WorldWideScience

Sample records for aluminum silicates

  1. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  2. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  3. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin irritation study. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate and Sodium Magnesium Silicate caused minimal eye irritation in a Draize eye irritation test. Bentonite caused severe iritis after injection into the anterior chamber of the eyes of rabbits and when injected intralamellarly, widespread corneal infiltrates and retrocorneal membranes were recorded. In a primary eye irritation study in rabbits, Hectorite was moderately irritating without washing and practically nonirritating to the eye with a washout. Rats tolerated a single dose of Zeolite A without any adverse reaction in the eye. Calcium Silicate had no discernible effect on nidation or on maternal or fetal survival in rabbits. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate had neither a teratogenic nor adverse effects on the mouse fetus. Female rats receiving a 20% Kaolin diet exhibited maternal anemia but no significant reduction in birth weight of the pups was

  4. Silicate Removal in Aluminum Hydroxide Co-Precipitation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Chiharu Tokoro; Shinya Suzuki; Daisuke Haraguchi; Sayaka Izawa

    2014-01-01

    The removal mechanisms of silicate using an aluminum hydroxide co-precipitation process was investigated and compared with an adsorption process, in order to establish an effective and validated method for silicate removal from wastewater. Adsorption isotherms, XRD and FT-IR analyses showed that silicate uptake occurred by adsorption to boehmite for initial Si/Al molar ratios smaller than two, but by precipitation of poorly crystalline kaolinite for the ratios larger than two, in both co-pre...

  5. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  6. Aluminum-silicates flotation with quaternary ammonium salts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王毓华; 胡岳华; 陈湘清

    2003-01-01

    The zeta potential measurements show that the flotation separation of diaspore from kaolinite, illite and pyrophyllite could be achieved in the range of pH 46.5 with cationic collectors. A special quaternary ammonium salts(DTAL) shows better selectivity than that the dodecyl amine(DDA) does for the flotation of three silicates. The closed-circuit flotation results show that the reverse flotation de-silicate can be achieved with DTAL as collector, a new inorganic reagent(SFL) as depressant and MIBC as frother to obtain a bauxite concentrate m(Al2O3)/m(SiO2)>10, Al2O3 recovery>86%).

  7. Characterization of chitosan-magnesium aluminum silicate nanocomposite films for buccal delivery of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Khunawattanakul, Wanwisa; Strachan, Clare J;

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare and characterize chitosan-magnesium aluminum silicate (CS-MAS) nanocomposite films as a buccal delivery system for nicotine (NCT). The effects of the CS-MAS ratio on the physicochemical properties, release and permeation, as well as on the mucoadhesive...

  8. Nicotine-magnesium aluminum silicate microparticle surface modified with chitosan for mucosal delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanjanakawinkul, Watchara; Rades, Thomas; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit;

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS), a negatively charged clay, and nicotine (NCT), a basic drug, can interact electrostatically to form microparticles. Chitosan (CS) was used for the surface modification of the microparticles, and a lyophilization method was used to preserve the original particle...

  9. Effect of Silica Ratio on the Corrosion Behavior of Nano-silica Potassium Silicate Coatings on Aluminum Alloy 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, H.; Danaee, I.; Rashed, G. R.; Zaarei, D.

    2015-02-01

    Nano-silica modified potassium silicate conversion coating was deposited in different nano-silica/potassium silicate ratios on the surface of 2024 aluminum alloy. The corrosion behavior of coatings was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, current transient, potentiodynamic polarization, and surface techniques. The ratio of nano-silica/potassium silicate was optimized in order to obtain higher corrosion protection. The experimental results indicated that with increasing nano-silica/potassium silicate ratio, the corrosion resistance of aluminum increases. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion probability of potassium silicate conversion coating decreased with increasing silica ratio. This can be related to the size of nano-silica particles and the ability to fill the pores in potassium silicate coating and reinforce the created siloxane bridges.

  10. Study on Properties and Synthesize of a new Polymeric Aluminum Sulfate-silicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shu-rong; Wang Qing-ning; Zhang Fei-long; Ye Qi-zhi

    2004-01-01

    The polymeric basic aluminum silicate-sulfate can be made from three substances, such as aluminum sulfate, sodium silicate and sodium aluminates. Adoption sort neote ric one synthesis,under high shear mixing condition to produce polymeric Aluminum Sulfate-silicate--inorganic macromolecule flocculants, that is liquid, PH is 3.0, molecular formula: AlA (OH) B (SO4) C (SiOx)Because inorganic macromolecule have capability of electricity neutralized, bigger molecular mass,strong capability of adsorption, and products are relative stabilize, more economical than organic macromolecule flocculants, innocuity and high effect compared with tradition flocculants.We can use the flocculants to make sewages purified .The sewages contain sulfur, oiliness, which are treated sewages of oil refining to organism treatment sump in parturition course of oil refining,and the sewages of dark and white in parturition course of paper mill. We study the properties of the flocculants, change of CODCr and effect of sewerage decolouring and so on.Thus fig. Can be seen to add the flocculants(0.1ml) to the sewages of the oil refining and the paper mill that effect is not distinctly. Yet increase of quantity to remove turbidity and floccules effect is distinctness. When the flocculants (0.5mi) be added to the dark sewage of, the penetrate light rate attain 90~98%, the sewage of the oil refining is about 90%, but when we make floccules experiment, the color of dark green and auras of the sewages of oil refining and the paper mill are all disappear, the PASS that add to the sewage will have certainly time to flocculate. When use pay attention to quantity and horary the connection.As a result in the sewages purified, those products form quickly, granule density is big, and subsided velocity is quickly, Floccules effect and capability of removing turbidity, removing CODCr are ascendancy than tradition flocculants - aluminates, and the remained aluminum of water treatment is little. It has

  11. Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticle surface modified with chitosan for mucosal delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjanakawinkul, Watchara [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rades, Thomas [School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit [Department of Manufacturing Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Pongjanyakul, Thaned, E-mail: thaned@kku.ac.th [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS), a negatively charged clay, and nicotine (NCT), a basic drug, can interact electrostatically to form microparticles. Chitosan (CS) was used for the surface modification of the microparticles, and a lyophilization method was used to preserve the original particle morphology. The microparticles were characterized in terms of their physicochemical properties, NCT content, mucoadhesive properties, and release and permeation across porcine esophageal mucosa. The results showed that the microparticles formed via electrostatic interaction between MAS and protonated NCT had an irregular shape and that their NCT content increased with increasing NCT ratios in the microparticle preparation solution. High molecular weight CS (800 kDa) adsorbed to the microparticle surface and induced a positive surface charge. CS molecules intercalated into the MAS silicate layers and decreased the crystallinity of the microparticles, leading to an increase in the release rate and diffusion coefficient of NCT from the microparticles. Moreover, the microparticle surface modified with CS was found to have higher NCT permeation fluxes and mucoadhesive properties, which indicated the significant role of CS for NCT mucosal delivery. However, the enhancement of NCT permeation and of mucoadhesive properties depended on the molecular weight and concentration of CS. These findings suggest that NCT-MAS microparticle surface modified with CS represents a promising mucosal delivery system for NCT. Highlights: ► Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticles were prepared using electrostatic interaction. ► Lyophilization was used for drying and maintaining an original morphology of the microparticles. ► Chitosan (CS) was used for surface modification of the microparticles at acidic pH. ► Surface modification using CS caused an increase in release and permeation of nicotine. ► Microparticle surface-modified with CS presented better mucoadhesive properties.

  12. Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticle surface modified with chitosan for mucosal delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS), a negatively charged clay, and nicotine (NCT), a basic drug, can interact electrostatically to form microparticles. Chitosan (CS) was used for the surface modification of the microparticles, and a lyophilization method was used to preserve the original particle morphology. The microparticles were characterized in terms of their physicochemical properties, NCT content, mucoadhesive properties, and release and permeation across porcine esophageal mucosa. The results showed that the microparticles formed via electrostatic interaction between MAS and protonated NCT had an irregular shape and that their NCT content increased with increasing NCT ratios in the microparticle preparation solution. High molecular weight CS (800 kDa) adsorbed to the microparticle surface and induced a positive surface charge. CS molecules intercalated into the MAS silicate layers and decreased the crystallinity of the microparticles, leading to an increase in the release rate and diffusion coefficient of NCT from the microparticles. Moreover, the microparticle surface modified with CS was found to have higher NCT permeation fluxes and mucoadhesive properties, which indicated the significant role of CS for NCT mucosal delivery. However, the enhancement of NCT permeation and of mucoadhesive properties depended on the molecular weight and concentration of CS. These findings suggest that NCT-MAS microparticle surface modified with CS represents a promising mucosal delivery system for NCT. Highlights: ► Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticles were prepared using electrostatic interaction. ► Lyophilization was used for drying and maintaining an original morphology of the microparticles. ► Chitosan (CS) was used for surface modification of the microparticles at acidic pH. ► Surface modification using CS caused an increase in release and permeation of nicotine. ► Microparticle surface-modified with CS presented better mucoadhesive properties

  13. Effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy in 0.5M HCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N. K.; Mohamad, N.; Zulkafli, R.; Jalar, A.

    2013-05-01

    Silicate-based corrosion inhibitor prepared by treating silica powder extracted from rice husk ash with concentrated alkaline. The electrochemical behavior of the Al 6061 immersed in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) has been studied using the measurements of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and optical or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that, the optimum concentration of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was prominent at 5 ppm. The small addition of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was exhibited the decreasing of the weight loss of Al 6061 in acidic medium. SEM micrograph proved that the morphology of untreated Al 6061 with silicate-base corrosion inhibitor contributes more corrosion attack on sample compared to that treated Al 6061. The purpose of this research is to understand the effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor concentration yielded from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy.

  14. Effect of aluminum silicate fiber modification on crack-resistance of a ceramic mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yehua

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the crack-resistance of the mould for silica sol bonded quartz based ceramic mould casting, aluminum silicate fibers with the diameter ranging from 5 µm to 25 µm and the length about 1 mm were dispersed in the ceramic mould. The effect of the aluminum silicate fibers on the tensile strength, shrinkage rate and the cracking trend of the ceramic mould were investigated. In the ceramic slurry, quartz sand was applied as ceramic aggregate, silica sol containing 30% silicon dioxide as bonder, and the weight ratio of quartz sand to silica sol was 2.69; the dispersed fibers changed from 0 to 0.24vol.%. The mould samples were formed after the slurry was poured and gelled at room temperature, and then sintered at different temperatures ranging from 100 to 800 ℃ to measure the tensile strength and shrinkage rate. The results show that, with the aluminum silicate fiber addition increasing from 0 to 0.24vol.%, the tensile strength increases linearly from 0.175 MPa to 0.236 MPa, and the shrinkage rate decreases linearly from 1.75% to 1.68% for the ceramic mould sintered at 400 ℃, from 1.37% to 1.31% for the ceramic mould at room temperature. As the sintering temperature was raised from 100 ℃ to 800 ℃, the tensile strength increases, and the shrinkage rate decreases at all temperatures, compared with those without fiber dispersion, but their variation patterns remain the same. Furthermore, the cracking trend of the mould and its decreasing proportion were defined and analyzed quantitatively considering both effects of the fiber dispersion on the strength and shrinkage. The cracking trend appears to decrease linearly with increasing fiber content and to reach the maximum reduction of 28.8% when 0.24vol.% fiber was dispersed. Therefore, the investigation proposes a new method to improve the crack-resistance of the ceramic mould, i.e., inorganic fiber dispersion into the ceramic mould.

  15. Lysozyme-magnesium aluminum silicate microparticles: Molecular interaction, bioactivity and release studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanjanakawinkul, Watchara; Medlicott, Natalie J.; Rades, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    LSZ. Moreover, the LSZ extracted from microparticles prepared at pH 4 showed an obvious change in the tertiary structure, leading to a decrease in the biological activity of the LSZ released. These findings suggested that LSZ can strongly interact with MAS to form microparticles that may potentially......The objectives of this study were to investigate the adsorption behavior of lysozyme (LSZ) onto magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) at various pHs and to characterize the LSZ–MAS microparticles obtained from the molecular interaction between LSZ and MAS. The results showed that LSZ could be bound...... onto the MAS layers at different pHs, leading to the formation of LSZ–MAS microparticles. The higher preparation pH permitted greater adsorption affinity but a lower adsorption capacity of LSZ onto MAS. LSZ could interact with MAS via hydrogen bonds and electrostatic forces, resulting in the formation...

  16. The effect of the nature of rare earth elements on the stable activity of an industrial amorphous aluminum silicate catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoblo, V.A.; Kapustin, V.M.; Kozlov, L.L.

    1983-01-01

    The promoting effect of fourteen rare earth elements (REE) on the catalytic activity and stability of an industrial aluminum silicate catalyst (Kt) in a reaction of cracking gas oil is studied. It is shown that the individual rare earth elements have a promoting effect on the catalyst to a varying degree. Neodymium in a cerium subgroup has the greatest promoting effect, along with Disprosium and Holmium in a Yttrium subgroup of rare earth elements.

  17. Thermal treatment of mixtures of Tunisian phosphorite and additives of aluminum silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process in the mixtures of Tunisian phosphorite (TP) with addition of aluminum silicate waste by chemical and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses was studied. The influence of the additive's quantity, the temperature of thermal treatment, as well as the mechanical activation on the solubility of the heated mixtures in various extracting agents (citric acid, ammonium citrate and formic acid), were investigated. The solubility of P2O5 is higher in the case of the calcined and mechanically activated TP and its mixtures with ''Medet's steryl'' (MS) compared to the non-activated TP and its mixtures. The activated mixtures with 20% of MS have highest rate of P2O5 solubilization in citrate acid (66%) as well into ammonium citrate soluble form (60%). New phases [Ca5(PO4)3(OH), Ca5(PO4)2·SiO4, Ca7(PO4)2·(SiO4)2 and Ca4P2O9] in non-activated and activated calcined products were determined using XRD analysis

  18. Surface alteration of sintered product of strontium aluminum silicate under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface alteration of strontium aluminum silicate has been studied under hydrothermal conditions in connection with the leachability of Sr from solidified radioactive wastes. Samples exposed to a 3 M NaCl solution at 300 C produced a precipitated layer of analcime (NaAlSi2O6) with high crystallinity. The normalized leach rates for Sr in 3 M NaCl and 3 M KCl solutions were found to be less than 10-3 g/cm2·d, yielding high resistance to leaching in these solutions. On exposure to the CaCl2 solution at 300 C, anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) was formed on the surface, indicating the replacement of Sr with Ca through isomorphous substitution. In the case of MgCl2 solution, a thick precipitated layer of clinochlore (Mg5Al(Si3Al)O10(OH)8) built up on the outermost surface. This layer serves to depress the migration of Sr, resulting in the deposition of SrCl2 salts in the altered layer

  19. Influence of sodium silicate concentration on structural and tribological properties of microarc oxidation coatings on 2017A aluminum alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polat, Aytekin, E-mail: apolat@nigde.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nigde University, Nigde 51100 (Turkey); Makaraci, Murat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kocaeli University, Kocaeli (Turkey); Usta, Metin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2010-08-20

    In this paper, thick and hard oxide coatings resistant to wear were produced on 2017A-T6 Al alloy by the microarc oxidation (MAO) technique in an alkali electrolyte consisting of different sodium silicate concentrations (0-8 g/l). The coatings were characterized by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and surface profilometry. Microhardness, scratch adhesion and pin-on-disk sliding wear tests were also performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. The influence of sodium silicate concentration on the structural and tribological properties of the MAO coatings was discussed. Results reveal that increasing sodium silicate concentration from 0 to 8 g/l in the electrolyte caused an increase in the electrolyte conductivity (from 7.71 to 18.1 mS/cm) and a decrease in positive final voltage (from 627 to 590 V) in the MAO process. In response to the increase in sodium silicate concentration, the thickness, surface roughness (R{sub a}) and critical load (L{sub c}) corresponding to adhesive failure of the coatings were increased simultaneously from 74 to 144 {mu}m, and 4.4 to 6.58 {mu}m, and 127.76 to 198.54 N, respectively. At the same time, the phase structure and composition of the coatings also varied by the participation of silicate ions in the reactions and their incorporation into the coating structure. Moreover, it was observed that the coating formed in the low sodium silicate concentration (4 g/l) had higher surface hardness (2020 HV) and improved wear resistance than the one (1800 HV) formed in the high sodium silicate concentration (8 g/l). The coatings produced in three different electrolytic solutions provided an excellent wear resistance and a load carrying capacity compared to the uncoated aluminum alloy.

  20. Quaternary polymethacrylate-magnesium aluminum silicate films: Water uptake kinetics and film permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongthong, Thitiphorn; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul; Siepmann, Florence; Siepmann, Juergen; Pongjanyakul, Thaned

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the addition of different amounts of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) to polymeric films based on quaternary polymethacrylates (QPMs, here Eudragit RS and RL). MAS contains negatively charged SiO(-) groups, while QPM contains positively charged quaternary ammonium groups. The basic idea is to be able to provide desired water and drug permeability by simply varying the amount of added MAS. Thin, free films of varying composition were prepared by casting and exposed to 0.1M HCl and pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. The water uptake kinetics and water vapor permeability of the systems were determined gravimetrically. The transport of propranolol HCl, acetaminophen, methyl-, ethyl- and propylparaben across thin films was studied using side-by-side diffusion cells. A numerical solution of Fick's second law of diffusion was applied to determine the apparent compound diffusion coefficients, partition coefficients between the bulk fluids and the films as well as the apparent film permeability for these compounds. The addition of MAS resulted in denser inner film structures, at least partially due to ionic interactions between the positively charged quaternary ammonium groups and the negatively charged SiO(-) groups. This resulted in lower water uptake, reduced water vapor permeability and decreasing apparent compound diffusivities. In contrast, the affinity of the investigated drugs and parabens to the films substantially increased upon MAS addition. The obtained new knowledge can be helpful for the development of novel coating materials (based on QPM-MAS blends) for controlled-release dosage forms. PMID:26004005

  1. Oxide and proton conductivity in aluminum-doped tricalcium oxy-silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras-Vazquez, J.M.; De la Torre, A.G.; Losilla, E.R.; Aranda, M.A.G. [Dept. Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, Campus Teatinos, 29071-Malaga (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Aluminum doping in tricalcium silicate, Ca{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4})O, has been studied by high-resolution laboratory X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. Two nominal series have been designed and studied. Oxygen-fixed Ca{sub 3-x/2}Al{sub x/2}(Si{sub 1-x/2}Al{sub x/2}O{sub 4})O series has been prepared as single-phase up to x = 0.03. However, oxygen-variable Ca{sub 3}(Si{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O{sub 4})O{sub 1-x/2}{open_square}{sub x/2} series has not been stabilized for any composition. The samples show oxide anion conductivity with a small p-type electronic contribution under oxidizing conditions. Typical total conductivities for these solids are 10{sup -} {sup 5}-10{sup -} {sup 4}S cm{sup -} {sup 1} at 1100 K. The oxide ion transference numbers are very high, {proportional_to} 0.98, under reducing conditions, i.e. dry 5%H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}/air gradient. The oxide ion transference numbers are slightly lower, {proportional_to} 0.91 under oxidizing conditions, i.e. dry O{sub 2}/air gradient. These compounds display a very important proton contribution to the overall conductivities under humidified atmospheres. The proton transference number ranges between 0.72 and 0.55 at 873 and 1023 K, respectively. (author)

  2. Characterization and corrosion resistance of organically modified silicate-NiZn ferrite/polyaniline hybrid coatings on aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.H. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: khwu@ccit.edu.tw; Chao, C.M. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.H. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China); Chang, T.C. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China)

    2007-07-15

    Hybrid coatings based on organically modified silicate (Ormosil)-NiZn ferrite/polyaniline (10-30 wt.%) were synthesized through a sol-gel technique. Tetraethylenepentamine, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, tetraethoxysilane and Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/polyaniline were used as precursors for the hybrid coatings. These hybrid films were deposited via spin coating onto an aluminum alloy to improve the corrosion protection. The effects induced by the NiZn ferrite/polyaniline content on the chain dynamics, ferromagnetic behavior and corrosion performances of the coated samples were investigated. The rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times and scale of the spin-diffusion path length indicated that the configuration of the hybrid films was highly cross-linked, dense and adhered to the aluminum alloy substrates. The magnetic properties of the resulting hybrids showed super-paramagnetic behavior, such as zero coercive force (coercivity 0 G) and a low blocking temperatures (45 K). Potentio-dynamic and salt-spray analysis revealed that the hybrid films provided an exceptional barrier and corrosion protection in comparison with untreated aluminum alloy substrates.

  3. Characterization and corrosion resistance of organically modified silicate-NiZn ferrite/polyaniline hybrid coatings on aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid coatings based on organically modified silicate (Ormosil)-NiZn ferrite/polyaniline (10-30 wt.%) were synthesized through a sol-gel technique. Tetraethylenepentamine, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, tetraethoxysilane and Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4/polyaniline were used as precursors for the hybrid coatings. These hybrid films were deposited via spin coating onto an aluminum alloy to improve the corrosion protection. The effects induced by the NiZn ferrite/polyaniline content on the chain dynamics, ferromagnetic behavior and corrosion performances of the coated samples were investigated. The rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times and scale of the spin-diffusion path length indicated that the configuration of the hybrid films was highly cross-linked, dense and adhered to the aluminum alloy substrates. The magnetic properties of the resulting hybrids showed super-paramagnetic behavior, such as zero coercive force (coercivity 0 G) and a low blocking temperatures (45 K). Potentio-dynamic and salt-spray analysis revealed that the hybrid films provided an exceptional barrier and corrosion protection in comparison with untreated aluminum alloy substrates

  4. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2016-03-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to ameliorate soil acidity in rice-cropped soil. The secondary objective was to study the effects of calcium silicate amendment on soil acidity, exchangeable Al, exchangeable Ca, and Si content. The soil was treated with 0, 1, 2, and 3 Mg ha-1 of calcium silicate under submerged conditions and the soil treatments were sampled every 30 days throughout an incubation period of 120 days. Application of calcium silicate induced a positive effect on soil pH and exchangeable Al; soil pH increased from 2.9 (initial) to 3.5, while exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 (initial) to 0.82 cmolc kg-1. Furthermore, the exchangeable Ca and Si contents increased from 1.68 (initial) to 4.94 cmolc kg-1 and from 21.21 (initial) to 81.71 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it was noted that calcium silicate was effective at alleviating Al toxicity in acid sulfate, rice-cropped soil, yielding values below the critical level of 2 cmolc kg-1. In addition, application of calcium silicate showed an ameliorative effect as it increased soil pH and supplied substantial amounts of Ca and Si.

  5. Organosilane self-assembled layers (SAMs) and hybrid silicate magnesium-rich primers for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloy 2024 T3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duhua

    Although current chromate coatings function very well in corrosion protection for aircraft alloys, such as aluminum alloy 2024 T3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is planning to totally ban the use of chromates as coating materials in the next decade or so because of their extremely toxic effect. For this purpose, both self-assembled layers and silicate magnesium-rich primers were tested to provide the corrosion protection for aluminum alloy. The long-term goal of this research is to develop a coating system to replace the current chromate coating for aircraft corrosion protection. Aluminum alloy 2024 T3 substrates were modified with self-assembled monolayer or multilayer thin films from different alkylsilane compounds. Mono-functional silanes, such as octadecyltrichlorosilane (C18SiCl3), can form a mixed hydrophobic monolayer or multilayer thin film on the aluminum oxide surface to provide a barrier to water and other electrolytes, so the corrosion resistance of the SAMs modified surface was increased significantly. On the other hand, the bi-functional silane self-assembly could attach the aluminum surface through the silicon headgroup while using its functional tailgroup to chemically bond the polymer coating, thus improving the adhesion between the aluminum substrate and coating substantially, and seems to contribute more to corrosion protection of aluminum substrate. Organosilanes were also combined with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in propel ratios to form a sol-gel binder to make silicate magnesium-rich primers. Analogue to the inorganic zinc-rich coatings, the silicate magnesium-rich primers also showed excellent adhesion and solvent resistance. The sacrificial magnesium pigments and the chemically inert silicate binder both contribute to the anti-corrosion properties. Future studies will be focused on the formula optimization for better toughness, chemical resistance and anticorrosion performance.

  6. Calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate "cement" phases and rare Ca-zeolite association at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppa, F.; Scordari, F.; Mesto, E.; Sharygin, V.; Bortolozzi, G.

    2010-06-01

    Very high temperature, Ca-rich alkaline magma intruded an argillite formation at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy, producing cordierite-tridymite metamorphism in the country rocks. An intense Ba-rich sulphate-carbonate-alkaline hydrothermal plume produced a zone of mineralization several meters thick around the igneous body. Reaction of hydrothermal fluids with country rocks formed calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), i.e., tobermorite-afwillite-jennite; calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (CASH) — "cement" phases - i.e., thaumasite, strätlingite and an ettringite-like phase and several different species of zeolites: chabazite-Ca, willhendersonite, gismon-dine, three phases bearing Ca with the same or perhaps lower symmetry of phillipsite-Ca, levyne-Ca and the Ca-rich analogue of merlinoite. In addition, apophyllite-(KF) and/or apophyllite-(KOH), Ca-Ba-carbonates, portlandite and sulphates were present. A new polymorph from the pyrrhotite group, containing three layers of sphalerite-type structure in the unit cell, is reported for the first time. Such a complex association is unique. Most of these minerals are specifically related to hydration processes of: (1) pyrometamorphic metacarbonate/metapelitic rocks (natural analogues of cement clinkers); (2) mineralization between intrusive stocks and slates; and (3) high-calcium, alkaline igneous rocks such as melilitites and foidites as well as carbonatites. The Colle Fabbri outcrop offers an opportunity to study in situ complex crystalline overgrowth and specific crystal chemistry in mineral phases formed in igneous to hydrothermal conditions.

  7. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2016-01-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the ma...

  8. Structural incorporation of titanium and/or aluminum in layered silicate magadiite through direct syntheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesized inorganic layered magadiite containing structurally incorporated titanium and aluminum was obtained through hydrothermal procedures. The effects associated with reaction time and amount of metal used in the crystallization process yielded mostly pure and crystalline samples with 1.0% of aluminum after 36 h at 423 K. Amounts up to 4.0 and 2.0% for aluminum and titanium were successfully incorporated in the magadiite structure without co-crystallization of other phases. A higher amount of metal source or longer crystallization times led to formation of crystobalite and trydimite phases, detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopies. Metal incorporation slightly improved the thermal resistance of the precursor layered magadiite. Replacement of both atoms in the silicon network was examined by spectroscopy analysis. The changes in tetrahedral-oxygen-tetrahedral structural shape vibrations caused the appearance of the Ti–O–Si band at 960 cm−1. Nuclear magnetic resonance in the solid state demonstrated tandem octahedral and tetrahedral aluminum sites. Another structural feature related to titanium incorporation was observed through diffuse reflectance with UV–Vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, which distinguish crystalline and amorphous TiO2 and titanium incorporated into the silica network. Metal quantification by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was also followed with multivariate analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS). The PCA methodology procedure clearly gives information to separate sample groups, in agreement with XRD results, which becomes a valuable feature obtained for the first time for these kinds of materials. Highlights: ► Well-crystallized magadiite containing structural aluminum and titanium were hydrothermically synthesized. ► Systematical studies on crystallization times and metal amount. ► Use of multivariate analyses

  9. Interstitial Oxide Ion Distribution and Transport Mechanism in Aluminum-Doped Neodymium Silicate Apatite Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Tao; Baikie, Tom; Orera, Alodia; Piltz, Ross O; Meven, Martin; Slater, Peter R; Wei, Jun; Sanjuán, María L; White, T J

    2016-04-01

    Rare earth silicate apatites are one-dimensional channel structures that show potential as electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) due to their high ionic conductivity at intermediate temperatures (500-700 °C). This advantageous property can be attributed to the presence of both interstitial oxygen and cation vacancies, that create diffusion paths which computational studies suggest are less tortuous and have lower activation energies for migration than in stoichiometric compounds. In this work, neutron diffraction of Nd(28+x)/3AlxSi6-xO26 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5) single crystals identified the locations of oxygen interstitials, and allowed the deduction of a dual-path conduction mechanism that is a natural extension of the single-path sinusoidal channel trajectory arrived at through computation. This discovery provides the most thorough understanding of the O(2-) transport mechanism along the channels to date, clarifies the mode of interchannel motion, and presents a complete picture of O(2-) percolation through apatite. Previously reported crystallographic and conductivity measurements are re-examined in the light of these new findings. PMID:27015162

  10. Studies on hollow spherical aluminum silicate cluster. Synthesis of environment friendly materials; Chuku kyujo aluminium keisan`en cluster ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, F.; Maeda, M.; Suzuki, M.; Watamura, S. [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya,Nagoya (Japan)

    1999-01-25

    Synthesis of microfine particles of nanometer size, their surface adulteration and control of microstructure take an important position in different areas, such as electronics, chemical, machine and metal industries. However, reports on the established methods for synthesizing hollow spherical particles of nanometer size, which may be applied to micro capsules, cannot be found except for fullerene composed of carbon. This paper introduces a new method for synthesizing hollow spherical amorphous aluminum silicate cluster called allophane as an earth environmental material, and the derived properties of allophane. (translated by NEDO)

  11. Multi-channel transition emissions of Sm3+ in lithium yttrium aluminum silicate glasses and derived opalescent glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Multi-channel transitions of Sm3+ in aluminosilicate glasses are investigated. • Judd–Ofelt parameters are derived to be 4.12 × 10−20, 4.26 × 10−20 and 2.11 × 10−20 cm2. • Cross-section profiles σem for visible and NIR emissions are calculated by FL formula. • 44.9% internal quantum efficiency and 11.58% external quantum yield are exposed. • Orientational crystallization was observed after the heat-treatment testing. -- Abstract: Sm3+-doped lithium–yttrium–aluminum-silicate (LYAS) glasses have been fabricated and effective visible and near-infrared (NIR) emissions are exhibited. The predicated spontaneous emission probabilities (Arad) are derived to be 29.1, 149.2, 150.1 and 39.0 s−1 for conventional visible emissions assigned to 4G5/2 → 6HJ (J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2) transitions, and Arad are obtained to be 24.8, 4.6 and 2.7 s−1 for the optical transitions 4G5/2 → 6FJ (J = 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2) corresponding to the NIR emissions, respectively. The maximum stimulated emission cross-sections (σem) are obtained to be 7.45 × 10−22 and 0.48 × 10−22 cm2 for visible (4G5/2 → 6H9/2) and NIR (4G5/2 → 6F9/2) emissions, respectively. Internal quantum efficiency for the 4G5/2 level and external quantum yield for visible emissions of Sm3+ are determined to be 44.9% and 11.58%, respectively. High temperature heat treatment testing was carried out on the LYAS glasses and orientational crystallization was observed. Visible transition emissions of Sm3+ with obvious Stark splitting indicate Sm3+ ions have been introduced into the YAG micro-crystal formed in the glass ceramics. Investigations on multi-channel radiative transition emissions of Sm3+ in LYAS glasses provide a new clue to develop tunable lasers, compact light sources and optoelectronic devices

  12. Aluminum Silicate Nanotube Modification of Cotton-Like Siloxane-poly(L-lactic acid-vaterite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiheon Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier work, a cotton-like biodegradable composite, consisting of poly(L-lactic acid with siloxane-containing vaterite, has been prepared by electrospinning. In the present work, the fibers skeleton of the cotton-like composites was modified successfully with imogolite, which is hydrophilic and biocompatible, via a dip process using ethanol diluted solution to improve the cellular initial attachment. Almost no change in the fiber morphology after the surface modification was observed. The surface-modified composite showed the similar calcium and silicate ions releasabilities, for activating the osteoblasts, as an unmodified one. Cell culture tests showed that the initial adhesion of murine osteoblast-like cells on the surface of the fibers was enhanced by surface modification.

  13. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Ae [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Abo-Mosallam, Hany A. [Glass Research Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Young [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyu-Ri [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae-Won [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae-Hyoung, E-mail: haelee@dku.edu [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-CaO-ZnO-MgO{sub (1-X)}-SrO{sub X}-CaF{sub 2} (X = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X = 0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X = 0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues. - Highlights: • We developed multicomponent glass compositions for a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement (GIC). • The effects of MgO replacement with SrO in the glasses on the mechanical properties and cell proliferation were evaluated. • Substitution of MgO with SrO at low levels led to improvement of mechanical properties and cell viability of the cements. • Microstructural degradations in the cement matrix of the GICs with strontium at high levels were observed after aging.

  14. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO2-P2O5-CaO-ZnO-MgO(1-X)-SrOX-CaF2 (X = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X = 0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X = 0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues. - Highlights: • We developed multicomponent glass compositions for a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement (GIC). • The effects of MgO replacement with SrO in the glasses on the mechanical properties and cell proliferation were evaluated. • Substitution of MgO with SrO at low levels led to improvement of mechanical properties and cell viability of the cements. • Microstructural degradations in the cement matrix of the GICs with strontium at high levels were observed after aging

  15. 稻壳灰制备聚硅酸硫酸铝絮凝剂及其结构性能%Preparation of poly aluminum silicate sulfate flocculant from rice husk ash and its structure performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周颖; 刘龙; 李哲; 宋蔺娜; 武文洁

    2014-01-01

    为了进一步充分利用稻壳灰中的硅和碳,该文提出由稻壳灰制备水玻璃并进一步制备聚硅酸硫酸铝(poly aluminum silicate sulfate,PASS)絮凝剂,对PASS进行结构表征,并考察了PASS处理有机废水的絮凝效果。结果表明,由稻壳灰制备水玻璃,可通过碱处理稻壳灰获得模数为3.3的水玻璃并联产活性炭;再由上述水玻璃制备PASS。通过考察二氧化硅质量分数、铝硅摩尔比、pH 值对其絮凝性能的影响,得到较佳工艺条件:二氧化硅质量分数7%,铝硅摩尔比1∶2,pH值为2.0,此条件下投量(以Al2O3计)60 mg/L时有机废水(油墨废水)的除浊率和脱色率分别为97.29%、94.26%,相同投量下处理有机废水(油墨废水和油脂废水),PASS的除浊率和脱色率高于聚合氯化铝(poly aluminum chloride)10%~20%左右;X射线衍射(x-ray diffraction)、傅里叶红外光谱(Fourier transform infrared spectrometer)的结构分析表明PASS是由硅和铝组成的无定型聚合物。研究结果为稻壳灰资源的应用开辟一条新途径,为絮凝剂的原料来源提供参考。%Rice husk ash was a kind of resource, but it was often wasted. In order to better use rice husk ash, the process of poly-generation of sodium silicate and activated carbon from rice husk ash, and the further production of poly aluminum silicate sulfate (PASS)from sodium silicate were reported in this paper. In addition, the flocculation performance of PASS for the treatment of organic waste water was investigated, and the structure of PASS was also characterized with several different analysis methods. As is well known, the ash-alkali ratio has a significant influence on the modulus of sodium silicate and methylene blue adsorption value of activated carbon in the process of poly-generation of sodium silicate and activated carbon from rice husk. In this paper, the reaction of rice husk ash and sodium hydroxide

  16. Lack of Evidence of In-Situ Decay of Aluminum-26 in a FeO-Poor Ferromagnesian Crystalline Silicate Particle, Pyxie, from Comet Wild 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, D.; Ushikubo, T.; Weisberg, M. K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ebel, D. S.; Kita, N. T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the important discoveries from the Stardust mission is the observation of crystalline silicate particles that resemble Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules in carbonaceous chondrites], which suggests radial transport of high temperature solids from the inner to the outer solar nebula regions and capture by accreting cometary objects. The Al-Mg isotope analyses of CAI-like and type II chondrule-like particles revealed no excess of Mg-26 derived from in-situ decay of Al-26 (Tau)(sub 1/2) = 0.705Myr; ), suggesting late formation of these particles. However, the number of Wild 2 particles analyzed for Al-Mg isotopes is still limited (n = 3). In order to better understand the timing of the formation of Wild 2 particles and possible radial transport in the protoplanetary disk, we performed SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer) Al-Mg isotope analyses of plagioclase in a FeO-poor ferromagnesian Wild 2 particle, which is the most abundant type among crystalline Wild 2 particles.

