructural evolution and phase transformations have been investigated during partial remelting of the 2024 bulk alloy, prepared by cold pressing of atomized alloy powders to clarify the mechanisms of how the consolidated powders evolve into small and spheroidal primary...

  20. Preliminary Nanosims Analysis of Carbon Isotope of Carbonates in Calcium-Aluminum-Rich Inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Paque, J. M.; Burnett, D.S.; Eiler, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Carbonate minerals observed in primitive meteorites are products of either terrestrial weathering or aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Most of the carbonate minerals in carbonaceous chondrites occur primarily as isolated grains in matrix, as crosscutting veins, or as replacement minerals in chondrules [e.g., 1, 2]. A few calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) have been reported containing carbonate minerals as well [2, 3]. The C and O isotopes of carbonates in c...

  1. SORPTION EXTRACTION OF Cu (II AND Co (II BY MODIFIED COMPOSITE BASED ON NANOPOROUS ALUMINUM OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. E. Silina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of modified nanoporous aluminum oxide (PAO as a composite for concentration and extraction of heavy metals is discussed in the article. There are identified the conditions for the synthesis of PAO matrix, selected the optimum surface-active agent for its modification. Spectrophotometric investigations have shown that the synthesized sorbent has complexing properties and it is suitable for concentration of metals from solutions.

  2. Aluminum honeycomb impact limiter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaksh, M.C.; Thompson, T.C. (Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)); Nickell, R.E. (Applied Science and Technology, Inc., Poway, CA (United States))

    1991-07-01

    Design requirements for a cask transporting radioactive materials must include the condition of the 30-foot free fall of the cask onto an unyielding surface. To reduce the deceleration loads to a tolerable level for all the components of the cask, a component (impact limiter) is designed to absorb the kinetic energy. The material, shape, and method of attachment of the impact limiter to the cask body comprises the design of the impact limiter. The impact limiter material of interest is honeycomb aluminum, and the particular design examined was for the NAC Legal Weight Truck cask (NAC-LWT) for spent fuel from light water reactors. The NAC-LWT has a design weight of 52,000 pounds, and it has a nominal length of 200 inches. The report describes the numerical calculations embodied in the FADE program to determine the accelerations and crush strain resulting from an arbitrary height and angle of orientation. Since the program serves as a design tool, static tests are performed to assess the effect of the shell containing the honeycomb aluminum. The static tests and their results are contained in the study. The static tests are used to demonstrate for licensing purposes the level of accelerations imposed on the cask during a 30-foot drop. 3 refs., 41 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Recrystallization in Commercially Pure Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bent; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    Recrystallization behavior in commercial aluminum with a purity of 99.4 pct was studied by techniques such as high voltage electron microscopy, 100 kV transmission electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Sample parameters were the initial grain size (290 and 24 microns) and the degree of defor......Recrystallization behavior in commercial aluminum with a purity of 99.4 pct was studied by techniques such as high voltage electron microscopy, 100 kV transmission electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Sample parameters were the initial grain size (290 and 24 microns) and the degree...... (FeAl3), which start to become operative when the degree of deformation is raised from 15 to 30 pct. The temperature of nucleation and of recrystallization decreases when the degree of deformation is increased and the initial grain size is decreased. The recrystallized grain size follows the same...... trend and it is observed that the refinement of the recrystallized grain size caused by an increasing degree of deformation and decreasing initial grain size is enhanced by the FeAl3 particles (when the degree of deformation is raised from 15 to 30 pct). Finally, the structural and kinetic observations...

  4. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  5. The Matrix Cookbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices.......Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices....

  6. Aluminum-based metal-air batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, Cody A.; Martinez, Jose Antonio Bautista

    2016-01-12

    Provided in one embodiment is an electrochemical cell, comprising: (i) a plurality of electrodes, comprising a fuel electrode that comprises aluminum and an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the aluminum is oxidized at the fuel electrode and oxygen is reduced at the air electrode, and (ii) an ionically conductive medium, comprising an organic solvent; wherein during non-use of the cell, the organic solvent promotes formation of a protective interface between the aluminum of the fuel electrode and the ionically conductive medium, and wherein at an onset of the discharge mode, at least some of the protective interface is removed from the aluminum to thereafter permit oxidation of the aluminum during the discharge mode.

  7. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  8. Gelling nature of aluminum soaps in oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaorong; Rackaitis, Mindaugas

    2009-03-15

    Aluminum soaps are notable for their ability to form soap-hydrocarbon gels of high viscosity. For more than half a century, it has been believed that the gelling mechanism is due to a formation of polymeric chains of aluminum molecules with the aluminum atoms linking along the axis and with the fatty acid chain extended sideways. Here we report results from an investigation using high-resolution electron microscopy and rheology measurements that clearly resolve the ambiguity. Our results reveal that the gelling mechanism stems from the formation of spherical nano-sized micelles from aluminum soap molecules, and those colloidal micelle particles then aggregate into networks of highly fractal and jammed structures. The earlier proposed polymer chain-like structure is definitely incorrect. The discovery of aluminum soap particles could expand application of these materials to new technologies.

  9. Proposal of recycling system for waste aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Š. Valenčík

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduced work is focused on waste aluminum recycling process with objective to propose complex production system for recovering of aluminum and some aluminum alloys. Solution is supported by extended analysis concerning purpose, basis and system sequences for recyclation. Based on that, sources, possibilities and conditions for recycling are formed. This has been used in proposal of manufacturing system. The principle is the structural proposal of manufacturing system, which does not only differentiate the stage of aluminum melting process, but also related stages as gross separation, sizing, containerisation and batching, palletisation, stacking and some related operations. Production system respects technological specifications, requirements for rationalisation of manufacturing systems, technical and economical feasibility conditions and is considered in lower automation level. However production system solves complex problem of recycling of some types of aluminum, it improves flexibility, production, quality (melting by high enforcements and in protective atmosphere and extention of production (final products production.

  10. Trends in the global aluminum fabrication industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subodh; Yin, Weimin

    2007-02-01

    The aluminum fabrication industry has become more vital to the global economy as international aluminum consumption has grown steadily in the past decades. Using innovation, value, and sustainability, the aluminum industry is strengthening its position not only in traditional packaging and construction applications but also in the automotive and aerospace markets to become more competitive and to face challenges from other industries and higher industrial standards. The aluminum fabrication industry has experienced a significant geographical shift caused by rapid growth in emerging markets in countries such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Market growth and distribution will vary with different patterns of geography and social development; the aluminum industry must be part of the transformation and keep pace with market developments to benefit.

  11. Aluminum phosphate shows more adjuvanticity than Aluminum hydroxide in recombinant hepatitis –B vaccine formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although a number of investigation have been carried out to find alternative adjuvants to aluminum salts in vaccine formulations, they are still extensively used due to their good track record of safety, low cost and proper adjuvanticity with a variety of antigens. Adsorption of antigens onto aluminum compounds depends heavily on electrostatic forces between adjuvant and antigen. Commercial recombinant protein hepatitis B vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant is facing low induction of immunity in some sections of the vaccinated population. To follow the current global efforts in finding more potent hepatitis B vaccine formulation, adjuvanticity of aluminum phosphate has been compared to aluminum hydroxide. Materials and methods: The adjuvant properties of aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate in a vaccine formulation containing a locally manufactured hepatitis B (HBs surface antigen was evaluated in Balb/C mice. The formulations were administered intra peritoneally (i.p. and the titers of antibody which was induced after 28 days were determined using ELISA technique. The geometric mean of antibody titer (GMT, seroconversion and seroprotection rates, ED50 and relative potency of different formulations were determined. Results: All the adjuvanicity markers obtained in aluminum phosphate formulation were significantly higher than aluminum hydroxide. The geometric mean of antibody titer of aluminum phosphate was approximately three folds more than aluminum hydroxide. Conclusion: Aluminum phosphate showed more adjuvanticity than aluminum hydroxide in hepatitis B vaccine. Therefore the use of aluminum phosphate as adjuvant in this vaccine may lead to higher immunity with longer duration of effects in vaccinated groups.

