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Sample records for aluminosilicate nsas reduces

  1. Protonated nanostructured aluminosilicate (NSAS reduces plasma cholesterol concentrations and atherosclerotic lesions in Apolipoprotein E deficient mice fed a high cholesterol and high fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinides Panayiotis P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this work was to assess the effect of chronic administration of protonated nanostructured aluminosilicate (NSAS on the plasma cholesterol levels and development of atherosclerotic lesions in Apolipoprotein (ApoE deficient mice fed a high cholesterol and high fat diet. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE deficient mice were divided into the following treatment groups: protonated NSAS 1.4% (w/w, untreated control and 2% (w/w stigmastanol mixed with high-cholesterol/high-fat diet. Animals were treated for 12 weeks, blood samples were withdrawn every 4 weeks for determination of plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. At the end of the study the aortic roots were harvested for assessment of atherosclerotic lesions. NSAS at 1.4% (w/w and stigmastanol at 2% (w/w treatment groups showed significant decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations at all time points relative to the control animals. The lesion sum area in 1.4% (w/w NSAS and 2% (w/w stigmastanol groups were significantly less from the control animals. In conclusion, in this study, the effectiveness of chronic administration of protonated NSAS material in the reduction of plasma cholesterol levels and decrease in development of atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated in Apo-E deficient mice model.

  2. Potentiated clinoptilolite: artificially enhanced aluminosilicate reduces symptoms associated with endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potgieter W

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Wilna Potgieter, Caroline Selma Samuels, Jacques Renè SnymanDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng, South AfricaPurpose: The cation exchanger, a potentiated clinoptilolite (Absorbatox™ 2.4D, is a synthetically enhanced aluminosilicate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible benefits of a potentiated clinoptilolite as a gastroprotective agent in reducing the severity of clinical symptoms and signs associated with 1 endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease (ENGORD and 2 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID medication.Methods and patients: Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot studies, the ENGORD and NSAID studies, were conducted. After initial negative gastroscopy, a total of 25 patients suffering from ENGORD were randomized to receive either placebo capsules or 750 mg Absorbatox twice daily for 14 days. The NSAID study recruited 23 healthy patients who received orally either 1,500 mg Absorbatox or placebo three times daily, plus 500 mg naproxen twice daily. Patients underwent gastroscopic evaluation of their stomach linings prior to and on day 14 of the study. Gastric biopsies were obtained and evaluated via the upgraded Sydney system, whereas visible gastric events and status of the gastric mucosa were evaluated via a 0–3 rating scale. During both studies, patients recorded gastric symptoms in a daily symptom diary.Results: In the ENGORD study, patients who received the potentiated clinoptilolite reported a significant reduction (P≤0.05 in severity of symptoms including reduction in heartburn (44%, discomfort (54%, and pain (56%. Symptom-free days improved by 41% compared to the group who received placebo (not significant. This was over and above the benefits seen with the proton pump inhibitor. In the NSAID study, the reduction in gastric symptom severity was echoed in the group who received the potentiated

  3. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  4. Water behaviour in nanoporous aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel, E-mail: Konstantin.Smirnov@univ-lille1.f [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Universite Lille 1, Sciences et Technologie, CNRS, Batiment C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-07-21

    This paper briefly reviews results of molecular dynamics simulation studies of water confined in nanoporous aluminosilicates. The behaviour of confined molecules is shown to be influenced by the nature of the host structure, and the size and the topology of the voids. For some of the systems discussed the ambiguity in results of different modelling studies call for the use of extended potential and structural models. Thus, the use of polarizable force fields was shown to be necessary to take into account the variation of the molecular dipole of confined molecules in different environments.

  5. Imogolite: an aluminosilicate nanotube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analogy between carbon nanotubes and synthetic imogolite, an aluminosilicate of stoichiometry (OH)3Al2O3SiOH, having a tubular structure of external diameter 2.4nm and internal diameter 0.9nm, is examined. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, computer-simulations and image-matching and electron diffraction are used to examine the tube structure. Some interesting new results are obtained, concerning the various states of aggregation of the imogolite tubes, ranging from randomly oriented single tubes to essentially close-packed arrays. Both longitudinal and cross-sectional images were obtained. These confirm directly the tubular structure deduced by X-ray structure analysis. Some possible applications of imogolite as new materials are discussed. The various imogolite textures pose challenging problems for solid state physicists, concerning e.g. the transport and optical properties of such fibre bundles. (authors)

  6. Flotation of aluminosilicate minerals using alkylguanidine collectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Feng; ZHONG Hong; LIU Guang-yi; ZHAO Sheng-gui; XIA Liu-yin

    2009-01-01

    The flotation mechanism of aluminosilicate minerals using alkylguanidine collectors was studied through flotation experiments, Zeta potential measurements and FT-IR spectrum analysis. It is shown that kaolinite, illite and pyrophyllite all exhibit good floatability with alkylguanidines as collectors at pH 4-12. The flotation recoveries rise with the increase of the carbon chain length. Isoelectric point(IEP) is determined to be 3.5, 3.0 and 2.3 for kaolinite, illite and pyrophyllite, respectively. However, it is anomalous that the presence of cationic collectors has less influence on the negatively charged mineral surfaces. It is explained by the special structure of guanidine which is one of the strongest bases, having two -NH2 groups. One of them maybe interacts with minerals by electrostatic forces, and the other maybe forms hydrogen bonding with OH- ions on the aluminosilicate surfaces or in the aqueous solution, increasing the density of negative charge on the aluminosilicate surface and leading unpronounced positive charge to increase on the aluminosilicate. By combining the flotation tests, Zeta potential and FTIR measurements above, the interaction mechanism can be concluded. The simultaneous presence of cationic and neutral amine groups makes it possible for SAG cation to bind on three aluminosilicate minerals by both electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. While in acidic medium, the interaction of the alkylguanidines on the aluminosilicate surfaces is mainly by means of electrostatic force and hydrogen bond; in the alkaline medium, it is by the way of electrostatic effect and hydrogen bond.

  7. Mechanical properties of gangue-containing aluminosilicate based cementitious materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High performance aluminosilicate based cementitious materials were produced using calcined gangue as one of the major raw materials.The gangue was calcined at 500℃.The main constituent was calcined gangue, fly ash and slag, while alkali-silicate solutions were used as the diagenetic agent.The structure of gangue-containing aluminosilicate based cementitious materials was studied by the methods of IR, NMR and SEM.The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by the mass ratio between the gangue, slag and fly ash, the kind of activator and additional salt.For 28-day curing time, the compressive strength of the sample with a mass proportion of 2:1:1 (gangue: slag: fly ash) is 58.9 MPa, while the compressive strength of the sample containing 80wt%gangue can still be up to 52.3 MPa.The larger K+ favors the formation of large silicate oligomers with which Al(OH)4- prefers to bind.Therefore, in Na-K compounding activator solutions more oligomers exist which result in a stronger compressive strength of aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials than in the case of Na-containing activator.The reasons for this were found through IR and NMR analysis.Glauber's salt reduces the 3-day compressive strength of the paste, but increases its 7-day and 28-day compressive strengths.

