WorldWideScience

Sample records for aluminum hydride phases

  1. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH3– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH3 and α-AlH3 irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH3 and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers

  2. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  3. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  4. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  5. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Xiang [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  7. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    instruments were utilized for this work and their data collection and analysis are reported. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were conducted at NIST Center for Neutron Research to characterize atomic hydrogen diffusion in bulk and nano-confined NaAlH4. It was observed that upon confinement of NaAlH4, a significantly higher fraction of hydrogen atoms were involved in diffusive motion on the pico-second to nano-second timescales. However, the confinement had no impact on the lattice diffusivities (jump/hopping rates) of atomic hydrogen, indicating that the improved hydrogen release rates were not due to any kinetic destabilization effects. Instead, the investigation strongly suggested thermodynamic destabilization as the major effect of nano-confinement. The local interaction of the metal sites in metal organic frameworks with the infiltrated hydride was studied using extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy technique. The experiments were conducted at Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices at Louisiana State University. The metal sites were found to be chemically un-altered, hence ruling out any catalytic role in the dehydrogenation at room temperatures. The fractal morphology of NaAlH4 was characterized by ultra-small angle x-ray scattering experiments performed at Argonne National Lab. The studies quantitatively estimated the extent of densification in the course of one desorption cycle. The particle sizes were found to increase two-fold during heat treatment. Also, the nano-confinement procedure was shown to produce dense mass fractals as opposed to pristine NaAlH4, exhibiting a surface fractal morphology. Based on this finding, a new method to identify confined material from un-confined material in nano-composites was developed and is presented. Preliminary results of modeling and correlating multi-scale phenomena using a phase-field approach are also presented as the foundation for future work.

  8. Complex rare-earth aluminum hydrides: mechanochemical preparation, crystal structure and potential for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenthaler, Claudia; Pommerin, André; Felderhoff, Michael; Sun, Wenhao; Wolverton, Christopher; Bogdanović, Borislav; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-11-25

    A novel type of complex rare-earth aluminum hydride was prepared by mechanochemical preparation. The crystal structure of the REAlH(6) (with RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds was calculated by DFT methods and confirmed by preliminary structure refinements. The trigonal crystal structure consists of isolated [AlH(6)](3-) octahedra bridged via [12] coordinated RE cations. The investigation of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides during thermolysis shows a decrease of thermal stability with increasing atomic number of the RE element. Rare-earth hydrides (REH(x)) are formed as primary dehydrogenation products; the final products are RE-aluminum alloys. The calculated decomposition enthalpies of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides are at the lower end for reversible hydrogenation under moderate conditions. Even though these materials may require somewhat higher pressures and/or lower temperatures for rehydrogenation, they are interesting examples of low-temperature metal hydrides for which reversibility might be reached. PMID:19886669

  9. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  10. Analytic Force Field for Clusters and Nanoparticles of Aluminum and Its Hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingfan; Tang, Enoch; Xi, Yongjie; Han, Bo; Legenski, Nicole; Chalas, Guadalupe; Chan, Frankie; Cheng, Hansong; Forrey, Robert C.

    2014-06-01

    An analytic potential energy function is developed for simulating clusters and nanoparticles of aluminum and its hydride. An embedded-atom method is used which modulates the background electron density as a function of the number of nearest-neighbor atoms. The method is parametrized and tested using an extensive training set computed from first-principle density-functional theory. The potential energy function is found to be reliable for clusters of arbitrary size, shape, and composition ratio. The force field obtained from the analytic potential energy function is computationally efficient and well suited for simulating large systems of aluminum and aluminum hydride particles. A proposed molecular dynamics simulation related to hydrogen-storage technologies for onboard automotive applications is briefly discussed.

  11. Aluminum hydride as a hydrogen and energy storage material: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3) and its associated compounds make up a fascinating class of materials that have motivated considerable scientific and technological research over the past 50 years. Due primarily to its high energy density, AlH3 has become a promising hydrogen and energy storage material that has been used (or proposed for use) as a rocket fuel, explosive, reducing agent and as a hydrogen source for portable fuel cells. This review covers the past, present and future research on aluminum hydride and includes the latest research developments on the synthesis of α-AlH3 and the other polymorphs (e.g., microcrystallization reaction, batch and continuous methods), crystallographic structures, thermodynamics and kinetics (e.g., as a function of crystallite size, catalysts and surface coatings), high-pressure hydrogenation experiments and possible regeneration routes.

  12. Hydride phase equilibria in V-Ti-Ni alloy membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • V70Ti15Ni15 (at.%) comprises a vanadium solid solution plus NiTi and NiTi2. • Dissolution of Ni and Ti into vanadium solid solution increase critical temperature for BCT β-hydride formation. • Three VSS hydride phase fields were observed: BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT. • NiTi and NiTi2 phases do not stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. - Abstract: Vanadium is highly permeable to hydrogen which makes it one of the leading alternatives to Pd alloys for hydrogen-selective alloy membrane applications, but it is prone to brittle failure through excessive hydrogen absorption and transitions between the BCC α and BCT β phases. V-Ti-Ni alloys are a prospective class of alloy for hydrogen-selective membrane applications, comprising a highly-permeable vanadium solid solution and several interdendritic Ni-Ti compounds. These Ni-Ti compounds are thought to stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. This hypothesis was investigated through a systematic study of V70Ti15Ni15 by hydrogen absorption and X-ray diffraction under conditions relevant to membrane operation. Dissolved hydrogen concentration in the bulk alloy and component phases, phase identification, thermal and hydrogen-induced expansion, phase quantification and hydride phase transitions under a range of pressures and temperatures have been determined. The vanadium phase passes through three different phase fields (BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT) during cooling under H2 from 400 to 30 °C. Dissolution of Ni and Ti into the vanadium phase increases the critical temperature for β-hydride formation from <200 to >400 °C. Furthermore, the Ni-Ti phases also exhibit several phase transitions meaning their ability to stabilise the alloy is questionable. We conclude that this alloy is significantly inferior to V with respect to its stability when used as a hydrogen-selective membrane, but the hydride phase transitions suggest potential application for high-temperature hydrogen and thermal energy

  13. On the high-pressure superconducting phase in platinum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczȩśniak, D.; Zemła, T. P.

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the ambiguous experimental data for the superconducting phase in silane (SiH4), which may originate from platinum hydride (PtH), we provide a theoretical study of the superconducting state in the latter alloy. The quantitative estimates of the thermodynamics of PtH at 100 GPa are given for a wide range of Coulomb pseudopotential values ({μ }*) within the Eliashberg formalism. The obtained critical temperature value ({T}{{C}}\\in for {μ }*\\in ) agrees well with the experimental TC for SiH4, which may be ascribed to PtH. Moreover, the calculated characteristic thermodynamic ratios exceed the predictions of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, implying the occurrence of strong-coupling and retardation effects in PtH. We note that our results may be of high relevance for future theoretical and experimental studies on hydrides.

  14. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  15. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr–H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented

  16. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yoji [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Li, Zhaofei [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hirai, Kei [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tassel, Cédric [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Loyer, François [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226 Université de Rennes 1-CNRS, équipe CSM, Bât. 10B, Campus de Beaulieu, 263, Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Ichikawa, Noriya [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Abe, Naoyuki [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takafumi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Shimakawa, Yuichi [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); and others

    2013-11-15

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

  17. Gallium Nitride Nanowires Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhan-Hui; XIU Xiang-Qan; YAN Huai-Yue; ZHANG Rong; XIE Zi-Li; HAN Ping; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst.The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy,electron diffraction,roomtemperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy.The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the[0001]direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects.The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.%GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst. The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, room-temperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the [0001] direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects. The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.

  18. Synthesis and formation process of Al2CuHx: A new class of interstitial aluminum-based alloy hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Saitoh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-based alloy hydride Al2CuHx (x ∼ 1 is synthesized by hydrogenating Al2Cu alloy using high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere. Al8Cu square antiprisms in Al2Cu twist around the c axis of a tetragonal unit cell by hydrogenation. The twist enlarges the interstitial spaces for accommodating hydrogen atoms which align linearly parallel to the c axis in Al2CuHx. Thermodynamic stability of Al2CuHx results from the balance of stabilization by H 1s and Al 3sp hybridization and destabilization owing to the Fermi-level lifting upon hydrogenation. The crystal and electronic structures of Al2CuHx illustrate the formation of an interstitial hydride of aluminum-based alloy.

  19. Well-Defined Silica Supported Aluminum Hydride: Another Step Towards the Utopian Single Site Dream?

    KAUST Repository

    Werghi, Baraa

    2015-07-17

    Reaction of triisobutylaluminum with SBA15700 at room temperature occurs by two parallel pathways involving either silanol or siloxane bridges. It leads to the formation of a well-defined bipodal [(≡SiO)2Al-CH2CH(CH3)2] 1a, silicon isobutyl [≡Si-CH2CH(CH3)2] 1b and a silicon hydride [≡Si-H] 1c. Their structural identity was characterized by FT-IR and advance solid-state NMR spectroscopies (1H, 13C, 29Si, 27Al and 2D multiple quantum), elemental and gas phase analysis, and DFT calculations. The reaction involves the formation of a highly reactive monopodal intermediate: [≡SiO-Al-[CH2CH(CH3)2]2], with evolution of isobutane. This intermediate undergoes two parallel routes: Transfer of either one isobutyl fragment or of one hydride to an adjacent silicon atom. Both processes occur by opening of a strained siloxane bridge, ≡Si-O-Si≡ but with two different mechanisms, showing that the reality of “single site” catalyst may be an utopia: DFT calculations indicate that isobutyl transfer occurs via a simple metathesis between the Al-isobutyl and O-Si bonds, while hydride transfer occurs via a two steps mechanism, the first one is a ß-H elimination to Al with elimination of isobutene, whereas the second is a metathesis step between the formed Al-H bond and a O-Si bond. Thermal treatment of 1a (at 250 °C) under high vacuum (10-5 mbar) generates Al-H through a ß-H elimination of isobutyl fragment. These supported well-defined Al-H which are highly stable with time, are tetra, penta and octa coordinated as demonstrated by IR and 27Al–1H J-HMQC NMR spectroscopy. All these observations indicate that surfaces atoms around the site of grafting play a considerable role in the reactivity of a single site system.

  20. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd3H4 follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one

  1. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part I. Development of quantitative free energy functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A temperature dependent, quantitative free energy functional was developed for the modeling of hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys within a phase field scheme. The model takes into account crystallographic variants of hydrides, interfacial energy between hydride and matrix, interfacial energy between hydrides, elastoplastic hydride precipitation and interaction with externally applied stress. The model is fully quantitative in real time and real length scale, and simulation results were compared with limited experimental data available in the literature with a reasonable agreement. The work calls for experimental and/or theoretical investigations of some of the key material properties that are not yet available in the literature

  2. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  3. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-10-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification.

  4. Characterization of a U-Mo alloy subjected to direct hydriding of the gamma phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has imposed the need to develop plate-type fuel elements based on high density uranium compounds, such as U-Mo alloys. One of the steps in the fabrication of the fuel elements is the pulverization of the fissile material. In the case of the U-Mo alloys, the pulverization can be accomplished through hydriding - dehydriding. Two alternative methods of the hydriding-dehydriding process, namely the selective hydriding in alpha phase (HS-alpha) and the massive hydriding in gamma phase (HM-gamma) are currently being studied at the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica. The HM-gamma method was reproduced at laboratory scale starting from a U-7 wt % Mo alloy. The hydrided and dehydrided materials were characterized using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction. These results are compared with previous results of the HS-alpha method. (author)

  5. Mathematical model of metal-hydride phase change applied to Yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a mathematical model for the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding of metal powders. The single powder particle is considered. Its shape is approximated by one of the symmetric ones: sphere, long thin cylinder (wire), or flat thin plate. A few concurrent processes are considered. The model equations are derived from the mass conservation law. We consider the case of the 'shrinking core' morphology, i.e. formation of the hydride skin on the surface of the particle with subsequent growth of this skin. We consider three successive stages of the phase change: skin development, skin growth, and final saturation or degassing. We apply the model to experimental data for Yttrium and show that the approximation of the experimental curves by the model ones is comparable for different cycles and different shapes for similar sets of the kinetic parameters. This also shows that shape of powder particles do not influence significantly on the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding

  6. Mathematical model of metal-hydride phase change applied to Yttrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I. A.; Manicheva, S. V.; Gabis, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    We present a mathematical model for the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding of metal powders. The single powder particle is considered. Its shape is approximated by one of the symmetric ones: sphere, long thin cylinder (wire), or flat thin plate. A few concurrent processes are considered. The model equations are derived from the mass conservation law. We consider the case of the "shrinking core" morphology, i.e. formation of the hydride skin on the surface of the particle with subsequent growth of this skin. We consider three successive stages of the phase change: skin development, skin growth, and final saturation or degassing. We apply the model to experimental data for Yttrium and show that the approximation of the experimental curves by the model ones is comparable for different cycles and different shapes for similar sets of the kinetic parameters. This also shows that shape of powder particles do not influence significantly on the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding.

  7. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  8. New nanomaterials for hydrogen storage. A new class of aluminum hydrides; Neue Nanomaterialien zur Wasserstoffspeicherung. Eine neue Klasse von Aluminiumhydriden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, Joern

    2009-02-13

    In this work, Aluminum was vaporized in a PACIS cluster source, while molecular Hydrogen was also provided, thus producing Aluminum hydride clusters. These clusters were mass selected and investigated via Photoelectron Spectroscopy with anions in order to determine their electronic structure. In a cooperation with Puru Jena et al. at the Virginia Commonwealth University, electronic and geometric structures of the clusters were also calculated using Density Functional Theory. A group of clusters, specifically Al{sub 4}H{sub 4}, Al{sub 4}H{sub 6} and a series of clusters Al{sub n}H{sub n+2} (5 {<=} n {<=} 8) showed large HOMO-LUMO-Gaps and relatively small adiabatic electron affinities, hinting towards an increased stability of these clusters. The resemblance of the structures of already known and stable Boranes (BnHm) led to investigations whether ''Wade's Rules'' could also be applied to the new Alanes Al{sub n}H{sub m}. Comparison of the experimentally found values for the HOMO-LUMO-Gap, Adiabatic electron Affinity and Vertical Detachment Energy with the calculated values led to geometric structures of the ground states that, in case of the clusters Al{sub n}H{sub n+2} (5 {<=} n {<=} 8) follow Wade's (n+1) rule: They adopt hollow, cage-like closo-structures with one terminal Hydrogen atom per Aluminum atom and two additional Hydrogen atoms on bridge-sites. The clusters Al{sub 4}H{sub 4} and Al{sub 4}H{sub 6} have tetrahedron-shaped structures. While Al{sub 4}H{sub 4} is a perfect tetrahedron, Al{sub 4}H{sub 6} adopts a slightly distorted tetrahedral geometry with D{sub 2d} symmetry and two Hydrogen atoms on bridge sites. Furthermore, Al{sub 4}H{sub 6} showed the biggest HOMO-LUMO-Gap of all investigated clusters with a value of 1.9 {+-} 0.1 eV. These findings seem to contradict Wade's (n+1) rule, but can be understood in terms of the Polyhedral Skeletal Electron Pair Theory (PSEPT). The molecular orbitals predicted by the PSEPT

  9. Possible "Magnéli" Phases and Self-Alloying in the Superconducting Sulfur Hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Ryosuke; Sano, Wataru; Arita, Ryotaro; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically give an infinite number of metastable crystal structures for the superconducting sulfur hydride HxS under pressure. Previously predicted crystalline phases of H2S and H3S have been thought to have important roles for experimentally observed low and high Tc, respectively. The newly found structures are long-period modulated crystals where slablike H2S and H3S regions intergrow on a microscopic scale. The extremely small formation enthalpy for the H2S -H3S boundary indicated by first-principles calculations suggests possible alloying of these phases through the formation of local H3S regions. The modulated structures and gradual alloying transformations between them not only explain the peculiar pressure dependence of Tc in sulfur hydride observed experimentally, but also could prevail in the experimental samples under various compression schemes.

  10. Preparation and properties of unsolvated aluminum hydride. thermal decomposition of gaseous triethylaluminum. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartik, T.; Smith, W.

    1963-03-29

    Kinetic studies were conducted on the thermal decomposition of gaseous triethylaluminum in static systems in the temperature range between 162.0 and 192.4C. At various stages of the reaction, the following species were observed: methane, ethane, ethene, butane, 1-butene, 2 butenes, hexenes, hydrogen, and metallic aluminum. The hydrolysis (D2O) products included: ethane-d sub 1, butane d sub 1, hexane, hydrogen deuteride, deuterium and CHxD4-x where x 0,1,2 or 3. The kinetic data were treated in terms of the disappearance of the aluminum ethyl bond and satisfied the rate expression for a first order heterogeneous reaction unretarded by its products, but with weak to moderate absorption of the reactant. Graphical studies of the data showed good linearity throughout the entire decomposition for the usual first order plots. Further support for the conclusion of a first order kinetics was obtained by an experiment concerning the influence of initial concentration on the fraction of original material decomposed in a given period. (Author)

  11. Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition of Thin Aluminum Oxide Films

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jie; Sun, Yingchun

    2007-01-01

    Thin aluminum oxide films were deposited by a new and simple physicochemical method called chemical liquid phase deposition (CLD) on semiconductor materials. Aluminum sulfate with crystallized water and sodium bicarbonate were used as precursors for film growth, and the control of the system pH value played an important role in this experiment. The growth rate is 12 nm/h at room temperature. Post-growth annealing not only densifies and purifies the films, but results in film crystallization a...

  12. Study on the effects of matrix yield strength on hydride phase stability in Zircaloy-2 and Zr 2.5 wt% Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on the effect of matrix yield strength on precipitation of hydride phases in zirconium alloys is presented. X-ray diffraction measurements from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory were used to characterise the quantity of δ (fcc) and γ (fct) hydride phases in zirconium alloys as a function of yield stress and cooling rate. While experimental results indicate that yield stress has a pronounced effect on hydride phase stability in the zirconium–hydrogen system, other factors including defect structure and β-phase distribution also influence the hydride phase stability, for material of a given yield stress. These results offer a possible explanation for the wide range of hydride phase stability reported in the literature for the zirconium–hydrogen system.

  13. Growth of AlN layer on patterned sapphire substrate by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gang Seok; Lee, Chanmi; Jeon, Hunsoo; Lee, Chanbin; Bae, Sung Geun; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Yang, Min; Yi, Sam Nyung; Yu, Young Moon; Lee, Jae Hak; Honda, Yoshio; Sawaki, Nobuhiko; Kim, Suck-Whan

    2016-05-01

    Even though a patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) has been used for the growth of a high-quality epilayer because of its many advantages, it has not been successfully used to grow an AlN epilayer for ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on a PSS up to now. We report the growth of a high-quality AlN epilayer on a PSS, as a substrate for the manufacture of UV LEDs, by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks for the AlN epilayer grown on the PSS indicate that crystalline AlN with a wurtzite structure was grown successfully on the PSS. Furthermore, HVPE combining both in situ HVPE technology and liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) using a mixed source is proposed as a novel method for the growth of a flat AlN epilayer on a PSS.

  14. Influence of the V/III ratio in the gas phase on thin epitaxial AlN layers grown on (0001) sapphire by high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudel, A., E-mail: arnaud.claudel@grenoble-inp.org [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Fellmann, V. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Gélard, I. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Coudurier, N. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Sauvage, D. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Balaji, M. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Crystal Growth Center, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); and others

    2014-12-31

    Thin (0001) epitaxial aluminum nitride (AlN) layers were grown on c-plane sapphire using high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The experimental set-up consists of a vertical cold-wall quartz reactor working at low pressure in which the reactions take place on a susceptor heated by induction. The reactants used are ammonia and aluminum chlorides in situ formed via hydrogen chloride reaction with high purity aluminum pellets. As-grown AlN layers have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies. The influence of the V/III ratio in the gas phase, from 1.5 to 15, on growth rate, surface morphology, roughness and crystalline quality is investigated in order to increase the quality of thin epitaxial AlN layers grown at high temperature. Typical growth rates of around 0.45 μm/h were obtained for such thin epitaxial AlN layers. The growth rate was unaffected by the V/III ratio. An optimum for roughness, crystalline quality and optical properties seems to exist at V/III = 7.5. As a matter of fact, for a V/III ratio of 7.5, best root mean square roughness and crystalline quality — measured on 0002 symmetric reflection — as low as 6.9 nm and 898 arcsec were obtained, respectively. - Highlights: • Growth of thin epitaxial AlN layers by high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy • Influence of V/III ratio on growth rate, morphology and crystalline quality • The effect of surface morphology on strain state and crystal quality is established.

  15. Hangzhou Jinjiang Group Shanxi Fusheng Aluminum Phase I 800,000 t/a Aluminum Oxide Project Started Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On October 19,the Shanxi Province Pinglu County Phase I 800,000t/a Aluminum Oxide Project of Shanxi Fusheng Aluminum Co.,Ltd,a subordinate of Hangzhou Jinjiang Group,started operation.This is the fourth Aluminum oxide project constructed and operated by Jinjiang Group.

  16. Ab initio study of H and He migrations in β-phase Sc, Y, and Er hydrides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ru-Cheng; Yang Li; Dai Yun-Ya; Zhu Zi-Qiang; Peng Shu-Ming; Long Xing-Gui; Gao Fei; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed to investigate the migrations of hydrogen(H)and helium(He)atoms in β-phase scandium(Sc),yttrium(Y),and erbium(Er)hydrides with three different ratios of H to metal.The results show that the migration mechanisms of H and He atoms mainly depend on the crystal structures of hydrides,but their energy barriers are affected by the host-lattice in metal hydrides.The formation energies of octahedral-occupancy H(Hoct)and tetrahedral vacancy(Vtet)pairs are almost the same(about 1.2 eV).It is of interest to note that the migration barriers of H increase with increasing host-lattice atomic number.In addition,the results show that the favorable migration mechanism of He depends slightly on the Vtet in the Sc hydride,but strongly on that in the Y and Er hydrides,which may account for different behaviours of initial He release from ScT2 and ErT2.

  17. Luminescence transients in highly excited GaN grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurilcik, G.; Zukauskas, A. [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-2040 Vilnius (Lithuania); Hageman, P.R. [University of Nijmegen, Fac. of Science, Dept. of Exp. Solid State Physics III, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2004-01-01

    Luminescence transients has been studied in GaN grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) under intense photoexcitation conditions. The HVPE grown GaN layer exhibited luminescence decay time of 205 ps, that implies the room-temperature free-carrier lifetime of 420 ps. The obtained carrier lifetime of HVPE-grown GaN is significantly higher that the typical values of carrier lifetime measured for GaN heterolayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, what suggests high potential of HVPE growth technique for light-emitting diode and blue laser applications. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Electrical, optical, and structural properties of GaN films prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • GaN films are prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). • Residual donors and deep traps show a minimum density versus growth temperature. • This minimum is located close to the HVPE growth temperature of 950 °C. • Good crystalline GaN with residual donor density < 1016 cm−3 can be grown at 950 °C. - Abstract: Two sets of undoped GaN films with the thickness of 10–20 μm were prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and characterized by capacitance–voltage (C–V) profiling, microcathodoluminescence (MCL) spectra measurements, MCL imaging, electron beam induced current (EBIC) imaging, EBIC dependence on accelerating voltage, deep levels transient spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction measurements. The difference in growth conditions was mainly related to the lower (850 °C, group 1) or higher (950 °C, group 2) growth temperature. Both groups of samples showed similar crystalline quality with the dislocation density close to 108 cm−2, but very different electrical and optical properties. In group 1 samples the residual donors concentration was ∼1017 cm−3 or higher, the MCL spectra were dominated by the band-edge luminescence, and the diffusion length of charge carriers was close to 0.1 μm. Group 2 samples had a 2–4.5 μm thick highly resistive layer on top, for which MCL spectra were determined by green, yellow and red defect bands, and the diffusion length was 1.5 times higher than in group 1. We also present brief results of growth at the “standard” HVPE growth temperature of 1050 °C that show the presence of a minimum in the net donor concentration and deep traps density as a function of the growth temperature. Possible reasons for the observed results are discussed in terms of the electrical compensation of residual donors by deep traps

  19. Point defect dynamics in sodium aluminum hydrides - a combined quasielastic neutron scattering and density functional theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qing; Voss, Johannes; Jacobsen, H.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the catalytic role of titanium-based additives on the reversible hydrogenation of complex metal hydrides is an essential step towards developing hydrogen storage materials for the transport sector. Improved bulk diffusion of hydrogen is one of the proposed catalytic effects, and here...

  20. Clean Grain Boundary Found in C14/Body-Center-Cubic Multi-Phase Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ting Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundaries of three Laves phase-related body-center-cubic (bcc solid-solution, metal hydride (MH alloys with different phase abundances were closely examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and more importantly, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD techniques. By using EBSD, we were able to identify the alignment of the crystallographic orientations of the three major phases in the alloys (C14, bcc, and B2 structures. This finding confirms the presence of crystallographically sharp interfaces between neighboring phases, which is a basic assumption for synergetic effects in a multi-phase MH system.

  1. Phase transformations by yttrium implantation into pure aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on phase transformations by yttrium implantation into pure aluminum using 60 kV ions and 3 x 1017 ions/cm2 dose that have been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). YAl3(12R) particles with an average size of 0.3μm were formed in the modified aluminum surface, which transformed into YFe3.5Alx (predominantly) and YAl3(8H) phase particles with 2 μm average diameter after being annealed at 600 degrees C for one hour. The Fe ions were introduced by ion sputtering from the iron screws of the specimen holder, a previously unnoticed effect during heavy metal ion implantation for surface modification of materials. Electron diffraction experiments indicated that the YFe3.5Alx was a new phase and belongs to the orthorhombic system with a C-face-centered lattice (a = c = 0.887nm, b = 1.024nm). The reciprocal lattice of the YFe3.5Alx phase is related to that of the YFe4Al8 magnetic phase. The microstructure of the modified aluminum surface was also investigated by high-resolution TEM

  2. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  3. Electrical, optical, and structural properties of GaN films prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A.Y. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow (Russian Federation); School of Advanced Materials Engineering and Research Center of Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Smirnov, N.B. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Rare Metals, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakimov, E.B. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials Russian Academy of Science, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Usikov, A.S. [Nitride Crystals, Inc., Deer Park (United States); Saint-Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Helava, H. [Nitride Crystals, Inc., Deer Park (United States); Shcherbachev, K.D. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering and Research Center of Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Govorkov, A.V. [Institute of Rare Metals, Moscow (Russian Federation); Makarov, Yu N. [Nitride Crystals, Inc., Deer Park (United States); Lee, In-Hwan, E-mail: ihlee@jbnu.ac.kr [School of Advanced Materials Engineering and Research Center of Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • GaN films are prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). • Residual donors and deep traps show a minimum density versus growth temperature. • This minimum is located close to the HVPE growth temperature of 950 °C. • Good crystalline GaN with residual donor density < 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} can be grown at 950 °C. - Abstract: Two sets of undoped GaN films with the thickness of 10–20 μm were prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and characterized by capacitance–voltage (C–V) profiling, microcathodoluminescence (MCL) spectra measurements, MCL imaging, electron beam induced current (EBIC) imaging, EBIC dependence on accelerating voltage, deep levels transient spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction measurements. The difference in growth conditions was mainly related to the lower (850 °C, group 1) or higher (950 °C, group 2) growth temperature. Both groups of samples showed similar crystalline quality with the dislocation density close to 10{sup 8} cm{sup −2}, but very different electrical and optical properties. In group 1 samples the residual donors concentration was ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} or higher, the MCL spectra were dominated by the band-edge luminescence, and the diffusion length of charge carriers was close to 0.1 μm. Group 2 samples had a 2–4.5 μm thick highly resistive layer on top, for which MCL spectra were determined by green, yellow and red defect bands, and the diffusion length was 1.5 times higher than in group 1. We also present brief results of growth at the “standard” HVPE growth temperature of 1050 °C that show the presence of a minimum in the net donor concentration and deep traps density as a function of the growth temperature. Possible reasons for the observed results are discussed in terms of the electrical compensation of residual donors by deep traps.

  4. Determination of arsenic and selenium by hydride generation and headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyburska, Anna; Jankowski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kj@ch.pw.edu.pl; Rodzik, Agnieszka

    2011-07-15

    A hydride generation headspace solid phase microextraction technique has been developed in combination with optical emission spectrometry for determination of total arsenic and selenium. Hydrides were generated in a 10 mL volume septum-sealed vial and subsequently collected onto a polydimethylsiloxane/Carboxen solid phase microextraction fiber from the headspace of sample solution. After completion of the sorption, the fiber was transferred into a thermal desorption unit and the analytes were vaporized and directly introduced into argon inductively coupled plasma or helium microwave induced plasma radiation source. Experimental conditions of hydride formation reaction as well as sorption and desorption of analytes have been optimized showing the significant effect of the type of the solid phase microextraction fiber coating, the sorption time and hydrochloric acid concentration of the sample solution on analytical characteristics of the method developed. The limits of detection of arsenic and selenium were 0.1 and 0.8 ng mL{sup -1}, respectively. The limit of detection of selenium could be improved further using biosorption with baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for analyte preconcentration. The technique was applied for the determination of total As and Se in real samples.

  5. DEEP TRAPS SPECTRA IN UNDOPED GAN FILMS GROWN BY HYDRIDE VAPOR PHASE EPITAXY UNDER VARIOUS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Polyakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreasing the residual donors density and deep traps spectra densities in undoped GaN films grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE is very important for promoting the use of such material in high- voltage/high-power rectifiers, radiation detectors. In this study we studied the effects of changing the growth temperature of undoped HVPE GaN films on these properties. The two groups of undoped GaN HVPE samples analyzed in this study were grown at growth temperature being either 850ºC or 950ºC. Measurements by means of Capacitance-Voltage (C-V profiling, deep levels transient spectroscopy, Micro Cathode Luminescence (MCL spectroscopy and imaging and by Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC showed a much lower density of residual donors (by almost two orders of magnitude, of deep electron traps and hole traps (by about an order of magnitude and considerably (about 1.5 times longer diffusion length of charge carriers in the films grown at 850ºC compared to samples prepared at 950ºC. The data obtained indicate that there is an optimal reduced growth temperature (close to 850ºC resulting in lower concentration of shallow donors and deep traps while still preserving the high crystalline quality of the layer. This is of paramount importance for device applications of HVPE grown undoped GaN films.

  6. Gradual variation method for thick GaN heteroepitaxy by hydride vapour phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two strain-state samples of GaN, labelled the strain-relief sample and the quality-improved sample, were grown by hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE), and then characterized by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and optical microscopy. Two strain states of GaN in HVPE, like 3D and 2D growth modes in metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), provide an effective way to solve the heteroepitaxial problems of both strain relief and quality improvement. The gradual variation method (GVM), developed based on the two strain states, is characterized by growth parameters' gradual variation alternating between the strain-relief growth conditions and the quality-improved growth conditions. In GVM, the introduction of the strain-relief amplitude, which is defined by the range from the quality-improved growth conditions to the strain-relief growth conditions, makes the strain-relief control concise and effective. The 300-μm thick bright and crack-free GaN film grown on a two-inch sapphire proves the effectiveness of GVM. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. Gradual variation method for thick GaN heteroepitaxy by hydride vapour phase epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Yan-Hao; Wu Jie-Jun; Luo Wei-Ke; John Goldsmith; Han Tong; Tao Yue-Bin; Yang Zhi-Jian; Yu Tong-Jun; Zhang Guo-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Two strain-state samples of GaN,labelled the strain-relief sample and the quality-improved sample,were grown by hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE),and then characterized by high-resolution X-ray diffraction,photoluminescence and optical microscopy. Two strain states of GaN in HVPE,like 3D and 2D growth modes in metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD),provide an effective way to solve the heteroepitaxial problems of both strain relief and quality improvement. The gradual variation method (GVM),developed based on the two strain states,is characterized by growth parameters' gradual variation alternating between the strain-relief growth conditions and the qualityimproved growth conditions. In GVM,the introduction of the strain-relief amplitude,which is defined by the range from the quality-improved growth conditions to the strain-relief growth conditions,makes the strain-relief control concise and effective. The 300-4m thick bright and crack-free GaN film grown on a two-inch sapphire proves the effectiveness of GVM.

  8. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured GaxIn1−xP (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique

  9. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Qiye; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Runyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Braun, Paul V., E-mail: pbraun@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Sardela, Mauro [Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Balaji, Manavaimaran; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting [Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2015-12-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}P (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics-aided analysis of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Kevin L.; Simon, John; Roy, Abhra; Reedy, Robert C.; Young, David L.; Kuech, Thomas F.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a dual chamber hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) growth reactor. Uniformity of reactant concentrations in the growth stream, transient reactor flows, and cross doping between the two growth chambers, all factors critical to the deposition of uniform, low defect semiconductor layers, were modeled. Simulation results were generated by solving the fundamental continuity, momentum and energy equations over a discretized reactor volume by a finite volume analysis with the aid of CFD-ACE+ commercial software. We demonstrated uniformity of the vapor composition within ±1% across the substrate, achieved due to specific features of the reactor design. Small compositional non-uniformity (±2% absolute) in In1-xGaxP layers grown in our reactor was correlated with calculated temperature non-uniformity across the substrate. Gas switching was modeled and the transient time predicted by the model was confirmed by measurement of doping transients in a sample grown in the reactor. Lastly the gas curtains that chemically isolate the reactor chambers were modeled and the results were compared to experimental data for cross doping between the chambers. As an example, we demonstrate, based on insight from the model, that our HVPE reactor is suitable for the deposition of GaAs PV devices. CFD modeling is a critical tool for the scale up of laboratory level processes to industrial levels.

  11. XRD and NMR investigation of Ti-compound formation in solution-doping of sodium aluminum hydrides: solubility of Ti in NaAlH4 crystals grown in THF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium aluminum hydrides have gained attention due to their high hydrogen weight percent (5.5% ideal) compared to interstitial hydrides, and as a model for hydrides with even higher hydrogen weight fraction. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Ti-compounds that are formed under solution-doping techniques, such as wet doping in solvents such as tetrahydrofuran (THF). Compound formation in Ti-doped sodium aluminum hydrides is investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We present lattice parameter measurements of crushed single crystals, which were exposed to Ti during growth. Rietveld refinements indicate no lattice parameter change and thus no solubility for Ti in NaAlH4 by this method of exposure. In addition, X-ray diffraction data indicate that no Ti substitutes in NaH, the final decomposition product for the alanate. Reaction products of completely reacted (33.3 at.%-doped) samples that were solvent-mixed or mechanically milled are investigated. Formation of TiAl3 is observed in mechanically milled materials, but not solution mixed samples, where bonding to THF likely stabilizes Ti-based nano-clusters. The Ti in these clusters is activated by mechanical milling

  12. Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition of Thin Aluminum Oxide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN,Jie(孙捷); SUN,Ying-Chun(孙迎春)

    2004-01-01

    Thin aluminum oxide films were deposited by a new and simple physicochemical method called chemical liquid phase deposition (CLD) on semiconductor materials. Aluminum sulfate with crystallized water and sodium bicarbonate were used as precursors for film growth, and the control of the system's pH value played an important role in this experiment. The growth rate is 12 nm/h with the deposition at [Al2(SO4)3]=0.0837 mol·L-1, [NaHCO3]=0.214 mol·L-1, 15 ℃. Post-growth annealing not only densifies and purifies the films, but results in film crystallization as well, Excellent quality of A12O3 films in this work is supported by electron dispersion spectroscopy,Fourier transform infrared spectrum, X-ray diffraction spectrum and scanning electron microscopy photograph.

  13. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting, E-mail: yasun@kth.se; Lourdudoss, Sebastian [Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Pietralunga, Silvia M. [CNR-Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, P. Leonardo da Vinci, 32 20133 Milano (Italy); Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto [Department of Physics Politecnico di Milano, P. Leonardo da Vinci, 32 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  14. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  15. Guangxi Shanglin Aluminum Plant cross-regional technical upgrade project(phase 1)put into operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>The project(Phase 1)of cross-regional techni- cal upgrade of the aluminum plant of Guangxi Shanglin Nannan Industrial Co.was completed and put into operation on June 8,2007.The plant is a cross-regional technical upgrade pro- ject of Nanning Aluminum Plant,featuring the integration of coal,electricity and aluminum.

  16. First Principles Studies of Phase Stability and Reaction Dynamics in Complex Metal Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Mei-Yin

    2014-09-29

    Complex metal hydrides are believed to be one of the most promising materials for developing hydrogen storage systems that can operate under desirable conditions. At the same time, these are also a class of materials that exhibit intriguing properties. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to study the fundamental properties of these materials.

  17. Cracking in hydride blisters in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the pressure tubes contact to the calandria tubes in the CANDU reactor, temperature gradient in the Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube causes the thermal diffusion of hydrogen and formation of hydride blisters. This surface shape change is a result of the volume expansion associated with the transformation from pressure tube matrix to δ-phase hydride. Cracking in the hydride blisters may cause a direct failure of pressure tubes or develope to the delayed hydride cracking. The Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube specimen are hydrided by an electrolytic method and homogenized considering the temperature and time of hydrogen diffusion. The hydride blisters are formed on the outer surface of the specimen by a thermal diffusion between a heat bath maintained at the temperature of 415 deg C and an aluminum cold finger cooled with the flowing water of 15 deg C. An optical microscopy and 3-dimensional profilometry were used to characterize the hydride blisters with different hydrogen concentrations and thermal diffusion times. It reveals higher possibility of cracking for higher hydrogen concentration and longer time for thermal diffusion. The mechanism of cracking in the hydride blister is discussed

  18. Flow analysis-hydride generation-gas phase derivative molecular absorption spectrophotometric determination of antimony in antileishmanial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo Gallignani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the development of a method based on the coupling of flow analysis (FA, hydride generation (HG, and derivative molecular absorption spectrophotometry (D-EAM in gas phase (GP, is described in order to determine total antimony in antileishmanial products. Second derivative order (D²224nm of the absorption spectrum (190 - 300 nm is utilized as measurement criterion. Each one of the parameters involved in the development of the proposed method was examined and optimized. The utilization of the EAM in GP as detection system in a continuous mode instead of atomic absorption spectrometry represents the great potential of the analytic proposal.

  19. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  20. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  1. High temperature superconductivity in sulfur hydride under ultrahigh pressure: A complex superconducting phase beyond conventional BCS

    OpenAIRE

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Kohler, Jurgen; Whangbo, M.-H.; Bianconi, Antonio; Simon, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    The recent report of superconductivity under high pressure at the record transition temperature of Tc=203K in sulfur hydride has been identified as conventional in view of the observation of an isotope effect upon deuteration. Here it is demonstrated that conventional theories of superconductivity in the sense of BCS or Eliashberg formalisms can neither account for the observed values of Tc nor the pressure dependence of the isotope coefficient. The only way out of the dilemma is a multi-band...

  2. First Principles Study of Titanium Hydrides, TiHn: n = 1, 2, 3; Energetics and Phase Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunmugam KANAGAPRABHA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structure and structural phase transition of TiHn (n = 1, 2 and 3 are investigated using the Tight-Binding Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (TB-LMTO method with Local density approximation (LDA and Atomic sphere approximation (ASA. The equilibrium geometries, the electronic band structure, and the total and partial Density of States (DOS are obtained under various pressures, and are analyzed in comparison with the available experimental and theoretical data. It is predicted that the most stable structure of Titanium hydride is a cubic structure at normal pressure. Both TiH and TiH2 undergo a structural phase transition from a cubic to a hexagonal phase under high pressure. The stability of TiM2H and TiMH2 is analyzed.

  3. Phase and texture analysis of a hydride blister in a Zr-2.5%Nb tube by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a detailed phase and texture study within and around a hydride blister grown on the surface of a Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube. The analysis is based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments using an 80 keV photon beam and a high-speed area detector placed in transmission geometry. It was found that the blister is composed of two main phases, α-Zr and (delta)-ZrH, with a composition which changes locally across the blister. No location within the blister presents pure (delta) zirconium hydride, with a maximum of 80% for the volume fraction of (delta) hydride at the center of the blister. The texture observed for both phases in the original pressure tube remains essentially unaltered across the hydride blister. A detailed analysis of this texture using well-known parent-precipitate relationships shows that some selective precipitation occurs at α-Zr grains with their c-axis under a tensile stress, and on grains with grain boundaries favorably aligned for hydride nucleation.

  4. Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Waste: Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminosilicate deposit buildup experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. Recent investigations illustrated the accumulation 7 wt% uranium, 3% was 235U and absent of neutron poisons, within these deposits and presented a criticality concern. The Waste Processing Technology Section of Westinghouse Savannah River Company at SRS is now collaborating with a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in efforts to identify the phases controlling uranium solubility and understand the conditions under which they precipitate

  5. Determination of antimony in environment samples by gas phase chemiluminescence detection following flow injection hydride generation and cryotrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yousheng; Sang, Jianchi; Ma, Hongbing; Tao, Guanhong

    2010-06-15

    A novel method for the determination of antimony in environmental samples was developed with gas phase chemiluminescence detection following flow injection hydride generation and cryotrapping. The stibine, generated from samples by borohydride reduction of antimony using flow injection technique, was separated by using a new gas-liquid separator, dried with an ice-salt cryogenic bath and concentrated in a glass U-tube immersed in liquid nitrogen. Re-vaporization of stibine based on its boiling point was achieved by allowing the tube to warm at room temperature. A gas phase chemiluminescence signal was produced during the ozonation of the hydride in a reflective chamber. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method was characterized by a wide linear calibration range from 1.0microgL(-1) to 10.0mgL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.18microgL(-1) (n=11). The relative standard deviation for 10.0microgL(-1) antimony was 3.56% (n=11) and the sampling rate was 15 samples h(-1). Blank signal was reduced by the purification of reagents and the interference from transition metal ions was eliminated by the addition of L-cysteine into samples. The method was applied to the determination of antimony in environmental samples with satisfactory results. PMID:20441930

  6. Materials engineering of metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermetallic hydrides of the AB5 type have enthalpies in the range valid for chemical heat pumps. A scheme for manufacturing hydrides with optimal properties for a chemical heat pump is described, using LaNi/sub 5-x/Al/sub x/ and ZrV/sub 2x/Cr/sub x as examples. The Laves-phase ternary hydrides appear to be good candidates for gettering hydrogen in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  7. Effect of vapor phase corrosion inhibitor on microbial corrosion of aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Ku, C H; Bor, H J; Lin, Y T

    1996-02-01

    Vapor phase corrosion inhibitors were used to investigate the antimicrobial activities and anticorrosion of aluminum alloy. Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, A. versicolor, Chaetomium globosum and Penicillium funiculosum had moderate to abundant growth on the aluminum alloy AA 1100 at Aw 0.901, while there was less growth at Aw 0.842. High humidity stimulated microbial growth and induced microbial corrosion. Dicyclohexylammonium carbonate had a high inhibitory effect on the growth of test fungi and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy, dicyclohexylammonium caprate and dicyclohexylammonium stearate were the next. Aluminum alloy coating with vapor phase corrosion inhibitor could prevent microbial growth and retard microbial corrosion. PMID:10592784

  8. Interstellar Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier R

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar hydrides -- that is, molecules containing a single heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms -- were among the first molecules detected outside the solar system. They lie at the root of interstellar chemistry, being among the first species to form in initially-atomic gas, along with molecular hydrogen and its associated ions. Because the chemical pathways leading to the formation of interstellar hydrides are relatively simple, the analysis of the observed abundances is relatively straightforward and provides key information about the environments where hydrides are found. Recent years have seen rapid progress in our understanding of interstellar hydrides, thanks largely to far-IR and submillimeter observations performed with the Herschel Space Observatory. In this review, we will discuss observations of interstellar hydrides, along with the advanced modeling approaches that have been used to interpret them, and the unique information that has thereby been obtained.