  12. Aluminum recovery as a product with high added value using aluminum hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, E., E-mail: david@icsi.ro [National Institute for Research and Development for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, Street Uzinei, No. 4, P.O. Râureni, P.O. Box 7, 240050 Rm. Vâlcea (Romania); Kopac, J. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 6, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Granular and compact aluminum dross were physically and chemically characterized. • A relationship between density, porosity and metal content from dross was established. • Chemical reactions involving aluminum in landfill and negative consequences are shown. • A processing method for aluminum recovering from aluminum dross was developed. • Aluminum was recovered as an value product with high grade purity such as alumina. -- Abstract: The samples of hazardous aluminum solid waste such as dross were physically and chemically characterized. A relationship between density, porosity and metal content of dross was established. The paper also examines the chemical reactions involving aluminum dross in landfill and the negative consequences. To avoid environmental problems and to recovery the aluminum, a processing method was developed and aluminum was recovered as an added value product such as alumina. This method refers to a process at low temperature, in more stages: acid leaching, purification, precipitation and calcination. At the end of this process aluminum was extracted, first as Al{sup 3+} soluble ions and final as alumina product. The composition of the aluminum dross and alumina powder obtained were measured by applying the leaching tests, using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and chemical analysis. The mineralogical composition of aluminum dross samples and alumina product were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The method presented in this work allows the use of hazardous aluminum solid waste as raw material to recover an important fraction from soluble aluminum content as an added value product, alumina, with high grade purity (99.28%)

  13. Fatigue Resistance of Liquid-assisted Self-repairing Aluminum Alloys Reinforced with Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M. Clara; Manuel, Michele; Wallace, Terryl

    2013-01-01

    A self-repairing aluminum-based composite system has been developed using a liquid-assisted healing theory in conjunction with the shape memory effect of wire reinforcements. The metal-metal composite was thermodynamically designed to have a matrix with a relatively even dispersion of a low-melting eutectic phase, allowing for repair of cracks at a predetermined temperature. Additionally, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire reinforcements were used within the composite to provide crack closure. Investigators focused the research on fatigue cracks propagating through the matrix in order to show a proof-of-concept Shape Memory Alloy Self-Healing (SMASH) technology for aeronautical applications.

  14. Characterization of aluminum surfaces: Sorption and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkinghorne, Jeannette Clera

    Aluminum, due to its low density and low cost, is a key material for future lightweight applications. However, like other structural materials, aluminum is subject to various forms of corrosion damage that annually costs the United States approximately 5% of its GNP [1]. The main goal is to investigate the effects of various solution anions on aluminum surfaces, and specifically probe pit initiation and inhibition. Using surface analysis techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, results have been correlated with those obtained from electrochemical methods and a radiolabeling technique developed in the Wieckowski laboratory. Analysis of data has indicated that important variables include type of anion, solution pH, and applied electrode potential. While aggressive anions such as chloride are usually studied to elucidate corrosion processes to work ultimately toward inhibition, its corrosive properties can be successfully utilized in the drive for higher energy and smaller-scale storage devices. Fundamental information gained regarding anion interaction with the aluminum surface can be applied to tailor etch processes. Standard electrochemical techniques and SEM are respectively used to etch and analyze the aluminum substrate. Aluminum electrolytic capacitors are comprised of aluminum anode foil covered by an anodically grown aluminum oxide dielectric film, electrolytic paper impregnated with electrolyte, and aluminum cathode foil. Two main processes are involved in the fabrication of aluminum electrolytic capacitors, namely etching and anodic oxide formation. Etching of the anode foil results in a higher surface area (up to 20 times area enlargement compared to unetched foil) that translates into a higher capacitance gain, permitting more compact and lighter capacitor manufacture. Anodic oxide formation on the anode, creates the required dielectric to withstand high voltage operation. A

  15. Titanium Carbide Nanofibers-Reinforced Aluminum Compacts, a New Strategy to Enhance Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Abdelrazek Khalil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available TiC nanofibers reinforced Al matrix composites were produced by High Frequency Induction Heat Sintering (HFIHS.The titanium carbide nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are first prepared by electrospinning technique and high temperature calcination process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium isopropoxide is first electrospun into the nanofibers, which are subsequently stabilized and then calcined to produce the desired TiC nanofibers. The X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The TiC nanofibers is then mixed with the aluminum powders and introduced into high frequency induction heat sintering (HFIHS to produce composites of TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix. The potential application of the TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix composites was systematically investigated. 99.5% relative density and around 85 HV (833 MPa Vickers hardness of the Al reinforced with 5 wt % TiC nanofiber has been obtained. Furthermore, the sample of Al contains 5 wt % TiC, has the highest value of compression and yield strength of about 415 and 350 MPa, respectively. The ductility of the Al/5 wt % TiC showed increasing with increasing the TiC contents.

  16. Microstructural and hardness behavior of graphene-nanoplatelets/aluminum composites synthesized by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Bustamante, R. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Bolaños-Morales, D.; Bonilla-Martínez, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH), Facultad de Ingeniería, Circuito No. 1 Nuevo Campus Universitario, C.P. 31125 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Estrada-Guel, I. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Martínez-Sánchez, R., E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Pure aluminum was reinforced with graphene-platelets by using mechanical milling. • The composites were studied after sintering condition. • Milling time and graphene-platelet enhance the mechanical behavior of the composites. - Abstract: Graphene can be considered as an ideal reinforcement for the production of composites due to its outstanding mechanical properties. These characteristics offer an increased opportunity for their study in the production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In this research, the studied composites were produced by mechanical alloying (MA). The employed milling times were of 1, 3 and 5 h. GNPs were added in 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 wt% into an aluminum powder matrix. Milled powders were cold consolidated and subsequently sintered. Composites were microstructurally characterized with Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hardness behavior in composites was evaluated with a Vickers micro-hardness test. A homogeneous dispersion of graphene during MA and the proper selection of sintering conditions were considered to produce optimized composites. The obtained results with electron microscopy indicate a homogeneous dispersion of GNPs into the aluminum matrix. Analyses showed GNPs edges where the structure of the graphene layers conserved after MA is observed.

  17. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  18. Evaluating the aluminum content of pressed dross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkijan, V.

    2002-02-01

    Pressing of skimmed hot drosses in a press is a very popular technology for cooling hot dross and obtaining the maximum in-house recovery of aluminum alloy. As a result of the pressing action, part of the molten aluminum alloy is squeezed out, while the rest of the free metal remains in the pressed skulls. Thus, pressed skulls are a valuable waste product, consisting of 30 70 wt.% free aluminum. Other constituents are aluminum oxide and oxides of alloying metals. Pressed skulls are generally valued on a free-metal recovery basis, which necessarily involves practical determination of their free aluminum content. Because most analytical methods are limited to the laboratory level and representative sub-samples, there is a practical interest in developing a routine, cost-effective, and non-destructive method to predict the free aluminum content in entire pressed skulls, based on their density. To develop such a method, a relation between the bulk density, porosity, and free aluminum content of pressed skulls was established. This article offers a review of those experiments and an analysis of their results.