  8. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.;

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural and...

  9. Glass forming ability of calcium aluminosilicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite-wollastonite-tridymite and that of...

  10. The effect of two novel cholesterol-lowering agents, disodium ascorbyl phytostanol phosphate (DAPP) and nanostructured aluminosilicate (NSAS) on the expression and activity of P-glycoprotein within Caco-2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs-Barrable, Kristina; Darlington, Jerald W; Wasan, Kishor M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many drugs are substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and interactions involving P-gp may be relevant to clinical practice. Co-administration with P-gp inhibitors or inducers changes the absorption profile as well as the risk for drug toxicity, therefore it is important to evaluate possible P-gp alterations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two novel cholesterol-lowering agents, disodium ascorbyl phytostanol phosphate (DAPP) and nanostructured aluminium sili...

  11. SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE FOULING AND CLEANING OF DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION COALESCERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During initial non-radioactive operations at the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the pressure drop across the decontaminated salt solution coalescer reached ∼10 psi while processing ∼1250 gallons of salt solution, indicating possible fouling or plugging of the coalescer. An analysis of the feed solution and the 'plugged coalescer' concluded that the plugging was due to sodium aluminosilicate solids. MCU personnel requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate the formation of the sodium aluminosilicate solids (NAS) and the impact of the solids on the decontaminated salt solution coalescer. Researchers performed developmental testing of the cleaning protocols with a bench-scale coalescer container 1-inch long segments of a new coalescer element fouled using simulant solution. In addition, the authors obtained a 'plugged' Decontaminated Salt Solution coalescer from non-radioactive testing in the MCU and cleaned it according to the proposed cleaning procedure. Conclusions from this testing include the following: (1) Testing with the bench-scale coalescer showed an increase in pressure drop from solid particles, but the increase was not as large as observed at MCU. (2) Cleaning the bench-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (11 g of bayerite if all aluminum is present in that form or 23 g of sodium aluminosilicate if all silicon is present in that form). (3) Based on analysis of the cleaning solutions from bench-scale test, the 'dirt capacity' of a 40 inch coalescer for the NAS solids tested is calculated as 450-950 grams. (4) Cleaning the full-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (60 g of aluminum and 5 g of silicon). (5) Piping holdup in the full-scale coalescer system caused the pH to differ from the target value. Comparable hold-up in the facility could lead to less effective cleaning and

  12. Theoretical Design of High-spin Organic Molecules with-. N-S-as a Spin-containing Fragment and Heterocycle as End Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Novel stable high-spin molecules possessing three different arranging fashions were designed with -(.) N-S-as a spin-containing (SC) fragment, an aromatic group, such as benzene (1), pyridine (2), pyridazine (3), pyrimidine (4), pyrazine (5) or triazine (6) as end groups (EG), and phenyl as a ferromagnetic coupling (FC) unit.The effects of different EG on the spin multiplicities of the ground states and their stabilities were investigated by means of the AM1-CI approach. All the investigated molecules corresponded to the FC and possessed high-spin ground states. The spin on the two atoms of the SC fragment was not in agreement with the delocalization results in the specific stability of -(.) N-S-. In those molecules, the stabilities of the triplet states decreased when the distance between the atoms of central SC fragments (-N-) increased. The stabilities of the triplet states of compounds 1a-n, 1b-n and 1c-n, with heterocycles as EG were higher than those of the triplet states of those compounds with phenyl as EG. Furthermore, the stabilities of the triplet states of the compounds with pyrimidine and triazine as EG were higher than those with pyridine, pyridazine or pyrazine as EG.

  13. Anti wetting additives for aluminosilicate refractories in molten aluminum contact applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Devdutt Pramod

    Aluminosilicate based refractories are widely used in furnace installations for melting aluminum because they are inexpensive, readily available and generally exhibit the properties desired from a refractory material. However, they face severe corrosion and degradation issues due to the extremely reducing nature of molten aluminum alloys. Isothermal static cup testing is widely used as a tool to evaluate the performance of refractories against penetration by molten aluminum alloys. Various testing methods were reviewed and an upgraded static cup test was recommended. Commercially available aluminosilicate refractories were tested using this method and their results were studied in order to understand the corrosion process. Barium sulfate, which is widely used as an anti-wetting additive to improve refractory performance by limiting physical contact between molten metal and the refractory, has proved ineffective at temperatures above 1000°C. A literature review suggested that barium sulfate formed barium celsian at high temperatures and that the celsian was responsible for the non-wetting effect. Wetting angle measurements of molten AL 5083 on synthetic celsian discs revealed that barium celsian and strontium celsian were both not wetted by molten aluminum. Static cup tests were performed on aluminosilicate refractories containing barium carbonate and strontium carbonate. These additives led to the in-situ formation of celsian phases within the refractory matrix that led to improved corrosion resistance at 1300°C. Phase analysis revealed that celsian formation suppressed the formation of mullite within refractories, thereby reducing penetration.

  14. Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation in Tank 43H Simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studied the formation of a sodium aluminosilicate, Na8Al6Si6O24(NO3)2?4H2O, at 40 degree 110 degree C in simulated waste solutions with varied amounts of silicon and aluminum. The data agree well with literature solubility data for sodalite, the analogous chloride salt. The following conclusions result from this work: (1) The study shows, by calculation and experiments, that evaporation of the September 1997 Tank 43H inventory will only form minor quantities of the aluminosilicate. (2) The data indicate that the rate of formation of the nitrate enclathrated sodalite solid at these temperatures falls within the residence time (<; 4 h) of liquid in the evaporator. (3) The silicon in entrained Frit 200 transferred to the evaporator with the Tank 43H salt solution will quantitatively convert to the sodium aluminosilicate. One kilogram of Frit 200 produces 2.1 kg of the sodium aluminosilicate

  15. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  16. Aluminosilicate nanoparticles for catalytic hydrocarbon cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2003-03-01