  9. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argabright, T. A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 1100 C (160 to 2300 F) for the source heat and 140 to 1900 C (280 to 3750 F) for the product heat.

  10. Superconductivity and the structural phase transitions in palladium hydride and palladium deuteride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of two experimental studies of the superconducting transition temperature, T/sub c/, of palladium hydride, PdH/sub x/, and palladium deuteride, PdD/sub x/, are presented. In the first study, the superconducting transition temperature of PdH/sub x/(D/sub x/) is studied as a function of H(D) concentration, x, in the temperature range from 0.2 K to 4K. The data join smoothly with those reported previously by Miller and Satterthwaite at higher temperatures, and the composite data are described by the empirical relation T/sub c/ = 150.8 (x-x/sub o/)2244, where x/sub o/ = 0.715 for hydride samples and 0.668 for deuteride samples. The results, when compared with the theoretical predictions of Klein and Papaconstantopoulos, et al., raise questions about the validity of their explanation of the reverse isotope effect, which is based solely on a difference in force constants. In the second study, the effect of the order-disorder structural transition associated with the 50 K anomaly on the superconductivity of PdH/sub x/(D/sub x/) is investigated. Samples were quenched to low temperatures in the disordered state, and their transition temperatures measured. The samples were then annealed just below the anomaly temperature, and the ordering process followed by monitoring the change in sample resistance. The transition temperatures in the ordered state were then measured

  11. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  12. Effect of AlN intermediate layer on growing GaN film by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chaotong; RUTERANA Pierre; CHEN Jun; YU Guanghui; LEI Benliang; WANG Xinzhong; YE Haohua; MENG Sheng; QI Ming; LI Aizhen; NOUET Gérard

    2006-01-01

    Thick GaN layer deposited by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) on a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) GaN template with a thin low temperature (LT) AlN intermediate layer was investigated.High resolution X-ray resolution diffraction (HRXRD) shows that the crystalline quality of thick GaN layer was improved compared with the template.As confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations, the surface morphology of AlN intermediate layer helps to improve the nucleation of GaN epilayer.Photoluminescence (PL) spectra measurement shows its high optical quality and low compressive stress, and micro Raman measurement confirms the latter result.Thus, the deposition of the LT-AlN interlayer has promoted the growth of an HVPE-GaN layer with an excellent crystalline quality.

  13. Hydride Generation for Headspace Solid-Phase Extraction with CdTe Quantum Dots Immobilized on Paper for Sensitive Visual Detection of Selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Xu, Kailai; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Lu; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost, simple, and highly selective analytical method was developed for sensitive visual detection of selenium in human urine both outdoors and at home, by coupling hydride generation with headspace solid-phase extraction using quantum dots (QDs) immobilized on paper. The visible fluorescence from the CdTe QDs immobilized on paper was quenched by H2Se from hydride generation reaction and headspace solid-phase extraction. The potential mechanism was investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT). Potential interferences from coexisting ions, particularly Ag(+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+), were eliminated. The selectivity was significantly increased because the selenium hydride was effectively separated from sample matrices by hydride generation. Moreover, due to the high sampling efficiency of hydride generation and headspace solid phase extraction, the sensitivity and the limit of detection (LOD) were significantly improved compared to conventional methods. A LOD of 0.1 μg L(-1) and a relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 7) of 2.4% at a concentration of 20 μg L(-1) were obtained when using a commercial spectrofluorometer as the detector. Furthermore, a visual assay based on the proposed method was developed for the detection of Se, 5 μg L(-1) of selenium in urine can be discriminated from the blank solution with the naked eye. The proposed method was validated by analysis of certified reference materials and human urine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26631425

  14. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum-containing phases compose the bulk of solids precipitating during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes designed to minimize the volume of high-level waste through conversion to glassy phases require transporting waste solutions near-saturated with aluminum-containing species from holding tank to processing center. The uncontrolled precipitation within transfer lines results in clogged pipes and lines and fouled ion exchangers, with the potential to shut down processing operations

  15. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Dabbs; Ilhan A. Aksay

    2005-01-12

    Aluminum-containing phases compose the bulk of solids precipitating during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes designed to minimize the volume of high-level waste through conversion to glassy phases require transporting waste solutions near-saturated with aluminum-containing species from holding tank to processing center. The uncontrolled precipitation within transfer lines results in clogged pipes and lines and fouled ion exchangers, with the potential to shut down processing operations.

  16. Aluminum-containing intergranular phases in hot-pressed silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum-containing intergranular phases, forming intergranularfilms and secondary phase particles at triple-junctions in SiC hot-pressed with aluminum, boron, and carbon additions, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Statistical high-resolution electron microscopy study of intergranular films indicated that a large fraction of the vitreous intergranular films in the s-hot-pressed SiC crystallized during postannealing in argon above 1000oC. However, brief heating to 1900oC ...

  17. Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 tube by electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 ferrule tube were carried out using an electron backscattering diffraction pattern (EBSP). A basket-weave structure with sub-micron lath width caused by quenching from the β to α phase was observed in the heat-affected and fusion zones, and mainly showed a grain boundary misorientation angle of 60 deg. with an rotation axis. This result is consistent with the Burgers orientation relationship of {1 1 0}β//(0 0 0 1)α and β//α for the β to α phase transformation. The texture of the quenched α' phase was strongly inherited from the original α phase, having a radial (0 0 0 1) basal pole and axial {1 1 2-bar0} textures, even in the fusion zone. The primary hydride habit plane in the welded Zircaloy-2 was (0 0 0 1)α//{1 1 1}δ, matching previously obtained results for recrystallized cladding tubes. In addition to the primary habit plane, secondary habit planes were observed for the other low-index planes {1 0 1-bar0} and {1 0 1-bar1} in the fusion zone. The heterogeneous accumulation of hydrides in the transition zone between heat-affected and unaffected zones was mainly due to the residual stress distribution in the narrow region.

  18. Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 tube by electron backscattering diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Une, K.; Ishimoto, S.

    2009-06-01

    Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 ferrule tube were carried out using an electron backscattering diffraction pattern (EBSP). A basket-weave structure with sub-micron lath width caused by quenching from the β to α phase was observed in the heat-affected and fusion zones, and mainly showed a grain boundary misorientation angle of 60° with an rotation axis. This result is consistent with the Burgers orientation relationship of {1 1 0} β//(0 0 0 1) α and β// α for the β to α phase transformation. The texture of the quenched α' phase was strongly inherited from the original α phase, having a radial (0 0 0 1) basal pole and axial {1 1 2¯ 0} textures, even in the fusion zone. The primary hydride habit plane in the welded Zircaloy-2 was (0 0 0 1) α//{1 1 1} δ, matching previously obtained results for recrystallized cladding tubes. In addition to the primary habit plane, secondary habit planes were observed for the other low-index planes {1 0 1¯ 0} and {1 0 1¯ 1} in the fusion zone. The heterogeneous accumulation of hydrides in the transition zone between heat-affected and unaffected zones was mainly due to the residual stress distribution in the narrow region.

  19. Theoretical Study of Hydrogenated Tetrahedral Aluminum Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Wagatsuma, Ayumu; Watanabe, Kouhei; Szarek, Pawel; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We report on the structures of aluminum hydrides derived from a tetrahedral aluminum Al4 cluster using ab initio quantum chemical calculation. Our calculation of binding energies of the aluminum hydrides reveals that stability of these hydrides increases as more hydrogen atoms are adsorbed, while stability of Al-H bonds decreases. We also analyze and discuss the chemical bonds of those clusters by using recently developed method based on the electronic stress tensor.

  20. Investigations on the phase equilibria of some hydride ion conducting electrolyte systems and their application for hydrogen monitoring in sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical meters for measuring hydrogen levels in liquid sodium need thermodynamically stable hydride ion conducting electrolytes. In order to identify electrolytes that have high hydride ion conductivity, phase diagram of systems consisting of low melting compounds such as CaCl2-LiCl, SrBr2-LiBr, SrBr2-SrHBr and CaBr2-CaHBr were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and their phase diagrams established. Using these information and supplementary information on effects of addition of alkaline earth hydride to these systems, potential electrolytes were tested for their use in electrochemical meters. Meters were constructed using electrolytes with (i) 22mol%SrCl2-12.2mol%CaCl2-54.5mol%LiCl-11.3mol%CaHCl (ii) 70mol%LiCl-16mol%CaHCl-14mol%CaCl2 and (iii) 40mol%CaHBr-60mol%CaBr2 compositions. Output of meters that had Li ions in liquid phase electrolyte showed non-linearity at low hydrogen levels. Output of meters using CaBr2-40mol%CaHBr solid showed linearity in the concentration range of 50-250 ppb in sodium

  1. Photo-electrochemical etching of free-standing GaN wafer surfaces grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation into the photo-electrochemical (PEC) etching of free-standing GaN wafers produced by hydride vapor phase epitaxial growth (HVPE) has found that etching is only possible with UV illumination in an acidic or basic electrolyte. Through photo-current measurement and X-ray analysis it was determined that lack of etching in a neutral electrolyte can be attributed to the formation of an oxide film on the GaN surface. Surface damage was also found to be a significant factor, with the etching rate and photo current density of surfaces treated by grinding and mechanical polishing being markedly less compared to a finely polished surface. Subsequent investigation of the luminescence and the etching characteristics of the intentionally-introduced scratches indicated that subsurface damage is difficult to remove from GaN by PEC etching due to the trapping of photo-excited carriers. A peculiar surface feature of concentric ring structures made up of alternating small and large pores was observed on the GaN surface along with small island regions, which is attributed to variations in the electronic properties of the GaN crystal that is created during HVPE growth

  2. Electron Transport in a High Mobility Free-Standing GaN Substrate Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, L.; Kurdak, C.; Yun, F.; Morkoc, H.; Rode, D. L.; Tsen, K. T.; Park, S. S.; Lee, K. Y.

    2001-03-01

    We studied electron transport properties in a high quality free-standing GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The GaN, with a thickness of more than 200 μm, was lifted off the sapphire substrate and mechanically polished. At room temperature the carrier density is 1.3x10^16cm-3 and the Hall mobility is 1200 cm^2/V-s, which is the highest reported electron mobility for GaN with a wurtzite structure. Transport properties are studied using a van der Pauw geometry in a temperature range of 20 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. Electron mobility is found to increase at lower temperatures with a peak mobility of 7400 cm^2/V-s at 48 K. The carrier density decreases exponentially at temperatures below 80 K with an activation energy of 28 meV. The electron transport measurements were used to examine the contributions of different scattering mechanisms. Numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation was carried out, including non-parabolic conduction bands and wavefunction admixture, along with lattice scattering and ionized-impurity scattering. LO and TO phonon energies were determined by Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Deformation of vanadium and niobium on hydridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deformation of wire samples made of polycrystalline vanadium and niobium on hydridation is studied. It is shown that sample allowance under loading after deformation below the yield strength doesn't cause considerable creep. Cathode saturation of samples with hydrogen sharply accelerates vanadium microdeformation velocity, that is connected with the beginning of intensive vanadium hydride precipitation (β-phase) from α-solid vanadium-hydrogen solution. Niobium hydridation at the first stage doesn't hydridation at the first stage doesn't cause negative deformation, then change in deformation direction takes place at the moment of intensive growth of the hydride phase. The conclusion is made that in both metals microdeformation is determined by contribution of two components: deformation caused by changing a shift module of metal-hydrogen system, and deformation caused by the oriented growth of the hydride phase in the field of apphed stresses

  4. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  5. Structural phase stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of alkali metal hydrides AMH4 (A=Li, Na; M=B, AL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.

    2016-01-01

    The structural stability of Alkali metal hydrides AMH4 (A=Li, Na; M=B, Al) is analyzed among the various crystal structures, namely hexagonal (P63mc), tetragonal (P42/nmc), tetragonal (P-421c), tetragonal (I41/a), orthorhombic (Pnma) and monoclinic (P21/c). It is observed that, orthorhombic (Pnma) phase is the most stable structure for LiBH4, monoclinic (P21/c) for LiAlH4, tetragonal (P42/nmc) for NaBH4 and tetragonal (I41/a) for NaAlH4 at normal pressure. Pressure induced structural phase transitions are observed in LiBH4, LiAlH4, NaBH4 and NaAlH4 at the pressures of 4 GPa, 36.1 GPa, 26.5 GPa and 46 GPa respectively. The electronic structure reveals that these metal hydrides are wide band gap insulators. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these metal hydrides are mechanically stable at normal pressure.

  6. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John, E-mail: john.knowles@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase.

  7. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase

  8. Dislocations limited electronic transport in hydride vapour phase epitaxy grown GaN templates: A word of caution for the epitaxial growers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GaN templates grown by hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE) and metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) techniques are compared through electronic transport measurements. Carrier concentration measured by Hall technique is about two orders larger than the values estimated by capacitance voltage method for HVPE templates. It is learnt that there exists a critical thickness of HVPE templates below which the transport properties of epitaxial layers grown on top of them are going to be severely limited by the density of charged dislocations lying at layer-substrate interface. On the contrary MOVPE grown templates are found to be free from such limitations

  9. Formation of uniform magnetic structures and epitaxial hydride phases in Nd/Pr superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; McMorrow, D.F.; Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    The chemical and magnetic structures of neodymium/praseodymium superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy have been determined using x-ray and neutron-diffraction techniques. The x-ray measurements show that the superlattices have a dhcp structure of high crystalline quality, and that the...... months of growth these light rare-earth samples are found to react with hydrogen to form new single-crystal phases, which are coherent with the epitaxial structure....

  10. The effect of aluminum on the microstructure and phase composition of boron carbide infiltrated with silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction-bonded boron carbide is prepared by pressureless infiltration of boron carbide preforms with molten silicon in a graphite furnace under vacuum. The presence of Al2O3 parts in the heated zone, even though not in contact with the boron carbide preform, causes aluminum to appear in the liquid silicon. The formation of aluminum sub-oxide (Al2O) stands behind the transport of aluminum into the composite. The presence of aluminum in the boron carbide-silicon system accelerates the transformation of the initial boron carbide particles into Bx(C,Si,Al)y and Al1.36B24C4, newly formed carbide phases. It also leads during cooling to the formation of some Si-Al solid solution particles. The effect of Al on the microstructural evolution is well accounted for by the calculated isothermal section of the quaternary Al-B-C-Si phase diagram, according to which the solubility of boron in liquid silicon increases with increasing aluminum content. This feature is a key factor in the evolution of the microstructure of the infiltrated composites.

  11. The effect of aluminum on the microstructure and phase composition of boron carbide infiltrated with silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayun, S., E-mail: hayuns@bgu.ac.il [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Dilman, H.; Dariel, M.P.; Frage, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2009-12-15

    Reaction-bonded boron carbide is prepared by pressureless infiltration of boron carbide preforms with molten silicon in a graphite furnace under vacuum. The presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} parts in the heated zone, even though not in contact with the boron carbide preform, causes aluminum to appear in the liquid silicon. The formation of aluminum sub-oxide (Al{sub 2}O) stands behind the transport of aluminum into the composite. The presence of aluminum in the boron carbide-silicon system accelerates the transformation of the initial boron carbide particles into B{sub x}(C,Si,Al){sub y} and Al{sub 1.36}B{sub 24}C{sub 4}, newly formed carbide phases{sub .} It also leads during cooling to the formation of some Si-Al solid solution particles. The effect of Al on the microstructural evolution is well accounted for by the calculated isothermal section of the quaternary Al-B-C-Si phase diagram, according to which the solubility of boron in liquid silicon increases with increasing aluminum content. This feature is a key factor in the evolution of the microstructure of the infiltrated composites.

  12. Evolution of Intermetallic Phases in Soldering of the Die Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Wang, Xiaoming; DenOuden, Tony; Han, Qingyou

    2016-06-01

    Most die failures are resulted from chemical reactions of dies and molten aluminum in the die casting of aluminum. The formation of intermetallic phases between a steel die and molten aluminum is investigated by stationary immersion tests and compared to a real die casting process. Three intermetallic phases are identified in the stationary immersion tests: a composite layer and two compact layers. The composite layer is a mixture of α bcc, Al, and Si phases. The α bcc phase changes in morphology from rod-like to spherical shape, while the growth rate of the layer changes from parabolic to linear pattern with immersion time. The first compact layer forms rapidly after immersion and maintains a relatively constant thickness. The second compact layer forms after 4 hours of immersion and exhibits parabolic growth with immersion time. In comparison, only a composite layer and the first compact layer are observed in a real die casting process. The fresh molten aluminum of high growth rate washes away the second intermetallic layer easily.

  13. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  14. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  15. Mechanism of corrosion of zirconium hydride and impact of precipitated hydrides on the Zircaloy-4 corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Higher corrosion rate of hydride compared to matrix (Zy4). • Higher oxygen diffusion coefficient through oxide formed on hydride. • Presence of Zr3O phase between hydride and oxide. • Hydrogen from the hydride phase is not integrated in the oxide during the corrosion process. - Abstract: In Pressurized Water Reactors, zirconium hydrides precipitate in the matrix and could increase the oxidation rate of the claddings. To understand their effect, corrosion tests, TEM and μ-XRD analyses have been performed. This work showed that the oxidation rate and the oxygen diffusion coefficient in the oxide formed on massive hydride are much greater than those of Zircaloy-4. Moreover, oxide characterizations indicated an additional phase indexed as the sub-oxide Zr3O between the oxide film and the massive hydride. Finally, the hydrogen of the hydrides is not incorporated in the oxide during the corrosion process

  16. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum-containing phases compose the bulk of solids precipitating during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes designed to minimize the volume of high-level waste through conversion to glassy phases require transporting waste solutions near-saturated with aluminum-containing species from holding tank to processing center. The uncontrolled precipitation within transfer lines results in clogged pipes and lines and fouled ion exchangers, with the potential to shut down processing operations. The principal focus of our research was to maintain the fluidity of aluminum- or silicon-containing suspensions and solutions during transport, whether by preventing particle formation, stabilizing colloidal particles in suspension, or by combining partial dissolution with particle stabilization. We have found that all of these can be effected in aluminum-containing solutions using the simple organic, citric acid. Silicon-containing solutions were found to be less tractable, but we have strong indications that chemistries similar to the citric acid/aluminum suspensions can be effective in maintaining silicon suspensions at high alkalinities. In the first phase of our study, we focused on the use of simple organics to raise the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in high alkaline aqueous solvents. In a limited survey of common organic acids, we determined that citric acid had the highest potential to achieve our goal. However, our subsequent investigation revealed that the citric acid appeared to play two roles in the solutions: first, raising the concentration of aluminum in highly alkaline solutions by breaking up or inhibiting 'seed' polycations and thereby delaying the nucleation and growth of particles; and second, stabilizing nanometer-sized particles in suspension when nucleation did occur. The second phase of our work involved the solvation of silicon, again in solutions of high alkalinity. Here, the use of polyols was determined to be effective in

  17. Numerical and experimental study of phase transformation in resistance spot welding of 6082 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xinxin; SHA Ping; LUO Zhen; LUO Baofa

    2009-01-01

    Resistance spot welding(RSW) is an efficient and convenient joining process for aluminum alloy sheet assembly. Because the RSW has the character of energy concentration and quick cooling rate, the microstructure transformation of the base metal can be confined in the least limit. The material properties and the welding parameters have significant effects on thequality of the nugget. To predict the microstructure evolution in the melted zone and the heat-affected zone, an electrical, thermal, metallurgical and mechanical coupled finite element model is described and applied to simulate the welding process of the 6082 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests are also carried out. The comparison between experimental and numerical results shows that the adopted model is effective enough to well interpret and predict some important phenomena in terms of the phase transformation in spot welding of 6082 aluminum alloy.

  18. Electromagnetic separation of primary iron-rich phases from aluminum-silicon melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天晓; 许振明; 孙宝德; 疏达; 周尧和

    2003-01-01

    The difference of conductivity between primary iron-rich phases and aluminum melt has been used toseparate them by electromagnetic force (EMF) which is induced by imposing a direct electric current and a steadymagnetic field in molten Al-Si alloy. Theoretical analysis and experiments on self-designed electromagnetic separa-tion indicates that primary needle-like β phases are difficult to separate; while primary a iron-rich phases can be sepa-rated by electromagnetic separation. Primary iron-rich phases have been removed from the melt successfully whenthe molten metal flows horizontally through separation channel. The iron content is reduced from 1.13% to 0.41%.

  19. Interface properties and phase formation between surface coated SKD61 and aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Se-Weon CHOI; Young-Chan KIM; Se-Hun CHANG; Ik-Hyun OH; Joon-Sik PARK; Chang-Seog KANG

    2009-01-01

    The intermediate phase formation and surface protection effects between SKD61 die mold alloys and aluminum alloys were investigated during a simulated die-casting process. The surface coatings of SKD61 alloy were carried out via Si pack cementation coatings at 900 ℃ for 10 h and the e-FeSi phase formed. When the coated SKD61 alloy was dipped in the liquid aluminum alloy (ALDC12), the surface coated SKD61 alloys showed better surface properties compared with uncoated SKD61 alloys, i.e., the intermediate phases (FeSiAl compound) were not produced for the coated SKD61 alloy. The coating layer of e-FeSi served as a diffusion barrier for the formation of FeSiAl compounds.

  20. Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakainen, Kati

    Metal hydride materials have been intensively studied for hydrogen storage applications. In addition to potential hydrogen economy applications, metal hydrides offer a wide variety of other interesting properties. For example, hydrogen-dominant materials, which are hydrides with the highest hydrogen content for a particular metal/semimetal composition, are predicted to display high-temperature superconductivity. On the other side of the spectrum are hydrides with small amounts of hydrogen (0.1 - 1 at.%) that are investigated as viable magnetic, thermoelectric or semiconducting materials. Research of metal hydride materials is generally important to gain fundamental understanding of metal-hydrogen interactions in materials. Hydrogenation of Zintl phases, which are defined as compounds between an active metal (alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth) and a p-block metal/semimetal, were attempted by a hot sintering method utilizing an autoclave loaded with gaseous hydrogen (Hydride formation competes with oxidative decomposition of a Zintl phase. The oxidative decomposition, which leads to a mixture of binary active metal hydride and p-block element, was observed for investigated aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) containing Zintl phases. However, a new phase Li2Al was discovered when Zintl phase precursors were synthesized. Using the single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD), the Li2Al was found to crystallize in an orthorhombic unit cell (Cmcm) with the lattice parameters a = 4.6404(8) Å, b = 9.719(2) Å, and c = 4.4764(8) Å. Increased demand for materials with improved properties necessitates the exploration of alternative synthesis methods. Conventional metal hydride synthesis methods, like ball-milling and autoclave technique, are not responding to the demands of finding new materials. A viable alternative synthesis method is the application of high pressure for the preparation of hydrogen-dominant materials. Extreme pressures in the gigapascal ranges can open access to

  1. Solid phosphorus phase in aluminum- and iron-treated biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Chen, Yona; Shenker, Moshe

    2007-01-01

    Stabilization of phosphorus (P) in sewage sludge (biosolids) to reduce water-soluble P concentrations is essential for minimizing P loss from amended soils and maximizing the capacity of the soil to safely serve as an outlet for this waste material. The chemical form at which P is retained in biosolids stabilized by Al(2)(SO(4))(3) x 18H(2)O (alum) or FeSO(4) x 7H(2)O (FeSul) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray elemental spectrometry (EDXS) and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both treatments resulted in the formation of a Ca-P phase, probably brushite. Phosphorus was further retained in the alum-treated biosolids by precipitation of an Al-P phase with an Al/P molar ratio of about 1:1, while in the FeSul-treated biosolids, P was retained by both precipitation with Fe/P molar ratios of 1:1 or 1.5:1, and by adsorption onto newly formed Fe hydroxides exhibiting an Fe/P molar ratio of up to 11:1. All of these mechanisms efficiently reduced P solubility and are crucial in biosolids environmentally safe agronomic beneficial use for this waste product; however, each P phase formed may react differently in the amended soil, depending on soil properties. Thus, the proper P stabilization method would depend on the target soil. PMID:17332259

  2. Catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN nanowires: exceptional length and constant rod-like shape capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekhal, K.; Avit, G.; André, Y.; Trassoudaine, A.; Gil, E.; Varenne, C.; Bougerol, C.; Monier, G.; Castelluci, D.

    2012-10-01

    The hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) process exhibits unexpected properties when growing GaN semiconductor nanowires (NWs). With respect to the classical well-known methods such as metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, this near-equilibrium process based on hot wall reactor technology enables the synthesis of nanowires with a constant cylinder shape over unusual length. Catalyst-assisted HVPE shows a record short time process (less than 20 min) coupled to very low precursor consumption. NWs are grown at a fast solidification rate (50 μm h-1), facilitated by the high decomposition frequency of the chloride molecules involved in the HVPE process as element III precursors. In this work growth temperature and V/III ratio were investigated to determine the growth mechanism which led to such long NWs. Analysis based on the Ni-Ga phase diagram and the growth kinetics of near-equilibrium HVPE is proposed.

  3. Phase transformations in laminar iron-aluminum system at thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of structural materials in aggressive medium conditions corresponding by considerable mechanical, thermal and other loading imposes different requirements to their surface and volumetric properties. In this connection the investigation of diffusion and phase formation in laminar metallic systems is actual. Iron and aluminum are suitable model pair for study of kinetics, diffusion and phase formation in such systems. Complex investigation of phase transformations in iron after aluminum deposition on its surface and following thermal treatment in a wide time interval has been carried out by the methods of nuclear γ-resonant spectroscopy and X-ray analysis. The samples for investigations were prepared from α-iron in purity 99.98 % by the method of rolling on bending. After the foil reached ∼10 μm in thickens, it was exposed to homogeneous annealing at temperature 850 deg. C within 3 hours. Then aluminum layer has been deposed on the foil by the method of magnetron sputtering at 'Argamak' installation. Coating thickness (2.2 μm) was estimated according to time of target sputtering and was controlled by the method of Rutherford backscattering at the UKP-2-1 accelerator of heavy ions. It was supposed that aluminum concentration in accordance with the phase diagram would correspond to the area of solid solution of aluminum in iron. The prepared samples by this method were exposed by isothermal annealing in vacuum not worse than 10-6 mm of mercury at temperature 600 deg. C with duration till 100 hours. Moessbauer investigations have been carried out with the aid of standard methods in geometry on absorption with registration of γ-quantum. X-ray investigations have been carried out on diffractometer DRON-2 using copper pipe. Mathematical processing of specters by restoration of function of hyperfine field distribution into the DISTRI.M program has allowed defining the main phase components of specters and determining Moessbauer phase parameters. The

  4. Hydride compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  5. Phase Transformations of α-Alumina Made from Waste Aluminum via a Precipitation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamirul Amin Matori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on a recycling project in which α-Al2O3 was produced from aluminum cans because no such work has been reported in literature. Heated aluminum cans were mixed with 8.0 M of H2SO4 solution to form an Al2(SO43 solution. The Al2(SO43 salt was contained in a white semi-liquid solution with excess H2SO4; some unreacted aluminum pieces were also present. The solution was filtered and mixed with ethanol in a ratio of 2:3, to form a white solid of Al2(SO43·18H2O. The Al2(SO43·18H2O was calcined in an electrical furnace for 3 h at temperatures of 400–1400 °C. The heating and cooling rates were 10 °C /min. XRD was used to investigate the phase changes at different temperatures and XRF was used to determine the elemental composition in the alumina produced. A series of different alumina compositions, made by repeated dehydration and desulfonation of the Al2(SO43·18H2O, is reported. All transitional alumina phases produced at low temperatures were converted to α-Al2O3 at high temperatures. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that the α-Al2O3 phase was realized when the calcination temperature was at 1200 °C or higher.

  6. Crystalline Phase and Decomposition Dynamics of Aluminum Titanate at Different Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林寿; 阮玉忠; 沈阳; 罗金荣

    2012-01-01

    The crystalline phase formed during aluminum titanate at 750-1300 ℃ as well as the relationship between its content change and decomposition dynamics was mainly discussed in this paper.Dynamical equation was established for calculating the reaction activation energy.It aimed at providing dynamics basic data for taking up necessary measures to inhibit the decomposition of aluminum titanate.Experimental results showed that aluminum titanate would decompose into TiO2 and corundum at 750-1300 ℃.Content of aluminum titanate would reduce with the increase of decomposition time,and the order of decomposition rates at different temperature was 1100 1200 1000 900 ℃.The decomposition was a chemical reaction with control steps,and could meet the first order reaction dynamic equation-F(G) = [(1-G)-2/3-1] = Kt.According to the calculation,rate constants of different decomposition reaction dynamic equations were K900 = 2.2×10-3,K1000 = 1.2×10-2,K1100 = 4×10-1 and K1200 = 1.5×10-1,and the reaction activation energy ΔGave = 203.21 KJ/mol.

  7. Thermomechanical properties of hafnium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine bulk samples of delta-phase Hf hydride with various hydrogen contents (CH) ranging from 1.62 to 1.72 in the atomic ratio (H/Hf) were prepared, and their thermomechanical properties were characterized. At room temperature, the sound velocity and Vickers hardness were measured. The elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the thermal expansion was measured by using a dilatometer, and the linear thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. Empirical equations describing the thermomechanical properties of Hf hydride as a function of CH were proposed. (author)

  8. Comminution by hydriding-dehydriding process of the U-Zr-Nb alloys stabilized at different phases by aging heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powders of the U-Zr-Nb alloys are raw materials for obtaining plate-type dispersion fuel of high density and medium enrichment for research and test reactors as well as small power reactors. U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb and U-3Zr-9Nb (wt%) alloys, initially homogenized at high temperatures, were transformed at different phases by means aging heat treatments, and then comminuted by hydriding-dehydriding process to powder production. The phases transformations were obtained by the homogenization of the U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb and U-3Zr-9Nb alloys at high temperatures (1000 deg C for 1 and 16 h), followed by aging heat treatment at 600 deg C, in times of 0.5 h, 3.0 h and 24h, and subsequently quenched in water to stabilize the desired phase. The comminution process was performed at 200 deg C for different times ranging from 20 minutes to 4 hours. The powders were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and determination of particle size distribution by means of laser equipment CILAS. One of the main objectives of this study was to verify the influence of the different phases in the characteristics of the obtained powders. It was found that alloys stabilized in gamma phase produced powders with smaller particles sizes than those with cellular structure of the α and γ phases. Regardless of retained phases, the produced powders consist of agglomerates with irregular morphology. (author)

  9. Investigation of phase explosion in aluminum induced by nanosecond double pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Single and collinear double pulse configurations were used for laser ablation of aluminum target in air. • The 5, 10, 15 and 20 ns delay times between pre pulse and main pulse in double pulse arrangement was investigated. • In comparison between single and double pulse regimes, the phase explosion threshold fluence is decreased in double pulse configuration. • The plasma shielding effect reduces the crater depth in lower laser fluence in double pulse configuration rather that its in single pulse configuration. - Abstract: In this paper, the influence of double pulse technique on phase explosion threshold in laser ablation of an aluminum target is investigated. Single and double pulse laser ablation of aluminum target was performed by a high power Nd:YAG laser beam in ambient air. In the double pulse excitation, the two pulses were from a single laser source which separated by a delay time in the range of 5–20 ns. Measuring ablation depth and rate, the phase explosion threshold was estimated in double pulse configuration as well as in the single pulse regime. The results show that in comparison between single and double pulse regimes, the phase explosion threshold fluence is decreased in double pulse configuration. The lowest phase explosion threshold fluence of 0.9 J/cm2 was obtained at 5 ns delay time. The results also show that plasma shielding effect reduced crater depth at a laser fluence which depended on the laser ablation configuration (single pulse or double pulse). The reduction of crater depth occurs at lower laser fluences for double pulse regime

  10. Use of a Novel Sub-2 µm Silica Hydride Vancomycin Stationary Phase in Nano-Liquid Chromatography. II. Separation of Derivatized Amino Acid Enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Silvia; Fanali, Chiara; Fanali, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    A novel vancomycin silica hydride stationary phase was synthesized and the particles of 1.8 µm were packed into fused silica capillaries of 75 µm internal diameter (I.D.). The chiral stationary phase (CSP) was tested for the separation of some derivatized amino acid enantiomers by using nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC). Some experimental parameters such as the type and the content of organic modifier, the pH, and the concentration of the buffer added to the mobile phase were modified and the effect on enantioselectivity, retention time, and enantioresolution factor was studied. The separation of selected dansyl amino acids (Dns-AAs), e.g., Asp, Glu, Leu, and Phe in their enantiomers was initially achieved utilizing a mobile phase containing 85% (v/v) methanol (MeOH) and formate buffer measuring the enantioresolution factor and enantioselectivity in the range 1.74-4.17 and 1.39-1.59, respectively. Better results were obtained employing a more polar organic solvent as acetonitrile (ACN) in the mobile phase. Optimum results (Rs 1.41-6.09 and α 1.28-2.36) were obtained using a mobile phase containing formate buffer pH 2.5/water/MeOH/ACN 6:19:12.5:62.5 (v/v/v/v) in isocratic elution mode at flow rate of 130 nL/min. PMID:26335144

  11. The effect of thermal cycling on the movement of the αZr/ αZr hydride phase boundary in cold-worked Zr-2.5 wt% Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A piece of CW Zr-2.5 wt% Nb alloy pressure tube was hydrided at one end in 40 g/L LiOH solution at 573 K (after nickel-plating that end). The result was a solid hydride layer 0.6 mm thick plus approximately 130 ppm hydrogen in the core under the nickel plate. Thermal cycling under conditions similar to those likely to be experienced during a reactor trip did not cause any significant movement of the α+hydridephase boundary along the tube for up to 2688 cycles from 573 to 523 K. Supercharging of the core was observed in the nickel-plated area. Some conclusions have been drawn concerning the origin of the hydrogen in the nickel-plated area, and the factors controlling the supercharging process. (auth)

  12. Cross-stacked carbon nanotubes assisted self-separation of free-standing GaN substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tongbo; Yang, Jiankun; Wei, Yang; Huo, Ziqiang; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel method to fabricate high quality 2-inch freestanding GaN substrate grown on cross-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) coated sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). As nanoscale masks, these CSCNTs can help weaken the interface connection and release the compressive stress by forming voids during fast coalescence and also block the propagation of threading dislocations (TDs). During the cool-down process, thermal stress-induced cracks are initiated at the CSCNTs interface with the help of air voids and propagated all over the films which leads to full self-separation of FS-GaN substrate. Raman and photoluminescence spectra further reveal the stress relief and crystalline improvement of GaN with CSCNTs. It is expected that the efficient, low cost and mass-producible technique may enable new applications for CNTs in nitride optoelectronic fields.

  13. Determination of trace total inorganic arsenic by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry after solid phase extraction-preconcentration on aluminium hydroxide gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple, effective, inexpensive and rapid method for the determination of trace amounts of total inorganic arsenic in water samples by means of a modified solid phase preconcentration procedure using an aluminium hydroxide gel sorbent and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). This method avoids the traditional extraction procedures that are time- and solvent-consuming. The effects of quantity of adsorbent, solution pH, adsorption time and potentially interfering ions were studied. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit is 3 ng.L-1, and the enrichment factor is 167. The calibration plot is linear in the range from 0.05 to 10 μg.L-1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 6.1 % (n = 5) and recoveries in spiked environmental water were >100 %. The method was successfully applied to the determination of total inorganic arsenic in natural water samples. (author)

  14. Phase Transformations of α-Alumina Made from Waste Aluminum via a Precipitation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matori, Khamirul Amin; Wah, Loy Chee; Hashim, Mansor; Ismail, Ismayadi; Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    2012-01-01

    We report on a recycling project in which α-Al2O3 was produced from aluminum cans because no such work has been reported in literature. Heated aluminum cans were mixed with 8.0 M of H2SO4 solution to form an Al2(SO4)3 solution. The Al2(SO4)3 salt was contained in a white semi-liquid solution with excess H2SO4; some unreacted aluminum pieces were also present. The solution was filtered and mixed with ethanol in a ratio of 2:3, to form a white solid of Al2(SO4)3·18H2O. The Al2(SO4)3·18H2O was calcined in an electrical furnace for 3 h at temperatures of 400–1400 °C. The heating and cooling rates were 10 °C/min. XRD was used to investigate the phase changes at different temperatures and XRF was used to determine the elemental composition in the alumina produced. A series of different alumina compositions, made by repeated dehydration and desulfonation of the Al2(SO4)3·18H2O, is reported. All transitional alumina phases produced at low temperatures were converted to α-Al2O3 at high temperatures. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that the α-Al2O3 phase was realized when the calcination temperature was at 1200 °C or higher. PMID:23222685

  15. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, I.A.

    2005-12-01

    In the first phase of our study, we focused on the use of simple organics to raise the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in high alkaline aqueous solvents. In a limited survey of common organic acids, we determined that citric acid had the highest potential to achieve our goal. However, our subsequent investigation revealed that the citric acid appeared to play two roles in the solutions: first, raising the concentration of aluminum in highly alkaline solutions by breaking up or inhibiting ''seed'' polycations and thereby delaying the nucleation and growth of particles; and second, stabilizing nanometer-sized particles in suspension when nucleation did occur. The results of this work were recently published in Langmuir: D.M. Dabbs, U. Ramachandran, S. Lu, J. Liu, L.-Q. Wang, I.A. Aksay, ''Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid'' Langmuir, 21, 11690-11695 (2005). The second phase of our work involved the solvation of silicon, again in solutions of high alkalinity. Citric acid, due to its unfavorable pKa values, was not expected to be useful with silicon-containing solutions. Here, the use of polyols was determined to be effective in maintaining silicon-containing particles under high pH conditions but at smaller size with respect to standard suspensions of silicon-containing particles. There were a number of difficulties working with highly alkaline silicon-containing solutions, particularly in solutions at or near the saturation limit. Small deviations in pH resulted in particle formation or dissolution in the absence of the organic agents. One of the more significant observations was that the polyols appeared to stabilize small particles of silicon oxyhydroxides across a wider range of pH, albeit this was difficult to quantify due to the instability of the solutions.

  16. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  17. A comparative study of interatomic potentials for copper and aluminum gas phase sputter atom transport simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kuwata, K T; Doyle, J R

    2003-01-01

    A comparative study of interatomic potential models for use in gas phase sputter atom transport simulations is presented. Quantum chemical interatomic potentials for argon-copper and argon-aluminum are calculated using Kohn-Sham density functional theory utilizing the PW91 functional. These potentials (PW91) are compared to the commonly used Born-Mayer potentials calculated by Abrahamson [Phys. Rev. 178 (1969) 76] using the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac model (TFD) and the screened Coulomb potentials derived from the 'universal' form calculated by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). Monte Carlo simulations of gas phase sputter atom transport were performed to determine the average energy of atoms arriving at the substrate versus pressure for the three potential models. Overall, the ZBL potential gave results in much better agreement with the PW91 potential than the TFD potential. A characteristic thermalization pressure-distance product of approx 0.11 mTorr cm was found for both copper and aluminum using the PW91 pote...

  18. The effect warming time of mechanical properties and structural phase aluminum alloy nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrous aluminum alloys as fuel cladding will experience the process of heat treatment above the recrystallization temperature. Temperature and time of heat treatment will affect the nature of the metal. Heating time allows will affect change in mechanical properties, thermal and structure of the metal phase. This study aims to determine the effect of time of heat treatment on mechanical properties and phase metal alloys. Testing the mechanical properties of materials, especially violence done by the method of Vickers. Observation of microstructural changes made by metallographic-optical and phase structure were analyzed Based on the x-ray diffraction patterns Elemental analysis phase alloy compounds made by EDS-SEM. Test results show the nature of violence AlFeNiMg alloy by heating at 500°C with a warm-up time 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hours respectively decreased range 94.4 HV, 87.6 HV and 85.1 HV. The nature of violence AlFeNi alloy showed a decrease in line with the longer heating time. Metallographic-optical observations show the microstructural changes with increasing heating time. Microstructure shows the longer the heating time trend equi axial shaped grain structure of growing and the results showed a trend analyst diffraction pattern formation and phase θ α phase (FeAl3) in the alloy. (author)

  19. Threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact. Two effective simulation methods, piston-driven method and multi-scale shock technique, are used to simulate the shock wave. The simulation results from the two methods agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the shock wave velocity is linearly dependent on the particle velocity. The atom is considered to be ionized if the increase of its internal energy is larger than the first ionization energy. The critical impact velocity for plasma phase transition is about 13.0 km/s, corresponding to the threshold of pressure and temperature which is about 220 GPa and 11.0 × 103 K on the shock Hugoniot, respectively

  20. Effect of previous phase formation on densification and microstructure of aluminum titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum titanate based ceramics are potential candidates for many industrial applications mainly due to their low coefficient of thermal expansion and high thermal shock resistance. However, these ceramics are susceptible to phase dissociation in temperature range between 1100 and 1300 deg C, with consequent deterioration of properties. In this paper, it was assessed the effect of previous formation of Al2TiO5, obtained by calcination and subsequent grinding of equimolar mixtures of Al2O3 and TiO2, containing MgO and SiO2, additives which promote Al2TiO5 stabilization. Compacted samples from calcinated and non-calcinated powders were evaluated considering densification, formed crystalline phases, as well as grains size and morphology, by means of dilatometer studies, sintering treatments, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of previous formation of Al2TiO5 was associated with the properties and obtained features. (author)

  1. Effect of intermetallic phases on the anodic oxidation and corrosion of 5A06 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song-mei; Li, Ying-dong; Zhang, You; Liu, Jian-hua; Yu, Mei

    2015-02-01

    Intermetallic phases were found to influence the anodic oxidation and corrosion behavior of 5A06 aluminum alloy. Scattered intermetallic particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after pretreatment. The anodic film was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and its corrosion resistance was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization in NaCl solution. The results show that the size of Al-Fe-Mg-Mn particles gradually decreases with the iron content. During anodizing, these intermetallic particles are gradually dissolved, leading to the complex porosity in the anodic film beneath the particles. After anodizing, the residual particles are mainly silicon-containing phases, which are embedded in the anodic film. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the porous anodic film layer is easily penetrated, and the barrier plays a dominant role in the overall protection. Meanwhile, self-healing behavior is observed during the long immersion time.