  19. The Integrated Fuzzy AHP and Goal Programing Model Based on LCA Results for Industrial Waste Management by Using the Nearest Weighted Approximation of FN: Aluminum Industry in Arak, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Zare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide recycled aluminum generation is increasing quickly thanks to the environmental considerations and continuous growing of use demands. Aluminum dross recycling, as the secondary aluminum process, has been always considered as a problematic issue in the world. The aim of this work is to propose a methodical and easy procedure for the proposed system selection as the MCDM problem. Here, an evaluation method, integrated FAHP, is presented to evaluate aluminum waste management systems. Therefore, we drive weights of each pair comparison matrix by the use of the goal programming (GP model. The functional unit includes aluminum dross and aluminum scrap, which is defined as 1000 kilograms. The model is confirmed in the case of aluminum waste management in Arak. For the proposed integrated fuzzy AHP model, five alternatives are investigated. The results showed that, according to the selected attributes, the best waste management alternative is the one involving the primary aluminum ingot 99.5% including 200 kg and the secondary aluminum 98% (scrap including 800 kg, and beneficiation activities are implemented, duplicate aluminum dross is recycled in the plant, and finally it is landfilled.

  20. Investigation of radiations penetration in aluminum used in reactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Abdo, A.; Bashter, I.I.; Makarious, A.S.; Kansouh, W.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center

    1996-07-01

    Measurements have been carried out to determine the spatial and energy distributions of fast neutrons, total gamma rays and secondary gamma rays in aluminum as a reactor wide structural material experimental work was performed using one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. For secondary gamma ray investigations, measurements were carried out for bar, cadmium filtered and boron carbide filtered reactor beams. Aluminum cylinders with a diameter of 100mm and of different thicknesses have been used. Fast neutrons and gamma rays were measured using a neutron-gamma spectrometer with a stilbene scintillator. Discrimination against undesired pulses of neutrons and gamma rays was achieved by a pulse shape discrimination based on zero cross over technique. The measured pulse amplitude distributions of fast neutrons or gamma rays were transformed to neutron or gamma ray energy distributions using the differentiation method and the matrix correction method, respectively. The obtained data were displayed in the form of spatial fluxes and energy distributions and attenuation curves. Total fast neutron macroscopic cross sections, gamma rays linear attenuation coefficients and the relaxation lengths were obtained for the whole energy range and at different energies. (Author).

  1. The effect of high density electric pulses on sintered aluminum 201AB silicon carbide MMC PM compacts during plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dariavach, Nader Guseinovich

    The effect of high-density electrical pulses on mechanical and structural properties of sintered aluminum SiC metal-matrix composites, fabricated by standard powder-metallurgy compaction and sintering, was investigated. Three types of phenomena where investigated during transverse rupture testing of the samples: a consolidation effect (increasing of the transverse rupture strength (TRS)), an electroplastic effect (decreasing of the flow stresses), and an increasing of the stress intensity factor by electric pulse application. It was observed, that an increase in the TRS strength of sintered powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum and aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) compacts is a result of the electric pulse consolidation effect due to non-uniform temperature distribution around the grain boundaries. Three analytical models of the thermal effect of electric pulses on aluminum samples where considered: total temperature change of the sample due to a one electric pulse, one-dimensional steady state model and transient 2D thermal analysis of the temperature distribution around the grain boundary. The 2D transient analysis shows that the temperature rise in the grain boundary of a sintered PM aluminum sample due to an electric pulse can exceed the melting point. At the same time the temperature of the bulk material has an insignificant (melt the crack tip and increase the strength of the damaged material. The experimental study shows an increase in the stress intensity factor up to 76% for sintered aluminum PM compacts and up to 116% for sintered aluminum MMC PM compacts due to application of high-density electric pulses during transverse rapture testing.

  2. Random matrix theory and acoustic resonances in plates with an approximate symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Ellegaard, C.; Jackson, A.D.;

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a random matrix model of systems with an approximate symmetry and present the spectral fluctuation statistics and eigenvector characteristics for the model. An acoustic resonator like, e.g., an aluminum plate may have an approximate symmetry. We have measured the frequency spectrum...... the spectral fluctuation statistics and the distribution of widths for the resonances, we find that this transition is well described by the random matrix model....

  3. Lead exposure from aluminum cookware in Cameroon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D.; Kobunski, Peter A. [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, 401 College Ave., Ashland University, Ashland, OH 44805 (United States); Kuepouo, Gilbert [Research and Education Centre for Development (CREPD), Yaounde (Cameroon); Corbin, Rebecca W. [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, 401 College Ave., Ashland University, Ashland, OH 44805 (United States); Gottesfeld, Perry, E-mail: pgottesfeld@okinternational.org [Occupational Knowledge International, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Blood lead levels have decreased following the removal of lead from gasoline in most of the world. However, numerous recent studies provide evidence that elevated blood lead levels persist in many low and middle-income countries around the world at much higher prevalence than in the more developed countries. One potential source of lead exposure that has not been widely investigated is the leaching of lead from artisanal aluminum cookware, which is commonly used in the developing world. Twenty-nine samples of aluminum cookware and utensils manufactured by local artisans in Cameroon were collected and analyzed for their potential to release lead during cooking. Source materials for this cookware included scrap metal such as engine parts, radiators, cans, and construction materials. The lead content of this cookware is relatively low (< 1000 ppm by X-ray fluorescence), however significant amounts of lead, as well as aluminum and cadmium were released from many of the samples using dilute acetic acid extractions at boiling and ambient temperatures. Potential exposures to lead per serving were estimated to be as high as 260 μg, indicating that such cookware can pose a serious health hazard. We conclude that lead, aluminum and cadmium can migrate from this aluminum cookware during cooking and enter food at levels exceeding recommended public health guidelines. Our results support the need to regulate lead content of materials used to manufacture these pots. Artisanal aluminum cookware may be a major contributor to lead poisoning throughout the developing world. Testing of aluminum cookware in other developing countries is warranted. - Highlights: • Cookware is manufactured in Cameroon from scrap aluminum including car parts. • Twenty-nine cookware samples were evaluated for their potential to leach lead. • Boiling extractions to simulate the effects of cooking released significant lead. • Potential lead exposures per serving are estimated as high as 260 μg.

  4. Evolution of recrystallization textures in high voltage aluminum capacitor foils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘楚明; 张新明; 周鸿章; 陈志永; 邓运来; 周卓平

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of recrystallization textures in high voltage aluminum capacitor foils which are produced with a high level of cold reduction was tracked by analysis of microstructure and crystallographic texture. The results show that the deformation textures are mainly composed of S-orientation, Cu-orientation and a little Bs-orientation. During the low temperature stages of final annealing, the iron precipitates first along the sub-grain boundaries, and the Fe concentration in the matrix becomes low. Then, the cube grains nucleate preferably into the sub-grains. At high temperature stages, the cube nuclei can grow preferably because of their 40°〈111〉 orientation relationship to the S orientation, the main component of the rolling texture. Finally, the cube texture is sharply strong and the R orientation is very weak in the foils.

  5. Explosive welding technique for joining aluminum and steel tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Silver sheet is wrapped around aluminum portion of joint. Mylar powder box is wrapped over silver sheet. Explosion welds silver to aluminum. Stainless-steel tube is placed over silver-aluminum interface. Mylar powder box, covered with Mylar tape, is wrapped around steel member. Explosion welds steel to silver-aluminum interface.