    Aluminosilicate nanoparticles containing 9.0-20 nm mesopores were prepared through the use of protozeolitic nanoclusters as the inorganic precursor and starch as a porogen. The calcined, porogen-free composition containing 2 mol % aluminum exhibited the porosity, hydrothermal stability, and acidity needed for the cracking of very large hydrocarbons. In fact, the hydrothermal stability of the nanoparticles to pure steam at 800 degrees C, along with the cumene cracking activity, surpassed the analogous performance properties of ultrastable Y zeolite, the main catalyst component of commercial cracking catalysts. The remarkable hydrothermal stability and catalytic reactivity of the new nanoparticles are attributable to a unique combination of two factors, the presence of protozeolitic nanoclusters in the pore walls and the unprecedented pore wall thickness (7-15 nm). In addition, the excellent catalytic longevity of the nanoparticles is most likely facilitated by the small domain size of the nanoparticles that greatly improves access to the acid sites on the pore walls and minimizes the diffusion length of coke precursors out of the pores. PMID:12603109

  17. Immobilization of Methyltrioxorhenium on Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Stekrova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented report focuses on an in-depth detailed characterization of immobilized methyltrioxorhenium (MTO, giving catalysts with a wide spectra of utilization. The range of mesoporous materials with different SiO2/Al2O3 ratios, namely mesoporous alumina (MA, aluminosilicates type Siral (with Al content 60%–90% and MCM-41, were used as supports for immobilization of MTO. The tested support materials (aluminous/siliceous exhibited high surface area, well-defined regular structure and narrow pore size distribution of mesopores, and therefore represent excellent supports for the active components. Some of the supports were modified by zinc chloride in order to obtain catalysts with higher activities for instance in metathesis reactions. The immobilization of MTO was optimized using these supports and it was successful using all supports. The success of the immobilization of MTO and the properties of the prepared heterogeneous catalysts were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, physical adsorption of N2, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR using pyridine as a probe molecule and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of the immobilized MTO on the tested supports was demonstrated on metathesis reactions of various substrates.

  18. Crystallization of lanthanum and yttrium aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization behaviour of aluminosilicate glasses of lanthanum (LAS) and yttrium (YAS) containing 2-8 mol% of Ln2O3 (Ln = La or Y), 12-30 mol% of Al2O3, and 64-80 mol% of SiO2 has been studied by DTA, XRD and SEM-EDX analysis. X-ray diffraction results indicate the presence of the mullite phase and La2Si2O7 in the monoclinic high-temperature G form (group space P21/c) for the LAS glasses, and mullite y-Y2Si2O7 in the monoclinic structure (group space C2/m) and a small amount of β-Y2Si2O7 in the orthorhombic structure (space group Pna2) for the YAS. For both cases, very little tridymite phase is observed. The results also show that the values of T g for YAS are higher than those for LAS glasses. The crystallization of LAS glasses is more difficult than that of YAS. For all samples, we observed only one kind of mullite (Al/Si = 3.14)

  19. Properties of Nanocrystals-formulated Aluminosilicate Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Conciauro

    2015-10-01

    insulating and/or mechanical properties. The nanocrystals- modified refractories showed variations in properties, with respect to the untreated aluminosilicate reference in heat- insulating performances (thermal diffusivities were measured by the “hot disk” technique. In general, they also showed improvements in mechanical compression resist‐ ance for all of the samples at 2 wt. %. The best heat insula‐ tion was obtained with the addition of nano-aluminium hydroxide at 2 wt. %, while the highest mechanical compres‐ sion breaking resistance was found with nano-CaCO3 at 2 wt. %. These outcomes were investigated with complemen‐ tary techniques, like mercury porosimetry for porosity, and Archimedes methods to measure physical properties like the bulk and apparent densities, apparent porosities and water absorption. The results show that the nano-alumini‐ um hydroxide modified bricks were the most porous, which could explain the best heat-insulating performances. There is a less straightforward explanation for the mechanical resistance results, as they may have relations with the characteristics of the pores. Furthermore, the nanoparti‐ cles may have possible reactions with the matrix during the heat treatments.

  20. Method of gradual acid leaching of uranium ores of silicate and aluminosilicate nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching uranium ore pulp is divided into two stages. The first stage takes place without any addition of a leaching agent at elevated pressure and temperature. In the second stage, sulfuric acid is added to the pulp (50 to 1000 kg per tonne of ore) or an oxidation agent. Leaching then proceeds according to routine procedures. The procedure is used to advantage for silicate or aluminosilicate ores which contain uranium minerals which are difficult to leach, pyrite and reducing substances. The two stage leaching allows to use the technology of pressure leaching, reduces consumption of sulfuric acid and oxidation agents and still achieves the required reduction oxidation potential. (E.S.)

  1. XPS analysis of aluminosilicate microspheres bioactivity tested in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todea, M.; Vanea, E. [Faculty of Physics and Institute of Interdisciplinary Research on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania); Bran, S. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Haţieganu”, Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, 400029 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Berce, P. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Machine Building and National Centre of Rapid Prototyping, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Simon, S., E-mail: simons@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Physics and Institute of Interdisciplinary Research on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania)

    2013-04-01

    The study aims to characterize surface properties of aluminosilicate microspheres incorporating yttrium, with potential biomedical applications. Micrometric particles of spherical shape were obtained by spray drying method. The behavior of aluminosilicate microspheres without yttrium and with yttrium was investigated under in vitro conditions, by seven days incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF). The surface elemental composition and the atomic environments on outermost layer of the microspheres, prior to and after incubation in SBF were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to investigate their bioactivity. The results were analyzed to underline the effect of yttrium addition on surface properties of the aluminosilicate microspheres and implicitly on the behavior of the samples in simulated body environments.

  2. Mesostructured silica and aluminosilicate carriers for oxytetracycline delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, D; Nastase, S; Mitran, R A; Petrescu, M; Vasile, E; Matei, C; Negreanu-Pirjol, T

    2016-08-30

    Oxytetracycline delivery systems containing various MCM-type silica and aluminosilicate with different antibiotic content were developed in order to establish the influence of the support structural and textural properties and aluminum content on the drug release profile. The antibiotic molecules were loaded into the support mesochannels by incipient wetness impregnation method using a drug concentrated aqueous solution. The carriers and drug-loaded materials were investigated by small- and wide-angle XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, TEM and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. Faster release kinetics of oxytetracycline from uncalcined silica and aluminosilicate supports was observed, whereas higher drug content led to lower delivery rate. The presence of aluminum into the silica network also slowed down the release rate. The antimicrobial assays performed on Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates showed that the oxytetracycline-loaded materials containing MCM-41-type mesoporous silica or aluminosilicate carriers inhibited the bacterial development. PMID:26861688

  3. Synthesis and characterization of aluminosilicate catalyst impregnated by nickel oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulida, Iffana Dani; Sriatun, Taslimah