  17. Fractionation of residual Al in natural water treatment from reservoir with poly-aluminum-silicate-chloride (PASiC): Effect of OH/Al,Si/Al molar ratios and initial pH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonglian Yang; Baoyu Gao; Yan Wang; Yaqin Zhao; Qinyan Yue

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum fractionation study was conducted for a surface reservoir water treatment to understand the performance of polyaluminum-silicate-chloride (PASiC) in terms of the residual Al fractions as a function of initial pH.The coagulation performance expressed as turbidity and organic matter removal was established as supporting data.Some extra data were evaluated in terms of the residual Al ratio of the composite PASiC coagulant.The main residual Al sources were the Al fractions derived from the use of PASiC.The turbidity and organic matter removal ability was optimal at initial pH 6.00-7.00,while the concentrations of various residual Al species and the residual Al ratio of PASiC were minimal at an initial pH range of 7.00-8.00.Under the conditions of OH/Al molar ratio =2.00 and Si/Al molar ratio =0.05,PASiC had superior coagulation performance and comparatively low residual Al concentrations.The Al fraction in the composite PASiC coagulant seldom remained under such conditions.Experimental data also indicated that the suspended (filterable) Al fraction was the dominant species,and organic-bound or organo-Al complex Al was considered to be the major species of dissolved Al in water treated by PASiC coagulation.Additionally,the dissolved inorganic monomeric Al species dominated the dissolved monomeric Al fraction.

  18. 超声法制备聚硅酸硫酸铝及其混凝效能研究%STUDY ON PREPARATION OF POLY SILICATE ALUMINUM SULFATE BY ULTRASONIC METHOD AND ITS COAGULATION PERFORMANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周颖; 王东田

    2013-01-01

    采用超声法制备聚硅酸硫酸铝(PASS),对其混凝效能进行了研究,并与PAC混凝效能进行对比.结果表明,采用超声制得PASS的pH低于传统方法制得PASS的pH,但其混凝效能优于后者,且在高投加量时优于PAC;先0.2kW超声1.5 h再0.2 kW超声1.5 h制备的PASS,在其投加量(以A12O3计)为6.0 mg/L时,处理太湖水样沉后浊度为0.377 NTU、滤后CODMn为1.162 mg/L、滤后Al3-质量浓度为40 μg/L,此为PASS的优化超声制备条件.混凝机理主要为电中和与吸附架桥作用.%Poly Silicate Aluminum Sulfate (PASS) is a new type of inorganic high polymer coagulant.Compared with the conventional coagulants it has better coagulation performance.In this paper,PASS is prepared by ultrasonic method.Its coagulation performance is investigated and compared with the coagulation performance of PAC.The experimental results show that pH of PASS prepared by ultrasonic method is lower than that of the PASS prepared by conventional method.However,the coagulation performance is better than the latter and PAC.Tai Lake water samples are processed by the PASS,and the ultrasonic condition was first 0.2 kW for 1.5 h and then 0.2 kW for 1.5 h.This ultrasound condition is proved to be the best by following data.Precipitated turbidity of the Tai Lake water sample is 0.377 NTU,filtered CODMn is 1.162 mg/L,and filtered aluminum ion concentration is 40 μg/L.The coagulation mechanisms of PASS are the electricity neutralization and absorption bridge.

  19. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of Si/Ga Eni Carbon Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Bellussi; Angela Carati; Stefania Guidetti; Caterina Rizzo; Roberto Millini; Stefano Zanardi; Erica Montanari; Wallace O’Neil Parker Jr.; Michela Bellettato

    2015-01-01

    Phenylene-gallosilicates were prepared with the same crystalline structure as their aluminum ana-logues. The new Ga-Eni Carbon Silicates (Ga-ECS) phases were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and thermogravimetric analysis, which demonstrated that gallium isomorphously replaced aluminum in the framework of the organ-ic-inorganic hybrids similar to the case of classical zeolites. Hybrid ECS materials were obtained with different types of bridged silsesquioxane precursors that maintained the aluminum-silicate nature of the inorganic moiety. This work confirms a new level of crystal chemistry versatility for this class of materials, and demonstrates the possibility to tailor also the inorganic part of the framework by changing the nature of the trivalent heteroatom.

  1. Aluminum Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  2. SPM nanolithography of hydroxy-silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is becoming a crucial technique with applications ranging from molecular and cell biology to medicine. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is one of the most useful tools for nanopatterning of flat surfaces. However, these patterns are usually built on homogeneous surfaces and require chemical functionalization to ensure specific affinity. Layered magnesium–aluminum hydroxide–silicates have already shown unique self-assembly properties on DNA molecules, due to their peculiar crystal chemistry based on alternating positive and negative crystal layers. However, patterns on these surfaces tend to be randomly organized. Here we show etching and oxidation at the nanometer scale of magnesium–aluminum hydroxide–silicates using the same SPM probe for the creation of organized nanopatterns. In particular, it is possible to produce three-dimensional structures in a reproducible way, with a depth resolution of 0.4 nm, lateral resolution of tens of nm, and a speed of about 10 μm s−1. We report, as an example, the construction of an atomically flat charged pattern, designed to guide DNA deposition along predetermined directions without the need of any chemical functionalization of the surface. (paper)

  3. Tin-Containing Silicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolborg, Søren; Meier, Sebastian; Sádaba, I.;

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic glycolytic systems, capable of transforming glucose through a cascade of catalytic steps, can lead to efficient chemical processes utilising carbohydrates as feedstock. Tin-containing silicates, such as Sn-Beta, are showing potential for the production of lactates from sugars through a ...

  4. THE ALUMINA-SILICATES IN STABILIZATION PROCESSES IN FLUIDIZED-BED ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA PERNA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Presented study of coal fluidized-bed ash solidification was accompanied with specific studies of alumino-silicates residues in ashes. The specific technology of fluid coal burning and its relatively low temperature combustion combines coal burning and decomposition of calcium carbonate added to the fluid layer in the main endeavor to capture all sulfur oxides. The burning temperature seems be decisive to the behavior of clayed residues and calcium carbonate decomposition in connection for the future solidification of fluidized bed ash. The calcareous substances in combination with alumino-silicate residues form solid bodies where silicates play decisive role of long-term stability and insolubility of obtained solids. The position of aluminum ions in clayed residues of burned coal were studied by MAS-NMR with attention on aluminum ion coordination to oxygen and formation of roentgen amorphous phase of poly-condensed calcium alumina-silicate.

  5. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  6. The effect of inversion of matrix and inclusions composition in liquation phospho-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitarz, M

    2011-08-15

    Silico-phosphate glasses of XCaPO(4)-SiO(2) and XCaPO(4)-AlPO(4)-SiO(2) (X=Na(+) and/or K(+)) system have been the subject of the presented investigations. Glasses belonging to those systems are characterized by a liquation phenomenon-spherical amorphous inclusions dispersed in an amorphous matrix. Thorough EDX investigations have shown that introduction of aluminum ions into the structure of phospho-silicate glasses results in inversion of matrix and inclusions composition, when XCaPO(4) exceeds 25-35% mol. Such a substantial influence of aluminum ions on phospho-silicate glasses texture as well as matrix and inclusions composition (inversion) must be a result of structural changes. (27)Al MAS NMR research stated that aluminum ions in structures of XCaPO(4)-AlPO(4)-SiO(2) phospho-silicate glasses always acts as a glass-forming ion-i.e. aluminum always occupies fourfold coordinated sites. (23)Na and (31)P MAS NMR research has shown that the inversion of matrix and inclusions composition, brought about by introduction of aluminum ions into the structure of phospho-silicate glasses, is an outcome of a change in phosphorous and alkaline ions coordination. PMID:20864392

  7. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    OpenAIRE

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Robert J. Flatt; D'Espinose De Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measuremen...

  8. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  9. Aluminum Silicate System: Experimental Determination of the Triple Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P M

    1963-03-15

    The kyanite-sillimanite-andalusite triple point exists in the pressure-temperature plane at 8 +/- 0.5 kb and 300 +/- 50 degrees C. Reactions are accomplished experimentally with a Bridgman opposed-anvil press (with an external furnace), modified to provide shearing of the sample charges. All three equilibrium boundaries are proved by reversed reactions. PMID:17812984

  10. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  11. Low toxic corrosion inhibitors for aluminum in fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Combinations of chemical compounds that reportedly reduce the corrosion of aluminum in fresh water were evaluated. These included combinations of borates, nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, silicates, and mercaptobenzothiazole. Eight of fifty inhibitor combinations evaluated gave excellent corrosion protection and compared favorably with sodium chromate, which has generally been considered standard for many years.

  12. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  13. On the Anomalous Silicate Absorption Feature of the Prototypical Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of the silicate absorption feature in AGNs was made at 9.7 micrometer for the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 over 30 years ago, indicating the presence of a large column of silicate dust in the line-of-sight to the nucleus. It is now well recognized that type 2 AGNs exhibit prominent silicate absorption bands, while the silicate bands of type 1 AGNs appear in emission. More recently, using the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, Jaffe et al. (2004) by the first time spatially resolved the parsec-sized dust torus around NGC 1068 and found that the 10 micrometer silicate absorption feature of the innermost hot component exhibits an anomalous profile differing from that of the interstellar medium and that of common olivine-type silicate dust. While they ascribed the anomalous absorption profile to gehlenite (Ca_2Al_2SiO_7, a calcium aluminum silicate species), we propose a physical dust model and argue that, although the presence of gehl...

  14. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na2O-B2O3-SiO2-FeO and Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe3+/ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO4 species in the glass network whereas the BO3 and BO4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO3 and BO4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  15. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  16. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  17. Experimentally determined sulfur isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and implications for planetary differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; Shahar, A.; Le Losq, C.; Hillgren, V. J.; Mysen, B. O.; Farquhar, J.

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's mantle displays a subchondritic 34S/32S ratio. Sulfur is a moderately siderophile element (i.e. iron-loving), and its partitioning into the Earth's core may have left such a distinctive isotope composition on the terrestrial mantle. In order to constrain the sulfur isotope fractionation occurring during core-mantle differentiation, high-pressure and temperature experiments were conducted with synthetic mixtures of metal and silicate melts. With the purpose to identify the mechanism(s) responsible for the S isotope fractionations, we performed our experiments in different capsules - namely, graphite and boron nitride capsules - and thus at different fO2, with varying major element chemistry of the silicate and metal fractions. The S isotope fractionations Δ34Smetal-silicate of equilibrated metal alloys versus silicate melts is +0.2 ± 0.1‰ in a boron-free and aluminum-poor system quenched at 1-1.5 GPa and 1650 °C. The isotope fractionation increases linearly with increasing boron and aluminum content, up to +1.4 ± 0.2‰, and is observed to be independent of the silicon abundance as well as of the fO2 over ∼3.5 log units of variations explored here. The isotope fractionations are also independent of the graphite or nitride saturation of the metal. Only the melt structural changes associated with aluminum and boron concentration in silicate melts have been observed to affect the strength of sulfur bonding. These results establish that the structure of silicate melts has a direct influence on the S2- average bonding strengths. These results can be interpreted in the context of planetary differentiation. Indeed, the structural environments of silicate evolve strongly with pressure. For example, the aluminum, iron or silicon coordination numbers increase under the effect of pressure. Consequently, based on our observations, the sulfur-bonding environment is likely to be affected. In this scheme, we tentatively hypothesize that S isotope fractionations

  18. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  19. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...

  20. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  1. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate....

  2. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  3. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  4. Enhancement of cryptosporidium oocyst removal by coagulation and sedimentation with poly-silicate iron (PSI)

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Deevanhxay, Phengxay; Nishijima, Wataru; Hasegawa, Takako; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2006-01-01

    The improvement of Cryptosporidium oocysts removals is an urgent need in drinking water treatment and one of the possible solutions is to use high-performance coagulant such as poly-silicate iron coagulant (PSI) instead of conventional coagulants like poly aluminum chloride (PAC). The efficiency of synthetic Cryptosporidium oocysts (S-Crypto) removal using PSI was evaluated by both jar tests and pilot plant experiments. The residual concentration of S-Crypto could be reduced even though the c...

  5. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  6. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  7. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    OpenAIRE

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The me...

  8. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  9. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  10. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. → Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. → Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. → The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  11. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolucci, Stephen F., E-mail: stephen.bartolucci@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Benet Laboratories, Armaments Research Development and Engineering Center, Watervliet, NY 12189-4000 (United States); Paras, Joseph [U.S. Army Benet Laboratories, Armaments Research Development and Engineering Center, Watervliet, NY 12189-4000 (United States); Rafiee, Mohammad A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Rafiee, Javad [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, Sabrina; Kapoor, Deepak [U.S. Army Benet Laboratories, Armaments Research Development and Engineering Center, Watervliet, NY 12189-4000 (United States); Koratkar, Nikhil, E-mail: koratn@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. {yields} Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. {yields} Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. {yields} The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  12. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  13. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  14. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  15. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  16. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  17. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  18. Aluminum-dependent regulation of intracellular silicon in the aquatic invertebrate Lymnaea stagnalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouky, Mahmoud; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; McCrohan, Catherine R.; White, Keith N.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is essential for some plants, diatoms, and sponges but, in higher animals, its endogenous regulation has not been demonstrated. Silicate ions may be natural ligands for aluminum and here we show that, in the freshwater snail (Lymnaea stagnalis), intracellular silicon seems specifically up-regulated in response to sublethal aluminum exposure. X-ray microanalysis showed that exposure of snails to low levels of aluminum led to its accumulation in lysosomal granules, accompanied by marked up-regulation of silicon. Increased lysosomal levels of silicon were a specific response to aluminum because cadmium and zinc had no such effect. Furthermore, intra-lysosomal sulfur from metallothionein and other sulfur-containing ligands was increased after exposure to cadmium and zinc but not aluminum. To ensure that these findings indicated a specific in vivo response, and not ex vivo formation of hydroxy-aluminosilicates (HAS) from added aluminum (555 μg/liter) and water-borne silicon (43 μg/liter), two further studies were undertaken. In a ligand competition assay the lability of aluminum (527 μg/liter) was completely unaffected by the presence of silicon (46 μg/liter), suggesting the absence of HAS. In addition, exogenous silicon (6.5 mg/liter), added to the water column to promote formation of HAS, caused a decrease in lysosomal aluminum accumulation, showing that uptake of HAS would not explain the loading of aluminum into lysosomal granules. These findings, and arguments on the stability, lability, and kinetics of aluminum–silicate interactions, suggest that a silicon-specific mechanism exists for the in vivo detoxification of aluminum, which provides regulatory evidence of silicon in a multicellular organism. PMID:11891333

  19. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    OpenAIRE

    Lidsky, Theodore I.

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed w...

  20. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  1. The aluminum smelting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  2. Aluminum deoxidation equilibria and inclusion modification mechanism by calcium treatment of stainless steel melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic equilibrium between aluminum and oxygen along with the inclusion morphology in Fe-16%Cr stainless steel was investigated to understand the fundamentals of aluminum deoxidation technology for ferritic stainless steels. Further, the effects of calcium addition on the changes in chemistry and morphology of inclusions were discussed. The measured results for aluminum-oxygen equilibria exhibit relatively good agreement with the calculated values, indicating that the introduction of the first- and second-order interaction parameters, recently reported, is reasonable to numerically express aluminum deoxidation equilibrium in a ferritic stainless steel. In the composition of dissolved aluminum content greater than about 60 ppm, pure alumina particles were observed, while the alumino-manganese silicates containing Cr2O3 were appeared at less than 20 mass ppm of dissolved aluminum. The formation of calcium aluminate inclusions after Ca treatment could be discussed based on the thermodynamic equilibrium with calcium, aluminum, and oxygen in the steel melts. In the composition of steel melt with relatively high content of calcium and low aluminum, the log(XCaO/XAl2O3) of inclusions linearly increases with increasing the log [aCa/aAl2·aO2] with the slope close to unity. However, the slope of the line is significantly lower than the expected value in the composition of steel melt with relatively low calcium and high aluminum contents

  3. Transport properties of silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Huaiwei; Hui, Hejiu; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2015-09-01

    A quantitative description of the transport properties, diffusivity, viscosity, electrical, and thermal conductivity, of silicate melts is essential for understanding melting-related petrologic and geodynamic processes. We here provide a systematic overview on the current knowledge of these properties from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, their dependence on pressure, temperature, and composition, atomistic processes underlying them, and physical models to describe their variations. We further establish phenomenological and physical links between diffusivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity that are based on structural rearrangement in the melt. Neutral molecules and network-modifying cations with low electric field strength display intrinsic diffusivity, which is controlled by the intrinsic properties (size and valence) of the species. By contrast, oxygen and network formers with high field strength show extrinsic diffusivity, which is more sensitive to extrinsic parameters including temperature (T), pressure (P), and melt composition (X). Similar T-P-X dependence of diffusivity and electrical conductivity and their quantitative relation reveal the role of intrinsically diffusing species in electrical transport, while viscosity is tied to the extrinsically diffusing species in a similar way. However, the differences in the structural role and mobility of various atomic species diminish with increasing temperature and/or pressure: all transport processes are increasingly coupled, eventually converging to a uniform rate and mechanism. Accurate comprehension of interatomic interactions and melt structure is vital to fully accounting for the compositional dependence of transport properties, and simple polymerization parameters such as nonbridging oxygen per tetrahedrally coordinated cation are inadequate.

  4. Magnetic properties of sheet silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susceptibility, magnetisation and Moessbauer measurements are reported for a representative selection of 2:1 layer phyllosilicates. Eight samples from the mica, vermiculite and smectite groups include examples diluted in iron which are paramagnetic at all temperatures, as well as iron-rich silicates which order magnetically below 10 K. Anisotropic susceptibility of crystals of muscovite, biotite and vermiculite is quantitatively explained with a model where the Fe2+ ions lie in sites of effective trigonal symmetry, the trigonal axis lying normal to the sheets. The ferrous ground state is an orbital singlet. Ferric iron gives an isotropic contribution to the susceptibility. Fe2+-Fe2+ exchange interactions are ferromagnetic with Gapprox. equal to2 K, whereas Fe3+-Fe3+ coupling is antiferromagnetic in the purely ferric minerals. A positive paramagnetic Curie temperature for glauconite may be attributable to Fe2+ → Fe3+ charge transfer. Magnetic order was found to set in inhomogeneously for glauconite at 1-7 K. One biotite sample showed an antiferromagnetic transition at Tsub(N) = 7 K marked by a well-defined susceptibility maximum. Its magnetic structure, consisting of ferromagnetic sheets with moments in their planes coupled antiferromagnetically by other, weak interactions, resembles that found earlier for the 1:1 mineral greenalite. (orig.)

  5. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  6. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  7. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  8. Geo-neutrinos and Silicate Earth Enrichment

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The terrestrial distribution of U, Th, and K abundances governs the thermal evolution, traces the differentiation, and reflects the bulk composition of the earth. Comparing the bulk earth composition to chondritic meteorites estimates the net amounts of these radiogenic heat-producing elements available for partitioning to the crust, mantle, and core. Core formation enriches the abundances of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by ~1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to ~2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from the ratio of K to U. Variable enrichment produces a range of possible heat-producing element abundances in the silicate earth. A model assesses the essentially fixed amounts of U, Th, and K in the approximately closed crust reservoir. Subtracting these sequestered crustal amounts from the variable amounts in the silicate earth results in a range of possible mantle allocations, leaving global dynamics and therm...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  10. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  11. Burning characteristics of individual aluminum/aluminum oxide particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ruttenberg, Eric C.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited An experimental investigation was conducted in which the burning characteristics of individual aluminum/aluminum oxide particles were measured using a windowed combustion bomb at atmospheric pressure and under gravity-fall conditions. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to measure the size distribution of the initial aluminum particles and the aluminum oxide residue. Analysis of the residue indicated that the mass of aluminum...

  12. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  13. Zinc-rich coatings for aluminum in seawater. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouillette, C.V.

    1973-08-01

    Aluminum 6061-T6 coated test panels were prepared for exposure in the harbor water at Port Hueneme, California. Surface preparation of most of the panels was by a light sandblast before application of selected coatings; but one series was merely washed clean with water and then with mineral spirits, and another was treated with Alodine 1200S before the coatings were applied. Zinc-rich primers of various types were used, top-coated with epoxy vinyl or coal-tar epoxy systems. After three years of exposure coatings over the Alodine 1200S gave good to excellent protection comparable to that over the zinc inorganic silicates. The topcoated zinc-rich organic primers were slightly inferior to the zinc inorganic silicates. Several coating systems gave excellent protection during the three years of harbor exposure and indicated a protective potential for several years more. (Author)

  14. Spectral studies on the interaction of acetylacetone with aluminum-containing MCM-41 mesoporous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) was used to study the interaction of acetylacetone (acac) with the mesoporous aluminum-containing MCM-41 materials. A room temperature synthesis method was used for preparation of purely siliceous MCM-41 and for aluminum-containing MCM-41 materials. Samples with Si/Al ratios of 50, 20, 10 and 5 were synthesized. The synthesized mesoporous materials possess highly ordered structure and high surface area as evidenced from X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption measurements, respectively. The treatment of the as-synthesized aluminum-containing MCM-41 samples with acac shows a distinct band at ∼290 nm. This band is assigned to six coordinated aluminum atoms in the structure which is produced by diffusion of acac molecules through surfactant micelles and their interaction with aluminum atoms. The 290-nm band disappears upon several successive washing of the sample with ethanol. The treatment of the calcined aluminum-containing MCM-41 sample with acac produces the same 290-nm band where its intensity increases with the aluminum content of the sample. The intensity of this band is reduced upon successive ethanol washing, but remains nearly constant after three times washing. This irremovable aluminum species can be assigned to framework aluminum. The measured acidity for our aluminum-containing MCM-41 samples correlates linearly with the intensity of 290-nm band for the ethanol treated samples. This supports the idea that the Bronsted acidity in aluminum-modified MCM-41 samples is a function of the amount of tetrahedral framework aluminum in the structure

  15. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  16. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  17. Wear and chemistry of zirconium-silicate, aluminium-silicate and zirconium-aluminium-silicate glasses in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the chemical durability, in alkaline solutions, of zirconium silicate, aluminium silicate, zirconium/aluminium silicate glasses as a function of glass composition is carried out. The glasses were tested using standard DIN-52322 method, where the glass samples are prepared in small polished pieces and attacked for 3 hours in a 800 ml solution of 1N (NaOH + NA2CO3) at 970C. The results show that the presence of ZrO2 in the glass composition increases its chemical durability to alkaline attack. Glasses of the aluminium/zirconium silicate series were melted with and without TiO2. It was shown experimentally that for this series of glasses, the presence of both TiO2 and ZrO2 gave better chemical durability results. However, the best overall results were obtained from the simpler zirconium silicate glasses, where it was possible to make glasses with higher values of ZrO2. (Author)

  18. Comparison of Conventional and Microwave-assisted Synthesis and Characteristics of Aluminum-pillared Rectorite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Dongyun; ZHAO Xiaorong; LU Xiaohua

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of aluminum-pillared rectorite were studied. The synthesis was conducted with both conventional heating and microwave irradiation. Microwave irradiation was found to enhance the intercalation and ion-exchange during synthesis, and to be able to produce the rectorite with a larger d001 and a better uniformity. The specific surface area is 180 m2/g and basal spacing is 3.2 nm. The texture change and thermal and hydrothermal stability of cross-linked rectorite were examined using XRD, FTIR, nitrogen-adsorption and TGA. The experimental results show that the aluminum-pillared rectorite, after calcined at 800 ℃ for 3 hours, can keep the basal aluminum-silicate texture and would not disperse in water at room or an elevated temperature. The aluminum-pillared rectorite shows a high specific surface area, good thermal and hydrothermal stability, and is promising in applications as catalyst carriers and adsorbents for waste treatment.

  19. Fabrication of aluminum foam from aluminum scrap Hamza

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Osman1 ,; Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Engineering- Qena, Al_Azhar University, Egypt

    2015-01-01

    In this study the optimum parameters affecting the preparation of aluminum foam from recycled aluminum were studied, these parameters are: temperature, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as foaming agent, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as thickening agent, and stirring time. The results show that, the optimum parameters are the temperature ranged from 800 to 850oC, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 5%, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 3% and stirring time was 45 second ...

  20. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  1. Fabrication of aluminum foam from aluminum scrap Hamza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Osman1 ,

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the optimum parameters affecting the preparation of aluminum foam from recycled aluminum were studied, these parameters are: temperature, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as foaming agent, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as thickening agent, and stirring time. The results show that, the optimum parameters are the temperature ranged from 800 to 850oC, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 5%, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 3% and stirring time was 45 second with stirring speed 1200 rpm. The produced foam apparent densities ranged from 0.40-0.60 g/cm3. The microstructure of aluminum foam was examined by using SEM, EDX and XRD, the results show that, the aluminum pores were uniformly distributed along the all matrices and the cell walls covered by thin oxide film.

  2. ALUMINUM RECLAMATION BY ACIDIC EXTRACTION OF ALUMINUM-ANODIZING SLUDGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extraction of aluminum-anodizing sludges with sulfuric acid was examined to determine the potential for production of commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, that is liquid alum. The research established kinetic and stoichiometric relationships and evaluates product qu...

  3. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-03-01

    II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  4. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  5. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  6. Dielectric properties of plasma sprayed silicates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Neufuss, Karel; Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel

    -, č. 31 (2005), s. 315-321. ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Optical microscopy * electric al properties * silicates * insulators * plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2005

  7. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  8. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium...

  9. Dysprosium (III)-doped novel silicate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stara-Janakova, S.; Spirková, J.; Míka, M.; Oswald, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2009), s. 79-84. ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : dysprosium silicate glass Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.728, year: 2009 www.elsevier.com/locate/optmat

  10. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    OpenAIRE

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ; TEREZA BĚLOUBKOVÁ; ZUZANA MIZEROVÁ; LUDVÍK ŠANDA; ZUZANA CÍLOVÁ; MARKÉTA ČASTORÁLOVÁ; ALEŠ HELEBRANT

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings cont...

  11. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Katarina Simon; Davorin Matanović

    2004-01-01

    The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact ...

  12. RECLAMATION OF ALUMINUM FINISHING SLUDGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research study of the reclamation of aluminum-anodizing sludges was conducted in two sequential phases focused on enhanced dewatering of aluminum-anodizing sludges to produce commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, i.e., liquid alum. The use of high-pressure (14 to...

  13. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  14. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  15. The fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic (NOTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUSANKA KITIC

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The content and composition of fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic were analized by GC. It was found that unsaturated acids prevailed and that the major components were palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The hydrocarbon fractions of pentane extracts were shown to consist of the alkane homologues (C17 to C34 with nonacosane and hentriacontane being prevailing compounds.

  16. Study on Microstructure and Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of PEO Coatings Formed on Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, N.; Song, R. G.; Li, H.; Wang, C.; Mao, Q. Z.; Xiong, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated 6063 aluminum alloy was applied in a silicate- and borate-based alkaline solution. The microstructure and electrochemical corrosion behavior were studied by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The results showed that the silicate-based PEO coating was of a denser structure compared with that of borate-based PEO coating. In addition, the silicate-based PEO coating was composed of more phased (Al9Si) than borate-based PEO coating. The results of corrosion test indicated that the silicate-based PEO coating provided a superior protection to 6063 aluminum alloy substrate, while borate-based PEO coating with a porous structure showed an inferior conservancy against corrosive electrolyte. Furthermore, the EIS tests proved that both coatings were capable to resist the aggressive erosion in 0.5 M NaCl solution after 72 h of immersion. However, the borate-based PEO coating could not provide sufficient protection to the substrate after 72-h immersion in 1 M NaCl solution.

  17. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  18. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  19. Hot pressing aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment was performed on the hot pressing of aluminum nitride, using three kinds of powder which are: a) made by electric arc method, b) made by nitrifying aluminum metal powder, and c) made from alumina and carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. The content of oxygen of these powders was analyzed by activation analysis using high energy neutron irradiation. The density of hot pressed samples was classified into two groups. The high density group contained oxygen more than 3 wt. %, and the low density group contained about 0.5 wt %. Typical density vs. temperature curves have a bending point near 1,5500C, and the sample contains iron impurity of 0.5 wt. %. Needle crystals were found to grow near 1,5500C by VLS mechanism, and molten iron acts a main part of mechanism as a liquid phase. According to the above-mentioned curve, the iron impurity in aluminum nitride prevents densification. The iron impurity accelerates crystal growth. Advance of densification may be expected by adding iron impurity, but in real case, the densification is delayed. Densification and crystal growth are greatly accelerated by oxygen impurity. In conclusion, more efforts must be made for the purification of aluminum nitride. In the present stage, the most pure nitride powder contains about 0.1 wt. % of oxygen, as compared with good silicon carbide crystals containing only 10-5 wt. % of nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  20. Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ling; Congiu, Emanuele; Roser, Joe; Swords, Sol; Perets, Hagai B; Lederhendler, Adina; Biham, Ofer; Brucato, John Robert; Pirronello, Valerio; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

  1. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten;

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...

  2. Polymer Layered Silicate Nanocomposites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Mittal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to present recent advances in the synthesis and structure characterization as well as the properties of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites. The advent of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites has revolutionized research into polymer composite materials. Nanocomposites are organic-inorganic hybrid materials in which at least one dimension of the filler is less than 100 nm. A number of synthesis routes have been developed in the recent years to prepare these materials, which include intercalation of polymers or pre-polymers from solution, in-situ polymerization, melt intercalation etc. The nanocomposites where the filler platelets can be dispersed in the polymer at the nanometer scale owing to the specific filler surface modifications, exhibit significant improvement in the composite properties, which include enhanced mechanical strength, gas barrier, thermal stability, flame retardancy etc. Only a small amount of filler is generally required for the enhancement in the properties, which helps the composite materials retain transparency and low density.

  3. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  4. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  5. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO4). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  6. Polymorphism in silicate-postperovskite reviewed (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschauner, O. D.

    2010-12-01

    Early on in the examination of postperovskite(ppv)-type magnesium metasilicate it had been debated if this potential deep mantle mineral can be subject to further structural transformation as function of composition, pressure, and temperature within the range of conditions in the lower mantle. MgSiO3-perovskite accommodates minor elements through local lattice distortions by tilt of the corner-sharing octahedral framework. The CaIrO3-type ppv structure does not seem to possess a similar mechanism of local relaxation of lattice strain. Instead minor elements may rather be accommodated by periodic kinks in this layered structure (1). This kinking-mechanism allows for generating a plethora of polymorphs similar in structure and free energy (1,2). However, the elastic properties of ppv may be strongly affected by this type of structural modification. While structural analogues of silicate-ppv exhibit this type of polymorphism (3,4) previous attempts to examine polymorphism in silicate-ppv remained suggestive (2,5). This is mostly owed to the severe constraints imposed on powder diffraction studies conducted under the extreme conditions of stability of MgSiO3-ppv. Here I present new results on silicate-ppv based on different experimental strategies which shed more light on this complex yet important issue of structural modifications in minor-element bearing silicate-ppv. (1) Oganov et al. Nature 438, 1142 (2005);(2) Tschauner et al. Am. Min. 93, 533 (2008); (3) Shirako et al. Phys. Chem. Min. 36, 455 (2009); Yakovlev et al. J. Sol. Stat. Chem. 182, 1545 (2009) Work supported through NNSA Cooperative Agreement DOE-FC88-01NV14049

  7. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  8. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and am...

  9. Process for acidizing hot siliceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuerman, R. F.; Silverman, S. A.

    1985-10-22

    The dissolving of siliceous material in an environment containing corrodable metal and having a temperature exceeding about 300/sup 0/ F. is improved by using an aqueous solution containing an amount of ammonium fluoride equivalent to that in a 2-3 molar solution of hydrogen fluoride and enough weak acid and weak acid salt to provide a pH of near to but less than 7.

  10. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation. PMID

  11. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: pengfei.wang@dit.ie [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic [Light-Matter Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Farrell, Gerald [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  12. Volume of ionic sites in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molar volume data of alkali and alkaline earth silicate glasses have been used to calculate the free volume associated with the bridging and nonbridging oxygen and modifier ions. The free volume associated with the bridging oxygen is constant (15.39 x 10-24 cm3) for all modifier ions up to 33.3 mol% modifier oxide. It decreases (in alkali or alkaline earth silicate glasses) with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The nonbridging oxygen ion is associated with a constant free volume (6.50 x 10-24 cm3) in all cases. Modifier ions are associated with free volume that increases with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The used model explores the change in the free volume due to changing the concentration of alkali oxides in mixed alkali silicate glasses. The results show that, in such glasses, the free volume related to a certain type of alkali oxide increases with increasing content

  13. Aluminum microstructures on anodic alumina for aluminum wiring boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2010-03-01

    The paper demonstrates simple methods for the fabrication of aluminum microstructures on the anodic oxide film of aluminum. The aluminum sheets were first engraved (patterned) either by laser beam or by embossing to form deep grooves on the surface. One side of the sheet was then anodized, blocking the other side by using polymer mask to form the anodic alumina. Because of the lower thickness at the bottom part of the grooves, the part was completely anodized before the complete oxidation of the other parts. Such selectively complete anodizing resulted in the patterns of metallic aluminum on anodic alumina. Using the technique, we fabricated microstructures such as line patterns and a simple wiring circuit-board-like structure on the anodic alumina. The aluminum microstructures fabricated by the techniques were embedded in anodic alumina/aluminum sheet, and this technique is promising for applications in electronic packaging and devices. PMID:20356280

  14. INFLUENCE OF WATER IONS AND ALUMINUM SILICATE PARTICLES ON EMULSION RESOLUTION OF CRUDE OIL

    OpenAIRE

    Jamshid BEHIN; Norouzi, Shaghayegh

    2011-01-01

    The price of exporting oil is defined by its qualitative properties. These properties are in a direct relation to emulsion stability of desalter feed. The present study was undertaken to experimentally investigate the effects of water ions, and solid particles on emulsions stability. These studies have also confirmed the effects of several process variables such as temperature and contact time between two phases. The selected waters used in this work were distillated water and Persian Gulf wa...