  6. Nanshan Aluminum Reached Strategic Cooperation with CSR Corporation Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    As a key supplier of aluminum profiles and aluminum plate,sheet and trip products for CSR Corporation Limited,Nanshan Aluminum will join hands with CSR Corporation Limited to reach strategic cooperation.On January 5,Nanshan Aluminum signed strategic cooperation agreement with CSR Sifang Locomotive&Rolling; Stock Co.,Ltd,both

  7. Changes in porosity of foamed aluminum during solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to control the porosity of foamed aluminum, the changes in the porosity of foamed aluminum melt in the processes of foaming and solidification, the distribution of the porosity of foamed aluminum, and the relationship between them were studied. The results indicated that the porosity of foamed aluminum coincides well with the foaming time.

  8. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  9. 用钨酸钠分离法研究诏安湾甲藻休眠孢子%Study on dinoflagellate resting cysts in Zhaoan Bay using method of sodium tungstate separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾海峰; 蓝东兆

    2001-01-01

    本文介绍了一种分离富集沉积物中甲藻休眠孢子的新方法——钨酸钠法,并用这种方法在诏安湾沉积物中分离到了12种甲藻休眠孢子.%This article states a new method to separate dinoflagellate resting cyst from sediment——method of sodium tungstate separation. We also separate 12 dinoflagellate resting cysts from sediment in Zhaoan Bay using this method.

  10. Fatigue analysis of aluminum drill pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ribeiro Plácido

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was performed to investigate the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of aluminum drill pipes. Initially, the fatigue properties were determined through small-scale tests performed in an optic-mechanical fatigue apparatus. Additionally, full-scale fatigue tests were carried out with three aluminum drill pipe specimens under combined loading of cyclic bending and constant axial tension. Finally, a finite element model was developed to simulate the stress field along the aluminum drill pipe during the fatigue tests and to estimate the stress concentration factors inside the tool joints. By this way, it was possible to estimate the stress values in regions not monitored during the fatigue tests.

  11. Evidências da formação de monocamada de óxido de alumínio sobre sílica, através de reações de enxerto Evidence of aluminum oxide monolayer formation on a silica gel surface using grafting reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. D. Cónsul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum oxide was dispersed on a commercial silica gel surface, using successive grafting reactions. The reaction products were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The progressive incorporation of aluminum, up to 5.5% (w/w, does not produce agglomeration of alumina, since changes in the original pore size distribution of the silica matrix were not observed. The aluminum oxide covers homogeneously the silica surface.

  12. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of phonon spectra, and simulations of pressure-induced amorphization in tungstates A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Prabhatasree; Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Rols, S.; Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2015-03-01

    Lattice dynamics and high-pressure phase transitions in A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb ) have been investigated using inelastic neutron scattering experiments, ab initio density functional theory calculations, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational modes that are internal to W O4 tetrahedra occur at the highest energies consistent with the relative stability of W O4 tetrahedra. The neutron data and the ab initio calculations are found to be in excellent agreement. The neutron and structural data are used to develop and validate an interatomic potential model. The model is used for classical molecular dynamics simulations to study their response to high pressure. We have calculated the enthalpies of the scheelite and fergusonite phases as a function of pressure, which confirms that the scheelite to fergusonite transition is second order in nature. With increase in pressure, there is a gradual change in the A O8 polyhedra, while there is no apparent change in the W O4 tetrahedra. We found that all the four tungstates amorphize at high pressure. This is in good agreement with available experimental observations which show amorphization at around 45 GPa in BaW O4 and 40 GPa in CaW O4 . Further molecular dynamics simulations at high pressure and high temperature indicate that application of pressure at higher temperature hastens the process of amorphization. On amorphization, there is an abrupt increase in the coordination of the W atom while the bisdisphenoids around the A atom are considerably distorted. The pair-correlation functions of the various atom pairs corroborate these observations. Our observations aid in predicting the pressure of amorphization in SrW O4 and PbW O4 .

  13. Technical Note: A Simulation Study on the Feasibility of Radiotherapy Dose Enhancement with Calcium Tungstate and Hafnium Oxide Nano- and Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherck, Nicholas J; Won, You-Yeon

    2017-09-18

    To assess the radiotherapy dose enhancement (RDE) potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO4 ) and hafnium oxide (HfO2 ) nano- and microparticles (NPs). A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to gauge their respective RDE potentials relative to that of the broadly studied gold (Au) NP. The study was warranted due to the promising clinical and preclinical studies involving both CaWO4 and HfO2 NPs as RDE agents in the treatment of various types of cancers. The study provides a baseline RDE to which future experimental RDE trends can be compared to. All three materials were investigated in silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE 2014) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" for a baseline. The key metric used in the evaluation of the materials was the local dose enhancement factor (DEFloc ). An additional metric used, termed the relative enhancement ratio (RER), evaluates material performance at the same mass concentrations. The results of the study indicate that Au has the strongest RDE potential using the DEFloc metric. HfO2 and CaWO4 both underperformed relative to Au with lower DEFloc of 2-3× and 4-100×, respectively. The computational investigation predicts the RDE performance ranking to be: Au > HfO2 > CaWO4 . This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Coordination Structure of Aluminum in Magnesium Aluminum Hydroxide Studied by 27Al NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The coordination structure of aluminum in magnesium aluminum hydroxide was studiedby 27Al NMR. The result showed that tetrahedral aluminum (AlⅣ) existed in magnesiumaluminum hydroxide, and the contents of AlⅣ increased with the increase of the ratio of Al/Mg andwith the peptizing temperature. AlⅣ originated from the so-called Al13 polymer with the structureof one Al tetrahedron surrounded by twelve Al octahedrons.

  15. South West Aluminum: Next year The Capacity of Auto-use Aluminum Sheet will Reach 5000 Tonnes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Following supplying supporting aluminum products for"Shenzhou"spacecraft,"Long March"rocket,Boeing and Airbus,South West Aluminum again tapped new economic growth points,i.e.automobile-use aluminum products.According to what the reporter has learned from South West Aluminum Group recently,this group has finished early stage

  16. Southwest Aluminum Increase Two Production Lines and May Become the Largest Aluminum Fabricator In the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Recently,Wu Bing,Director of Chongqing Economic Committee,announced at the"Industrial Economy Meeting"that the city will"facilitate the technical upgrade and capacity expansion of the existing production lines at Southwest Aluminum with great efforts on the construction of one additional hot continuous rolling line and one cold continuous rolling line so as to have a comprehensive production ca- pacity of 1.2 million tons on aluminum processing profiles for the achievement of building Southwest Aluminum into the world largest aluminum processing enterprise".

  17. Preliminary Study on Aluminum Content of Foods and Aluminum Intake of Residents in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUGe-Sheng; JINRng-Pei; 等

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum contents of 64 kinds of foods in Tianjin were detrmined.The results showed that the aluminum levels in diffeent kinds of foods varied greatly,and most foodstuffs from natural sources(including contamination from food processing)contained less than 10mg/kg,Aluminum contents were higher in foodstuffs of plant origin,especiallydry beans containing large amounts of aluminum naturally.Lower concentration of aluminum seemed to be present in foodstuffs of animal origin.It was estimated that the potential daily intake of aluminum per person from natural dietary sources in Tianjin was about 3.79 mg.This estimated figure of dietary aluminum intake was very close to the measured data from 24 daily diets of college students.which was 4.86±1.72mg.Considering all the potential sources of natural aluminum in foods.water and the individual habitual food,it would apear that most residents in Tianjin would consume 3-10mg aluminum daily from natural dietary sources.