    2015-09-01

    Aluminosilicate as a catalyst has been synthesized by pore-engineering using CetylTrimethylAmmonium-Bromide (CTAB) as templating agent. It can produce bigger aluminosilicate pore therefore it will be more suitable for bulky molecule. The aims of this research are to synthesize aluminosilicate supported by Nickel, using CTAB surfactant as templating agent for larger pore radius than natural zeolite and characterize the synthesis product, consist of total acid sites and surface area characteristic. This research has been done with following steps. First, making sodium silicate and sodium aluminate. Second, aluminosilicate was synthesized by direct methods, calcined at 550, 650 and 750°C variation temperature, characterized product by X-RD and FTIR spectrometer. Third, NiCl2 was impregnated to the aluminosilicate that has the best cristallinity and main TO4 functional groups product (550 sample). Variation of NiCl2:aluminosilicate (w/w) ratio were 25%:75%, 50%:50% and 75%:25%. Last but not least characterization of catalytic properties was performed. It comprised total acidity test (gravimetric method) and Surface Area Analyzer. The result shows that the product synthesized by direct method at 550oC calcination temperature has the best cristallinity and main functional groups of TO4. The highest total acid sites was 31.6 mmole/g (Imp-A sample). Surface Area Analyzer shows that Imp-B sample has the best pore distribution and highest total pore volume and specific surface area with value 32.424 cc/g and 46.8287 m2/g respectively. We can draw the conclusion that the most potential catalyst is Imp-A sample compared to Imp-B and Imp-C because it has the highest total acid sites. However the most effective catalyst used for product selectivity was Imp-B sample among all samples.

  4. Recycling of aluminosilicate waste: Impact onto geopolymer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaidi, N.; Gharzouni, A.; Vidal, L.; Gouny, F.; Joussein, E.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    Geopolymers are innovative ecomaterials resulting from the activation of an aluminosilicate source by an alkaline solution. Their properties depend on the used raw materials. This paper focuses on the possibility to obtain geopolymer materials with aluminosilicate laboratory waste. The effect of these additions on the geopolymer properties was studied by FTIR spectroscopy and mechanical test. It was evidenced a slowdown of the polycondensation reaction as well as the compressive strength due to the addition of laboratory waste which decreases the Si/K ratio of mixture.

  5. Transformation kinetics in plasma-sprayed barium- and strontium-doped aluminosilicate (BSAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hexacelsian-to-celsian phase transformation in Ba1-xSrxAl2Si2O8 is of interest for environmental barrier coating applications. Plasma-sprayed microstructures were heat treated above 1100 oC and the kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation were quantified. Activation energies for bulk and crushed materials were determined to be ∼340 and ∼500 kJ mol-1, respectively. X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction were used to establish how plasma spraying barium- and strontium-doped aluminosilicate effectively reduces the energy required for its transformation.

  6. Mixed alkaline earth effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.;

    2013-01-01

    While the mixed alkali effect has received significant attention in the glass literature, the mixed alkaline earth effect has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we investigate the latter effect by partial substitution of magnesium for calcium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and NMR...

  7. Morphology diagram of a diblock copolymer - aluminosilicate nanoparticle system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, B.C.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Ulrich, R.; Jain, A.; Gruner, S.M.; Wiesner, U.

    2009-01-01

    We explore the morphology space of nanocomposites prepared from poly(isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) (PI-b-PEO) diblock copolymers as structure directing agents for aluminosilicate nanoparticles prepared from (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GLYMO) and aluminum(III) sec-butoxide. The results of

  8. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  9. Assessment of the multi-mycotoxin-binding efficacy of a carbon/aluminosilicate-based product in an in vitro gastrointestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avantaggiato, G.; Havenaar, R.; Visconti, A.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory model, set to simulate the in vivo conditions of the porcine gastrointestinal tract, was used to study the small intestinal absorption of several mycotoxins and the effectiveness of Standard Q/FIS (a carbon/aluminosilicate-based product) in reducing mycotoxin absorption when added to mu

  10. Development of a Composite Non-Electrostatic Surface Complexation Model Describing Plutonium Sorption to Aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, B A; Kersting, A; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-10-28

    ) and upscaled for use in CAU models (Stoller-Navarro, 2008) includes surface complexation constants for U, Am, Eu, Np and Pu (Zavarin and Bruton, 2004). Generally, between 15 to 30 datasets were used to develop the constants for each radionuclide. However, the constants that describe Pu sorption to aluminosilicates were developed using only 10 datasets, most of which did not specify the oxidation state of Pu in the experiment. Without knowledge or control of the Pu oxidation state, a high degree of uncertainty is introduced into the model. The existing Pu surface complexation model (e.g. Zavarin and Bruton, 2004) drastically underestimates Pu sorption and, thus, will overestimate Pu migration rates (Turner, 1995). Recent HST simulations at Cambric (Carle et al., 2006) suggest that the existing surface complexation model may underpredict Pu K{sub d}s by as much as 3 orders of magnitude. In order to improve HST and CAU-scale transport models (and, as a result, reduce the conservative nature Pu migration estimates), sorption experiments were performed over a range of solution conditions that brackets the groundwater chemistry of the Nevada National Security Site. The aluminosilicates examined were gibbsite, silica, and montmorillonite.

  11. Development of a New Ferrous Aluminosilicate Refractory Material for Investment Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chen; Jones, Sam; Blackburn, Stuart

    2012-12-01

    Investment casting is a time-consuming, labour intensive process, which produces complex, high value-added components for a variety of specialised industries. Current environmental and economic pressures have resulted in a need for the industry to improve current casting quality, reduce manufacturing costs and explore new markets for the process. Alumino-silicate based refractories are commonly used as both filler and stucco materials for ceramic shell production. A new ceramic material, norite, is now being produced based on ferrous aluminosilicate chemistry, having many potential advantages when used for the production of shell molds for casting aluminum alloy. This paper details the results of a direct comparison made between the properties of a ceramic shell system produced with norite refractories and a typical standard refractory shell system commonly used in casting industry. A range of mechanical and physical properties of the systems was measured, and a full-scale industrial casting trial was also carried out. The unique properties of the norite shell system make it a promising alternative for casting aluminum based alloys in the investment foundry.

  12. Radiation and thermal effects on cobalt retention by Mexican aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cobalt from two cobalt exchanged zeolites and one clay were determined. The cobalt exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 deg. C), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 and 5 M) and HNO3 (0.001 and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behavior of cobalt from the materials. Cobalt showed greater stability when the materials were heated at the highest temperature. The unheated samples and those heated at 1100 deg. C were gamma irradiated, and it was found that cobalt leaching from gamma irradiated aluminosilicates was higher than that for non-irradiated materials

  13. Negative thermal expansion of lithium aluminosilicate ceramics at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five lithium aluminosilicate compositions of the LAS system have been synthesized and sintered. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the sintered samples has been studied down to cryogenic conditions. The data presented here under cryogenic conditions will be of value in the future design of new composite materials with very low thermal expansion values. The variation in thermal expansion properties with composition and sintering temperature was studied and is discussed in relation to composition and crystal structure.