  15. An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolph, Brittany Helen

    Culturally significant monuments made of weathered siliceous stone often display sub-surface condition issues such as cracks and voids. These issues require grouts that are ideally compatible with the composition and properties of the substrate. Based on the successful application of ethyl silicates as consolidants in recent literature, this study examines possible formulation pathways for the development of a grout incorporating ethyl silicate. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL) as a catalyst, silicone oil (PDMS), various grades of ground quartz, sepiolite, and hollow glass spheres were used in differing concentrations to create samples. These were visually and physically assessed on workability, separation, shrinkage, cracking, strength, and flexibility. Quantitative analysis was performed on selected formulations using UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy in coordination with a weight loss experiment to investigate kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Successful formulations tended to include oligomeric TEOS, crushed quartz of mixed grades, sepiolite powder, and PDMS, and show promise for future investigations.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum back contact layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, V.A.; Janssen, M.; Richardson, I.M. [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); van Amstel, T.; Bennett, I.J. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Solar Energy, PV Module Technology, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    The overall demand to reduce solar energy costs gives a continuous drive to reduce the thickness of silicon wafers. Handling and bowing problems associated with thinner wafers become more and more important, as these can lead to cells cracking and thus to high yield losses. In this paper the microstructure and mechanical properties of the aluminum on the rear side of a solar cell are discussed. It is shown that the aluminum back contact has a complex composite-like microstructure, consisting of five main components: (1) the back surface field layer; (2) a eutectic layer; (3) spherical (3-5 {mu}m) hypereutectic Al-Si particles surrounded by a thin aluminum oxide layer (200 nm); (4) a bismuth-silicate glass matrix; and (5) pores (14 vol%). The Young's modulus of the Al-Si particles is estimated by nanoindentation and the overall Young's modulus is estimated on the basis of bowing measurements. These results are used as input parameters for the improved thermomechanical multiscale model of a solar cell. (author)

  17. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  18. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Fernanda Cruz; Fabrício Ávila Rodrigues; Ana Paula Cardoso Diniz; Maurilio Alves Moreira; Everaldo Gonçalves de Barros

    2013-01-01

    The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS) and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS) on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection ...

  19. Synthesis and characterization of calcium-alumino-silicate hydrates from oil shale ash - Towards industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek Reinik; Ivo Heinmaa; Jyri-Pekka Mikkola; Uuve Kirso [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2008-08-15

    The influence of the alkaline medium on the hydrothermal activation of the oil shale fly ash with NaOH and KOH was studied using SEM/EDX, XRD, {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al high-resolution MAS-NMR spectra. In the presence of NaOH the silicon in the original fly ash was completely converted into calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrates, mainly into 1.1 nm tobermorite structure during 24-h treatment at 160{sup o}C. At similar reaction conditions, the activation with KOH resulted only to the formation of amorphous calcium-silica-hydrate gel on the surface of ash particles at temperature. The results obtained in this study indicate that the oil shale fly ash can be used for production of Al-substituted tobermorites when strongly alkaline media (NaOH) is applied. The synthesized product was used in a catalytic d-lactose isomerization reaction. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Redox control of sulfur degassing in silicic magmas

    OpenAIRE

    Scaillet, Bruno; Clémente, Béatrice; Evans, Bernard W.; Pichavant, Michel

    1998-01-01

    International audience Explosive eruptions involve mainly silicic magmas in which sulfur solubility and diffusivity are low. This inhibits sulfur exsolution during magma uprise as compared to more mafic magmas such as basalts. Silicic magmas can nevertheless liberate large quantities of sulfur as shown by the monitoring of SO2 in recent explosive silicic eruptions in arc settings, which invariably have displayed an excess of sulfur relative to that calculated from melt degassing. If this e...

  1. High-pressure rare earth silicates: Lanthanum silicate with barium phosphate structure, holmium silicate apatite, and lutetium disilicate type X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase relations of a wide selection of rare earth disilicates have been investigated up to 10 GPa and 1700 deg. C using piston cylinder and multi-anvil equipment. Single-crystal X-ray structures have been obtained for the following high-pressure phases: (1) La2.67(SiO4)2: monoclinic, space group C2/m, Z=2, a=9.419(2), b=5.445(1), c=7.214(1) A, β=115.71(3)o, R=0.042; disordered Ba3(PO4)2 structure type, with 3xb and 7xb superstructures identified. (2) Ho8.67(SiO4)6(OH)2: hexagonal, P63/m, Z=1, a=9.3221(4), c=6.7347(2) A, R=0.026; silicate hydroxyapatite. (3) Lu2Si2O7: tetragonal, P41212, Z=4, a=6.5620(2), c=11.9535(4) A, R=0.023; type X diorthosilicate structure, and the silicate analogue of tetragonal Er2Ge2O7

  2. Photoemission study of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum/aluminum oxide/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the interface electronic structure of a sandwich structure involving aluminum oxide and tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq), i.e. (Alq/AlOx/Alq), has been investigated with photoemission spectroscopy. Strong chemical reactions have been observed due to aluminum deposition onto the Alq substrate. The subsequent oxygen exposure releases some of the Alq molecules from the interaction with aluminum. Finally, the deposition of the top Alq layer leads to an asymmetry in the electronic energy level alignment with respect to the AlOx interlayer

  3. EXAFS studies of silicate glasses containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium silicate glasses containing hexavalent uranium ions have been studied using the EXAFS technique. The U6+ ions appear in the uranyl configuration with two oxygen atoms at 1.85 A and four to five at 2.2-2.3 A. In the glasses (0.25Na2O.0.75SiO2)sub(1-x)(UO3)sub(x) with x = 0.02 to x = 0.1, planar (or nearly planar) uranium containing clusters, with U-U distances of 3.3 A, are observed. A layered model is proposed to describe these glasses. (Auth.)

  4. Tribo-exoemission from some silicate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tribo-exoemission from some minerals has been investigated in view of applications in the porcelain industries. Milling and sample preparation were performed under defined (liquid and solvent free) conditions. Quartz and the members of the alumo-silicate family feldspar, kaolin, and pegmatite are characterised by a strongly overlapped TSEE-peak between 1000C and 2000C, growing strongly with the mechanical dispersion of the powders. Thermal (TSEE) as well as optical (OSEE) stimulation reveal pegmatite as the strongest emitter with a very low fading of the tribo-signal at room temperature. (author)

  5. Tribo-exoemission from some silicate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, G.; Lesz, J.; Otto, W. (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-01-01

    The tribo-exoemission from some minerals has been investigated in view of applications in the porcelain industries. Milling and sample preparation were performed under defined (liquid and solvent free) conditions. Quartz and the members of the alumo-silicate family feldspar, kaolin, and pegmatite are characterised by a strongly overlapped TSEE-peak between 100/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/C, growing strongly with the mechanical dispersion of the powders. Thermal (TSEE) as well as optical (OSEE) stimulation reveal pegmatite as the strongest emitter with a very low fading of the tribo-signal at room temperature.

  6. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.)

  7. Submarine silicic volcanism: Processes and products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kalangutkar, N.G.; Iyer, S.D.

    version: Geo-Spect. Interface, vol.6(1); 2012; 30-39 Submarine Silicic Volcanism Niyati G. Kalangutkar* and Sridhar D. Iyer National Institute of Oceanography (CSIR), Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India. * Corresponding author. Tel.: +91 832 2450 244; Fax... Nodules (PMN 2005); Regional Research Laboratory, Bhubaneswar, Orissa; India; 29-30 Sep 2005), 19-21. IYER, S. D., SHYAM PRASAD, M., GUPTA, S. M. and CHARAN, S. N. (1997) Evidence for recent hydrothermal activity in the Central Indian Basin. Deep...

  8. Immobilization of Papain on Siliceous Mesocellular Foam

    OpenAIRE

    ZOU Ze-Chang,WEI Qi,NA Wei,SUN Hui,NIE Zuo-Ren

    2009-01-01

    Siliceous mesocellular foam (MCF) was employed as carriers in the immobilization of papain, and the properties and the stabilities of the immobilized enzyme were investigated in detail. The results show that the amount of papain immobilized on MCF material reaches 334 mg/g MCF. The optimal pH and reaction temperature of the immobilized papain are 7.5 and 50¡䪠respectively. The Michaelis constant (Km) of immobilized papain is disclosed as 6.99¡�0-3mol/L by the Lineweaver-Burk plot at 37¡䬠The im...

  9. Silicate emissions in active galaxies - From LINERs to QSOs

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Lutz, D.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Lehnert, M. D.; Tacconi, L.J.; Veilleux, S.; Rupke, D. S.; Kim, D. -C.; Sternberg, A; Maoz, D.; Lord, S.; Mazzarella, J.; Sanders, D. B.

    2005-01-01

    We report the first detection of ~10 and ~18 micron silicate dust emissions in a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), obtained in Spitzer-IRS 7-37 micron spectroscopy of the Type 1 LINER galaxy NGC3998. Silicate emissions in AGN have only recently been detected in several quasars. Our detection counters suggestions that silicate emissions are present only in the most luminous AGN. The silicate features may be signatures of a dusty ``obscuring torus'' viewed face-on as postulated for ...

  10. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  11. Location of silicic caldera formation in arc settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gwyneth R; Mahood, Gail A [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra, Mall, Building 320, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Silicic calderas are the surface expressions of silicic magma chambers, and thus their study may yield information about what tectonic and crustal features favor the generation of evolved magma. The goal of this study is to determine whether silicic calderas in arc settings are preferentially located behind the volcanic front. After a global analysis of young, arc-related calderas, we find that silicic calderas at continental margins do form over a wide area behind the front, as compared to other types of arc volcanoes.

  12. Mechanical loss associated with silicate bonding of fused silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on mechanical loss associated with hydroxy-catalysis (or 'silicate') bonding between fused silica substrates in the presence of potassium hydroxide or sodium silicate. We measured the mechanical quality factor of three fused silica samples, each composed of two half-rods bonded together on their flat surfaces and compared them to that of an unbonded half-rod. The measurements show a significant reduction of quality factor due to mechanical loss associated with the silicate bonds. We calculate the loss factor of the bonded region φbond and estimate that the effect of silicate bonding on thermal noise in the Advanced LIGO interferometers will be small

  13. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  14. Neurofibrillary pathology and aluminum in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, R. W.; Lee, V. M. Y; Trojanowski, J Q

    1995-01-01

    Since the first reports of aluminum-induced neurofibrillary degeneration in experimental animals, extensive studies have been performed to clarify the role played by aluminum in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additional evidence implicating aluminum in AD includes elevated levels of aluminum in the AD brain, epidemiological data linking aluminum exposure to AD, and interactions between aluminum and protein components in the pathological lesions o...

  15. A study of the minor element concentrations of spinels from two type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions: An investigation into potential formation conditions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Burnett, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    We have conducted an electron microprobe study of minor element distributions among spinels from two type B1 calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs): Allende TS-23 and Leoville 3537–2. We show that by maintaining the petrologic context (edge, middle, and center of the inclusion plus their host silicate phase), four populations of spinels are resolvable based on their minor element contents. One population resides within the edge area (mainly mantle melilite) and is characterized by the highes...

  16. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Angulo Barrios

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (biosensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (biosensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs.

  17. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  18. Physico-chemical characteristic of aluminum alloy castings manufactured with cores containing fly ash as a base material

    OpenAIRE

    A. Baliński

    2008-01-01

    Castings were poured from PA9 aluminum alloy. Cores in the form of standard cylindrical specimens were made from the core mixture based on fly ash of the identified chemical and granular composition. The binder for the fly ash-based core mixture was chemically modified, hydrated sodium silicate. From the ready test castings, specimens were cut out for metallographic examinations and evaluation of morphology in the examined microregions. The structure was examined under a NEOPHOT 32 metallogra...

  19. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  20. Hualu Aluminum Will Construct Large Coal-Power-Aluminum Aluminum Processing Industrial Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The reporter learned from relevant departments of Baiyin City that in order to further push forward industrial upgrading,fulfill expansion and consolidation of the enterprise,Gansu Hualu Aluminum Co.,Ltd(Hualu Aluminum)will implement Out-Of-City-Into-Park project,

  1. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnöckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  2. Determinazione della silice: metodo spettrofotometrico in assorbimento molecolare

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriele A. TARTARI

    2012-01-01

    Metodo analitico interno al laboratorio di idrochimica del CNR-ISE di Verbania per la determinazione della silice disciolta reattiva al molibdato. Il metodo colorimetrico si basa sulla reazione della silice con il sodio molibdato in condizioni acide, per formare il complesso silicomolibdato poi ridotto dal cloruro stannoso al colorante blu di molibdeno che viene determinato alla lunghezza d'onda di 802 nm.

  3. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  4. Electrophysical properties of microalloyed alumo-silicate ceramics as active dielectric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purenović Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, electrophysical properties of porous alumo-silicate ceramics, modified by alloying with magnesium and microalloying with aluminum, were investigated. Complex multiphase system, as active microalloyed ceramics, has specific behavior under influence of external electrical field, which involves changes of dielectric losses and impedance, depending on frequency and temperature. Dielectric properties were measured in the frequency range 20 Hz - 1 MHz. Values for permittivity (εr ranged between 140 - 430. Order of magnitude for electrical resistivity was about 106 Ωm, for impedance 104 - 108 Ω, and loss tangent had values about and greater than 0.05. Current flow through active dielectric takes place through dielectric barrier and throughout conduction bands of thin aluminum and magnesium metal films. Permittivity has nonlinear distribution and complex functional dependences because of significant nonhomogeneity of active microalloyed ceramics. Lower values of electrical resistivity are the result of complex electron and ion transfer of charge through solid phase and pores, with decreased potential barriers height, due to the influence of additives, ingredients and defects. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45012 i br. ON 172057

  5. NMR Study on Structural Characteristics of Rare Earth Doped Boro-Alumino-Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The structural characteristics of Re2O3 doped B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses and factors such as the component and heat-treating conditions affecting the glass structure were investigated by magic angle spin nuclear magnetic resonance(MAS NMR) spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It is found that, in B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass, the boron coordination sites are mainly of trigonal (B(3)) and tetrahedral (B(4)), and the aluminum coordination sites are Al(4), Al(5) and partly of Al(6). With the increase of BaO content in the B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass, B(3) gradually changes to B(4), and Al(5), Al(6) changes to Al(4). On the other hand, compared with Ba2+, RE3+ can accumulate the boron network because of its higher field strength, which results in a large network structure. With the increase of samarium oxide, the silicate coordination Q4 (3T) will have predominance gradually. Heat-treatment has little effect on the boron and aluminum coordination sites in the glass structure.

  6. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  7. Spectral properties of porphyrins in the systems with layered silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is focused on investigation of hybrid materials based on layered silicates, representing host inorganic component, and porphyrin dyes as organic guest. Aqueous colloidal dispersions, as well as thin solid films of layered silicate/porphyrin systems were studied. Modification of photophysical properties, such as absorption and fluorescence of molecules, adsorbed or incorporated in layered silicate hosts, were studied mainly to spread the knowledge about the environments suitable for incorporating aromatic compounds, providing photoactive properties of potential technological interest. TMPyP cations interact with the surfaces of layered silicates via electrostatic interactions. The extent of dye adsorption on colloidal particles of the silicates is influenced by the CEC values and swelling ability of silicates. Interaction of porphyrins with layered silicate hosts leads to significant changes of dye spectral properties. One of the key parameters that has a crucial impact on this interaction is the layer charge of silicate template. Other factors influence the resulting spectral properties of hybrid systems, such as the method of hybrid material preparation, the material's type (colloid, film), and the modification of the silicate host. Molecular orientation studies using linearly-polarized spectroscopies in VIS and IR regions revealed that TMPyP molecules were oriented in almost parallel fashion with respect to the silicate surface plane. Slightly higher values of the orientation angle of TMPyP transition moment were observed for the TMPyP/FHT system. Thus, flattening of the guest TMPyP molecules is the next important factor (mainly in the systems with lower layer charge), influencing its spectral properties upon the interaction with layered silicates. Fluorescence was effectively quenched in the systems based on solid films prepared from the high concentration of the dye (10-3 mol.dm-3). The quenching is most probably related to the structure of the

  8. Ultrahigh vacuum system with aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bakeable vacuum chamber (1500C continuous) consists of aluminum alloy beam pipe (6063-T6) and bellows (5052-F) with an aluminum alloy flange (2219-T87) and a metal seal [Helicoflex-HN: pure aluminum (1050) O-ring with an elastic core (Ni base super alloy Inconel 750) which supplies the sealing force] has been constructed. The beam pipe and the flange (6063-T6/2219-T87), and the bellows and the flange (5052-F/2219-T87) were welded by an alternate current (50 Hz) TIG process using an aluminum alloy filler wire (4043). The mechanical properties of the aluminum alloy (2219-T87) is suitable for using the Helicoflex O-ring but the groove surface for the gasket is weak for scratching. Cromium-nitride coating by ion plating method was carried out on the aluminum surface of the gasket groove [thickness: 16 μm, micro Vickers hardness: 1800]. Ordinary stainless steel vacuum system can be replaced by the aluminum vacuum system in an accelerator. (author)

  9. Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Amorphous Silicates Under Interstellar Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Perets, H B; Biham, O; Vidali, G; Li, L; Swords, S; Congiu, E; Roser, J; Manico, G; Brucato, J R; Pirronello, V; Perets, Hagai B.; Lederhendler, Adina; Biham, Ofer; Vidali, Gianfranco; Li, Ling; Swords, Sol; Congiu, Emanuele; Roser, Joe; Manico, Giulio; Brucato, John Robert; Pirronello, Valerio

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented for the first time and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained earlier for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. These barriers are used in order to evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation within a temperature range which is relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds (but not to photo-dissociation regions, where grain temperatures are higher). The results also indicate that the hydrogen molecules are thermalized with the surface and desorb with low kinetic energy. Thus, they are unlikely to occupy highly excited states.

  10. Low-Temperature Crystallization of Amorphous Silicate in Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reaction...

  11. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples. PMID:18669265

  12. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  13. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen;

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 10(12) mol Si per year, which makes them the...... major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under d......Si-limited conditions in a chemokinetic response and, if gradients of this resource are present, increased directionality of cell movement promotes chemotaxis. The ability to exploit local and short-lived dSi hotspots using a specific search behaviour likely contributes to micro-scale patch dynamics in biofilm...

  14. Kinetics of iron oxidation in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature XANES experiments at the Fe K-edge have been used to study the kinetics of iron oxidation in a supercooled melt of Fe-bearing pyroxene composition. These experiments, made just above the glass transition between 600 and 700 deg C, show that variations in relative abundances of ferric and ferrous iron can be determined in situ at such temperatures. The kinetics of iron oxidation do not vary much with temperature down to the glass transition. This suggests that rate-limiting factor in this process is not oxygen diffusion, which is coupled to relaxation of the silicate network, but diffusion of network modifying cations along with a counter flux of electrons. To give a firmer basis to redox determinations made from XANES spectroscopy, the redox state of a series of a samples was first determined from wet chemical, Moessbauer spectroscopy and electron microprobe analyses. (authors)

  15. Ion-implantation damage in silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, G. W.

    Ion implantation is a rapid technique for simulating damage induced by alpha recoil nuclei in nuclear waste forms. The simulation has been found to be quite good in TEM comparisons with natural alpha decay damage in minerals, but leach rate differences have been observed in glass studies and were attributed to dose rate differences. The similarities between ion implantation and recoil nuclei as a means of producing damage suggest that insights into the long term behavior of glass waste forms can be obtained by examination of what is known about ion implantation damage in silicate glasses. This paper briefly reviews these effects and shows that leaching results in certain nuclear waste glasses can be understood as resulting from plastic flow and track overlap. Phase separation is also seen to be a possible consequence of damage induced compositional changes.

  16. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg Kα irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  17. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  18. Interstellar Silicate Dust in the z=0.89 Absorber Towards PKS 1830-211: Crystalline Silicates at High Redshift?

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Monique C; York, Donald G; Vladilo, Giovanni; Welty, Daniel E; Som, Debopam

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence of a >10-sigma detection of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of tau_10=0.27+/-0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources wit...

  19. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  20. Refinement of Aluminum Thermal Chrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refinement of aluminum thermal chrome of the X98.5 mark by a high-temperature annealing in high vacuum is explored experimentally. It is shown that at the temperature of annealing 1150 C during 1...6 hours the content of such interstitial impurity as nitrogen is essentially depressed in chrome, and also the content of aluminum and iron admixtures is noticeably moderated

  1. Behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; ZHAO Zhuo; LIU Gui-hua; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; PENG Zhi-hong

    2005-01-01

    Using calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate as starting materials, two kinds of calcium silicate hydrates, CaO · SiO2 · H2O and 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2O, were hydro-thermally synthesized at 120 ℃. The reaction rule of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution was investigated. The result shows that CaO · SiO2 · H2O is more stable than 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2 O in aluminate solution and its stability increases with the increase of reaction temperature but decreases with the increase of caustic concentration. The reaction between calcium silicate hydrate and aluminate solution is mainly through two routes. In the first case, Al replaces partial Si in calcium silicate hydrate, meanwhile 3CaO · Al2 O3 · xSiO2 · (6-2x) H2 O (hydro-garnet) is formed and some SiO2 enters the solution. In the second case, calcium silicate hydrate can react directly with aluminate solution, forming hydro-garnet and Na2O · Al2O3 · 2SiO2 · nH2O (DSP). The desilication reaction of aluminate solution containing silicate could contribute partially to forming DSP.

  2. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  3. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶大年; 马哲生; 赫伟; 李哲; 施倪承; D.Pushcharovsky

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-0 and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures. Therefore, those silicates may be named titano-and zircono-silicates. Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra, the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet, respectively. As a new concept, the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  4. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  5. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  6. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg2SiO4 and Fe2SiO4, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H2 formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg2SiO4 and Fe2SiO4 described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  7. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  8. Gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of study of leaching behavior for solidified dry low level radioactive waste, gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar was investigated, and a plan of our research was proposed. The effect of pH on corrosion rate of aluminum, corrosion product, time dependency of corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar, change of corrosion mechanism, the effects of Na, Ca and Cl ions on corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar and corrosion behavior of aluminum when aluminum was used as sacrificed anode in reinforced concrete were previously clarified. Study of the effects of environmental factors such as pH, kind of ions and temperature on gas evolution behavior of aluminum and the effect of aluminum/carbon steel surface ratio no gas evolution behavior of aluminum were planed. (author). 75 refs

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Amorphous Layer on Aluminum Alloy Formed by Plasma Electrolytic Deposition (PED)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yong-jun; XIA Yuan

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, protective layers were formed on aluminum substrate by Plasma Electrolytic Deposition (PED) using sodium silicate solution. The relation between the thickness of the layer and process time were studied. XRD,SEM, EDS were used to study the layer's structure, composition and micrograph. The results show that the deposited layers are amorphous and contain mainly oxygen, silicon, and aluminum. The possible formation mechanism of amorphous [Al-Si-O] layer was proposed: During discharge periods, Al2O3 phase of the passive film and SiO32-near the substrate surface are sintered into xSiO2(1-x)Al2O3 and then transformed into amorphous [Al-Si-O] phase.

  10. The di- and tricalcium silicate dissolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a specially designed reactor connected to an ICP spectrometer enabled the careful determination of the dissolution rates of C3S, C2S and CaO, respectively, over a broad range of concentration of calcium and silicates under conditions devoid of C–S–H. The kinetic laws, bridging the dissolution rates and the undersaturations, were obtained after extrapolation of rate zero allowing the estimation of the true experimental solubility products of C3S (Ksp = 9.6 · 10−23), C2S (Ksp = 4.3 · 10−18) and CaO (Ksp = 9.17 · 10−6). The latter are then compared to the solubilities calculated from the enthalpies of formation. We propose that the observed deviations result from the protonation of the unsaturated oxygen atoms present at the surface of these minerals. Hydration rates measured in cement pastes or in C3S pastes are in excellent agreement with the kinetic law found in this study for C3S under conditions undersaturated with respect to C–S–H

  11. Immobilization of active concrete debris using soluble sodium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demolition of biological shields will generate large quantities of active concrete debris. Sodium silicate solutions have already been shown capable of immobilizing such debris in a pellet form; this new study investigates debris immobilization via a silicate solution/debris slurry. A study of the physical and chemical properties of demolition debris has been undertaken. Laboratory scale trials have shown that only the finer (''less than''5mm) debris fractions set satisfactorily when mixed with a sodium silicate solution. Debris from ordinary portland cement concrete set more quickly than that containing a 30% pulverized fuel ash cement replacement. The particle size of the debris is a major factor in the setting process, but chemical interactions are also significant. A ratio of 1.2:1 debris:sodium silicate solution (SiO2/Na2O = 3.30), produced an optimum mix. A brief study of the logistics of a full scale process plant has also been made. (author)

  12. Properties of sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jina; Fan Zitian; Zan Xiaolei; Pan Di

    2009-01-01

    The sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating has many advantages,such as low sodium silicate adding quantity,fast hardening speed,high room temperature strength,good collapsibility and certain surface stability. However,it has big moisture absorbability in the air,which would lead to the compression strength and the surface stability of the sand molds being sharply reduced. In this study,the moisture absorbability of the sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating in different humidity conditions and the effect factors were investigated. Meanwhile,the reasons for the big moisture absorbability of the sand were analyzed.Some measures to overcome the problems of high moisture absorbability,bad surface stability and sharply reducing strength in the air were discussed. The results of this study establish the foundation of green and clean foundry technology based on the microwave heating hardening sodium silicate sand process.

  13. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine.

  14. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when those small grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing the dipole moment per atom ($\\beta$) and can reach $P\\sim 20\\%$ for $\\beta\\sim 0.1$D at grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space $(\\beta,Y_{Si})$ for silicate nanoparticles in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the ob...

  15. Study of thermal effects of silicate-containing hydroxyapatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Zaits, A. V.; Berdinskaya, N. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of modifications of hydroxyapatite silicate ions, from the extracellular fluid prototype solution under near-physiological conditions has been studied. Formation of silicon-structured hydroxyapatite with different extent of substitution of phosphate groups in the silicate group has been established through chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained are in agreement and suggest the possibility of substitution of phosphate groups for silicate groups in the hydroxyapatite structure when introducing different sources of silica, tetraethoxysilane and sodium silicate, in the reaction mixture. Growth in the amount of silicon in Si-HA results in the increase in the thermal stability of the samples. The greatest mass loss occurs at temperatures in the range of 25-400 0C that is caused by the removal of the crystallization and adsorption water and volatile impurities. It is shown that the modified apatites are of imperfect structure and crystallize in a nanocrystalline state.

  16. A study of rare earth doped silicate and phosphate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Bowron, Daniel Timothy

    1994-01-01

    The complementary techniques of X-ray diffraction and EXAFS have been applied to silicate and phosphate glass systems containing varying quantities of rare earth elements. The silicate systems that have been studied are rare earth doped fibre optic preforms of interest to the optoelectronics and telecommunications industry. Techniques were developed to allow spatially resolved diffraction and EXAFS data to be taken from the small ~1mm diameter core region of the preforms. Absorpt...

  17. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles...

  18. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    OpenAIRE

    Quirk, J; D. J. Beerling; S. A. Banwart; Kakonyi, G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increase...

  19. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    OpenAIRE

    Yukio Homma; Akira Ishikawa; Kanami Takaya; Teruaki Kobayashi; Yorito Nose; Toshikazu Sato; Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilep...

  20. Influence of PC superplasticizers on tricalcium silicate hydration.

    OpenAIRE

    Pourchet, S.; Comparet, C.; Nicoleau, L.; Nonat, A.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of polycarboxylate superplasticizers with variations of content of anionic groups was studied on pure tricalcium silicate hydration. The hydration in diluted suspension has been investigated by conductimetry, calorimetry, and ionic and total organic carbon analysis of the liquid phase. The tricalcium silicate hydration is always delayed in presence of polycarboxylate superplasticizer. Moreover, the delay can be correlated with the number of carboxylate groups which are on the ad...

  1. Effects of silicate application on soil fertility and wheat yield

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Vinícius Mansano Sarto; Maria do Carmo Lana; Leandro Rampim; Jean Sérgio Rosset; Jaqueline Rocha Wobeto

    2015-01-01

    An improvement in soil chemical properties and crop development with silicate application has been confirmed in several plant species. The effects of silicate application on soil chemical properties and wheat growth were investigated in the present study. The experiment was carried out in 8-L plastic pots in a greenhouse. Treatments were arranged in a randomized block design in a 3 × 5 factorial: three soils [Rhodic Acrudox (Ox1), Rhodic Hapludox (Ox2) and Arenic Hapludult (Ult)] and five sil...

  2. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    OpenAIRE

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior; Lucia Helena Garófala Chaves; Fernando Antônio Melo da Costa; Hans Raj Gheyi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to...

  3. Mineralogy and chemical compositions of Colomera (IIE) silicate inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, W.; H. Takeda; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Irons of groups lAB and IIE contain silicate inclusions. In IAB irons, these inclusions are basically chondritic, but in IIE they vary from chondritic to highly differentiated [1,2]. In this work, we present detailed studies of mineralogy and trace-element geochemistry of eight silicate inclusions from Colomera with the goal of better understanding early planetary differentiation and possible genetic relationships between iron and stony meteorites.

  4. Fluoroalkylsilane versus Alkylsilane as Hydrophobic Agents for Silica and Silicates

    OpenAIRE

    Teofil Jesionowski; Hieronim Maciejewski; Adam Piasecki; Joanna Karasiewicz; Magdalena Nowacka; Filip Ciesielczyk; Damian Ambrożewicz

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobic powders were obtained via surface modification of silica or magnesium silicate with selected silanes. A modified precipitation method, carried out in an emulsion system, was used for monodisperse silica synthesis, while magnesium silicate was precipitated in a traditional water system. Functionalization of the obtained inorganic supports was performed with selected alkylsilanes: one newly synthesized, 3-(2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5-octafluoropentyloxy)propyltriethoxysilane (OPF), and two comm...

  5. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    OpenAIRE

    Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Koter, de, A.; Hovenier, J. W.; Keller, L.P.; Markwick-Kemper, F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effects of the amount of magnesium and iron in the silicate lattice are studied in detail. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu m extinction feature as observed towards the galactic center using various particle shapes and dust materials. We use very irregularly shaped coated and non- coated porous Gaussian Random Field particles as well as a statistical approach to mod...

  6. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  7. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  8. H-Bond interactions between silicates and water during zeolite pre-nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Fonz, Miguel J; Catlow, C Richard A; Lewis, Dewi W

    2008-11-21

    The relative strength of water-water, water-silicate and silicate-silicate interactions are studied, in order to explain the low solubility of the monomer (Si(OH)(4)), and determine the degree of dispersion of silicate clusters in solution during the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites. We will show how the hydrogen bond interactions between water and monomeric silicate species are similar to that in pure water, whilst monomer-monomer interactions are stronger. However, when larger silicate species are also considered we find the relative hydrogen-bonding strength to follow: water-water silicate-water silicate-silicate. The effects of pH are also considered. The implications of the relative strength of these interactions on the formation of larger silicate species, leading to zeolite pre-nucleation, are discussed. PMID:18979042

  9. Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (EC deliver aerosol by heating fluid containing nicotine. Cartomizer EC combine the fluid chamber and heating element in a single unit. Because EC do not burn tobacco, they may be safer than conventional cigarettes. Their use is rapidly increasing worldwide with little prior testing of their aerosol.We tested the hypothesis that EC aerosol contains metals derived from various components in EC.Cartomizer contents and aerosols were analyzed using light and electron microscopy, cytotoxicity testing, x-ray microanalysis, particle counting, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.The filament, a nickel-chromium wire, was coupled to a thicker copper wire coated with silver. The silver coating was sometimes missing. Four tin solder joints attached the wires to each other and coupled the copper/silver wire to the air tube and mouthpiece. All cartomizers had evidence of use before packaging (burn spots on the fibers and electrophoretic movement of fluid in the fibers. Fibers in two cartomizers had green deposits that contained copper. Centrifugation of the fibers produced large pellets containing tin. Tin particles and tin whiskers were identified in cartridge fluid and outer fibers. Cartomizer fluid with tin particles was cytotoxic in assays using human pulmonary fibroblasts. The aerosol contained particles >1 µm comprised of tin, silver, iron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (<100 nm of tin, chromium and nickel. The concentrations of nine of eleven elements in EC aerosol were higher than or equal to the corresponding concentrations in conventional cigarette smoke. Many of the elements identified in EC aerosol are known to cause respiratory distress and disease.The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer aerosol demonstrates the need for improved quality control in EC design and manufacture and studies on how EC aerosol impacts the health of users and bystanders.

  10. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  11. Recrystallization in Commercially Pure Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bent; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    Recrystallization behavior in commercial aluminum with a purity of 99.4 pct was studied by techniques such as high voltage electron microscopy, 100 kV transmission electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Sample parameters were the initial grain size (290 and 24 microns) and the degree of...... are discussed and compared with results from an earlier study1 covering the recrystallization behavior of commercial aluminum of the same purity deformed at higher degrees of deformation (50 to 90 pct reduction in thickness by cold-rolling)....

  12. Baise to Build Ecological Aluminum Industry Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The government of Baise announced the construction of an ecological aluminum industry base over the next few years,pledging to turn the city into a major aluminum industry base in China and the rest of Asia.

  13. Decreasing residual aluminum level in drinking water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志红; 崔福义

    2004-01-01

    The relativity of coagulant dosage, residual turbidity, temperature, pH etc. with residual aluminum concentration were investigated, and several important conclusions were achieved. Firstly, dosage of alum-coagulant or PAC1 influences residual aluminum concentration greatly. There is an optimal-dosage-to-aluminum, a bit less than the optimal-dosage-to-turbidity. Secondly, it proposes that decreasing residual aluminum concentration can be theoretically divided into two methods, either decreasing (even removing) the concentration of particulate aluminum component, or decreasing dissolved aluminum. In these tests there is an optimal value of residual turbidity of postprecipitation at 7.0 NTU. Thirdly, residual aluminum level will increase while water temperature goes higher. At the last, optimal pH value corresponds a minimum dissolved aluminum at a given turbidity. Data shows the optimal pH value decreases with water temperature's increasing.

  14. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... in the Federal Register on November 17, 2009 (74 FR 59254). At the request of the State agency and a... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site...

  15. Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum in Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hui; ZHU; Li-yang; LIN; Ru-shan; TAN; Hong-bin; HE; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum is one of cladding materials for nuclear fuel,it is important to investigate the electrolytic dissolution of aluminum in nitric acid.The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,polarization curve and cyclic voltammetry cure of anodic aluminum electrode in nitric acid under various conditions were collected(Fig.1).It turns out,under steady state,the thickness of the passivated film of aluminum

  16. Mineral resource of the month: aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, E. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on aluminum, a mineral resource which is described as the third-most abundant element in Earth's crust. According to the article, aluminum is the second-most used metal. Hans Christian Oersted, a Danish chemist, was the first to isolate aluminum in the laboratory. Aluminum is described as lightweight, corrosion-resistant and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat.

  17. Evaluation of Aluminum in Iranian Consumed Tea

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Asgari; Mahdi Ahmadi Moghaddam; Amirhossein Mahvi; Masoud Yonesian

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Black tea leaf is one of the most important sources of Aluminum in dietary. Therefore this research was conducted to assess the amount of Aluminum in Iranian tea infusion. Methods: To assess Aluminum in Iranian consumed tea, 27 tea samples were analyzed for Al concentration for 10 and 60 min infusion, aluminum concentration was measured with atomic absorption and the results were analyzed by SPSS.13 version. Results: The results showed that minimum and maximum concentration of A...