  18. Aluminum recovery as a product with high added value using aluminum hazardous waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2013-10-15

    The samples of hazardous aluminum solid waste such as dross were physically and chemically characterized. A relationship between density, porosity and metal content of dross was established. The paper also examines the chemical reactions involving aluminum dross in landfill and the negative consequences. To avoid environmental problems and to recovery the aluminum, a processing method was developed and aluminum was recovered as an added value product such as alumina. This method refers to a process at low temperature, in more stages: acid leaching, purification, precipitation and calcination. At the end of this process aluminum was extracted, first as Al(3+) soluble ions and final as alumina product. The composition of the aluminum dross and alumina powder obtained were measured by applying the leaching tests, using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and chemical analysis. The mineralogical composition of aluminum dross samples and alumina product were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The method presented in this work allows the use of hazardous aluminum solid waste as raw material to recover an important fraction from soluble aluminum content as an added value product, alumina, with high grade purity (99.28%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Over-heated Investment in Aluminum Hub Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Aluminum hub is one of typical products with the comparative advantages.China’s aluminum hub industry is very competitive.In recent years,the value of export for the aluminum hub soared,increasing from USD130 millions in 1999 up to nearly USD1 billion in 2004.The main exporter are Wanfeng Auto Holding Group,Shanghai Fervent Alloy Wheel MFG Co.,Ltd.,Nanhai Zhongnan Aluminum Co., Ltd.,Taian Huatai Aluminum Hub Co.,Ltd.

  20. Effect of matrix on the metal poisoning of REY catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.J.; Chen, Y.W. [National Central Univ., Chungli (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Li, C. [Chinese Petroleum Corp., Chiayi (Taiwan, Province of China). Refining and Manufacturing Research Inst.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of matrix on the resistance of vanadium and nickel poisoning of the REY zeolite has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and n-hexane cracking reaction. Alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnesia-alumina (MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), alumina-aluminum phosphate (AAP), and magnesia-alumina-aluminum phosphate (MgAAP) were used as matrices of REY. The presence of matrix can increase the resistance of REY to steam deactivation. AAP has a better hydrothermal stability than the other matrics. MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix demonstrates the highest ability to capture vanadium due to the basicity of magnesia. There is an interaction between vanadium and nickel. This interaction inhibits the destruction of REY structure caused by vanadium. AAP has a strong interaction with nickel. The stronger the nickel-matrix interaction, the less poison effect of nickel. In addition, the strong interaction leads to the decrease in nickel`s ability to retard the destruction of REY structure by vanadium.

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of MWCNTs Reinforced A356 Aluminum Alloys Cast Nanocomposites Fabricated by Using a Combination of Rheocasting and Squeeze Casting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou Bakr Elshalakany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A356 hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys matrix composites reinforced by different contents of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were fabricated using a combination of rheocasting and squeeze casting techniques. A novel approach by adding MWCNTs into A356 aluminum alloy matrix with CNTs has been performed. This method is significant in debundling and preventing flotation of the CNTs within the molten alloy. The microstructures of nanocomposites and the interface between the aluminum alloy matrix and the MWCNTs were examined by using an optical microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. This method remarkably facilitated a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within A356 aluminum alloy matrix as well as a refinement of grain size. In addition, the effects of weight fraction (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt% of the CNT-blended matrix on mechanical properties were evaluated. The results have indicated that a significant improvement in ultimate tensile strength and elongation percentage of nanocomposite occurred at the optimal amount of 1.5 wt% MWCNTs which represents an increase in their values by a ratio of about 50% and 280%, respectively, compared to their corresponding values of monolithic alloy. Hardness of the samples was also significantly increased by the addition of CNTs.

  2. Parallelism in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Gallopoulos, Efstratios; Sameh, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended as a research monograph that could also be used in graduate courses for the design of parallel algorithms in matrix computations. It assumes general but not extensive knowledge of numerical linear algebra, parallel architectures, and parallel programming paradigms. The book consists of four parts: (I) Basics; (II) Dense and Special Matrix Computations; (III) Sparse Matrix Computations; and (IV) Matrix functions and characteristics. Part I deals with parallel programming paradigms and fundamental kernels, including reordering schemes for sparse matrices. Part II is devoted to dense matrix computations such as parallel algorithms for solving linear systems, linear least squares, the symmetric algebraic eigenvalue problem, and the singular-value decomposition. It also deals with the development of parallel algorithms for special linear systems such as banded ,Vandermonde ,Toeplitz ,and block Toeplitz systems. Part III addresses sparse matrix computations: (a) the development of pa...

  3. China Aluminum Processing Industry Development Report 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2011,China’s aluminum processing industry maintained a high growth rate,with the aluminum output reaching 23,456,000tons,up 20.6% y-o-y.Overshadowed by complicated situation both at home and abroad,China’seconomy slowed down and declined by2.2% y-o-y.In 2011,China’s aluminum processing industry showed a downward tendency,that is,it grew at a high speed before the3rd quarter,but suffered from a shortage of orders in the remaining time of the year and the growth rate fell increasingly.Between January and August,China’s aluminum output rose by 26% y-o-y;

  4. Small-scale explosive welding of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Welding technique uses very small quantities of explosive ribbon to accomplish small-scale lap-welding of aluminum plates. Technique can perform small controlled welding with no length limitations and requires minimal protective shielding.

  5. Shock wave compression behavior of aluminum foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程和法; 黄笑梅; 薛国宪; 韩福生

    2003-01-01

    The shock wave compression behavior of the open cell aluminum foam with relative density of 0. 396 was studied through planar impact experiments. Using polyvinylidene fluoride(PVDF) piezoelectric gauge technique, the stress histories and propagation velocities of shock wave in the aluminum foam were measured and analyzed. The results show that the amplitude of shock wave attenuates rapidly with increasing the propagation distance in the aluminum foam, and an exponential equation of the normalized peak stress vs propagation distance of shock wave is established, the attenuation factor in the equation is 0. 286. Furthermore, the Hugoniot relation, νs = 516.85+ 1.27νp,for the aluminum foam is determined by empirical fit to the experimental Hugoniot data.

  6. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  7. Masking of aluminum surface against anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, G. B.; Thompson, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Masking material and a thickening agent preserve limited unanodized areas when aluminum surfaces are anodized with chromic acid. For protection of large areas it combines well with a certain self-adhesive plastic tape.

  8. Aluminum plasmonic multicolor meta-hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pin Chieh; Wang, Chih-Ming; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-05-13

    We report a phase-modulated multicolor meta-hologram (MCMH) that is polarization-dependent and capable of producing images in three primary colors. The MCMH structure is made of aluminum nanorods that are arranged in a two-dimensional array of pixels with surface plasmon resonances in red, green, and blue. The aluminum nanorod array is patterned on a 30 nm thick SiO2 spacer layer sputtered on top of a 130 nm thick aluminum mirror. With proper design of the structure, we obtain resonances of narrow bandwidths to allow for implementation of the multicolor scheme. Taking into account of the wavelength dependence of the diffraction angle, we can project images to specific locations with predetermined size and order. With tuning of aluminum nanorod size, we demonstrate that the image color can be continuously varied across the visible spectrum.

  9. Inhibition of aluminum corrosion using Opuntia extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Etre, A.Y

    2003-11-01

    The inhibitive action of the mucilage extracted from the modified stems of prickly pears, toward acid corrosion of aluminum, is tested using weight loss, thermometry, hydrogen evolution and polarization techniques. It was found that the extract acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for aluminum corrosion in 2.0 M HCl solution. The inhibition action of the extract was discussed in view of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. It was found that the adsorption of the extract on aluminum surface is a spontaneous process. The inhibition efficiency (IE) increases as the extract concentration is increased. The effect of temperature on the IE was studied. It was found that the presence of extract increases the activation energy of the corrosion reaction. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process were calculated. It was found also that the Opuntia extract provides a good protection to aluminum against pitting corrosion in chloride ion containing solutions.