  14. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  15. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2012-04-01

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  16. Alteration of biophysical activity of pulmonary surfactant by aluminosilicate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondej, Dorota; Sosnowski, Tomasz R

    2013-02-01

    The influence of five different types of aluminosilicate nanoparticles (NPs) on the dynamic surface activity of model pulmonary surfactant (PS) (Survanta) was studied experimentally using oscillating bubble tensiometry. Bentonite, halloysite and montmorillonite (MM) NPs, which are used as fillers of polymer composites, were characterized regarding the size distribution, morphology and surface area. Particle doses applied in the studies were estimated based on the inhalation rate and duration, taking into account the expected aerosol concentration and deposition efficiency after penetration of NPs into the alveolar region. The results indicate that aluminosilicate NPs at concentrations in the pulmonary liquid above 0.1 mg cm(-3) are capable of promoting alterations of the original dynamic biophysical activity of the PS. This effect is indicated by deviation of the minimum surface tension, stability index and the size of surface tension hysteresis. Such response is dependent on the type of NPs present in the system and is stronger when particle concentration increases. It is suggested that interactions between NPs and the PS must be related to the surfactant adsorption on the suspended particles, while in the case of surface-modified clay NPs the additional washout of surface-active components may be expected. It is speculated that observed changes in surface properties of the surfactant may be associated with undesired health effects following extensive inhalation of aluminosilicate NPs in the workplace. PMID:23363039

  17. Development of Li+ alumino-silicate ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, one strategy is to deposit most of the ion energy at the peak of energy loss (dE/dx) with a low (E < 5 MeV) kinetic energy beam and a thin target. Lower mass ions have a peak dE/dx at a lower kinetic energy. To this end, a small lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate source has been fabricated, and its emission limit has been measured. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1000-1150 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Alumino-silicates sources of K+ and Cs+ have been used extensively in beam experiments, but there are additional challenges for the preparation of high-quality Li+ sources: There are tighter tolerances in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. We report on recent measurements ofhigh ( up to 35 mA/cm2) current density from a Li+ source. Ion species identification of possible contaminants is being verified with a Wien (E x B) filter, and via time-of-flight.

  18. Technetium (VII) Co-precipitation with Framework Aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harsh, James B. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Dickson, Johnbull Otah [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pierce, Eric M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bargar, John [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-07-13

    Technetium-99 (99Tc), a long-lived radionuclide, is one of the most widespread contaminants within the Hanford subsurface. At some depths, it is only extractable with strong acids, suggesting incorporation into a solid phase. We hypothesized that Tc may have coprecipitated with feldspathoid aluminosilicates under waste tanks that had leaked caustic solutions into the vadose zone. Our objectives were to determine if Tc could be incorporated into the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite and under what conditions coprecipitation could occur. Our hypothesis was that sodalite was more likely to incorporate and retain Tc. Our approach was to use known methods of feldspathoid formation in solutions resembling those in Hanford waste tanks contacting sediments in terms of major ion (Na, NO3, OH, Al(OH)4, and Si(OH)4 concentrations. In some cases, Al and Si were supplied from zeolite. We used perrhenate (ReO4) as a surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4) to avoid the radioactivity. The major findings of this study were 1) ReO4 could be incorporated into either sodalite or cancrinite but the concentration in the solid was < 1% of the competing ion Cl, NO3, or NO2. 2) The small amount of ReO4 incorporated was not exchangeable with NO3 or NO2. 3) In sodalite, NO3 was highly preferred over ReO4 but significant Re-sodalite was formed when the mole fraction in solution (Re/Re+N) exceeded 0.8. 4) A nonlinear relation between the unit cell parameter and amount of Re incorporated suggested that a separate Re-sodalite phase was formed rather than a solid solution. 5) We determined that sodalite preference for sodalite in the presence of different anions increased with the ionic size of the competing anion: Cl < CO3 < NO3 < SO4 < MnO4 < WO4 and significant incorporation did not occur unless the difference in anion radii was less than 12%. 6) Re(VII) was not significantly reduced to Re(IV) under the conditions of this experiment and Re appeared to be a good surrogate for Tc under oxidizing

  19. Formation and stability of aluminosilicate colloids by coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Kirana Yuniati

    2011-02-15

    Colloids are ubiquitous in natural waters. Colloid-facilitated migration is of importance in safety assessment of a nuclear waste disposal. Aluminosilicate colloids are considered to be the kernel of aquatic colloids. Their stability is affected by a number of geochemical parameters. This work aims to study qualitatively and quantitatively the stability of aluminosilicate colloids formed by coprecipitation under various geochemical conditions, i.e. pH, concentration of Al and Si metal ions, ionic strength, and omnipresent cations (Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}). The work is performed by colorimetric method and laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). Two consecutive phase separations at 450 nm and 1 kDa are applied to separate the precipitates and colloids from the ionic species. By means of colorimetry, Si and Al can be detected down to 5.8 x10{sup -8} M and 7.4x10{sup -7} M, respectively. On the other hand, LIBD is able to quantify the colloidal size and its number density down to several ppt. Depending on the concentration of Al and Si metal ions, the formation trend of aluminosilicate colloid changes following its solubility curve. The lower the concentration, the higher the pH range in which the colloids start to emerge. Furthermore, the colloids are stable at higher Al and Si concentration and at low ionic strength. In the low pH range, cations provide different effects at low and high ionic strengths. At high ionic strength, the colloids are stable in the presence of a larger cation, while all cations exhibit similar effects at low ionic strength. However, in the high pH range, valence seems to have a stronger effect than ionic radius; colloids are more stable in the presence of monovalent cations than divalent ones. Meanwhile, XRD shows non- and/or poor crystalline structure of the aluminosilicate species. Nevertheless, results from XPS may suggest that the chemical composition (Si/Al ∼ 0.6) of the aluminosilicate precipitates is sillimanite or

  20. Influence of Al content on textural properties and catalytic activity of hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ling Xu; Limei Duan; Zongrui Liu; Jingqi Guan; Qiubin Kan

    2013-12-01

    A series of hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials were prepared using hydrothermal treatment of the composite formed by polystyrene colloidal spheres and aluminosilicate gel. Influence of Al content on the textural properties, acidic properties and catalytic activity of the hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials was studied. The results showed that textural and acidic properties of the hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials were strongly related to Al content. As Al content is increased (Si/Al = 25), the hierarchical porous catalysts exhibited higher catalytic activity and major product selectivity for alkylation of phenol with tert-butanol than the catalysts with a lower Al content (Si/Al = 50).