  18. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings contained calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate. Mechanically and chemically treated titanium substrates were dipped into sols and dried and fired. Silicate coatings from the first group were also chemically treated in 10 mol.l-1 solution of sodium hydroxide. All coatings were measured to determine their adhesive and bioactive properties and furthermore the antibacterial properties were tested in the case of first group. Surfaces of the coated substrates were investigated after the firing and after the individual tests with optical and electron microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction. A tape test demonstrated excellent adhesive property of all coatings to the substrate, classified with degree 5. A static in vitro test demonstrated bioactivity of nearly all the coatings. The basic silicate coating from the first group and one type of coating from the second group were identified as inert. Antibacterial properties of silicate coatings containing silver showed to be different when tested against Escherichia coli bacteria. A complete inhibition of the growth of bacteria under our experimental conditions was observed for the coating containing silver and monetite and a partial inhibition of the growth of bacteria for coatings containing silver and silver in combination with brushite.

  19. Guangxi Aluminum Giant Made Investment in Changfeng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>A aluminum processing and supporting project (450,000 tons) of Hefei Guangyin Aluminum Company kicked off in Xiatang Town of Changfeng County recently. It is a project jointly invested by Guangxi Investment Group and Guangxi Baise Guangyin Aluminum in Xiatang Town of Changfeng County.

  20. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  2. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 75 FR 80527 - Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination, 75 FR 54302, September 7, 2010, and Aluminum Extrusions From... Antidumping Duty Determination, 75 FR 57441, September 21, 2010. \\3\\ See Aluminum Extrusions From the People's... Determination of Targeted Dumping, 75 FR 69403, November 12, 2010, and Aluminum Extrusions From the...

  5. Characterization of ultrafine aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum nanopowders with particle sizes ranging from ∼25 nm to 80 nm were characterized by a variety of methods. We present and compare the results from common powder characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), BET gas adsorption surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and low angle laser light scattering (LALLS). Aluminum nanoparticles consist of an aluminum core with an aluminum oxide coating. HRTEM measurements of both the particle diameter and oxide layer thickness tend to be larger than those obtained from BET and TGA. LALLS measurements show a large degree of particle agglomeration in solution; therefore, primary particle sizes could not be determined. Furthermore, results from small-angle scattering techniques (SAS), including small-angle neutron (SANS) and x-ray (SAXS) scattering are presented and show excellent agreement with the BET, TGA, and HRTEM. The suite of analytical techniques presented in this paper can be used as a powerful tool in the characterization of many types of nanosized powders.

  6. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH3– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH3 and α-AlH3 irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH3 and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers

  7. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  8. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to water replacement of 50, 75, 100 and 125% of the crop evapotranspiration, with fertilizer levels of 0, 82, 164 and 246 g of calcium-magnesium silicate, with three replications. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, with the irrigation depths distributed in bands while the silicon levels constituted the subplots. Corn yield was influenced by calcium-magnesium silicate and by irrigation depth, obtaining the greatest grain yield with the dose of 164 g pot-1 irrigated at the highest water level. The water-use efficiency of in corn production tended to decrease when the irrigation depth was increased. The best water-use efficiency was observed when the irrigation level was between 87 and 174 mm, and the dose of silicate was 164 g pot-1.

  9. SON68 glass dissolution driven by magnesium silicate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results are reported on the effect of magnesium silicate precipitation on the mechanisms and rate of borosilicate glass dissolution. Leaching experiments with SON68 glass, a borosilicate containing no Mg, were carried out in initially deionized water at 50 °C with a glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume ratio of 20,000 m−1. After 29 days of alteration the experimental conditions were modified by the addition of Mg to trigger the precipitation of Mg-silicate. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate the importance of other parameters such as pH or dissolved silica on the mechanisms of precipitation of Mg-silicates and their consequences on the glass dissolution rate. Mg-silicates precipitate immediately after Mg is added. The amount of altered glass increases with the quantity of added Mg, and is smaller when silicon is added in solution. A time lag is observed between the addition of magnesium and the resumption of glass alteration because silicon is first provided by partial dissolution of the previously formed alteration gel. It is shown that nucleation does not limit Mg-silicate precipitation. A pH above 8 is necessary for the phase to precipitate under the investigated experimental conditions. On the other hand the glass alteration kinetics limits the precipitation if the magnesium is supplied in solution at a non-limiting rate

  10. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  11. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown

  12. Natural Rubber - Layered Silicates Nanocomposites: Mechanical Properties, Structure & Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsos, Haris

    2008-03-01

    Natural Rubber (NR) is one of the most industrially relevant elastomers due to unique elastic properties. Recently we have been developed NR composites with incorporated natural or synthetic clays. We present structural, dynamical and mechanical properties to justify the influence of different parameters, like silicate dispersion, cross-linking density and strength of polymer/silicate interface, on the reinforcement phenomena of those composites. To understand the improvement of the mechanical properties we have investigated the possibility of any bound rubber formation on the outer surface of fillers like in carbon black or silica composites. Evidence from a rather similar situation have been found in silicate nanocomposites by dielectric spectroscopy and the existence of a possible relaxation mode suggests a strong adhesion with the fillers (interfacially adsorbed polymer IA) that corresponds to a glass transition around 100 C higher than the bulk glass transition.

  13. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  14. Multiparameter structure optimization of the cellular silicate concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Bedarev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening the concept of energy efficiency requires the development and implementation of high-performance wall materials. The most promising in this respect is the cellular silicate concrete (gas silicate, which properties are superior to other insulating building materials. However, production of gas silicate insulation purpose with medium density less than 300 kg/m3 poses a number of difficulties due to the nature of its structure. In this regard, the current task is to maintain the specified quality of concrete porous silica with a decrease in its average density. In the article this problem is solved by a multi-level optimization of the macro- and microstructure based on multi-rich (multiparameter mathematical model. Algorithm and the general structure of the model and the results of laboratory studies are given.

  15. Rubber curing chemistry governing the orientation of layered silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing systems on the orientation and the dispersion of the layered silicates in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber nanocomposite is reported. Significant differences in X-ray diffraction pattern between peroxide curing and sulfur curing was observed. Intense X-ray scattering values in the XRD experiments from peroxide cured vulcanizates indicate an orientation of the layers in a preferred direction as evinced by transmission electron micrographs. However, sulfur cured vulcanizates show no preferential orientation of the silicate particles. Nevertheless, a closer inspection of transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of peroxide and sulfur cured samples shows exfoliated silicate layers in the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR matrix. It was revealed in the prevailing study that the use of an excess amount of stearic acid in the formulation of the sulfur curing package leads to almost exfoliated type X-ray scattering pattern.

  16. Electrodeposition of aluminum on aluminum surface from molten salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenmao HUANG; Xiangyu XIA; Bin LIU; Yu LIU; Haowei WANG; Naiheng MA

    2011-01-01

    The surface morphology,microstructure and composition of the aluminum coating of the electrodeposition plates in AlC13-NaC1-KC1 molten salt with a mass ratio of 8:1:1 were investigated by SEM and EDS.The binding force was measured by splat-cooling method and bending method.The results indicate that the coatings with average thicknesses of 12 and 9 μm for both plates treated by simple grinding and phosphating are compacted,continuous and well adhered respectively. Tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC) can effectively prevent the growth of dendritic crystal,and the anode activation may improve the adhesion of the coating. Binding force analysis shows that both aluminum coatings are strongly adhered to the substrates.

  17. Potassium Silicate Foliar Fertilizer Grade from Geothermal Sludge and Pyrophyllite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muljani Srie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium silicate fertilizer grade were successfully produced by direct fusion of silica (SiO2 and potasium (KOH and K2CO3 in furnaces at temperatures up to melting point of mixture. The geothermal sludge (98% SiO2 and the pyrophyllite (95% SiO2 were used as silica sources. The purposes of the study was to synthesise potassium silicate fertilizer grade having solids concentrations in the range of 31-37% K2O, and silica in the range of 48-54% SiO2. The weight ratio of silicon dioxide/potasium solid being 1:1 to 5:1. Silica from geothermal sludge is amorphous, whereas pyrophylite is crystalline phase. The results showed that the amount of raw materials needed to get the appropriate molar ratio of potassium silicate fertilizer grade are different, as well as the fusion temperature of the furnace. Potassium silicate prepared from potassium hydroxide and geothermal sludge produced a low molar ratio (2.5: 1 to 3: 1. The potassium required quite small (4:1 in weight ratio, and on a fusion temperature of about 900 °C. Meanwhile, the potassium silicate prepared from pyrophyllite produced a high molar ratio (1.4 - 9.4 and on a fusion temperature of about 1350 °C, so that potassium needed large enough to meet the required molar ratio for the fertilizer grade. The product potassium silicate solid is amorphous with a little trace of crystalline.

  18. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the 23Na, 27Al and 17O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the 17O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  19. Preparation, characterization and cytocompatibility of bioactive coatings on porous calcium-silicate-hydrate scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major goal of this research was to investigate and characterize the deposition of a biomimetic apatite-like coating onto the surface of 3D porous calcium-silicate-hydrate scaffolds with suitable bioactivity for potential application in bone tissue engineering. Basically, Portland cement, water, sand and lime were mixed for preparing the slurry which was poured into molds, and fine aluminum powder was added as foaming agent resulting on the formation of porous 3D structures. After aging for 28 days, these porous inorganic scaffolds were immersed in calcium chloride supersaturated solution in PBS for 7 days at 37 deg. C for the biomimetic layer deposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques were used in order to characterize the porous scaffolds and the apatite-like biomimetic coating. The results have showed that 3D constructs were successfully produced with interconnected porosity, compressive strength and cytocompatibility appropriate for potential use as an alternative in trabecular bone repair.

  20. Low-to-Medium-Frequency AC Impedance Spectroscopy Investigations of Nanocrystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrate Dried Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-to-medium-frequency range impedance spectroscopy was used to investigate two series of dried calcium silicate hydrates with or without aluminum atoms, C-S-H and C-A-S-H. Over four decades in frequency, sample Nyquist plots were fitted by adopting an equivalent circuit using constant phase elements (CPE). Conductivity values of the order of 10-9-10-10 S/cm were obtained at 316 K. The presence of CPE characteristic of the depleted semicircle at high frequency was related to a fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 up to 2.7. Above 316 K, the impedance spectra behaved unpredictably due to the dehydration process, while below 316 K the behavior was followed by adopting the modulus loss factor. The associated peak maximum variation is of the Arrhenius-type. The entire behavior may be interpreted by ionic motion and charge accumulation in addition to dielectric polarization at the grain boundaries associated to low fractal surface. (authors)

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA1235 Aluminum Foil Stocks Produced Directly from Electrolytic Aluminum Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Yu, Kun; Wen, Li; Yao, Sujuan; Dai, Yilong; Wang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    A new process is developed to obtain high-quality AA1235 aluminum foil stocks and to replace the traditional manufacture process. During the new manufacture process, AA1235 aluminum sheets are twin-roll casted directly through electrolytic aluminum melt (EAM), and subsequently the sheets are processed into aluminum foil stocks by cold rolling and annealing. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the AA1235 aluminum sheets produced through such new process are investigated in each state by optimal microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, orientation imaging microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc. The results show that compared with the traditional AA1235 aluminum foil stocks produced through re-melted aluminum melt (RAM), the amount of impurities is decreased in the EAM aluminum foil stocks. The EAM aluminum foil stock obtains less β-FeSiAl5 phases, but more α-Fe2SiAl8 phases. The elongation of EAM aluminum foil stocks is improved significantly owing to more cubic orientation. Especially, the elongation value of the EAM aluminum foil stocks is approximately 25 pct higher than that of the RAM aluminum foil stocks. As a result, the EAM aluminum foil stocks are at an advantage in increasing the processing performance for the aluminum foils during subsequent processes.

  2. Mantle Mineral/Silicate Melt Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, E. A.; Drake, M. J.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction: The partitioning of elements among mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. It has been proposed that the elevated Mg/Si ratio of the upper mantle of the Earth is a consequence of the flotation of olivine into the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). Agee and Walker (1988) have generated a model via mass balance by assuming average mineral compositions to generate upper mantle peridotite. This model determines that upper mantle peridotite could result from the addition of 32.7% olivine and 0.9% majorite garnet into the upper mantle, and subtraction of 27.6% perovskite from the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). The present contribution uses experimental data to examine the consequences of such multiple phase fractionations enabling an independent evaluation of the above mentioned model. Here we use Mg-perovskite/melt partition coefficients from both a synthetic and a natural system (KLB-1) obtained from this laboratory. Also used are partition coefficient values for majorite garnet/melt, beta spinel/melt and olivine/melt partitioning (McFarlane et al., 1991b; McFarlane et al., 1992). Multiple phase fractionations are examined using the equilibrium crystallization equation and partition coefficient values. The mineral proportions determined by Agee and Walker (1988) are converted into weight fractions and used to compute a bulk partition coefficient value. Discussion: There has been a significant debate concerning whether measured values of trace element partition coefficients permit large-scale fractionation of liquidus phases from an early terrestrial magma ocean (Kato et al., 1988a,b; Walker and Agee, 1989; Drake, 1989; Drake et al., 1991; McFarlane et al., 1990, 1991). It should be noted that it is unclear which, if any, numerical values of partition coefficients are appropriate for examining this question, and certainly the assumptions for the current model must be more fully

  3. Mathematical Viscosity Models for Ternary Metallic and Silicate Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yuan-kun; MENG Xian-min; GUO Han-jie

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical viscosity models for metallic melts were discussed. The experimental data of Ag-Au-Cu systems were used to verify the models based on Chou's general geometric thermodynamic model and the calculated results are consistent with the reported experimental data. A new model predicting the viscosity of multi-component silicate melts was established. The CaO-MnO-SiO2, CaO-FeO-SiO2 and FeO-MnO-SiO2 silicate slag systems were used to verify the model.

  4. Preparation of Hollow Calcium Silicate Microparticles by Simple Emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Eiichi Toorisaka; Syotaro Nagamatsu; Yasunobu Saruwatari; Makoto Hirata; Tadashi Hano

    2014-01-01

    Hollow calcium silicate microparticles were prepared by mixing a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion containing silicate ions in aqueous phase with an oil phase containing a calcium/di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) complex. The inorganic precipitation reaction at the oil-water interface was accelerated by using a simple W/O emulsion. Hollow microparticles were obtained when the mole ratio of D2EHPA and calcium in the oil phase was nearly 2:1. The shell formation of the par-ticles depended on ...

  5. High-Q bismuth silicate nonlinear glass microsphere resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Ganapathy; Lee, Timothy; Ding, Ming; Brambilla, Gilberto; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Koizumi,Fumihito; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a bismuth-silicate glass microsphere resonator has been demonstrated. At wavelengths near 1550 nm, high-modes can be efficiently excited in a 179-μm diameter bismuth-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of circa 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as were observed. The dependence of the spectral response on variations in the input power level was studied in detail to gain an insight in...

  6. Lead Silicate Glass Microsphere Resonators With Absorption-Limited Q

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Genapathy; Lee, Timothy; Feng, Xian; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Loh, Wei; Brambilla, Gilberto; Wilkinson, James; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a lead-silicate glass microsphere resonator. We show that at the wavelengths near 1555 nm high Q modes can be efficiently excited from a 109 μm diameter lead-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as 0.9×107 were observed. This is very close to the theoretical material-limited Q-factor and is the highest Q-factor reported so far from a non...

  7. Leaf application of silicic acid to upland rice and corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Si (stabilized silicic acid, Silamol® leaf application on mineral nutrition and yield in upland rice and corn crops. The treatments were the control (without Si and Si foliar split spraying using 2 L ha-1 of the Silamol® commercial product, with 0.8% soluble Si as concentrated stabilized silicic acid. Silicon leaf application increased the concentrations of K, Ca and Si in rice and corn leaves, the number of panicles per m2 of rice and the number of grains per ear of corn; accordingly, the Si leaf application provided a higher grain yield in both crops.

  8. Implants of aluminum into silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvagno, G.; Scandurra, A.; Raineri, V.; Rimini, E.; La Ferla, A.; Sciascia, V.; Frisina, F.; Raspagliesi, M.; Ferla, G.

    1993-04-01

    The electrical behaviour of ion implanted aluminum into silicon was investigated by varying the beam energy in the 80 keV-6 MeV range, the dose in the 1 × 10 13-1 × 10 14/cm 2 range and the annealing procedure. Aluminum atoms precipitate into exten defects at the end of range damage and where the concentration exceeds the solid solubility value (about 2 × 10 19/cm 3 at 1200°C Escape of Al atoms occurs very easily as soon as they reach the external surface during the thermal diffusion. Using high energy implants, 6 MeV, it was possible to follow in detail the broadening of the diffused profiles. The measured trends between the retained dose and the junction depth and between the outdiffused dose and the annealing time are quite well predicted by the solution of the diffusion equation with the surface acting as a perfect sink for the dopant.

  9. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic, electrostaticdischarge- suppressing finishes: examples include silver impregnated anodized, black electroless nickel, black chrome, and black copper. In

  10. Microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Chen, C Y; Wei, C B; Lin, Y T

    1996-11-01

    Several microbes were isolated from the contaminated fuel-oil in Taiwan and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy A356-T6 was tested by MIL-STD-810E test method. Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and Cladosporium resinac ATCC 22712 had significant adsorption and pitting on the surface of aluminum alloy, Pseudomonas acruginosa AM-B5 had weak adsorption and some precipitation in the bottom, and Candida sp. AM-Y1 had the less adsorption and few cavities formation on the surface. pH of the aqueous phase decreased 0.3 to 0.7 unit for 4 months of incubation. The corrosion of aluminum alloy was very significant in the cultures of Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and C. resinac ATCC 22712. The major metabolites in the aqueous phase with the inoculation of C. resinac were citric acid and oxalic acid, while succinic acid and fumaric acid were the minors. PMID:10592801

  11. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Purification technology of molten aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宝德; 丁文江; 疏达; 周尧和

    2004-01-01

    Various purification methods were explored to eliminate the dissolved hydrogen and nonmetallic inclusions from molten aluminum alloys. A novel rotating impeller head with self-oscillation nozzles or an electromagnetic valve in the gas circuit was used to produce pulse gas currents for the rotary impeller degassing method. Water simulation results show that the size of gas bubbles can be decreased by 10%-20% as compared with the constant gas current mode. By coating ceramic filters or particles with active flux or enamels, composite filters were used to filter the scrap A356 alloy and pure aluminum. Experimental results demonstrate that better filtration efficiency and operation performance can be obtained. Based on numerical calculations, the separation efficiency of inclusions by high frequency magnetic field can be significantly improved by using a hollow cylinder-like separator or utilizing the effects of secondary flow of the melt in a square separator. A multi-stage and multi-media purification platform based on these methods was designed and applied in on-line processing of molten aluminum alloys. Mechanical properties of the processed scrap A356 alloy are greatly improved by the composite purification.

  13. Obtainment and characterization of pure and doped gadolinium oxy ortho silicates with terbium III, precursor of luminescent silicates with sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicate and sulfide lattices are uniquely efficient luminescent materials to excitation by cathodic rays and furthermore the cathodoluminescence study of these compounds have been few investigated. In this work it has been prepared, characterized and investigated some spectroscopic properties of pure and Tba+ - activated Gd2 Si O3 system and it has been tried to substitute oxygen by sulphur in order to obtain this or sulfide-silicate lattices. Products were characterized by vibrational infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction patterns and electronic emission in UV-VIS region. (author)

  14. Non-conservative controls on distribution of dissolved silicate in Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.

    Cochin backwater system was studied with regard to dissolved silicate (DSi) to understand its seasonal distribution and behaviour during estuarine mixing. Silicate had a linear relationship with salinity during the high river discharge period...

  15. PLASMA SPRAYING AND DIELECTRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM SILICATE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Neufuss, Karel

    online, č. 2 (2007), s. 4-9. ISSN 1335-9053 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200430560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * Electric al properties * Zircon * Silicates * Insulators Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://web.mtf.stuba.sk/sk/casopis/index.htm

  16. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life. PMID:22035594

  17. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  18. Annealing of Silicate Dust by Nebular Shocks at 10 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, David E.; Desch, Steven J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium are known to be mostly amorphous, yet crystalline silicate grains have been observed in many long-period comets and in protoplanetary disks. Annealing of amorphous silicate grains into crystalline grains requires temperatures greater than or approximately equal to 1000 K, but exposure of dust grains in comets to such high temperatures is apparently incompatible with the generally low temperatures experienced by comets. This has led to the proposal of models in which dust grains were thermally processed near the protoSun, then underwent considerable radial transport until they reached the gas giant planet region where the long-period comets originated. We hypothesize instead that silicate dust grains were annealed in situ, by shock waves triggered by gravitational instabilities. We assume a shock speed of 5 km/s, a plausible value for shocks driven by gravitational instabilities. We calculate the peak temperatures of pyroxene grains under conditions typical in protoplanetary disks at 5-10 AU. We show that in situ annealing of micron-sized dust grains can occur, obviating the need for large-scale radial transport.

  19. 77 FR 21676 - Silicic Acid, Sodium Salt etc.; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... human skin. Since Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with chlorotrimethylsilane and iso-propyl... Register of Thursday, December 8, 2011 (76 FR 76674) (FRL-9328-8), EPA issued a notice pursuant to section... human health. In order to determine the risks from aggregate exposure to pesticide inert...

  20. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    OpenAIRE

    Skaug, V; Davies, R.; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells.

  1. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  2. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  3. Siliceous surfaces treated with supercritical water: applications in separation methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Horká, Marie; Šlais, Karel; Planeta, Josef; Foret, František; Roth, Michal

    Salzburg : Society of Analytical Chemistry , 2014. OR42. [International Symposium on Chromatography /30./. 14.09.2014-18.09.2014, Salzburg] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : treatment of siliceous surfaces * separation methods * supercritical water Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation

  4. Calorimetric signature of structural heterogeneity in a ternary silicate glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Yang, G.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural heterogeneity in a silicate glass by hyperquenching–annealing–calorimetry approach. The results show a striking phenomenon: two separated sub-Tg relaxation peaks appear on the calorimetric curve of the hyperquenched CaO–MgO–SiO2 glass, implying the existence of two...

  5. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  6. Radiation effects on transport and bubble formation in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (pulsed EPR, time-resolved EPR, high-frequency EPR, ENDOR) has been used to structurally characterize metastable point defects in irradiated alkali borate, silicate, and borosilicate glasses and to study mobile interstitial H atoms. In addition, the yield of radiolytic oxygen has been determined by outgassing. Several mechanisms for the defect formation in oxide glasses have been established

  7. Square Root Relationship in Growth Kinetics of Silicate-1 Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Pavel; Brabec, Libor; Šolcová, Olga; Bortnovsky, Oleg; Zikánová, Arlette; Kočiřík, Milan

    Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2002, s. 1505-1511. - (Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis.. 142 B). [International FEZA Conference /2./. Taormina (IT), 01.09.2002-05.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/0522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : silicate-1 layer * growth kinetics * sedimentation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Small angle X-ray scattering from hydrating tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique was used to study the structural evolution of hydrated tricalcium silicate at room temperature. The changes in specific area of the associated porosity and the evolution of density fluctuations in the solid hydrated phase were deduced from the scattering data. A correlation of these variations with the hydration mechanism is tried. (Author)

  9. Silicate karst associated with lateritic formations (examples from eastern Niger)

    OpenAIRE

    Sponholz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Silicate and iron crust karst pits and sinkholes in eastern Niger are filled with reworked lateritic sediments or with unconsolidated palaeosoils and aeolian deposits. The fillings facies depend on the environmental conditions during deposition. Geomorphological and sedimentological studies on the karst fillings and the interpretation of various karst/filling associations allow an approach to the chronology of landscape development in eastern Niger plateaus.

  10. The silicate absorption profile in the ISM towards the heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, P. F.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Gonzalez-Martin, O.

    2015-01-01

    The 9.7-micron silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium provides important information on the physical and chemical composition of interstellar dust grains. Measurements in the Milky Way have shown that the profile in the diffuse interstellar medium is very similar to the amorphous silicate profiles found in circumstellar dust shells around late M stars, and narrower than the silicate profile in denser star-forming regions. Here, we investigate the silicate absorption profile to...

  11. Silicate anion structural change in calcium silicate hydrate gel on dissolution of hydrated cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pH conditions of aqueous solutions in a radioactive waste repository can be brought about by dissolution of cementitious materials. In order to clarify the mechanisms involved in maintaining this high pH for long time, we investigated the dissolution phenomena of OPC hydrate. In the present research, leaching tests on powdered cement hydrates were conducted by changing the ratio of mass of leaching water to mass of OPC hydrate (liquid/solid ratio) from 10 - 2,000 (wt/wt). Ordinary Portland Cement hydrate was contacted with deionized water and placed in a sealed bottle. After a predetermined period, the solid was separated from the solution. From the results of XRD analysis on the solid phase and the Ca concentration in the aqueous phase, it was confirmed that Ca(OH)2 was preferentially dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 10 or 100 (wt/wt), and that C-S-H gel as well as Ca(OH)2 were dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or larger. 29Si-NMR results showed that the silicate anion chain of the C-S-H gel became longer when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or greater. This indicates that leaching of OPC hydrate results in a structural change of C-S-H gel. (author)

  12. Silicate Dispersion and Mechanical Reinforcement in Polysiloxane/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Schmidt, Daniel F.

    2010-01-12

    We report the first in-depth comparison of the mechanical properties and equilibrium solvent uptake of a range of polysiloxane nanocomposites based on treated and untreated montmorillonite and fumed silica nanofillers. We demonstrate the ability of equilibrium solvent uptake data (and, thus, overall physical and chemical cross-link density) to serve as a proxy for modulus (combining rubber elasticity and Flory-Rehner theory), hardness (via the theory of Boussinesq), and elongation at break, despite the nonideal nature of these networks. In contrast, we find that tensile and tear strength are not well-correlated with solvent uptake. Interfacial strength seems to dominate equilibrium solvent uptake and the mechanical properties it predicts. In the montmorillonite systems in particular, this results in the surprising consequence that equilibrium solvent uptake and mechanical properties are independent of dispersion state. We conclude that edge interactions play a more significant role than degree of exfoliation, a result unique in the field of polymer nanocomposites. This demonstrates that even a combination of polymer/nanofiller compatibility and thermodynamically stable nanofiller dispersion levels may not give rise to reinforcement. These findings provide an important caveat when attempting to connect structure and properties in polymer nanocomposites, and useful guidance in the design of optimized polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites in particular. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. PREFACE: 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezinskis, G.; Bragina, L.; Colombo, P.; Frischat, G. H.; Grabis, J.; Greil, P.; Deja, J.; Kaminskas, R.; Kliava, J.; Medvids, A.; Nowak, I.; Siauciunas, R.; Valancius, Z.; Zalite, I.

    2011-12-01

    Logo This Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of the contributions to the 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials (BaltSilica2011) held at Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia from 23-25 May 2011. The conference was organized by Riga Technical University (Latvia) and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). The series of Baltic conferences on silicate materials was started since 2004: the first conference was held in Riga, Latvia, 2004; the second conference was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2005; the third was held again in Riga, Latvia, 2007, and the fourth was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2009. BaltSilica 2011 was attended by around 50 participants from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Ukraine and Russia. In comparison with previous silicate materials conferences, the broadening of participating countries is an indication of the interest of scientists, engineers and students to exchange research ideas, latest results, and to find new research topics for cooperation in the fields of silicate, high temperature materials, and inorganic nanomaterials. The scientific programme included 8 invited plenary lectures 23 oral presentations and 25 posters [1]. Scientific themes covered in the conference and in this special issue: Natural and Artificial Stone Materials; Traditional and New Ceramic and Glass-Like Materials; Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials. This volume consists of 23 selected proceeding papers. The Editor of this special issue is grateful to all the contributors to BaltSilica 2011. I am also very grateful to the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the session chairs, the referees who refereed the submitted articles to this issue, and to students from the Department of Silicate, High Temperature and Inorganic Nanomaterials Technology of the Riga Technical University who ensured the smooth running of the conference. Particular thanks goes to eight plenary

  14. The Corrosion Protection of 2219-T87 Aluminum by Organic and Inorganic Zinc-Rich Primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Walsh, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    The behavior of zinc-rich primer-coated 2219-T87 aluminum in a 3.5-percent Na-Cl was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The alternating current (ac) method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in the frequency range of 0.001 to 40,000 Hz, and the direct current (dc) method of polarization resistance (PR) were used to evaluate the characteristics of an organic, epoxy zinc-rich primer and an inorganic, ethyl silicate zinc-rich primer. A dc electrochemical galvanic corrosion test was also used to determine the corrosion current of each zinc-rich primer anode coupled to a 2219-T87 aluminum cathode. Duration of the EIS/PR and galvanic testing was 21 days and 24 h, respectively. The galvanic test results demonstrated a very high galvanic current between the aluminum cathode and both zinc-rich primer anodes (37.9 pA/CM2 and 23.7 pA/CM2 for the organic and inorganic primers, respectively). The PR results demonstrated a much higher corrosion rate of the zinc in the inorganic primer than in the organic primer, due primarily to the higher porosity in the former. Based on this investigation, the inorganic zinc-rich primer appears to provide superior galvanic protection and is recommended for additional study for application in the solid rocket booster aft skirt.

  15. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous-Ooze Sediments, More Basin, Norwegian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic siliceous-ooze sediments occur above the hydrocarbon reservoir of the Ormen Lange gas field in More Basin, Norwegian Sea. A possible hydrocarbon prospect of siliceous ooze was proposed, but siliceous ooze is significantly different in texture from most commonly known reservoir rocks...

  16. Laboratory Analysis of Silicate Stardust Grains of Diverse Stellar Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Silicate dust is ubiquitous in a multitude of environments across the cosmos, including evolved oxygen-rich stars, interstellar space, protoplanetary disks, comets, and asteroids. The identification of bona fide silicate stardust grains in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites, and dust returned from comet Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft has revolutionized the study of stars, interstellar space, and the history of dust in the Galaxy. These stardust grains have exotic isotopic compositions that are records of nucleosynthetic processes that occurred in the depths of their now extinct parent stars. Moreover, the chemical compositions and mineralogies of silicate stardust are consequences of the physical and chemical nature of the stellar condensation environment, as well as secondary alteration processes that can occur in interstellar space, the solar nebula, and on the asteroid or comet parent body in which they were incorporated. In this talk I will discuss our use of advanced nano-scale instrumentation in the laboratory to conduct coordinated isotopic, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of silicate stardust grains from AGB stars, supernovae, and novae. By analyzing the isotopic compositions of multiple elements in individual grains, we have been able to constrain their stellar sources, explore stellar nucleosynthetic and mixing processes, and Galactic chemical evolution. Through our mineralogical studies, we have found these presolar silicate grains to have wide-ranging chemical and mineral characteristics. This diversity is the result of primary condensation characteristics and in some cases secondary features imparted by alteration in space and in our Solar System. The laboratory analysis of actual samples of stars directly complements astronomical observations and astrophysical models and offers an unprecedented level of detail into the lifecycles of dust in the Galaxy.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Amorphous Layer on Aluminum Alloy Formed by Plasma Electrolytic Deposition (PED)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANYong-jun; XIAYuan

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, protective layers were formed on aluminum substrate by Plasma Electrolytic Deposition (PED) using sodium silicate solution. The relation between the thickness of the layer and process time were studied. XRD, SEM, EDS were used to study the layer's structure, composition and micrograph. The results show that the deposited layers are amorphous and contain mainly oxygen, silicon, and aluminum. The possible formation mechanism of amorphous[Al-Si-O] layer was proposed: During discharge periods, Al2O3 phase of the passive film and SiO32- near the substrate surface are sintered into xSiO2(1-x)Al2O3 and then transformed into amorphous [Al-Si-O] phase.

  18. Theoretical Study of Hydrogenated Tetrahedral Aluminum Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Wagatsuma, Ayumu; Watanabe, Kouhei; Szarek, Pawel; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We report on the structures of aluminum hydrides derived from a tetrahedral aluminum Al4 cluster using ab initio quantum chemical calculation. Our calculation of binding energies of the aluminum hydrides reveals that stability of these hydrides increases as more hydrogen atoms are adsorbed, while stability of Al-H bonds decreases. We also analyze and discuss the chemical bonds of those clusters by using recently developed method based on the electronic stress tensor.

  19. Aluminum exclusion and aluminum tolerance in woody plants

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, Ivano; Sperisen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The aluminum (Al) cation Al3 + is highly rhizotoxic and is a major stress factor to plants on acid soils, which cover large areas of tropical and boreal regions. Many woody plant species are native to acid soils and are well adapted to high Al3 + conditions. In tropical regions, both woody Al accumulator and non-Al accumulator plants occur, whereas in boreal regions woody plants are non-Al accumulators. The mechanisms of these adaptations can be divided into those that facilitate the exclusio...

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum back contact layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, V.A.; Janssen, M.; Richardson, I.M. [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Van Amstel, T.; Bennett, I.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    The overall demand to reduce solar energy costs gives a continuous drive to reduce the thickness of silicon wafers. Handling and bowing problems associated with thinner wafers become more and more important, as these can lead to cells cracking and thus to high yield losses. In this paper the microstructure and mechanical properties of the aluminium on the rear side of a solar cell are discussed. It is shown that the aluminium back contact has a complex composite-like microstructure, consisting of five main components: (1) the back surface field layer; (2) a eutectic layer; (3) spherical (3 - 5 {mu}m) hypereutectic Al-Si particles surrounded by a thin aluminum oxide layer (200 nm); (4) a bismuth-silicate glass matrix; and (5) pores (14 vol.%). The Young's modulus of the Al-Si particles is estimated by nanoindentation and the overall Young's modulus is estimated on the basis of bowing measurements. These results are used as input parameters for an improved thermomechanical multiscale model of a silicon solar cell.

  1. Investigating aluminum alloy reinforced by graphene nanoflakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.J., E-mail: shaojiuyan@126.com [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Dai, S.L.; Zhang, X.Y.; Yang, C.; Hong, Q.H.; Chen, J.Z. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Lin, Z.M. [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2014-08-26

    As one of the most important engineering materials, aluminum alloys have been widely applied in many fields. However, the requirement of enhancing their mechanical properties without sacrificing the ductility is always a challenge in the development of aluminum alloys. Thanks to the excellent physical and mechanical properties, graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) have been applied as promising reinforcing elements in various engineering materials, including polymers and ceramics. However, the investigation of GNFs as reinforcement phase in metals or alloys, especially in aluminum alloys, is still very limited. In this study, the aluminum alloy reinforced by GNFs was successfully prepared via powder metallurgy approach. The GNFs were mixed with aluminum alloy powders through ball milling and followed by hot isostatic pressing. The green body was then hot extruded to obtain the final GNFs reinforced aluminum alloy nanocomposite. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis show that GNFs were well dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix and no chemical reactions were observed at the interfaces between the GNFs and aluminum alloy matrix. The mechanical properties' testing results show that with increasing filling content of GNFs, both tensile and yield strengths were remarkably increased without losing the ductility performance. These results not only provided a pathway to achieve the goal of preparing high strength aluminum alloys with excellent ductilitybut they also shed light on the development of other metal alloys reinforced by GNFs.