  2. Threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact. Two effective simulation methods, piston-driven method and multi-scale shock technique, are used to simulate the shock wave. The simulation results from the two methods agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the shock wave velocity is linearly dependent on the particle velocity. The atom is considered to be ionized if the increase of its internal energy is larger than the first ionization energy. The critical impact velocity for plasma phase transition is about 13.0 km/s, corresponding to the threshold of pressure and temperature which is about 220 GPa and 11.0 × 103 K on the shock Hugoniot, respectively.

  3. Threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming, E-mail: qmzhang@bit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact. Two effective simulation methods, piston-driven method and multi-scale shock technique, are used to simulate the shock wave. The simulation results from the two methods agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the shock wave velocity is linearly dependent on the particle velocity. The atom is considered to be ionized if the increase of its internal energy is larger than the first ionization energy. The critical impact velocity for plasma phase transition is about 13.0 km/s, corresponding to the threshold of pressure and temperature which is about 220 GPa and 11.0 × 10{sup 3 }K on the shock Hugoniot, respectively.

  4. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Christini; R.K. Dawless; S.P. Ray; D.A. Weirauch, Jr.

    2001-11-05

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be

  5. Effect of alloying with Ti, V, Mn on the electrochemical properties of Zr-Cr-Ni based Laves phase and metal hydride electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main phase in Zr(CrxNi1-x)2 Laves phase alloys (0.20≤x≤0.60) changes from C15 to C14 at x=0.45-0.50. Electrodes with Cr content in the range 0.30≤x≤0.50 have favorable electrochemical capacities. The substitution effect of Cr or Ni by V or Mn in the form of Zr(CrxMyNi2-x-y) (M=V or Mn, x + y = 0.7-1.2) on the electrochemical discharge capacity was also studied. The alloys with x + y = 0.7-1.0/AB2 formula have larger hydrogen storage and electrochemical discharge capacities. When Ti is used to partly substitute Zr in TiyZr1-yM2 (y = 0.0-0.3) alloys, the plateau pressure of the hydride tends to increase with increasing y, however, its electrochemical capacity decreases as well due to lower reversible hydrogen storage density. The electrochemical cycling deterioration increases with increasing Ti content. Electrodes with no Ti or very low Ti content preserve 86% of their discharge capacities after 820 cycles under 65% depth of discharge, exhibiting excellent electrochemical stability. (orig.)

  6. Mechanical behavior of shock-wave consolidated nano and micron-sized aluminum/silicon carbide and aluminum/aluminum oxide two-phase systems characterized by light and electron metallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Baena, Noe Gaudencio

    This dissertation reports the results of the exploratory study of two-phase systems consisting of 150 microm diameter aluminum powder mechanically mixed with 30 nm and 30 microm diameter SiC and Al2O3 powders (in volume fractions of 2, 4, and 21 percent). Powders were mechanically mixed and green compacted to ˜80% theorical density in a series of cylindrical fixtures (steel tubes). The compacted arrangements were explosively consolidated using ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) to form stacks of two-phase systems. As result, successfully consolidated cylindrical monoliths of 50 mm (height) x 32 mm (in diameter) were obtained. By taking advantage of the use of SWC (shock wave consolidation) and WEDM (wire-electric discharge machining), the heterogeneous systems were machined in a highly efficiency rate. The sample cuts used for characterization and mechanical properties testing, require the use of less that 10cc of each monolith, in consequence there was preserved an average of 60% of the obtained system monoliths. Consolidated test cylinders of the pure Al and two-phase composites were characterized by optical metallography and TEM. The light micrographs for the five explosively consolidated regimes: aluminum powder, nano and micron-sized Al/Al2O3 systems, and the nano and micron-sized Al/SiC systems exhibit similar ductility in the aluminum grains. Low volume fraction systems exhibit small agglomerations at the grain boundaries for the Al/Al2O3 system and the Al/SiC system reveal a well distributed phase at the grain boundaries. Large and partially bonded agglomerations were observable in the nano-sized high volume fraction (21%) systems, while the micron-sized Al/ceramic systems exhibit homogeneous distribution along the aluminum phase grains. TEM images showed the shock-induced dislocation cell structure, which has partially recrystallized to form a nano grain structure in the consolidated aluminum powder. Furthermore, the SiC nano-agglomerates appeared to have

  7. Electrical properties in free-standing GaN substrates fabricated by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy and self-separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on the electrical properties of free-standing GaN substrates, using one typical set of low crystalline quality (type I) and high crystalline quality (type II), fabricated by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy and self-separation technique. Type I has a large electron concentration of ∼1018 cm-3 and a small electron mobility of ∼85 cm2/Vsec while type II has a small electron concentration of ∼ 5 x 1015 cm-3 and a large electron mobility of ∼400 cm2/Vsec. In type I, the electron concentration decreases with the decrease of temperature until a critical temperature and then increases at lower temperatures while in type II, the electron concentration continuously decreases with the decrease of temperature. These different electrical properties are ascribed to the difference in the structural defect densities of the two samples. These indicate that the electron transport mechanism of the defective free-standing GaN substrates is dominated by the two-band conduction model. These results are consistent with the temperature dependence of the electron mobility and with the structural properties observed by using high-resolution X-ray diffraction and atomic-force microscopy.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen motion in nanostructured Laves-phase hydrides ZrCr2Hx and TaV2Hx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloninin, A. V.; Buzlukov, A. L.; Skripov, A. V.; Aleksashin, B. A.; Tankeyev, A. P.; Yermakov, A. Ye; Mushnikov, N. V.; Uimin, M. A.; Gaviko, V. S.

    2008-07-01

    In order to study the mobility of hydrogen in nanostructured Laves-phase hydrides, we have measured the proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and the proton spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rates in two nanostructured systems prepared by ball milling: ZrCr2H3 and TaV2H1+δ. The proton NMR measurements have been performed at the resonance frequencies of 14, 23.8 and 90 MHz over the temperature ranges 11-424 K (for coarse-grained samples) and 11-384 K (for nanostructured samples). Hydrogen mobility in the ball-milled ZrCr2H3 is found to decrease strongly with increasing milling time. The experimental data suggest that this effect is related to the growth of the fraction of highly distorted intergrain regions where H mobility is much lower than in the crystalline grains. For the nanostructured TaV2H1+δ system, the ball milling is found to lead to a slight decrease in the long-range H mobility and to a suppression of the fast localized H motion in the crystalline grains.

  9. Optical in-situ monitoring system for simultaneous measurement of thickness and curvature of thick layer stacks during hydride vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmelroth, K.; Berwian, P.; Schröter, C.; Leibiger, G.; Schönleber, M.; Friedrich, J.

    2015-10-01

    For improved real-time process control we integrated a novel optical in-situ monitoring system in a vertical reactor for hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) bulk crystals. The in-situ monitoring system consists of a fiber-optical interferometric sensor in combination with an optimized differential measuring head. The system only needs one small optical path perpendicular to the center of the layer stack typically consisting of sapphire as substrate and GaN. It can handle sample distances up to 1 m without difficulty. The in-situ monitoring system is simultaneously measuring the optical layer thicknesses of the GaN/sapphire layer stack and the absolute change of the distance between the measuring head and the backside of the layer stack. From this data it is possible to calculate the thickness of the growing GaN up to a thickness of about 1000 μm and the absolute change in curvature of the layer stack. The performance of the in-situ monitoring system is shown and discussed based on the measured interference signals recorded during a short-time and a long-time HVPE growth run.

  10. Oxidation Phase Diagram of Small Aluminum Clusters Based on First-Principles Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ligen; Kuklja, Maija

    2009-06-01

    It is important to understand the properties of individual nanometals before we can exploit their efficiency as energetic materials or as enhancement additives to other energetic formulations. In this paper, we construct the (p, T) phase diagram for the O/Al13 system based on first-principles atomistic thermodynamics. The temperature and pressure is taken into account via the oxygen chemical potential. The optimized Al13 cluster has an icosahedral shape. We find that O adsorption on the Al13 surface is site-specific; in particular, O adsorption at the bridge sites is most stable, whereas adsorption at the hollow sites is slightly unfavorable. For various oxygen adsorption layers, we determine the adsorption configurations/patterns by performing Monte Carlo calculations. We assume that the metal cluster becomes completely oxidized and calculate formation enthalpies of various oxidized metal clusters. The obtained phase diagram shows that an intact Al13 cluster is stable at the low O chemical potential range and the fully oxidized metal cluster is stable at the high O chemical potential range. However, the O adsorption phases are never thermodynamically stable. This study provides important insights into basic behavior of small aluminum clusters in the presence of oxygen, and may affect reliable predictions of behavior of Al-high explosive composites.

  11. Kinetics of Final Degassing of Hydrogen Desorption by Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The proposed model concerns the 'confluent shrinking core' scenario and reproduces the desorption kinetic after the complete decay of the stoichiometric hydride ($\\beta$-phase). The exact analytical solution is obtained, the numerical values are demonstrated by the example of magnesium hydride.

  12. Role of aluminum doping on phase transformations in nanoporous titania anodic oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of aluminium doping on anatase to rutile phase transformation of nanoporous titanium oxide films were investigated. For this purpose pure and aluminum doped metal films were deposited on alumina substrates by cathodic arc physical deposition. The nanoporous anodic oxides were prepared by porous anodizing of pure and aluminum doped titanium metallic films in an ethylene glycol + NH4F based electrolyte. Nanoporous amorphous structures with 60–80 nm diameter and 2–4 μm length were formed on the surfaces of alumina substrates. The amorphous undoped and Al-doped TiO2 anodic oxides were heat-treated at different temperatures in the range of 280–720 °C for the investigation of their crystallization behavior. The combined effects of nanoporous structure and Al doping on crystallization behavior of titania were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro Raman analysis. The results indicated that both Al ions incorporated into the TiO2 structure and the nanoporous structure retarded the rutile formation. It was also revealed that presence or absence of metallic film underneath the nanopores has a major contribution to anatase-rutile transformation. - Highlights: • Al-doped TiO2 nanopores were grown on alumina substrates using anodization method. • The crystallization behavior of nanoporous Al-doped TiO2 were investigated. • Al doping into nanoporous TiO2 retarded the anatase-rutile transformation. • Nanostructuring has significant role in controlling rutile formation temperature. • The absence of the metallic film under the nanopores delayed the rutile formation

  13. Role of aluminum doping on phase transformations in nanoporous titania anodic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayata, Fatma [Istanbul Bilgi University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 34060, Eyup, Istanbul (Turkey); Ürgen, Mustafa, E-mail: urgen@itu.edu.tr [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    The role of aluminium doping on anatase to rutile phase transformation of nanoporous titanium oxide films were investigated. For this purpose pure and aluminum doped metal films were deposited on alumina substrates by cathodic arc physical deposition. The nanoporous anodic oxides were prepared by porous anodizing of pure and aluminum doped titanium metallic films in an ethylene glycol + NH{sub 4}F based electrolyte. Nanoporous amorphous structures with 60–80 nm diameter and 2–4 μm length were formed on the surfaces of alumina substrates. The amorphous undoped and Al-doped TiO{sub 2} anodic oxides were heat-treated at different temperatures in the range of 280–720 °C for the investigation of their crystallization behavior. The combined effects of nanoporous structure and Al doping on crystallization behavior of titania were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro Raman analysis. The results indicated that both Al ions incorporated into the TiO{sub 2} structure and the nanoporous structure retarded the rutile formation. It was also revealed that presence or absence of metallic film underneath the nanopores has a major contribution to anatase-rutile transformation. - Highlights: • Al-doped TiO{sub 2} nanopores were grown on alumina substrates using anodization method. • The crystallization behavior of nanoporous Al-doped TiO{sub 2} were investigated. • Al doping into nanoporous TiO{sub 2} retarded the anatase-rutile transformation. • Nanostructuring has significant role in controlling rutile formation temperature. • The absence of the metallic film under the nanopores delayed the rutile formation.

  14. Neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements of phase stresses in SiC particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron diffraction method was applied to measure the loading stress in each constituent phase of an aluminum alloy composite reinforced by silicon carbide (SiC) particles. Under uniaxial loading, the longitudinal strain measured by the neutron method increased proportionally to the applied stress, while the transverse stress decreased with the applied stress in both materials. The phase stress of the aluminum matrix and SiC particles measured by the neutron method as a function of the applied stress agreed well with the theoretical prediction by Eshelby model. The X-ray diffraction method was also applied to measure the loading and residual stresses in the same materials. The residual stress was compression for both Al and SiC phases in the composite. The diffraction elastic constants of the monolithic aluminum alloy obtained from the X-ray method are very close to those determined by the neutron method and calculated by Kroener's model. The increase in the phase stress in each phase of the composite due to uniaxial tensile loading is nearly equal to the value measured by the neutron method. The macrostress calculated from the phase stress by using the rule of mixture was equal to the applied stress. (author)

  15. The effect of ductile phase reinforcements on dynamic fracture toughness of discontinuously reinforced aluminum (D.R.A.) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum Alloys were tested under impact loading using the modified fracture bar apparatus. The apparatus is a modified version of split Hopkinson pressure bar and uses stress wave theory to give an experimental reading of Force-time history during crack initiation and propagation. Specimens of composite 840-854 materials under investigation were made of 7093 Al/SiC/15p toughened with different ductile phase -3 reinforcements. The ductile phase reinforcements were made with different Aluminum Alloys and commercially) sites, Journal of pure aluminum. The purpose of ductile phase reinforcements was to introduce impediments in the crack path thus increasing the crack propagation energy. The crack propagation velocity was measured using crack propagation gages. Stress intensity factor as a function of time was calculated to find out the peak values of K/sub dyn/(t) at crack initiation. Investigations were also made to find out the Crack Arrest Fracture Toughness. It was found out that the commercial purity aluminum reinforcements could act as crack arrestors by blunting the crack tip. (author)

  16. Characterization of Phases in an As-cast Copper-Manganese-Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Iqbal, F.Hasan; F.Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    Copper-manganese-aluminum (CMA) alloys, containing small additions of Fe, Ni, and Si, exhibit good strength and remarkable corrosion resistance against sea water. The alloys are used in as-cast condition, and their microstructure can show wide variations. The morphology, crystallography and composition of the phases presented in an as-cast (CMA) alloy of nominal composition Cu-14%Mn-8%Al-3%Fe-2%Ni were investigated using optical, electron optical, and microprobe analytical techniques. The as-cast microstructure consisted of the grains of fcc α and bcc β-phases alongwith intermetallic precipitates of various morphologies. The dendritic-shaped particles and the cuboid-shaped precipitates, which were rich in Fe and Mn and had an fcc DO3 structure. These four different morphologies of intermetallic precipitates exhibited discrete orientationrelationships with the α-matrix. The β-grains only contained very small cuboid shaped precipitates, which could only be resolved through transmission electron microscopy. These precipitates were found to be based on Fe3Al and had the DO3 structure.

  17. Compression and phase diagram of lithium hydrides at elevated pressures and temperatures by first-principles calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang M.; Chen, Xiang R.; Wu, Qiang; Geng, Hua Y.; Yan, Xiao Z.; Wang, Yi X.; Wang, Zi W.

    2016-09-01

    High pressure and high temperature properties of AB (A  =  6Li, 7Li; B  =  H, D, T) are comprehensively investigated with first-principles methods. It is found that H‑sublattice features in the low-pressure electronic structure near the Fermi level of LiH are shifted to that dominated by the Li+ sublattice under compression. The lattice dynamics are studied in quasi-harmonic approximation, from which the phonon contribution to the free energy and the isotopic effects are accurately modelled with the aid of a parameterized double-Debye model. The equation of state (EOS) obtained matches perfectly with available static experimental data. The calculated principal Hugoniot is also in accordance with that derived from shock wave experiments. Using the calculated principal Hugoniot and the previous theoretical melting curve, we predict a shock melting point at 56 GPa and 1923 K. In order to establish the phase diagram for LiH, the phase boundaries between the B1 and B2 solid phases are explored. The B1–B2-liquid triple point is determined at about 241 GPa and 2413 K. The remarkable shift in the phase boundaries with isotopic effect and temperature reveal the significant role played by lattice vibrations. Furthermore, the Hugoniot of the static-dynamic coupling compression is assessed. Our EOS suggests that a precompression of the sample to 50 GPa will allow the shock Hugoniot to pass through the triple point and enter the B2 solid phase. This transition leads to a discontinuity with 4.6% volume collapse—about four times greater than the same B1–B2 transition at zero temperature.

  18. Compression and phase diagram of lithium hydrides at elevated pressures and temperatures by first-principles calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yang M; Wu, Qiang; Geng, Hua Y; Yan, Xiao Z; Wang, Yi X; Wang, Zi W

    2016-01-01

    High pressure and high temperature properties of AB (A = $^6$Li, $^7$Li; B = H, D, T) are investigated with first-principles method comprehensively. It is found that the H$^{-}$ sublattice features in the low-pressure electronic structure near the Fermi level of LiH are shifted to that dominated by the Li$^{+}$ sublattice in compression. The lattice dynamics is studied in quasi-harmonic approximation, from which the phonon contribution to the free energy and the isotopic effects are accurately modelled with the aid of a parameterized double-Debye model. The obtained equation of state (EOS) matches perfectly with available static experimental data. The calculated principal Hugoniot is also in accordance with that derived from shock wave experiments. Using the calculated principal Hugoniot and the previous theoretical melting curve, we predict a shock melting point at 56 GPa and 1923 K. In order to establish the phase diagram for LiH, the phase boundaries between the B1 and B2 solid phases are explored. The B1-...

  19. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  20. Eggshell membrane-based solid-phase extraction combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for trace arsenic(V) in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjiang; Wang, Weidong; Li, Lu; Huang, Yuming; Cao, Jia

    2010-03-15

    The eggshell membrane (ESM) contains several surface functional groups such as amines, amides and carboxylic groups with potential as SPE adsorbent for the retention of target species of interest. In this paper, the potential use of ESM, a typical biomaterial, as solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent is evaluated for analysis of trace arsenic(V) in environmental water samples in combination with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). In order to obtain the satisfactory recovery of arsenic(V), various parameters including the desorption and enrichment conditions such as pH, the flow rate and the volume of sample solution, the amount of ESM and the content of sodium chloride were systematically optimized and the effects of co-existed ions were also investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, arsenic(V) could be easily extracted by the ESM packed cartridge and the breakthrough adsorption capacity was found to be 3.9 microg g(-1). The favorable limit of detection (LOD) for arsenic(V) was found to be 0.001 microg L(-1) with an enrichment factor of 33.3, and the relative standard deviations (R.S.Ds) was 2.1% for 0.6 microg L(-1) arsenic (n=11). The reproducibility among columns was satisfactory (R.S.D. among columns is less than 5%). The proposed method has been successfully applied to analysis of arsenic(V) in aqueous environmental samples, which suggests the ESM can be an excellent SPE adsorbent for arsenic(V) pretreatment and enrichment from real water samples. PMID:20152431

  1. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27154830

  2. Formation and growth of hydride blisters in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydride blisters were formed on the outer surface of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube by a nonuniform steady thermal diffusion process. A thermal gradient was applied to the pressure tube with a heat bath kept at a temperature of 415 .deg. C and an aluminum cold finger cooled with flowing water of 15 .deg. C. Optical microscopy and three-dimensional laser profilometry were used to characterize the hydride blisters with different hydrogen concentrations and thermal diffusion time. Hydride blisters were expected to start at a hydrogen concentration of 30 - 70 ppm and a thermal diffusion time of 4 - 6x105 sec. The hydride blister size increases with higher hydrogen concentrations and longer thermal diffusion time. Some of the samples revealed cracks on the hydride blisters. The ratio of hydride blister depth to height was estimated as approximately 8:1

  3. Hydrolysis of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its high hydrogen density and unique nuclear chemistry, lithium hydride, in all its isotopic forms, has an unsurpassed place in modem nuclear weapons. The hydrolysis of the material, and the outgassing of hydrogen from the bulk, are crucial to the performance of the material in service. This thesis describes research conducted at AWE Aldermaston, UK, to examine the hydrolysis and hydrogen outgassing from the bulk material, with the aim of ultimately developing the kinetics 8c mechanisms responsible. The basic chemistry is of great interest, especially the reaction with water. This reaction, whilst being fairly extensively studied in the past, has not been conclusively described with an accepted mechanism and associated kinetics. The last significant UK work on the topic was by Imperial College, London, under contract to AW(R)E in the late 1960s. This thesis describes the development of: (i) a solid state NMR spectroscopy technique to examine semi-quantitatively the surface of bulk lithium hydride for its chemical composition, and (ii) a dedicated lithium hydride inert atmosphere gravimetric analysis glove box to study the hydride/water reaction. Solid State NMR Spectroscopy has been utilised for the first time to probe the hydride/hydroxide ratio of partially hydrolysed lithium hydride. 6Li chemical shifts have been established for species of interest and extremely long, up to 17 hours, T1 relaxation times have been measured for 6Li hydride and hydroxide. A method for semi-quantitatively determining the hydroxide/hydride composition of a partially reacted sample has been developed, based on a 'dual-scan' technique using one short and one long pulse sequence. Gravimetric analysis has been developed for lithium hydride/humidity studies. This facility fully contains gravimetric analysis within an argon glove box, with the ability to control the sample atmosphere from room temperature to 60 deg C and from 0.5 to 40 percent relative humidity. The hydrolysis of

  4. ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPLIANT CORROSION-ACTIVATED INHIBITOR SYSTEM FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    The federal government is estimated to spend $1 billion on painting/repainting aircraft annually. Aircraft have surfaces composed of aluminum alloys that are highly susceptible to corrosion and must be protected with corrosion-preventative treatments that typically conta...

  5. Evolution of microstructure characteristics during the electron-beam-induced phase transition of aluminum trihydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report interesting microscopic features that evolve as a function of electron dose from the starting aluminum trihydroxide to the resulting transition aluminas with layered mesoporous structures. Remarkably, the sizes of pores and crystals in the porous structure were reduced as the electron dose was increased. The properties of the layered structure from the aluminum trihydroxide were maintained through the transition process, and hence the final mesoporous structures (mainly γ-alumina) were of lamella-type microstructure.

  6. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  7. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  8. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-α phase to transform to UH3: a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert γ -phase to α -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this α -phase to UH3. The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  9. Determination of As(III) and total inorganic As in water samples using an on-line solid phase extraction and flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, Mirna, E-mail: msigrist@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Albertengo, Antonela; Beldomenico, Horacio [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Tudino, Mabel [Laboratorio de Analisis de Trazas, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-04-15

    A simple and robust on-line sequential injection system based on solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HGAAS) with a heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) was developed and optimized for the determination of As(III) in groundwater without any kind of sample pretreatment. The method was based on the selective retention of inorganic As(V) that was carried out by passing the filtered original sample through a cartridge containing a chloride-form strong anion exchanger. Thus the most toxic form, inorganic As(III), was determined fast and directly by AsH{sub 3} generation using 3.5 mol L{sup -1} HCl as carrier solution and 0.35% (m/v) NaBH{sub 4} in 0.025% NaOH as the reductant. Since the uptake of As(V) should be interfered by several anions of natural occurrence in waters, the effect of Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -} on retention was evaluated and discussed. The total soluble inorganic arsenic concentration was determined on aliquots of filtered samples acidified with concentrated HCl and pre-reduced with 5% KI-5% C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6} solution. The concentration of As(V) was calculated by difference between the total soluble inorganic arsenic and As(III) concentrations. Detection limits (LODs) of 0.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1} for As(III) and inorganic total As, respectively, were obtained for a 500 {mu}L sample volume. The obtained limits of detection allowed testing the water quality according to the national and international regulations. The analytical recovery for water samples spiked with As(III) ranged between 98% and 106%. The sampling throughput for As(III) determination was 60 samples h{sup -1}. The device for groundwater sampling was especially designed for the authors. Metallic components were avoided and the contact between the sample and the atmospheric oxygen was carried to a minimum. On-field arsenic species

  10. Conference 'Chemistry of hydrides' Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of thesis of conference of Chemistry hydrides presents the results of investigations concerning of base questions of chemistry of nonorganic hydrides, including synthesis questions, studying of physical and chemical properties, thermodynamics, analytical chemistry, investigation of structure, equilibriums in the systems of metal-hydrogen, behaviour of nonorganic hydrides in non-water mediums and applying investigations in the chemistry area and technology of nonorganic hydrides

  11. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  12. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  13. Effect of Catalyst Precursor and Its Pretreatment on the Amount of ß-Pd Hydride Phase and HDS Activity of Pd-Pt/Silica-Alumina

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vít, Zdeněk; Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Boaro, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 146, SI (2014), s. 213-220. ISSN 0926-3373. [International Conference on Environmental Catalysis /7./. Lyon, 02.09.2012-06.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0751; GA ČR GAP106/11/0902 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Pd-Pt catalyst * hydrodesulfurization * Pd hydride Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.435, year: 2014

  14. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H2 separation factors and rates of HT--H2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  15. Spray forming -- Aluminum: Third annual report (Phase 2). Technical progress -- Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozarek, R.L.

    1998-04-20

    Commercial production of aluminum sheet and plate by spray atomization and deposition is a potentially attractive manufacturing alternative to conventional ingot metallurgy/hot-milling and to continuous casting processes because of reduced energy requirements and reduced cost. To realize the full potential of the technology, the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa), under contract by the US Department of Energy, is investigating currently available state-of-the-art atomization devices to develop nozzle design concepts whose spray characteristics are tailored for continuous sheet production. This third technical progress report will summarize research and development work conducted during the period 1997 October through 1998 March. Included are the latest optimization work on the Alcoa III nozzle, results of spray forming runs with 6111 aluminum alloy and preliminary rolling trials of 6111 deposits.

  16. Gaseous Phase and Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage Properties of Ti50Zr1Ni44X5 (X = Ni, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, or Cu for Nickel Metal Hydride Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural, gaseous phase hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties of a series of the Ti50Zr1Ni44X5 (X = Ni, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, or Cu metal hydride alloys were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed the multi-phase nature of all alloys, which were composed of a stoichiometric TiNi matrix, a hyperstoichiometric TiNi minor phase, and a Ti2Ni secondary phase. Improvement in synergetic effects between the main TiNi and secondary Ti2Ni phases, determined by the amount of distorted lattice region in TiNi near Ti2Ni, was accomplished by the substitution of an element with a higher work function, which consequently causes a dramatic increase in gaseous phase hydrogen storage capacity compared to the Ti50Zr1Ni49 base alloy. Capacity performance is further enhanced in the electrochemical environment, especially in the cases of the Ti50Zr1Ni49 base alloy and Ti50Zr1Ni44Co5 alloy. Although the TiNi-based alloys in the current study show poorer high-rate performances compared to the commonly used AB5, AB2, and A2B7 alloys, they have adequate capacity performances and also excel in terms of cost and cycle stability. Among the alloys investigated, the Ti50Zr1Ni44Fe5 alloy demonstrated the best balance among capacity (394 mAh·g−1, high-rate performance, activation, and cycle stability and is recommended for follow-up full-cell testing and as the base composition for future formula optimization. A review of previous research works regarding the TiNi metal hydride alloys is also included.

  17. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  18. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  19. Internal friction study of hydrides in zirconium at low hydrogen contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Internal friction and shear modulus measurements were carried out on crystal bar zirconium in the as received and hydride conditions using an inverted forced pendulum. Hydriding was achieved in two ways: inside and out of the pendulum. The final hydrogen content determined by fusion analysis in the 'in situ' hydride sample was of 36 ppm. Another sample was hydride by the cathodic charge method with 25 ppm. The thermal solid solubility (TSS) phase boundary presents hysteresis between the precipitation (TSSP) and the dissolution (TSSD) temperatures for the zirconium hydrides. During the first thermal cycling the anelastic effects could be attributed to the δ, ε and metastable γ zirconium hydrides. After 'in situ' annealing at 490 K, these peaks completely disappear in the electrolytically charged sample, while in the 'in situ' hydride, the peaks remain with decreasing intensity. This effect can be understood in terms of the different surface conditions of the samples. (author)

  20. Structural relationships in complex hydrides of the late transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature data on complex hydrides of the late transition metals (groups 7-10), such as the hydrogen storage material Mg2NiH4, are reviewed with respect to order-disorder phase transitions and structural relationships. They are analysed in terms of crystallographic group-subgroup trees and their use in understanding the different crystal structures from a symmetry point of view is demonstrated. New data are presented on the low temperature behaviour of magnesium iridium hydrides and strontium rhodium hydrides studied by powder X-ray diffraction. (orig.)

  1. The versatility of hydride-forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Already in 1866 it was realised by Graham that large amounts of hydrogen gas were, as he called it, occluded in pure metallic palladium. Even after more than one century of research in the field of hydrogen storage materials this area is still of great interest. This is not only due to the present-day commercial importance of rechargeable Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries, in which hydride-forming intermetallic materials are widely exploited, but also from a fundamental point of view where new discoveries are still being made. In this review these two areas will be highlighted on the basis of two illustrative examples. The first example relates to the application of hydride-forming bulk materials as electrodes in NiMH batteries. Several hydride-forming compounds are, in principle, available to be used as energy storage electrode material. It turned out, however, that AB5 -type compounds are most successfully applied due to their excellent electrode properties, like high storage capacity, rate capability and rapid electrode activation. Another important aspect is the electrode stability during cycling, which determines the battery cycle life. By designing multicomponent AB5 compounds it has been shown that this stability can be drastically improved. Recently, a second class of very stable compounds has been proposed. These so-called non-stoichiometric AB5+x compounds are characterised by the fact that the severe particle size reduction, always accompanying the hydride-formation process, is reduced. The stability mechanism responsible for this remarkable behaviour will be outlined. The second example relates to thin film applications. Recently, it has been found that the electronic conductivity of thin films composed of rare earth metal hydrides like, for example, yttrium hydride and gadolinium hydride, changes dramatically from metallic in the dihydride state to semiconducting in the trihydride state. In line with these conductivity changes the

  2. A spectral effect on phase evolution in neutron-irradiated aluminum?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed that the spatial distribution of transmutation-produced silicon precipitates formed in aluminum by capture of thermal neutrons is systematically modified by the fast neutron portion of the spectrum, and the tensile strength is altered accordingly. The concept is used to rationalize some previously erratic tensile data

  3. Analysis of Intermetallic Phases Formed on Surface Vapor Oxidized H13 Hot Work Steels in Molten Aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGRong; WUXiao-chun; MINYong-an

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author dipped surface vapor oxidized H13 steel specimens into 700℃ molten aluminum liquid for a certain period of time. Analyze the intermetallic phases formed on the H 13 samples surface with optical microscope and X-ray diffraction method. The observation of immersion test sample's cross-section shows that Fe304 film will protect die substrate from molten aluminum erosion. The identification of the intermetallic phases reveals that they consist of 2 parts, which is named as the composite layer and the compact layer. Further investigations are made in order to know the phase constituents of the 2 layers, they are Al8Fe2Si (outer composite layer), (AlCuMg) and Al5Fe2 (compact layer), respectively. The experimental results show that on the same specimen, a convex surface with bigger radius of curvature is more likely to be molten and the melting loss speed is also faster than a flat and smooth surface. The thickness of compact layer on a smooth surface is much bigger than that of the convex surface. Therefore, the author supposes the compact layer is favorable in stabilizing the die surface material from further melting loss, as their formation on the die surface, the melting loss speed will decrease.

  4. Analysis of Intermetallic Phases Formed on Surface Vapor Oxidized H13 Hot Work Steels in Molten Aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rong; WU Xiao-chun; MIN Yong-an

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author dipped surface vapor oxidized H13 steel specimens into 700℃ molten aluminum liquid for a certain period of time. Analyze the intermetallic phases formed on the H13 samples surface with optical microscope and X-ray diffraction method. The observation of immersion test sample's cross-section shows that Fe3O4 film will protect die substrate from molten aluminum erosion. The identification of the intermetallic phases reveals that they consist of 2parts, which is named as the composite layer and the compact layer. Further investigations are made in order to know the phase constituents of the 2 layers, they are Al8Fe2Si (outer composite layer), (AlCuMg) and Al5Fe2 (compact layer),respectively. The experimental results show that on the same specimen, a convex surface with bigger radius of curvature is more likely to be molten and the melting loss speed is also faster than a flat and smooth surface. The thickness of compact layer on a smooth surface is much bigger than that of the convex surface. Therefore, the author supposes the compact layer is favorable in stabilizing the die surface material from further melting loss, as their formation on the die surface, the melting loss speed will decrease.

  5. Properties of GaN film grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy%氢化物气相外延生长GaN膜性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘战辉; 张李骊; 李庆芳; 修向前; 张荣; 谢自力

    2013-01-01

    利用氢化物气相外延技术在c 面蓝宝石上生长得到纤锌矿结构 GaN 膜.采用高分辨 X 射线衍射、拉曼光谱和光致发光谱对GaN 外延膜进行了结构表征和光学性质研究,重点探讨了光致发光谱的温度变化特性.样品(002)面和(102)面摇摆曲线半高宽分别为322和375 arcsec,表明生长的 GaN 膜具有较好的晶体质量.高分辨 X射线衍射、拉曼光谱和光致发光谱测试表明,外延膜中存在0.26 GPa 的面内压应力.变温光致发光谱研究发现 GaN 外延膜中 A 自由激子发射峰和施主束缚激子发射峰随温度变化服从能带收缩理论.但由于 A 自由激子单声子伴峰可能是一种与自由激子动能变化相关的自由激子-声子相互作用的复合机制,导致其峰位呈现先蓝移后红移变化,以及其积分强度出现先增加后降低的现象.%The high crystal quality GaN film has been successfully grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE)and the properties of GaN epilayers have been investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD),Raman and photoluminescence (PL)measurements.The temperature dependence of photolumines-cence has been studied particularly.X-ray rocking curves (XRC)showed that the full widths at half maximum (FWHM)of (002 )and (102 )were 322 and 375 arcsec,respectively.Temperature-dependent PL spectra showed that the neutral donor bound excitons (D0 X)emission and free A-excitons recombination peaks reflected the shrinkage of the band gap,but the peak energy and the integrated intensity of 1-longitudinal optical (LO) phonon replica of the free A-excitons exhibited non-monotonic variations with increasing temperature,which might be related to the exciton-polariton dispersion effects of the free excitons caused by gain extra kinetic ener-gy with increasing temperature.HRXRD measurements,Raman and PL spectra all revealed that biaxial in-plane compressive strain (about 0.26 GPa)existed in the GaN layer and the

  6. First-principles phase stability, magnetic properties and solubility in aluminum-rare-earth (Al-RE) alloys and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The phase stability, magnetic property and solubility of aluminum rare-earth compounds are systematically studied by first-principles calculations. → Magnetic contributions of the RE elements and compounds have a significant impact on the formation energy of ordered Al3RE compounds, and are responsible for the stability of the observed DO19 phases for the early Al3RE compounds. → Standard potentials with f-electrons treated as valence band electron correctly predict all the stable phases of Al-RE compounds and frozen potentials are also in good agreements with experiments except one compound, Al3Yb.cP4. → The vibrational entropy plays an important role in the solubility of RE in Al. The calculated solubility of RE decreases as the RE atomic number increases. → The calculated solvus curves of Er and Yb are in very good agreement with experimental values. - Abstract: First-principles density-functional calculations are used to study the phase stability, magnetic properties and solubilities in aluminum-rare-earth (Al-RE) alloys and compounds. The results are compared with those from potentials with f-electrons treated as valence/core electrons to calculate the phase stability of different Al-RE compounds. Using a small set of test structures, it is found that calculations with potentials with f-electrons in the valence band predict correctly all the known stable phases of Al-RE compounds. It is found that the contribution of magnetism in the compounds is crucial for predicting the correct ground-state Al3RE structures. The calculated magnetic moments are in excellent agreement with experimental values. The RE solubilities in Al are calculated, including both static total energy contributions as well as the free energies associated with atomic vibrations. The vibrational entropy serves to increase significantly the solubilities of RE elements in Al. The calculated solvus curves are in good agreement with the available experimentally measured

  7. Analysis of time phase of characteristic rad iation in plasma induced by laser ablating aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With time- and space-resolved technique, we have recorde d time-resolved spectra of irradiation of the plasma induced by Nd: YAG laser a blating metal Aluminum in Ar, in which, laser pulse-energy was set up to 145 mJ /pulse and the buffer pressure 100 kpa. The continuum radiation and special emis sion of Aluminum plasma were studied based on the records. According to time dis tribution of Al Ⅰ396.15 nm emission, we analyzed the time differences between c haracteristic and continuum radiation evolving. We tried to explain the time pha ses of characteristic radiation evolving with traditional theoretical model of a tomic transition. As the result, we found that it was difficult to explain our e xperimental results with the model. In order to explain our experimental results , we need new model or to improve the traditional theoretical model of atomic tr ansition.

  8. Phase Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of the Semi-Solid SIMA Processed 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Behzad Binesh; Mehrdad Aghaie-Khafri

    2016-01-01

    Microstructural and mechanical behaviors of semi-solid 7075 aluminum alloy were investigated during semi-solid processing. The strain induced melt activation (SIMA) process consisted of applying uniaxial compression strain at ambient temperature and subsequent semi-solid treatment at 600–620 °C for 5–35 min. Microstructures were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). During the isothermal heating, intermetallic p...

  9. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  10. Suppression of the critical temperature in binary vanadium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Addition of 10 mol% Cr to V increases the β-hydride TC to >200 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Ni to V increases the β-hydride TC to >400 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Al to V decreases the β-hydride TC to 90Al10 membrane can be cycled to 2 without β-hydride formation. -- Abstract: The tendency of vanadium-based alloy membranes to embrittle is the biggest commercialisation barrier for this hydrogen separation technology. Excessive hydrogen absorption and the α → β hydride transition both contribute to brittle failure of these membranes. Alloying is known to reduce absorption, but the influence of alloying on hydride phase formation under conditions relevant to membrane operation has not been studied in great detail previously. Here, the effect of Cr, Ni, and Al alloying additions on V–H phase equilibrium has been studied using hydrogen absorption measurements and in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The addition of 10 mol% Ni increases the critical temperature for α + β hydride formation to greater than 400 °C, compared to 170 °C for V. Cr also increases the critical temperature, to between 200 and 300 °C. The addition of 10 mol% Al, however, suppresses the critical temperature to less than 30 °C, thereby enabling this material to be cycled thermally and hydrostatically while precluding formation of the β-hydride phase. This is despite Al also decreasing hydrogen absorption. The implication of this finding is that one of the mechanisms of brittle failure in vanadium-based hydrogen-selective membranes has been eliminated, thereby increasing the robustness of this material relative to V

  11. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF THE IRON CONTENT ON FORMATION OF IRON-BEARING PHASES IN FOUNDRY ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Gorbachiova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available  The microstructure and microhardness of aluminum and silumin аК12 with iron content of 0 to 12 mas.% produced by sand casting and mol casting have been investigated. For the Al–Si–Fe and Al–Si–Fe–Mn systems the portions of the liquidus surfaces, which correspond to commercial silumin compositions, have been calculated using the updated thermodynamic model of the Al– Si–Fe system and COST–507 database. The area of primary crystallization of the iron-containing a and b phases is assessed for the commercial silumin. It has been proved that manganese promotes the formation of the iron-containing a-phase in the commercial silumin.

  12. Metal hydride actuation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-recocking actuation device is disclosed. One possible use for it is in conjunction with a pneumatic fire protection system. This invention employs the process known as occlusion to store large amounts of gas in a small volume. Metal hydrides in a chamber are used to store hydrogen in the disclosed preferred embodiment. Upon the application of heat-from a heat source like a resistance heater-the charged metal hydride releases its hydrogen (H2) in a chamber having only one exit opening which empties into a sealed bellows. This bellows contacts a piston located in another chamber wherein a biased resetting spring is provided to normally maintain the piston in contact with the bellows. As the pressure from the H2 gas builds up, it overcomes the biased spring to move it and the piston along with an associated pin or other actuator. If used to actuate a pneumatic fire protection system, the pin or actuator at the downward side of its stroke in turn, may puncture a shearable diaphragm or in some other way releases the contents of a container containing a second gas, like nitrogen (N2), which is then released from a second exit port in a different chamber to charge the fire protection system. Recocking of the piston begins as the heating of the metal hydride ceases. As cooling takes place the hydrogen is absorbed to reenter the hydride to decrease the gas pressure supplied. The piston's biased resetting spring then recocks the piston to its original position

  13. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  14. Powder production of U-Mo alloy, HMD process (Hydriding- Milling- Dehydriding)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys can be hydrided massively in metastable γ (gamma) phase. The brittle hydride can be milled and dehydrided to acquire the desired size distributions needed for dispersion nuclear fuels. The developments of the different steps of this process called hydriding-milling- dehydriding (HMD Process) are described. Powder production scales for industrial fabrication is easily achieved with conventional equipment, small man-power and low investment. (author)

  15. Vapor-phase synthesis of a solid precursor for α-alumina through a catalytic decomposition of aluminum triisopropoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A new solid precursor for α-alumina was prepared at about 200 °C from aluminum tri-isopropoxide vapor. ► The obtained precursor was calcined at 1200 °C to form α-alumina particles, 75 nm in surface area equivalent diameter. ► The weight loss of the precursor upon calcination was 24%, lower than that of Al(OH)3, a conventional alumina precursor. -- Abstract: A new solid precursor, hydrous aluminum oxide, for α-alumina nanoparticles was prepared by thermal decomposition of aluminum triisopropoxide (ATI) vapor in a 500 mL batch reactor at 170–250 °C with HCl as catalyst. The conversion of ATI increased with increasing temperature and catalyst content; it was nearly complete at 250 °C with the catalyst at 10 mol% of the ATI. The obtained precursor particles were amorphous, spherical and loosely agglomerated. The primary particle size is in the range 50–150 nm. The ignition loss of the precursor was 24%, considerably lower than 35% of Al(OH)3, the popular precursor for alumina particles. Upon calcination of the precursor at 1200 °C in the air with a heating rate of 10 °C/min and a holding time of 2 h, the phase was completely transformed into α. The spherical particles composing the precursor turned worm-like by the calcination probably due to sintering between neighboring particles. The surface area equivalent diameter of the resulting α-alumina was 75 nm.

  16. Calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate "cement" phases and rare Ca-zeolite association at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppa, F.; Scordari, F.; Mesto, E.; Sharygin, V.; Bortolozzi, G.