  10. Profit of Aluminum Industry Dropped Sharply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>On August 2nd,the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology published the performance of nonferrous metal industry in the first half of 2011.Relevant data showed that due to cost increase,aluminum smelting enter

  11. Aluminum-CNF Lightweight Radiator Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal relates to a new materials concept for an aluminum-carbon nanofiber composite, high thermal conductivity ultra lightweight material that will form the...

  12. Phosphine in various matrixes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Matrix-bound phosphine was determined in the Jiaozhou Bay coastal sediment, in prawn-pond bottom soil, in the eutrophic lake Wulongtan, in the sewage sludge and in paddy soil as well. Results showed that matrix-bound phosphine levels in freshwater and coastal sediment, as well as in sewage sludge, are significantly higher than that in paddy soil. The correlation between matrix bound phosphine concentrations and organic phosphorus contents in sediment samples is discussed.

  13. Transfer and transport of aluminum in filtration unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum salt coagulants were used prevalently in various water works. In this article, the effects of filtration on residual aluminum concentration and species distribution were researched by determining the concentration of different Aluminum species before and after single layer filter, double layer filter, and membrane filtration units. In the research, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used to separate colloidal and soluble aluminum, ion exchange chromatography (IEC) was used to separate organic and inorganic aluminum, and inductivity coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the aluminum concentration. The results showed that the rapid filtration process had the ability of removing residual aluminum from coagulant effluent water, and that double layer filtration was more effective in residual aluminum removal than single layer filtration, while Nano filtration was more effective than micro filtration. It was found that when the residual aluminum concentration was below 1mg/L in sediment effluent, the residual aluminum concentration in treated water was above 0.2 mg/L. The direct rapid filtration process mainly removed the suspended aluminum. The removal of soluble and colloidal aluminum was always less than 10% and the natural small particles that adsorbed the amount of soluble or small particles aluminum on their surface were difficult to be removed in this process. Micro filtration and nano filtration were good technologies for removing aluminum; the residual aluminum concentration in the effluent was less than 0.05 mg/L.

  14. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  15. Plasma ARC keyhole welding of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostervoll, H.

    1993-02-01

    An increasing and more advanced use of aluminum as a construction material make higher demands to the effectiveness and quality in aluminum joining. Furthermore, if the advantages of aluminum shall be exploited in the best possible way, it is necessary to use the best processes available for the certain application. Today, the most widely used processes of aluminum welding are gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Plasma arc welding (PAW) is another interesting process, which is rather newly adopted for aluminum welding. However, up to now the use is limited and most of the users are within the space industry in USA (NASA); also the new space industry in Europe has adopted the process. The reason for the great interest for PAW in the space industry is, according to NASA, higher weld quality and less repair costs, less heat distortion, and less groove preparations costs. Of these reasons, PAW should also be of interest for the aluminum industry in Scandinavia. The aim of the project is to focus on the possibilities and to some extent testing the PAW process.

  16. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Effect of Aluminum Filler Material on Thermal Properties of Palmyra Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pavanu Sai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites are renewable, cheap, completely or partially recyclable, carbon neutral and biodegradable. Their easy availability, lower density, higher specific properties, lower cost, satisfactory mechanical and thermal properties, non-corrosive nature, lesser abrasion to processing equipment, makes them an attractive ecological alternative to glass, carbon or other man-made synthetic fibers. Natural fiber composites are generally very good thermal insulators and thus cannot be used where thermal conduction is desirable. Increase in thermal conduction may be done by adding metal filler powders to the matrix. In this work, the effect of aluminum filler material on thermal properties of chemically treated palmyra fiber reinforced composites is investigated. Thermal properties studied include thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal degradation and stability. Five different samples with 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% aluminum powder are considered. With the addition of aluminum filler powder, thermal conductivity increases, specific heat capacity decreases, thermal diffusivity increases and thermal stability improves with maximum at 50% aluminum powder.

  18. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  19. Nanostructures Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos M.; Pereiro, Juan; Basaran, Ali C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2013-03-01

    We present two fabrication methods for asymmetric mesoscopic dot arrays over macroscopic areas using anodic aluminum oxide templates. In the first approach, metal is deposited at 45o to the template axis to partially close the pores and produce an elliptical shadow-mask. In the second approach, now underway, nanoimprint lithography on a polymer intermediary layer is followed by reactive ion etching to generate asymmetric pore seeds. Both these techniques are quantified by an analysis of the lateral morphology and lattice of the pores or dots using scanning electron microscopy and a newly developed MATLAB based code (available for free download at http://ischuller.ucsd.edu). The code automatically provides a segmentation of the measured area and the statistics of morphological properties such as area, diameter, and eccentricity, as well as the lattice properties such as number of nearest neighbors, and unbiased angular and radial two point correlation functions. Furthermore, novel user defined statistics can be easily obtained. We will additionally present several applications of these methods to superconducting, ferromagnetic, and organic nanostructures. This work is supported by AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0409

  20. Synthesis and characterization of poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV tungstate: A new and novel ‘organic–inorganic’ nano-composite material and its electro-analytical applications as Hg(II ion-selective membrane electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif A. Khan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An organic–inorganic nano-composite poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV tungstate was chemically synthesized by sol–gel mixing of the incorporation of organic polymer o-anisidine into the matrices of inorganic ppt of Sn(IV tungstate in different mixing volume ratios. This composite material has been characterized using various analytical techniques like XRD (X-ray diffraction, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared, SEM (Scanning electron microscopy, TEM (Transmission electron microscopy and simultaneous TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis studies. On the basis of distribution studies, the material was found to be highly selective for Hg(II. Using this nano-composite cation exchanger as electro-active material, a new heterogeneous precipitate based on ion-sensitive membrane electrode was developed for the determination of Hg(II ions in solutions. The membrane electrode was mechanically stable, with a quick response time, and can be operated within a wide pH range. The electrode was also found to be satisfactory in electrometric titrations.

  1. Aluminum carboxymethyl cellulose-rice bran microcapsules: enhancing survival of Lactobacillus reuteri KUB-AC5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitprasert, Pakamon; Sudsai, Polin; Rodklongtan, Akkaratch