  2. Investigating aluminum alloy reinforced by graphene nanoflakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the most important engineering materials, aluminum alloys have been widely applied in many fields. However, the requirement of enhancing their mechanical properties without sacrificing the ductility is always a challenge in the development of aluminum alloys. Thanks to the excellent physical and mechanical properties, graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) have been applied as promising reinforcing elements in various engineering materials, including polymers and ceramics. However, the investigation of GNFs as reinforcement phase in metals or alloys, especially in aluminum alloys, is still very limited. In this study, the aluminum alloy reinforced by GNFs was successfully prepared via powder metallurgy approach. The GNFs were mixed with aluminum alloy powders through ball milling and followed by hot isostatic pressing. The green body was then hot extruded to obtain the final GNFs reinforced aluminum alloy nanocomposite. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis show that GNFs were well dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix and no chemical reactions were observed at the interfaces between the GNFs and aluminum alloy matrix. The mechanical properties' testing results show that with increasing filling content of GNFs, both tensile and yield strengths were remarkably increased without losing the ductility performance. These results not only provided a pathway to achieve the goal of preparing high strength aluminum alloys with excellent ductilitybut they also shed light on the development of other metal alloys reinforced by GNFs

  3. Gut: An underestimated target organ for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignal, C; Desreumaux, P; Body-Malapel, M

    2016-06-01

    Since World War II, several factors such as an impressive industrial growth, an enhanced environmental bioavailability and intensified food consumption have contributed to a significant amplification of human exposure to aluminum. Aluminum is particularly present in food, beverages, some drugs and airbone dust. In our food, aluminum is superimposed via additives and cooking utensils. Therefore, the tolerable intake of aluminum is exceeded for a significant part of the world population, especially in children who are more vulnerable to toxic effects of pollutants than adults. Faced with this oral aluminum influx, intestinal tract is an essential barrier, especially as 38% of ingested aluminum accumulates at the intestinal mucosa. Although still poorly documented to date, the impact of oral exposure to aluminum in conditions relevant to real human exposure appears to be deleterious for gut homeostasis. Aluminum ingestion affects the regulation of the permeability, the microflora and the immune function of intestine. Nowadays, several arguments are consistent with an involvement of aluminum as an environmental risk factor for inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26970682

  4. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  5. The Aluminum Deep Processing Project of North United Aluminum Landed in Qijiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On April 10,North United Aluminum Company respectively signed investment cooperation agreements with Qijiang Industrial Park and Qineng Electricity&Aluminum Co.,Ltd,signifying the landing of North United Aluminum’s aluminum deep processing project in Qijiang.

  6. [The corrosion resistance of aluminum and aluminum-based alloys studied in artificial model media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakhangirov, A Zh; Doĭnikov, A I; Aboev, V G; Iankovskaia, T A; Karamnova, V S; Sharipov, S M

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum and its alloys, designed for orthodontic employment, were exposed to 4 media simulating the properties of biologic media. The corrosion resistance of the tested alloys was assessed from the degree of aluminum migration to simulation media solutions, which was measured by the neutron activation technique. Aluminum alloy with magnesium and titanium has shown the best corrosion resistance. PMID:1799002

  7. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić Lela Munjas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon (Si is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4, as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K, the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel, silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide, and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4 in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  8. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D2/ = 1.9 x 10-2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup --1/2/ s-1cm-1. The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  9. X-ray scattering on layered silicates in polymeric matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocomposites based on polymeric matrices have been studied via small angle X-ray scattering with respect to the dispersion and the orientation of filler particles. Both natural and synthetic layered silicates were used as filler particles. For this purpose, a software was developed which allows to determine the size and the size distribution of nanoparticles with various geometries by analyzing small angle X-ray scattering data. In contrast to conventional software, the one developed and used here is based on free distribution functions, e.g. no particular size distribution is pre-supposed. By example of three different reference systems it could be shown that the software works reliably and accurately. Using the computer-based evaluation of scattering data, significantly more information can be obtained about the samples compared to classical analytical and numerical evaluation schemes. By means of this software, the inner structure of the microgel PVCUAAEM (Poly(N-Vinylcaprolactam- co-acetoacetoxyethylmethacrylat)) filled with a synthetic layered silicate was investigated as a function of temperature. For this temperature-sensitive microgelnanocomposite, the dispersion of the silicate layers was determined and a structural model was developed. It could be shown that with increasing temperature, the layers move closer together and, depending on the amount of filler content, the filler particles drift to the surface of the nanocomposites. Additionally, for higher filler contents the charged layered silicate prevents the typical reduction of the particle radius, which is otherwise observed with increasing temperature. For polyethylene filled with natural layered silicate, it could be shown that small angle X-ray scattering allows the quantitative evaluation of the orientation of platelet-shaped nanoparticles in a polymeric matrix. Based on spatially resolved measurements of injection-molded tensile bars, the degree of orientation could be determined quantitatively

  10. Aluminum Silicate Nanotube Modification of Cotton-Like Siloxane-poly(L-lactic acid)-vaterite Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Daiheon Lee; Hirotaka Maeda; Akiko Obata; Keiichi Inukai; Katsuya Kato; Toshihiro Kasuga

    2013-01-01

    In our earlier work, a cotton-like biodegradable composite, consisting of poly(L-lactic acid) with siloxane-containing vaterite, has been prepared by electrospinning. In the present work, the fibers skeleton of the cotton-like composites was modified successfully with imogolite, which is hydrophilic and biocompatible, via a dip process using ethanol diluted solution to improve the cellular initial attachment. Almost no change in the fiber morphology after the surface modification was observed...

  11. Electron microscopy of phase and microstructure development in aluminum silicate ceramics for the immobilization of transuranium element containing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Institute for Nuclear Waste Technology (INE) with the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KfK) ceramic materials were evaluated as matrices for the solidification of radioactive alpha-bearing wastes. A suitable ceramic material, KAB 78, which is prepared from the raw materials kaolin, bentonite, and corundum, was examined with and without waste-simulating oxides. Applied methods were X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, both in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The effects of the sintering conditions and of the waste materials' nature are revealed and discussed. (orig.)

  12. High-pressure optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on synthetic cobalt aluminum silicate garnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Taran, Michail; Nestola, Fabrizio; Ohashi, Haruo;

    2007-01-01

    The pressure-induced behavior of spin-allowed dd-bands of VIIICo2+ in the absorption spectra of synthetic Co3Al2Si3O12 garnet was studied from 10-4 to 13 GPa. The plots of the peak energy vs. pressure for the three sharpest well resolved bands at ca. 5160, 17 680, and 18 740 cm-1 display small...... but discernible breaks in linear relations between 4 and 5 GPa. Datafromsingle-crystalX-raydiffractionData from single-crystal X-ray diffraction likewise show discontinuities in trends of CoO8 polyhedral volume and distortion, and Co-O and Si-O bond distances over this pressure range. These effects are related...

  13. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  14. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  15. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  16. Sanmenxia strives to create aluminum industrial base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Contradiction between rich alumina resource and relatively weak electrolytic aluminum production capacity is the "bottleneck" inhibiting development of aluminum industry in San-menxia. During the period of "11th Five-Year Development", Sanmenxia will relay on its

  17. Aluminum induced proteome changes in tomato cotyledons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotyledons of tomato seedlings that germinated in a 20 µM AlK(SO4)2 solution remained chlorotic while those germinated in an aluminum free medium were normal (green) in color. Previously, we have reported the effect of aluminum toxicity on root proteome in tomato seedlings (Zhou et al. J Exp Bot, 20...

  18. Chemical bonding and structural ordering of cations in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific surrounding of cations in multicomponent silicate glasses is briefly presented. Information about interatomic distances and site geometry may be gained by using spectroscopic methods among which x-ray absorption spectroscopy may be used for the largest number of glass components. Scattering of x-rays and neutrons may also be used to determine the importance of medium range order around specific cations. All the existing data show that cations occur in sites with a well-defined geometry, which are in most cases connected to the silicate polymeric network. Medium range order has been detected around cations such as Ti, Ca and Ni, indicating that these elements have an heterogeneous distribution within the glassy matrix. (authors)

  19. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  20. EXAFS studies of sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved Th, U, Np, and Pu have been studied using the EXAFS technique. Th4+, U4+, Np4+, and Pu4+ ions in the silicate glasses are 8-fold coordinated to oxygen neighbors. The higher valent U6+ and Np5+ ions have complex local symmetries. The U6+ ions appear in a uranyl configuration with 2 oxygen atoms at 1.85A and 4 at 2.25A from the U ion. The Np5+ local symmetry is more complex and difficult to determine uniquely. The U6+ glasses show substantial clustering of the uranium atoms. A structural model, with nearly planar uranyl sheets sandwiched between alkali and silica layers, is used to explain the U6+ EXAFS data. This model allows us to understand why U6+ ions are much more soluble in the glasses than the actinide 4+ ions. 4 references, 2 figures

  1. Lanthanum containing silicates and germanates as halogen apatites and oxyapatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halogen apatites M4La6(XO4)6Z2 and oxyapatites M2La8(XO4)6O2 have been prepared: M = Sr, Pb, Ba; X = Si, Ge, and Z = F, Cl. The lattice parameters are discussed. The i.r. active internal vibrations of the silicate ion are assigned. A translational vibration of the 'free' oxide ions in the oxyapatites causes an intense absorption at about 400 cm-1 (silicates) and 350 cm-1 (germanates), respectively. The products 'M3La6(XO4)6' and 'M4La6(XO4)6O' are mixtures of various phases. Their respective apatite phase is a solid solution between M2La8(XO4)6O2 and the defect apatite M4La6(XO4)6Osub(vacant). Its composition mostly approximates to M2La8(XO4)6O2, however. (author)

  2. In vitro bioactivity of a tricalcium silicate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent of Portland cement and the responsible for their mechanical strength at early stages. In order to be used as and additive of conventional calcium phosphate cement (CPC), in vitro bioactivity of a calcium silicate cement (CSC) after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days was study. The cement was obtained by mixing Ca3SiO5, obtained by sol-gel process, and a Na2HPO4 solution. The morphological and structural changes of the material before and after soaking were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the formation of a layer of a Hydroxyapatite (HA) onto the CSC cement after soaking for 1h in SBF that became denser with the increase of soaking time. The study suggests that Ca3SiO5 would be an effective additive to improve the bioactivity and long term strength of conventional CPC. (author)

  3. Silicates in D-type symbiotic stars: an ISO overview

    CERN Document Server

    Angeloni, R; Ciroi, S; Rafanelli, P

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the IR spectral features of a sample of D-type symbiotic stars. Analyzing unexploited ISO-SWS data, deriving the basic observational parameters of dust bands and comparing them with respect to those observed in other astronomical sources, we try to highlight the effect of environment on grain chemistry and physic. We find strong amorphous silicate emission bands at 10 micron and 18 micron in a large fraction of the sample. The analysis of the 10 micron band, along with a direct comparison with several astronomical sources, reveals that silicate dust in symbiotic stars shows features between the characteristic circumstellar environments and the interstellar medium. This indicates an increasing reprocessing of grains in relation to specific symbiotic behavior of the objects. A correlation between the central wavelength of the 10 and 18 micron dust bands is found. By the modeling of IR spectral lines we investigate also dust grains conditions within the shocked nebulae. Both the unusual depletion ...

  4. Chemical Fractionation in the Silicate Vapor Atmosphere of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Eiler, John; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.10.03

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance to questions of lunar origin, the chemical composition of the Moon is not precisely known. In recent years, however, the isotopic composition of lunar samples has been determined to high precision and found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial mantle despite widespread isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar System. In the context of the giant-impact hypothesis, this level of isotopic homogeneity can evolve if the proto-lunar disk and post-impact Earth undergo turbulent mixing into a single uniform reservoir while the system is extensively molten and partially vaporized. In the absence of liquid-vapor separation, such a model leads to the lunar inheritance of the chemical composition of the terrestrial magma ocean. Hence, the turbulent mixing model raises the question of how chemical differences arose between the silicate Earth and Moon. Here we explore the consequences of liquid-vapor separation in one of the settings relevant to the lunar composition: the silicate vapor atmosphere...

  5. Structural characterization of gel-derived calcium silicate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiszterics, Anikó; Rosta, László; Peterlik, Herwig; Rohonczy, János; Kubuki, Shiro; Henits, Péter; Sinkó, Katalin

    2010-09-30

    The main aim of this study is to synthesize calcium silicate ceramics that exhibit suitable properties to be used for biomedical applications. In the present work, attention was paid to the understanding of processing-structure relationships. A particular effort was made to clarify the identification of Ca-O-Si bonds by means of spectroscopy. The calcium silicate systems were prepared via a sol-gel route, varying the chemical compositions, the catalyst concentration, and the temperature and time of aging and heat treatment. The processes and the phases evolved during the sol-gel procedure were determined. The bond systems were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and the aggregate structures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. PMID:20828114

  6. Silica from triethylammonium tris (oxalato) silicate (IV) thermal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica can be obtained from differents precursors by differents methods. In this paper it has been investigated the thermal decomposition of triethylammonium tris (oxalato) silicate (IV) to render silica. Among the trisoxalato-complexes of silicon preparation methods reviewed it has been used the Bessler's one with the reflux adaptaded in microwave oven. Thermal decomposition analysis of the compound has been made by TG-DTG and DTA curves. Silica powders obtained and heated between 300 to 9000C in a oven were characterized by infrared vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray powder difraction and nitrogen adsorption isotherm (BET). The triethylammonium tris (oxalato) silicate (IV) thermal decomposition takes place at 3000C and the silica powder obtained is non cristalline with impurities that are eliminated with heating at 4000C. (author)

  7. Effective elastic moduli of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Polymer-layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites exhibit some mechanical properties that are much better than conventional polymer filled composites. A relatively low content of layered silicate yields a significant enhancement of material performance. After the volume fraction of clay reaches a relatively low "critical value"; however, further increasing does not show a greater stiffening effect. This phenomenon is contrary to previous micromechanical pre-dictions and is not understood well. Based on the analysis on the microstructures of PLS nanocomposites, the present note provides an insight into the physical micromechanisms of the above unexpected phenomenon. The Mori-Tanaka scheme and a numerical method are employed to estimate the effec-tive elastic moduli of such a composite.

  8. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  9. Dosimetric investigations of Tb3+ doped strontium silicate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In past few decades, silicates are found to exhibit excellent luminescent properties in the blue, green and red spectral regions. Eu2+ doped Strontium Silicate is known to be an excellent yellow phosphor applicable in LED based solid-state lighting applications. Tb3+ doped Mg2SiO4 is known to be a promising TLD material for the dosimetry due to high TL sensitivity and its use to access the real time dose has been recently reported. Also amongst several rare earths, Tb3+ is known to be used as a green light emitting luminescent materials because of the 5D4-7F5 transition peak at around 545 nm of the Tb3+ ion. However, luminescence properties of SrSiO3:Tb3+ has been rarely studied. In this paper we report the dosimetric properties of Tb doped SrSiO3 synthesized by co-precipitation technique

  10. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous Ooze Sediments, Ormen Lange Field, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    structure is complex and the solids are mechanically fragile and hydrous. Normal petrophysical methods used in formation evaluation might not be suitable for interpreting siliceous ooze. For example, density and neutron logging tools are calibrated to give correct porosity readings in a limestone formation......, but apparent porosity indications in any other lithology, such as siliceous ooze, are wrong and they should be corrected. The apparent bulk density log should be influenced by the hydrogen in opal as also the neutron porosity tools because they are sensitive to the amount of hydrogen in a formation...... and to a lesser extent upon other elements. It is normally assumed that the contribution to the neutron porosity measurement comes entirely from the hydrogen in fluids fully occupying the pore space. But, elements other than hydrogen that exist in the rock matrix do contribute to the signal; and...

  11. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  12. Trends in the global aluminum fabrication industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subodh; Yin, Weimin

    2007-02-01

    The aluminum fabrication industry has become more vital to the global economy as international aluminum consumption has grown steadily in the past decades. Using innovation, value, and sustainability, the aluminum industry is strengthening its position not only in traditional packaging and construction applications but also in the automotive and aerospace markets to become more competitive and to face challenges from other industries and higher industrial standards. The aluminum fabrication industry has experienced a significant geographical shift caused by rapid growth in emerging markets in countries such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Market growth and distribution will vary with different patterns of geography and social development; the aluminum industry must be part of the transformation and keep pace with market developments to benefit.

  13. Aluminum-based metal-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Cody A.; Martinez, Jose Antonio Bautista

    2016-01-12

    Provided in one embodiment is an electrochemical cell, comprising: (i) a plurality of electrodes, comprising a fuel electrode that comprises aluminum and an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the aluminum is oxidized at the fuel electrode and oxygen is reduced at the air electrode, and (ii) an ionically conductive medium, comprising an organic solvent; wherein during non-use of the cell, the organic solvent promotes formation of a protective interface between the aluminum of the fuel electrode and the ionically conductive medium, and wherein at an onset of the discharge mode, at least some of the protective interface is removed from the aluminum to thereafter permit oxidation of the aluminum during the discharge mode.

  14. Penetration experiments in aluminum 1100 targets using soda-lime glass projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William E.; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry L.

    1995-01-01

    The cratering and penetration behavior of annealed aluminum 1100 targets, with thickness varied from several centimeters to ultra-thin foils less than 1 micrometer thick, were experimentally investigated using 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s. The objective was to establish quantitative, dimensional relationships between initial impact conditions (impact velocity, projectile diameter, and target thickness) and the diameter of the resulting crater or penetration hole. Such dimensional relationships and calibration experiments are needed to extract the diameters and fluxes of hypervelocity particles from space-exposed surfaces and to predict the performance of certain collisional shields. The cratering behavior of aluminum 1100 is fairly well predicted. However, crater depth is modestly deeper for our silicate impactors than the canonical value based on aluminum projectiles and aluminum 6061-T6 targets. The ballistic-limit thickness was also different. These differences attest to the great sensitivity of detailed crater geometry and penetration behavior on the physical properties of both the target and impactor. Each penetration experiment was equipped with a witness plate to monitor the nature of the debris plume emanating from the rear of the target. This plume consists of both projectile fragments and target debris. Both penetration hole and witness-plate spray patterns systematically evolve in response to projectile diameter/target thickness. The relative dimensions of the projectile and target totally dominate the experimental products documented in this report; impact velocity is an important contributor as well to the evolution of penetration holes, but is of subordinate significance for the witness-plate spray patterns.

  15. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  16. The Characterisation of Silicate Glasses Implanted with Ag+ Ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Kormunda, M.; Kolitsch, A.

    Melville: American Institute of Physics, 2011, s. 327-334. ISBN 978-0-7354-0986-6. ISSN 0094-243X. [11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques. Crete (GR), 12.06.2011-18.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ion implantation * silicate glasses * metal nanoparticles * Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy * optical absorption Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  17. Forming the Moon from terrestrial silicate-rich material

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, R.J.; Anisichkin, V. F.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent high-precision measurements of the isotopic composition of lunar rocks demonstrate that the bulk silicate Earth and the Moon show an unexpectedly high degree of similarity. This is inconsistent with one of the primary results of classic dynamical simulations of the widely accepted giant impact model for the formation of the Moon, namely that most of the mass of the Moon originates from the impactor, not Earth. Resolution of this discrepancy without changing the main premises of the gia...

  18. Analysis of silicate rocks by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at developing an all-purpose method for the determination of various elements in silicate rocks, by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The sample is prepared by borax fusion, in the presence of cobalt oxide acting as an inner standard meant for eliminating certain errors. Contents are computed in comparison with outer standards having a chemical composition akin to that of the rock sample under analysis. (authors)

  19. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    OpenAIRE

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E. Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  20. Strength and impermeability recovery of siliceous mudstone from complete failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide migration can be undesirably increased by weakening the mechanical properties of a rock mass in the excavated disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnels of a geological disposal facility for high level radioactive waste. Laboratory testing of loading stress and loading time on failed siliceous mudstone specimens has identified the potential for the long-term recovery of the strength and impermeability of the rock mass in the EDZ. (author)

  1. Coloration processes in soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of mechanical stretching upon room temperature γ coloration of soda-lime silicate (SLS) glasses has been investigated. Optical absorption measurements were performed to follow the formation and thermal bleaching of the induced color centers. It has been shown that the mechanical deformation reduces the coloration effectivity and thermal stability of the created centers. It has been proposed that increase of the concentration of the non-bridging oxygens accelerate the bleaching processes

  2. Geotechnical properties of siliceous sediments from the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    COMMUNICATIONS CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 82, NO. 3, 10 FEBRUARY 2002 Geotechnical properties of siliceous sediments from the Central Indian B a sin N. H. Khadge National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India Indian Deep - sea... , for baseline data collec - tion. A NW - SE trending strip of 3000 m length and RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 82, NO. 3, 10 FEBRUARY 2002 339 200 m width was selected for carrying out simulated disturbance studies in this area...

  3. Silicate Scales Formation During ASP Flooding: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Abubakar Umar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reviewed and assessed some of the inhibition techniques used in the industry with regards to handling oilfield scales in general and silicates scales in particular. Conventional scale inhibitors used are facing restrictions world over, due to their ecotoxicity and non-biodegradability, which has led to the call for green scale inhibition in the oil and industry. Due to the inefficiency of the conventional primary and secondary recovery methods to yield above 20-40% OOIP, the need for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR techniques to recover a higher proportion of the Oil Originally in Place (OOIP has become vital. Alkaline/Surfactant/Polymer (ASP is one of such techniques and has proven successful due to its ability to raise displacement and sweep efficiency. Despite its popularity as a potentially cost-effective chemical flooding method, it is not without (its problems, one of which is the excessive formation of silicate scales. Silicate scale is a very serious problem in the oil and gas industry; which forms in perforation holes, casing surface, tubing and surface facilities. During an ASP flood, as the flood progresses into the production well, liquid produced from different layers intermingle, leading to a rapid decrease in the pH value of the mixed waters. Other factors such as temperature, pressure, divalent cations present also play some roles, but pH variation plays the major role. These among other factors facilitate precipitation of silicates and its deposition on tubing, surface pipeline, pumps and surface production facilities resulting in excessive production loss; increasing the average work over periods, which influences the production and causes low commercial effectiveness. Green scale inhibitors are considered as alternative scale inhibitors due to their value-added benefits to the environment with respect to the methods of treating oilfield scales. It is recommended that the industry should shift to the green technology as

  4. Aluminum recovery as a product with high added value using aluminum hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Granular and compact aluminum dross were physically and chemically characterized. • A relationship between density, porosity and metal content from dross was established. • Chemical reactions involving aluminum in landfill and negative consequences are shown. • A processing method for aluminum recovering from aluminum dross was developed. • Aluminum was recovered as an value product with high grade purity such as alumina. -- Abstract: The samples of hazardous aluminum solid waste such as dross were physically and chemically characterized. A relationship between density, porosity and metal content of dross was established. The paper also examines the chemical reactions involving aluminum dross in landfill and the negative consequences. To avoid environmental problems and to recovery the aluminum, a processing method was developed and aluminum was recovered as an added value product such as alumina. This method refers to a process at low temperature, in more stages: acid leaching, purification, precipitation and calcination. At the end of this process aluminum was extracted, first as Al3+ soluble ions and final as alumina product. The composition of the aluminum dross and alumina powder obtained were measured by applying the leaching tests, using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and chemical analysis. The mineralogical composition of aluminum dross samples and alumina product were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The method presented in this work allows the use of hazardous aluminum solid waste as raw material to recover an important fraction from soluble aluminum content as an added value product, alumina, with high grade purity (99.28%)

  5. Aluminum phosphate shows more adjuvanticity than Aluminum hydroxide in recombinant hepatitis –B vaccine formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although a number of investigation have been carried out to find alternative adjuvants to aluminum salts in vaccine formulations, they are still extensively used due to their good track record of safety, low cost and proper adjuvanticity with a variety of antigens. Adsorption of antigens onto aluminum compounds depends heavily on electrostatic forces between adjuvant and antigen. Commercial recombinant protein hepatitis B vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant is facing low induction of immunity in some sections of the vaccinated population. To follow the current global efforts in finding more potent hepatitis B vaccine formulation, adjuvanticity of aluminum phosphate has been compared to aluminum hydroxide. Materials and methods: The adjuvant properties of aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate in a vaccine formulation containing a locally manufactured hepatitis B (HBs surface antigen was evaluated in Balb/C mice. The formulations were administered intra peritoneally (i.p. and the titers of antibody which was induced after 28 days were determined using ELISA technique. The geometric mean of antibody titer (GMT, seroconversion and seroprotection rates, ED50 and relative potency of different formulations were determined. Results: All the adjuvanicity markers obtained in aluminum phosphate formulation were significantly higher than aluminum hydroxide. The geometric mean of antibody titer of aluminum phosphate was approximately three folds more than aluminum hydroxide. Conclusion: Aluminum phosphate showed more adjuvanticity than aluminum hydroxide in hepatitis B vaccine. Therefore the use of aluminum phosphate as adjuvant in this vaccine may lead to higher immunity with longer duration of effects in vaccinated groups.

  6. A Review: Fundamental Aspects of Silicate Mesoporous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid A. ALOthman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicate mesoporous materials have received widespread interest because of their potential applications as supports for catalysis, separation, selective adsorption, novel functional materials, and use as hosts to confine guest molecules, due to their extremely high surface areas combined with large and uniform pore sizes. Over time a constant demand has developed for larger pores with well-defined pore structures. Silicate materials, with well-defined pore sizes of about 2.0–10.0 nm, surpass the pore-size constraint (<2.0 nm of microporous zeolites. They also possess extremely high surface areas (>700 m2 g−1 and narrow pore size distributions. Instead of using small organic molecules as templating compounds, as in the case of zeolites, long chain surfactant molecules were employed as the structure-directing agent during the synthesis of these highly ordered materials. The structure, composition, and pore size of these materials can be tailored during synthesis by variation of the reactant stoichiometry, the nature of the surfactant molecule, the auxiliary chemicals, the reaction conditions, or by post-synthesis functionalization techniques. This review focuses mainly on a concise overview of silicate mesoporous materials together with their applications. Perusal of the review will enable researchers to obtain succinct information about microporous and mesoporous materials.

  7. Translational dynamics of water in a nanoporous layered silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sankar; Chowdhuri, Zema; Peral, Inmaculada; Neumann, Dan A.; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tompsett, Geoffrey; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy have been used to study the translational diffusion of water molecules in the unusual layered material AMH-3, which consists of (zeolitelike) three-dimensionally nanoporous silicate layers spaced by (claylike) interlayer regions. The synthesis of AMH-3 and its characterization by Si29 NMR, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy, are described. An analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra using the random jump diffusion model reveals two translational diffusive motions clearly separated in time scales: a fast process ( Dtilde 10-9m2/s at 300 K), and a much slower process ( Dtilde 10-11m2/s at 300 K). Considering the structural model of AMH-3 and the transport properties extracted from the QENS data, it is suggested that the slower motion corresponds to diffusion by water molecules in the interlayer spaces whereas the fast process involves diffusion in the silicate layer. This first investigation of transport phenomena in nanoporous layered silicates like AMH-3 indicates that they have the potential to offer mass transport properties different from zeolite materials and layered clays.

  8. Development of Li+ alumino-silicate ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, one strategy is to deposit most of the ion energy at the peak of energy loss (dE/dx) with a low (E < 5 MeV) kinetic energy beam and a thin target. Lower mass ions have a peak dE/dx at a lower kinetic energy. To this end, a small lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate source has been fabricated, and its emission limit has been measured. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1000-1150 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Alumino-silicates sources of K+ and Cs+ have been used extensively in beam experiments, but there are additional challenges for the preparation of high-quality Li+ sources: There are tighter tolerances in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. We report on recent measurements ofhigh ( up to 35 mA/cm2) current density from a Li+ source. Ion species identification of possible contaminants is being verified with a Wien (E x B) filter, and via time-of-flight.

  9. Electrical properties of iron doped apatite-type lanthanum silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Qingle; ZHANG Hua

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Fe doping on the electrical properties of lanthanum silicates was investigated.The apatite-type lanthanum silicates La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 (x=0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0) were synthesized via sol-gel process.The unit cell volume increased with Fe doping because the ionic radius of Fe3+ ion is larger than that of Si4+ ion.The conductivities of La10Si6-xFexO27 x/2 first increased and then decreased with the increasing of Fe content.The increase of the conductivity might be attributed to the distortion of the cell lattice,which assisted the migration of the interstitial oxygen ions.The decrease of the conductivity might be caused by the lower concentration of interstitial oxygen ions.The optimum Fe doping content in lanthanum silicates was 0.6.La10Si5.4Fe0.6O26.7 exhibited the highest ionic conductivity of 2.712× 10-2 S/cm at 800 ℃.The dependence of conductivity on oxygen partial pressure p(O2) suggested that the conductivity of La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 was mainly contributed by ionic conductivity.

  10. Proton tunneling in low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1 (monoclinic phase of CsHSi2O5), anomalous infrared absorption bands observed at 93, 155, 1210, and 1220 cm−1 are assigned to the vibrational mode of protons, which contribute to the strong hydrogen bonding between terminal oxygen atoms of silicate chain (O–O distance = 2.45 Å). The integrated absorbance (oscillator strength) for those modes is drastically enhanced at low temperatures. The analysis of integrated absorbance employing two different anharmonic double-minimum potentials makes clear that proton tunneling through the potential barrier yields an energy splitting of the ground state. The absorption bands at 93 and 155 cm−1, which correspond to the different vibrational modes of protons, are attributed to the optical transition between the splitting levels (excitation from the ground state (n = 0) to the first excited state (n = 1)). Moreover, the absorption bands at 1210 and 1220 cm−1 are identified as the optical transition from the ground state (n = 0) to the third excited state (n = 3). Weak Coulomb interactions in between the adjacent protons generate two types of vibrational modes: symmetric mode (93 and 1210 cm−1) and asymmetric mode (155 and 1220 cm−1). The broad absorption at 100–600 cm−1 reveals an emergence of collective mode due to the vibration of silicate chain coupled not only with the local oscillation of Cs+ but also with the proton oscillation relevant to the second excited state (n = 2)

  11. Kinetics of structure formation in PP/layered silicate nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP/organophilized montmorillonite (OMMT and polypropylene/organophilized montmorillonite/maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP composites were prepared in an internal mixer under a wide range of processing conditions to study the kinetics of structure formation. Structure and properties were characterized by a variety of techniques. The gallery structure of the organophilic silicate changed in spite of the fact that no compatibilizer was added to PP/OMMT composites. Silicate reflection shifted towards smaller 2θangles, broadened and its intensity decreased indicating intercalation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM micrographs even showed individual platelets at long mixing times. However, the extent and direction of changes in the gallery structure of the silicate did not justify those observed in properties. The analysis of the results and additional experiments proved that the degradation of the polymer also takes place during processing leading to the formation of carbonyl and/or carboxyl groups, as well as to the decrease of molecular weight. The modification of the chain structure of the polymer influences interfacial interactions and the intercalation process. Some properties are directly determined by molecular weight (rheological properties, elongation. Both the clay and the MAPP seem to accelerate degradation. Thermooxidative degradation must have disadvantageous effect during the application of PP nanocomposites and needs further study.

  12. Crystalline silicate dust around evolved stars I. The sample stars

    CERN Document Server

    Molster, F J; Tielens, A G G M; Barlow, M J

    2002-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series of three where we present the first comprehensive inventory of solid state emission bands observed in a sample of 17 oxygen-rich circumstellar dust shells surrounding evolved stars. The data were taken with the Short and Long Wavelength Spectrographs on board of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and cover the 2.4 to 195 micron wavelength range. The spectra show the presence of broad 10 and 18 micron bands that can be attributed to amorphous silicates. In addition, at least 49 narrow bands are found whose position and width indicate they can be attributed to crystalline silicates. Almost all of these bands were not known before ISO. We have measured the peak positions, widths and strengths of the individual, continuum subtracted bands. Based on these measurements, we were able to order the spectra in sequence of decreasing crystalline silicate band strength. We found that the strength of the emission bands correlates with the geometry of the circumstellar shell, as derive...

  13. Electrochemical Studies on Silicate and Bicarbonate Ions for Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohorich, Michael E.; Lamb, Joshua; Chandra, Dhanesh; Daemen, Jaak; Rebak, Raul B.

    2010-10-01

    Several types of carbon and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels are being considered for use in the underground reinforcement of the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. In this study, potentiodynamic polarization under reducing conditions was used to determine the corrosion rates (CRs) and passivity behavior of AISI 4340 steel using different combinations of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), in both pure water (PW) and simulated seawater (SW, 3.5 pct NaCl). These experiments were carried out to examine the potential inhibiting properties of the silicate or bicarbonate ions on the surface of the steel. The addition of sodium silicate to solution reduced the observed CR at room temperature to 19 μm/y at 0.005 M concentration and 7 μm/y at 0.025 M concentration in PW. The addition of sodium bicarbonate increased the CR from 84 μm/y (C = 0.1 M) to 455 μm/y (C = 1 M). These same behaviors were also observed at higher temperatures.

  14. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  15. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  16. Oxidation dynamics of aluminum nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum nanorods (Al-NRs) are promising fuels for pyrotechnics due to the high contact areas with oxidizers, but their oxidation mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study thermally initiated burning of oxide-coated Al-NRs with different diameters (D = 26, 36, and 46 nm) in oxygen environment. We found that thinner Al-NRs burn faster due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio. The reaction initiates with the dissolution of the alumina shell into the molten Al core to generate heat. This is followed by the incorporation of environmental oxygen atoms into the resulting Al-rich shell, thereby accelerating the heat release. These results reveal an unexpectedly active role of the alumina shell as a “nanoreactor” for oxidation

  17. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 800 C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V

  18. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Sohn, H. Y.; Cutler, Raymond A.

    2013-11-01

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB2) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB2 in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB2 beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB2 and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB2 exhibited O2-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O2 than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB2 suggested that Al2O3-B2O3 interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al2O3 on aluminum particles into a Al4B2O9 shell, while the same Al4B2O9 developed a needle-like morphology in AlB2 that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB2, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments.

  19. Replacement of glass in the Nakhla meteorite by berthierine: Implications for understanding the origins of aluminum-rich phyllosilicates on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin R.; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias

    2016-07-01

    A scanning and transmission electron microscope study of aluminosilicate glasses within melt inclusions from the Martian meteorite Nakhla shows that they have been replaced by berthierine, an aluminum-iron serpentine mineral. This alteration reaction was mediated by liquid water that gained access to the glasses along fractures within enclosing augite and olivine grains. Water/rock ratios were low, and the aqueous solutions were circumneutral and reducing. They introduced magnesium and iron that were sourced from the dissolution of olivine, and exported alkalis. Berthierine was identified using X-ray microanalysis and electron diffraction. It is restricted in its occurrence to parts of the melt inclusions that were formerly glass, thus showing that under the ambient physico-chemical conditions, the mobility of aluminum and silicon were low. This discovery of serpentine adds to the suite of postmagmatic hydrous silicates in Nakhla that include saponite and opal-A. Such a variety of secondary silicates indicates that during aqueous alteration compositionally distinct microenvironments developed on sub-millimeter length scales. The scarcity of berthierine in Nakhla is consistent with results from orbital remote sensing of the Martian crust showing very low abundances of aluminum-rich phyllosilicates.