    2010-06-01

    Very high temperature, Ca-rich alkaline magma intruded an argillite formation at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy, producing cordierite-tridymite metamorphism in the country rocks. An intense Ba-rich sulphate-carbonate-alkaline hydrothermal plume produced a zone of mineralization several meters thick around the igneous body. Reaction of hydrothermal fluids with country rocks formed calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), i.e., tobermorite-afwillite-jennite; calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (CASH) — "cement" phases - i.e., thaumasite, strätlingite and an ettringite-like phase and several different species of zeolites: chabazite-Ca, willhendersonite, gismon-dine, three phases bearing Ca with the same or perhaps lower symmetry of phillipsite-Ca, levyne-Ca and the Ca-rich analogue of merlinoite. In addition, apophyllite-(KF) and/or apophyllite-(KOH), Ca-Ba-carbonates, portlandite and sulphates were present. A new polymorph from the pyrrhotite group, containing three layers of sphalerite-type structure in the unit cell, is reported for the first time. Such a complex association is unique. Most of these minerals are specifically related to hydration processes of: (1) pyrometamorphic metacarbonate/metapelitic rocks (natural analogues of cement clinkers); (2) mineralization between intrusive stocks and slates; and (3) high-calcium, alkaline igneous rocks such as melilitites and foidites as well as carbonatites. The Colle Fabbri outcrop offers an opportunity to study in situ complex crystalline overgrowth and specific crystal chemistry in mineral phases formed in igneous to hydrothermal conditions.

  17. Synthesis of metal hydrides by cold rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' In the development of metal hydrides for commercial applications, a special attention should be devoted to the ways of production. For commercial success, the raw elements of the hydrogen storage materials should be of low cost, the synthesis process should be inexpensive and easily scalable. Therefore, it is important to put some effort on the elaboration of new and more efficient means of producing metal hydrides. In this perspective, cold rolling was investigated as a new means of producing nanocrystalline materials. This technique is well-known in the industry and easily scalable. Cold rolling was performed on Mg-Ni system. The evolution of morphology, crystal structure, crystallite size, deformation, and preferred orientation was studied as a function of number of rolling passes. Cold rolling followed by a heat treatment produced the intermetallic Mg2Ni. Without heat treatment and for a large number of rolling, an amorphous phase was synthesized. (author)

  18. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  19. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  20. Modelling of fuel rod hydriding failures in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanistic models which were developed to describe primary hydriding phenomena in claddings of initially intact rods with residual moisture are described. The models include the following key processes: fuel rod thermal behavior, UO2 fuel oxidation in steam-hydrogen atmosphere under irradiation, hydrogen diffusion in zirconium and in the hydride, growth of the hydride phase. Fuel rod thermomechanical behavior is calculated by using RTOP integral fuel code. An oxidation model represents the effects of temperature dynamics and temperature profile along fuel axis and radius on fuel oxidation as well as on hydrogen accumulation inside the fuel rod. Along with ordinary thermal dissociation of water molecules, the oxidation model also addresses radiolysis of the steam-hydrogen mixture due to fission fragments. The present radiolysis model takes into account the effects of the gas mixture composition, temperature and pressure. A new model of cladding hydriding is proposed in which calculation of the massive hydride growth is performed in 2-D geometry. Hydrogen transport in zirconium cladding is modeled with account for thermodiffusion. The RTOP code comprising the models developed allows us to calculate different scenarios of hydriding rod failures under given operation conditions. Test calculations were carried out and compared to available data. It is shown that there are threshold values of initial steam content inside the intact fuel rod which lead to the possibility of through-cladding hydride growth and formation of the primary defect. The threshold values depend on the oxidation state of the cladding inner surface, linear power profile in the fuel rod, fuel rod geometry, cladding temperature conditions and hydrogen diffusivities in zirconium and zirconium hydride

  1. Phase composition and structure of aluminum Al-Cu-Si-Sn-Pb alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, N. A.; Stolyarova, O. O.; Murav'eva, T. I.; Zagorskii, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and phase composition of cast and heat treated Al-Cu-Si-Sn-Pb alloys containing 6 wt % Sn, 2 wt % Pb, 0-4 wt % Cu, 0-10 wt % Si have been studied using calculations and experimental methods. Polythermal and isothermal sections are reported, which indicate the existence of two liquid phases. It was found that the low-melting phase is inhomogeneous and consists of individual leadand tin-based particles.

  2. High ramp rate thermogravimetric analysis of zirconium(II) hydride and titanium(II) hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A unique arc image device has been proposed for high ramp rate thermogravimetry. • Powder oxidation influences decomposition kinetics at temperatures below 933 K. • Particle size has a negligible effect on TiH2 decomposition behavior. • Improvements to the device are required to conduct accurate kinetic analysis. - Abstract: Zirconium and titanium hydride are utilized in liquid phase metal foam processing techniques. This application results in immediate exposure to molten metal and almost immediate decomposition at high temperatures. Most decomposition characterization techniques utilize slow heating rates and are unable to capture the decomposition behavior of hydrides under foam processing conditions. In order to address this issue a specialized high ramp rate thermogravimetric analyzer was created from a xenon arc image refiner. In addition to thermogravimetry, complimentary techniques including X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize hydride decomposition and compare the results to literature. Hydrides were partially oxidized and separated into particles size ranges to evaluate the influence of these factors on decomposition. Oxidizing treatments were found to decrease decomposition rate only at temperatures below 933 K (660 °C) while particle size effects appeared to be negligible. Several improvements to the unique TGA apparatus presented in the current work are suggested to allow reliable kinetic modeling and analysis

  3. Effects of microwave irradiation on metal hydrides and complex hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of single-mode microwave irradiation on metal hydrides, MHn (LiH, MgH2, CaH2, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48) and complex hydrides MBH4 (LiBH4, NaBH4, and KBH4) were systematically investigated. Among the metal hydrides, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 exhibit a rapid heating by microwave irradiation, where small amount of hydrogen (less than 0.5 mass%) are desorbed. On the other hand, LiBH4 is heated above 380 K by microwave irradiation, where 13.7 mass% of hydrogen is desorbed. The rapid heating of metal hydrides such as TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 are mainly due to the conductive loss. Meanwhile the microwave heating in LiBH4 is attributed to the conductive loss which is caused by a structural transition. The difference in the amount of desorbed hydrogen between metal hydrides and complex hydrides might be caused by the different microwave penetration depth and/or the temperature saturation in the microwave irradiation process. Microwave heating might be applied to hydrogen storage system, though further development of hydrides themselves and engineering techniques are required

  4. Development of a Two-Phase Model for the Hot Deformation of Highly-Alloyed Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Beaudoin; J. A. Dantzig; I. M. Robertson; B. E. Gore; S. F. Harnish; H. A. Padilla

    2005-10-31

    Conventional processing methods for highly alloyed aluminum consist of ingot casting, followed by hot rolling and thermal treatments. Defects result in lost productivity and wasted energy through the need to remelt and reprocess the material. This research centers on developing a fundamental understanding for deformation of wrought 705X series alloys, a key alloy system used in structural airframe applications. The development of damage at grain boundaries is characterized through a novel test that provides initiation of failure while preserving a controlled deformation response. Data from these mechanical tests are linked to computer simulations of the hot rolling process through a critical measure of damage. Transmission electron microscopy provides fundamental insight into deformation at these high working temperatures, and--in a novel link between microscale and macroscale response--the evolution of microstructure (crystallographic orientation) provides feedback for tuning of friction in the hot rolling process. The key product of this research is a modeling framework for the analysis of industrial hot rolling.

  5. Shock-induced structural phase transition, plasticity, and brittle cracks in aluminum nitride ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branicio, Paulo S; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2006-02-17

    Atomistic mechanisms of fracture accompanying structural phase transformation (SPT) in AlN ceramic under hypervelocity impact are investigated using a 209 x 10(6) atom molecular-dynamics simulation. The shock wave generated by the impact splits into an elastic wave and a slower SPT wave that transforms the wurtzite structure into the rocksalt phase. The interaction between the reflected elastic wave and the SPT wave front generates nanovoids and dislocations into the wurtzite phase. Nanovoids coalesce into mode I cracks while dislocations give rise to kink bands and mode II cracking. PMID:16606007

  6. Spin Forming of an Aluminum 2219-T6 Aft Bulkhead for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle: Phase II Supplemental Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Squire, Michael D.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hoffman, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the aft bulkhead of the pressure vessel. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) 2219 aft bulkhead which will eliminate the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design that will reduce vehicle weight by eliminating welds. Phase I of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece forward pressure vessel bulkhead from aluminum-lithium 2195.

  7. Preparation of metallic terbium and terbium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of metallic terbium preparation is described. The method consists in vacuum thermolysis of terbium hydride prepared as a result of terbium chloride interaction with lithium hydride. The prepared modification of terbium hydride demonstrates a high stability in the air. It is pointed out that problems arising from direct hydridation of the metal are responsible for certain advantages of the terbium hydride preparation method described

  8. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser welding of dual phase steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We found that energy input pattern influence the mechanical properties of dual phase steels. → The longitudinal welded specimen showed higher strength than transverse one. → At higher levels of pulse duration the welded samples showed coarse grains in the heat affected zone. → Increasing the effective peak power density caused an increase in strength of the welded specimens. -- Abstract: In this paper, the effect of energy input pattern in pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser welding on mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of a 0.19% carbon dual phase steel is studied. The experimental results showed that the energy input pattern to the fusion zone had a significant effect on the ultimate tensile strength of the welded samples. The longitudinally and transversely tested weld specimens showed higher and lower strength than the base metal respectively. Increase in effective peak power density increased the volume of fusion zone which in turn caused an increase in the strength of the welded specimens. Microstructural studies showed coarse grains in the heat affected zone of welded samples especially at higher levels of pulse duration. Fracture studies showed presence of dimples on the fractured surfaces of the heat affected zone indicating that a ductile fracture had occurred.

  9. Vapor liquid solid-hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) growth of ultra-long defect-free GaAs nanowires: Ab initio simulations supporting center nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    André, Yamina, E-mail: yamina.andre@univ-bpclermont.fr; Lekhal, Kaddour; Hoggan, Philip; Avit, Geoffrey; Réda Ramdani, M.; Monier, Guillaume; Colas, David; Ajib, Rabih; Castelluci, Dominique; Gil, Evelyne [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut Pascal, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR6602, Institut Pascal, F-63171 Aubière (France); Cadiz, Fabian; Rowe, Alistair; Paget, Daniel [Physique de la matière condensée, Ecole Polytechnique CNRS, Palaiseau (France); Petit, Elodie [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubière (France); Leroux, Christine [Université de Toulon, IM2NP, Bât. R, B.P. 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR 7334, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); Trassoudaine, Agnès [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut Pascal, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR6602, Institut Pascal, F-63171 Aubière (France); Clermont Université, Université d’Auvergne, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2014-05-21

    High aspect ratio, rod-like and single crystal phase GaAs nanowires (NWs) were grown by gold catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). High resolution transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed polytypism-free zinc blende (ZB) NWs over lengths of several tens of micrometers for a mean diameter of 50 nm. Micro-photoluminescence studies of individual NWs showed linewidths smaller than those reported elsewhere which is consistent with the crystalline quality of the NWs. HVPE makes use of chloride growth precursors GaCl of which high decomposition frequency after adsorption onto the liquid droplet catalysts, favors a direct and rapid introduction of the Ga atoms from the vapor phase into the droplets. High influxes of Ga and As species then yield high axial growth rate of more than 100 μm/h. The diffusion of the Ga atoms in the liquid droplet towards the interface between the liquid and the solid nanowire was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The diffusion coefficient of Ga atoms was estimated to be 3 × 10{sup −9} m{sup 2}/s. The fast diffusion of Ga in the droplet favors nucleation at the liquid-solid line interface at the center of the NW. This is further evidence, provided by an alternative epitaxial method with respect to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, of the current assumption which states that this type of nucleation should always lead to the formation of the ZB cubic phase.

  10. Positional dependence of defect distribution in semipolar (20\\bar{2}1) hydride vapor phase epitaxy-GaN films grown on (22\\bar{4}3) patterned sapphire substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Toshiro; Takeuchi, Shotaro; Kamada, Shohei; Arauchi, Takuji; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamane, Keisuke; Okada, Narihito; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Akira

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the position dependence of crystalline quality and defect distribution in a semipolar (20\\bar{2}1) hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE)-GaN film grown on a (22\\bar{4}3) patterned sapphire substrate (PSS). Position-dependent X-ray microdiffraction (XRMD) measurement clearly revealed the periodic fluctuation of the 20\\bar{2}1 lattice plane tilting in HVPE-GaN films. This correlated with the periodic distribution of (a + c)-type dislocations owing to the patterning pitch of the PSS as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the three-dimensional reciprocal lattice space map, the diffuse streak exactly along the c-axis can be clearly detected, indicating the presence of basal plane stacking faults in HVPE-GaN films. Furthermore, we have quantitatively estimated the defect densities from the results of XRMD and TEM measurements. From the obtained results of XRMD and TEM measurements, the fluctuation of the lattice plane tilting and the defect distribution in (20\\bar{2}1) HVPE-GaN films grown on two types of metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy-GaN templates will be discussed in detail.

  11. Novel phases of lithium-aluminum binaries from first-principles structural search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Cerqueira, Tiago F. T.; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A. L., E-mail: marques@tddft.org [Institut Lumière Matière (UMR5306) and ETSF, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Valencia-Jaime, Irais [Institut Lumière Matière (UMR5306) and ETSF, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, MX-76230 Querétaro (Mexico); Amsler, Maximilian; Goedecker, Stefan [Department of Physics, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Romero, Aldo H. [Physics Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Intermetallic Li–Al compounds are on the one hand key materials for light-weight engineering, and on the other hand, they have been proposed for high-capacity electrodes for Li batteries. We determine from first-principles the phase diagram of Li–Al binary crystals using the minima hopping structural prediction method. Beside reproducing the experimentally reported phases (LiAl, Li{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, Li{sub 9}Al{sub 4}, LiAl{sub 3}, and Li{sub 2}Al), we unveil a structural variety larger than expected by discovering six unreported binary phases likely to be thermodynamically stable. Finally, we discuss the behavior of the elastic constants and of the electric potential profile of all Li–Al stable compounds as a function of their stoichiometry.

  12. Reductive demercuration of hex-5-enyl-1-mercuric bromide by metal hydrides. Rearrangement, isotope effects, and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the rearrangement of hex-5-enyl radical intermediates as a mechanistic probe has been examined in the reductive demercurations of hex-5-enyl-l-mercuric bromide (1). Methylcyclopentane and 1-hexene are the major products from reductions of 1 by sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and tri-n-butyltin hydride. The formation of methylcyclopentane and the absence of cyclohexane are consistent with a noncage, free-radical chain mechanism for these reductions. The sodium amalgam reduction of 1 produces only 1-hexene. Hex-5-en-l-ol and a peroxide are formed from sodium borohydride reductions of 1 in the presence of molecular oxygen. Isotope effects for transfer of hydrogen to the intermediate hex-5-enyl radicals have been determined from the 1-hexene/methylcyclopentane product ratio, since rearrangement of the 5-hexenyl radical competes with hydrogen abstraction. The magnitude of these isotope effects (1.8 +- 0.2) is the same for reductive demercurations of 1 by sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and tri-n-butyltin hydride; these results provide evidence for a common hydrogen-transfer agent, such as hex-5-enyl-1-mercuric hydride, for all of these metal-hydride reductions. The validity of the competing rearrangement method of determining hydrogen isotope effects has been demonstrated by determining the isotope effect for the tri-n-butyltin hydride reduction of 6-bromo-1-hexene (2.8 +- 0.2) at 400C

  13. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  14. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  15. MC-3125 Phase I development. [Aluminum Linear Shaped Charge; HNSII explosive; Uralite 3121S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, G.T.

    1977-10-01

    The scope of work outlined as Phase I product development is reported. Specific interest areas are (1) choice of adhesives, (2) compatibility of materials, (3) prototype tooling designs, (4) processes and procedures, and (5) testing. Technical data generated in laboratory studies have been reduced to tabular form and/or charts.

  16. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  17. Low density metal hydride foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam. 6 figures

  18. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  19. RECLAMATION OF ALUMINUM FINISHING SLUDGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research study of the reclamation of aluminum-anodizing sludges was conducted in two sequential phases focused on enhanced dewatering of aluminum-anodizing sludges to produce commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, i.e., liquid alum. The use of high-pressure (14 to...

  20. Thermal and mechanical properties of zirconium hydrides with various hafnium contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium (Zr) hydride is currently expected as a neutron shield material for fast reactors. In order to evaluate safety and economic efficiency of the nuclear reactor, the thermal and mechanical properties of the hydride should be understood. In addition, since chemical properties of Zr and hafnium (Hf) are quite similar, Zr contains a few percent Hf generally. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the effect of Hf content on the properties of Zr hydride. In the present study, fine bulk samples of δ-phase Zr hydrides with various Hf contents were prepared and their thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. We examined the phase states and the microstructure of the hydrides by means of X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDX analyses. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the heat capacity and the thermal diffusivity of the hydrides were measured and the thermal conductivity was evaluated. The Vickers hardness and the sound velocity of the hydrides were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. The effects of temperature and Hf content on the properties of Zr hydrides were studied. (author)

  1. FORMATION REGULARITIES OF PHASE COMPOSITION, STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES DURING MECHANICAL ALLOYING OF BINARY ALUMINUM COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    F. G. Lovshenko; G. F. Lovshenko

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents investigation results pertaining to  ascertainment of formation regularities of phase composition and structure during mechanical alloying of binary aluminium composites/substances. The invetigations have been executed while applying a wide range of methods, devices and equipment used in modern material science. The obtained data complement each other. It has been established that presence of oxide and hydro-oxide films on aluminium powder  and introduction of surface-activ...

  2. FORMATION REGULARITIES OF PHASE COMPOSITION, STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES DURING MECHANICAL ALLOYING OF BINARY ALUMINUM COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Lovshenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigation results pertaining to  ascertainment of formation regularities of phase composition and structure during mechanical alloying of binary aluminium composites/substances. The invetigations have been executed while applying a wide range of methods, devices and equipment used in modern material science. The obtained data complement each other. It has been established that presence of oxide and hydro-oxide films on aluminium powder  and introduction of surface-active substance in the composite have significant effect on mechanically and thermally activated phase transformations and properties of semi-finished products.  Higher fatty acids have been used as a surface active substance.The mechanism of mechanically activated solid solution formation has been identified. Its essence is  a formation of  specific quasi-solutions at the initial stage of processing. Mechanical and chemical interaction between components during formation of other phases has taken place along with dissolution  in aluminium while processing powder composites. Granule basis is formed according to the dynamic recrystallization mechanism and possess submicrocrystal structural type with the granule dimension basis less than 100 nm and the grains are divided in block size of not more than 20 nm with oxide inclusions of 10–20 nm size.All the compounds  with the addition of  surface-active substances including aluminium powder without alloying elements obtained by processing in mechanic reactor are disperse hardened. In some cases disperse hardening is accompanied by dispersive and solid solution hardnening process. Complex hardening predetermines a high temperature of recrystallization in mechanically alloyed compounds,  its value exceeds 400 °C.

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization, and gas-phase unimolecular reactivity of the silver hydride nanocluster [Ag3((PPh2)2CH2)3(μ3-H)](BF4)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavras, Athanasios; Khairallah, George N; Connell, Timothy U; White, Jonathan M; Edwards, Alison J; Mulder, Roger J; Donnelly, Paul S; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2014-07-21

    A bis(diphenylphosphino)methane-ligated trinuclear silver hydride nanocluster, [Ag3((Ph2P)2CH2)3(μ3-H)](BF4)2, featuring three silver(I) ions coordinated to a μ3-hydride, and its deuteride analogue, [Ag3((Ph2P)2CH2)3(μ3-D)](BF4)2, have been isolated and structurally characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), X-ray crystallography, NMR and IR spectroscopy. The position of the deuteride in [Ag3((Ph2P)2CH2)3(μ3-D)](BF4)2 was determined by neutron diffraction. ESI-MS of [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)](BF4)2 [L = ((Ph2P)2CH2)2] produces [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)](2+) and [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)(BF4)](+). A rich gas-phase ion chemistry of [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)](2+) is observed under conditions of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-capture dissociation (ECD). CID gives rise to the following complementary ion pairs: [Ag3L2](+) and [L+(H/D)](+); [Ag2(H/D)L2](+) and [AgL](+); [Ag2(H/D)L](+) and [AgL2](+). ECD gives rise to a number of dissociation channels including loss of the bis(phosphine) ligand, fragmentation of a coordinated bis(phosphine) ligand via C-P bond activation, and loss of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom with concomitant formation of [Ag3L3](+). Under CID conditions, [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)(BF4)](+) fragments via ligand loss, the combined loss of a ligand and [H,B,F4], and cluster fragmentation to give [Ag2(BF4)L2](+) and [Ag2(L-H)L](+) [where (L-H) = (Ph2P)2CH(-)]. PMID:24991699

  4. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  5. Characteristics of hydriding and hydrogen embrittlement of the Ti-Al-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of hydriding and hydrogen embrittlement of the Ti-Al-Zr alloy were evaluated. The amount of hydrogen absorbed into the alloy at 500 deg. C was continuously monitored using a hydrogen pressure measurement. The rate of decrease in hydrogen pressure indicated a high absorption rate of hydrogen into the alloy, following a linear rate law. X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of δ-phase titanium hydride (TiH1.97) after hydriding. At room temperature, the alloy showed much sensitivity to embrittlement in ductility by hydrogen. The δ-hydrides in the grain boundaries promoted the crack propagation in the presence of stress, leading to the cleavage failure mode. However, the tensile strengths were almost independent of the hydrogen content up to 1174 ppm. It is thus concluded that the δ-hydride acts to decrease the ductility without affecting tensile strengths

  6. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: fuelpr@nuc.berkeley.edu; Greenspan, Ehud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Garkisch, Hans D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U{sub 0.3}ZrH{sub 1.6} pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to {approx}650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity {approx}100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of {approx}300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrH{sub x}, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1

  7. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U0.3ZrH1.6 pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to ∼650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity ∼100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of ∼300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrHx, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1.6 to ∼1.45 at the center and

  8. Simulation of metal hydride reactor with aluminium foam matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' A 1-D model has been developed for testing different designs of hydride reactors. The computer program can simulate a complete reactor or a part of it in planar, cylindrical or spherical geometry. It reproduces an experimental loop: absorption followed by desorption and calculates heat transfer during the reaction. Simulation results have been confronted to experimental data with very good correlation. A reactor with a heat transfer matrix inside, such as aluminum foam, can be simulated. We have evaluated the size limits of a reactor and the category of foam that preserves the good reaction kinetic performances of a reactor filled with LaNi5. (author)

  9. Laboratory investigation of aluminum solubility and solid-phase properties following alum treatment of lake waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Jacob; Anderson, Michael A; Graham, Robert C

    2005-10-01

    Water samples from two southern California lakes adversely affected by internal nutrient loading were treated with a 20 mg/L dose of Al3+ in laboratory studies to examine Al solubility and solid-phase speciation over time. Alum [Al2(SO4)3 . 18 H2O] applications to water samples from Big Bear Lake and Lake Elsinore resulted in a rapid initial decrease in pH and alkalinity followed by a gradual recovery in pH over several weeks. Dissolved Al concentrations increased following treatment, reaching a maximum of 2.54 mg/L after 17 days in Lake Elsinore water and 0.91 mg/L after 48 days in Big Bear Lake water; concentrations in both waters then decreased to 45% gibbsite. These results were supported by geochemical modeling using Visual MINTEQ, with Al solubility putatively controlled by amorphous Al(OH)3 shortly after treatment and approaching that of microcrystalline gibbsite after about 150 days. These findings indicate that Al(OH)3 formed after alum treatment undergoes significant chemical and mineralogical changes that may alter its effectiveness as a reactive barrier to phosphorus release from lake sediments. PMID:16139325

  10. Hydrogen storage in magnesium-based hydrides and hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mg and Mg-based hydrides have attracted much attention because of their high gravimetric hydrogen storage densities and favourable kinetic properties. Due to novel preparation methods and the development of suitable catalysts, hydrogen uptake and desorption is now possible within less than 2 min. However, the hydrogen reaction enthalpy of pure Mg is too high for many applications, for example, for the zero emission car. Therefore, different routes are explored to tailor the hydrogen reaction enthalpy to potential applications. This article summarizes the recent developments concerning sorption properties and thermodynamics of Mg-based hydrides for hydrogen storage applications. In particular, promising strategies to decrease the hydrogen reaction enthalpy by alloying and the use of reactive hydride composites are discussed

  11. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  12. Kinetics of Liquid-Phase Hydrogenation of Benzene in a Metal Hydride Slurry System Formed by M1Ni5 and Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代世耀; 徐国华; 安越; 陈长聘; 陈立新; 王启东

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzene in misch metal nickel-five (M1Ni5) and benzene slurry system was studied by investigating the influences of the reaction temperature, pressure, alloy concentration and stirring speed on the mass transfer-reaction processes inside the slurry. The results show that the whole process is controlled by the reaction at the surface of the catalyst. The mass transfer resistance at gas-liquid interface and that from the bulk liquid phase to the surface of the catalyst particles are negligible. The apparent reaction rate is zero order for benzene concentration and first order for hydrogen concentration in the liquid phase. The kinetic model obtained fits the experimental data very well. The apparent activation energy of the hydrogen absorption reaction of M1Ni5-C6H6 slurry system is 42.16 kJ·mo1-1.

  13. The microstructure and hydriding characteristics of high temperature aged U-13 at.%Nb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hefei; Shi, Peng; Li, Ruiwen; Jiang, Chunli; Yang, Jiangrong; Hu, Guichao

    2015-09-01

    Niobium as alloying element significantly improves physical and chemical properties of metallic uranium, exhibiting great application potential in uranium alloy materials. The corrosion resistance performance as well as the internal alloy phase structure of uranium-niobium alloy is closely related to aging processes. Microstructure and hydriding characteristics of the 400 °C/9 h + 500 °C/2 h aged uranium-13 at.% niobium alloys (U-13 at.%Nb) were investigated from the point of view of relationship between the microstructure and growth of the hydriding areas. The microstructure, morphology and composition of the alloy phases before and after the hydriding were well characterized by the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Experimental results indicated that the hydrogen preferentially reacted with the Nb-depleted phase α-like-U to form monolithic β-UH3Nbx, and the alloy microstructure played an important role in hydride growth.

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of metal hydrides alloys for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results obtained from two different classes of metal hydrides. First, we will discuss the effect of ball milling on the hydrogen storage properties of magnesium hydride. High energy milling of MgD2 produces a nanocrystalline structure made of a mixture of β-MgD2 and the high temperature/high pressure phase γ-MgD2. Neutron powder diffraction showed that the ball-milled β-MgD2 and γ-MgD2 structures are distorted compared to the same phases synthesised at high-pressure and high temperature. The Mg-D bond lengths are modified in β-MgD2. In γ-MgD2 phase, only one bond length is changed. This may be the explanation for the limited amount of γ-MgD2 synthesized by energetic ball milling. The second case is the crystal structure of a new class of metal hydrides, the so called 'Laves phase related BCC solid solution'. From neutron diffraction, we found that two phases are present in the as-cast alloy TiV0.9Mn1.1. One is a BCC solid solution, the other is a C14 Laves phase. We found that in the C14 phase there is a preferential site for titanium atoms while the vanadium and manganese atoms are distributed on the other two sites. (author)

  15. Aluminum Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  16. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. Ley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability.

  17. High speed fabrication of aluminum nanostructures with 10 nm spatial resolution by electrochemical replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biring, Sajal; Tsai, Kun-Tong; Sur, Ujjal Kumar; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2008-09-01

    A high fidelity electrochemical replication technique for the rapid fabrication of Al nanostructures with 10 nm lateral resolution has been successfully demonstrated. Aluminum is electrodeposited onto a lithographically patterned Si master using a non-aqueous organic hydride bath of aluminum chloride and lithium aluminum hydride at room temperature. Chemical pretreatment of the Si surface allows a clean detachment of the replicated Al foil from the master, permitting its repetitive use for mass replication. This high throughput technique opens up new possibilities in the fabrication of Al-related nanostructures, including the growth of long range ordered anodic alumina nanochannel arrays. PMID:21828842

  18. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Robin; Godfrey, Hugh; Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter; Diggle, Andrew; Bradshaw, John

    2016-08-01

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH3 fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition.

  19. Determination of butyltins in harbour sediment and water by aqueous phase ethylation GC-ICP-MS and hydride generation GC-AAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsema, R; De Smaele, T; Moens, L; De Jong, A S; Donard, O F

    1998-01-01

    Sediment and water samples have been collected between 1992 and 1995 for evaluating butyltin contamination in two marinas from the coastal area in The Netherlands, two years after the ban of TBT. Sediments extracts were analysed by capillary gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Sediment concentrations for TBT showed no trend of decrease between 1992 and 1995 and were extremely high in the marina secluded from tidal action; 17.5 +/- 8.0 microg g(-1) and much lower for the marina with tidal action; 0.117 +/- 0.073 microg g(-1). High ratios between TBT and DBT in the sediments indicate that degradation mechanisms in the sediments are of minor importance. Dissolved butyltin compounds were analysed in water by means of gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry. Water concentrations of TBT showed no clear trend of decrease between 1992 and 1995 and were high in the marina secluded from tidal action; 139 +/- 166 ng litre(-1) but much lower for the marina with tidal action; 48 +/- 98 ng litre(-1). An active degradation mechanism during summer periods was indicated by low (<1) TBT/DBT ratios in the water phase of the marina secluded from tidal action. PMID:15093321

  20. Study on Non-interlayer Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding for SiCp/ZL101 Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei GUO; Jitai NIU; Jinfan ZHAI; Changli WANG; Jie YU; Guangtao ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    Through the vacuum diffusion bonding for SiCp/ZLl01 aluminum matrix composite, the influence of bonding parameters on the joint properties was reported, with the aim to obtain optimal bonding parameters. The microstructureof joints was analyzed by means o

  1. Hydride blister formation in Zr-2.5wt%Nb pressure tube alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydride blisters were grown over a period of 5-91 days under controlled thermal boundary condition using Zr-2.5wt%Nb pressure tube sections. Rectangular plate type specimens were hydrided to hydrogen concentration in the range of 20-250 ppm by weight and homogenized at 400 deg. C. These specimens were held in a specially fabricated jig capable of producing the required thermal gradients. The bulk specimen and the cold spot temperatures were maintained in the range of 270-400 deg. C and 40-100 deg. C respectively. Depending on the thermal gradients employed, two types of blister morphology were identified. The type I blister was single, round and located at the cold spot region whereas the type II blister consisted of several small blisters along a ring around the cold spot. Microstructural examination of the blister cross-section revealed three regions; a single-phase region consisting of hydrides, a region consisting of matrix containing both radial and circumferential hydrides, and another region consisting of matrix and circumferential hydrides. An attempt was made to rationalize the observed radial-circumferential hydride platelet orientation. Hydride blister growth rates were found to vary strongly with hydrogen concentration and bulk specimen temperature. The observed time for blister growth was found to be in agreement with the Sawatzky's model

  2. Effect of lattice defects and temperature transition rates on the deuteride (hydride) particle morphology and phase transformation thermal hysteresis in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements have been performed to investigate deuteride particle morphology and the phase transformation temperature hysteresis in low-concentration Nb-D alloys. Deformation either by cold rolling and or by previous deuteride cycling induced a coarse deuteride particle distribution. This observation is attributed to a more heterogeneous precipitation process facilitated by the dislocation defects and/or dislocation substructure. Deuteride precipitation in the deformed samples was observed immediately upon crossing the incoherent solvus during temperature reduction, again consistent with dislocation-aided nucleation. Deuteride dissolution was observed at the very onset of heating for the cold-rolled material, an observation unique among the samples characterized here. This is attributed to the availability of elastic accommodation energy for deuteride particles embedded in the severely work-hardened host matrix. In other words, the elastic energy assists dissolution, consistent with a theoretical model developed by Puls (1984 Acta Metall. 32 1259-69). The effect of temperature reduction transition rates was also investigated. Rapid, direct cooling (at 2-3 K min-1) resulted in a much finer deuteride particle distribution - a factor of 200 increase in the particle number density and a factor of ten reduction in characteristic particle size compared to well annealed single crystal Nb. The thermal hysteresis was also affected by the temperature transition rates, with a significant reduction of the hysteresis for the slowest cooling rates. This implies that at least part of the recorded hysteresis in the well annealed material is dependent on the temperature transition rate. (author)

  3. Sensitive determination of As (III) and As (V) by magnetic solid phase extraction with Fe@polyethyleneimine in combination with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Zheng, Zhenwen; Xiao, Junping; Fan, Huili

    2016-08-15

    The magnetic nanomaterial Fe@polyethyleneimine (Fe@PEI) was successfully synthesized and used as an effective adsorbent material for magnetic solid phase extraction(MSPE) of As(III) and As(V) from water samples. Fe@SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by one pot synthetic method using a borohydride reduction method, then modified with (3-chloropropyl)trimethoxysilane to obtain Fe@SiO2-Cl by chloropropylation, which was reacted with PEI to achieve Fe@polyethyleneimine (Fe@PEI). The microstructure and morphology of Fe@PEI were characterized by transmission electron microscoscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results showed that Fe@PEI demonstrated excellent adsorption for As(III) and As(V). Based on this fact, the determination method for these two arsenic species earned good limits of detection (LODs) of 0.002μgL(-1) and wide calibration curves in the concentration range from 0.008 to 0.2μgL(-1). The precisions of As (III) and As (V)were 1.95% and 2.55% (RSD, n=6), respectively. The proposed method was validated with real samples and the spiked recoveries were in the range of 82.7-98.3% and the accuracies were in the range of 2-13.3%. The results demonstrated that the developed MSPE method had good advantages such as simplicity, rapid separation, low cost, easy to reuse and high-quality analytical performances, which made it attractive for rapid and efficient extraction of inorganic arsenic species in the environmental water samples. PMID:27260453

  4. On the chemistry of hydrides of N atoms and O$^+$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, Zainab; Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low density lines of sight towards G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H$_2$ formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O$^+$ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O$^+$ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of DyFe3 hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ternary hydride phases, DyFe3H/sub x/ with x = 1.7, 2.5, and 4.2 all retain the PuNi3 rhombohedral structure of DyFe3 with a maximum volume expansion of 18% for DyFe3H/sub 4.2/. All phases show a preferential expansion parallel to the c0 axis. From bulk magnetization measurements, the Dy-Fe spin compensation temperature is found to decrease linearly from 5450K for DyFe3 to 1500K for DyFe3H/sub 4.2/ with increasing volume of the hydride phases. The 161Dy Moessbauer results for the two Dy sites in the structure indicate a slight reduction occurs in free-ion moment found for DyFe3 in all hydride phases. In addition, the 57Fe Moessbauer data show that the average Fe moment for the five inequivalent Fe sites increases with hydrogen concentration up to x = 2.5

  6. Precipitation of reoriented hydrides and textural change of α-zirconium grains during delayed hydride cracking of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantilever beam (CB) specimens referred to as L90 and L60 with the notch directions tilted normal to, and at an angle of 60 deg. to, the transverse direction of a cold-worked and annealed Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube, respectively, were subjected to delayed hydride cracking (DHC) testing at 250 deg. C. L60 specimen showed slanted growth of the DHC crack compared to L90 without tilting. An X-ray diffractometric study was carried out on the fractured surfaces of the two CB specimens after DHC testing. The δ-hydride phase was confirmed to sit on the fracture surface, demonstrating the growth of the DHC crack through fracturing of the reoriented hydrides. Furthermore, the texture of the reoriented hydrides was determined for the first time. Comparing the pole figures of the {1 1 1}δ-hydride and the (0 0 0 1)α-zirconium, it is concluded that the reoriented hydrides nucleate first of all at the α-zirconium grains. A change in the orientation of the α-zirconium grains, mainly by twinning on the {1 0 1-bar} planes, was demonstrated to occur during the propagation of the DHC crack. On the basis of the above findings, a mechanism of the DHC was discussed

  7. Structural stability of complex hydrides LiBH4 revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodziana, Zbigniew; Vegge, Tejs

    2004-01-01

    A systematic approach to study the phase stability of LiBH4 based on ab initio calculations is presented. Three thermodynamically stable phases are identified and a new phase of Cc symmetry is proposed for the first time for a complex hydride. The x-ray diffraction pattern and vibrational spectra...

  8. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly...... followed by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was...

  9. Tritium processing using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company is commissioned by the US Department of Energy to operate the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory. The primary purpose of the plant is to produce radioactive materials for national defense. In keeping with current technology, new processes for the production of tritium are being developed. Three main objectives of this new technology are to ease the processing of, ease the storage of, and to reduce the operating costs of the tritium production facility. Research has indicated that the use of metal hydrides offers a viable solution towards satisfying these objectives. The Hydrogen and Fuels Technology Division has the responsibility to conduct research in support of the tritium production process. Metal hydride technology and its use in the storage and transportation of hydrogen will be reviewed

  10. Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 7 (2014), s. 2313-2333. ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : metal-hydrid phase transformation * hydrogen diffusion * swelling Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2014 http://aimsciences.org/journals/pdfs.jsp?paperID=10195&mode=full

  11. Hydrogen storage materials and metal hydride-Ni batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen storage alloy is the key active material in metal hydride-Ni (MH-Ni) batteries. A brief review of hydrogen storage negative electrode materials including misch-nickel-based alloys, Laves phase alloys, magnesium-based alloys, vanadium-based solid solutions and nanotubes is presented. Current problems that need to be solved are mentioned. In addition, recent developments of MH/Ni-batteries with high power and energy are introduced

  12. Drying dichloromethane over calcium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of dichloromethane by a simple 10 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. First, dichloromethane is refluxed with calcium hydride to remove water. Then, dichloromethane is distilled to separate it from the byproducts of the reflux reaction. This procedure can be implemented in 1 day. ### Introduction In many instances i...

  13. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  14. Surface treatments toward obtaining clean GaN(0 0 0 1) from commercial hydride vapor phase epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition substrates in ultrahigh vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied processes of cleaning GaN(0 0 0 1) surfaces on four different types of wafers: two types were hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) free-standing substrates and two types were metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) films grown on these HVPE substrates and prepared by annealing and/or Ar ion sputtering in ultra high vacuum. We observed the surfaces through treatments using in situ low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and Auger electron spectroscopy, and also using ex situ temperature programmed desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. For HVPE samples, we obtained relatively clean surfaces under optimized three-step annealing conditions (200 deg. C for 12 h + 400 deg. C for 1 h + 500 deg. C for 5 min) without sputtering, after which the surface contamination of oxide and carbide was reduced to ∼20% of that before annealing. Clear GaN(0 0 0 1)1x1 patterns were obtained by LEED and RHEED. STM images showed flat terraces of ∼10 nm size and steps of ∼0.5 nm height. Upon annealing the HVPE-GaN samples at a much higher temperature (>550 deg. C), three-dimensional (3D) islands with facets were formed and the surface stoichiometry was broken down with the desorption of nitrogen in the form of ammonia, since the samples include hydrogen as an impurity. Ar+ sputtering was effective for removing surface contamination, however, postannealing could not recover the surface roughness but promoted the formation of 3D islands on the surface. For MOCVD/HVPE homoepitaxial samples, the surfaces are terminated by hydrogen and the as-introduced samples showed a clear 1x1 structure. Upon annealing at 500-600 deg. C, the surface hydrogen was removed and a 3x3 reconstruction structure partially appeared, although a 1x1 structure was dominant. We summarize the structure differences among the samples under the same

  15. Behaviour of aluminum foam under fire conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account fire-protection requirements it is advantageous for aluminum foam, after melting at a temperature considerably exceeding the melting point, to have a structure of discontinuous suspension of solid inclusions to liquid metal instead of liquid consistency. Continuity of the suspension depends on the solid phase content. The boundary value of the phase determined by J. Śleziona, above which the suspension becomes discontinuous, is provided by the formula (1. Figure 1 presents the relationship graphically. Boundary values of the vs content resulting from the above relationship is too low, taking into account the data obtained from the technology of suspension composites [4]. Therefore, based on the structure assumed for the suspension shown in Figure 2 these authors proposed another way of determining the contents, the value of which is determined by the relationship (3 [5].For purposes of the experimental study presented in the paper two foams have been molten: a commercially available one, made by aluminum foaming with titanium hydride, and a foam manufactured in the Marine Materials Plant of the Maritime University of Szczecin by blowing the AlSi7 +20% SiC composite with argon. Macrophotographs of foam cross-sections are shown in Figure 3. The foams have been molten in the atmosphere of air at a temperature of 750ºC. The products of melting are presented in Figure 4. It appears that molten aluminum foam may have no liquid consistency, being unable to flow, which is a desired property from the point of view of fire-protection. The above feature of the molten foam results from the fact that it may be a discontinuous suspension of solid particles in a liquid metal. The suspended particles may be solid particles of the composite that served for making the foam or oxide membranes formed on extended metal surface of the bubbles included in the foam. The desired foam ability to form a discontinuous suspension after melting may be

  16. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  17. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions

  18. NMR study of hydride systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrides of thorium (ThH2, Th4H15 and Th4D15) and the intermetallic compound system (Zr(Vsub(1-x)Cosub(x))2 and its hydrides were investigated using the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. From the results for the thorium hydride samples it was concluded that the density of states at the Fermi level n(Esub(f)) is higher in Th4H15 than in ThH2; there is an indirect reaction between the protons and the d electrons belonging to the Th atoms in Th4H15; n(E) has a sharp structure near Esub(f). It was also found that the hydrogen diffusion mechanism changes with temperature. From the results for the intermetallic compound system conclusions were drawn concerning variations in the electronic structure, which explain the behavior of the system. In hydrogen diffusion studies in several samples it was found that Co atoms slow the diffusion rate. Quadrupole spectra obtained at low temperatures show that the H atoms preferably occupy tetrahedral sites formed by three V atoms and one Z atom. (H.K.)