  1. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al2O3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  2. New nanocomposites based on layered aluminosilicate and guanidine containing polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new functional nanomaterials based on layered aluminosilicate and guanidine containing polyelectrolytes combining high bactericidal activity with an increased ability to bind to heavy metals and organic pollutants were received. To prove the chemical structure of the model compounds (zwitterionic delocalized resonance structures AG/MAG and PAG/PMAG), as well as the presence of such structures in nanocomposites received on their basis and the MMT, IR, 1H NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction studies and nanoindentation/sclerometry followed by scanning the surface in the area of the indentation were used

  3. The preparation method of new tungsten-aluminosilicate molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new preparation method of tungsten-aluminosilicate molecular sieves has been worked out. The method consists in chemical reaction of tungsten aluminum silicon compounds and inorganic compounds of type MeX. The agent governing the structure R should be added to reaction mixture as well. The advantageous compositions of reaction mixtures have been defined. As the inorganic compounds MeX being the component of the reaction mixture soluble salts or hydroxides of alkali metals have been used. As the structure governing agent aliphatic or acyclic amines were applied

  4. Cadmium leaching from thermal treated and gamma irradiated Mexican aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cadmium from two cadmium exchanged zeolitic tuffs and one clay were determined. The cadmium exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 oC), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 M and 5 M) and HNO3 (0.001 M and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behaviour of cadmium from the materials. The stability of cadmium in the materials increased as the heating temperature was increased. Cadmium leaching from gamma irradiated and heated materials at 1100 oC was higher than leaching from non-irradiated samples

  5. New nanocomposites based on layered aluminosilicate and guanidine containing polyelectrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khashirov, Azamat A.; Zhansitov, Azamat A.; Khashirova, Svetlana Yu. [Kabardino-Balkarian State University a. Kh.M. Berbekov, 173 Chernyshevskogo st., 360004, Nalchik (Russian Federation); Zaikov, Genadiy E. [N. M. Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 4, Kosygin St., 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    The new functional nanomaterials based on layered aluminosilicate and guanidine containing polyelectrolytes combining high bactericidal activity with an increased ability to bind to heavy metals and organic pollutants were received. To prove the chemical structure of the model compounds (zwitterionic delocalized resonance structures AG/MAG and PAG/PMAG), as well as the presence of such structures in nanocomposites received on their basis and the MMT, IR, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction studies and nanoindentation/sclerometry followed by scanning the surface in the area of the indentation were used.

  6. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanyuan Yue; Haiyan Liu; Pei Yuan; Chengzhong Yu; Xiaojun Bao

    2015-01-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-,...

  7. Characterization of aluminosilicate glasses matrices for the production of microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, hepatocellular carcinomas are the third most common type of cancer that leads to death worldwide. Selective internal radiotherapy treatment (SIRT) was developed to increase the dose on cancerous tissue whilst diminishing the effect over the surrounding healthy cells. In the present work, three different types of glass microspheres were obtained and characterized. The first case used yttrium, the second, samarium, both for radio therapeutic applications and the third involved yttrium with lutetium for radiotherapy and imaging. It was demonstrated that the glasses exhibit chemical homogeneity, homogeneous density, absence of surface defects, good mechanical properties and leaching resistance in simulated body fluid, therefore they could potentially be used for SIRT. Samples of yttrium aluminosilicate glass plates and microspheres were subjected to thermal neutron irradiation fluxes in the RA-3 in Ezeiza. Through material characterization tests, it was shown that neutron irradiation did not hinder the material's integrity

  8. Mechanical Properties of Densified Tectosilicate Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Nicole; Lamberson, Lisa; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup;

    elastic modulus and hardness in comparison to their uncompressed counterparts. Structural changes during compression can inform mechanisms of deformation at the atomic scale, and linking unit deformation mechanisms to hardness is key to developing glasses that exhibit desirable mechanical properties like......Aluminosilicate glasses are widely used in applications such as LCD glass, touchscreens for hand held devices and car windows. We have shown that the tectosilicate compositions exhibit an interesting non-monotonic variation in hardness with increasing SiO2 content. From 40% to 85 mol% SiO2......, hardness and indentation modulus both decrease, consistent with the topological constraint theory. Above 85 mol% SiO2 , hardness increases rapidly with increasing SiO2 content while modulus continues to decrease. A switch from shear to densification based on the species present in the glass has been...

  9. Selective laser densification of lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Selective laser densification of glass-ceramic tapes has been investigated. ► A possible application to the layerwise-slurry deposition process was evaluated. ► The effect of a few percent organic in the slurry was also studied. ► A range of parameters was identified to densify layers without macroscopic defects. - Abstract: Tapes, cast by blade deposition of a lithium aluminosilicate glass slurry, were sintered using a YAG-fiber laser, with the aim of finding suitable parameters for an additive manufacturing process based on layer-wise slurry deposition and selective laser densification. The influence of the laser parameters (output power and scan velocity) on the sintering was evaluated, by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction, on the basis of the quality of the processed layer. Well densified samples could be obtained only in a small window of values for the output power and the scan velocity. The measurement of the width of a set of single scanned lines allowed also to estimate the minimum resolution of the system along the layer plane.

  10. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid (HT3P and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP, on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid.

  11. Evaluation of aluminosilicate glass sintering during differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a difference in the baseline in differential scanning calorimetry analyses, observed in a work where aluminosilicate glasses microspheres containing Ho were studied for application in selective internal radiotherapy as hepatocellular carcinoma treatment, was studied. The glasses with nominal composition 53,7 SiO2 .10,5 Al2O3 . 35,8 MgO in %mol were produced from traditional melting. The first obtained were milled and sieved in the range of 45 a 63 μm. The material was used to produce glass microspheres by the gravitational fall method. The glass powder and the microspheres were characterized by X ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser diffraction, X ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry, mass spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy. After the thermal analyses, pellets were formed in the crucibles and were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X ray diffraction, and He pycnometry. The difference in the baseline was associated to the viscous flow sintering process and happens because of the decrease in the detected heat flow due to the sample shrinkage. Other events as concurrent crystallization with the sintering process were also studied. (author)