  20. Superhydrophobic coating deposited directly on aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Ana M., E-mail: annaescobarromero@ub.edu; Llorca-Isern, Nuria

    2014-06-01

    This study develops an alternative method for enhancing superhydrophobicity on aluminum surfaces with an amphiphilic reagent such as the dodecanoic acid. The goal is to induce superhydrophobicity directly through a simple process on pure (99.9 wt%) commercial aluminum. The initial surface activation leading to the formation of the superhydrophobic coating is studied using confocal microscopy. Superhydrophobic behavior is analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The highest contact angle (approaching 153°) was obtained after forming hierarchical structures with a particular roughness obtained by grinding and polishing microgrooves on the aluminum surface together with the simultaneous action of HCl and dodecanoic acid. The results also showed that after immersion in the ethanol-acidic-fatty acid solutions, they reacted chemically through the action of the fatty acid, on the aluminum surface. The mechanism is analyzed by TOF-SIMS and XPS in order to determine the molecules involved in the reaction. The TOF-SIMS analysis revealed that the metal and its oxides seem to be necessary, and that free-aluminum is anchored to the fatty acid molecules and to the alumina molecules present in the medium. Consequently, both metallic aluminum and aluminum oxides are necessary in order to form the compound responsible for superhydrophobicity.

  1. Modification of galvannealed steel through aluminum addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum is believed to modify and to some extent control the coating characteristics of commercially produced galvanneal sheet steel. These include mechanical, chemical, and aesthetic properties. Whereas the aluminum added to the molten zinc bath is known to form intermetallics before the steel is annealed, our research is primarily concerned with the effect aluminum has on suppression or enhancement of the particular iron-zinc alloy phases in the coating during galvannealing. The microstructure of four commercially important iron-zinc intermetallic phases containing varying aluminum content between 0-1.5 weight percent has been studied. It is also believed that an iron-aluminum alloy, known as the inhibition layer, forms on the steel surface following hot dipping and prior to annealing. Transmission and scattering Moessbauer spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction have been used to identify iron-zinc and iron-aluminum alloys present in the coatings. Discussion will be presented on the effect aluminum has on phase suppression for Fe-Zn alloys prepared in commercially produced galvanneal

  2. Lead exposure from aluminum cookware in Cameroon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D.; Kobunski, Peter A. [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, 401 College Ave., Ashland University, Ashland, OH 44805 (United States); Kuepouo, Gilbert [Research and Education Centre for Development (CREPD), Yaounde (Cameroon); Corbin, Rebecca W. [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, 401 College Ave., Ashland University, Ashland, OH 44805 (United States); Gottesfeld, Perry, E-mail: pgottesfeld@okinternational.org [Occupational Knowledge International, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Blood lead levels have decreased following the removal of lead from gasoline in most of the world. However, numerous recent studies provide evidence that elevated blood lead levels persist in many low and middle-income countries around the world at much higher prevalence than in the more developed countries. One potential source of lead exposure that has not been widely investigated is the leaching of lead from artisanal aluminum cookware, which is commonly used in the developing world. Twenty-nine samples of aluminum cookware and utensils manufactured by local artisans in Cameroon were collected and analyzed for their potential to release lead during cooking. Source materials for this cookware included scrap metal such as engine parts, radiators, cans, and construction materials. The lead content of this cookware is relatively low (< 1000 ppm by X-ray fluorescence), however significant amounts of lead, as well as aluminum and cadmium were released from many of the samples using dilute acetic acid extractions at boiling and ambient temperatures. Potential exposures to lead per serving were estimated to be as high as 260 μg, indicating that such cookware can pose a serious health hazard. We conclude that lead, aluminum and cadmium can migrate from this aluminum cookware during cooking and enter food at levels exceeding recommended public health guidelines. Our results support the need to regulate lead content of materials used to manufacture these pots. Artisanal aluminum cookware may be a major contributor to lead poisoning throughout the developing world. Testing of aluminum cookware in other developing countries is warranted. - Highlights: • Cookware is manufactured in Cameroon from scrap aluminum including car parts. • Twenty-nine cookware samples were evaluated for their potential to leach lead. • Boiling extractions to simulate the effects of cooking released significant lead. • Potential lead exposures per serving are estimated as high as 260 μg.

  3. Lead exposure from aluminum cookware in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood lead levels have decreased following the removal of lead from gasoline in most of the world. However, numerous recent studies provide evidence that elevated blood lead levels persist in many low and middle-income countries around the world at much higher prevalence than in the more developed countries. One potential source of lead exposure that has not been widely investigated is the leaching of lead from artisanal aluminum cookware, which is commonly used in the developing world. Twenty-nine samples of aluminum cookware and utensils manufactured by local artisans in Cameroon were collected and analyzed for their potential to release lead during cooking. Source materials for this cookware included scrap metal such as engine parts, radiators, cans, and construction materials. The lead content of this cookware is relatively low (< 1000 ppm by X-ray fluorescence), however significant amounts of lead, as well as aluminum and cadmium were released from many of the samples using dilute acetic acid extractions at boiling and ambient temperatures. Potential exposures to lead per serving were estimated to be as high as 260 μg, indicating that such cookware can pose a serious health hazard. We conclude that lead, aluminum and cadmium can migrate from this aluminum cookware during cooking and enter food at levels exceeding recommended public health guidelines. Our results support the need to regulate lead content of materials used to manufacture these pots. Artisanal aluminum cookware may be a major contributor to lead poisoning throughout the developing world. Testing of aluminum cookware in other developing countries is warranted. - Highlights: • Cookware is manufactured in Cameroon from scrap aluminum including car parts. • Twenty-nine cookware samples were evaluated for their potential to leach lead. • Boiling extractions to simulate the effects of cooking released significant lead. • Potential lead exposures per serving are estimated as high as 260 μg.

  4. Fatigue analysis of aluminum drill pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ribeiro Plácido

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was performed to investigate the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of aluminum drill pipes. Initially, the fatigue properties were determined through small-scale tests performed in an optic-mechanical fatigue apparatus. Additionally, full-scale fatigue tests were carried out with three aluminum drill pipe specimens under combined loading of cyclic bending and constant axial tension. Finally, a finite element model was developed to simulate the stress field along the aluminum drill pipe during the fatigue tests and to estimate the stress concentration factors inside the tool joints. By this way, it was possible to estimate the stress values in regions not monitored during the fatigue tests.

  5. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

    2005-02-01

    Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

  6. Recycling of Aluminum from Fibre Metal Laminates

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, G.; Xiao, Y; Yang, Y.; Wang, J.; Sun, B; Boom, R.

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of aluminum alloy scrap obtained from delaminated fibre metal laminates (FMLs) was studied through high temperature refining in the presence of a salt flux. The aluminum alloy scrap contains approximately mass fraction w(Cu) = 4.4%, w(Mg) = 1.1% and w(Mn) = 0.6% (2024 aluminum alloy). The main objective of this research is to obtain a high metal yield, while maintaining its original alloy compositions. The work focuses on the metal yield and quality of recycled Al alloy under differ...

  7. Changes in porosity of foamed aluminum during solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to control the porosity of foamed aluminum, the changes in the porosity of foamed aluminum melt in the processes of foaming and solidification, the distribution of the porosity of foamed aluminum, and the relationship between them were studied. The results indicated that the porosity of foamed aluminum coincides well with the foaming time.

  8. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  9. 49 CFR 229.51 - Aluminum main reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum main reservoirs. 229.51 Section 229.51... Aluminum main reservoirs. (a) Aluminum main reservoirs used on locomotives shall be designed and fabricated as follows: (1) The heads and shell shall be made of Aluminum Association Alloy No. 5083-0,...

  10. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  11. 49 CFR 178.505 - Standards for aluminum drums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for aluminum drums. 178.505 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.505 Standards for aluminum drums. (a) The following are the identification codes for aluminum drums: (1) 1B1 for a non-removable head aluminum...

  12. Nanshan Aluminum Reached Strategic Cooperation with CSR Corporation Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    As a key supplier of aluminum profiles and aluminum plate,sheet and trip products for CSR Corporation Limited,Nanshan Aluminum will join hands with CSR Corporation Limited to reach strategic cooperation.On January 5,Nanshan Aluminum signed strategic cooperation agreement with CSR Sifang Locomotive&Rolling; Stock Co.,Ltd,both

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of catalyzed aluminum carbide formation at aluminum-carbon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenberg, L.; Maruyama, Benji

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum carbide may form at aluminum-graphite interfaces during the high-temperature processing of graphite fiber-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites. The chemical interactions leading to the formation of the aluminum carbide in the solid state involve the breaking of the carbon-carbon bonds within the graphite, the transport of the carbon atoms across the interface, and the reaction with the aluminum to form Al4C3. The aluminum carbide formation process has been followed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of model, thin-film, reaction couples. The overall reaction is shown to be catalyzed by the presence of water vapor. Water at the interface increases reaction kinetics by apparently weakening the bonds between the surface carbon atoms and their substrate. This result is in general agreement with what is known to occur during the oxidation of graphite in air.

  14. A simple aluminum gasket for use with both stainless steel and aluminum flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique has been developed for making aluminum wire seal gaskets of various sizes and shapes for use with both stainless steel and aluminum alloy flanges. The gasket material used is 0.9999 pure aluminum, drawn to a diameter of 3 mm. This material can be easily welded and formed into various shapes. A single gasket has been successfully used up to five times without baking. The largest gasket tested to date is 3.5 m long and was used in the shape of a parallelogram. Previous use of aluminum wire gaskets, including results for bakeout at temperatures from 20 to 660 degree C, is reviewed. A search of the literature indicates that this is the first reported use of aluminum wire gaskets for aluminum alloy flanges. The technique is described in detail, and the results are summarized. 11 refs., 4 figs

  15. Preparation and fluorescence property of red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the energy efficient synthesis of a red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor produced by heating a Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor. Concentration quenching of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was not observed and the emission intensity did not decrease up to a Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio of 0.46. Heating of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate (Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio = 0.32) phosphor produced an amorphous Eu3+-activated calcium silicate phosphor, which had a maximum emission intensity at 870 oC and emitted in the red under near-ultraviolet irradiation (395 nm). The emission intensity of the Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was about half that of a commercial BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphor, and shows great potential for application in white light-emitting diodes.

  16. The silicate absorption profile in the ISM towards the heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418

    CERN Document Server

    Roche, P F; Gonzalez-Martin, O

    2015-01-01

    The 9.7-micron silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium provides important information on the physical and chemical composition of interstellar dust grains. Measurements in the Milky Way have shown that the profile in the diffuse interstellar medium is very similar to the amorphous silicate profiles found in circumstellar dust shells around late M stars, and narrower than the silicate profile in denser star-forming regions. Here, we investigate the silicate absorption profile towards the very heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418, the galaxy with the deepest known silicate absorption feature, and compare it to the profiles seen in the Milky Way. Comparison between the 8-13 micron spectrum obtained with TReCS on Gemini and the larger aperture spectrum obtained from the Spitzer archive indicates that the former isolates the nuclear emission, while Spitzer detects low surface brightness circumnuclear diffuse emission in addition. The silicate absorption profile towards the nucleus is very similar to...

  17. Coordination Structure of Aluminum in Magnesium Aluminum Hydroxide Studied by 27Al NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The coordination structure of aluminum in magnesium aluminum hydroxide was studiedby 27Al NMR. The result showed that tetrahedral aluminum (AlⅣ) existed in magnesiumaluminum hydroxide, and the contents of AlⅣ increased with the increase of the ratio of Al/Mg andwith the peptizing temperature. AlⅣ originated from the so-called Al13 polymer with the structureof one Al tetrahedron surrounded by twelve Al octahedrons.

  18. Diffuse Parenchymal Diseases Associated With Aluminum Use and Primary Aluminum Production

    OpenAIRE

    Taiwo, Oyebode A.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum use and primary aluminum production results in the generation of various particles, fumes, gases, and airborne materials with the potential for inducing a wide range of lung pathology. Nevertheless, the presence of diffuse parenchymal or interstitial lung disease related to these processes remains controversial. The relatively uncommon occurrence of interstitial lung diseases in aluminum-exposed workers—despite the extensive industrial use of aluminum—the potential for concurrent exp...

  19. Differences of growth response to aluminum excess of two Melaleuca trees differing in aluminum resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Houman, Yoshifumi; Tahara, Ko; Shinmachi, Fumie; Noguchi, Akira; Satohiko, Sasaki; Hasegawa, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Factors that inhibit the growth of plants in strongly acidic soils include low pH and aluminum excess. We evaluated two Myrtaceae species (Melaleuca cajuputi and Melaleuca bracteata), which are useful trees in tropical regions due to their resistance to low pH and excessive aluminum, to determine their response characteristics to environmental stresses. The results revealed that M.cajuputi, the growth by the aluminum concentration was not inhibited. However, the root growth of M.bracteata, by...

  20. Aluminum hydroxide nanoparticles show a stronger vaccine adjuvant activity than traditional aluminum hydroxide microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xinran; Aldayel, Abdulaziz M.; Cui, Zhengrong

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum hydroxide is used as a vaccine adjuvant in various human vaccines. Unfortunately, despite its favorable safety profile, aluminum hydroxide can only weakly or moderately potentiate antigen-specific antibody responses. When dispersed in an aqueous solution, aluminum hydroxide forms particulates of 1–20 µm. There is increasing evidence that nanoparticles around or less than 200 nm as vaccine or antigen carriers have a more potent adjuvant activity than large microparticles. In the prese...

  1. Infiltration of molten aluminum in aluminum-nickel powder preform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown by the present author that when molten aluminum comes in contact with nickel, an exothermic reaction is initiated and both stiochiometric and non-stiochiometric phases form at the interface. For nickel powders, such reaction is expected to be much faster due to high surface area to volume ratio of the fine particles. Infiltration of molten metals in ceramics powder preforms has long been used to fabricate near or net-shaped Metal Matrix Composite components. For metallic preforms however, it is important to see if the exothermic reaction compromises the infiltration of the molten metal constituent, i.e. defective components. The current project studied the fabrication of near net-shaped Intermetallic Matrix Composites, (IMC) via molten metal infiltration and subsequent reaction with the metal powder preform. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Optical and SEM microscopes were used to characterize the infiltration, reaction and the resulted microstructure. It is expected that the molten metal temperature, holding time within the molten metal, the infiltration pressure, i.e. metallostatic pressure and the preform compaction pressure are all important parameters to be considered carefully to achieve sound components. The current report examined the feasibility of such fabrication technique and the resultant microstructure. (author)

  2. Productivity and nutritive value of bluestem grass fertilized with calcium and magnesium silicate

    OpenAIRE

    Cinthya Souza Santana; Laura Souza Santos; Greiciele de Morais; Luiz Arnaldo Fernandes; Luciana Castro Geraseev

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of application of calcium and magnesium silicate on the productivity, chemical composition and in situ ruminal degradation of bluestem grass (Andropogon gayanus Kunth, cv. Baeti; Embrapa 23) during the rainy and dry seasons. The design consisted of completely randomized blocks in a 6x2 factorial scheme (six silicate doses and two cutting seasons), arranged in plots subdivided over time. The plots were the calcium and magnesium silicate doses (0, 200, 400, 600, ...

  3. Southwest Aluminum Increase Two Production Lines and May Become the Largest Aluminum Fabricator In the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Recently,Wu Bing,Director of Chongqing Economic Committee,announced at the"Industrial Economy Meeting"that the city will"facilitate the technical upgrade and capacity expansion of the existing production lines at Southwest Aluminum with great efforts on the construction of one additional hot continuous rolling line and one cold continuous rolling line so as to have a comprehensive production ca- pacity of 1.2 million tons on aluminum processing profiles for the achievement of building Southwest Aluminum into the world largest aluminum processing enterprise".

  4. Preliminary Study on Aluminum Content of Foods and Aluminum Intake of Residents in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUGe-Sheng; JINRng-Pei; 等

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum contents of 64 kinds of foods in Tianjin were detrmined.The results showed that the aluminum levels in diffeent kinds of foods varied greatly,and most foodstuffs from natural sources(including contamination from food processing)contained less than 10mg/kg,Aluminum contents were higher in foodstuffs of plant origin,especiallydry beans containing large amounts of aluminum naturally.Lower concentration of aluminum seemed to be present in foodstuffs of animal origin.It was estimated that the potential daily intake of aluminum per person from natural dietary sources in Tianjin was about 3.79 mg.This estimated figure of dietary aluminum intake was very close to the measured data from 24 daily diets of college students.which was 4.86±1.72mg.Considering all the potential sources of natural aluminum in foods.water and the individual habitual food,it would apear that most residents in Tianjin would consume 3-10mg aluminum daily from natural dietary sources.

  5. South West Aluminum: Next year The Capacity of Auto-use Aluminum Sheet will Reach 5000 Tonnes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Following supplying supporting aluminum products for"Shenzhou"spacecraft,"Long March"rocket,Boeing and Airbus,South West Aluminum again tapped new economic growth points,i.e.automobile-use aluminum products.According to what the reporter has learned from South West Aluminum Group recently,this group has finished early stage

  6. China Aluminum Processing Industry Development Report 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2011,China’s aluminum processing industry maintained a high growth rate,with the aluminum output reaching 23,456,000tons,up 20.6% y-o-y.Overshadowed by complicated situation both at home and abroad,China’seconomy slowed down and declined by2.2% y-o-y.In 2011,China’s aluminum processing industry showed a downward tendency,that is,it grew at a high speed before the3rd quarter,but suffered from a shortage of orders in the remaining time of the year and the growth rate fell increasingly.Between January and August,China’s aluminum output rose by 26% y-o-y;

  7. Aluminum-CNF Lightweight Radiator Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal relates to a new materials concept for an aluminum-carbon nanofiber composite, high thermal conductivity ultra lightweight material that will form the...

  8. Macrodeformation Twins in Single-Crystal Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F.; Wang, L.; Fan, D.; Bie, B. X.; Zhou, X. M.; Suo, T.; Li, Y. L.; Chen, M. W.; Liu, C. L.; Qi, M. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Deformation twinning in pure aluminum has been considered to be a unique property of nanostructured aluminum. A lingering mystery is whether deformation twinning occurs in coarse-grained or single-crystal aluminum at scales beyond nanotwins. Here, we present the first experimental demonstration of macrodeformation twins in single-crystal aluminum formed under an ultrahigh strain rate (˜106 s-1 ) and large shear strain (200%) via dynamic equal channel angular pressing. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the frustration of subsonic dislocation motion leads to transonic deformation twinning. Deformation twinning is rooted in the rate dependences of dislocation motion and twinning, which are coupled, complementary processes during severe plastic deformation under ultrahigh strain rates.

  9. Electrometallurgical treatment of aluminum-based fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have successfully demonstrated aluminum electrorefining from a U-Al-Si alloy that simulates spent aluminum-based reactor fuel. The aluminum product contains less than 200 ppm uranium. All the results obtained have been in agreement with predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. We have also demonstrated the need for adequate stirring to achieve a low-uranium product. Most of the other process steps have been demonstrated in other programs. These include uranium electrorefining, transuranic fission product scrubbing, fission product oxidation, and product consolidation by melting. Future work will focus on the extraction of active metal and rare earth fission products by a molten flux salt and scale-up of the aluminum electrorefining

  10. ALUMINUM NITRIDE AS A HIGH TEMPERATURE TRANSDUCER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature capabilities of bulk single crystal aluminum nitride are investigated experimentally. Temperatures in excess of 1100 deg. Celsius are obtained and held for eight hours. Variation in the performance of single crystal samples is demonstrated.

  11. Masking of aluminum surface against anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, G. B.; Thompson, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Masking material and a thickening agent preserve limited unanodized areas when aluminum surfaces are anodized with chromic acid. For protection of large areas it combines well with a certain self-adhesive plastic tape.

  12. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO2–(60−x)Bi2O3–40SiO2 with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10−1 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623–703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), so called crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses

  13. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  14. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  15. Over-heated Investment in Aluminum Hub Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Aluminum hub is one of typical products with the comparative advantages.China’s aluminum hub industry is very competitive.In recent years,the value of export for the aluminum hub soared,increasing from USD130 millions in 1999 up to nearly USD1 billion in 2004.The main exporter are Wanfeng Auto Holding Group,Shanghai Fervent Alloy Wheel MFG Co.,Ltd.,Nanhai Zhongnan Aluminum Co., Ltd.,Taian Huatai Aluminum Hub Co.,Ltd.

  16. Anodic Activation of Aluminum by Trace Element Tin

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Anodic activation of commercial and model aluminum alloys in chloride solution became of practical importance in connection with filiform corrosion of painted aluminum sheet in architectural application and aluminum components of brazed heat exchangers. Activation in chloride solution manifests itself in the form of a significant negative shift in the pitting potential relative to pure aluminum and a significant increase in the anodic current output at potentials where aluminum is normally ex...

  17. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB2) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB2 in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB2 beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB2 and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB2 exhibited O2-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O2 than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB2 suggested that Al2O3–B2O3 interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al2O3 on aluminum particles into a Al4B2O9 shell, while the same Al4B2O9 developed a needle-like morphology in AlB2 that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB2, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal kinetic data for AlB2 in air, showing a constantly decreasing activation energy with increasing conversion. Model-free analysis allowed for the calculation of global kinetic parameters despite many simultaneous mechanisms occurring concurrently. (a) Time–temperature plots, (b) conversion as a function of time, (c) Arrhenius plots used to calculate activation energies, and (d) activation energy

  18. Experimental study of the electrolysis of silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K. T.

    1991-01-01

    To produce oxygen from lunar resources, it may be feasible to melt and electrolyze local silicate ores. This possibility was explored experimentally with synthesized melts of appropriate compositions. Platinum electrodes were employed at a melt temperature of 1425 C. When silicon components of the melt were reduced, the platinum cathode degraded rapidly, which prompted the substitution of a graphite cathode substrate. Discrete particles containing iron or titanium were found in the solidified electrolyte after three hours of electrolysis. Electrolyte conductivities did not decrease substantially, but the escape of gas bubbles, in some cases, appeared to be hindered by high viscosity of the melt.

  19. Silicate rock and rock forming mineral neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron-activation scheme for the determination of nine rare earths and other trace elements in various rock forming minerals (feldspars, ilmenite, magnetite, pyroxenes) and silicate rocks is presented. The procedure is based on three different irradiations involving three separate samples: - epithermal neutron irradiation (2 days) followed by nondestructive analysis; - thermal neutron irradiation (1 day) followed by instrumental analysis; - thermal neutron irradiation (1 week) followed by radiochemical analysis (precipitation, anion exchange separation, liquid-liquid extraction). Two USGS reference samples - granite G-2 and andesite AGV-1 - have been analysed in order to assess the accuracy of the proposed procedure. Our results agree with previous neutron-activation data. (orig.)

  20. Kinetics of Cyclohexanone Ammoximation over Titanium Silicate Molecular Sieves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永祥; 吴巍; 闵恩泽

    2005-01-01

    An intrinsic kinetics of cyclohexanone ammoximation in the liquid phase over titanium silicate molecular sieves is investigated in an isothermal slurry reactor at different initial reactant concentrations, catalyst loading,and reaction temperature. The rate equations are developed by analyzing data of kinetic measurements. More than 10 side reactions were found. H202 decomposition reaction Inust be considered and other side reactions can be neglected in the kinetic modeling. The predicted values of reaction rates based on the kinetic models are almost consistent with experimental ones. The models have guidance to the selection of reactor types and they are useful to the design and operation of reactor used.

  1. Minerals ontology: application in the environmental field to silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to describe the application of an ontology, or up-to-date computerized tool, developed in the field of artificial intelligence and in particular of knowledge engineering, to inert elements, in this case the silicate class, which are minerals of scientific, technical and economic interest. The importance of applying ontology to minerals lies in the fact that these substances are capable of causing negative environmental impacts upon other variables in the natural environment, such as the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, and possible subsequent effects on human health. (Author) 37 refs.

  2. Characterization of Silicate Glasses Implanted with Ag+ Ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Kormunda, M.; Kolitsch, A.

    Crete: 11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques, 2011, s. 25-25. [11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques. Crete (GR), 12.06.2011-18.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Grant ostatní: UJEP Usti nad Labem(CZ) iga ujep 5322215000901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ion implantation * silicate glasses * metal nanoparticles * Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy * optical absorption Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  3. In vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of tricalcium silicate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiaoming Liao; Hongyang Zhu; Guangfu Yin; Zhongbing Huang; Yadong Yao; Xianchun Chen

    2011-08-01

    The in vitro bioactivity of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5) ceramics was investigated by the bone-like apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid (SBF), and the cytocompatibility was evaluated through osteoblast adhesion and proliferation assay. The results show that the Ca3SiO5 ceramics possess bone-like apatite formation ability in SBF. In vitro cytocompatible evaluation reveals that osteoblasts adhere and spread well on the Ca3SiO5 ceramics, indicating good bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

  4. Micro-PIXE analysis of silicate reference standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czamanske, G.K.; Sisson, T.W.; Campbell, J.L.; Teesdale, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the University of Guelph proton microprobe have been evaluated through trace-element analysis of well-characterized silicate glasses and minerals, including BHVO-1 glass, Kakanui augite and hornblende, and ten other natural samples of volcanic glass, amphibole, pyroxene, and garnet. Using the 2.39 wt% Mo in a NIST steel as the standard, excellent precision and agreement between reported and analyzed abundances were obtained for Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, and Nb. -from Authors

  5. Competitive Adsorption of Arsenite and Silicic Acid on Goethite

    OpenAIRE

    Luxton, Todd Peter

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of silicic acid and arsenite alone and competitively on goethite over a broad pH range (3-11) at environmentally relevant concentrations was investigated utilizing pH adsorption data and zeta potential measurements. Both addition scenarios (Si before As(III) and As(III) before Si) were examined. The results of the adsorption experiments and zeta potential measurements were then used to model the single ion and competitive ion adsorption on goethite with the CD-MUSIC ...

  6. Tin in silicate glasses: structure, thermodynamics and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work Moessbauer spectroscopy is used to investigate the oxidation states and structures of tin in silicate glasses. Thermal treatment of the glasses in atmospheres with varying oxygen partial pressure leads to the simultaneous appearance of reduction and diffusion. Experiments with varying treatment time give the opportunity to study diffusion and reduction processes in detail. Comparison of the hyperfine parameters of reference materials with measured parameter provides information about the local surroundings of the tin atoms. An octahedral surrounding for Sn4+ is presumed, while Sn2+ and three oxygen atoms form a tetrahedral coordination.

  7. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  8. Microstructural study of an iron silicate catalyst by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the effects of various synthesis conditions on the structure of iron silicate analogs of zeolite ZSM-5 considered. Scanning electron microscopy and morphologies. Particle sizes vary from tenths of a micron to several microns, depending on degree of agitation during crystal growth, while morphology is additionally dependent on the concentration of iron in the gel during crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine the size and spatial distributions of iron-rich (as compared to the FeZSM-5 matrix) second phase particles within the ZSM-5 framework as a function of SiO2/Fe2O3-ratio, thermal and hydrothermal treatments

  9. Formation of Uranyl-Silicate Nanoparticles at Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, K. L.; Sturchio, N. C.; Klie, R. F.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium(VI)-silicates are the dominant crystalline form of U(VI) at and near Earth's surface, but are difficult to form as pure phases under ambient conditions because of slow reaction kinetics aided by similar thermodynamic stabilities of the many possible minerals. We have investigated the effects of pH (2 to 11) and time (1 to 10 days) on the formation of U(VI)-silicates from initial solutions with U = 0.05 M and a fixed molar ratio of U:Si = 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:5 using high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and solution thermodynamic modeling. Previously, we used HEXS to identify from solutions with U:Si = 1:2 at pH 5 to 9, aged for one day, a trimeric U-silicate structural unit, or synthon, approximately one nanometer in dimension with U-U correlation lengths of about 0.4 nm. This synthon is a structural building block in uranyl silicate minerals such as soddyite, boltwoodite, and weeksite. ATR-FTIR results on the full set of samples show systematic changes in peak positions along with appearance and disappearance of vibrational modes that occurred with reaction time, pH and/or U:Si ratio; whereas, XRD indicated only a crystalline Na-boltwoodite-like phase at pH 11 and without the correlation length-scale resolution of HEXS. HRTEM results show few particles in a matrix of material containing areas having the lower correlation length visible in HEXS data. The data show clearly different mixtures of solids, including silica, and precipitate sizes under all conditions that transform over the 1 to 10 day aging period. The experimental reactions simulate conditions in the subsurface at sites contaminated with uranium, and the results are relevant to processes of uranium adsorption and colloid formation. [This work is supported by DOE's Environmental Remediation Science Program].

  10. Cracking phenomena in lithium-di-silicate glass ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat Banerjee

    2001-04-01

    Lithium-di-silicate glass ceramic (Li2O, SiO2) with uniformly oriented crystals was placed on a Vickers indentation with extrusion axis horizontally parallel to the base axis. The material was rotated through 0°– 90° and at each angle a 20 N load was applied to ascertain the crack path. It was observed that the crack length decreases and the crack deviates from its original path with increasing angle. The deviation of the crack was correlated with the component of the crack driving force and the theoretical strength of the aligned crystals at different angles.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and modelling of zinc and silicate co-substituted hydroxyapatite

    OpenAIRE

    Friederichs, Robert J.; Chappell, Helen F.; Shepherd, David V.; Best, Serena M.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental chemistry and atomic modelling studies were performed here to investigate a novel ionic co-substitution in hydroxyapatite (HA). Zinc, silicate co-substituted HA (ZnSiHA) remained phase pure after heating to 1100°C with Zn and Si amounts of 0.6 wt% and 1.2 wt%, respectively. Unique lattice expansions in ZnSiHA, silicate Fourier transform infrared peaks and changes to the hydroxyl IR stretching region suggested Zn and silicate co-substitution in ZnSiHA. Zn and silicate insertion in...

  12. On the Anomalous Silicate Absorption Feature of the Prototypical Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1068

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler, Melanie; Li, Aigen

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of the silicate absorption feature in AGNs was made at 9.7 micrometer for the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 over 30 years ago, indicating the presence of a large column of silicate dust in the line-of-sight to the nucleus. It is now well recognized that type 2 AGNs exhibit prominent silicate absorption bands, while the silicate bands of type 1 AGNs appear in emission. More recently, using the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument on the Very Large Telescope Inte...

  13. Adsorption of Free Fatty Acid from Crude Palm Oil on Magnesium Silicate Derived from Rice Husk

    OpenAIRE

    Pornsawan Assawasaengrat; Prakob Kitchaiya; Weerawat Clowutimon

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium silicate with various silica and magnesium oxide ratios (SiO2/MgO ratios) was used as the adsorbent for a study of adsorption of free fatty acid (FFA) in crude palm oil (CPO). Magnesium silicate was prepared from magnesium nitrate or magnesium sulfate solution precipitated with a solution of sodium silicate derived from rice husk. SiO2/MgO ratios of the magnesium silicate synthesized from magnesium nitrate and magnesium sulfate were 3.93, 3.75, 2.74, 2.40, 1.99 and 3.96, 3.61, 3.51,...

  14. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  15. Anodizing of aluminum with improved corrosion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anodizing of aluminum was studied in sulphuric/oxalic/boric acid electroiyte system. The corrosion resistance of the anodic oxide coating of aluminum was determined by potentiodynamic polarization test and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology before and after corrosion test. It was found that the oxide coating obtained by this method showed better corrosion resistance with no significant difference in surface morphology. (author)

  16. Aluminum Nitride Sensors for Harsh Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Goericke, Fabian Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Harsh environment applications include high temperature, pressure and mechanical shock. Aluminum nitride is a strong ceramic material with very good high temperature survivability. It also has piezoelectric properties that can be used for sensing applications and it can be deposited with good control as thin polycrystalline film for the fabrication of micro-electromechanical systems. In this dissertation, optimized deposition parameters for aluminum nitride films and characterization techniqu...

  17. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T e and N e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T e and N e for aluminum in aluminum alloys as a marker for the correct alloying using an optical fiber probe.

  18. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T(e and N(e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T(e and N(e for the aluminum in aluminum alloys using an optical fiber probe.

  19. ALUMINUM FOIL REINFORCED BY CARBON NANOTUBES

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Alekseev; PREDTECHENSKIY M.R.

    2016-01-01

    In our research, the method of manufacturing an Al-carbon nanotube (CNT) composite by hot pressing and cold rolling was attempted. The addition of one percent of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by OCSiAl provides a significant increase in the ultimate tensile strength of aluminum. The tensile strength of the obtained composite material is at the tensile strength level of medium-strength aluminum alloys.

  20. Discharge behaviors during plasma electrolytic oxidation on aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Run [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhenjiang Watercraft College, Zhenjiang 212000, Jiangsu (China); Wu, Jie [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Xue, Wenbin, E-mail: xuewb@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Qu, Yao; Yang, Chaolin; Wang, Bin; Wu, Xianying [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-11-14

    A plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was performed on the 2024 aluminum alloy in silicate electrolyte to fabricate ceramic coatings under a constant voltage. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was employed to evaluate the characteristics of plasma discharge during PEO process. The plasma electron temperature and density were obtained by analyzing the spectral lines of OES, and the atomic ionization degree in discharge zone was calculated in terms of Saha thermal ionization equation. The illumination intensity of plasma discharge and the temperature in the interior of alloy were measured. Combining the surface morphology and cross-sectional microstructure with the optical emission spectra and illumination at different discharge stage, a discharge model in the growth of PEO ceramic coatings was proposed. It is found that there are two discharge modes of type A with small spark size and type B with large spark size, and the latter only appears in the intermediate stage of PEO process. The illumination intensity has a maximum value in the initial stage of oxidation with many sparks of discharge type A. The electron temperature in plasma discharge zone is about 3000 K–7000 K and atomic ionization degree of Al is about 2.0 × 10{sup −5}–7.2 × 10{sup −3}, which depend on discharge stage. The discharge type B plays a key role on the electron temperature and atomic ionization degree. The electron density keeps stable in the range of about 8.5 × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}–2.6 × 10{sup 22} m{sup −3}. - Highlights: • The characteristics of PEO plasma discharge was evaluated by OES. • Electron temperature, concentration, atomic ionization degree were calculated. • Discharge model for the growth of PEO coatings was proposed. • Temperature in the interior of alloy during PEO process was measured.

  1. Transfer and transport of aluminum in filtration unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum salt coagulants were used prevalently in various water works. In this article, the effects of filtration on residual aluminum concentration and species distribution were researched by determining the concentration of different Aluminum species before and after single layer filter, double layer filter, and membrane filtration units. In the research, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used to separate colloidal and soluble aluminum, ion exchange chromatography (IEC) was used to separate organic and inorganic aluminum, and inductivity coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the aluminum concentration. The results showed that the rapid filtration process had the ability of removing residual aluminum from coagulant effluent water, and that double layer filtration was more effective in residual aluminum removal than single layer filtration, while Nano filtration was more effective than micro filtration. It was found that when the residual aluminum concentration was below 1mg/L in sediment effluent, the residual aluminum concentration in treated water was above 0.2 mg/L. The direct rapid filtration process mainly removed the suspended aluminum. The removal of soluble and colloidal aluminum was always less than 10% and the natural small particles that adsorbed the amount of soluble or small particles aluminum on their surface were difficult to be removed in this process. Micro filtration and nano filtration were good technologies for removing aluminum; the residual aluminum concentration in the effluent was less than 0.05 mg/L.