  19. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  20. Hydrides of intermetallic compounds R3Ni8Al (R=Sm, Tu, Lu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of hydrogen with intermetallic compounds (IC) R3Ni8Al (R=Sm, Tu, Lu) with the structure of Ce3Co8Si type was studied. Formation of hydride Sm3Ni8AlH11.7 takes place at a high rate and it is accompanied by increase in the volume of unit cell of IC structure by 23 %. According to the data of X-ray diffraction study the volume of unit cells of hydride structure [Tu, Lu]3Ni8AlHx (1) is 0.7-1.2 % higher than the volume of unit cells of the structures of intermetallic compounds. Thermal decomposition of hydride takes place in two stages at 340-390 K, and that of hydride phase of (1) - in one stage at 340 and 450 K respectively

  1. Development of a rapid and sensitive method for the determination of aluminum by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using a fluorescence detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heena; Kumar, Rajesh; Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This study represents a new analytical high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector method for the determination of Al(III) as Al(III) complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid in a tap water sample and a coke sample. A micellar liquid chromatographic method is proposed for the determination of aluminum metal in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, a cationic surfactant (0.05 M) used for the solubilization of the aluminum complex. The influence of pH and ligand concentration on the formation of the complex was studied by adding a small amount of 0.1 M sodium hydroxide. The metal chelate was detected at λEx 410 nm and λEm 510 nm. This method eliminates the need for addition of reagent or organic modifier to the mobile phase. The complex was analyzed using an Ascentis Express C18 column and a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile, methanol and water (55 : 30 : 15). Under the optimized conditions, the linear range was 1-200 µg L(-1) and the limit of detection was 0.05 µg L(-1). The method showed a good detector response over the range of interest and was successfully applied for the determination of trace Al(III) in canned coke and water samples containing excess of Mg(II), Ca(II) and other matrices. PMID:25323526

  2. Hydrogen charging, hydrogen content analysis and metallographic examination of hydride in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaseous and electrolytic hydrogen charging techniques for introducing controlled amount of hydrogen in zirconium alloy is described. Zr-1wt%Nb fuel tube, zircaloy-2 pressure tube and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube samples were charged with up to 1000 ppm of hydrogen by weight using one of the aforementioned methods. These hydrogen charged Zr-alloy samples were analyzed for estimating the total hydrogen content using inert gas fusion technique. Influence of sample surface preparation on the estimated hydrogen content is also discussed. In zirconium alloys, hydrogen in excess of the terminal solid solubility precipitates out as brittle hydride phase, which acquire platelet shaped morphology due to its accommodation in the matrix and can make the host matrix brittle. The FN number, which represents susceptibility of Zr-alloy tubes to hydride embrittlement was measured from the metallographs. The volume fraction of the hydride phase, platelet size, distribution, interplatelet spacing and orientation were examined metallographically using samples sliced along the radial-axial and radial-circumferential plane of the tubes. It was observed that hydride platelet length increases with increase in hydrogen content. Considering the metallographs generated by Materials Science Division as standard, metallographs prepared by the IAEA round robin participants for different hydrogen concentration was compared. It is felt that hydride micrographs can be used to estimate not only that approximate hydrogen concentration of the sample but also its size, distribution and orientation which significantly affect the susceptibility to hydride embrittlement of these alloys. (author)

  3. Stability of the hydrides REMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} (RE = Y, Gd) from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roquefere, Jean-Gabriel [Institut de Recherche sur l' Hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 Boul. des Forges, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada); Matar, Samir F.; Bobet, Jean-Louis [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Av. du Dr. A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-08-15

    YMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} and GdMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} hydrides were studied from first principles. Starting from the experimental crystallographic values, the Equation Of State (EOS) of the intermetallics as well as the hydrides have been established. Considering the two possible structures reported for such pseudo Laves phase hydrides (i.e. cubic and orthorhombic), the relative stabilities of the hydrides have been compared. The orthorhombic configuration is confirmed for REMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} (RE = Y, Gd) as seen experimentally. Nevertheless, in a larger cell (i.e. REMgNi{sub 4-x}Al{sub x} solid solution), it has been shown experimentally that the hydride remains cubic, and the present calculations show that the hydrogen atoms have to be considered within the [RENi{sub 3}] tetrahedrons. (author)

  4. Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH4 and transition metals-added magnesium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H2, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H2, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti and MgH2. Highlights: ► Addition of Ni, LiBH4, and Ti to MgH2 to increase reaction rates. ► Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ► At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. ► Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH2 was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH4 with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H2. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH2, Mg, Ni, TiH1.924, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH4, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg2Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample

  5. The progress of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews research at the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, on the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials. Nanocrystalline materials have been synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by annealing. Examples of the materials include TiFe-, ZrV2-, LaNi5 and Mg2Ni-type phases. Details on the process used and the enhancement of properties due to the nanoscale structures are presented. The synthesized alloys were used as negative electrode materials for Ni-MH battery. The properties of hydrogen host materials can be modified substantially by alloying to obtain the desired storage characteristics. For example, it was found that the respective replacement of Fe in TiFe by Ni and/or by Cr, Co, Mo improved not only the discharge capacity but also the cycle life of these electrodes. The hydrogen storage properties of nanocrystalline ZrV2- and LaNi5-type powders prepared by mechanical alloying and annealing show no big difference with those of melt casting (polycrystalline) alloys. On the other hand, a partial substitution of Mg by Mn or Al in Mg2Ni alloy leads to an increase in discharge capacity, at room temperature. Furthermore, the effect of the nickel and graphite coating on the structure of some nanocrystalline alloys and the electrodes characteristics were investigated. In the case of Mg2Ni-type alloy mechanical coating with graphite effectively reduced the degradation rate of the studied electrode materials. The combination of a nanocrystalline TiFe-, ZrV2- and LaNi5-type hydride electrodes and a nickel positive electrode to form a Ni-MH battery, has been successful. (authors)

  6. Gas-Phase Partial Oxidation of Lignin to Carboxylic Acids over Vanadium Pyrophosphate and Aluminum-Vanadium-Molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Samira; Boffito, Daria C; Patience, Gregory S

    2015-10-26

    Lignin is a complex polymer that is a potential feedstock for aromatic compounds and carboxylic acids by cleaving the β-O-4 and 5-5' linkages. In this work, a syringe pump atomizes an alkaline solution of lignin into a catalytic fluidized bed operating above 600 K. The vanadium heterogeneous catalysts convert all the lignin into carboxylic acids (up to 25 % selectivity), coke, carbon oxides, and hydrogen. Aluminum-vanadium-molybdenum mostly produced lactic acid (together with formic acid, acrylic acid, and maleic anhydride), whereas the vanadium pyrophosphate catalyst produced more maleic anhydride. PMID:26361086

  7. Delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5 % Nb: effect of hydride blisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the zirconium base alloys subjected to a local thermal gradient, in presence of hydrogen, fully hydride region (frequently called blisters) can be formed. Due to the brittle character of the zirconium hydride, cracks are usually found inside the blisters. These cracks are prone to growing, under stress and temperature, by successive hydride precipitation at the crack tip. This process is called hydride induced delayed cracking (HIDC). In a previous work, hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. In the present one, blisters were grown on Zr-2.5 wt % Nb pressure tubes. Then, tensile specimens were submitted to HIDC tests. During the test, the radial hydrides length increase due to stress concentrator effect of the blister. If a crack, that was initiated into the blister, reaches the Zr matrix therefore can propagate through the radial hydrides. (author)

  8. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formedby chemical reaction between hydrogen and ...

  9. Fabrication of a hierarchical dodecyl sulfate-layered double hydroxide nanocomposite on porous aluminum wire as an efficient coating for solid-phase microextraction of phenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have synthesized, by a hydrothermal crystallization method, a layered double hydroxide of aluminum that is intercalated with the dodecyl sulfate anion. This nanocomposite is formed on a porous aluminum wire and can be used as a fiber coating for solid-phase microextraction. The nanocomposite has a flower like morphology and a high specific surface. The coating can be prepared easily, is mechanically stable, and exhibits relatively high thermal stability. It is capable of extracting phenolic compounds from water samples. Following thermal desorption, the phenols were quantified by GC-MS. The effects of extraction temperature, extraction time, sample ionic strength, stirring rate, pH, desorption temperature and desorption time were studied. Under optimal conditions, the repeatability for one fiber (for n = 5), expressed as the relative standard deviation, is between 3.9 and 7.6 %. The detection limits range from 0.2 to 4 pg mL−1. The method is simple, fast, and inexpensive. The fibers are thermally stable and yield better recoveries than conventional methods of analysis. (author)

  10. Scanning electron microscope techniques for studying Zircaloy corrosion and hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure has been developed for preparing scanning electron microscope (SEM) samples of irradiated or unirradiated Zircaloy, suitable for oxide layer imaging, hydride concentration and morphology determination, and X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The area fraction of the hydride phase is determined by image analysis of backscattered electron images (BEI). Measurements performed on unirradiated laboratory-hydrided samples, as well as cladding samples from pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel irradiated to a burnup of about 40 MWd/kg U, gave good agreement with hot extraction hydrogen analysis over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations, based on the assumption that all the hydrogen i present as the δ-phase hydride. The local hydrogen concentration can be determined quantitatively with a spatial resolution of less than 100μm. This capability was used to determine the radial hydrogen concentration profiles across the cladding wall for PWR samples with different total hydrogen contents, surface oxide thicknesses, and local heat rating. The results indicated that the hydrogen concentration profile was essentially flat (uniform) across the wall thickness for the samples with a low total hydrogen content (∼200 ppm) or a negligible radial heat flux (plenum), while the samples from fueled sections with >200 ppm or a negligible radial heat flux (plenum), while the samples from fueled sections with >200 ppm H had a steep increase in the hydrogen concentration close to the outer surface. Analysis of a longitudinal section showed peak hydrogen concentrations opposite pellet interfaces a factor of two higher than in the mid-pellet region

  11. Fracture mechanism of TiAl intermetallics caused by hydride and atomic hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高克玮; 王燕斌; 林志; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of TiAl intermetallics was studied at room temperature. The results showed that there were two forms of HE in TiAl intermetallics, i.e. hydride HE and atomic HE. Most of hydrogen in TiAl intermetallics was transformed into hydrides at room temperature. The hydride exists as (TiAl)Hx for a low hydrogen concentration while it exists in several forms for a higher hydrogen concentration. Stress intensity factor KIC decreased with increase in hydride concentration. KIC decreased further when TiAl intermetallics were charged cathodically with hydrogen in 1 mol/L H2SO4 solution. Stress intensity factor during hydrogen charging KIH was about 50% KIC. 20% of the decrease was caused by hydrides while 30% was caused by atomic hydrogen. Mechanism of HE caused hydrides was the same as any other second phase in nature. Delayed fracture caused by atomic hydrogen resulted from hydrogen induced local plastic deformation.

  12. Low and high-pressure hydriding of V-0.5at.%C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-pressure hydriding characteristics of V-0.5at.%C alloy were determined in this study. There are several prior reports on the pressure-composition-temperature (p-c-T) isotherms and stability of the low-pressure vanadium hydride phases (V2H or β1), and of vanadium alloyed with transition elements, but there are no reports on the hydrides of V-C alloys. The thermodynamic properties of the vanadium did not change significantly with the addition of carbon. In addition to low-pressure studies on V-0.5at.%C, we also performed high-pressure studies on V2H ↔ VH ↔ VH2 (β1 ↔ β2 ↔ γ) hydrides, including thermal cycling (778 cycles) between the β and γ phases. Thermal cycling between VH ↔ VH2 increased the pressure hysteresis. The effects of thermal cycling (4000 cycles) on the absorption and desorption isotherms of V-0.5at.%C and on the H/M ratios for the β1-, β2- and γ-phase hydrides are also presented. There was minimal decrepitation (pulverization) of the alloy; decrepitation of the V-0.5at.%C alloy was dramatically less than that of pure vanadium.

  13. Evaluation of a new method for chemical coating of aluminum wire with molecularly imprinted polymer layer. Application for the fabrication of triazines selective solid-phase microextraction fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber is fabricated through ultra violet irradiation polymerization of ametryn-molecularly imprinted polymer on the surface of anodized-silylated aluminum wire. The prepared fiber is durable with very good chemical and thermal stability which can be coupled to GC and GC/MS. The effective parameters on the fabrication and application procedures such as spraying mode, ultra violet irradiation (polymerization) time, number of sprayings and polymerizations, pH and ionic strength of sample and extraction time were optimized. This fiber shows high selectivity with great extraction capacity toward triazines. SPME and GC analysis of ametryn, prometryn, terbutryn, atrazine, simazine, propazine and cyanazine using the fabricated fiber result in the detection limits of 9, 32, 27, 43, 51, 74 and 85 ng mL-1, respectively. The reliability of the prepared fiber in real samples has been investigated and proved by using spiked tap water, rice, maize and onion samples.

  14. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  15. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  16. Effects of Hf on thermal and mechanical properties of Zr hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polycrystalline fine bulk samples of δ-phase Zr hydrides with various Hf contents were prepared and their thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. In the temperature range from room temperature to 973 K, the phase states were examined by high-temperature X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry/differential thermal analyses. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal conductivity were evaluated. The Vickers hardness and sound velocity were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was evaluated. The effects of Hf on the thermal and mechanical properties of Zr hydrides were studied. (author)

  17. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent nano-research prospects which

  18. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Aymard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0 and the lowest electrode polarization (2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent

  19. Transparent yttrium hydride thin films prepared by reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Thin films of transparent (semiconducting) and black (metallic) yttrium hydride. → Magnetron sputtering with an yttrium target and hydrogen as a reactive gas. → Optical transmission and reflection resemble β-YH2 (black) and γ-YH3 (transparent). → XRD shows that transparent films have an expanded fcc lattice with a = 5.35 A. → Samples are stable at ambient conditions. - Abstract: Metal hydrides have earlier been suggested for utilization in solar cells. With this as a motivation we have prepared thin films of yttrium hydride by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The resulting films are metallic for low partial pressure of hydrogen during the deposition, and black or yellow-transparent for higher partial pressure of hydrogen. Both metallic and semiconducting transparent YHx films have been prepared directly in situ without the need of capping layers and post-deposition hydrogenation. Optically the films are similar to what is found for YHx films prepared by other techniques, but the crystal structure of the transparent films differ from the well-known YH3-η phase, as they have an fcc lattice instead of hcp.

  20. Hydrogen Storage using Metal Hydrides in a Stationary Cogeneration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the development of a hydrogen production and storage unit to supply a 40 kW stationary fuel cell, a metal hydride storage tank was chosen according to its reliability and high energetic efficiency. The study of AB5 compounds led to the development of a composition adapted to the project needs. The absorption/desorption pressures of the hydride at 75 C (2 / 1.85 bar) are the most adapted to the specifications. The reversible storage capacity (0.95 %wt) has been optimized to our work conditions and chemical kinetics is fast. The design of the Combined Heat and Power CHP system requires 5 kg hydrogen storage but in a first phase, only a 0.1 kg prototype has been realised and tested. Rectangular design has been chosen to obtain good compactness with an integrated plate fin type heat exchanger designed to reach high absorption/desorption rates. In this paper, heat and mass transfer characteristics of the Metal Hydride tank (MH tank) during absorption/desorption cycles are given. (authors)

  1. Experimental reproducibility analysis in DU hydriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Chung, Hongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A storage and delivery system (SDS) is used for storing hydrogen isotopes as a metal hydride form. The rapid hydriding of tritium is very important not only for safety reasons but also for the economic design and operation of the SDS. For the storage, supply, and recovery of hydrogen isotopes, depleted uranium (DU) has been extensively proposed. To develop nuclear fusion technology, it will be necessary to store and supply hydrogen isotopes needed for Tokamak operation. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments. The experimental reproducibility of tank pressure on DU hydriding was analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the tank pressure showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the bed temperatures increased up to maximum temperature with exothermic reaction and then they showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments.

  2. Precipitation and dissolution peaks of hydride in Zr-2.5 Nb during quasistatic thermal cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Two internal friction peaks have been observed in hydride forming metals upon heating and cooling, respectively. The corresponding discontinuity ('knee') points on the curves of elastic modulus versus temperature are, respectively, associated with the maximum slope points of the two peaks. Knowledge of the solvus (or terminal solid solubility (TSS)) for precipitation and dissolution of hydrides in Zr alloys is of great interest to nuclear industry because of the potential effect of hydrides on fracture behaviour. In the present work, measurements of the elastic modulus as function of temperature and hold time (quasistatic thermal cycling) were made in Zr-2.5 Nb samples containing hydrogen using a composite oscillator technique. The increment of elastic modulus during an isothermal hold is proportional to the decrease in hydrogen concentration in solid solution of the Zr alloy. As a result, elastic modulus measurements provide a mean for the concentration/temperature of the hydride transition (solvus) to be detected. It is confirmed experimentally that the two peaks reflect the variation of hydride transition rate during heating or cooling. This result also provides a direct experimental evidence of the physical process involved in a general phase transformation peak. It was well established that for such a peak, the internal friction represents the amount of phase transformation in each vibration period of the measurement. It is demonstrated by the present work that the maximum slope point of the high temperature side of each peak provides the most reliable indicator of the end of dissolution of hydride during heating or the beginning of precipitation of hydride during cooling. (author)

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA1235 Aluminum Foil Stocks Produced Directly from Electrolytic Aluminum Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Yu, Kun; Wen, Li; Yao, Sujuan; Dai, Yilong; Wang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    A new process is developed to obtain high-quality AA1235 aluminum foil stocks and to replace the traditional manufacture process. During the new manufacture process, AA1235 aluminum sheets are twin-roll casted directly through electrolytic aluminum melt (EAM), and subsequently the sheets are processed into aluminum foil stocks by cold rolling and annealing. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the AA1235 aluminum sheets produced through such new process are investigated in each state by optimal microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, orientation imaging microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc. The results show that compared with the traditional AA1235 aluminum foil stocks produced through re-melted aluminum melt (RAM), the amount of impurities is decreased in the EAM aluminum foil stocks. The EAM aluminum foil stock obtains less β-FeSiAl5 phases, but more α-Fe2SiAl8 phases. The elongation of EAM aluminum foil stocks is improved significantly owing to more cubic orientation. Especially, the elongation value of the EAM aluminum foil stocks is approximately 25 pct higher than that of the RAM aluminum foil stocks. As a result, the EAM aluminum foil stocks are at an advantage in increasing the processing performance for the aluminum foils during subsequent processes.

  4. Hydriding failure analysis based on PIE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure causes of the two fuel rods of a Korean nuclear power plant had been investigated by using PIE technique. The destructive and physico-chemical examinations revealed that the clad hydriding phenomena had caused the rod failures primarily and secondarily in each case. In this study the basic mechanisms of the primary and the secondary hydriding failures are reviewed, PIE data such as cladding inner and outer surface oxide thickness and the restructuring of fuel pellets are analyzed, and they are compared with predicted behaviors by a fuel performance code. The results strongly support that the hydriding processes, primary and secondary, had played critical roles in the respective fuel rods failures. (author)

  5. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH2 as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH2 are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  6. Hydride observations using the neutrography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron radiography observations were performed at the RA-6 experimental nuclear facility in Bariloche. Images from a prototype of a hydride-based hydrogen storage device have been obtained. The technique allows visualizing the inner hydride space distribution. The hydride appeared compacted at the lower part of the prototype after several cycles of hydrogen charge and discharge. The technique has also been applied to the study of Zr/ZrH2 samples. There is a linear relation between the sample width/hydrogen concentration and the photograph grey scale. This information could be useful for the study of nuclear engineering materials and to determine their possible degradation by hydrogen pick up (author)

  7. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Tunold, Reidar

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... observed. The impedance analysis was found to be an efficient method for characterizing metal hydride electrodes in situ....

  8. Photoelectrode Characteristics of Partially Hydrolyzed Aluminum Phthalocyanine Chloride/Fullerene C60 Composite Nanoparticles Working in a Water Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemical measurements were used to study the photoelectrode characteristics of composite nanoparticles composed of fullerene C60 and partially hydrolyzed aluminum phthalocyanine chloride (AlPc. In cyclic voltammetry measurements, the electrodes coated with the composite nanoparticles were found to have photoanodic [electron donor: 2-mercaptoethanol (ME] and photocathodic (electron acceptor: O2 characteristics similar to those of the vapor-deposited p/n junction electrode. Their photoanodic features were further investigated with respect to the transient photocurrent response to light irradiation and the dependence on ME concentration (under potentiostatic conditions, from which it was noted that there was a decrease in the initial spiky photocathodic current and saturation of the steady-state photoanodic current at a higher ME concentration. Thus, the reaction kinetics was probably dominated by charge transport process. Moreover, external and internal quantum efficiency spectrum measurements indicated that the composite nanoparticles responded to the full spectrum of visible light ( < 880 nm for both the photoanodic and photocathodic current. The present research will assist comprehension of photocatalytic behavior of the composite nanoparticles.

  9. Formation and characterization of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.hellouin-de-menibus@cea.fr [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mines ParisTech/Centre des matériaux, CNRS UMR 7633, 91003 Evry (France); Auzoux, Quentin; Dieye, Ousmane [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berger, Pascal [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CNRS UMR 3299, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bosonnet, Sophie [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Foy, Eddy [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CNRS UMR 3299, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Macdonald, Vincent [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Besson, Jacques; Crépin, Jerome [Mines ParisTech/Centre des matériaux, CNRS UMR 7633, 91003 Evry (France)

    2014-06-01

    This article is focused on the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloys an experimental and theoretical standpoint, and their characterization in terms of morphology, hydrides crystallographic phases, hardness and hydrogen concentration. An experimental setup was developed to grow hydride blisters on pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes by thermo-diffusion. The thermal conditions were optimized based on thermo-diffusion calculations, that take into account the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit, to obtain a high blister growth rate. Micro-X-ray Diffraction (XRD), nano-hardness and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) showed that the blisters contain a hydrogen gradient, with pure δ-hydride phase close to the external surface over one third of the blister depth. Thermo-diffusion calculations showed these half thickness blisters should grow in only a few days in PWR conditions. Eventually, the Diffusion Equilibrium Threshold (DET) was defined as a criterion that limits the blister growth, and emphasizes that the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit in zirconium must be taken into account to model hydrogen thermo-diffusion in zirconium alloys.

  10. Formation and characterization of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is focused on the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloys an experimental and theoretical standpoint, and their characterization in terms of morphology, hydrides crystallographic phases, hardness and hydrogen concentration. An experimental setup was developed to grow hydride blisters on pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes by thermo-diffusion. The thermal conditions were optimized based on thermo-diffusion calculations, that take into account the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit, to obtain a high blister growth rate. Micro-X-ray Diffraction (XRD), nano-hardness and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) showed that the blisters contain a hydrogen gradient, with pure δ-hydride phase close to the external surface over one third of the blister depth. Thermo-diffusion calculations showed these half thickness blisters should grow in only a few days in PWR conditions. Eventually, the Diffusion Equilibrium Threshold (DET) was defined as a criterion that limits the blister growth, and emphasizes that the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit in zirconium must be taken into account to model hydrogen thermo-diffusion in zirconium alloys

  11. Formation and Compression Behavior of Two-Phase Bulk Metallic Glasses with a Minor Addition of Aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hai-Tao; MA Ming-Zhen; ZHANG Xin-Yu; QI Li; LI Gong; JING Qin; LIU Ri-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A remarkable enhancement in room-temperature compressive deformability is realized by the minor-addition of 1.5 at. % Al in ZrTi-based bulk metallic glass.Two amorphous phases are observed by transmission electron microscopy in the Al-containing alloys and this explains the improvement of compression deformability. The studies suggest that phase separation might occur in glass forming alloys with a negative enthalpy of mixing.

  12. Metastable phases in the aluminum-germanium alloy system: Synthesis by mechanical alloying and pressure induced transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvon, P.

    1994-01-01

    Al and Ge form a simple equilibrium eutectic with limited mutual solubility and no intermetallic intermediate phases. We used a regular solution approach to model effects of pressure on Al-Ge. Effects of pressure are to extend solubility of Ge in Al, to displace the eutectic composition towards the Ge rich side, and to slightly decrease the eutectic temperature. We designed thermobaric treatments to induce crystal-to-glass transformations in fine grain mixtures of Al and Ge. We used Merrill-Bassett diamond anvil cells to perform experiments at high pressures. We built an x-ray apparatus to determine the structure of alloys at pressure and from cryogenic temperatures to 400C. Two-phase Al-Ge samples with fine microstructures were prepared by splat-quenching and mechanical alloying. We observed a crystal-to-glass transformation at about 80 kbar. The amorphous phase formed was metastable at ambient temperature after pressure release. This was confirmed by TEM. The amorphous phase obtained by pressurization was found to have a liquid-like structure and was metallic. In the TEM samples we also observed the presence of a second amorphous phase formed upon release of the pressure. This second phase had a tetrahedrally-bonded continuous random network structure, similar to that of semi-conducting amorphous germanium.

  13. Technical Status Report on the Effect of Phosphate and Aluminum on the Development of Amorphous Phase Separation in Sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A.D.

    1998-11-03

    The objective of the Tank Focus Area ''Optimize Waste Loading'' task is to enhance the definition of the acceptable processing window for high-level waste vitrification plants. One possible manner in which the acceptable processing window may be enhanced is by reducing the uncertainty of various compositional/property models through a specifically defined experimental plan. A reduction in model uncertainty can reduce limitations on current acceptance constraints and may allow for a larger processing or operational window. Enhanced composition/property model predictions coupled with an increased waste loading may decrease the processing time and waste glass disposal costs (i.e., overall lifecycle costs). One of the compositional/property models currently being evaluated by the Tanks Focus Area is related to the development of amorphous phase separation in multi-component borosilicate glasses.Described in this report is the current status for evaluating the effect of phosphorus and alumina on both simple sodium borosilicate and high-level waste glasses on the formation of amorphous phase separation. The goal of this subtask is to increase the understanding of the formation of phase separation by adding significant amounts (3-5 wt. percent) of phosphorus and alumina to well-characterized glasses. Additional scope includes evaluating the effects of thermal history on the formation of amorphous phase separation and durability of select glasses.The development of data, understanding, and quantitative description for composition and kinetic effects on the development of amorphous phase separation will continue in FY99. This effort will provide insight into the compositional and thermal effects on phase stability and will lead to a better understanding of the methods used to predict the development of amorphous phase separation in HLW glasses.

  14. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model. Version 2

    OpenAIRE

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model. In second version of...

  15. Atomistic Potentials for Palladium-Silver Hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Zhou, X.

    2013-01-01

    New EAM potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the mis...

  16. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  17. In situ generation of hydrogen from water by aluminum corrosion in solutions of sodium aluminate

    OpenAIRE

    Soler Turu, Lluis; Candela Soto, Angélica Maria; Macanás de Benito, Jorge; Muñoz Tapia, Maria; Casado Giménez, Juan

    2009-01-01

    A new process to obtain hydrogen from water using aluminum in sodium aluminate solutions is described and compared with results obtained in aqueous sodium hydroxide. This process consumes only water and aluminum, which are raw materials much cheaper than other compounds used for in situ hydrogen generation, such as hydrocarbons and chemical hydrides, respectively. As a consequence, our process could be an economically feasible alternative for hydrogen to supply fuel cells. Results showed an i...

  18. Study on hydrogen permeation barrier of zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using gas-solid reaction method, the hydrogen permeation barrier with 5-20 μm thickness was prepared on the surface of zirconium and zirconium hydride. The examinations of the morphology and structure of the barrier were accomplished by optical microscope and SEM. The compositions of the barrier were determined by EDS. The phases in the barrier were also analyzed by XRD. The results indicate that the barrier is well distributed and compact, moreover it combines firmly with the matrix. There are Zr, O, C, P and H etc. elements in the barrier. Otherwise the oxygen diffuses in matrix apparently. The main phases of the barrier are the ZrO2 and ZrP. There exists the ZrC phase or other phases. (authors)

  19. gamma-Zr-Hydride Precipitate in Irradiated Massive delta- Zr-Hydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, M. R.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    During examination of A Zircaloy-2-clad fuel pin, which had been part of a test fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor, several regions of severe internal hydriding were noticed in the upper-plenum end of the pin. Examination of similar fuel pins has shown that hydride of this type is caused by...

  20. Modifications of the hydriding kinetics of a metallic surface, using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium reacts with hydrogen to form an hydride: this reaction leads to the total destruction of the material. To modify the reactivity of an uranium surface towards hydrogen, ion implantation was selected, among surface treatments techniques. Four elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur) were implanted to different doses. The results show a modification of the hydriding mechanism and a significant increase in the reaction induction times, notably at high implantation doses. Several techniques (SIMS, X-rays phases analysis and residual stresses determination) were used to characterize the samples and understand the different mechanisms involved

  1. 物相定量分析在铝工业中的应用%Application of Phase Quantitative Analysis in Aluminum Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 郭永恒

    2011-01-01

    总结介绍了到目前为止在铝工业中应用的物相定量分析方法,分析了各种方法的应用范围以及优缺点,包括化学物相定量法、外标法、化学物相计算法、X射线衍射增量法、K值法、绝热法、Rietveld全谱拟合定量法、K值法和化学物相计算法结合以及Zevin无标定量法等.结果表明:每种物相定量分析方法都有各自的优点和缺点,需要根据样品的实际情况,选择最适当的分析方法,才能得到准确的结果.%Phase quantitative analysis methods which had been used in aluminum industry by now were summarized and introduced, and application range, merits and demerits of each method were analyzed respectively,including chemical in quantitative method, external standard method, chemical quantitative calculating method,X-ray diffraction incremental method, K value method, adiabatic method, Rietveld full pattern fitting quantitative method, combining K value method and chemical phase calculation method, Zevin no standard quantitative method,and so on. The results show that each method has its advantages and disadvantages. In order to obtain accurate results, it should according to actual situation of the sample to select the most appropriate phase quantitative analysis method.

  2. Fourier-Domain Analysis of Hydriding Kinetics Using Pneumato-Chemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Millet, P.; C. Decaux; R. Ngameni; Guymont, M.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of phase transformation processes observed in hydrogen absorbing materials (pure metals, alloys, or compounds) is still a matter of active research. Using pneumato-chemical impedance spectroscopy (PIS), it is now possible to analyze the mechanism of hydriding reactions induced by the gas phase. Experimental impedance diagrams, measured on activated LaNi5 in single- and two-phase domains, are reported in this paper. It is shown that their shape is mostly affected by the slope of the i...

  3. Four-phase fully-coupled mold-filling and solidification simulation for gas porosity prediction in aluminum sand casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of mold-filling and oxide film enclosure on gas porosity in A356 was investigated using a three-phase, fully-coupled, mold-filling and solidification simulation. For the prediction of gas porosity, a fourth hydrogen phase was added. At the solidification front hydrogen is rejected from the solid and accumulates in the melt. Pores nucleate if the solute gas exceeds the solubility limit. Air and melt are separated by a volume of fluid interface and special treatment of the hydrogen phase convection was necessary to limit the hydrogen to the melt. Folding of the melt surface was used as a source for oxide film entrainment. These oxide films were transported with the melt and used as nucleation sites for gas porosity formation. The influence of melt flow due to filling and oxide film distribution was analyzed using a simple 3-block test geometry. The test geometry was cast in A356 and analyzed by computer tomography to validate the porosity prediction.

  4. Four-phase fully-coupled mold-filling and solidification simulation for gas porosity prediction in aluminum sand casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakumeit, J.; Jana, S.; Waclawczyk, T.; Mehdizadeh, A.; Sadiki, A.; Jouani, J.

    2012-07-01

    The impact of mold-filling and oxide film enclosure on gas porosity in A356 was investigated using a three-phase, fully-coupled, mold-filling and solidification simulation. For the prediction of gas porosity, a fourth hydrogen phase was added. At the solidification front hydrogen is rejected from the solid and accumulates in the melt. Pores nucleate if the solute gas exceeds the solubility limit. Air and melt are separated by a volume of fluid interface and special treatment of the hydrogen phase convection was necessary to limit the hydrogen to the melt. Folding of the melt surface was used as a source for oxide film entrainment. These oxide films were transported with the melt and used as nucleation sites for gas porosity formation. The influence of melt flow due to filling and oxide film distribution was analyzed using a simple 3-block test geometry. The test geometry was cast in A356 and analyzed by computer tomography to validate the porosity prediction.

  5. Hot pressing aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment was performed on the hot pressing of aluminum nitride, using three kinds of powder which are: a) made by electric arc method, b) made by nitrifying aluminum metal powder, and c) made from alumina and carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. The content of oxygen of these powders was analyzed by activation analysis using high energy neutron irradiation. The density of hot pressed samples was classified into two groups. The high density group contained oxygen more than 3 wt. %, and the low density group contained about 0.5 wt %. Typical density vs. temperature curves have a bending point near 1,5500C, and the sample contains iron impurity of 0.5 wt. %. Needle crystals were found to grow near 1,5500C by VLS mechanism, and molten iron acts a main part of mechanism as a liquid phase. According to the above-mentioned curve, the iron impurity in aluminum nitride prevents densification. The iron impurity accelerates crystal growth. Advance of densification may be expected by adding iron impurity, but in real case, the densification is delayed. Densification and crystal growth are greatly accelerated by oxygen impurity. In conclusion, more efforts must be made for the purification of aluminum nitride. In the present stage, the most pure nitride powder contains about 0.1 wt. % of oxygen, as compared with good silicon carbide crystals containing only 10-5 wt. % of nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  7. Hydrogen in aluminum during alkaline corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, Saikat; Ai, Jiahe [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Hebert, Kurt R., E-mail: krhebert@iastate.ed [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ho, K.M.; Wang, C.Z. [US DOE, Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2010-07-30

    The thermodynamic state of hydrogen in aluminum during alkaline corrosion was investigated, using a two-compartment hydrogen permeation cell with an Al/Pd bilayer membrane. The open-circuit potential of the Pd layer in a pH 7.0 buffer solution was monitored to sense the hydrogen chemical potential, {mu}{sub H}. At pH 12.5-13.5, the measurements established a minimum {mu}{sub H} of 0.55 eV relative to the ideal gas reference, equivalent to a H{sub 2} gas pressure of 5.7 GPa. Statistical mechanics calculations show that vacancy-hydrogen defects are stable in Al at this condition. A dissolution mechanism was proposed in which H at very high {mu}{sub H} is produced by oxidation of interfacial aluminum hydride. The mechanism explains the observed rapid accumulation of H in the metal by extensive formation of vacancy-hydrogen defects.

  8. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  9. Two-Phase CFD Model of the Bubble-Driven Flow in the Molten Electrolyte Layer of a Hall-Héroult Aluminum Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuqing; Schwarz, M. Philip; Yang, William; Cooksey, Mark

    2015-08-01

    A two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to simulate the time-averaged flow in the molten electrolyte layer of a Hall -Héroult aluminum cell. The flow is driven by the rise of carbon dioxide bubbles formed on the base of the anodes. The CFD model has been validated against detailed measurements of velocity and turbulence taken in a full-scale air-water physical model containing three anodes in four different configurations, with varying inter-anode gap and the option of slots. The model predictions agree with the measurements of velocity and turbulence energy for all configurations within the likely measurement repeatability, and therefore can be used to understand the overall electrolyte circulation patterns and mixing. For example, the model predicts that the bubble holdup under an anode is approximately halved by the presence of a slot aligned transverse to the cell long axis. The flow patterns do not appear to be significantly altered by halving the inter-anode gap width from 40 to 20 mm. The CFD model predicts that the relative widths of center, side, and end channels have a major influence on several critical aspects of the cell flow field.

  10. Vapor-phase polymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on commercial carbon coated aluminum foil as enhanced electrodes for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Linyue; Skorenko, Kenneth H.; Faucett, Austin C.; Boyer, Steven M.; Liu, Jian; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M.; Bernier, William E.; Jones, Wayne E.

    2015-11-01

    Laminar composite electrodes are prepared for application in supercapacitors using a catalyzed vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) on the surface of commercial carbon coated aluminum foil. These highly electrically conducting polymer films provide for rapid and stable power storage per gram at room temperature. The chemical composition, surface morphology and electrical properties are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). A series of electrical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge-discharge (CD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are also used to evaluate electrical performance. The processing temperature of VPP shows a significant effect on PEDOT morphology, the degree of orientation and its electrical properties. The relatively high temperature leads to high specific area and large conductive domains of PEDOT layer which benefits the capacitive behavior greatly according to the data presented. Since the substrate is already highly conductive, the PEDOT based composite can be used as electrode materials directly without adding current collector. By this simple and efficient process, PEDOT based composites exhibit specific capacitance up to 134 F g-1 with the polymerization temperature of 110 °C.

  11. Porous carbon derived from aluminum-based metal organic framework as a fiber coating for the solid-phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nanoporous carbon derived from an aluminum-based metal-organic framework was deposited on stainless steel wires in a sol–gel matrix. The resulting fibers were applied to the solid-phase microextraction of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene from water and soil samples. The fiber was then directly inserted into the GC injector and the PAHs were quantified by GC-MS. The effects of salt addition, extraction temperature, extraction time, sample volume and desorption conditions on the extraction efficiency were optimized. A linear response to the analytes was observed in the 0.1 to 12 μg∙L−1 range for water samples, and in the 0.6 to 30 μg∙kg−1 for soil samples, with the correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9934 to 0.9985. The limits of detection ranged from 5.0 to 20 ng∙L−1 for water samples, and from 30 to 90 ng∙kg−1 for soil samples. The recoveries of spiked samples were between 72.4 and 108.0 %, and the precision, expressed as the relative standard deviations, is <12.8 %. (author)

  12. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Friction bit joining (FBJ) and weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) processes. • FBJ to spot weld high-strength Al alloy to high-strength steel. • Lap shear strength of ∼10 kN for high-strength Al alloy to high-strength steel. • Effective corrosion mitigation by combining FBJ with adhesive. - Abstract: In this work, we have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. The FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints

  13. The Mg{sub 2}Si phase evolution during thermomechanical processing of in-situ aluminum matrix macro-composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafieizad, A.H. [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation & Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei-Hanzaki, A., E-mail: Zareih@ut.ac.ir [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation & Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abedi, H.R. [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation & Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Al-Fadhalah, K.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering & Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2015-09-17

    The microstructure and flow stress behavior of thermomechanically processed Al–Cu/Mg{sub 2}Si in-situ composite was studied emphasizing the evolution of primary and secondary reinforcement phases. Toward this end, the hot compression tests were conducted over the wide range of temperature (300–500 °C) and strain rate (0.001–0.1 s{sup −1}). Both the temperature and strain rate are found to possess a significant effect on the microstructural characteristics where a considerable softening is identified specially at low temperature regime. Besides the occurrence of restoration processes (mainly particle stimulated nucleation) the dynamic evolution of the reinforcements is introduced as the main factors affecting the reported softening. In this regard, the mechanical fragmentation, thermal disintegration, micro-buckling, coalescence and spheroidization of the primary and secondary particles are quantitatively and qualitatively addressed through a comprehensive scanning electron microscopy studies.

  14. The Mg2Si phase evolution during thermomechanical processing of in-situ aluminum matrix macro-composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructure and flow stress behavior of thermomechanically processed Al–Cu/Mg2Si in-situ composite was studied emphasizing the evolution of primary and secondary reinforcement phases. Toward this end, the hot compression tests were conducted over the wide range of temperature (300–500 °C) and strain rate (0.001–0.1 s−1). Both the temperature and strain rate are found to possess a significant effect on the microstructural characteristics where a considerable softening is identified specially at low temperature regime. Besides the occurrence of restoration processes (mainly particle stimulated nucleation) the dynamic evolution of the reinforcements is introduced as the main factors affecting the reported softening. In this regard, the mechanical fragmentation, thermal disintegration, micro-buckling, coalescence and spheroidization of the primary and secondary particles are quantitatively and qualitatively addressed through a comprehensive scanning electron microscopy studies

  15. Phase field simulation of kinetic superheating and melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by pico- and femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two melting mechanisms are reproduced and quantified for superheating and melting of Al nanolayer irradiated by pico- and femtosecond laser using the advanced phase-field approach coupled with mechanics and a two-temperature model. At heating rates Q≤79.04 K/ps induced by picosecond laser, two-sided barrierless surface melting forms two solid-melt interfaces, which meet near the center of a sample. The temperature for surface melting is a linear function, and for complete melting it is a cubic function, of logQ. At Q≥300 K/ps induced by femtosecond laser, barrierless and homogeneous melting (without nucleation) at the sample center occurs faster than due to interface propagation. Good agreement with experimental melting time was achieved in a range of 0.95≤Q≤1290 K/ps without fitting of material parameters

  16. Phase field simulation of kinetic superheating and melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by pico- and femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok Hwang, Yong [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Levitas, Valery I. [Departments of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Material Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Two melting mechanisms are reproduced and quantified for superheating and melting of Al nanolayer irradiated by pico- and femtosecond laser using the advanced phase-field approach coupled with mechanics and a two-temperature model. At heating rates Q≤79.04 K/ps induced by picosecond laser, two-sided barrierless surface melting forms two solid-melt interfaces, which meet near the center of a sample. The temperature for surface melting is a linear function, and for complete melting it is a cubic function, of logQ. At Q≥300 K/ps induced by femtosecond laser, barrierless and homogeneous melting (without nucleation) at the sample center occurs faster than due to interface propagation. Good agreement with experimental melting time was achieved in a range of 0.95≤Q≤1290 K/ps without fitting of material parameters.

  17. Behavior of an unirradiated aluminum-clad uranium fuel element in a simulated failure experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mockup experiment was conducted to simulate a loss-of-coolant incident in the K-West reactor. The mockup assembly included a K-Reactor Zircaloy-2 process tubing with a KVN aluminum-clad metallic uranium fuel element. The assembly was induction heated to 8500C in flowing steam environment. Bloating of the element occurred. The friable Al/U reaction product and the surface of the U core were not pyrophoric, even under abrasion. However, the mockup assembly was not subjected to hydrogen and water vapor. The Zircaloy-2 tube showed evidence of embrittlement along the bottom. Accelerated corrosion and hydriding also occurred near the six o'clock position. The core was removed easily from the Zircaloy-2 tube. Steam corrosion of the U core was not obvious from metallography, and hydrogen contents were minimal. Metallography of the U core indicated remnants of the Al/U reaction layer adhering to the OD and ID surfaces. The reaction product appeared to be two-phase, probably UAl3 and eutectic. Reactions of Zircaloy-2 in molten 8001 aluminum were investigated at 8500C. After an induction period (approx. 5 min), the penetration rate was 2.7 mil/min (as-etched). Oxides of 85 mg/dm2 (5 x 6 microns) delayed the reaction only 3.5 min

  18. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  19. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  20. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, B K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  1. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, M. B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch.

  2. Automotive cooling systems based on metal hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on metal hydride sorption systems as an alternative technology for automotive air-conditioning systems. Although this technology offers the possibility to increase the energy efficiency of a car (by utilising waste heat) and consequently reduces the CO2 emissions, its weight specific cooling power has so far been the main obstacle for an automotive application. Based on investigations of various metal hydrides, two alloys (LmNi4.91Sn0.15 and Ti0.99Zr0.01V0.43Fe0.09Cr0...

  3. Microdeformation due to hydride formation and shape memory effect in vanadium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microdeformation due to hydride phase formation and growth is measured, using wire vanadium and niobium samples after torsion and electrolytic hydrogen absorption. It is established that further heating, above the phase transformation temperature, is accompanied by arbitrary deformation in the direction opposite to primary deformation. It testifies to the possibility for formation in these metals structural states with tendency to manifest shape memory effect with different degree of reversibility

  4. Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL's MBM Framework for Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride δ-ZrH1.5 precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ''hydrogen pick-up''. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding. While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models. The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

  5. Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL's MBM Framework for Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Clark, Blythe; Glazoff, Michael V.; Homer, Eric R.