  12. Blue thermoluminescence emission of annealed lithium rich aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Y., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J.; Crespo-Feo, E. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    The blue thermoluminescence (TL) emission of different thermally annealed {beta}-eucryptite (LiAlSiO{sub 4}), virgilite-petalite (LiAlSi{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and virgilite-petalite-bikitaite (LiAlSi{sub 10}O{sub 22}) mixed crystals have been studied. The observed changes in the TL glow curves could be linked to simultaneous processes taking place in the lithium aluminosilicate lattice structure (phase transitions, consecutive breaking linking of bonds, alkali self-diffusion, redox reactions, etc). The stability of the TL signal after four months of storage performed at RT under red light, shows big differences between annealed (12 hours at 1200 deg C) and non-annealed samples. The fading process in non-annealed samples can be fitted to a first-order decay mathematical expression; however preheated samples could not be reasonably fitted due to the highly dispersion detected. The changes observed in the X-ray diffractograms are in the intensity of the peaks that denote modifications in the degree of crystallinity and, in addition, there are some differences in the appearance of new peaks that could suppose new phases (e.g. b-spodumene). (author)

  13. MoO3 incorporation in magnesium aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdate has a very low solubility in silicate and borosilicate glass systems and its excess presence in nuclear waste glass can cause the formation of a readily soluble “yellow phase”. In this study, the incorporation of molybdenum oxide (MoO3) in a magnesium aluminosilicate glass system has been investigated. The prepared glasses show a higher than 90% molybdenum retention rate and up to 5.34 mol% (12.28 wt%) MoO3 can be incorporated into these glasses without causing visible phase separation. The incorporation of MoO3 increases glass density, decreases glass transition and crystallisation temperatures and intensifies Raman bands assigned to vibrations of MoO42− units. When excess molybdate is added liquid–liquid phase separation and crystallisation occurs. The separated phase is spherical, 200–400 nm in diameter and randomly dispersed. Based on powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the separated phase is identified as MgMoO4

  14. Characteristics of a thermally activated alumino-silicate pozzolanic material and its use in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.H.; Malhotra, V.M. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-01

    Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET) has an ongoing program dealing with the development of concrete having long-term durability. One of the means of achieving this objective is to incorporate supplementary cementing materials such as silica fume, fly ash, slag, and rick husk ash in concrete. The incorporation of these supplementary cementing materials in concrete leads to reduction in its porosity; this, in turn, leads to reduced permeability and increased durability of concrete. This paper presents the results of the physical and chemical properties of a thermally activated alumino-silicate material (MK), and deals with the properties of fresh and hardened concrete incorporating this material. The properties of fresh concrete investigated included workability, bleeding, setting time, and autogenous temperature rise. The properties of the hardened concrete investigated included compressive, splitting-tensile and flexural strengths, Young`s modulus of elasticity, drying shrinkage, resistance to chloride-ion penetration, freezing and thawing, and salt-scaling resistance. The properties of the MK concrete were also compared with those of the control portland cement concrete and the silica fume concrete.

  15. Aluminosilicate Formation in High Level Waste Evaporators: A Mechanism for Uranium Accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level waste Evaporators at the Savannah River Site (SRS) process radioactive waste to concentrate supernate and thus conserve tank space. In June of 1997, difficulty in evaporator operation was initially observed. This operational difficulty evidenced itself as a plugging of the evaporator's gravity drain line (GDL). The material blocking the GDL was determined to be a sodium aluminosilicate. Following a mechanical cleaning of the GDL, the evaporator was returned to service until October 1999. At this time massive deposits were discovered in the evaporator pot. As a result of the changes in evaporator chemistry and the resulting formation of aluminosilicate deposits in the evaporator, a comprehensive research and development program has been undertaken. This program is underway in order to assist in understanding the new evaporator chemistry and gain insight into the deposition phenomena. Key results from testing in FY01 have demonstrated that the chemistry of the evaporator feed favors aluminosilicate formation. Both the reaction kinetics and particle growth of the aluminosilicate material under SRS evaporator conditions has been demonstrated to occur within the residence times utilized in the SRS evaporator operation. Batch and continuous-flow experiments at known levels of supersaturation have shown a significant correlation between the deposition of aluminosilicates and mixing intensity in the vessel. Advances in thermodynamic modeling of the evaporator chemistry have been accomplished. The resulting thermodynamic model has been related to the operational history of the evaporator, is currently assisting in feed selection, and could potentially assist in expanding the operating envelopes technical baselines for evaporator operation

  16. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-10-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warmdense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXII). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ~;;1275 oC, a space-charge-limited Li+ beam current density of J ~;;1 mA/cm2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ~;;50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 mu s.

  17. Evidence for lithium-aluminosilicate supersaturation of pegmatite-forming melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneta, Victoria; Baker, Don R.; Minarik, William

    2015-07-01

    New experimental data on the solubility of lithium (Li) at spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) and petalite (LiAlSi4O10) saturation at 500 MPa and 550-750 °C reveal evidence for lithium supersaturation of pegmatite-forming melts before the formation of Li-aluminosilicates. The degree of Li enrichment in granitic melts can reach ~11,000 ppm above the saturation value before the crystallization of Li-aluminosilicate minerals at lower temperatures. Comparison of the experimental results with the spodumene-rich Moblan pegmatite (Quebec) is consistent with extreme Li enrichment of the pegmatite-forming melt prior to emplacement, which cannot be explained with equilibrium crystallization of Li-aluminosilicates from a common granitic melt. The results of this study support the model of disequilibrium fractional crystallization through liquidus undercooling as the most plausible mechanism for the generation of such Li-rich ore resources.

  18. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, M; Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Herfort, D; Steenberg, M; Kirkegaard, L F; Skibsted, Jørgen; Yue, Y

    2012-01-01

    M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012).......M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012)....

  19. Structural analysis of nanostructured organo-inorganic aluminosilicates polymers by solid state NMR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobera, Libor; Kotek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    Sofia : The National Coordination Council on Nanotechnology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2012. s. 54. [International Workshop on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology /14./ - NANO´2012. 22.11.2012-23.11.2012, Sofia] Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200501203 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : NMR * aluminosilicate * polymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  20. Mesostructured-aluminosilicate-Nafion hybrid membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic–inorganic hybrid membranes are prepared from Nafion and acid functionalized aluminosilicate with varying structures and surface areas. Acid-functionalized mesostructured aluminosilicate with cellular foam framework (Al-MSU-F type) of surface area 463 m2 g−1, acid-functionalized aluminosilicate molecular sieves (Al-HMS type) of surface area 651 m2 g−1 and acid-functionalized mesostructured aluminosilicate with hexagonal network (Al-MCM-41 type) of surface area 799 m2 g−1 have been employed as potential filler materials to form hybrid membranes with Nafion. The structural behavior, water uptake, ion-exchange capacity, proton conductivity and methanol permeability of the hybrid membranes are extensively investigated. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) with Al-HMS-Nafion and Al-MCM-41-Nafion hybrid membranes deliver respective peak power-densities of 170 mW cm−2 and 246 mW cm−2, while a peak power-density of only 48 mW cm−2 is obtained for the DMFC employing pristine recast-Nafion membrane under identical operating conditions. The unique properties associated with hybrid membranes could be exclusively attributed to the presence of pendant sulfonic-acid groups in the filler materials, which provide proton-conducting pathways between the filler and matrix in the hybrid membranes, and facilitate proton transport with adequate balance between proton conductivity and methanol permeability