  2. Aluminum neurotoxicity in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we administered aluminum to healthy rats and examined the aluminum uptake in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the rat brain and in isolated brain cell nuclei by PIXE analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the brain after 15 months of oral aluminum administration. Moreover, Al was detected in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei from the patients with Alzheimer's disease. Silver impregnation studies revealed that spines attached to the dendritic processes of cortical nerve cells decreased remarkably after aluminum administration. Electron microscopy revealed characteristic inclusion bodies in the hippocampal nerve cells 75 days after the injection. These morphological changes in the rat brain after the aluminum administration were similar to those reportedly observed in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. Our results indicate that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminum in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  3. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using 14C autoradiography to measure the uptake of 14C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (14C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-μm resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The 14C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of 14C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 109 Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Spark plasma sintering of aluminum matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vineet

    2011-12-01

    Aluminum matrix composites make a distinct category of advanced engineering materials having superior properties over conventional aluminum alloys. Aluminum matrix composites exhibit high hardness, yield strength, and excellent wear and corrosion resistance. Due to these attractive properties, aluminum matrix composites materials have many structural applications in the automotive and the aerospace industries. In this thesis, efforts are made to process high strength aluminum matrix composites which can be useful in the applications of light weight and strong materials. Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) is a relatively novel process where powder mixture is consolidated under the simultaneous influence of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. In this work, SPS was used to process aluminum matrix composites having three different reinforcements: multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), silicon carbide (SiC), and iron-based metallic glass (MG). In Al-CNT composites, significant improvement in micro-hardness, nano-hardness, and compressive yield strength was observed. The Al-CNT composites further exhibited improved wear resistance and lower friction coefficient due to strengthening and self-lubricating effects of CNTs. In Al-SiC and Al-MG composites, microstructure, densification, and tribological behaviors were also studied. Reinforcing MG and SiC also resulted in increase in micro-hardness and wear resistance.

  5. Development of a New Ferrous Aluminosilicate Refractory Material for Investment Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chen; Jones, Sam; Blackburn, Stuart

    2012-12-01

    Investment casting is a time-consuming, labour intensive process, which produces complex, high value-added components for a variety of specialised industries. Current environmental and economic pressures have resulted in a need for the industry to improve current casting quality, reduce manufacturing costs and explore new markets for the process. Alumino-silicate based refractories are commonly used as both filler and stucco materials for ceramic shell production. A new ceramic material, norite, is now being produced based on ferrous aluminosilicate chemistry, having many potential advantages when used for the production of shell molds for casting aluminum alloy. This paper details the results of a direct comparison made between the properties of a ceramic shell system produced with norite refractories and a typical standard refractory shell system commonly used in casting industry. A range of mechanical and physical properties of the systems was measured, and a full-scale industrial casting trial was also carried out. The unique properties of the norite shell system make it a promising alternative for casting aluminum based alloys in the investment foundry.

  6. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution; Structure et reactivite aqueuse des verres silicates apport de la resonance magnetique nucleaire haute-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeli, F

    2000-10-25

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 17}O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the {sup 17}O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  7. The structure of alkali silicate gel by total scattering methods

    KAUST Repository

    Benmore, C.J.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of the alkali silicate gel (ASR) collected from the galleries of Furnas Dam in Brazil was determined by a pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of high energy X-ray diffraction data. Since this method is relatively new to concrete structure analysis a detailed introduction on the PDF method is given for glassy SiO2. The bulk amorphous structure of the dam material is confirmed as no Bragg peaks are observed in the scattered intensity. The real space results show that the local structure of the amorphous material is similar to kanemite (KHSi2O5:3H2O) however the long range layer structure of the crystal is broken up in the amorphous state, so that ordering only persists of the length scale of a few polyhedra. The silicate layer structure is a much more disordered than predicted by molecular dynamics models. The X-ray results are consistent with the molecular dynamics model of Kirkpatrick et al. (2005) [1] which predicts that most of the water resides in pores within the amorphous network rather than in layers. The total scattering data provide a rigorous basis against which other models may also be tested. © 2010.

  8. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  9. 6Li-doped silicate glass for thermal neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass formulations are described that contain high concentrations of 6Li and are suitable for use as thermal neutron shielding. One formulation contained 31 mol% of 6Li2O and 69 mol% of SiO2. Studies were performed on a second formulation that contained as much as 37 mol% of 6Li2O and 59 mol% of SiO2, with 4 mol% Al2O3 added to prevent crystallization at such high 6Li2O concentrations. These lithium silicate glasses can be formed into a variety of shapes using conventional glass fabrication techniques. Examples include flat plates, disks, hollow cylinders, and other more complex geometries. Both in-beam and in-core experiments have been performed to study the use and durability of Li silicate glasses. In-core experiments show the glass can withstand the intense radiation fields near the core of a reactor. The neutron attenuation of the glasses used in these studies was 90%/mm. In-beam studies show that the glass is effective for reducing the gamma-ray and neutron fields near experiments. ((orig.))

  10. New electrorheological fluid obtained from mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, Jessica A.; Dahmouche, Karim; Soares, Bluma G., E-mail: bluma@ima.ufrj.br

    2013-01-01

    Ormosil based on mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate (SiO{sub 2}/SSQ-SH) particle was prepared by sol-gel process involving a co-condensation of the hydrolyzed 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and tetraetoxysilane (TEOS). The resulting material was characterized by {sup 29}Si solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 29}Si NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The (SiO{sub 2}/SSQ-SH) particle presents a hierarchical structure, extending from micro to nanoscale and consisting of three structural levels. This SiO{sub 2}/SSQ-SH particle was used for the first time as the dispersed phase in silicone oil suspension to develop a new electro-rheological fluid with a very good response under the action of electrical field from 1 to 4 kV/mm, whose values are comparable to those exhibited by other conventional ER fluids, under the influence of electric field. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ormosil based on mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate particle was prepared by sol gel process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro/nano-structured mercapto-silica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercapto-modified ormosil particles with outstanding electro-rheological properties.

  11. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  12. Santaclaraite, a new calcium-manganese silicate hydrate from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erd, Richard C.; Ohashi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Santaclaraite, ideally CaMn4(Si5O14(OH))(OH).H2O, occurs as pink and tan veins and masses in Franciscan chert in the Diablo Range, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties, California. It is associated with four unidentified Mn silicates, Mn-howieite, quartz, braunite, calcite, rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, baryte, harmotome, chalcopyrite and native copper. Santaclaraite is triclinic, space group B1, a 15.633(1), b 7.603(1) , c 12.003(1) A, alpha 109.71(1)o, beta 88.61(1)o, gamma 99.95(1) o, V 1322.0(3) A3; Z = 4. The strongest lines of the X-ray pattern are 7.04(100), 3.003(84), 3.152(80), 7.69(63), 3.847(57) A. Crystals are lamellar to prismatic (flattened on (100)), with good cleavage on (100) and (010); H. 61/2 Dcalc. 3.398 g/cm3, Dmeas. 3.31 (+ or -0.01); optically biaxial negative, alpha 1.681, beta 1.696, gamma 1.708 (all + or - 0.002), 2Valpha 83 (+ or -1)o. Although chemically a hydrated rhodonite, santaclaraite dehydrates to Mn-bustamite at approx 550oC (in air) . Santaclaraite is a five-tetrahedral-repeat single-chain silicate and has structural affinities with rhodonite, nambulite, marsturite, babingtonite and inesite.-J.A.Z.

  13. Polymer-Layered Silicate Nanocomposites for Cryotank Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Meador, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous composite cryotank designs have relied on the use of conventional composite materials to reduce microcracking and permeability. However, revolutionary advances in nanotechnology derived materials may enable the production of ultra-lightweight cryotanks with significantly enhanced durability and damage tolerance, as well as reduced propellant permeability. Layered silicate nanocomposites are especially attractive in cryogenic storage tanks based on results that have been reported for epoxy nanocomposite systems. These materials often exhibit an order of magnitude reduction in gas permeability when compared to the base resin. In addition, polymer-silicate nanocomposites have been shown to yield improved dimensional stability, strength, and toughness. The enhancement in material performance of these systems occurs without property trade-offs which are often observed in conventionally filled polymer composites. Research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center have led to the development of epoxy-clay nanocomposites with 70% lower hydrogen permeability than the base epoxy resin. Filament wound carbon fiber reinforced tanks made with this nanocomposite had a five-fold lower helium leak rate than the corresponding tanks made without clay. The pronounced reduction observed with the tank may be due to flow induced alignment of the clay layers during processing. Additionally, the nanocomposites showed CTE reductions of up to 30%, as well as a 100% increase in toughness.

  14. Authigenic Mineralization of Silicates at the Organic-water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, B.; Wallace, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    It is relatively common for some fraction of organic material to be preserved in the sedimentary rock record as disseminated molecular fragments. The survival of wholly coherent tissues from primarily soft-bodied organisms is far more unusual. However, the literature is now well- populated with spectacular examples of soft-tissue preservation ranging from a 2,600 year old human brain to the tissues of the Ediacaran biota that have survived ~600 million years. Some of the most exceptional examples of soft tissue preservation are from the Proterozoic-Cambrian transition, however, nearly all modes of fossil preservation during this time are debated. Clay mineral templates have been implicated as playing a role in several types of soft tissue preservation, including Burgess Shale and Beecher's Trilobite-type preservation, and more recently, Bitter Springs-type silicification. Yet, there is still much debate over whether these clay mineral coatings form during early stage burial and diagenesis, or later stage metamorphism. This research addresses this question by using in situ fluid cell Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to investigate the nucleation and growth of silicate minerals on model biological surfaces. Herein we present preliminary results on the deposition of hydrous magnesium silicates on self-assembled monolayers (-OH, -COOH, -CH3, and -H2PO3 terminated surfaces) at ambient conditions.

  15. Geo-neutrinos, Mantle Circulation and Silicate Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorentini, G; Mantovani, F; Vannucci, R; Fiorentini, Gianni; Lissia, Marcello; Mantovani, Fabio; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    In preparation to the experimental results which will be available in the future, we consider geo-neutrino production in greater detail than in [F. Mantovani et al., arXiv:hep-ph/0309013], putting the basis for a more refined model. We study geo-neutrino production for different models of matter circulation and composition in the mantle. By using global mass balance for the Bulk Silicate Earth, the predicted flux contribution from distant sources in the crust and in the mantle is fixed within +-15% (full range). A detailed geological and geochemical investigation of the region near the detector has to be performed, for reducing the flux uncertainty from fluctuations of the local abundances to the level of the global geochemical error. A five-kton detector operating over four years at a site relatively far from nuclear power plants can measure the geo-neutrino signal with 5% accuracy (1 sigma). It will provide a crucial test of the Bulk Silicate Earth and a direct estimate of the radiogenic contribution to ter...

  16. Silicates on Iapetus from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Cindy L; Clark, Roger N; Spencer, John R; Jennings, Donald E; Hand, Kevin P; Poston, Michael J; Carlson, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal to noise ratios (S/Rs) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/R and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure hav...

  17. Lightning and Mass Independent Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation in Nebular Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Lightning has long been postulated as the agent of Chondru|e formation in the solar nebula, but it may have an additional role to play as well. Lightning bolts of almost any scale will both vaporize dust and liberate oxygen atoms that will then interact with both nebular gases as well as the refractory silicate vapor as it re-condenses. Such processes should result in the addition of the heavy oxygen isotopes to the growing silicate grains while the light oxygen-16 becomes part of the gas phase water. This process will proceed to some extent throughout the history of any turbulent nebula and will result in the gradual increase of O-16 in the gas phase and in a much larger relative increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of the nebular dust. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the production of such "heavy oxygen enriched", non-mass-dependently-fractionated dust grains in a high voltage discharge in a hydrogen rich gas containing small quantities of silane, pentacarbonyl iron and oxygen.

  18. Potassium-silicate glass exposed to low energy H+ beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Pristine potassium-silicate glass was irradiated with 5 keV protons. ► Surface relaxation increases amount of K and NBO in the surface layer. ► Enhanced bombardment leads to a continuous decrease of NBO and K. ► A constant surplus of K in elemental state was found on the glass surface. - Abstract: Pristine surface of binary potassium silicate glass 85SiO2·15K2O was prepared in vacuum and irradiated with a 5 keV proton beam within the range of 0.6–103 C/m2. The response of glass surface was monitored by XPS and the evolution of atomic concentrations divided it into two stages. During the first one, amounts of both potassium and non-bridging oxygen (NBO) increase in the surface layer and are governed by surface relaxation. The second stage is characterised by a continuous decrease of NBO and K. Comparison of K and NBO concentrations yielded a constant surplus of K proving the existence of potassium elemental state on the glass surface. Ratio of bridging oxygen (BO) and silicon is conserved during proton bombardment. The extrapolation of the glass response to the enhanced irradiation predicts a formation of substoichiometric SiOx with some elemental K on the topmost surface.

  19. Identification and Practical Application of Silicate-dissolving Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-mei; RAO Zheng-hua; SUN Yan-xing; YAO Jun; XING Li-jun

    2002-01-01

    Slime-forming bacteria were isolated from soils, rock surface and earthworm intestine, and their effects on dissolving silicate minerals and tomato growth were examined. One of the bacteria, Bacillus mucilaginosus RGBc13, had particularly strong ability to form slime and dissolve silicates. RGBc13 could also colonize and develop in both non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soil. Total number of slime-forming bacteria increased from 2.9 × 103 cfu·g- 1and 8.4 × 103 cfu·g-1 to 9.6 × 106 cfu·g-1 and 6.0 × 107 cfu·g-1 in the non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soils respectively. Potassium and phosphorus nutritional conditions in the rhizosphere were markedly improved through inoculation of this bacterium. Available K and P respectively increased from 25.86 and 3.63mg· kg-1 in the non-rhizosphere soil to 91.23 and 5.74mg· kg-1 in the rhizosphere soil. Tomato biomass increased by 125%, K and P uptakes were more than 150%, greater than the non- inoculation. Thus, there is a potential in applying RGBc13 for improving plant K and P nutrition.

  20. Formation of Water on a Warm Amorphous Silicate Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao

    2014-06-01

    It is well established that reactions on interstellar dust grain surfaces are indispensable for water formation in space. Among all the intermediate products that lead to water formation, the OH radical is especially important because is a product of all the three main water formation surface routes, i.e., the hydrogenation of O, O2, and O3, and it also connects these three routes. The desorption energy of OH from dust grain surfaces, along with dust grain temperature, determines the availability OH for grain surface versus gas-phase reactions. We experimentally investigated water formation on the surface of a warm amorphous silicate via H+O3→OH+O2. The surface temperature was kept at 50 K so as to exclude the interference of O2. It is found that OH has a significant residence time at 50 K. The OH desorption energy from amorphous silicate surface is calculated to be at least 1680 K, and possibly as high as 4760 K. Water is formed efficiently via OH+H and OH+H2, and the product H2O stays on the surface upon formation. Deuterium has also been used in place of hydrogen to check isotopic effects. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958) and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  1. Carbon substitution for oxygen in silicates in planetary interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett J; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mera, Gabriela; Tavakoli, Amir; Ionescu, Emanuel; Riedel, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs), synthesized from organometallic precursors, contain carbon- and silica-rich nanodomains, the latter with extensive substitution of carbon for oxygen, linking Si-centered SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra. Calorimetric studies demonstrated these PDCs to be thermodynamically more stable than a mixture of SiO2, C, and silicon carbide. Here, we show by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy that substitution of C for O is also attained in PDCs with depolymerized silica-rich domains containing lithium, associated with SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra with nonbridging oxygen. We suggest that significant (several percent) substitution of C for O could occur in more complex geological silicate melts/glasses in contact with graphite at moderate pressure and high temperature and may be thermodynamically far more accessible than C for Si substitution. Carbon incorporation will change the local structure and may affect physical properties, such as viscosity. Analogous carbon substitution at grain boundaries, at defect sites, or as equilibrium states in nominally acarbonaceous crystalline silicates, even if present at levels at 10-100 ppm, might form an extensive and hitherto hidden reservoir of carbon in the lower crust and mantle. PMID:24043830

  2. Structure and dynamics in polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A poly(methyl phenyl siloxane) homopolymer is intercalated within the organophilized galleries of layered silicates forming nanocomposites in which the polymer chains are confined within the ∼1.5 nm interlayer spacing. These are found to be equilibrium structures since they are independent of the preparation method whereas the spacing is independent of the hybrid composition as well. Quasielastic neutron scattering investigated the effect of such severe confinement on polymer dynamics. Two relaxation processes corresponding to the methyl group rotation and the polymer segmental relaxation were clearly identified for both the bulk homopolymer and the nanocomposite. The very local process of methyl group rotation was unaffected by the confinement within the silicate galleries. At temperatures above the polymer glass transition temperature, the quasielastic data reveal a strong coupling between the segmental motion and the motion of the surfactant chains of the organosilicate. However, the mean square displacement data show that the segmental process in confinement is actually faster than that of the bulk polymer even when the contribution of the surfactant chains is taken into account

  3. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  4. Aluminum electrocoagulation as pretreatment during microfiltration of surface water containing NOM: A review of fouling, NOM, DBP, and virus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellam, Shankararaman; Sari, Mutiara Ayu

    2016-03-01

    Electrocoagulation (EC) is the intentional corrosion of sacrificial anodes (typically aluminum or iron) by passing electricity to release metal-ion coagulant species and destabilize a wide range of suspended, dissolved, and macromolecular contaminants. It can be integrated ahead of microfiltration (MF) to effectively control turbidity, microorganisms, and disinfection by-products (DBPs) and simultaneously maintain a high MF specific flux. This manuscript summarizes the current knowledge on MF pretreatment by aluminum EC particularly focusing on mechanisms of (i) electrocoagulant dosing, (ii) (bio)colloid destabilization, (iii) fouling reductions, and (iv) enhanced removal of viruses, natural organic matter (NOM), and DBP precursors. Electrolysis efficiently removes hydrophobic NOM, viruses, and siliceous foulants. Aluminum effectively electrocoagulates viruses by physically encapsulating them in flocs, neutralizing their surface charge and reducing electrostatic repulsion, and increasing hydrophobic interactions between any sorbed NOM and free viruses. New results included herein demonstrate that EC achieves DBP control by removing NOM, reducing chlorine-reactivity of remaining NOM, and inducing a slight shift toward more brominated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. EC reduces MF fouling by forming large flocs that tend to deposit on the membrane surface, i.e. decrease pore penetration and forming more permeable cakes and by reducing foulant mass in case of significant floc-flotation. PMID:26619048

  5. The viability of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haopeng; Jae Ko, Yeon; Zhang, Xinxing; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnoeckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Jena, Puru [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-03-28

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have investigated the extent to which the aluminum moieties within selected magnesium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Magnesium-aluminum cluster anions were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, photoelectron spectra of Mg{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −} (m, n = 1,6; 2,5; 2,12; and 3,11) were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on these four stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for the cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra). Calculations revealed that, unlike the cases of recently reported sodium-aluminum clusters, the formation of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters was limited in most cases by weak charge transfer between the magnesium atoms and their aluminum cluster moieties. Only in cases of high magnesium content, e.g., in Mg{sub 3}Al{sub 11} and Mg{sub 2}Al{sub 12}{sup −}, did the aluminum moieties exhibit Zintl anion-like characteristics.

  6. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far.

  7. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far

  8. The Role of Particles in Fatigue Crack Propagation of Aluminum Matrix Composites and Casting Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenzhong CHEN; Ping HE; Liqing CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behaviors were studied to understand the role of SiC particles in 10 wt pct SiCp/A2024 composites and Si particles in casting aluminum alloy A356. The results show that a few particles appeared on the fracture surfaces in SiCp/Al composites even at high AK region, which indicates that cracks propagated predominantly within the matrix avoiding SiC particles due to the high strength of the particles and the strong particle/matrix interface. In casting aluminum alloy, Si particle debonding was more prominent.Compared with SiCp/Al composite, the casting aluminum alloy exhibited lower FCP rates, but had a slight steeper slope in the Paris region. Crack deflection and branching were found to be more remarkable in the casting aluminum alloy than that in the SiCp/Al composites, which may be contributed to higher FCP resistance in casting aluminum alloy.

  9. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  10. Selectivity modification by ion memory of magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate as inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate as inorganic ion exchange materials with the formula MgSi5.59O12.18.5.93H2O and MgAl2.32Si5.2O14.88.18.23H2O, respectively, have been found to be suitable for the removal of Cs+, Co2+ and Eu3+ ions with the selectivity sequence Eu3+ > Co2+ > Cs+. Samples of Cs-, Co- and Eu-loaded were prepared and thermally treated at 850 deg. C in a furnace for the creation of specific cavity. Surface area, IR and X-ray diffraction patterns of the products were conducted. Surface area values of OMS, OMAS, TMS, TMAS, ETMS and ETMAS were measured and indicated an increasing in the surface area values for the TMS and TMAS samples and decreasing in the ETMS and ETMAS samples. Desorption studies in nitric acid medium were carried out and reloading of the eluted solids with the studied cations were conduced and the data show an ion memory behaviour for the eluted solids. Finally, the rate of Cs+ ion sorption on OMS, OMAS, ETMS and ETMAS was studied. The diffusion coefficients calculated indicated that the diffusion of Cs+ ion is high for the ETMS and ETMAS samples compared to the OMS and OMAS samples

  11. EXAMINATION OF SILICATE LIMITATION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN JIAOZHOU BAY, CHINA——I. SILICATE BEING A LIMITING FACTOR OF PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨东方; 张经; 吕吉斌; 高振会; 陈豫

    2002-01-01

    Jiaozhou Bay data collected from May 1991 to February 1994, in 12 seasonal investigations, and provided the authors by the Ecological Station of Jiaozhou Bay, were analyzed to determine the spatiotemporal variations in temperature, light, nutrients (NO3--N, NO2--N, NH4+-N, SIO32--Si, PO43--P), phytoplankton, and primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The results indicated that only silicate correlated well in time and space with, and had important effects on, the characteristics, dynamic cycles and trends of, primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The authors developed a corresponding dynamic model of primary production and silicate and water temperature. Eq. ( 1 ) of the model shows that the primary production variation is controlled by the nutrient Si and affected by water temperature; that the main factor controlling the primary production is Si; that water temperature affects the composition of the structure of phytoplankton assemblage; that the different populations of the phytoplankton assemblage occupy different ecological niches for C, the apparent ratio of conversion of silicate in seawater into phytoplankton biomas and D, the coefficient of water temperature's effect on phytoplankton biomass. The authors researched the silicon source of Jiaozhou Bay, the biogeochemical sediment process of the silicon, the phytoplankton predominant species and the phytoplankton structure. The authors considered silicate a limiting factor of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, whose decreasing concentration of silicate from terrestrial source is supposedly due to dilution by current and uptake by phytoplankton; quantified the silicate assimilated by phytoplankton, the intrinsic ratio of conversion of silicon into phytoplankton biomass, the proportion of silicate uptaken by phytoplankton and diluted by current; and found that the primary production of the phytoplankton is determined by the quantity of the silicate assimilated by them. The phenomenon of apparently high plant

  12. EXAMINATION OF SILICATE LIMITATION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN JIAOZHOU BAY, CHINA Ⅰ. SILICATE BEING A LIMITING FACTOR OF PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨东方; 张经; 吕吉斌; 高振会; 陈豫

    2002-01-01

    Jiaozhou Bay data collected from May 1991 to February 1994, in 12 seasonal investigations, and provided the authors by the Ecological Station of Jiaozhou B ay, were analyzed to determine the spatiotemporal variations in temperature, light, nutrients (NO-3-N, NO-2-N, NH+4-N, SiO2-3-Si, PO3-4-P), phytoplankton, and primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The results indicated that only silicate correlated well in time and space with, and had important effects on, the characteristics, dynamic cycles and trends of, primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The authors developed a corresponding dynamic model of primary production and silicate and water temperature. Eq.(1) of the model shows that the primary production variation is controlled by the nutrient Si and affected by water temp erature; that the main factor controlling the primary production is Si; that water temper ature affects the composition of the structure of phytoplankton assemblage; that the different populations of the phytoplankton assemblage occupy different ecologica l niches for C, the apparent ratio of conversion of silicate in seawater into phytoplankton biomas and D, the coefficient of water temperature's effect on phytoplankton biomass. The authors researched the silicon source of Jiaozhou Bay , the biogeochemical sediment process of the silicon, the phytoplankton predominan t species and the phytoplankton structure. The authors considered silicate a limit ing factor of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, whose decreasing concentration of silicate from terrestrial source is supposedly due to dilution by current and up take by phytoplankton; quantified the silicate assimilated by phytoplankton, the intrins ic ratio of conversion of silicon into phytoplankton biomass, the proportion of silicate uptaken by phytoplankton and diluted by current; and found that the primary production of the phytoplankton is determined by the quantity of the silicate assimilated by them. The phenomenon of apparently high plant

  13. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7. PMID:27090705

  14. Annealing of Pre-Cometary Silicate Grains in Solar Nebula Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, D. E.; Desch, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Comets contain crystalline silicate grains which could only have formed at high temperatures, not generally experienced by comets. We test the hypothesis that amorphous silicates were annealed by shock waves in the solar nebula. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Mechanical and thermal properties of sodium silicate treated moso bamboo particles reinforced PVC composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to study the potential of sodium silicate modification on moso bamboo particles as reinforcements for thermoplastic. Moso bamboo particles were modified with sodium silicate aqueous solutions (of 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% and 10% concentrations). The mechanical properties of sodium silicate treated moso bamboo particles reinforced PVC composites (BPPC) were calculated and compared with raw bamboo particles filled samples. The thermal characteristics of the BPPC were studied to investigate the feasibility of sodium silicate treatment on moso bamboo particles. The particle morphology and BPPC microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of the BPPC increased before the concentration of sodium silicate solution reached 5% and got their maximum values of 15.72 MPa and 2956.80 MPa, respectively at 5% concentration. The modulus of rupture obtained the maximum value of 27.73 MPa at 2% concentration. The mechanical curve decreased as the concentration of solution went higher. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis illustrated that the sodium silicate solution treated BPPC possesses a better compatibility. More uniform dispersion of moso bamboo particles in PVC matrix was obtained after the sodium silicate treatment. Hence, the sodium silicate was a feasible and competitive agent of creating moso bamboo particles reinforced PVC composites.

  16. Effect of silicate pretreatment, post-sealing and additives on corrosion resistance of phosphated galvanized steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sodium silicate (water glass) pretreatment before phosphating, silicate post-sealing after phosphating and adding silicate to a traditional phosphating solution were respectively carried out to obtain the improved phosphate coatings with high corrosion resistance and coverage on hot-dip galvanized(HDG) steel. The corrosion resistance, morphology and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated using neutral salt spray(NSS) tests, scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS). The results show that pretreatment HDG steel with silicate solutions, phosphate coatings with finer crystals and higher coverage are formed and the corrosion resistance is enhanced. Adding silicate to a traditional phosphating solution, the surface morphology of the coatings is nearly unchanged. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is mainly dependent on phosphating time.Phosphating for a longer time (such as 5 min), the corrosion resistance, increasing with concentration of silicate, is improved significantly. Post-sealing the phosphated HDG steel with silicate solutions, the pores among the zinc phosphate crystals are sealed with the films containing Si, P, O and Zn and the continuous composite coatings are formed. The corrosion resistance of the composite coatings, related to the pH value, contents of hydrated gel of silica and Si2O52- and post-sealing time, is increased markedly. The improved coatings with optimal corrosion resistance are obtained for phosphating 5 min and post-sealing with 5 g/L silicate solution for 10 min.

  17. The interaction of components organic-silicate paintwork material with painted surface

    OpenAIRE

    Шолух, Н.Е.; Кудюков, Ю.П.; Ржецкий, Е.А.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of components organic-silicate paintwork material with painted surface is studied. It is shown that coverings on a basis of organic-silicate composition that is putting on a surfaces of concrete, brick, plaster, asbestos cement and similar building materials, have good physical-mechanical indicators.

  18. Controlled structure and properties of silicate nanoparticle networks for incorporation of biosystem components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic nanoparticles are of technological interest in many fields. We created silicate nanoparticle hydrogels that effectively incorporated biomolecules that are unstable and involved in complicated reactions. The size of the silicate nanoparticles strongly affected both the physical characteristics of the resulting hydrogel and the activity of biomolecules incorporated within the hydrogel. We used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze in detail the hydrogel network patterns formed by the silicate nanoparticles. We obtained clear nanostructured images of biomolecule-nanoparticle composite hydrogels. The TEM images also showed that larger silicate nanoparticles (22 nm) formed more loosely associated silicate networks than did smaller silicate nanoparticles (7 nm). The loosely associated networks formed from larger silicate nanoparticles might facilitate substrate diffusion through the network, thus promoting the observed increased activity of the entrapped biomolecules. This doubled the activity of the incorporated biosystems compared with that of biosystems prepared by our own previously reported method. We propose a reaction scheme to explain the formation of the silicate nanoparticle networks. The successful incorporation of biomolecules into the nanoparticle hydrogels, along with the high level of activity exhibited by the biomolecules required for complicated reaction within the gels, demonstrates the nanocomposites' potential for use in medical applications.

  19. Synthesis, structure peculiarities and electric conductivity of alkali metal-rare earth silicates (germanates)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of obtaining of rare earth-alkali metal silicates (germanates) is studied. The analysis of possibilities of structural disordering of alkaline cations in these structures is given. The interaction of the structure of different by the composition alkali alkali metal - rare earth silicates with electric conductivity values is shown

  20. 78 FR 14540 - Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl Sodium... the registration review of cyromazine, silica silicates (silica dioxide and silica gel), glufosinate..., consistent with the notice published in the Federal Register of August 17, 2012, (77 FR 49792)...

  1. Sodium Silicate Behavior in Porous Media Applied for In-Depth Profile Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein A. Akhlaghi Amiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses alkaline sodium silicate (Na-silicate behavior in porous media. One of the advantages of the Na-silicate system is its water-like injectivity during the placement stage. Mixing Na-silicate with saline water results in metal silicate precipitation as well as immediate gelation. This work demonstrated that low salinity water (LSW, sea water diluted 25 times could be used as a pre-flush in flooding operations. A water override phenomenon was observed during gel formation which is caused by gravity segregation. Dynamic adsorption tests in the sand-packed tubes showed inconsiderable adsorbed silicon density (about 8.5 × 10−10 kg/cm3 for a solution with 33 mg/L silicon content, which is less than the estimated mono-layer adsorption density of 1.4 × 10−8 kg/cm3. Na-silicate enhanced water sweep efficiency after application in a dual-permeability sand-pack system, without leak off into the oil-bearing low permeability (LP zone. Field-scale numerical sensitivity studies in a layered reservoir demonstrated that higher permeability and viscosity contrasts and lower vertical/horizontal permeability ratio result in lower Na-silicate leakoff into the matrix. The length of the mixing zone between reservoir water and the injected Na-silicate solution, which is formed by low salinity pre-flush, acts as a buffer zone.

  2. Quantitative estimation of the reinforcing effect of layered silicates in PP nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szazdi, Laszlo; Pukansky Jr, Bela; Vancso, G. Julius; Pukanszky, Bela

    2006-01-01

    Various polypropylene/layered silicate composites were prepared with different silicate contents. Montmorillonites with and without organophilization as well as three maleinated polypropylenes were used to change the extent of exfoliation and hence the properties of the composites. Structure was cha

  3. Synthesis and reaction behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in basic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 贺强; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2004-01-01

    At the molar ratio of CaO to SiO2 of 1, with calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate, calcium silicate hydrate was synthesized at 50, 100, 170 ℃, respectively. The results show that temperature favors the formation of calcium silicate hydrate with perfect structure. When calcium silicate hydrate reacts with caustic solution, the decomposition rate of calcium silicate hydrate increases with the increasing caustic concentration and decreases with the raising synthesis temperature and the prolongation of reaction time. The decomposition rate is all less than 1.2 % in caustic solution, and XRD pattern of the residue after reaction with caustic solution is found as the same as that of original calcium silicate hydrate, which indicates the stable existence of calcium silicate hydrate in caustic solution.When reacted with soda solution, the decomposition rate increases with the increasing soda concentration and reaction time, while decreases with the synthesis temperature. The decomposition rate is more than 2% because CaO · SiO2 · H2O(CSH( Ⅰ )), except Ca5 (OH)2Si6O16 · 4H2O and Ca6Si6O17 (OH)2, is decomposed. So the synthesis temperature and soda concentration should be controlled in the process of transformation of sodium aluminosilicate hydrate into calcium silicate hydrate.

  4. Electrochemically replicated smooth aluminum foils for anodic alumina nanochannel arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biring, Sajal; Tsai, Kun-Tong; Sur, Ujjal Kumar; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2008-01-01

    A fast electrochemical replication technique has been developed to fabricate large-scale ultra-smooth aluminum foils by exploiting readily available large-scale smooth silicon wafers as the masters. Since the adhesion of aluminum on silicon depends on the time of surface pretreatment in water, it is possible to either detach the replicated aluminum from the silicon master without damaging the replicated aluminum and master or integrate the aluminum film to the silicon substrate. Replicated ultra-smooth aluminum foils are used for the growth of both self-organized and lithographically guided long-range ordered arrays of anodic alumina nanochannels without any polishing pretreatment. PMID:21730530

  5. Determination of aluminum by four analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four procedures have been developed for determining the aluminum concentration in basic matrices. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) was the routine method of analysis. Citrate was required to complex the aluminum and eliminate matrix effects. AAS was the least accurate of the four methods studied and was adversely affected by high aluminum concentrations. The Fluoride Electrode Method was the most accurate and precise of the four methods. A Gran's Plot determination was used to determine the end point and average standard recovery was 100% +- 2%. The Thermometric Titration Method was the fastest method for determining aluminum and could also determine hydroxide concentration at the same time. Standard recoveries were 100% +- 5%. The pH Electrode Method also measures aluminum and hydroxide content simultaneously, but is less accurate and more time consuming that the thermal titration. Samples were analyzed using all four methods and results were compared to determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. On the basis of these comparisons, conclusions were drawn concerning the application of each method to our laboratory needs

  6. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dult, Meenakshi; Kundu, R.S. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Murugavel, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Punia, R., E-mail: rajeshpoonia13@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Kishore, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India)

    2014-11-01

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO{sub 2}–(60−x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}–40SiO{sub 2} with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10{sup −1} Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623–703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σ{sub dc}), so called crossover frequency (ω{sub H}), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (H{sub f}) and enthalpy of migration (H{sub m}) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti{sup 3+} and Ti{sup 4+} ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses.