    2014-07-01

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding. While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models. The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

  6. Application of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis processes in chemistry and technology of hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is the procedure of obtaining hydrides through self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory compounds from elements in burning regime. The flow chart of producing hydrides by this process is presented. The starting components are intimately mixed, compressed and burnt in a constant-pressure cylinder, in a hydrogen atmosphere, at a pressure of 3 to 100 atm. The reaction rates are determined by photorecording of the heat. In the Ti-B-H2 system, the reagent ratio B/Ti varies from 0.1 to 2. The combustion yields titanium hydrides for a charge with the B/Ti ratio of 0.1 to 0.5, and titanium borides containing from 1 to 0.2w.% of H2 for compositions with the B/Ti ratio of 0.6 to 2. The major factors governing the formation of the yield products have been revealed. When Ti and Zr burn in hydrogen, a change in pressure from 1 to 100 atm does not affect the hydrogen content in the hydride. When rare earth elements burn, an increase in pressure in the case of light lanthanides leads to a higher hydrogen content in the product. In the case of heavy lanthanides, a hexagonal trihydride phase appears along with the cubic dihydride phase. The percentage of hydrogen in the yield product is independent of the mass of the metal hydrogenated in the reactor

  7. Evaluated the adverse effects of cadmium and aluminum via drinking water to kidney disease patients: Application of a novel solid phase microextraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Naeemullah; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Arain, Salma Aslam

    2016-04-01

    In present study aluminum (Al) and cadmium (Cd) were determined in ground water samples and assesses human health risks associated with elevated concentrations of toxic metals in dissolved form, using a novel solid phase microextraction (SPμE). Ground water sample (n=200) and biological sample (blood) of patients having chronic kidney disorders (CKD) along with healthy control subjects of same area (southern part of Pakistan) were collected. A simple system, including the micropipette tip packed with modified ionic liquid-activated carbon cloth (IL-ACC) coated with 8-hydroxyqunilone (8-HQ) attached to syringe. The analytes in water and acid digested blood samples were manually drawn for 2-10 cycles (drawing/discharging) at different pH range. The analytes sorbed on coated ACC were then desorbed with 2.0molL(-1) HNO3 in ethanol by drawing/discharging cycles for 1-5 times. The concentration of extracted analytes was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency of Cd and Al, were optimized. The Al and Cd concentrations in groundwater were found to be elevated than recommended limits by the World Health Organization. The urinary N-acetyl-h-glucosaminidase values were significantly higher in CKD patients as compared to refrent subjects (p<0.001). The significant variation in levels of Cd and Al were observed in blood samples of CKD patients than referents subjects (p<0.01). The strong positive correlation among Al and Cd levels in groundwater versus blood samples of CKD patients (r=0.82-0.85) p<0.01) was observed than those values calculated for referent subjects (r=0.425-0.536). PMID:27037653

  8. Performances of Aluminum-cobalt Co-substituted α-Ni(OH)2 Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Heng-bin; LIU Han-san; CAO Xue-jing; SUN Chia-chung

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum-cobalt co-substituted α-Ni(OH)2 was prepared by means of the titration method in a buffer solution, the structure was characterized by XRD analysis. With above mentioned α-Ni(OH)2 as the positive electrode of a nickel-metal hydride cell, the discharge performances were examined by constant-current charge-discharge experiments. In comparison with the electrodes made of aluminum substituted or cobalt substituted Ni(OH)2 materials, the aluminum-cobalt co-substituted composite electrodes possess an excellent electrochemical performance and are of practical significance.

  9. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data

  10. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement

  11. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changji; Xiong, Liangyin; Wu, Erdong; Liu, Shi, E-mail: sliu@imr.ac.cn

    2015-02-15

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement.

  12. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi5 in a Ni/H2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  13. Hydride Formation in Neutron Irradiated Material Under In Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present is a brief summary of the three reports completed within the framework of the SPAR III project. The following is a resume of our aims, techniques used to achieve the objectives and conclusions attained under the guiding thread of the hydride formation in neutron irradiated zirconium alloys and other reactor in operating conditions. As is it known, under reactor operating conditions zirconium components go through transformations which affect their original microstructural and thermodynamical properties. Both concerns are starting points of many research lines for the zirconium alloys used in the nuclear power reactors. Regarding microstructural transformations, one of the most important topics is the phase stability of these alloys. To cite a well-known case, second phase particles of zircaloy-4 shown to be unstable under neutron radiation. Since such phases play a role in the corrosion rate control, this instability became a problem for high burnup fuel claddings design. Similar observations can be made about the β−Zr phase in the Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tubes alloy. On the other hand, there are issues directly involved with thermodynamics, e.g., hydrogen behaviour and its role in the degradation processes of fuel assemblies and other zirconium alloys components, which showed to be affected by neutron radiation. Finally, applied stresses and thermal cycling are part of these operating conditions, which can be simulated performing experiments in situ which allows testing hydrogen solubility behaviour and hydride reorientation. In the context described above, the research topics proposed to SPAR III were aimed to improve the knowledge of these degradation processes. In this scheme, zircaloy-4 which remained more than ten years at full power operation and virgin unirradiated zirconium alloys were suited by the more improved micro analytical techniques to characterize microstructural transformations cited above

  14. Separation of covalent hydrides by gas-solid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully automated method was developed for separating the hydrides of elements of the IVth to VIIIth main subgroup of the periodic system and of Kr and Xe on the basis of their volatility using gas chromatography. The automated instrument allowing to carry out reduction, separation of the gaseous phase, the loading of a PORAPAK-packed column, the chromatographic separation and sampling was controlled by a HP 2116B computer. The elution time, peak area and the number of theoretical column plates were computed from chromatograms. The capture probably proceeded by a type of nonpolar nonspecific sorption (ΔH/Tsub(b) = 19.2 cal/mol.deg). The height of the theoretical plate was 0.05 to 0.1 cm. The technique may be used as a routine radiochemical method for group separations and for the separation of radioactive hydrides contained in the solution of targets irradiated with neutrons or charged particles in the preparation of radioactive sources of short-lived radionuclides, or in destructive activation analysis. (M.K.)

  15. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH3BH3) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 oC at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  16. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  17. Interstellar chemistry of nitrogen hydrides in dark clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, Romane Le; Faure, Alexandre; Forêts, Guillaume Pineau des; Rist, Claire; Maret, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to perform a comprehensive analysis of the interstellar chemistry of nitrogen, focussing on the gas-phase formation of the smallest polyatomic species and in particular nitrogen hydrides. We present a new chemical network in which the kinetic rates of critical reactions have been updated based on recent experimental and theoretical studies, including nuclear spin branching ratios. Our network thus treats the different spin symmetries of the nitrogen hydrides self-consistently together with the ortho and para forms of molecular hydrogen. This new network is used to model the time evolution of the chemical abundances in dark cloud conditions. The steady-state results are analysed, with special emphasis on the influence of the overall amounts of carbon, oxygen, and sulphur. Our calculations are also compared with Herschel/HIFI observations of NH, NH$_2$, and NH$_3$ detected towards the external envelope of the protostar IRAS 16293-2422. The observed abundances and abundance ratios ...

  18. Electron and nuclear magnetic resonances in compounds and metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements were performed on the metallic hydrides ZrCr2Hx (x = 2, 3, 4) and ZrV2Hy (y = 2, 3, 4, 5) as a function of temperature between 180 and 400K. The ultimate aim was the investigation of the relaxation mechanisms in these systems by means of the measurement of both the proton (1H) spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times and to use these data to obtain information about the diffusive motion of the hydrogen atoms. The diffusional activation energies, the jump frequencies and the Korringa constant, Ck, related with the conduction electron contribution to the 1H relaxation were determined for the above hydrides as a function of hydrogen concentration. Our results were analysed in terms of the relaxation models described by Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP model) and by Torrey. The Korringa type relaxation due to the conduction electrons in metallic systems was also used to interpret the experimental results. We also present the Electron Paramagnetic Ressonance (EPR) study of Gd3+, Nd3+ and Er3+ ions as impurities in several AB3 intermetallic compounds where A = LA, Ce, Y, Sc, Th, Zr and B = Rh, Ir, Pt. The results were analysed in terms of the multiband model previously suggested to explain the behaviour of the resonance parameter in AB2 Laves Phase compounds. (author)

  19. Are RENiAl hydrides metallic?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eichinger, K.; Havela, L.; Prokleška, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Daniš, S.; Šantavá, Eva; Miliyanchuk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2009), s. 1200-1202. ISSN 1862-5282 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/07/0418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : rare earth metals * magnetism * hydrides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  20. Computational study of metal hydride cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satheesh, A.; Muthukumar, P.; Dewan, Anupam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2009-04-15

    A computational study of a metal hydride cooling system working with MmNi{sub 4.6}Al{sub 0.4}/MmNi{sub 4.6}Fe{sub 0.4} hydride pair is presented. The unsteady, two-dimensional mathematical model in an annular cylindrical configuration is solved numerically for predicting the time dependent conjugate heat and mass transfer characteristics between coupled reactors. The system of equations is solved by the fully implicit finite volume method (FVM). The effects of constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions on the reaction bed temperature distribution, hydrogen concentration, and equilibrium pressures of the reactors are investigated. A dynamic correlation of the pressure-concentration-temperature plot is presented. At the given operating temperatures of 363/298/278 K (T{sub H}/T{sub M}/T{sub C}), the cycle time for the constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions of a single-stage and single-effect metal hydride system are found to be 1470.0 s and 1765.6 s, respectively. The computational results are compared with the experimental data reported in the literature for LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} hydride pair and a good agreement between the two was observed. (author)

  1. Aluminum based metal-organic framework-polymer monolith in solid-phase microextraction of penicillins in river water and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Stephen; Liu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Chen-Lan; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-01

    In this study, aluminum based metal-organic framework (Al-MOF)-organic polymer monoliths were prepared via microwave-assisted polymerization of ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), butyl methacrylate (BMA) with different weight percentages of Al-MOF (MIL-53; 37.5-62.5%) and subsequently utilized as sorbent in solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of penicillins (penicillin G, penicillin V, oxacillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin). The Al-MOF-polymer was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to clarify the retained crystalline structure well as the homogeneous dispersion of Al-MOF (MIL-53) in polymer monolith. The developed Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column was evaluated according to its extraction recovery of penicillins. Several parameters affecting the extraction recoveries of penicillins using fabricated Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column including different MIL-53 weight percentages, column length, pH, desorption solvent, and mobile phase flow rate were investigated. For comparison, different Al-based MOFs (MIL-68, CYCU-4 and DUT-5) were fabricated using the optimized condition for MIL-53-polymer (sample matrix at pH 3, 200μL desorption volume using methanol, 37.5% of MOF, 4-cm column length at 0.100mLmin(-1) flow rate). Among all the Al-MOF-polymers, MIL-53(Al)-polymer still afforded the best extraction recovery for penicillins ranging from 90.5 to 95.7% for intra-day with less than 3.5% relative standard deviations (RSDs) and inter-day precision were in the range of 90.7-97.6% with less than 4.2% RSDs. Meanwhile, the recoveries for column-to-column were in the range of 89.5-93.5% (<3.4% RSDs) while 88.5-90.5% (<5.8% RSDs) for batch-to-batch (n=3). Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detections were in the range of 0.06-0.26μgL(-1) and limit of quantifications between 0.20 and 0.87

  2. Structural and hydrogen storage capacity evolution of Mg2FeH6 hydride synthesized by reactive mechanical alloying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song-lin(李松林); R.A.Varin

    2004-01-01

    Mg-based metal hydrides are promising as hydrogen storage materials for fuel cell application. In this work, Mg2 FeH6 complex hydride phase was synthesized by controlled reactive ball milling of 2Mg-Fe (atomic ratio)powder mixture in H2. Mg2 FeH6 is confirmed to be formed via the following three stages: formation of MgH2 via the reaction of Mg with H2, incubation stage and formation of Mg2 FeH6 by reaction of fully refined MgH2 and Fe.The incubation stage is characterized by no traces of Mg or hydride crystalline phase by XRD. On the other hand,Mg is observed uniformly distributed in the milled powder by SEM-EDS. Also, almost the same amount of H2 as the first stage is detected stored in the powders of the second stage by DSC and TGA.

  3. Study of the mechanical behavior of the hydride blister/rim structure in Zircaloy-4 using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun-li; Han, Xiaochun; Heuser, Brent J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2016-04-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was utilized to study the mechanical response of the f.c.c δ hydride phase, the intermetallic precipitation with hexagonal C14 lave phase and the α-Zr phase in the Zircaloy-4 materials with a hydride rim/blister structure near one surface of the material during in-situ uniaxial tension experiment at 200 °C. The f.c.c δ was the only hydride phase observed in the rim/blister structure. The conventional Rietveld refinement was applied to measure the macro-strain equivalent response of the three phases. Two regions were delineated in the applied load versus lattice strain measurement: a linear elastic strain region and region that exhibited load partitioning. Load partitioning was quantified by von Mises analysis. The three phases were observed to have similar elastic modulus at 200 °C.

  4. Rheology of suspensions with aluminum nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Teipel; Ulrich Förter-Barth

    2009-01-01

    Nano-scale aluminum particles are innovative materials increasingly used in energetic formulations. In this contribution, the rheological behavior of suspensions with either paraffin oil or HTPB as the matrix fluid and nano-scale aluminum (ALEX) as the dispersed phase is described and discussed. The paraffin oil/aluminum suspensions exhibit non-Newtonian flow behavior over a wide range of concentrations, whereas the HTPB/aluminum suspensions exhibitNewtonian behavior (i.e. the viscosity is in...

  5. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail

  6. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bücherl, T.; Söllradl, S.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-10-01

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  7. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börries, S., E-mail: stefan.boerries@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Metz, O.; Pranzas, P.K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Bücherl, T. [ZTWB Radiochemie München (RCM), Technische Universität München (TUM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Söllradl, S. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII), Technische Universität München (TUM), Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-10-11

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  8. Aluminum Target Dissolution in Support of the Pu-238 Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Benker, Dennis [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Felker, Leslie Kevin [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Selection of an aluminum alloy for target cladding affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the caustic dissolution step, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. We present a study to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal alloy, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. These data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Temperature logging during the transients has been investigated as a means to generate kinetic and mass transport data on the dissolution process. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  9. Investigating aluminum alloy reinforced by graphene nanoflakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.J., E-mail: shaojiuyan@126.com [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Dai, S.L.; Zhang, X.Y.; Yang, C.; Hong, Q.H.; Chen, J.Z. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Lin, Z.M. [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2014-08-26

    As one of the most important engineering materials, aluminum alloys have been widely applied in many fields. However, the requirement of enhancing their mechanical properties without sacrificing the ductility is always a challenge in the development of aluminum alloys. Thanks to the excellent physical and mechanical properties, graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) have been applied as promising reinforcing elements in various engineering materials, including polymers and ceramics. However, the investigation of GNFs as reinforcement phase in metals or alloys, especially in aluminum alloys, is still very limited. In this study, the aluminum alloy reinforced by GNFs was successfully prepared via powder metallurgy approach. The GNFs were mixed with aluminum alloy powders through ball milling and followed by hot isostatic pressing. The green body was then hot extruded to obtain the final GNFs reinforced aluminum alloy nanocomposite. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis show that GNFs were well dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix and no chemical reactions were observed at the interfaces between the GNFs and aluminum alloy matrix. The mechanical properties' testing results show that with increasing filling content of GNFs, both tensile and yield strengths were remarkably increased without losing the ductility performance. These results not only provided a pathway to achieve the goal of preparing high strength aluminum alloys with excellent ductilitybut they also shed light on the development of other metal alloys reinforced by GNFs.

  10. Investigating aluminum alloy reinforced by graphene nanoflakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the most important engineering materials, aluminum alloys have been widely applied in many fields. However, the requirement of enhancing their mechanical properties without sacrificing the ductility is always a challenge in the development of aluminum alloys. Thanks to the excellent physical and mechanical properties, graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) have been applied as promising reinforcing elements in various engineering materials, including polymers and ceramics. However, the investigation of GNFs as reinforcement phase in metals or alloys, especially in aluminum alloys, is still very limited. In this study, the aluminum alloy reinforced by GNFs was successfully prepared via powder metallurgy approach. The GNFs were mixed with aluminum alloy powders through ball milling and followed by hot isostatic pressing. The green body was then hot extruded to obtain the final GNFs reinforced aluminum alloy nanocomposite. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis show that GNFs were well dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix and no chemical reactions were observed at the interfaces between the GNFs and aluminum alloy matrix. The mechanical properties' testing results show that with increasing filling content of GNFs, both tensile and yield strengths were remarkably increased without losing the ductility performance. These results not only provided a pathway to achieve the goal of preparing high strength aluminum alloys with excellent ductilitybut they also shed light on the development of other metal alloys reinforced by GNFs

  11. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Satya Sekhar, B. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muthukumar, P. [Mechanical Department, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Linkov, V.; Pollet, B.G. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • MH H{sub 2} storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H{sub 2} charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system.

  12. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MH H2 storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H2 charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system

  13. Thermal and mechanical properties of hydrides of Zr–Hf alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline bulk samples of δ-phase Hf hydrides with various Zr contents were prepared and their high-temperature stability and thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. The phase structure was examined between room temperature and 973 K using high-temperature X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric–differential thermal analysis. From room temperature to 673 K, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal conductivity were evaluated. The Vickers hardness and sound velocity were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was evaluated. The effect of the Zr content on the high-temperature stability and the thermal and mechanical properties of Hf hydrides was studied. (author)

  14. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  15. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH2 and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH2 to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH2 as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV0.62Mn1.5 alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles

  16. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  17. SANS Measurement of Hydrides in Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SANS scattering is shown to be an effective method for detecting the presence of hydrogen precipitates in uranium. High purity polycrystalline samples of depleted uranium were given several hydriding treatments which included extended exposures to hydrogen gas at two different pressures at 630 C as well as a furnace anneal at 850 C followed by slow cooling in the near absence hydrogen gas. All samples exhibited neutron scattering that was in proportion to the expected levels of hydrogen content. While the scattering signal was strong, the shape of the scattering curve indicated that the scattering objects were large sized objects. Only by use of a very high angular resolution SANS technique was it possible to make estimates of the major diameter of the scattering objects. This analysis permits an estimate of the volume fraction and means size of the hydride precipitates in uranium

  18. NMR investigations of YMn2Hx hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The YMn2Hx hydrides with x = 1, 2, 3 were investigated by 55Mn NMR spin echo measurements at atmospheric and high pressure. Resonance lines at frequencies up to 440 MHz were observed for the hydrides, corresponding to a huge increase of the hyperfine fields at those Mn with hydrogen neighbours. At high pressure the initial decrease of the magnitude of the Mn hyperfine field of YMn2H1 at 4.2 K was found to be 4% per kbar which is an order of magnitude bigger than observed in the other magnetically ordered materials. The effects are interpreted in terms of changes of the orbital contribution and valence electron contribution to the hyperfine field caused by hydrogenation and the influence of the external pressure. (orig.)

  19. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  20. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  1. The hydride fluoride crystal structure database, HFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingl, F.; Gelato, L.; Yvon, K. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Lab. Crystallographie aux Rayons X

    1997-05-20

    HFD is a new data base containing crystal structure information on more than one thousand metal hydrides and fluorides. It includes space group, cell parameters, standardized atom positions, site occupancies and references. The compilation is critical as only refined crystal structures are considered and the data are checked for internal consistency. It is comprehensive as structural information is extracted from all major scientific journals, and it is continuously updated. HFD can be searched according to various criteria such as symmetry, chemical elements, composition etc. The primary motivation for creating HFD was to predict new metal hydrides and to study their structural analogies with metal fluorides. However, HFD can also be used for other applications such as the simulation of diffraction patterns and the drawing of crystal structures. (orig.) 13 refs.

  2. Speciesion arsenic and selenium using hydride method atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrides production - atomic absorption spectroscopy system was studied. Hydrides production tool and gas-liquid separator were tested and successfully used in this work. Hydride was produced through natrium borohydride reaction with sample solution. Emitted gas was separated by gas-liquid separator before it is carried by nitrogen gas through T tube which is put in atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer. Efficiency of the system was tested through standard reference sample and seawater / sediment samples which is collected from Negeri Johor water bays

  3. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species. PMID:25427244

  4. Modification of galvannealed steel through aluminum addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum is believed to modify and to some extent control the coating characteristics of commercially produced galvanneal sheet steel. These include mechanical, chemical, and aesthetic properties. Whereas the aluminum added to the molten zinc bath is known to form intermetallics before the steel is annealed, our research is primarily concerned with the effect aluminum has on suppression or enhancement of the particular iron-zinc alloy phases in the coating during galvannealing. The microstructure of four commercially important iron-zinc intermetallic phases containing varying aluminum content between 0-1.5 weight percent has been studied. It is also believed that an iron-aluminum alloy, known as the inhibition layer, forms on the steel surface following hot dipping and prior to annealing. Transmission and scattering Moessbauer spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction have been used to identify iron-zinc and iron-aluminum alloys present in the coatings. Discussion will be presented on the effect aluminum has on phase suppression for Fe-Zn alloys prepared in commercially produced galvanneal

  5. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of volautile inorganic hydrides in binary gaseous mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on possibility of single and continuons analysis of binary mixtures (hydride-gas) for the content of volatile inorganic hydrides (VIH) from absorption spectra in the 185-280 nm band. Dependences of the percentage of VIH transmission on the wavelength are presented. It is shown that the maximum of their absorption depends on the element-hydrogen the bond length and binding energy. Detection limit for boron hydride was established to be n x 10-3% vol at 185-190 nm wavelength. Technique for spectrophotometric hydride determination in binary mixtures with hydrogen, argon, helium was developed. The technique provides the continuous control of gaseous mixture composition

  7. Identification of the zirconium hydrides metallography in zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technique for the Identification of the zirconium hydrides in metallographic specimens have been developed. Microhardness, quantitative estimation and relative orientation of the present hydrides as well as grain size determination of the different Zircaloy-2 tube specimens have also been made. The specimens used were corrosion- tested in water during various periods of time at 300 degree castrating, prior to the metallographic examination. Reference specimens, as received, and heavily hydride specimens in a hydrogen atmosphere at 800 degree centigrees, have been used in the previous stages of the work. No difficulties have been met in this early stage of acquaintanceship with the zirconium hydrides. (Author) 5 refs

  8. Characteristics of hydride-like segregates of hydrogen at dislocations in palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of multifactor analysis of the most representative experimental data on the solubility, electrical resistance, and diffusivity of hydrogen in palladium specimens with high and low dislocation densities, it has been shown that the structure, composition, diameter (up to several nm), contribution to electrical resistance, thermodynamic and diffusion characteristics of hydride-like segregates at dislocations in palladium can vary in wide limits depending on the concentration and thermodynamic activity of hydrogen dissolved in the normal lattice of the metal. The formation of hydride-like segregation phases at dislocations occurs at high degrees of undersaturation of the solid solutions with respect to the hydride precipitation in the normal lattice of palladium. This means that a specific phase diagram can be considered for a 'hydrogen - near-dislocation segregation Pd nanoregions' system, in comparison with the conventional hydrogen-palladium phase diagram. The results obtained can be used for the description of the apparent concentration and distribution of hydrogen between the normal crystal lattice and defect regions in palladium specimens produced using different processing and treatment methods. In particular, the results can be used for the interpretation of hydrogen influence on the physical and mechanical properties of the materials, and also for revealing the micromechanisms and ways of the optimization of regimes of thermal-hydrogen treatment and governing hydrogen-induced transformation hardening of palladium and palladium-based alloys. (from the current literature)

  9. The Microstructure and Properties of Diffusion Layer of Spray Aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Hong; YAN Zhonglin; SUN Zhifu

    2005-01-01

    After diffusion processing of thermal spraying, aluminum on 20 # steel is discussed in this article. Variations of microstructure, composition as well as microhardness and corrosion resistance of diffusion layer of spray aluminum were explored by means of X- ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis ( EPMA ). The result shows that the diffusion layer of spray aluminum consists of η phase ( Fe2 Al5 ), ζ phase ( FeAl2 ), β1 phase ( Fe3Al ), β1 phase ( Fe3 Al ) and α phase from surface to substrate. There are balanced transitions between phases. The layer has extra high hardncss and corrosion resistance.

  10. Stress field computation for hydride blister forming in Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen migration under thermal gradient in zirconium alloys results in formation of hydride blisters. An array of blisters makes Zirconium alloy components of nuclear reactors susceptible to fracture. The whole process of hydride blister formation and fracture of these components is very complex and involves hydrogen migration under thermal gradient, hydride precipitation, straining of the matrix, setting up of hydrostatic stress gradient, enhanced hydrogen migration under the combined influence of thermal and stress gradients, stress reorientation of hydrides, cracking of hydrides, crack growth by delayed hydride cracking mechanism, interlinking of blisters and spontaneous fracture of the component. In this work we estimate the stress components in hydride blisters and the surrounding matrix for certain assumed blister depth as a function of hydride matrix yield strength ratio. The simulation was carried out for a semi ellipsoidal blister using ABAQUS finite element package. The blister formation was simulated by single step and multiple step transformation of the matrix to hydride. It is felt that the same methodology can be used to estimate the stress field around semi constrained inclusion such as hydride blister(s) in hydride forming metals like uranium, zirconium, titanium etc. and of localized corrosion products in metals and alloys. A matrix of dimension in the ratio 5 (along direction 1):1 (along direction 2) was considered for the computations. The Zr matrix having hexagonal crystal structure and faced centered cubic zirconium hydride was modeled as elastically isotropic. Both matrix and hydride was modeled to undergo linear work hardening up to ultimate tensile strength (=1.25Xyield strength), corresponding to a plastic strain of 10 percent. A small strain small displacement theory was adopted. Computations were made for an axisymmetric case with the symmetry axis along the 2 direction. Transformation of zirconium hydrogen solid solution into hydride

  11. Rheology of suspensions with aluminum nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Teipel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale aluminum particles are innovative materials increasingly used in energetic formulations. In this contribution, the rheological behavior of suspensions with either paraffin oil or HTPB as the matrix fluid and nano-scale aluminum (ALEX as the dispersed phase is described and discussed. The paraffin oil/aluminum suspensions exhibit non-Newtonian flow behavior over a wide range of concentrations, whereas the HTPB/aluminum suspensions exhibitNewtonian behavior (i.e. the viscosity is independent of shear stress up to a concentration of 50 vol.% aluminum. Both systems have unusual viscoelastic properties in that their elastic moduli are independent of the solids concentration.

  12. Effects of Hydride Precipitation on the Stress Developed in ZrO2 Thin Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that the effect of thermal redistribution of hydrides across the metal-oxide interface, coupled with thermal feedback on the metal-oxide interface, is a dominating factor in the accelerated oxidation in zirconium alloys cladding PWR fuel. Especially the precipitated and redistributed hydrides are known to relieve the stress imposed onto the metal/oxide interface during the waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys. Without the hydrides the stress exceeds the critical value of 3 GPa which induce the tetragonal ZrO2 phase formation. Therefore, in this study enhanced oxidation due to the precipitated hydrides are experimentally confirmed and stress on the interface is measured with steam beam apparatus in order to support hypothesis hydrides precipitates relieve the stress. In steam beam apparatus, Oxidation reaction occurs only the surface exposed to the steam beam. In order to avoid the oxidation of the other side of specimen, whole chamber is evacuated down to ultra-high vacuum (down to 10-5 Torr). The oxide thickness is measured with weight gain measurement and the curvature of the single side oxidized specimen is measured with spherometer. Specimen is thin film zirconium foil whose thickness is 40μm and diameter is 20mm. Only single surface of specimen exposed to the steam beam oxidizes at 400 .deg. C which is attained by halogen lamp. Basically the measurement technique used in this study is based on the curvature build-up during the single side oxidation process. The stress build-up can be directly evaluated according to the Stoney's formula. Measured stress from the curvature estimation are plotted as a function of thin oxide film thickness. And atmospheric oxidation was also carried out in the electric furnace using the specimen holder, which is designed to protect the other side oxidation of specimen. The stress in the oxide increases as the thickness decreases and the highest stress measured in this study is 5.2 GPa which is higher than

  13. Electrochemical corrosion of the α-Al matrix and Mg2Si phase of new deformable aluminum alloys of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system in a 0.1 M solution of NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aid of the polarization curve method using a microcapillar, optical microscopy of the sample surface before and after the anodic polarization, and EDX, the peculiarities of electrochemical corrosion of aluminum alloys of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system in a 0.1 M NaCl solution are studied. It is established that the process mechanism corresponds at first to solving the Mg2Si phase in the electrolyte and then to the corrosion attack of the matrix with the pitting. It has been shown that, at the selective dissolution of magnesium from the Mg2Si phase, a definite amount of SiO2 oxide has been formed.

  14. Rapid Microwave Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Lithium Nitride Hydride, Li4NH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Tapia-Ruiz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lithium nitride hydride, Li4NH, was synthesised from lithium nitride and lithium hydride over minute timescales, using microwave synthesis methods in the solid state for the first time. The structure of the microwave-synthesised powders was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction [tetragonal space group I41/a; a = 4.8864(1 Å, c = 9.9183(2 Å] and the nitride hydride reacts with moist air under ambient conditions to produce lithium hydroxide and subsequently lithium carbonate. Li4NH undergoes no dehydrogenation or decomposition [under Ar(g] below 773 K. A tetragonal–cubic phase transition, however, occurs for the compound at ca. 770 K. The new high temperature (HT phase adopts an anti-fluorite structure (space group Fm 3̅ m; a = 4.9462(3 Å with N3− and H− ions disordered on the 4a sites. Thermal treatment of Li4NH under nitrogen yields a stoichiometric mixture of lithium nitride and lithium imide (Li3N and Li2NH respectively.

  15. Di-hydrogen contact induced lattice instabilities and structural dynamics in complex hydride perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouwink, P; Hagemann, H; Embs, J P; D'Anna, V; Černý, R

    2015-07-01

    The structural phase transitions occurring in a series of perovskite-type complex hydrides based on the tetrahydroborate anion BH4(-) are investigated by means of in situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, thermal methods and ab initio calculations in the solid state. Structural dynamics of the BH4 anion are followed with quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We show that unexpected temperature-induced lattice instabilities in perovskite-type ACa(BH4)3 (A = K, Rb, Cs) have their origin in close hydridic di-hydrogen contacts. The rich lattice dynamics lead to coupling between internal B-H vibrations and phonons, resulting in distortions in the high-temperature polymorph that are identical in symmetry to well-known instabilities in oxide perovskites, generally condensing at lower temperatures. It is found that anion-substitution BH4(-) (X = Halide) can relax distortions in ACa(BH4)3 by eliminating coulomb repulsive H(-)···H(-) effects. The interesting nature of phase transition in ACa(BH4)3 enters an unexplored field of weak interactions in ceramic-like host lattices and is the principal motivation for this study. Close di-hydrogen contacts suggest new concepts to tailor crystal symmetries in complex hydride perovskites in the future. PMID:26076047

  16. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    OpenAIRE

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The me...

  17. Rietveld analysis of neutron powder diffraction of Mg6Pd alloy at various hydriding stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the crystal structure of Mg6Pd alloy, synthesized by ball milling, was investigated by simultaneous Rietveld refinement of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction. Samples with different deuterium contents were measured, corresponding to reaction end-products of proposed hydrogenation step. After full hydrogenation, Mg6Pd alloy transforms to MgPd alloy and MgD2. Increases in lattice parameters of MgPd alloy agrees well with measured hydrogen capacities. There are some evidences that at each hydrogenation step in magnesium alloys, magnesium atoms with high values of thermal parameters are the ones that will form magnesium hydride upon hydrogenation. Magnesium hydride phases presented a high level of strain which could be related to the important hysteresis in the pressure-composition isotherm curve.

  18. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  19. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk;

    2006-01-01

    -hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...

  20. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  1. Ultra-sonic observation in niobium hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hidrogen embrittlement of exothermic ocluders, had been considered as due to applied stress induced hydride precipitates leading to brittle fracture. The results of simultaneous measurements of macroscopic deformation and elastic change due to hydride precipitation, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique are showed. THen it was tested the possibility of kinectis precipitation parameters evoluation. (Author)

  2. Bonding in Zintl phase hydrides: density functional calculations for SrAlSiH, SrAl2H2, SrGa2H2 and BaGa2H2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, Alaska P [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the bonding characteristics of SrAlSiH, SrAl{sub 2}H{sub 2}, SrGa{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and BaGa{sub 2}H{sub 2} using density functional calculations. The mixed bonding characteristic of other families of Zintl phases is found, with the formation of covalent sp{sup 2} bonds in the Al/Ga/Al-Si planes of the various compounds. On the other hand the Sr and Ba atoms occur as divalent cations, while the H is anionic. The results indicate that insulating SrSiAlH may be a switchable ferroelectric.

  3. Ti–V–Mn based metal hydrides for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Ti0.47V0.46Mn and Ti0.50V0.51Mn alloys were produced by arc melting. •Compositional differences led to different unit cell volumes for the C14 Laves phase. •Change in composition caused a significant change in plateau pressure and hysteresis. -- Abstract: Two Ti–V–Mn BCC-Laves phase alloys with the nominal composition Ti0.5V0.5±xMn (x = −0.04 and 0.01), were synthesised by arc melting. This compositional difference resulted in different compositions and unit cell volumes for the C14 Laves phase. Ti0.47V0.46Mn and Ti0.50V0.51Mn demonstrated reversible hydrogen sorption capacities of 1.53 and 1.56 ± 0.05 wt.% (at 120 bar H2 at 303 K) respectively, however, the change in composition results in a small change in the enthalpy of hydride decomposition, and a significant change in plateau pressure and hysteresis. This may allow for the plateau pressure to be tuned to meet the requirements of different solid-state hydrogen storage applications

  4. Effects of various annealing conditions on (Nd, Mg, Zr)(Ni, Al, Co)3.74 metal hydride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K.; Ouchi, T.; Huang, B.

    2014-02-01

    Annealing Nd-only AB3.74 metal hydride alloy was found to effectively increase composition homogeneity, main A2B7 phase abundance, and both gaseous phase and electrochemical hydrogen storage capacities, as well as to facilitate activation, and improve battery high-rate performance, charge retention, and cycle life. As the phase abundance of the main A2B7 phase increases in the alloy with higher annealing temperatures, the general electrochemical performance improves. Extending the annealing period from 5 to 16 h further increases the A2B7 phase abundance, but deteriorates the high-rate dischargeability due to the reduction of AB5 catalytic phase.

  5. Preferred hydride growth orientations on oxide-coated gadolinium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The preferred hydride growth orientations on gadolinium metal coated by a thin oxide layer are presented. ► A preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the face centered cubic (FCC) GdH2 is observed for the hydride spots forming below the oxidation layer. ► A change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates for the hydride's Growth Centers. ► The texture change is attributed to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation layer on the developing hydride. - Abstract: The initial development of hydrides on polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd), as on some other hydride forming metals, is characterized by two sequential steps. The first step involves the rapid formation of a dense pattern of small hydride spots (referred to as the “small family” of hydrides) below the native oxidation layer. The second stage takes place when some of the “small family” nucleants (referred to as “growth centers”, GCs) break the oxide layer, leading to their rapid growth and finally to the massive hydriding of the sample. In the present study, the texture of the two hydride families was studied, by combining X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis with a microscopic analysis of the hydride, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been observed that for the “small family”, a preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the cubic GdH2 takes place, whereas for the GCs, a change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates. These preferred growth orientations were analyzed by their structure relation with the (0 0 .1)m basal plane of the Gd metal. It has been concluded that the above texture change is due to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation overlayer on the developing hydride, preventing the (0 0 .1)m||(1 1 1)h growth orientation. This stress is relieved upon the rupture of that overlayer and the development of the GCs, leading to the

  6. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. The Planck sorption cooler: Using metal hydrides to produce 20 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has built and delivered two continuous, closed cycle, hydrogen Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers for the ESA Planck mission, which will measure the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background. The metal hydride compressor consists of six sorbent beds containing LaNi4.78Sn0.22 alloy and a low-pressure storage bed of the same material. Each sorbent bed contains a separate gas-gap heat switch that couples or isolates the bed with radiators during the compressor operating cycle. ZrNiHx hydride is used in this heat switch. The Planck compressor produces hydrogen gas at a pressure of 48 bar by heating the hydride to ∼450 K. This gas passes through a cryogenic cold-end consisting of a tube-in-tube heat exchanger, three pre-cooling stages to bring the gas to nominally 52 K, a J-T value to expand the gas into the two-phase regime at ∼20 K, and two liquid-vapor heat exchangers that must remove 190 and 646 mW of heat, respectively. Gas evaporated from the liquid phase is recovered by three hydride beds at ∼0.3 bar and 270 K. Each cooler was designed to provide 1 W cooling at ∼20 K for a total input power of 470 W, excluding electronics. The performance of these coolers is mainly a function of the compressor interface and final pre-cooling stage temperatures. We present results from the testing of these two coolers for the input power, cooling power, temperature, and temperature fluctuations over the flight allowable ranges for these interfaces

  8. Noble-gas hydrides: new chemistry at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Gerber, R Benny

    2009-01-20

    Noble-gas chemistry has been undergoing a renaissance in recent years, due in large part to noble-gas hydrides, HNgY, where Ng = noble-gas atom and Y = electronegative fragment. These molecules are exceptional because of their relatively weak bonding and large dipole moments, which lead to strongly enhanced effects of the environment, complexation, and reactions. In this Account, we discuss the matrix-isolation synthesis of noble-gas hydrides, their spectroscopic and structural properties, and their stabilities.This family of species was discovered in 1995 and now has 23 members that are prepared in noble-gas matrices (HXeBr, HKrCl, HXeH, HXeOH, HXeO, etc.). The preparations of the first neutral argon molecule, HArF, and halogen-free organic noble-gas molecules (HXeCCH, HXeCC, HKrCCH, etc.) are important highlights of the field. These molecules are formed by the neutral H + Ng + Y channel. The first addition reaction involving HNgY molecules was HXeCC + Xe + H --> HXeCCXeH, and this led to the first hydride with two noble-gas atoms (recently extended by HXeOXeH). The experimental synthesis of HNgY molecules starts with production of H and Y fragments in solid noble gas via the UV photolysis of suitable precursors. The HNgY molecules mainly form upon thermal mobilization of the fragments.One of the unusual properties of these molecules is the hindered rotation of some HNgY molecules in solid matrices; this has been theoretically modeled. HNgY molecules also have unusual solvation effects, and the H-Xe stretching mode shifts to higher frequencies (up to about 150 cm-1) upon interaction with other species.The noble hydrides have a new bonding motif: HNgY molecules can be represented in the form (H-Ng)+Y-, where (H-Ng)+ is mainly covalent, whereas the interaction between (HNg)+ and Y- is predominantly ionic. The HNgY molecules are highly metastable species representing high-energy materials. The decomposition process HNgY --> Ng + HY is always strongly exoergic

  9. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  10. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  11. The influence of extraframework aluminum on H-FAU catalyzed cracking of light alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    Narbeshuber, T.F.; Brait, A.; Seshan, K.; Lercher, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The conversion of light linear and branched alkanes on two faujasite samples containing different concentrations of free Brønsted acid sites and extraframework alumina (EFAL) was studied between 733 K and 813 K. Protolytic cracking and bimolecular hydride transfer proceeded solely on Brønsted acid sites. For cracking of n-alkanes, the variation of the concentration of extraframework aluminum did not affect the catalytic activity per accessible Brønsted acid site. The activity to dehydrogenati...

  12. Low-frequency excitations in zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow inelastic neutron scattering (INS) on ZrHx systems (x = 0.38, 0.52) revealed new excitations located within the energy range 2-10 MeV. Besides the acoustic vibrations specific to α-HCP Zr and γ-FCO Zr hydride the fine structure of these excitations is clearly observed. The origin of the new observed peaks is not very clear but a proton tunneling or a resonance effect in α-Zr lattice could be taken into account

  13. Tritium immobilization and packaging using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium recovered from CANDU heavy water reactors will have to be packaged and stored in a safe manner. Tritium will be recovered in the elemental form, T2. Metal tritides are effective compounds in which to immobilize the tritium as a stable non-reactive solid with a high tritium capacity. The technology necessary to prepare hydrides of suitable metals, such as titanium and zirconium, have been developed and the properties of the prepared materials evaluated. Conceptual designs of packages for containing metal tritides suitable for transportation and long-term storage have been made and initial testing started. (author)

  14. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  15. Formation of hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of zirconium hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys due to the presence of a thermal gradient is a possible phenomenon which may occur in structural components of a reactor (pressure tubes), thus resulting a very important matter for the nuclear industry. For this reason, a series of experiments were initiated in the Hydrogen Damage Laboratory so as to obtain blisters of zirconium alloys and to study the aspects related to them. Zry-4 and Zr-2.5% Nb blisters were obtained. The propagation of a fissure present in a blister and the fracture surface were observed. The fissure propagated weakly in the blister and stopped in the Zry-4 matrix. (Author)

  16. Development of high-capacity nickel-metal hydride batteries using superlattice hydrogen-absorbing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New R-Mg-Ni (R: rare earths) superlattice alloys with higher-capacity and higher-durability than the conventional Mm-Ni alloys with CaCu5 structure have been developed. The oxidation resistibility of the superlattice alloys has been improved by optimizing the alloy composition by such as substituting aluminum for nickel and optimizing the magnesium content in order to prolong the battery life. High-capacity nickel-metal hydride batteries for the retail market, the Ni-MH2500/900 series (AA size type 2500mAh, AAA size type 900mAh), have been developed and commercialized by using an improved superlattice alloy for negative electrode material. alized by using an improved superlattice alloy for negative electrode material. (author)

  17. Hydrogen in novel solid-state metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state metal hydrides display hydrogen densities close to that of liquid hydrogen and thus provide a safe and efficient way of storing hydrogen. As a result of recent neutron and synchrotron diffraction work some novel metal hydrides have been characterized that shed new light on the nature of metal-hydrogen interactions. While hydrogen appears as an anion surrounded by a large inventory of cation configurations in ionic hydrides such as Ca4Mg3H14, Ca19Mg8H54, Eu2MgD6, Eu6Mg7D26 and Eu2Mg3D10, it acts as a terminal ligand in covalently bonded hydride complexes based on p-elements such as [BH4]- and d-elements such as [IrH5]4- and [IrH4]5- in the complex hydrides LiBH4 and Mg6Ir2H11, respectively. Surprisingly, hydride complexes and hydride anions can also be discerned in typically metallic (interstitial) hydrides such as NdMgNi4H4 (= Nd3+Mg+2.[Ni4H4]5-) and LaMg2NiD7 (= La3+Mg+22.[NiH4]4-.3H-). Some hydrides also reveal other interesting features such as a hydrogenation induced Ce4+→Ce3+ valence change in CeMn1.8Al0.2H4.4 at room temperature that is accompanied by a Mn/Al metal atom exchange over distances of ∝2.6 A, and a hydrogen induced metal-to-nonmetal transition near ambient conditions that leads from the metallic compound Mg3Ir to the red colored hydride Mg6Ir2H11. In this article recent work and some methodological aspects are highlighted. (orig.)