    2012-09-01

    This research aimed to enhance the survival of Lactobacillus reuteri KUB-AC5 from heat conditioning by using microencapsulation with aluminum carboxymethyl cellulose-rice bran (AlCMC-RB) composites of different weight ratios of 1:0, 1:1, and 1:1.5. The cell/polymer suspension was crosslinked with aluminum chloride at different agitation speeds of 1200, 1500, and 2100 rpm. The AlCMC microcapsules had significantly higher encapsulation efficiency, but lower microcapsule yield than the AlCMC-RB microcapsules (p≤0.05). Scanning electron microscopy revealed the complexation between AlCMC and RB. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed hydrogen bondings between AlCMC, RB, and cells. The AlCMC-RB microcapsules had significantly lower aluminum ion and moisture contents than the AlCMC ones. After heat exposure, the viability of non-encapsulated and microencapsulated cells in the AlCMC matrix dramatically declined, while that of microencapsulated cells in the AlCMC-RB matrix was about 8 log CFU/g. The results showed the promising potential of the AlCMC-RB composite microcapsules for the protection of probiotics against heat. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of fatigue damage in aluminum 2024 by x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum alloys are widely used in the automobile and aerospace industries. This is due to their attractive low density-high modulus and low density-high strength characteristics. Unfortunately, cyclic stress-strain deformations alter the microstructure of aluminum alloys when they are placed into service. These structural changes can lead to fatigue damage and ultimately service failure. Since x-ray diffraction analysis is known to be a sensitive nondestructive indicator of structural changes due to deformations, this technique is being used to evaluate changes in the microstructure of cycled aluminum 2024 commercial alloys. Line shapes, widths, and positions in an x-ray diffraction pattern depend on microstructural properties such as grain size, grain orientation, residual stress, microstrain, etc. Changes in the microstructure due to fatigue will appear as changes in the diffraction pattern. One parameter used to characterize a reflection in a diffraction pattern is the full width at half maximum (FWHM). Preliminary x-ray diffraction results on cycled Al 2024 indicate that the (111) and (222) reflections of the matrix phase do not show any variations in the FWHM due to an increase in the fatigue cycles. However, the FWHM of the (200) and (400) reflections of the same phase unexpectedly showed a dramatic decrease. These results can be interpreted as due to the relaxation of some initial nonuniform residual stresses in the matrix phase lattice. Further work is in progress to evaluate the FWHM of the second phase of the cycled alloys.

  3. Patience of matrix games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Podolskii, Vladimir V.;

    2013-01-01

    For matrix games we study how small nonzero probability must be used in optimal strategies. We show that for image win–lose–draw games (i.e. image matrix games) nonzero probabilities smaller than image are never needed. We also construct an explicit image win–lose game such that the unique optimal...

  4. Patience of matrix games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    For matrix games we study how small nonzero probability must be used in optimal strategies. We show that for image win–lose–draw games (i.e. image matrix games) nonzero probabilities smaller than image are never needed. We also construct an explicit image win–lose game such that the unique optimal...

  5. Transfer function matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Given a multivariable system, it is proved that the numerator matrix N(s) of the transfer function evaluated at any system pole either has unity rank or is a null matrix. It is also shown that N(s) evaluated at any transmission zero of the system has rank deficiency. Examples are given for illustration.

  6. Deposition of aluminum-magnesium alloys from electrolytes containing organo-aluminum complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmkuhl, H.; Mehler, K.; Bongard, H.; Tesche, B. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Reinhold, B. [Audi AG Technische Entwicklung, Ingolstadt (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Organo-aluminum compounds have been used for many years as electrolytes in the coating industry. In this communication the development of a galvanic process for generating aluminum-magnesium coatings from organometallic electrolyte systems is reported as well as results on physical properties like adhesion, ductility and corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  7. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far.

  8. Fabrication of novel fiber reinforced aluminum composites by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi, Saeed; Jahromi, Seyyed Ahmad Jenabali, E-mail: jahromi@shirazu.ac.ir; Javadpour, Sirus; Zebarjad, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2015-04-24

    In this study, chopped and attrition milled high strength carbon, E-glass, and S-glass fibers have been used as the reinforcing agents in an aluminum alloy (Al1100) considered as the matrix. The Surface Metal Matrix Composites (SMMCs) then are produced by Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Tensile and micro-hardness examinations represent a magnificent improvement in the hardness, strength, ductility and toughness for all of the processed samples. Scanning Electron Micrographs reveal a proper distribution of the reinforcements in the matrix and a change in the fracture behavior of the FSPed specimens. The synergetic effects of reinforcing by fibers and Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) lead to an extra ordinary improvement in the mechanical properties.

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of denture PMMA reinforced with silanized aluminum borate whiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjing; Zhang, Xiuyin; Zhu, Bangshang; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical and thermal properties of denture polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) reinforced with aluminum borate whiskers (ABWs). To improve bonding between ABWs and PMMA matrix, the surface of ABWs was modified with a silane coupling agent. Varied contents of silanized ABWs -ranging between 1 and 20 wt%- were mixed into the PMMA resin matrix to prepare ABW/PMMA composites, which were subjected to three-point bending test, Vickers hardness test, and thermal analysis. Silanized ABWs improved the flexural strength, surface hardness, and thermal stability of PMMA. Optimal amount of ABWs in the PMMA matrix was 5 wt%, which provided the ABW/PMMA with maximum reinforcement.

  10. Progress in Aluminum Electrolysis Control and Future Direction for Smart Aluminum Electrolysis Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Tianshuang; Li, Jie; Yang, Shuai; Zou, Zhong

    2016-10-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions. However, these conditions have restricted the measurement of key control parameters, making the control of aluminum reduction cells a difficult problem in the industry. Because aluminum electrolysis control systems have a significant economic influence, substantial research has been conducted on control algorithms, control systems and information systems for aluminum reduction cells. This article first summarizes the development of control systems and then focuses on the progress made since 2000, including alumina concentration control, temperature control and electrolyte molecular ratio control, fault diagnosis, cell condition prediction and control system expansion. Based on these studies, the concept of a smart aluminum electrolysis plant is proposed. The frame construction, key problems and current progress are introduced. Finally, several future directions are discussed.

  11. Methods for both coating a substrate with aluminum oxide and infusing the substrate with elemental aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-11-01

    Methods of aluminizing the surface of a metal substrate. The methods of the present invention do not require establishment of a vacuum or a reducing atmosphere, as is typically necessary. Accordingly, aluminization can occur in the presence of oxygen, which greatly simplifies and reduces processing costs by allowing deposition of the aluminum coating to be performed, for example, in air. Embodiments of the present invention can be characterized by applying a slurry that includes a binder and powder granules containing aluminum to the metal substrate surface. Then, in a combined step, a portion of the aluminum is diffused into the substrate and a portion of the aluminum is oxidized by heating the slurry to a temperature greater than the melting point of the aluminum in an oxygen-containing atmosphere.

  12. Nucleation Catalysis in Aluminum Alloy A356 Using Nanoscale Inoculants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cicco, Michael P.; Turng, Lih-Sheng; Li, Xiaochun; Perepezko, John H.

    2011-08-01

    Different types of nanoparticles in aluminum (Al) alloy A356 nanocomposites were shown to catalyze nucleation of the primary Al phase. Nanoparticles of SiC β, TiC, Al2O3 α, and Al2O3 γ were added to and dispersed in the A356 matrix as nucleation catalysts using an ultrasonic mixing technique. Using the droplet emulsion technique (DET), undercoolings in the nanocomposites were shown to be significantly reduced compared to the reference A356. None of the nanocomposites had a population of highly undercooled droplets that were observed in the reference samples. Also, with the exception of the A356/Al2O3 α nanocomposite, all nanocomposites showed a reduction in undercooling necessary for the onset of primary Al nucleation. The observed nanocomposite undercoolings generally agreed with the undercooling necessary for free growth. The atomic structure of the particles showed an influence on nucleation potency as A356/Al2O3 γ nanocomposites had smaller undercoolings than A356/Al2O3 α nanocomposites. The nucleation catalysis illustrates the feasibility of, and basis for, grain refinement in metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs).