  7. Apatite: a new redox proxy for silicic magmas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Andrew; Graham, Colin; Hawkesworth, Chris; Gillespie, Martin; Bromiley, Geoff; Hinton, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The oxidation states of magmas provide valuable information about the release and speciation of volatile elements during volcanic eruptions, metallogenesis, source rock compositions, open system magmatic processes, tectonic settings and potentially titanium (Ti) activity in chemical systems used for Ti-dependent geothermometers and geobarometers. In this presentation we explore the use of Mn in apatite as an oxybarometer in intermediate and silicic igneous rocks. Increased Mn concentrations in apatite in granitic rocks from the zoned Criffell granitic pluton (southern Scotland) correlate with decreasing Fe2O3 (Fe3+) and Mn in the whole-rock and likely reflect increased Mn2+/Mn3+and greater compatibility of Mn2+ relative to Mn3+ in apatite under reduced conditions. Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in biotites have previously been used to calculate oxygen fugacities (fO2) in the outer zone granodiorites and inner zone granites where redox conditions have been shown to change from close to the magnetite-hematite buffer to close to the nickel-nickel oxide buffer respectively[1]. This trend is apparent in apatite Mn concentrations from a range of intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks that exhibit varying redox states and are shown to vary linearly and negatively with log fO2, such that logfO2=-0.0022(±0.0003)Mn(ppm)-9.75(±0.46) Variations in the Mn concentration of apatites appear to be largely independent of differences in the Mn concentration of the melt. Apatite Mn concentrations may therefore provide an independent oxybarometer that is amenable to experimental calibration, with major relevance to studies on detrital mineral suites, particularly those containing a record of early Earth redox conditions, and on the climatic impact of historic volcanic eruptions[2]. [1] Stephens, W. E., Whitley, J. E., Thirlwall, M. F. and Halliday, A. N. (1985) The Criffell zoned pluton: correlated behaviour of rare earth element abundances with isotopic systems. Contributions to Mineralogy and

  8. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7 using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source, magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesium silicate was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Calcium magnesium silicate crystallite size was observed in nano regime which can effectively mimic natural bone apatite composition. In-vitro bioactivity was investigated by immersing calcium magnesium silicate pellet in simulated body fluid (SBF for three weeks. Results show effective deposition of crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAP layer on its surface and predicting its possibilities for applications in hard tissue regeneration.

  9. Spectroscopic investigation of gamma radiation-induced coloration in silicate glass for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicate glass irradiated by γ-rays was investigated in this study using spectroscopic analyses which included ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The phenomenon of coloration on γ-ray-irradiated silicate glass was analyzed and the effect of annealing on the silicate coloration was also investigated. The results revealed that the coloration originates from the creation of hole-centers (HC) caused by radiation. The shade of the coloration highly correlates to the amount of these HC-related defects but can be reversed by thermal annealing. The variation in coloration is an effective predictive factor in understanding radiation damage on silicate glass. Therefore, this study is relevant in the development of radiation detectors using silicate material as well as in the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in glass form

  10. Search for Large Presolar Silicate Grains in the QUE 99177 CR Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Messenger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silicates are among the most abundant pre-solar grain type, and their diverse chemical and isotopic compos-tions preserve detailed constraints on their stellar origins, condensation conditions, and nucleosynthetic and interstellar processes. Yet, owing to their small sizes, relatively few grains have been measured for isotopic compositions besides O and Si, and their mineralogy is poorly characterized. The average grain size (approx 270 nm) limits the number of analyses that can be conducted on a given grain, and their identification among solar system silicates introduces contaminating signal. These difficulties can be overcome by identifying large presolar silicate grains. However, such grains are very rare and only two approx 1 micron grains have been discovered. We are conducting a dedicated search for large presolar silicates in size-separated QUE 99177 matrix material. This primitive meteorite has among the highest abundance of presolar silicates

  11. A highly crystalline layered silicate with three-dimensionally microporous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Nair, Sankar; Vogt, Thomas; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Layered silicates with three-dimensional microporosity within the layers have the potential to enable new applications in catalysis, adsorption and ion-exchange. Until now no such materials have been reported. However, here we present the synthesis and structure of AMH-3, a silicate with three-dimensionally microporous layers, obtained in high purity and crystallinity. AMH-3 is composed of silicate layers containing eight-membered rings in all three principal crystal directions, and spaced by strontium cations, sodium cations and water molecules. Because of its three-dimensional pore structure, acid and thermal stability, this layered material could find applications in polymer-silicate composites for membrane applications, for synthesis of combined microporous-mesoporous materials, and for the formation of new zeolites and microporous films. Its existence also opens new possibilities for the synthesis of other layered silicates with multidimensional microporous framework layers.

  12. Soft X-ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications on Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ciaravella, A; Chen, Y -J; Caro, G M Muñoz; Huang, C -H; Jiménez-Escobar, A; Venezia, A M

    2016-01-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate ?lms submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted solgel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  13. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated. PMID:27287140

  14. Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricalcium silicate was hydrated at 274, 278, 283, 298, and 313 K in stirred suspensions of saturated CaO solutions under a nitrogen-gas atmosphere until the end of deceleratory period. The suspension conductivities and energy flows were measured continuously. The individual reaction rates for tricalcium silicate dissolution, calcium silicate hydrate precipitation, and calcium hydroxide precipitation were calculated from these measurements. The results suggest that the proportion of tricalcium silicate dissolved was determined by the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution and the time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation. The time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation was more sensitive to changes in temperature than was the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution, so that the proportion of tricalcium silicate hydration dissolved by the deceleratory period increased with decreasing temperature. The average chain length of the calcium silicate hydrate ascertained by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy increased with increasing temperature

  15. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with 29Si and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca2+ concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca2+ and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation.

  16. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with (29)Si and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca(2+) concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca(2+) and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation. PMID:26559965

  17. High-performance polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidecker, Matthew J.

    High-performance layered-silicate nanocomposites of Polycarbonate (PC), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and their blends were produced via conventional melt-blending techniques. The focus of this thesis was on the fundamentals of dispersion, control of thermal stability, maintenance of melt-blending processing conditions, and on optimization of the composites' mechanical properties via the design of controlled and thermodynamically favorable nano-filler dispersions within the polymer matrices. PET and PC require high temperatures for melt-processing, rendering impractical the use of conventional/commercial organically-modified layered-silicates, since the thermal degradation temperatures of their ammonium surfactants lies below the typical processing temperatures. Thus, different surfactant chemistries must be employed in order to develop melt-processable nanocomposites, also accounting for polymer matrix degradation due to water (PET) or amine compounds (PC). Novel high thermal-stability surfactants were developed and employed in montmorillonite nanocomposites of PET, PC, and PC/PET blends, and were compared to the respective nanocomposites based on conventional quaternary-ammonium modified montmorillonites. Favorable dispersion was achieved in all cases, however, the overall material behavior -- i.e., the combination of crystallization, mechanical properties, and thermal degradation -- was better for the nanocomposites based on the thermally-stable surfactant fillers. Studies were also done to trace, and ultimately limit, the matrix degradation of Polycarbonate/montmorillonite nanocomposites, through varying the montmorillonite surfactant chemistry, processing conditions, and processing additives. Molecular weight degradation was, maybe surprisingly, better controlled in the conventional quaternary ammonium based nanocomposites -- even though the thermal stability of the organically modified montmorillonites was in most cases the lowest. Dependence of the

  18. The GRD Model for Silicate Melt Viscosity: Volcanological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K.; Giordano, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    We recently published a model for predicting the non-Arrhenian Newtonian viscosity of silicate melts as a function of temperature (T) and melt composition (X), including the volatile constituents H2O and F (Giordano et al. 2008). The non-Arrhenian T-dependence is accounted for by the VFT equation [log η = A + B/(T(K) -C)] and the model is calibrated on > 1750 measurements of melt viscosity. All compositional dependence is accommodated by 17 model coefficients embedded in the parameters B and C. The optimization assumes a common, high-T limit (A) for silicate melt viscosity and returns a value for this limit of - 4.55 (± 0.2) (e.g., log η ~ 10-4.6 Pa s) making for a total of 18 model coefficients. The effects of pressure on the silicate melt viscosity are not accounted for in this model, however, the model has the following attributes: a) it covers over fifteen log units of viscosity [10-1 to 1014 Pa s], b) it spans most of the compositional range found in naturally-occurring volcanic rocks, c) it is computationally continuous across the entire compositional and temperature spectrum of the database, and d) it is capable of accommodating both strong (near-Arrhenian T-dependence) and fragile (non-Arrhenian T-dependence) behaviour of silicate melts. Lastly, the model for melt viscosity can be used to predict other transport properties including glass transition temperatures (Tg) and melt fragility (m). Volcanic regimes feature constantly changing T-X melt conditions and, in many instances, these small changes generate strong non- linear variations in melt viscosity. The GRD model allows for accurate, continuous prediction of melt properties as a function of temperature and melt composition and, thus, is ideal for modelling transport properties in dynamic natural systems. Below we demonstrate the utility of this model with three volcanological applications: (A) We track variations in viscosity along liquid lines of descent predicted by MELTS (Ghiorso et al. 1995) and

  19. High-dose dosimetry using natural silicate minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Lucas S. do; Mendes, Leticia, E-mail: isatiro@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Watanabe, Shigueo; Rao, Gundu; Lucas, Natasha; Sato, Karina, E-mail: lacifid@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Nuclear; Barbosa, Renata F., E-mail: profcelta@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Santos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias do Mar

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, certain natural silicate minerals such as aquamarine (AB), morganite (PB), goshenite (WB), white jadeite (JW), green jadeite (JG), pink tourmaline (PT) and two varieties of jadeite-like quartz, denoted here by JQ1 and JQ2, were investigated using the thermoluminescence technique to evaluate their potential for use as very-high- and high-dose dosimeters. These minerals respond to high doses of γ-rays of up to 1000 kGy and often to very high doses of up to 3000 kGy. The TL response of these minerals may be considered to be satisfactory for applications in high-dose dosimetry. Investigations of electron paramagnetic resonance and optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry are in progress. (author)

  20. Shear viscosity of alkali and alkaline earth titanium silicate liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Dingwell, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The shear viscosities of l3 silicate liquids along the NarSiOr-TiO, and CaSiOr-TiO, joins as well as six liquids based on the sphene stoichiometry X#TiSiO. (where X represents Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ca, and Sr) have been measured in equilibrium with air using the concentric cylinder method. The NarSiOr-TiO, join was investigated from l0 to 50 mol0/oT iO, in the temperaturer ange 1000-1150 "C, whereast he CaSiO3-TiO,jo in was investigated from l0 to 80 molo/oT iO, in the temperature range of 1400-...

  1. Beneficiation studies of an uranium siliceous - phosphate ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consolidation of the beneficiation studies of a low-grade uranium siliceous - phosphate ore (11% P2O5) from Itataia region in the Northeast of Brazil, owned by Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. - NUCLEBRAS, are presented. Laboratory studies using froth flotation technique and applying statistical methods for data evaluation were made. Pilot plant tests in a 120 Kg/h scale were conducted as a consequence of the bench scale tests. The developed process using tall-oil as collector and starch as depressant gave a total yield of 80% for the P2O5 and 71% the U3O8, for a 33% P2O5 phosphate concentrate. (Author)

  2. Laser induced changes of refractive index of lead - silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of photoinduced changes of refractive index of the TΦ lead - silicate glasses (analogous with the SF glasses from Schott catalog) under the effect of high power laser radiation with quantum energy less bandgap have been studied. It is shown that the laser induced color centers results in increase of refractive index into the exposed bulk during the laser pulse action. This leads to considerable redistribution of irradiance and decrease of laser radiation brightness even in the case of optical elements less 1 mm thickness. The observed effect may be connected both with radiation induced dilatation of matter and heating of interaction region owing to absorption of radiation by color centers. Comparison the kinetics of refractive index change of the glass after exposure by laser pulse at 0.53 μm and the kinetics of color centers decay allowed to draw a conclusion about heat character of observed changes

  3. Shrinking core models applied to the sodium silicate production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The sodium silicate production process, with the molar ratio SiO2/Na2O = 2, for detergent zeolite 4A production, is based on quartz sand dissolving in NaOH aqueous solution, with a specific molality. It is a complex process performed at high temperature and pressure. It is of vital importance to develop adequate mathematical models, which are able to predict the dynamical response of the process parameters. A few kinetic models were developed within this study, which were adjusted and later compared to experimental results. It was assumed that SiO2 particles are smooth spheres, with uniform diameter. This diameter decreases during dissolving. The influence of particle diameter, working temperature and hydroxide ion molality on the dissolution kinetics was investigated. It was concluded that the developed models are sufficiently correct, in the engineering sense, and can be used for the dynamical prediction of process parameters.

  4. Discrete element modeling of calcium-silicate-hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discrete element method (DEM) was used to model calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) at the nanoscale. The C-S-H nanoparticles were modeled as spherical particles with diameters of approximately 5 nm. Interparticle forces included traditional mechanical contact forces, van der Waals forces and ionic correlation forces due to negatively charged C-S-H nanoparticles and ion species in the nanopores. Previous work by the authors demonstrated the DEM method was feasible in studying the properties of the C-S-H nanostructures. In this work, the simulations were performed to look into the effects of nanoparticle packing, nanoparticle morphology, interparticle forces and nanoparticle properties on the deformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of the C-S-H matrix. This work will provide insights into possible ways to improve the properties of the C-S-H matrix. (paper)

  5. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the sulfation of porous calcium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfation of plasma sprayed calcium silicate in flowing SO2/air mixtures at 900 and 1000 C was investigated thermogravimetrically. Reaction products were analyzed using electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction analysis techniques, and results were compared with thermodynamic predictions. The percentage, by volume, of SO2 in air was varied between 0.036 and 10 percent. At 10 percent SO2 the weight gain curve displays a concave downward shoulder early in the sulfation process. An analytical model was developed which treats the initial process as one which decays exponentially with increasing time and the subsequent process as one which decays exponentially with increasing weight gain. At lower SO2 levels the initial rate is controlled by the reactant flow rate. At 1100 C and 0.036 percent SO2 there is no reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions.

  6. Chemistry of Silicate Atmospheres of Evaporating Super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Laura

    2009-01-01

    We model the formation of silicate atmospheres on hot volatile-free super-Earths. Our calculations assume that all volatile elements such as H, C, N, S, and Cl have been lost from the planet. We find that the atmospheres are composed primarily of Na, O2, O, and SiO gas, in order of decreasing abundance. The atmospheric composition may be altered by fractional vaporization, cloud condensation, photoionization, and reaction with any residual volatile elements remaining in the atmosphere. Cloud condensation reduces the abundance of all elements in the atmosphere except Na and K. We speculate that large Na and K clouds such as those observed around Mercury and Io may surround hot super-Earths. These clouds would occult much larger fractions of the parent star than a closely bound atmosphere, and may be observable through currently available methods.

  7. The solubility of rare gases in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubilities of neon, argon, and krypton in basaltic andesite, alkali-olivine basalt, and tholeiitic basalt melts have been measured as functions of the pressure of the dissolving gas and the temperature of the melt. For the purposes of K-Ar dating it is shown that the solubility of Ar in silicate melts (magma) is large enough that the 'no initial argon' assumption and hence the atmospheric argon correction is no longer valid. It is also shown that the excess argon phenomenon is actually a manifestation of an aspect of initial argon incorporated in magma prior to emplacement and subsequent crystallization, and that the conventional method of K-Ar age calculation should be replaced with an isochron approach. Other findings concerning the origin and composition of the primordial atmosphere of the earth and of outgassing processes in the molten earth are discussed

  8. The mechanisms of water diffusion in polymerized silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Harald; Nowak, M.

    1997-02-01

    Diffusion of water was experimentally investigated for melts of albitic (Ab) and quartz-orthoclasic (Qz29Or71, in wt %) compositions with water contents in the range of 0 to 8.5 wt % at temperatures of 1100 to 1200 °C and at pressures of 1.0 and 5.0 kbar. Apparent chemical diffusion coefficients of water ( D water) were determined from concentration-distance profiles measured by FTIR microspectroscopy. Under the same P- T condition and water content the diffusivity of water in albitic, quartz-orthoclasic and haplogranitic (Qz28Ab38 Or34, Nowak and Behrens, this issue) melts is identical within experimental error. Comparison to data published in literature indicates that anhydrous composition only has little influence on the mobility of water in polymerized melts but that the degree of polymerization has a large effect. For instance, Dwater is almost identical for haplogranitic and rhyolitic melts with 0.5-3.5 wt % water at 850 °C but it is two orders of magnitude higher in basaltic than in haplogranitic melts with 0.2-0.5 wt % water at 1300 °C. Based on the new water diffusivity data, recently published in situ near-infrared spectroscopic data (Nowak 1995; Nowak and Behrens 1995), and viscosity data (Schulze et al. 1996) for hydrous haplogranitic melts current models for water diffusion in silicate melts are critically reviewed. The NIR spectroscopy has indicated isolated OH groups, pairs of OH groups and H2O molecules as hydrous species in polymerized silicate melts. A significant contribution of isolated OH groups to the transport of water is excluded for water contents above 10 ppm by comparison of viscosity and water diffusion data and by inspection of concentration profiles from trace water diffusion. Spectroscopic measurements have indicated that the interconversion of H2O molecules and OH pairs is relatively fast in silicate glasses and melts even at low temperature and it is inferred that this reaction is an active step for migration of water. However

  9. XPS study of CaO in sodium silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows that CaO added to silicate glasses behaves much like Na2O in converting bridging oxygen sites to nonbridging sites. Good correspondence with model predictions was obtained but deviations were still sufficiently large to warrant attention. We speculate that some CaO may remain unreacted or that small-scale phase separation may occur. XPS core level shifts were monitored and possible charge-transfer effects were considered. Preliminary theoretical calculations utilizing a molecular-cluster approach were presented. XPS spectra for various glass compositions were simulated by appropriately combining local densities of state calculated for individual atoms. Dominant spectral features observed experimentally were found in the simulations. In conjunction with experiments, more carefully refined calculations will be subsequently examined. 7 figures

  10. Highly porous silicate ceramics prepared from saponite clay mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extremely porous silicate ceramics were fabricated by a freeze-drying process. This material was prepared from a water-based clay mineral. Porosity reached 99% for sintering bodies prepared from 2 mass% suspension. Porosity was controllable in the range of 95% 99% by modifying exchangeable cations. Card-house and card-pack structures were developed, which resembled dried agar. Heat treatments up to 1100 deg C had no effect on porosity for the sintered specimens. It was assumed that multiple condensation to be occurred on the basis of the N2 adsorption and desorption isotherm. Specific surface area of these porous materials was high. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  11. Structural changes between soda-lime silicate glass and melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction has been used to study the structure of a glass and melt of composition 75SiO2-15Na2O-10CaO. RMC modeling of the neutron and X-ray diffraction data for the glass allowed the determination of the Na and Ca environment. The structure has been investigated at 300 K, just below the glass transition at 823 K and in the melt at 1273 K. The short range order does not present important modifications with temperature while significant reorganization appears at the medium range order. These latter changes can be associated with the Si and O pairs and indicate the relaxation of the silicate network. This indicates that the glass formation involved structural rearrangement during cooling. (authors)

  12. Femtosecond Laser Induced Rewritable Optical Memory in Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiongwei; QIU Jianrong; ZHU Congshan; K.Hirao; GAN Fuxi

    2001-01-01

    A novel method for producing rewritable optical memory with ultra-high storage density and ultra-high recording and readout speed is presented. A 120 fs, 800 nm, 1 kHz laser focused by an objective lens is used to produce recording bits in glass with high transmittance contrast. These recording bits can be erased by heat-treatment. The mechanism has been discussed by means of the absorption and electron spin resonance(ESR) spectra of silicate glasses before and after irradiation by the laser. The absorption of glasses increases greatly after irradiation because of color-center generation through multi-photon absorption. ESR spectra shows that the color-center induced in the glass are hole-trapped defects. The color-center disappears when the glass heated because the holes and electrons at traps are released by thermal stimulation and recombine again.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Different Crystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrate: Application for the Removal of Aflatoxin B1 from Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Zeng; Ligang Yang; Shuping Wang; Kai Yang

    2014-01-01

    Different crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) were synthesized under specific hydrothermal conditions and several methods were used to analyze samples. Amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (ACSH) mainly consists of disordered calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H gel) and crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CCSH) consists of crystallized tobermorite. The adsorption of carcinogenic aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) onto ACSH and CCSH was investigated. The adsorption kinetics was studied using pseudo...

  14. Oxygen isotope and petrological study of silicate inclusions in IIE iron meteorites and their relationship with H chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Mcdermott, Kathryn H.; Greenwood, Richard C.; Scott, Edward R. D.; Franchi, Ian A.; Anand, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The origin of silicate-bearing irons, especially those in groups IAB, IIICD, and IIE, is poorly understood as silicate should have separated rapidly from molten metal. Here we report the results of high precision oxygen isotope analysis of silicate inclusions in eleven group IIE meteorites and a petrological study of silicate inclusions in ten IIE irons including those in Garhi Yasin and Tarahumara, which have not been described in detail before. Oxygen isotopes have also been analysed in 20 ...

  15. Study of aluminum-doped silicon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using full-muffin-tin-orbital molecular-dynamics (FP-LMTO-MD) method, we have investigated the effect of aluminum heteroatoms on the geometric structures and bond characteristics of Si n (n=5-10) clusters in detail. It is found that the geometric framework of the ground state structures for Si n (n=5-10) clusters change to some extent upon the substitution of Al atoms in some Si atoms. The effect of aluminum doping on the silicon clusters depends on the geometric structures of Si n (n=5-10) clusters. In particular, the calculations suggest that the aluminum doping would improve the bond strength of some Si-Si bonds in the mixed Si n-m Al m clusters

  16. Aluminum phosphate ceramics for waste storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D

    2014-06-03

    The present disclosure describes solid waste forms and methods of processing waste. In one particular implementation, the invention provides a method of processing waste that may be particularly suitable for processing hazardous waste. In this method, a waste component is combined with an aluminum oxide and an acidic phosphate component in a slurry. A molar ratio of aluminum to phosphorus in the slurry is greater than one. Water in the slurry may be evaporated while mixing the slurry at a temperature of about 140-200.degree. C. The mixed slurry may be allowed to cure into a solid waste form. This solid waste form includes an anhydrous aluminum phosphate with at least a residual portion of the waste component bound therein.

  17. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and aluminum dust exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.R.; Churg, A.M.; Hutcheon, M.; Lom, S.

    1984-08-01

    A 44-yr-old male presented shortness of breath, diffuse X-ray infiltrates, and physiologic evidence of a restrictive lung disease. Biopsy revealed pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The patient had worked for the previous 6 yr as an aluminum rail grinder in a very dusty environment. Analysis of his lung tissue revealed greater than 300 X 10(6) particles of aluminum/g dry lung; all of the particles appeared as spheres of less than 1 mu diameter. We believe that this case represents an example of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis induced by inhalation of aluminum particles; this finding confirms animal studies which suggest that proteinosis can be produced by very large doses of many types of finely divided mineral dust.

  18. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-24

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm(-1) in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si(4+) ions by Al(3+) and Na(+) ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties. PMID:26815634

  19. Evaluation of apatite silicates as solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero-Lopez, D. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martin-Sedeno, M.C.; Aranda, M.A.G. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Pena-Martinez, J. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto de Energias Renovables, Parque Tecnologico, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, 02006 Albacete (Spain); Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Nunez, P. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Apatite-type silicates have been considered as promising electrolytes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC); however studies on the potential use of these materials in SOFC devices have received relatively little attention. The lanthanum silicate with composition La{sub 10}Si{sub 5.5}Al{sub 0.5}O{sub 26.75} has been evaluated as electrolyte with the electrode materials commonly used in SOFC, i.e. manganite, ferrite and cobaltite as cathode materials and NiO-CGO composite, chromium-manganite and Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} as anode materials. Chemical compatibility, area-specific resistance and fuel cell studies have been performed. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis did not reveal any trace of reaction products between the apatite electrolyte and most of the aforementioned electrode materials. However, the area-specific polarisation resistance (ASR) of these electrodes in contact with apatite electrolyte increased significantly with the sintering temperature, indicating reactivity at the electrolyte/electrode interface. On the other hand, the ASR values are significantly improved using a ceria buffer layer between the electrolyte and electrode materials to prevent reactivity. Maximum power densities of 195 and 65 mWcm{sup -2} were obtained at 850 and 700 C, respectively in H{sub 2} fuel, using an 1 mm-thick electrolyte, a NiO-Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} composite as anode and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} as cathode materials. This fuel cell was tested for 100 h in 5%H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere showing stable performance. (author)

  20. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  1. Silicate reduces cadmium uptake into cells of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greger, Maria; Kabir, Ahmad H; Landberg, Tommy; Maity, Pooja J; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a health threat all over the world and high Cd content in wheat causes high Cd intake. Silicon (Si) decreases cadmium content in wheat grains and shoot. This work investigates whether and how silicate (Si) influences cadmium (Cd) uptake at the cellular level in wheat. Wheat seedlings were grown in the presence or absence of Si with or without Cd. Cadmium, Si, and iron (Fe) accumulation in roots and shoots was analysed. Leaf protoplasts from plants grown without Cd were investigated for Cd uptake in the presence or absence of Si using the fluorescent dye, Leadmium Green AM. Roots and shoots of plants subjected to all four treatments were investigated regarding the expression of genes involved in the Cd uptake across the plasma membrane (i.e. LCT1) and efflux of Cd into apoplasm or vacuole from the cytosol (i.e. HMA2). In addition, phytochelatin (PC) content and PC gene (PCS1) expression were analysed. Expression of iron and metal transporter genes (IRT1 and NRAMP1) were also analysed. Results indicated that Si reduced Cd accumulation in plants, especially in shoot. Si reduced Cd transport into the cytoplasm when Si was added both directly during the uptake measurements and to the growth medium. Silicate downregulated LCT1 and HMA2 and upregulated PCS1. In addition, Si enhanced PC formation when Cd was present. The IRT1 gene, which was downregulated by Cd was upregulated by Si in root and shoot facilitating Fe transport in wheat. NRAMP1 was similarly expressed, though the effect was limited to roots. This work is the first to show how Si influences Cd uptake on the cellular level. PMID:26745394

  2. Air-Impregnated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Layers for Enhancing the Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Lee, Junghoon; Sheppard, Keith; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2015-10-13

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layers were fabricated on aluminum substrates with systematically varied pore diameters (20-80 nm) and oxide thicknesses (150-500 nm) by controlling the anodizing voltage and time and subsequent pore-widening process conditions. The porous nanostructures were then coated with a thin (only a couple of nanometers thick) Teflon film to make the surface hydrophobic and trap air in the pores. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate was evaluated by a potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution (saltwater). Results showed that the hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate compared to a hydrophilic oxide layer of the same nanostructures, to bare (nonanodized) aluminum with only a natural oxide layer on top, and to the latter coated with a thin Teflon film. The hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer with the largest pore diameter and the thickest oxide layer (i.e., the maximized air fraction) resulted in the best corrosion resistance with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of up to 99% for up to 7 days. The results demonstrate that the air impregnating the hydrophobic nanopores can effectively inhibit the penetration of corrosive media into the pores, leading to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance. PMID:26393523

  3. A study of the association between urinary aluminum concentration and pre-clinical findings among aluminum-handling and non-handling workers

    OpenAIRE

    OGAWA,Masanori; Kayama, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    Background Aluminum is considered to be a relatively safe metal for humans. However, there are some reports that aluminum can be toxic to humans and animals. In order to estimate the toxicity of aluminum with respect to humans, we measured the aluminum concentration in urine of aluminum-handling and non-handling workers and investigated the relationships between their urinary aluminum concentrations and pre-clinical findings. Methods Twenty-three healthy aluminum-handling workers and 10 healt...

  4. Aluminum stabilized multifilamentary NbTi superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently there have been significant improvements in the properties of Cu stabilized NbTi (1-3) and the techniques used to accomplish these improvements have suggested new approaches to the manufacture of aluminum stabilized material with a range of filament sizes. A totally aluminum stabilized conductor with 14 relatively large filaments and an Al:Sc ratio of 5:1, which offers promise for use in large d.c. magnets, is described. Some finer filament arrays are also illustrated, although no J/sub c/ properties have yet been measured

  5. Development of deep drawn aluminum piston tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.C.; Bronder, R.L.; Kilgard, L.W.; Evans, M.C.; Ormsby, A.E.; Spears, H.R.; Wilson, J.D.

    1990-06-08

    An aluminum piston tank has been developed for applications requiring lightweight, low cost, low pressure, positive-expulsion liquid storage. The 3 liter (183 in{sup 3}) vessel is made primarily from aluminum sheet, using production forming and joining operations. The development process relied mainly on pressurizing prototype parts and assemblies to failure, as the primary source of decision making information for driving the tank design toward its optimum minimum-mass configuration. Critical issues addressed by development testing included piston operation, strength of thin-walled formed shells, alloy choice, and joining the end cap to the seamless deep drawn can. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Effect of Electrolyte on the Dissolution of Aluminum from Acid Sois and the Distribution of Aluminum Forms in Soil Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XURENKOU; JIGUOLIANG

    1997-01-01

    KCl,CaCl2,NH4Cl,NaCl,K2SO4 and KF solutions were used for studying the effects of cations and anions on the dissolution of aluminum and the distribution of aluminum forms respectively.Power of exchanging and releasing aluminum of four kinds of cations was in the decreasing order Ca2+>K+>NH4+>Na+,The dissolution of aluminum increased with the cation concentration.The adsorption affinity of various soils fro aluminum was different.The aluminum in the soil with a stronger adsorption affinity was diffcult to be exchanged and released by cations.The Al-F complexes were main species of inorganic aluminum at a low concentration of cations,while Al3+ became major species of inorganic aluminum at a hiht concentration of cations .The results on the effct of anions indicated that the concentrations of total aluminum,three kinds of inorganc aluminum(Al3+,Al-F and Al-OH complexes) and organic aluminum complexes(Al-OM) when SO42- was added into soil suspension were lower than those when Cl- was added.The dissolution of aluminum from soils and the distribution of aluminum forms in solution were affected by the adsorption of F- on the soil.For soils with strong affinity for F-,the concentrations of the three inorganic aluminum species in soil solution after addition of F- were lower than those after addition of Cl-;but for soils with weak affinity for F-,the concentrations of Al3+ and Al-OM were lower and the concentrations of Al-F complexes and total inorganic aluminum after addition of F- were higher than those after addition of Cl- .The increase of F- concentration in soil solution accelerated the dissolution of aluminum from soils.

  7. Refined Aluminum Industry Suffers From Deficit and Western Investment Accelerates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Under the backdrop of loss of the entire refined aluminum industry,the investment in electrolytic aluminum accelerates.The reporter learnt from a recent survey that,many companies including Shandong Xinfa Group,East Hope

  8. Anodization process produces opaque, reflective coatings on aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Opaque, reflective coatings are produced on aluminum articles by an anodizing process wherein the anodizing bath contains an aqueous dispersion of finely divided insoluble inorganic compounds. These particles appear as uniformly distributed occlusions in the anodic deposit on the aluminum.

  9. Low Mass, Aluminum NOFBX Combustion Chamber Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our team proposes to define a diffusion bonding process for aluminum as an enabling step to ultimately develop an innovative, lightweight, long life, aluminum...

  10. Aluminum-26 in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions and chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Huss, Gary R.; MacPherson, Glenn J.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Russell, Sara S.; Srinivasan, Gopalan

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the distribution of ^(26)A1 in chondrites, we measured aluminum-magnesium systematics in four calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) and eleven aluminum-rich chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs). All four CAIs were found to contain radiogenic ^(26)Mg (^(26)Mg^*) from the decay of ^(26)A1. The inferred initial ^(26)Al/^(27)Al ratios for these objects ((^(26)Al/^(27)Al)_0 ≅ 5 × 10^(−5)) are indistinguishable from the (^(26)Al/^(27)Al)_0 ratios found...

  11. Control of Temperature and Aluminum Fluoride Concentration Based on Model Prediction in Aluminum Electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng Shuiping; Wang Shasha; Qu Yaxing

    2014-01-01

    The temperature and the aluminum fluoride (AlF3) concentration of electrolyte greatly affect the current efficiency and energy consumption in aluminum electrolysis. This paper developed a new kind of algorithm to control the temperature and AlF3 concentration of electrolyte for 300 kA prebake aluminum production cells by altering the setting cell voltage and the AlF3 adding rate. One is liquidus model which can be used to calculate AlF3 concentration of electrolyte by some technical parameter...

  12. Aluminum base alloy powder metallurgy process and product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical method including cooling molten aluminum particles and consolidating resulting solidified particles into a multiparticle body, wherein the improvement comprises the provision of greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn. Aluminum containing greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn.

  13. Sunshine Group Builds High-End Aluminum Product Industrial Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    In order to propel development of the aluminum industry to move toward featured,specialized,and ecological directions,Sunlight Sanyuan Aluminum Company plans to expropriate 300 mu of land in Hanjiang District of Putian City,Fujian province,where it plans to construct high-end aluminum product industrial park,introduce the world’s most advanced fully automatic production equipment and technologies for aluminum profile and

  14. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation

  15. Macro deformation twins in single-crystal aluminum

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, F.; Wang, L.; Fan, D.; B. X. Bie; Zhou, X. M.; Suo, T.; Y. L. Li; Chen, M. W.; Liu, C; Qi, M. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Deformation twinning in pure aluminum has been considered to be a unique property of nanostructured aluminum. A lingering mystery is whether deformation twinning occurs in coarse-grained or single-crystal aluminum, at scales beyond nanotwins. Here, we present the first experimental demonstration of macro deformation twins in single-crystal aluminum formed under ultrahigh strain-rate ($\\sim$10$^6$ s$^{-1}$), large shear strain (200$\\%$) via dynamic equal channel angular pressing. Deformation t...

  16. Rheology of suspensions with aluminum nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Teipel; Ulrich Förter-Barth

    2009-01-01

    Nano-scale aluminum particles are innovative materials increasingly used in energetic formulations. In this contribution, the rheological behavior of suspensions with either paraffin oil or HTPB as the matrix fluid and nano-scale aluminum (ALEX) as the dispersed phase is described and discussed. The paraffin oil/aluminum suspensions exhibit non-Newtonian flow behavior over a wide range of concentrations, whereas the HTPB/aluminum suspensions exhibitNewtonian behavior (i.e. the viscosity is in...

  17. Removal of Aluminum from Water and Industrial Waste Water

    OpenAIRE

    Parisa Ghashghaiee pour; Mohammad Ali Takassi; Touba Hamoule

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to introduce a procedure to remove Aluminum ions from drinking water and industrial effluents by using active carbon with different grading as absorbent. Absorption of Aluminum ions were discussed in different conditions of Aluminum concentration, contact time, impact of electrolytes and pH on Aluminum ions absorbency. Both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms used to investigate the adsorption. Thermodynamics relations governing process, such as specification of ( ), ( ) an...

  18. Water content of aluminum, dialysis dementia, and osteomalacia.

    OpenAIRE

    Wills, M. R.; Savory, J

    1985-01-01

    In the presence of normal renal function, a high concentration of aluminum in drinking water has been implicated as a factor in the etiology of a neurological syndrome in one specific geographical area. The role of aluminum as a toxic agent in other neurological disorders, where renal function is normal, is controversial. Aluminum is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and is normally excreted by the kidneys in the urine. In patients with chronic renal failure, aluminum appears to be of ...

  19. Corrosion behavior of aluminum exposed to a biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Ballote, L.; Maldonado-Lopez, L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-IPN, Merida Yucatan, 97310 (Mexico); Lopez-Sansores, J.F. [Facultad de Quimica, UADY, Merida Yucatan, 97310 (Mexico); Garfias-Mesias, L.F. [Corrosion and Materials Technology Laboratory, DNV/CCT, Dublin, Ohio, 43017 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Aluminum was exposed to biodiesel with different levels of contaminants and impurities, and its corrosion behavior was evaluated by conventional electrochemical techniques. It was found that the corrosion behavior of aluminum in biodiesel contaminated with alkalis is similar to the corrosion behavior of aluminum in aqueous solutions. In addition, it was demonstrated that corrosion of aluminum can be used as a quantitative indication of the biodiesel purity. (author)

  20. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2