  18. Development of hydride absorber for fast reactor. Application of hafnium hydride to control rod of large fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hafnium hydride (Hf-hydride) to a control rod for a large fast reactor where the B4C control rod is originally employed is studied. Three types of Hf-hydride control rods are designed. The control rod worth and its change during the burnup are evaluated for different hydrogen-to-hafnium ratios and are compared with those of the original B4C control rod. The result indicates that the worths of the Hf-hydride and the 10B-enriched B4C control rods are approximately the same, and the lifetime of the Hf-hydride control rod is almost four times longer than that of the 10B-enriched B4C control rod. The core performances of the shutdown margin, sodium void reactivity, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and breeding ratio are analyzed. It is indicated that those for the Hf-hydride control rod are almost the same as those for the original B4C control rod. The behavior of neutrons moderated by the Hf-hydride control rod is analyzed. It is confirmed that the Hf-hydride control rod does not cause any thermal spike problems in the fast reactor core. (author)

  19. Mechanism of the α-to-β phase transformation in the LaNi5-H2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Very carefully controlled study of hydride formation in LaNi5 via crystallography. → Much more gamma phase formed transiently than in Joubert et al.'s work. → Demonstration that the gamma phase is a necessary intermediate in hydride formation. → Demonstration that the alpha, beta and gamma phases coexist nanoscopically. - Abstract: High-energy synchrotron in situ X-ray powder diffraction has been used to elucidate the mechanism of the hydriding phase transformation in a LaNi5 model hydrogen storage intermetallic in real time. The transformation proceeds at 10 deg. C via the transient growth of an interfacial phase, the γ phase, with lattice parameters intermediate between those of the α (dilute solid solution) and β (concentrated hydride) phases. The γ phase forms to partially accommodate the 24% change in unit cell volume between the α and β phases during hydriding and dehydriding. The α, γ and β phases coexist at the nanoscopic level.

  20. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. → Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. → Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. → The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  1. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolucci, Stephen F., E-mail: stephen.bartolucci@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Benet Laboratories, Armaments Research Development and Engineering Center, Watervliet, NY 12189-4000 (United States); Paras, Joseph [U.S. Army Benet Laboratories, Armaments Research Development and Engineering Center, Watervliet, NY 12189-4000 (United States); Rafiee, Mohammad A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Rafiee, Javad [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, Sabrina; Kapoor, Deepak [U.S. Army Benet Laboratories, Armaments Research Development and Engineering Center, Watervliet, NY 12189-4000 (United States); Koratkar, Nikhil, E-mail: koratn@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. {yields} Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. {yields} Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. {yields} The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  2. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  3. Neutron scattering on hydrides of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review surveys the application of neutron scattering for the investigation of the microscopic behaviour of hydrogen in intermetallic compounds. This concerns the structure as well as the dynamics. Neutron diffraction experiments were performed on Ti1.2Mn1.8D3 and LaNi5D7. In the latter case the dominant nickel scattering could be suppressed by isotope substitution with 60Ni, and the anisotropic broadening of the Bragg peaks could be modelled in a correspondingly modified Rietveld-profile refinement. For the investigation of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides by means of quasielastic neutron scattering an iterative multiple scattering correction procedure has been developped which allows a reliable determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients. The mechanism of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides comprises three types of jumps: escape jumps out of energetically lower interstitials, transport jumps over the energetically higher sites and locally restricted jump processes. For Ti1.2Mn1.8H3 the main features of the diffusional behaviour could be described quantitatively in the framework of a three state model. By means of neutron vibrational spectroscopy information about the occupied hydrogen sites and thus about the structure can be extracted from the symmetry splitting of the vibrational modes. In this way we showed that in α-LaNi5Hx, La2Ni4-octahedral and La2Ni2-tetrahedral interstitial sites are occupied. (orig./GG)

  4. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.

  5. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  6. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  7. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)]. PMID:22040085

  8. Polytypic transformations of aluminum hydroxide: A mechanistic investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thimmasandra Narayan Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of ammonia vapors into a solution of aluminum nitrate or ferric nitrate results in the precipitation of their respective hydroxides and oxyhydroxides.Polymorphic phase formation of aluminum hydroxide is controlled by the rate of crystallization.The PXRD patterns of products obtained via vapor phase diffusion revealed that poorly ordered aluminum hydroxide is formed during the initial stages of crystallization.After 8 days,the formation of the bayerite phase of aluminum hydroxide was observed.Upon prolonged exposure to ammonia vapors,bayerite was transformed into gibbsite.The infrared spectrum of the product confirmed the presence of different polytypic phases of aluminum hydroxide.The results demonstrated that the crystal structure of metal hydroxides is controlled by the rate of crystallization,nature of the metal ion,site selectivity and specificity and preparative conditions.

  9. Hydrogenation of AB5 and AB2 metal hydride alloys studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation process of an AB5 alloy and two AB2 alloys were studied by quasi in-situ XRD. • In both AB5 and AB2 metal alloy, hydrogen occupation sites on the half-plane were taken first. • In the C14/C15 mixed alloy, C14 phase is the main hydrogen storage phase with a lower equilibrium pressure. • In the C14/C15 mixed alloy, C15 phase is the catalyst hydrogen storage phase with a higher equilibrium pressure. • Small amount of C15 was hydrided first but not completed until C14 phase was fully hydrided. - Abstract: The evolution of lattice constants and abundances of metal (α) and metal hydride (β) phases during the hydrogenation process of an AB5 alloy with a CaCu5 crystal structure, an AB2 alloy with a predominating C14 structure, and a C14/C15-mixed AB2 alloy were reported. The preferred hydrogen insertion sites at different states of charge in both the α and β phases were studied based on the lattice parameter changes during hydrogenation. During the hydrogenation of the AB5 alloy, the ratio between lattice parameters a and c (a/c ratio) in the α phase decreases, stabilizes, and then decreases again while that in the β phase decreases and then stabilizes. The trends in unit cell volume changes are increasing, plateauing, and increasing again in the α phase and increasing followed by plateauing in the β phase as the hydrogenation level increases. In the C14-predominant AB2 alloy, the a/c ratio in the α phase increases at the beginning and then stabilizes while that in the β phase remains about the same and then increases during the addition of hydrogen. Moreover, the unit cell volume in the α phase increases slightly during hydrogenation, comparing to the increasing, decreasing, and then increasing trend in the β phase. In the C14/C15 mixed AB2 alloy, hydrogenation of the C15 phase starts at the beginning and promotes the hydrogenation of the C14 phase. The C14 phase, as the main hydrogen storage phase, completes hydrogenation

  10. Equation of state of palladium hydride and deuteride to 100 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownsberger, Keenan; Ahart, Muhtar; Somayazulu, Maddury; Gramsch, Stephen; Hemley, Russell

    To study the behavior of palladium hydrides under pressure, we loaded palladium foils in hydrogen or deuterium environments in two separate diamond anvil cells. We subsequently measured x-ray diffraction up to 100 GPa at room temperature. No structural phase transition was observed for either PdDx or PdHx between 0 GPa and 100 GPa. The pressure-volume data were fitted with the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, which gave an initial volume of 10.8 cm3/mol, a bulk modulus of 153 GPa, and its derivative of 4.3 for palladium hydride. An initial volume of 10.6 cm3/mol, a bulk modulus of 162 GPa, and its pressure derivative of 4.6 were determined for palladium deuteride. From initial volumes, we conclude that x =1 for both PdDx and PdHx. This work is supported by the Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center. EOS of palladium hydride and deuteride to 100 GPa.

  11. Effect of metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effect of some metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron is studied for the first time. • We are the first to conduct a TG experiment on boron samples at high temperatures (a maximum of 1750 °C). • The thermal reaction process of boron is firstly divided into five stages according to the weight gain rate of the sample. • Specific values of metal hydrides on ignition delay time and combustion intensity of boron are obtained. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of four metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron was investigated. Thermogravimetric experiment results show that the thermal reaction process of boron samples can be divided into five stages. The thermal reactions of boron can be significantly promoted with LiH, which can reduce the initial temperature of the first violent reaction stage by ∼140 °C. The starting temperature of the post-reaction stage also decreases by ∼260 °C. The results of the laser ignition experiment suggest that all four metal hydrides can promote boron burning. Nonetheless, different metal hydrides display varied promotional effects. Among the studied hydrides, LiH is the most effective additive and shortens the ignition delay time of boron by ∼34.1%. Moreover, it enhances the combustion intensity of boron by ∼117.6%. The other three metal hydrides (CaH2, TiH2, and ZrH2) can also contribute to boron burning

  12. Zircaloy-4 hydriding. Hydrogen distribution in PWR's rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurised water reactors, Zircaloy 4 is used as fuel cladding in contact with hot water. The precipitation of hydrides at room temperatures causes mechanical deterioration of the cladding. As the cladding is subjected to a radial temperature gradient, the hydrogen distribution is greatly affected. The image analysis method is used to determine the hydride distribution in the irradiated cladding. To calibrate this method, a device was specially built for the preparation of Zircaloy specimens with known hydrogen contents. The hydriding conditions and hydrogen content determination procedures were fixed. We have successfully realized specimens with various hydrogen contents. With these specimens, a relationship between the parameter Sv (surface density of hydrides) and the hydrogen content was established. This parameter Sv is independent from the Zircaloy 4 metallurgical state (i.e. stress relieved or recrystallized) and from the analysis section (longitudinal or transverse). Study of hydrogen content and hydride distribution in irradiated cladding by means of image analysis showed that the method is limited by its ability of separation between neighbouring hydrides at cladding's periphery where the hydrogen content can reach several thousands ppm. Nevertheless, this method gives us some information about hydride distribution inside the cladding. A model for thermal diffusion was developped to stimulate the migration of hydrogen in Zirconium alloys. This model was used to predict hydrogen distribution in the irradiated cladding. Comparison of model predictions with results of image analysis shows good agreement. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  13. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  14. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  15. Develop improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, K.

    1998-12-04

    The overall objective was to develop commercially viable metal hydrides capable of reversibly storing at least 3 wt.% hydrogen for use with PEM fuel cells and hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (HICE) applications. Such alloys are expected to result in system capacities of greater than 2 wt.%, making metal hydride storage systems (MHSS`s) a practical means of supplying hydrogen for many consumer applications. ECD`s (Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.) past work on sputtered thin films of transition metal-based alloys led to the commercialization of it`s nickel/metal hydride batteries, and similar work on thin film Mg-based alloys demonstrated potential to achieve very high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities approaching 2,500 Wh/Kg and 2,500 Wh/M{sup 3} respectively. Under this 2-year cost shared project with the DOE, the authors have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of scaling up the Mg-based hydrides from thin film to bulk production without substantial loss of storage capacity. ECD made progress in alloy development by means of compositional and process modification. Processes used include Mechanical Alloying, Melt spinning and novel Gas Phase Condensation. It was showed that the same composition when prepared by melt-spinning resulted in a more homogeneous material having a higher PCT plateau pressure as compared to mechanical alloying. It was also shown that mechanically alloyed Mg-Al-Zn results in much higher plateau pressures, which is an important step towards reducing the desorption temperature. While significant progress has been made during the past two years in alloy development and understanding the relationship between composition, structure, morphology, and processing parameters, additional R and D needs to be performed to achieve the goals of this work.

  16. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  17. 金属铝固液气完全物态方程研究%A solid-liquid-gas three-phase complete equation of state of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于继东; 李平; 王文强; 吴强

    2014-01-01

    Based on the GRAY equation of state (EOS), we establish a solid-liquid-gas three-phase complete EOS, and compare it with the experimental isothermal compression data, Hugoniot data, melting data and thermodynamic functions under ambient pressure. It is indicated that the EOS in this paper can describe reasonably the thermodynamic state of aluminum in a wide region.%基于GRAY模型建立了金属铝的固液气三相完全物态方程,并与等温压缩线、Hugoniot线、熔化线以及零压热力学函数的实验结果进行对比,表明本物态方程可合理描述金属铝在宽广热力学空间的热力学状态。

  18. Microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Chen, C Y; Wei, C B; Lin, Y T

    1996-11-01

    Several microbes were isolated from the contaminated fuel-oil in Taiwan and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy A356-T6 was tested by MIL-STD-810E test method. Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and Cladosporium resinac ATCC 22712 had significant adsorption and pitting on the surface of aluminum alloy, Pseudomonas acruginosa AM-B5 had weak adsorption and some precipitation in the bottom, and Candida sp. AM-Y1 had the less adsorption and few cavities formation on the surface. pH of the aqueous phase decreased 0.3 to 0.7 unit for 4 months of incubation. The corrosion of aluminum alloy was very significant in the cultures of Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and C. resinac ATCC 22712. The major metabolites in the aqueous phase with the inoculation of C. resinac were citric acid and oxalic acid, while succinic acid and fumaric acid were the minors. PMID:10592801

  19. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  20. PIE techniques for hydride reorientation test at NDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry storage of spent fuels in the interim storage facility is being planned in Japan. However, the gradual deterioration of the mechanical property of fuel cladding due to internal pressure and temperature during the storage term is known. Therefore, the integrity of stored fuel rods should be confirmed before the start of dry storage. For the last several years, NDC had a lot of experiences on the hydride reorientation test. The specimen preparation techniques on the hydride reorientation test and the mechanical testing techniques after the hydride reorientation are shown in this paper. (author)

  1. Method of Preventing Shrinkage of Aluminum Foam Using Carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakamura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are commonly produced using titanium hydride as a foaming agent. Carbonates produce aluminum foam with a fine and homogenous cell structure. However, foams produced using carbonates show marked shrinkage, which is clearly different from those produced using titanium hydride. It is essential for practical applications to clarify foam shrinkage and establish a method of preventing it. In this research, cell structures were observed to study the shrinkage of aluminum foam produced using carbonates. The cells of foam produced using dolomite as a foaming agent connected to each other with maximum expansion. It was estimated that foaming gas was released through connected cells to the outside. It was assumed that cell formation at different sites is effective in preventing shrinkage induced by cell connection. The multiple additions of dolomite and magnesium carbonate, which have different decomposition temperatures, were applied. The foam in the case with multiple additions maintained a density of 0.66 up to 973 K, at which the foam produced using dolomite shrank. It was verified that the multiple additions of carbonates are effective in preventing shrinkage.

  2. Development of delayed hydride cracking resistant-pressure tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, S. S.; Yim, K. S

    2000-10-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate that the pattern of nucleation and growth of a DHC crack is governed by the precipitation of hydrides so that the DHC velocity and K{sub IH} are determined by an angle of the cracking plane and the hydride habit plane 10.7. Since texture controls the distribution of the 10.7 habit plane in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube, we draw a conclusion that a textural change in Zr-2.5Nb tube from a strong tangential texture to the radial texture shall increase the threshold stress intensity factor, K{sub IH}, and decrease the delayed hydride cracking velocity. This conclusion is also verified by a complimentary experiment showing a linear dependence of DHCV and K{sub IH} with an increase in the basal component in the cracking plane. On the basis of the study on the DHC mechanism and the effect of manufacturing processes on the properties of Zr-2.5Nb tube, we have established a manufacturing procedure to make pressure tubes with improved DHC resistance. The main features of the established manufacturing process consist in the two step-cold pilgering process and the intermediate heat treatment in the {alpha} + {beta} phase for Zr-2.5Nb alloy and in the {alpha} phase for Zr-1Nb-1.2Sn-0.4Fe alloy. The manufacturing of DHC resistant-pressure tubes of Zr-2.5Nb and Zr-1N-1.2Sn-0.4Fe was made in the ChMP zirconium plant in Russia under a joint research with Drs. Nikulina and Markelov in VNIINM (Russia). Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube made with the established manufacturing process has met all the specification requirements put by KAERI. Chracterization tests have been jointly conducted by VNIINM and KAERI. As expected, the Zr-2.5Nb tube made with the established procedure has improved DHC resistance compared to that of CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube used currently. The measured DHC velocity of the Zr-2.5Nb tube meets the target value (DHCV <5x10{sup -8} m/s) and its other properties also were equivalent to those of the CANDU Zr-2.5Nb tube used currently. The Zr-1Nb-1

  3. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  4. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes. PMID:27491848

  5. Delayed hydride in zirconium based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) velocity along the axial direction of Zirconium-2.5% Nb pressure tube materials of different origins i.e. CANDU and RBMK (TMT -I), has been determined in the temperature range of 162 to 250 degree C. DHC crack growth was monitored using Direct Current Potential Drop Technique. It has been observed that the DHC velocity of both materials increases with increase in test temperature. The DHC velocity for the RBMK (TMT -I) material was found about 2 to 5 times lower than that for the CANDU materials at each temperature. In addition, the activation energy of the phenomena was calculated taking into account that DHC is a thermal activated mechanism, following an Arrhenius-type law. (author)

  6. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  7. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane [Victhom Human Bionics Inc., Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, QC (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  8. Formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloy pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fracture of the Zircaloy-2 pressure tube in the Pickering Unit 2 power reactor was associated with the growth of hydride blisters at points of contact between the pressure tube and the cooler calandria tube surrounding it. Similar blisters have been observed in a Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tube in WR-1, an organic-cooled research reactor. These hydride blisters were formed and grew as a result of the thermal diffusion of hydrogen in the zirconium, a mechanism whereby hydrogen diffuses down a temperature gradient. If the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen is exceeded in the cooler regions, hydride will precipitate. In this paper, the time required to grow these hydride blisters will be estimated from the blister size and the hydrogen distribution in its neighborhood, by using simple equations derived from thermal diffusion theory

  9. Out-of-pile accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy fasteners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical joints between Zircaloy and nickel-bearing alloys, mainly the Zircaloy-4/Inconel-600 combination, were exposed to water at 4500F and 5200F to study hydriding of Zircaloy in contact with a dissimilar metal. Accelerated hydriding of the Zircaloy occurred at both temperatures. At 4500F the dissolved hydrogen level of the water was over ten times that at 5200F. At 5200F the initially high hydrogen ingress rate decreased rapidly as exposure time increased and was effectively shut off in about 25 days. Severely hydrided Zircaloy components successfully withstood thermal cycling and mechanical testing. Chromium plating of the nickel-bearing parts was found to be an effective and practical barrier in preventing nickel-alloy smearing and accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy

  10. A nuclear analytical model for uranium zirconium hydride reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear analytical model and codes for the uranium zirconium hydride reactor are outlined. The criticality and control rods effeciency of abroad TRIGA reactor are obtained using this model and codes. The results are satisfactory

  11. A mechanistic approach to develop the secondary hydriding criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable criteria of secondary hydriding failures are important to assure safe operation of nuclear fuel in LWR power units. The present paper reviews available data on massive hydriding of Zirconium claddings covering out-of-pile studies and in-pile tests in research reactors. Analyses of these experimental data give evidence that threshold conditions leading to the onset of massive hydriding are drastically changed under irradiation. The changes are caused mainly by irradiation damage of oxygen sublattice in ZrO2 by fission fragments leaving the periphery of fuel pellets. The tests in research reactors provide a basis to develop a parametric dependency which relates the threshold of massive hydriding to composition of steam-hydrogen mixture, irradiation dose rate and temperature

  12. Transparent yttrium hydride thin films prepared by reactive sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Mongstad, T.; Platzer-Björkman, C.; Karazhanov, S. Zh.; Holt, A.; Maehlen, J. P.; Hauback, B. C.

    2011-01-01

    Metal hydrides have earlier been suggested for utilization in solar cells. With this as a motivation we have prepared thin films of yttrium hydride by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The resulting films are metallic for low partial pressure of hydrogen during the deposition, and black or yellow-transparent for higher partial pressure of hydrogen. Both metallic and semiconducting transparent YHx films have been prepared directly in-situ without the need of capping layers and post-deposi...

  13. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  14. Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setten, van M.J.; Popa, V.A.; Wijs, de G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-partic

  15. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology. List of papers. Papers II-VI are removed from the thesis due to copyright restrictions. Paper I C. Platzer-Björkman, T. Mongstad, S. Zh. Karazhanov, J. P. Mæhlen, E. S. Marst...

  16. Atomistic simulation of hydrogen dynamics near dislocations in vanadium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: h.ogawa@aist.go.jp

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hydrogen–dislocation interaction was simulated by molecular dynamics method. • Different distribution of H atoms were observed at edge and screw dislocation. • Planner distribution of hydrogen may be caused by partialized edge dislocation. • Hydrogen diffusivity was reduced in both edge and screw dislocation models. • Pipe diffusion was observed for edge dislocation but not for screw dislocation. - Abstract: Kinetics of interstitial hydrogen atoms near dislocation cores were analyzed by atomistic simulation. Classical molecular dynamics method was applied to model structures of edge and screw dislocations in α-phase vanadium hydride. Simulation showed that hydrogen atoms aggregate near dislocation cores. The spatial distribution of hydrogen has a planner shape at edge dislocation due to dislocation partialization, and a cylindrical shape at screw dislocation. Simulated self-diffusion coefficients of hydrogen atoms in dislocation models were a half- to one-order lower than that of dislocation-free model. Arrhenius plot of self-diffusivity showed slightly different activation energies for edge and screw dislocations. Directional dependency of hydrogen diffusion near dislocation showed high and low diffusivity along edge and screw dislocation lines, respectively, hence so called ‘pipe diffusion’ possibly occur at edge dislocation but does not at screw dislocation.

  17. Atomistic simulation of hydrogen dynamics near dislocations in vanadium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hydrogen–dislocation interaction was simulated by molecular dynamics method. • Different distribution of H atoms were observed at edge and screw dislocation. • Planner distribution of hydrogen may be caused by partialized edge dislocation. • Hydrogen diffusivity was reduced in both edge and screw dislocation models. • Pipe diffusion was observed for edge dislocation but not for screw dislocation. - Abstract: Kinetics of interstitial hydrogen atoms near dislocation cores were analyzed by atomistic simulation. Classical molecular dynamics method was applied to model structures of edge and screw dislocations in α-phase vanadium hydride. Simulation showed that hydrogen atoms aggregate near dislocation cores. The spatial distribution of hydrogen has a planner shape at edge dislocation due to dislocation partialization, and a cylindrical shape at screw dislocation. Simulated self-diffusion coefficients of hydrogen atoms in dislocation models were a half- to one-order lower than that of dislocation-free model. Arrhenius plot of self-diffusivity showed slightly different activation energies for edge and screw dislocations. Directional dependency of hydrogen diffusion near dislocation showed high and low diffusivity along edge and screw dislocation lines, respectively, hence so called ‘pipe diffusion’ possibly occur at edge dislocation but does not at screw dislocation

  18. Hydride distribution around a blister in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blisters were grown in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube sections by a thermal gradient without applying external stress. The surrounding hydride distribution was analyzed. Hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. The precipitation of these hydrides was found to be favored by low temperature of blister growth and slow cooling rate after blister formation. The misfit strain produced by hydride blister growth provides the stress necessary to promote radial precipitation. During the subsequent tensile test at 200 C (delayed hydride cracking test) the radial hydride length and thickness are increased. This increase is explained by a stress concentrator effect of the blister. When this effect vanishes, the increase of radial hydrides continues by an autocatalytic effect and stress concentrator effect of the hydride platelet. If a crack originated in the blister reaches the matrix it could propagate along a radial hydride previously precipitated. (orig.)

  19. Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment

  20. The aluminum chemistry and corrosion in alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinsuo [International Nuclear System Engineering, MS-K 575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: jszhang@lanl.gov; Klasky, Marc; Letellier, Bruce C. [International Nuclear System Engineering, MS-K 575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Aluminum-alkaline solution systems are very common in engineering applications including nuclear engineering. Consequently, a thorough knowledge of the chemistry of aluminum and susceptibility to corrosion in alkaline solutions is reviewed. The aluminum corrosion mechanism and corrosion rate are examined based on current experimental data. A review of the phase transitions with aging time and change of environment is also performed. Particular attention is given to effect of organic and inorganic ions. As an example, the effect of boron is examined in detail because of the application in nuclear reactor power systems. Methods on how to reduce the corrosion rate of aluminum in alkaline solutions are also highlighted.

  1. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  2. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  3. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C. E. Rönnebro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later, which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT metal hydride operating reversibly at 600–800 °C to generate heat, as well as a low-temperature (LT hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is the need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram-sized samples scaled up to kilogram quantities with retained performance. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a ~200-kWh/m3 bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated, and we demonstrated the ability to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  4. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  5. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    OpenAIRE

    Lidsky, Theodore I.

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed w...

  6. Evaluation of Al3Mg2 precipitates and Mn-rich phase in aluminum-magnesium alloy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yakun [ORNL; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Kar, Soumya [ORNL; Free, Michael P [ORNL; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to observe intergranular and intragranular -phase (Al3Mg2) formation and growth in as-received sample and long-term (~ 1 year) thermally treated samples of 5083-H131 alloy. Rod-shaped and equiaxed particles rich in Mn, Fe, and Cr were present in the as-received and heat treated samples. The -phase precipitated along grain boundaries as well as around and between preexisting Mn-Fe-Cr rich particles. The measured thickness of -phase along grain boundaries was lower than Zener Hillert diffusion model predicted value and the potential reasons were theoretically analyzed. Dislocation networks, grain boundaries, and different preexisting particles were observed to contribute to Mg diffusion and -phase precipitation.

  7. Effect of metallic phase species on the corrosion resistance of M/(10NiO-NiFe2O4) cermet inert anode of aluminum electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NiFe2O4-based cermet inert anodes with metallic phase compositions of Cu, Ni and 85Cu15Ni were prepared by cold pressing-sintering. Their corrosion resistance was also investigated in Na3 AlF6-Al2 O3 melts. The results show that the metallic phase species in cermets have no effect on the concentration of impurities in bath during electrolysis, the total steady-state concentration of impurities is almost the same, I.e. Between 4.12 × 10-4- 4.80 × 10-4. There exists metal preferential corrosion for the cermet inert anode with metal Ni as metallic phase. For NiFe2 O4-based cermets, the cermet with metal Cu as metallic phase exhibits better corrosion resistance than the others.

  8. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE ON THE KINETICS OF Mg-6mol%LaNi PREPARED BY HYDRIDING COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q. Li; K.C. Chou; K.D. Xu; L.J. Jiang; J.Y. Zhang; X.G. Lu

    2006-01-01

    A new model to study the hydriding/dehydriding (H/D) kinetic mechanism has been applied in the two-phase (α-β) region of the Mg-6mol%LaNi composite at temperature and pressure ranging from 523 to 623K and 0.256 to 0.992MPa H2, respectively. The coincidence of the theoretical calculation with the experimental data indicates that the rate-limiting step is hydrogen diffusion in the β phase for hydriding process and the diffusion of hydrogen in the α solid solution for hydrogen desorption with activation energies 89500 and 87900J/mol H2 for H/D processes, respectively, which were much smaller than those of MgH2 and can be attributed to the La and Ni additions.

  9. Effect of metallic phase content on mechanical properties of (85Cu- 15Ni)/(10NiO-NiFe2O4) cermet inert anode for aluminum electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    (85Cu-15Ni)/(10NiO-NiFe2O4) cermets were prepared with Cu-Ni mixed powders as toughening metallic phase and 10NiO-NiFe2O4 as ceramic matrix. The phase composition, microstructure of composite and the effect of metallic phase content on bending strength, hardness, fracture toughness and thermal shock resistance were studied. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the coexistence of (Cu-Ni), NiO and NiFe2O4 phases in the cermets. Within the content range of metallic phase from 0% to 20% (mass fraction), the maximal bending strength (176.4 MPa) and the minimal porosity (3.9%) of composite appear at the metallic phase content of 5%. The fracture toughness increases and Vickers' hardness decreases with increasing metal content. When the thermal shock temperature difference (△t) is below 200 ℃, the loss rate of residual strength for 10NiO-NiFe2O4 ceramic is only 8%, but about 40% for (85Cu-15Ni)/(10NiO-NiFe2O4) cermets. As △t is above 200 ℃, the residual strength sharply decreases for sample CN0 and falls slowly for samples CN5-CN20.

  10. Catalytic effect of fullerene and formation of nanocomposites with complex hydrides: NaAlH4 and LiAlH4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Catalytic effect of fullerenes on the reversible hydrogen storage → Hydrogen storage properties of alkali metal hydrides and fullerene mix forming nanocomposites → Novel ways of intercalating Na and Li atoms into C60 → Destabilization of hydrides → Potential to enable the formation of other high capacity hydrogen storage materials - Abstract: Carbonaceous nanomaterials utilized as scaffolds, catalysts, and additives in conjunction with complex metal hydrides have shown remarkable hydrogen sorption properties. Our studies have confirmed fullerene-C60 is an excellent catalyst for temperature induced hydrogen desorption for both NaAlH4 and LiAlH4. Fullerene-containing complex metal hydride composites comprised of fullerene-C60 with NaAlH4 or LiAlH4 desorbed hydrogen at elevated temperature and go onto form alkali metal fullerides and aluminum metal as final products. The as-prepared composites exhibit rapid hydrogen desorption at onset temperatures of 130 deg. C and 150 deg. C, and released hydrogen content of 5.9 and 2.2 wt.% (LiAlH4 and NaAlH4, respectively) relative to the composite. The resultant alkali metal fulleride containing composites have been characterized and are capable of reversible hydrogen storage. A series of desorption/absorption experiments on the Na-C60 and Li-C60 based composites demonstrate a 1.5 wt.% and a 1.2 wt.% reversible capacity, respectively. The complex metal hydride-C60 systems were characterized by PCT, XRD, FT-IR, and TGA-RGA and demonstrate the formation of fulleride material similar to traditional hydrofullerenes which appear to be responsible for the observed reversible hydrogen storage.

  11. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  12. Nitrogen hydrides in the cold envelope of IRAS16293-2422

    OpenAIRE

    Hily-Blant, Pierre; Maret, Sébastien; Bacmann, A.; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Parise, Bérengère; Caux, Emmanuel; Faure, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen is the fifth most abundant element in the Universe, yet the gas-phase chemistry of N-bearing species remains poorly understood. Nitrogen hydrides are key molecules of nitrogen chemistry. Their abundance ratios place strong constraints on the production pathways and reaction rates of nitrogen-bearing molecules. We observed the class 0 protostar IRAS16293-2422 with the heterodyne instrument HIFI, covering most of the frequency range from 0.48 to 1.78~THz at high spectral resolution. Th...

  13. Scaling at the Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition in yttrium hydride

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, A F T; Rosenbaum, T F

    2003-01-01

    A single yttrium hydride thin film is conveniently driven through the T 0 metal-insulator transition by fine-tuning the charge carrier density n via persistent photoconductivity at low temperature. Simultaneously, electrical conductivity and Hall measurements are performed for temperatures T down to 350 mK and magnetic fields up to 14 T. A scaling analysis is applied and critical exponents, resolved separately on the metallic and insulating sides of the critical region, are determined consistently. We introduce corrections to scaling to invoke collapse of the data onto a single master curve over an extended region of the (n, T) phase diagram.

  14. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. The aluminum smelting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  16. Study on Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption by Metal Hydride Slurries Ⅰ. Absorption of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Storage Alloy MlNi5 Suspended in Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安越; 陈长聘; 徐国华; 蔡官明; 王启东

    2002-01-01

    The absorption of hydrogen was studied in metal hydride slurry, which is formed by benzene and hydrogen storage alloy powder. The influence of temperature on the rate of absorption was discussed using three-phase mass transfer model. It is also concluded that the suitable absorption temperature is 313 K.

  17. Effect of lanthanum hydride on microstructures and hydrogen storage performances of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱惜林; 韩树民; 赵鑫; 李媛; 刘宝忠

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen storage properties of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system were improved by adding lanthanum hydride (LaH3), and the role of LaH3 in hydrogen sorption process of Li-Mg-N-H system was investigated. Temperature programmed sorption results showed that the addition of lanthanum hydride reduced the dehydriding/hydriding onset temperature of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system by at least 15 K. Moreover, A 0.053 wt.%/min average rate was determined for the hydrogen desorption of 2LiNH2-MgH2-0.05LaH3 composite, while it was only 0.035 wt.%/min for 2LiNH2-MgH2 system. Hydrogen absorption capacity increased from 1.62 wt.% to 2.12 wt.% within 200 min by adding LaH3 into 2LiNH2-MgH2 system at 383 K. In the dehydrogenation of 2LiNH2-MgH2-0.05LaH3 composite, LaH2 transferred to LaN phase, which reversed to LaH2 in the following hydrogen adsorption process. The reversible reaction of LaH2 ef-fectively promoted the hydrogen sorption of Li-Mg-N-H system. Moreover, the homogenous distribution of fine La hydride was fa-vorable to improving effect of lanthanum hydride.

  18. Synthesis and properties of the Mg{sub 2}Ni{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}H{sub 4.4} hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbovytskyy, Yu. [Physico-Mechanical Institute, NAS of Ukraine, 5 Naukova str., 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Zhang, J.; Cuevas, F.; Paul-Boncour, V. [Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux de Paris Est, CMTR, UMR 7182, CNRS-UPEC, 2-8 rue H. Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Zavaliy, I., E-mail: zavaliy@ipm.lviv.ua [Physico-Mechanical Institute, NAS of Ukraine, 5 Naukova str., 79601 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-10-05

    Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of the Mg{sub 2}Ni{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}H{sub 4.4} hydride. - Highlights: • Preparation of the Mg{sub 2}Ni{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}H{sub 4.4} hydride by reactive ball milling. • Crystal structure determination by X-ray powder diffraction. • Electrochemical studies of the ball milled MH/Ni electrodes. - Abstract: The Mg{sub 2}Ni{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}H{sub 4.4} hydride with a grain size of 16 nm was prepared by reactive ball milling. Its crystal structure was studied by X-ray powder diffraction. A tetragonal Mg{sub 2}CoH{sub 5} structure type was suggested for the obtained hydride. The decomposition temperature of the Mg{sub 2}Ni{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}H{sub 4.4} phase was observed at 213 °C. Electrochemical measurements as negative electrode of Ni–MH battery were also performed. Significant improvements can be made by ball-milling the hydride with nickel powder.

  19. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  20. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in DU Hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of nuclear fusion reaction are deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Generally, D is fused into T, which generates helium atoms and neutrons. At this time, a tremendous amount of energy is generated. D + T → 4He + n (E = 17.6 MeV) Hydrogen is a gas, and cannot be stored in large amounts. In addition, it can be explosive. Therefore, one of the storing methods for hydrogen is metal hydride. In this research, several kinds of metal hydrides including U, Zr, ZrCo, ZrNi, and LaNi5 have been simulated through modeling work of hydrogen absorption, desorption, and pressure effect in a bed using DU. For the exact modeling of the hydriding process, it is necessary to calculate simultaneous heat and mass transfer because, in the hydriding process, not only is hydrogen gas transported by mass transport and chemisorption but heat transfer also occurs through absorption. Therefore, in this paper, we tried to calculate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer using numerical analysis methods. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in DU hydriding is well fitted compared to the experimental data, and is more reasonable considering only one variable. The hydriding process changes the temperature and atomic ratio simultaneously, and thus it is necessary to consider in company with two transport phenomena. The numerical analysis method applied Euler's method; however, the Runge-Kutta method is a more widely used numerical solution of a differential equation. Therefore, when analyzing the hydriding process, Runge-Kutta or another method will henceforth be applied

  1. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  2. Higher Strength, Lighter Weight Aluminum Spacecraft Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I program proposes to develop a bulk processing technology for producing ultra fine grain (UFG) aluminum alloy structures. The goal is to...

  3. Hydriding and neutron irradiation in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition of Zircaloy-4 for nuclear applications is specified by the ASTM B350 Standard, that fixes the amount of alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr) and impurities (Ni, Hf, O, N, C, among others) to optimize good corrosion and mechanical behavior.The recycling of zircaloy-4 scrap and chips resulting from cladding tube fabrication is an interesting issue.However, changes in the final composition of the recycled material may occur due to contamination with tool pieces, stainless steel chips, turnings, etc. while scrap is stored and handled. Since the main components of the possible contaminants are Fe, Cr and Ni, it arises the interest in studying up to what limit the Fe, Ni and Cr contents could be exceeded beyond the standard specification without affecting significantly the alloy properties.Zircaloy-4 alloys elaborated with Fe, Cr and Ni additions and others of standard composition in use in nuclear plants are studied by tensile tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.Some samples are tested in the initial condition and others after hydriding treatments and neutron irradiation in the RA6

  4. Reactions of NO with nitrogen hydrides x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebel, A. M.; Lin, M. C.

    In this review, we consider the reactions of NO ( x 1,2) with the nitrogen x hydrides NH, NH and NH . The reactions are relevant to the post-combustion, non-catalytic reduction of NO with NH in the thermal de-NO process and with x x HNCO in the rapid reduction of NO as well as to the thermal decomposition of x some high-energy materials, including ammonium dinitramide. The practical importance has motivated considerable theoretical interest in these reactions. We review numerous ab - initio molecular orbital studies of potential energy surfaces for NO NH and theoretical calculations of their kinetic parameters, such as x y thermal rate constants and branching ratios of various products. The most advanced theoretical calculations are carried out using the Gaussian-2 family of methods which provides the chemical accuracy (within 2 kcal mol ) for the energetics and molecular parameters of the reactants, products, intermediates and transition states. We present a detailed comparison of the theoretical results with available experimental data. We show that the reactions of NO with NH and NH x are very fast because they occur without a barrier and lead to the formation of multiple products which include radicals and stable molecules. The reactions of NO with NH , taking place by the H abstraction to form NH and HNO , are slow x x but still relevant to the NH de-NO system, because of their fast reverse processes x which have not yet been measured experimentally.

  5. Burning characteristics of individual aluminum/aluminum oxide particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ruttenberg, Eric C.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited An experimental investigation was conducted in which the burning characteristics of individual aluminum/aluminum oxide particles were measured using a windowed combustion bomb at atmospheric pressure and under gravity-fall conditions. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to measure the size distribution of the initial aluminum particles and the aluminum oxide residue. Analysis of the residue indicated that the mass of aluminum...

  6. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  7. First-Principles Study of the γAngle Deformation Path in the Wurtzite-to-Rocksalt Phase Transition in Aluminum Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Ying-Xiang; XU Rui

    2010-01-01

    @@ A new transition path(γangle deformation path)is put forward and used to characterize the wurtzite-rocksalt transition in AlN.The enthalpy surface and the contour plot of enthalpy difference at equilibrium pressure are obtained by first-principles pseudopotential method within the generalized gradient approximation.The phase transition is needed to overcome two barriers and a metaphase arises between them.The total barrier height is0.26eV.

  8. Synergistic hydrogen desorption behavior of magnesium aluminum hydride synthesized by mechano-chemical activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mg(AlH4)2 could release 3.1 wt% H2 at initial temperature as low as 100 °C. ► The synergistic and mutual catalytic effects of NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 were noticed. ► In situ synchrotron XRD confirmed the two-step dehydrogenation process of Mg(AlH4)2. - Abstract: A mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS) is employed to fabricate Mg(AlH4)2 via milling the precursors, specifically NaAlH4 and MgCl2. The corresponding dehydrogenation behavior of the synthesized powders is investigated. The experimental results showed that incomplete synthesis or premature dehydrogenation may occur if the milling process was not properly controlled. The hydrogen content of each synthesized powder is determined by using a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The dehydrogenation reactions of the synthesized powders are investigated by employing ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ synchrotron XRD and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results showed that the incompletely synthesized powder consisted of residual NaAlH4 in the synthesized Mg(AlH4)2, which demonstrated an initial dehydrogenation temperature as low as 100 °C and accompanied with a maximum amount (3.1 wt%) of H2 released below 350 °C. The mutual catalytic effect of both NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 on lowering their initial dehydrogenation temperature is confirmed.

  9. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  10. Influence of metallurgical variables on the velocity of crack propagation by delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in Zr-Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis work the propagation of cracks due to the delayed hydride cracking (DHC) mechanism in Zr-2,5 % Nb pressure tubes is analyzed. For this purpose two different type of tubes of different origin were used: CANDU type (Canada) and RBMK type (Russia). The analyzed figurative parameters were: critical temperature Tc (highest temperature at which DHC phenomenon could occur) and crack propagation velocity by DHC, Vp, in the axial direction. The influence of the memory effect (phenomenon proper of hydride precipitation) was studied, as well as the type of cracks (fatigue or DHC) on Tc. However, no influence of these effects was found. Instead, it was found that Tc varies with the hydrogen content of the specimen, in agreement with previous works. Samples obtained from tubes with different microstructures and similar amounts of hydrogen presented similar Tc values. It was also shown that DHC propagation could occur without precipitated hydrides in the volume. Besides, Vp determinations were performed in temperature ranges and hydrogen amounts of technological importance. Two techniques were set up in order to determine Vp at different temperatures in a single specimen, thus saving time and material. An Arrhenius type variation was found for Vp vs. temperature, for temperatures lower than that corresponding to precipitation. For higher temperatures, but lower than the critical one, velocity decreases with temperature. Determination of Vp vs. temperature was performed for the two above-mentioned materials, whose microstructure and hardness were previously characterized. For RBMK material, which presents a spheroidal β phase, the velocity was lower than the corresponding to CANDU material, in which β phase is formed by continuous plates. In addition, yield stress σY is lower in RBMK material, which presents lower Vp. However, it is considered that the effect of microstructure is more important on Vp since it highly affects diffusion of hydrogen from the

  11. Behaviour of aluminum foam under fire conditions

    OpenAIRE

    J. Grabian; K. Gawdzińska; M. Szweycer

    2008-01-01

    Taking into account fire-protection requirements it is advantageous for aluminum foam, after melting at a temperature considerably exceeding the melting point, to have a structure of discontinuous suspension of solid inclusions to liquid metal instead of liquid consistency. Continuity of the suspension depends on the solid phase content. The boundary value of the phase determined by J. Śleziona, above which the suspension becomes discontinuous, is provided by the formula (1). Figure 1 present...

  12. A 7Li and 27Al NMR study of interaction of lithium hydride with aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium hydride interaction with metal aluminium is studied using 7Li and 27Al NMR method within 100-700 deg C temperature interval. It is detected, that at temperatures exceeding 420 deg C a number of α', α'', β, γ, δ and δ' phases based on intermetallic LiAl9, LiAl3, LiAl, Li3Al2 and Li9Al4 compounds (IC) are produced in LiH-Al system, their concentrations and rates of production being dependent on the molar ratio of initial components r =[LiH]:[Al]. Production of a stable αphase of [Al] and two methastable α' and α''-phases based on LiAl3 and LiAl9, which are decayed at 530 deg C, is detected under minor molar lithium content. Values of 7Li and 27Al NMR shifts in IC are determined. (author)

  13. Decomposition kinetics study of zirconium hydride by interrupted thermal desorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Mingwang; Liang, Li; Tang, Binghua; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Cheng, Yanlin; Tan, Xiaohua, E-mail: caepiee@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interrupted TDS was applied to investigate the mechanism of ZrH{sub 2} decomposition. • The activation energies for the five desorption peaks were determined. • The origins of the five desorption peaks were identified. • The γZrH phase was observed at ambient conditions. - Abstract: Thermal desorption kinetics of zirconium hydride powder were studied using thermogravimetry and simultaneous thermal desorption spectroscopy. The activation energies for observed desorption peaks were estimated according to Kissinger relation. The intermediate phase composition was studied using X-ray diffraction by rapid cooling on different stages of heating. The origins of the peaks were described as the equilibrium hydrogen pressure of a number of consecutive phase regions that decomposition reaction passed through. The zirconium monohydride γZrH was observed for extended periods of time at ambient conditions, which has been supposed to be metastable for a long time.

  14. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  15. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  16. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  17. Influence of Specific Surface Area of Powder on Hydrogen Desorption Kinetics for Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The observable results for desorption kinetics by powder of metal hydride on the example of mangesium hydride are reproduced with the model formulated in terms of specific surface of powder. A volumetric measurement of hydrogen desorption process is evaluated on an example of wet ball milled magnesium hydride, and can be applied generally for any metal hydride. The exact solution of the model reproduces the shape of experimental curves for desorption process providing a satisfying agreement with experimental data.