  13. Wastewater sludge dewaterability enhancement using hydroxyl aluminum conditioning: Role of aluminum speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bingdi; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Qiandi; Huang, Yangrui; Meng, Chenrui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-11-15

    Chemical conditioning is one of the most important processes for improve the performance of sludge dewatering device. Aluminum salt coagulant has been widely used in wastewater and sludge treatment. It is generally accepted that pre-formed speciation of aluminum salt coagulants (ASC) has an important influence on coagulation/flocculation performance. In this study, the interaction mechanisms between sludge particles and aluminum salt coagulants with different speciation of hydroxy aluminum were investigated by characterizing the changes in morphological and EPS properties. It was found that middle polymer state aluminum (Alb) and high polymer state aluminum (Alc) performed better than monomer aluminum and oligomeric state aluminum (Ala) in reduction of specific resistance to filtration (SRF) and compressibility of wastewater sludge due to their higher charge neutralization and formed more compact flocs. Sludge was significantly acidified after addition Ala, while pH was much more stable under Alb and Alc conditioning due to their hydrolysis stability. The size of sludge flocs conditioned with Alb and Alc was small but flocs structure was denser and more compact, and floc strength is higher, while that formed from Ala is relatively large, but floc structure was loose, floc strength is relatively lower. Scanning environmental microscope analysis revealed that sludge flocs conditioned by Alb and Alc (especially PAC2.5 and Al13) exhibited obvious botryoidal structure, this is because sludge flocs formed by Alb and Alc were more compact and floc strength is high, it was easy generated plentiful tiny channels for water release. In addition, polymeric aluminum salt coagulant (Alb, Alc) had better performance in compressing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) structure and removing sticky protein-like substances from soluble EPS fraction, contributing to improvement of sludge filtration performance. Therefore, this study provides a novel solution for improving sludge

  14. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Michael L., E-mail: michaelwhittaker2016@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, 122S. Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sohn, H.Y. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, University of Utah, 135S 1460 E, Rm 00412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Cutler, Raymond A. [Ceramatec, Inc., 2425S. 900W., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB{sub 2}) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB{sub 2} in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB{sub 2} beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB{sub 2} and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB{sub 2} exhibited O{sub 2}-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O{sub 2} than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB{sub 2} suggested that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on aluminum particles into a Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} shell, while the same Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} developed a needle-like morphology in AlB{sub 2} that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB{sub 2}, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal kinetic data for AlB{sub 2} in air, showing a constantly decreasing activation energy with increasing conversion. Model-free analysis allowed for the calculation of global kinetic parameters despite many simultaneous mechanisms occurring concurrently. (a) Time

  16. LOW-TEMPERATURE INFRARED REFLECTION SPECTRA OF LEAD TUNGSTATE CRYSTAL%钨酸铅晶体的低温红外反射谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙桂芳; 阮树仁; 牟娟; 钱霞; 盛淑芳

    2013-01-01

    The infrared reflection spectra of the Lead tungstate (PbWO4,PWO) crystal were measured at 77K,100K,200K and 300K.The measurement results show that the infrared reflection spectra of the PWO crystal have eight reflection peaks.The crystal structure of PWO crystal was stable at 77~ 300K.Using the Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relation,the data of infrared reflection spectra were processed.The transverse optical (TO) phonon frequency ωTO were obtained at different temperature.The temperature dependence of the lattice vibration mode was obtained.The results show that the frequencies of Pb2+ vibration mode changes toward higher wave numbers with the decrease of temperature,which are attributed to the thermal expansion.The frequencies of WO42-vibration mode changes toward lower wave numbers with the decrease of temperature,which are attributed to the anharmonic coupling of the phonos.%分别在77K、100K、200K和300K温度下测量了钨酸铅(PbWO4,PWO)晶体的红外反射谱,观察到8个反射峰;实验表明PWO晶体在低温77~300K范围内结构稳定.利用Kramers-Kronig(K-K)关系对样品的红外反射谱进行数据处理,获得了不同温度下各振动模的横光学(TO)声子频率ωTO,从而得到了PWO晶体各振动模的温度变化特性,研究表明:Pb2+离子的平动模频率随温度降低发生蓝移,主要是晶格的热膨胀影响;WO42-离子团的振动模频率随温度降低发生红移,主要是非简谐耦合作用影响.

  17. Improved Matrix Uncertainty Selector

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenbaum, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    We consider the regression model with observation error in the design: y=X\\theta* + e, Z=X+N. Here the random vector y in R^n and the random n*p matrix Z are observed, the n*p matrix X is unknown, N is an n*p random noise matrix, e in R^n is a random noise vector, and \\theta* is a vector of unknown parameters to be estimated. We consider the setting where the dimension p can be much larger than the sample size n and \\theta* is sparse. Because of the presence of the noise matrix N, the commonly used Lasso and Dantzig selector are unstable. An alternative procedure called the Matrix Uncertainty (MU) selector has been proposed in Rosenbaum and Tsybakov (2010) in order to account for the noise. The properties of the MU selector have been studied in Rosenbaum and Tsybakov (2010) for sparse \\theta* under the assumption that the noise matrix N is deterministic and its values are small. In this paper, we propose a modification of the MU selector when N is a random matrix with zero-mean entries having the variances th...

  18. Corrosion Behavior of Commercial Aluminum Alloy Processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atef Korchef

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial aluminum alloy was subjected to severe plastic deformation through equal channel angular pressing (ECAP. The alloy contains a low volume fraction of α-AlFeSi located essentially at the grain boundaries. The corrosion behavior of the ECAP’ed alloy was investigated in NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization and immersion tests. The effects of scan rate and NaCl concentration on the alloy susceptibility to corrosion were also studied. The results obtained were compared with those of the nonpressed alloy. ECAP leads to an intensive grain refinement accompanied by an increased dislocation density. All electrochemical tests confirm that corrosion resistance of the alloy remarkably diminished with increasing the ECAP number of passes. This is presumably due to the breakdown of the α-AlFeSi after ECAP leading to higher number of galvanic cells and enhanced dissolution of the aluminum matrix.

  19. Tensile properties of SiC/aluminum filamentary composites - Thermal degradation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, A.; Koczak, M. J.; Lawley, A.

    1982-01-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites with a low cost fiber, e.g. SiC, provide for an attractive combination of high elastic modulus and longitudinal strengths coupled with a low density. SiC (volume fraction 0.55)-aluminum (6061) systems have been studied in order to optimize fiber composite strength and processing parameters. A comparison of two SiC/aluminum composites produced by AVCO and DWA is provided. Fiber properties are shown to alter composite tensile properties and fracture morphology. The room temperature tensile strengths appear to be insensitive to thermal exposures at 500 C up to 150 h. The elastic modulus of the composites also appears to be stable up to 400 C, however variations in the loss modulus are apparent. The fracture morphology reflects the quality of the interfacial bond, fiber strengths and fiber processing.

  20. Development of a melt foaming process with particulate reinforced aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitlmeier, D. [ARC Leichtmetellkompetenzzentrum Ranshofen GmbH, Ranshofen (Austria)]. E-mail: dietmar.leitlmeier@arcs.ac.at; Degischer, H.P. [Technische Universitat Wien, Wien (Austria)]. E-mail: sek308@pop.tuwien.ac.at; Babcsan, N. [Univ. of Misckolc, Dept. of Nonmetallic Material, Miskolc (Hungary)]. E-mail: femnorbi@gold.uni-miskolc.hu; Flankl, H.J. [Huette Klein Reichenbach, Schwarzenau (Austria)]. E-mail: hkb@aon.at

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports on investigations by Huette Klein-Reichenbach and LKR in the course of the development of a new processing technique for cellular aluminum, to produce net shape parts of foamed aluminum via the melt route by gas injection. The foaming depends on the interaction between the blowing gas, the ceramic particles and the melt. The stabilization of the foam by different particle contents in interaction with air, oxygen and nitrogen as blowing gas has been investigated for some matrix alloys with respect to the processing parameters. The resulting cell structure is characterized by computed X-ray tomography, light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure of the cell walls is presented as well as the achieved pore size and the local mass density distribution. (author)