  18. Two-Dimensional Boron Hydride Sheets: High Stability, Massless Dirac Fermions, and Excellent Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yalong; Ma, Fengxian; Bell, John; Bilic, Ante; Du, Aijun

    2016-08-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) boron sheets have been successfully synthesized in recent experiments, however, some important issues remain, including the dynamical instability, high energy, and the active surface of the sheets. In an attempt to stabilize 2D boron layers, we have used density functional theory and global minimum search with the particle-swarm optimization method to predict four stable 2D boron hydride layers, namely the C2/m, Pbcm, Cmmm, and Pmmn sheets. The vibrational normal mode calculations reveal all these structures are dynamically stable, indicating potential for successful experimental synthesis. The calculated Young's modulus indicates a high mechanical strength for the C2/m and Pbcm phases. Most importantly, the C2/m, Pbcm, and Pmmn structures exhibit Dirac cones with massless Dirac fermions and the Fermi velocities for the Pbcm and Cmmm structures are even higher than that of graphene. The Cmmm phase is reported as the first discovery of Dirac ring material among boron-based 2D structures. The unique electronic structure of the 2D boron hydride sheets makes them ideal for nanoelectronics applications. PMID:27460282

  19. Calorimetric determination of the δ hydride dissolution enthalpy in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the dissolution enthalpy, ΔHδ→α, of the δ hydride phase in the αZr matrix in Zircaloy-4 has been determined with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) in two different ways: by means of a vant Hoff equation, measuring the terminal solubility temperature in dissolution, TSSd, and by direct measurement of the dissolution heat, Qδ→α, as the area between the base line and the calorimetric curve. The application of the DSC technique to the hydride dissolution heat measurements, a transformation which covers an extended temperature range, is completely original and requires a special treatment of the calorimetric curve. These measurements were done on samples, which practically cover the whole solubility range of hydrogen in αZr phase (80-640 ppm). The values obtained, 36.9 kJ/mol H and 39.3 kJ/mol H respectively, are self-consistent and in good agreement with the values of the more recent revisions, but reduces considerably the scatter of the literature data. (author)

  20. Rietveld analysis of neutron powder diffraction of Mg{sub 6}Pd alloy at various hydriding stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huot, J. [Institut de Recherche sur l' Hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 Boul. des Forges, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, G9A 5H7 (Canada)], E-mail: jacques.huot@uqtr.ca; Yonkeu, A. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council of Canada, Building 459, Station 18, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Dufour, J. [Institut de Recherche sur l' Hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 Boul. des Forges, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2009-05-05

    The evolution of the crystal structure of Mg{sub 6}Pd alloy, synthesized by ball milling, was investigated by simultaneous Rietveld refinement of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction. Samples with different deuterium contents were measured, corresponding to reaction end-products of proposed hydrogenation step. After full hydrogenation, Mg{sub 6}Pd alloy transforms to MgPd alloy and MgD{sub 2}. Increases in lattice parameters of MgPd alloy agrees well with measured hydrogen capacities. There are some evidences that at each hydrogenation step in magnesium alloys, magnesium atoms with high values of thermal parameters are the ones that will form magnesium hydride upon hydrogenation. Magnesium hydride phases presented a high level of strain which could be related to the important hysteresis in the pressure-composition isotherm curve.

  1. Effect of loaded organic phase containing mixtures of silicon and aluminum,single iron on extraction of lanthanum in saponification P507-HCl system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wenyuan; ZHANG Fengyun; BIAN Xue; XUE Shoufeng; YIN Shaohua; ZHENG Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Emulsification troubled normal extraction process of rare earths due to the existence of non-rare earth impurities,especially Si,Al and Fe.Against this background,the effect of emulsification caused by Si,Al and Fe on the La extraction with saponification P507 (2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester) in chloride medium was systematically investigated.A series of experiments were carried out to study the relationship of the extraction capacity of La and the concentration of impurities.ZPM-203 polarizing microscope was applied to investigate the morphology of emulsification,and the cation exchange extraction mechanism of Fe and Al as well as La was clarified by IR spectra.The results showed that a low concentration of Si in organic phase would aggravate the emulsification with A1,and the formation of ME (micro emulsion) and club-shaped polymer would result in emulsification in the extraction of mixtures of Si and A1,single Fe,respectively.Furthermore,the accumulation of impurity such as Si,Al and Fe in the organic phase would severely reduce the extraction capacity of La simultaneously.

  2. The effect of aluminum content on phase constitution and heat treatment behavior of Ti-Cr-Al alloys for healthcare application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As life expectancy steadily increases, developing reliable functional materials for healthcare applications gains importance. Titanium and its alloys, while attractive for such applications, are expensive. The present investigation suggests that it may be possible to reduce costs by using new, low-cost beta Ti alloys. To assess their reliability, the heat treatment behavior of beta Ti alloys, Ti-7 mass% Cr with varying Al content (0%, 1.5%, 3.0% and 4.5%), was investigated through electrical resistivity and Vickers hardness measurements. In the Ti-7Cr-0Al alloy quenched from 1173 K, only the beta phase was identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). In Ti-7Cr-1.5 to 4.5 Al alloys, XRD detected both beta and orthorhombic martensite. On isochronal heat treatment behavior of Ti-7Cr-3.0, 4.5 Al alloys, resistivity at liquid nitrogen temperature and resistivity ratio increased between 423 and 523 K.These increases are due to reverse transformation of orthorhombic martensite to the metastable beta phase

  3. A metal hydride-polymer composite for hydrogen storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To address the issue of the breakdown into fine powders that occurs in the practical use of metal hydrides, the possibility of using a polymeric material as a matrix that contains the active metal particles was experimentally assessed. A ball milling approach in the tumbling mode was used to develop a metal hydride-polymer composite with a high metal to polymer weight ratio. The alloy powder was blended with the polymer and a coating of the metal particles was obtained. The composite was consolidated by hot pressing and the pellets were characterized in terms of their hydriding-dehydriding properties. The materials did not show significant losses in either loading capacity or kinetic properties. The polymeric matrix resulted as being stable under hydrogen cycling. Further, from SEM observation it was confirmed that the metal powders remained embedded in the polymeric matrix even after a number of cycles and that the overall dimensional integrity was retained.

  4. Theoretical Estimate of Hydride Affinities of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Teng; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Aromatic carbonyl compounds are one type of the most important organic compounds, and the reductions ofthem by hydride agents such as LiAlH4 or NaBH4 are widely used in organic synthesis. The reactivity of carbonyl compounds generally increases in the following order: ketone < aldehyde, and amide < acid < ester < acid halide, which could be related to their hydride affinities (HA). In the previous paper, Robert[1] calculated the absolute HAof a series of small non-aromatic carbonyl compounds. In this paper, we use DFT method at B3LYP/6-311 + + G (2d, 2p)∥B3LYP/6-31 + G* level to estimate hydride affinities of five groups of aromatic carbonyl compounds. The detailed results are listed in Table 1.

  5. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental and hot bands of the vibration--rotation transitions of 6 LiH, 7 LiH, 6 LiD, and 7 LiD were observed by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at Doppler-limited resolution. Lithium hydride molecules were produced by the reaction of the Li vapor with hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Some 40 transitions were observed and, after combined with submillimeter-wave spectra reported by G. M. Plummer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 4893 (1984)], were analyzed to yield Dunham-type constants with accuracies more than an order of magnitude higher than those published in the literature. It was clearly demonstrated that the Born--Oppenheimer approximation did not hold, and some parameters representing the breakdown were evaluated. The Born--Oppenheimer internuclear distance r/sup BO//sub e/ was derived to be 1.594 914 26 (59) A, where a new value of Planck's constant recommended by CODATA was employed. The relative intensity of absorption lines was measured to determine the ratio of the permanent dipole moment to its first derivative with respect to the internuclear distance: μ/sub e/ [(partialμpartialr)/sub e/ r/sub e/ ] = 1.743(86). The pressure broadening parameter Δν/sub p/ P was determined to be 6.40 (22) MHzTorr by measuring the linewidth dependence on the pressure of hydrogen, which was about four times larger than the value for the dipole--quadrupole interaction estimated by Kiefer and Bushkovitch's theory

  6. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Yale University

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  7. Mn in misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloy - Part 1 structural, hydrogen storage and electrochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K.; Wong, D. F.; Wang, L.; Nei, J.; Ouchi, T.; Yasuoka, S.

    2015-03-01

    The structural, gaseous phase hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties of a series of Mn-modified misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloys were investigated in part one of this two-part series of papers. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that these alloys are all multi-phased compositions with different abundances of AB2, AB3, A2B7, AB4, and AB5 phases. Substitution of Ni in the B-site by Mn promotes AB5 phase formation and decreases both gaseous phase and electrochemical capacities due to the reduction in the abundance of main hexagonal A2B7 phase. AC impedance and magnetic susceptibility measurement were employed to characterize the surface of Mn-free and Mn-modified alloys and show deterioration in surface catalytic ability as the Mn-content increases. Mn-modification adversely affected misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloy properties such as phase homogeneity, capacity, cycle stability, high-rate performance, and surface reaction.

  8. Active-Transient Liquid Phase (A-TLP) Bonding of Pure Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Alumina Fiber Using Al-12Si-xTi Foils as Active Interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Suzumura, Akio

    2016-02-01

    To optimize both the interlayer composition design route and pressure for joining aluminum matrix composite reinforced with short alumina fiber (as-cast 30 vol pct Al2O3sf/Al), traditional transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding using Al-12Si and Cu interlayer and active-TLP (A-TLP) bonding using an active Ti-containing interlayer (Al-12Si-xTi, x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt pct) under the same condition [883 K (610 °C) × 30 minutes × 1 or 0.015 MPa in flowing argon] were compared in terms of interfacial wettability, bond seam microstructure, shear strength, and fracture path. It was found that not only the Ti content but also the pressure are critical factors affecting interfacial wettability and bond seam microstructure. The improvement in wettability by adding Ti as an active element were confirmed by reduction of expulsion of liquid interlayer, elimination of interfacial gap, higher shear strength and favorable fracture path (partially through bond seam and the composite). Because of the incubation period for wetting, reducing the pressure after melting of the interlayer could further increase joint shear strength by thickening the remaining bond seam of solid-solution matrix and decreasing fraction of the in situ newly formed Al-Si-Ti IMC phase (short bar shape) within the bond seam. The maximum shear strength of 88.6 MPa (99 pct of the as-cast composite) was obtained by adding trace Ti content (0.5 Ti wt pct) addition and using low pressure (0.015 MPa). The results showed that suitable combination of Ti content and pressure pattern is required for improving both wettability and bond seam microstructure.

  9. Active-Transient Liquid Phase (A-TLP) Bonding of Pure Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Alumina Fiber Using Al-12Si- xTi Foils as Active Interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Suzumura, Akio

    2016-06-01

    To optimize both the interlayer composition design route and pressure for joining aluminum matrix composite reinforced with short alumina fiber (as-cast 30 vol pct Al2O3sf/Al), traditional transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding using Al-12Si and Cu interlayer and active-TLP (A-TLP) bonding using an active Ti-containing interlayer (Al-12Si- xTi, x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt pct) under the same condition [883 K (610 °C) × 30 minutes × 1 or 0.015 MPa in flowing argon] were compared in terms of interfacial wettability, bond seam microstructure, shear strength, and fracture path. It was found that not only the Ti content but also the pressure are critical factors affecting interfacial wettability and bond seam microstructure. The improvement in wettability by adding Ti as an active element were confirmed by reduction of expulsion of liquid interlayer, elimination of interfacial gap, higher shear strength and favorable fracture path (partially through bond seam and the composite). Because of the incubation period for wetting, reducing the pressure after melting of the interlayer could further increase joint shear strength by thickening the remaining bond seam of solid-solution matrix and decreasing fraction of the in situ newly formed Al-Si-Ti IMC phase (short bar shape) within the bond seam. The maximum shear strength of 88.6 MPa (99 pct of the as-cast composite) was obtained by adding trace Ti content (0.5 Ti wt pct) addition and using low pressure (0.015 MPa). The results showed that suitable combination of Ti content and pressure pattern is required for improving both wettability and bond seam microstructure.

  10. Dissolution and Precipitation Temperatures of δ Hydrides in Zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anelastic effects due to the formation and dissolution of hydrides on crystal bar Zirconium (O-6 and 2x10-5 , in a gaseous atmosphere (He) to allow a better thermal conductivity inside the pendulum.Hydriding was achieved inside the pendulum by the inlet of hydrogen gas.The final hydrogen contents was determined by fusion analysis and resulted in 36 ppm.The first ''in situ'' hydriding is obtained by introducing an hydrogen pressure of 60kPa in the pendulum during 1h at 295K. Then, the hydrogen atmosphere is extracted by mechanical vacuum and an helium atmosphere is reinserted.The IF and G measurements are made in this condition. During the first heating an anomaly at 430K and a little step in the modulus G are obtained, indicating a d dissolution temperature TSSD of 430K for 8.6 wt ppm of H.After a solubilization of 10min at 495K, there are simultaneous effects: a step in G and an IF peak which is not enough developed on its right side.They presume a d precipitation temperature TSSP of 485K for 20 wt ppm of H. After a 1h at 490K, the peaks are again obtained with slight changes.The second ''in situ'' hydration during 8h at 173K, give rise to several peaks and modulus variations in the temperature range (300-400)K which are assessed to be due to transitions occurring to metastable γ and ε hydrides formed upon hydriding at low temperature, and to the δ hydride

  11. Fabrication of aluminum foam from aluminum scrap Hamza

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Osman1 ,; Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Engineering- Qena, Al_Azhar University, Egypt

    2015-01-01

    In this study the optimum parameters affecting the preparation of aluminum foam from recycled aluminum were studied, these parameters are: temperature, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as foaming agent, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as thickening agent, and stirring time. The results show that, the optimum parameters are the temperature ranged from 800 to 850oC, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 5%, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 3% and stirring time was 45 second ...

  12. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  13. Energy management of fuel cell electric vehicle with hydrid tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Ravey, Alexandre; FAIVRE, Sébastien; HIGEL, Charles; HAREL, Fabien; Djerdir, Abdesslem

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel control strategy for fuel cell electric vehicle including hydrid tanks using fuzzy logic controller. The aim of the study is to manage both thermal and electric energy with the same controller in order to use the fuel cell system as a range extender by preventing the batteries state of charge to drop too quickly. The presented controller use both batteries state of charge and thermal status of hydrid tank to control the fuel cell power. This work is a part of the M...

  14. Hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. First-principles calculations suggested that CaSiH n is thermodynamically stable. Experimentally, the p -c isotherms clearly demonstrated plateau pressures in a temperature range of 473-573 K and the maximum hydrogen content was 1.9 weight % (wt.%) under a hydrogen pressure of 9 MPa at 473 K. The structure of CaSiH n is different from those of ZrNi hydrides, although CaSi has the CrB-type structure as well as ZrNi

  15. Mechanism of the α-to-β phase transformation in the LaNi5-H2 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, E. MacA.; Blach, T. P.; Pitt, M. P.; Cookson, D. J. [Griffith U; (ASRP)

    2014-09-24

    High-energy synchrotron in situ X-ray powder diffraction has been used to elucidate the mechanism of the hydriding phase transformation in a LaNi5 model hydrogen storage intermetallic in real time. The transformation proceeds at 10 ºC via the transient growth of an interfacial phase, the {gamma} phase, with lattice parameters intermediate between those of the α (dilute solid solution) and β (concentrated hydride) phases. The γ phase forms to partially accommodate the 24% change in unit cell volume between the α and β phases during hydriding and dehydriding. The α, γ and β phases coexist at the nanoscopic level.

  16. Characteristics of the Decontamination by the Melting of Aluminum Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of the aluminum melting temperature, melting time and a kind of flux agents on the distribution of surrogate nuclide were investigated in the electric furnace at the aluminum melting including surrogate radionuclides(Co, Cs, Sr) in order to establish the fundamental research of the melting technology for the metallic wastes from the decommissioning of the TRIGA research reactor. It was verified that the fluidity of aluminum melt was increased by adding flux agent but it was slightly varied according to the sort of flux agents. The results of the XRD analysis showed that the surrogate nuclides move into the slag phase and then they were combined with aluminum oxide to form more stable compound. The weight of the slag generated from aluminum melting test increased with increasing melting temperature and melting time and the increase rate of the slag depended on the kind of flux agents added in the aluminum waste. The concentration of the cobalt in the ingot phase decreased with increasing reaction temperature but it increased in the slag phase up to 90% according to the experimental conditions. The volatile nuclides such as Cs and Sr considerably transferred from the ingot phase to the slag and dust phase.

  17. Characteristics of the Decontamination by the Melting of Aluminum Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Pyung Seob; Choi, Wang Kyu; Min, Byung Youn; Kim, Hak I; Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, Won Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Effects of the aluminum melting temperature, melting time and a kind of flux agents on the distribution of surrogate nuclide were investigated in the electric furnace at the aluminum melting including surrogate radionuclides(Co, Cs, Sr) in order to establish the fundamental research of the melting technology for the metallic wastes from the decommissioning of the TRIGA research reactor. It was verified that the fluidity of aluminum melt was increased by adding flux agent but it was slightly varied according to the sort of flux agents. The results of the XRD analysis showed that the surrogate nuclides move into the slag phase and then they were combined with aluminum oxide to form more stable compound. The weight of the slag generated from aluminum melting test increased with increasing melting temperature and melting time and the increase rate of the slag depended on the kind of flux agents added in the aluminum waste. The concentration of the cobalt in the ingot phase decreased with increasing reaction temperature but it increased in the slag phase up to 90% according to the experimental conditions. The volatile nuclides such as Cs and Sr considerably transferred from the ingot phase to the slag and dust phase.

  18. Electrochemical and metallurgical characterization of ZrCr1-xNiMox AB2 metal hydride alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of partial replacement of chromium by molybdenum was studied on the structure and electrochemical kinetic properties of ZrCr1-xNiMox(x = 0.0, 0.3 and 0.6) metal hydride alloys. The arc-melting prepared alloys were metallurgically characterized by X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy microanalysis, which showed AB2 (with hexagonal C14 structure) and ZrxNiy (Zr7Ni10, Zr9Ni11) phases. After a partial substitution of chromium by molybdenum, secondary phases monotonically increase with the C14 unit cell volume indicating that most of molybdenum atoms locate in the B-site. The alloys were electrochemically characterized using charge/discharge cycling, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and rate capability experiments that allowed the determination of hydriding reaction kinetic parameters. The presence of molybdenum produces a positive effect for hydrogen diffusion in the alloy lattice, and ZrCr0.7NiMo0.3 alloy depicts the better kinetics associated with a fast activation, lower charge transfer resistance and the best high rate discharge behavior. This fact would be related to a lower diffusion time constant and a bigger value of the product between exchange density current and surface active area. There is a trade-off in the amounts of secondary phase and Laves phases in order to improve the kinetic performance. - Highlights: • Metallurgical characterization evidences the presence of ZrxNiy and C14 phases. • The partial replacement of Cr by Mo promotes the segregation of ZrxNiy phase. • The incorporation of molybdenum improves the kinetics for the hydriding process. • Mo produces a decrease in the diffusion time constant

  19. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  20. Observations on Hydride Structures at the Tip of Arrested Cracks Grown under Conditions of Delayed Hydride Cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One sample of Zr2.5%Nb and one sample of cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 which have been tested for hydrogen induced crack growth have been examined in the crack tip region with the aim of determining the mechanism behind the growth of cracks. The proposed mechanisms are brittle failure of a crack tip hydride and hydrogen enhanced localized shear. The examinations were done by TEM and SEM. However attempts to produce a TEM specimen with a thinned region at the tip of the crack were unsuccessful in both samples. One feature observed in the Zr2.5%Nb material may however be an indication of intense shear deformation at the tip of the crack. On the other hand all observations on the Zircaloy-4 sample indicate precipitation of hydrides ahead of the crack tip and the presence of hydrides on the crack flanks

  1. X-ray investigation of intermetallides and their hydrides under hydrogen pressure in H2-LaNi5 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray phase analysis has been used to investigate phase composition of LaNi5-H2 system; comparison of X-ray diffraction data with the results of plotting absorption and desorption isotherms is conducted. Technique of the X-ray diffraction study of intermetallide-hydrogen system using special X-ray chamber to diffractometer DRON-1.5 (GUR-5) is worked out. The parameters of elementary cell of the LaNisub(5)Hsub(6.2) hydride are determined: a=0.541(2) pm, c=0.430(2) nm, c/a=0.795, V=0.109 nm3 (hexagonal syngony)

  2. Investigation of increased hydriding of guide tubes in Ringhals 2 during cycle startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two main sources for hydrogen uptake into Zr alloy components. Beside the uptake of hydrogen from the corrosion reaction, direct uptake of hydrogen from the PWR primary water is the second source and can occur under certain conditions. In Ringhals 2, two guide tubes broke during insertion of control rods in the pool during the outage in 1990 resulting from high hydrogen contents which were found in the Zry-4 guide tubes. The hydrogen content showed large variations between different guide tubes from the same assembly at the same axial elevation. In extreme cases, rims of massive hydrides were seen at the inner surface. In the most affected guide tubes, the oxide thickness at the ID was about 20 μm whereas normal oxide was only about 5 μm. Hot cell examination revealed that the hydrogen content was up to 3000 ppm (average in wall thickness) which means that the hydrogen pickup fraction was well above 100 %. This was a clear indication that a significant amount of hydrogen was stemming from a different source than corrosion. The inner surfaces of these particular guide tubes were grit-blasted with a stainless steel lance. The root-cause analysis revealed by SEM and GDOS that the grit-blasting with such a lance resulted in embedding small stainless steel particles at the guide tube inner surface which in-pile acted as 'hydrogen windows'. When Ni deposited on the surface during the start-up procedure, hydrogen was picked up catalytically after it was added to the coolant at about 150 deg. C. Autoclave tests simulating the start up of a PWR were used to demonstrate the increased hydrogen pickup. The tests showed that this type of accelerated hydriding can be reproduced in the laboratory with guide tube samples grit-blasted on the inside. A necessary condition was that Ni in the coolant was high during the start-up phase and hydrogen was added to the water before the formation of a protective oxide layer can prevent the hydrogen uptake. The tests revealed a

  3. Experimental design and simulation of a metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadre, Sarang Ajit

    Metal hydrides, as a hydrogen storage medium, have been under consideration for many years because they have the ability to store hydrogen reversibly in the solid state at relatively low pressures and ambient temperatures. The utility of metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage medium was demonstrated recently by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in an on-board hydrogen storage system for a hybrid electric bus project. The complex geometry and the intricate design of the SRTC bed presents quite a challenge to the development of a mathematical model that can be used for design and optimization. In a new approach introduced here, the reversible reaction kinetics and the empirical Van't Hoff relationship used in a typical reactor model are replaced by a solid phase diffusion equation and one of the two semi-empirical equilibrium P-C-T relationships based on modified virial and composite Langmuir isotherm expressions. Starting with the simplest mathematical formulation, which resulted in an analytical expression, various models were developed and successively improved by relaxing certain assumptions, eventually resulting in the most rigorous model yet developed for this system. All of these models were calibrated using experimental pressure and temperature histories obtained from a bench scale hydrogen storage test facility. The heat and mass transfer coefficients or the thermal conductivity were the only adjustable parameters in these models. A design of experiments approach was also used for studying the effect of various factors on the performance of this bench scale hydrogen storage unit. Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that even a fairly simple numerical model could do a reasonable job in predicting the discharge behavior of a fairly complicated, metal hydride hydrogen storage bed over a wide range of operating conditions. The more rigorous 2-D model gave considerable insight into the dynamics of the hydrogen discharge process from an

  4. New technological method of forming an ohmic contact to undoped amorphous silicon hydride semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The forming of surface ohmic contacts in thin film field transistors memory and solar cells on Schottky-type barrier and others on base amorphous hydrogenase silicon (a-Si:H) is rather laborious and not prime problem, as known. For example, typical ohmic contact layer materials sometimes exhibit diffusion through the amorphous silicon hydride layer resulting in ill-defined or dimensionally irregular contact and semiconductor regions and, in the extreme case, catastrophic degradation of the semiconductor properties of the material. Further, an oxide barrier may form at the interface, which limits electrical conductivity. Finally, in the prior art, in order to achieve ohmic contacts, it was required that a highly doped (n+- layer) film be deposited on the substrate before or after the amorphous silicon hydride deposition in order to reduce barrier formation at the metal-semiconductor interface. The dopant from gas phase contained gas phosphine for making n+- layer, but phosphine are toxic and explosive gas. This specified problem possible to solve entering in technological process of the creation thin-film device on a-Si:H (and other amorphous hydrogenase semiconductors) additional technological operation annealing the films of the amorphous semiconductor at a temperature of about 400 deg C (hydrogen effusion temperature), during 20-30 min, after the films of the semiconductor on substrate, if and when there is no need to forming the n-type layer. After cooling, an amorphous silicon hydride semiconductor layer covered with the masking dielectric layer, then the optical lithography for opening the windows in masking dielectric layer and evaporation metallic electrode are performed. The concerned method is based on the following known fact. The diffusion process (the evaporation) of the hydrogen occurs from surfaces of a-Si:H film at the temperature 350-450 deg. C. As a result this, concentration of the hydrogen a-Si:H surface layer are sharply decreased

  5. Fourier transformation IR spectroscopy of rare earth hydrides and manganates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication describes IR optical investigations of rare earth hybrids and manganates. Both of these material systems have a pronounced interaction with light in the IR spectral region and are therefore well suited for Fourier transformation IR spectroscopy. Especially the spectra of the La1-xCaxMnO3 films contain many structures that derive both from the investigated film and the substrate. Quantitative information on the properties of the material system is obtained by separating the optical properties of LCMO from the substrate by means of adaptation using a multilayer formalism. The temperature dependence of the IR spectra was investigated down to the low-temperature range. Splitting and frequency shifts of the phonon modes were quantified, and the sensitive influence of the oxygen concentration of the samples on their optical properties was demonstrated. As representatives of the class of rare earth hybrids, various aspects of the material systems NdH2, EuH2 and YHx were investigated in thin film samples grown on substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy. Detailed RHEED and Auger electron spectroscopy investigations provided information on the growth process, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the samples. By using a buffer layer between the rare earth metals and the palladium protective layer which is necessary with Nd and Eu, the minimum thickness of the Pd layer could be reduced about by half. The structural changes resulting from hydrogen loading are investigated by means of Raman measurements of the Nd hydride. The raman-active phonons that were observed for the first time by this method are strongly dependent on the crystal structure, i.e. the various phases are identified as a function of the hydrogen concentration. With the aid of the isotope effect, the origin of the phonons observed in the IR reflection and transmission spectra can be attributed to hydrogen oscillations. Evaluation of the spectra by multilayer formalism provides

  6. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  7. Fabrication of aluminum foam from aluminum scrap Hamza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Osman1 ,

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the optimum parameters affecting the preparation of aluminum foam from recycled aluminum were studied, these parameters are: temperature, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as foaming agent, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as thickening agent, and stirring time. The results show that, the optimum parameters are the temperature ranged from 800 to 850oC, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 5%, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 3% and stirring time was 45 second with stirring speed 1200 rpm. The produced foam apparent densities ranged from 0.40-0.60 g/cm3. The microstructure of aluminum foam was examined by using SEM, EDX and XRD, the results show that, the aluminum pores were uniformly distributed along the all matrices and the cell walls covered by thin oxide film.

  8. ALUMINUM RECLAMATION BY ACIDIC EXTRACTION OF ALUMINUM-ANODIZING SLUDGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extraction of aluminum-anodizing sludges with sulfuric acid was examined to determine the potential for production of commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, that is liquid alum. The research established kinetic and stoichiometric relationships and evaluates product qu...

  9. Studies of boron hydrides: new heteroboranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I. The chemistry of the bipentaborane 2,2'-(B5H8)2 is investigated to some extent. Pyrolysis of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 resulted in the formation of non-volatile solid boron hydrides and hydrogen. Treatment of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with bromine in the presence of AlBr3 resulted in the isolation of 1,1'Br2-2,2'-(B5H7)2. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with deprotonating agents resulted in the formation of the corresponding anions. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with diborane followed by acidification afforded n-B9H15 and B10H14 in moderate yield. II. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with potassium polyselenide resulted in the isolation of stable white crystals of B9H9SSe. Treatment of B9H9SSe with one equivalent of base in methanol gave the unstable heteroborane B8H9(OCH3)SSE and treatment with two equivalents of base afforded yellow crystals of B7H9SSe. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with arsenic trioxide in aqueous basic solution gave the electron-rich heteroborane, B8H8As2S in moderate yield. This resulted in the isolation and identification of Et3N.BH3 and the new metalloborane B7H7As2SCo(C5H5). Treatment of B10H11Se- with As2O3 resulted in the isolation of the stable nido-heteroborane B8H8As2Se in low yield. Reaction of B7C2H13 with potassium polyselenide gave the arachno selenacarborane B7H2C11Se in low yield. The structure of the new heteroborane is proposed on the basis of 11B and 1H nmr spectra. Reaction of B7C2H13 with AsCl3 resulted in the isolation of white stable crystals of B7C2H9As2 in 40 percent yield

  10. Uranium Hydride Nucleation Kinetics: Effects of Oxide Thickness and Vacuum Outgassing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many factors such as impurities in the oxide and metal, microstructure, gas impurities, and oxide thickness may influence the rate and location of the nucleation of hydride on uranium. This work has concentrated on isolating one of these variables, the oxide thickness, and measuring the effect of the oxide thickness on uranium hydride nucleation. Uranium samples, all from the same lot, were prepared with different oxide thicknesses. The oxide thickness was measured using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Oxidized uranium samples were then exposed to ultra-high purity hydrogen gas under constant volume conditions. Decreases in pressure indicated hydrogen uptake by the sample. The time for hydride nucleation--as well as the maximum hydriding rate--was then calculated from the measured decreases in pressure. The time to nucleate a hydride was found to increase whereas the maximum hydriding rate was found to decrease with increasing oxide thickness. The density of hydride pits also decreased with increasing oxide thickness. The observed results support the argument that the nucleation of hydride is controlled somewhat by diffusion of hydrogen through the oxide layer. Vacuum outgassing of samples, thereby removing the oxide impurities and keeping the oxide thickness constant, dramatically decreased the nucleation time and increased the maximum hydriding rate. Again, this is consistent with hydrogen diffusion through the oxide controlling the nucleation of hydride. Impurities in the oxide layer can decrease the diffusivity of hydrogen and therefore delay the nucleation of uranium hydride

  11. The Nondestructive Determination of the Aluminum Content in Pressed Skulls of Aluminum Dross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkijan, Varuzan; Škapin, Srečo Davor; Kovačec, Uroš

    2013-02-01

    During production of primary and secondary aluminum, various amounts (in some cases up to 200 kg) of aluminum dross, a mixture consisting of molten aluminum metal and different oxide compounds (the nonmetallic phase), are skimmed per tonne of molten metal. To preserve the maximum aluminum content in hot dross for further extraction, it is necessary to cool the dross immediately after skimming. One way to do this is to press the skimmed hot dross in a press. In this process, the skimmed dross is transformed into so-called pressed skulls, with characteristic geometry convenient for storage, transport, or further in-house processing. Because of its high aluminum content—usually between 30% and 70%—pressed skulls represent a valuable source of aluminum and hence are in great demand in the aluminum recycling industry. Because pressed skulls are generally valued on a free-metal recovery basis, which is influenced by the yield of recovery, or in other words, by the quality of the recycling process, it was recognized as important and useful to develop a method of fast and cost-effective nondestructive measurement of the free aluminum content in pressed skulls, independent of the technology of pressed skulls recycling. In the model developed in this work, the aluminum content in pressed skulls was expressed as a function of the pressed skulls density, the density of the nonmetallic phase, and the volume fraction of closed pores. In addition, the model demonstrated that under precisely defined conditions (i.e., skulls from the dross of the same aluminum alloy and skimmed, transported, cooled, and pressed in the same way and under the same processing conditions), when other parameters except the pressed skulls density remain constant, the aluminum content in pressed skulls can be expressed as a linear function of the pressed skulls density. Following the theoretical considerations presented in this work, a practical industrial methodology was developed for nondestructive

  12. Comparison of irradiation hardening and microstructure evolution in ion-irradiated delta and epsilon hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oono, Naoko, E-mail: n-oono@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Higuchi, Toru; Sakamoto, Kan; Nakatsuka, Masafumi [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Naritacho Oarai, Higashi-Ibaraki, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hasegawa, Akiko; Kondo, Sosuke; Iwata, Noriyuki Y.; Matsui, Hideki; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    A δ-Zr-hydride was irradiated with 6.4 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ions to clarify the relationship between hardening and microstructural changes of bulk Zr-hydrides under neutron irradiation. Irradiation hardening was measured by nanoindentation tests. Transmission electron microscope cross-sectional observations showed that the deformation mechanism of the δ-Zr-hydride was both slip and twinning. Dislocation loops were observed in the irradiated hydride matrix. These irradiation-induced defects make slip deformation difficult and consequently promote the twin deformation of δ-Zr-hydride. This work is a continuation of the previous our work (J. Nucl. Mater. 419 (2011) 366–370) focused upon ε-Zr-hydride and we discuss a comparison between the two Zr-hydrides.

  13. Dark cloud chemistry of nitrogen hydrides with the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, R.; Hily-Blant, P.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Stars form in dark clouds. A complete knowledge of dark cloud chemical composition can be helpful to understand star- and planet-formation processes. Nitrogen is the sixth most abundant interstellar element, and also a basic component of prebiotic molecules. Yet, the reservoir of gaseous nitrogen in dark clouds is not precisely known. It is expected to be mainly N and/or N_2, but both are unobservable in dark gas. Their abundances therefore derive indirectly from those of other N-bearing species through chemical modelling. In this context, our work focuses on a revision of the nitrogen-hydride chemistry in dark clouds using fundamental rotational transitions of NH, NH_2, and NH_3 observed with Herschel/HIFI towards a sample of low-mass protostellar objects. To this purpose, we update and upgrade a chemical network containing the chemistry of the ortho and para forms of nitrogen-hydride molecules, allowing to reproduce the NH:NH_2:NH_3 ratios observed with Herschel/HIFI towards IRAS 16293-2422, putting constraints on the budget of gas-phase carbon, oxygen and sulphur. Furthermore, our results explain the non-thermodynamical ortho-to-para ratio of ammonia observed in cold diffuse gas.

  14. DFT modeling of the electronic and magnetic structures and chemical bonding properties of intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents an ab initio study of several classes of intermetallics and their hydrides. These compounds are interesting from both a fundamental and an applied points of view. To achieve this aim two complementary methods, constructed within the DFT, were chosen: (i) pseudo potential based VASP for geometry optimization, structural investigations and electron localization mapping (ELF), and (ii) all-electrons ASW method for a detailed description of the electronic structure, chemical bonding properties following different schemes as well as quantities depending on core electrons such as the hyperfine field. A special interest is given with respect to the interplay between magneto-volume and chemical interactions (metal-H) effects within the following hydrided systems: binary Laves (e.g. ScFe2) and Haucke (e.g. LaNi5) phases on one hand, and ternary cerium based (e.g. CeRhSn) and uranium based (e.g. U2Ni2Sn) alloys on the other hand. (author)

  15. Separation of trace antimony and arsenic prior to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A separation method utilizing a synthetic zeolite (mordenite) was developed in order to eliminate the gas phase interference of Sb(III) on As(III) during quartz furnace hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric (HGAAS) determination. The efficiency of the proposed separation method in the reduction of suppression effects of transition metal ions on As(III) signal was also investigated. Among the volatile hydride-forming elements and their different oxidation states tested (Sb(III), Sb(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Te(IV), and Te(VI)), only Sb(III) was found to have a signal depression effect even at low (μg l-1) concentrations under the experimental conditions employed. It has been shown that mordenite adsorbs Sb(III) quantitatively, even at a concentration of 1000 μg l-1, at pHs greater than two, and also, it reduces the initial concentrations of the transition metal ions to lower levels which can be tolerated in many studies. The adsorption of Sb(III) on mordenite follows the Freundlich isotherm and is endothermic in nature

  16. A Novel Zr-1Nb Alloy and a New Look at Hydriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Mariani; James I. Cole; Assel Aitkaliyeva

    2013-09-01

    A novel Zr-1Nb has begun development based on a working model that takes into account the hydrogen permeabilities for zirconium and niobium metals. The beta-Nb secondary phase particles (SPPs) in Zr-1Nb are believed to promote more rapid hydrogen dynamics in the alloy in comparison to other zirconium alloys. Furthermore, some hydrogen release is expected at the lower temperatures corresponding to outages when the partial pressure of H2 in the coolant is less. These characteristics lessen the negative synergism between corrosion and hydriding that is otherwise observed in cladding alloys without niobium. In accord with the working model, development of nanoscale precursors was initiated to enhance the performance of existing Zr-1Nb alloys. Their characteristics and properties can be compared to oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys, and material additions have been proposed to zirconium-based LWR cladding to guard further against hydriding and to fix the size of the SPPs for microstructure stability enhancements. A preparative route is being investigated that does not require mechanical alloying, and 10 nanometer molybdenum particles have been prepared which are part of the nanoscale precursors. If successful, the approach has implications for long term dry storage of used fuel and for new routes to nanoferritic and ODS alloys.

  17. Superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydride: Dependences on pressure, composition, and crystal structure from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Ryosuke

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in sulfur hydride under extreme pressure has broken the long-standing record of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in the Hg-cuprate. According to the isotope effect measurement and theoretical calculations, the superconducting transition is mainly ascribed to the conventional phonon-mediated pairing interaction. It is, however, not enough for understanding the high-Tc superconductivity in the sulfur hydride. To elucidate various possible effects on Tc with accuracy, we have analyzed Tc with first-principles methods without any empirical parameters. First, for various pressures and theoretically proposed crystal structures, we calculated Tc with the density functional theory for superconductors (SCDFT) to examine which structure(s) can explain experimentally measured Tc data [Akashi et al., PRB 91, 224513 (2015)]. We next solved the Eliashberg equations without introducing the renormalized Coulomb parameter mu*, which is the Green-function-based counterpart of the SCDFT, and evaluated the effects of rapidly varying electron density of states, atomic zero-point motion, and phonon anharmonic corrections on Tc [Sano et al., in preparation]. In the talk, we review these results and discuss the dominant factors for the Tc and their relation to the experimental results. We also report some crystal structures that we recently found with first-principles calculations, which could have a key role for the pressure-induced transformation to the high-Tc phase.

  18. Development of MA-containing hydride fuel as MA burning target material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For accessing the feasibility to utilize U-Th-Zr-H alloys, or corresponding MA-containing hydride alloys, as nuclear fuel, hydrogen absorption / desorption properties at high temperature, thermal diffusivity and neutron irradiation effect on microstructure and hardness of U-Th-Zr-H alloys were examined. Hydrogen desorption measurement on an alloy with U: Th: Zr: H ratio being 1: 1: 4: 9.5 showed that the hydrogen holding capacity of this alloy was similar to or higher than that of the TRIGA type hydride fuel, U-ZrH2-x, at 1173 K. The microstructure of the U-Th-Zr-H alloys which consisted of finely and homogeneously mixed three phases: α-U, ZrH2-x and ThZr2H7-x, was subjected no significant change by the neutron irradiation of up to 7.4 x 1023 n/m2 in JMTR, though slight softening with irradiation was observed. Thermal diffusivity of the hydrogenated alloys exhibited reduction by only 50% or so compared to the corresponding unhydrogenated alloys. The observed characteristic features of the hydrogenated alloys encourage further developmental efforts on this type fuel as a MA burning target material. (author)

  19. Nitrogen hydrides in the cold envelope of IRAS16293-2422

    CERN Document Server

    Hily-Blant, Pierre; Bacmann, Aurore; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Parise, Bérengère; Caux, Emmanuel; Faure, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen is the fifth most abundant element in the Universe, yet the gas-phase chemistry of N-bearing species remains poorly understood. Nitrogen hydrides are key molecules of nitrogen chemistry. Their abundance ratios place strong constraints on the production pathways and reaction rates of nitrogen-bearing molecules. We observed the class 0 protostar IRAS16293-2422 with the heterodyne instrument HIFI, covering most of the frequency range from 0.48 to 1.78~THz at high spectral resolution. The hyperfine structure of the amidogen radical o-NH2 is resolved and seen in absorption against the continuum of the protostar. Several transitions of ammonia from 1.2 to 1.8~THz are also seen in absorption. These lines trace the low-density envelope of the protostar. Column densities and abundances are estimated for each hydride. We find that NH:NH2:NH3=5:1:300. {Dark clouds chemical models predict steady-state abundances of NH2 and NH3 in reasonable agreement with the present observations, whilst that of NH is underpredi...

  20. Hydrogenation of AB{sub 5} and AB{sub 2} metal hydride alloys studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); BASF – Battery Materials Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Young, K., E-mail: kwo.young@basf.com [BASF – Battery Materials Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Nei, J.; Pawlik, D. [BASF – Battery Materials Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Ng, K.Y.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation process of an AB{sub 5} alloy and two AB{sub 2} alloys were studied by quasi in-situ XRD. • In both AB{sub 5} and AB{sub 2} metal alloy, hydrogen occupation sites on the half-plane were taken first. • In the C14/C15 mixed alloy, C14 phase is the main hydrogen storage phase with a lower equilibrium pressure. • In the C14/C15 mixed alloy, C15 phase is the catalyst hydrogen storage phase with a higher equilibrium pressure. • Small amount of C15 was hydrided first but not completed until C14 phase was fully hydrided. - Abstract: The evolution of lattice constants and abundances of metal (α) and metal hydride (β) phases during the hydrogenation process of an AB{sub 5} alloy with a CaCu{sub 5} crystal structure, an AB{sub 2} alloy with a predominating C14 structure, and a C14/C15-mixed AB{sub 2} alloy were reported. The preferred hydrogen insertion sites at different states of charge in both the α and β phases were studied based on the lattice parameter changes during hydrogenation. During the hydrogenation of the AB{sub 5} alloy, the ratio between lattice parameters a and c (a/c ratio) in the α phase decreases, stabilizes, and then decreases again while that in the β phase decreases and then stabilizes. The trends in unit cell volume changes are increasing, plateauing, and increasing again in the α phase and increasing followed by plateauing in the β phase as the hydrogenation level increases. In the C14-predominant AB{sub 2} alloy, the a/c ratio in the α phase increases at the beginning and then stabilizes while that in the β phase remains about the same and then increases during the addition of hydrogen. Moreover, the unit cell volume in the α phase increases slightly during hydrogenation, comparing to the increasing, decreasing, and then increasing trend in the β phase. In the C14/C15 mixed AB{sub 2} alloy, hydrogenation of the C15 phase starts at the beginning and promotes the hydrogenation of the C14 phase. The C14