  1. Towards the Loewenstein limit (Si/Al = 1) in thermally stable mesoporous aluminosilicates

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera Medina, Saul; El Haskouri, Jamal; Mendioroz, Sagrario; Guillem, Carmen; Latorre Saborit, Julio; Beltrán Porter, Aurelio; Beltrán Porter, Daniel; Marcos, María Dolores; Amorós del Toro, Pedro José

    1999-01-01

    The use of complexing agents to generate polynuclear precursor species containing both Al and Si allows the synthesis of thermally stable mesoporous aluminosilicates including solely tetrahedrally coordinated aluminium, in which the Si/Al ratio can be modulated down to a minimum Si/Al value of 1.06(4).

  2. Properties of Aluminosilicate Refractories with Synthesized Boron-Modified TiO2 Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Carlucci

    2015-03-01

    ture was analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS. The bricks obtained with nanoadditives presented improved mechanical characteristics with respect to the typical aluminosilicates, presumably because of a better compac‐ tion during the raw materials’ mixing stage.

  3. Structural rearrangement at the yttrium-depleted surface of HCl-processed yttrium aluminosilicate glass for 90Y-microsphere brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Y-leaching effects in yttrium alumino-silicates are analyzed at the micrometer scale. ► A high degree of structural reconstruction is driven by non-bridging oxygens. ► Core–shell engineered glass microspheres are obtained after Y-leaching in HCl. - Abstract: The design of a process to create yttrium aluminosilicate microspheres with a core–shell structure is of interest in the field of cancer brachytherapy. Glass microspheres with yttrium-depleted shell may indeed reduce the risk of 90Y release into the organism. Here we show – by means of confocal micro-Raman scattering, microfluorescence, X-ray-fluorescence analysis, and IR spectroscopy – that yttrium depletion may be achieved by etching in HCl solution (pH 2) at a rate of 1 μm day−1 in bulk glass and 3 μm day−1 in glass microsphere (35 μm of diameter). Importantly, the spectroscopic results – collected in confocal configuration along the processed layer – indicate a high degree of structural reconstruction of the glass network, with the formation of an interconnected silicate-rich glass that surrounds a core of unmodified yttrium aluminosilicate. We also demonstrate that the process is driven by non-bridging oxygen sites, which regulate the hydroxylation and structural reconstruction of the glass within the Y-depleted layer. The analysis gives also some insight into open fundamental questions about the short-range structure and the chemical stability of this kind of glass, which is also important in photonics and nuclear waste disposal.

  4. Optical properties of thermally reduced bismuth-doped sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K.H.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng;

    Heat-treatment of multivalent ion containing glasses in a hydrogen atmosphere may cause both reduction of the multivalent ions and ionic inward diffusion, resulting in improved glass properties. Bismuth-doped glasses are also interesting objects not only concerning the reduction induced diffusion......, but also concerning the metal particle formation, and the broadband near infrared luminescence. Both the inward diffusion and the infrared luminescence depend on the bismuth oxidation state. The latter can be varied by adjusting the parameters of the heat-treatment, e.g., time, temperature, and...

  5. Facile Preparation of Aluminosilicate RTH across a Wide Composition Range Using a New Organic Structure-Directing Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Deimund, Mark A.; Davis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    RTH type zeolite (aluminosilicate) is a potentially useful catalytic material that is limited by the inability to easily prepare the material over a wide composition range. Here, we report the use of pentamethylimidazolium to prepare aluminosilicate RTH across a wide range of compositions in both fluoride and hydroxide inorganic systems. RTH type zeolites are crystallized with a calcined product Si/Al of 7–27 from fluoride media and 6–59 from hydroxide media. The use of this new, simple organ...

  6. Influence of Boehmite Precursor on Aluminosilicate Aerogel Pore Structure, Phase Stability and Resistance to Densification at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Newlin, Katy N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels are of interest as constituents of thermal insulation systems for use at temperatures higher than those attainable with silica aerogels. It is anticipated that their effectiveness as thermal insulators will be influenced by their morphology, pore size distribution, physical and skeletal densities. The present study focuses on the synthesis of aluminosilicate aerogel from a variety of Boehmite (precursors as the Al source, and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source, and the influence of starting powder on pore structure and thermal stability.

  7. Immobilization of simulated high-level liquid wastes in sintered borosilicate, aluminosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results obtained with different vitreous materials: a German borosilicate glass (VG98/12), its local counterpart (Simil VG), a natural aluminosilicate volcanic glass (VV), and two German aluminoborosilicate glasses (SG7 and SG8), with incorporated simulated high-level liquid wastes (HLLW), LWR and PHWR types. The optimal conditions for pressure and pressureless sintering are given, as well as the simulation, formulation and preparation of the simulated HLLW type PHWR, as well as the corrosion and thermal behavior of the waste forms obtained. Leaching rates of aluminosilicate (VV) and aluminoborosilicate (SG7) glasses were about 10-2 g m-2 d-1, that is one order of magnitude lower than those for borosilicate glasses. The devitrification of aluminoborosilicate glass (SG7) increased leaching rate by a factor of 3 for Mo. (orig.)

  8. Eu2+-doped OH− free calcium aluminosilicate glass: A phosphor for smart lighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a broad emission band from Eu2+-doped OH− free calcium aluminosilicate glass is reported. By changing the excitation wavelengths, the results showed it is possible to tune the emission from green to orange, what combined with the scattered light from the same blue LED used for excitation, provided a color rendering index of 71 and a correlated color temperature of 6550 K. Our preliminary tests indicate this material as a promising phosphor towards the development of smart lighting devices. -- Highlights: • We report a broad emission band from Eu2+-doped OH− free calcium aluminosilicate glass. • The maximum emission peak can be tune from green to orange region. • The test with a LED provided a color rendering index of 71 and a correlated color temperature of 6550 K

  9. Decontamination of waste waters and soils from heavy metals using artificial aluminosilicate sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physico-chemical properties of the commercial artificial aluminosilicate sorbent 'beringite' and a newly prepared sorbents (named 'S') were tested in order to test compare usefulness for decontamination of waste waters from heavy metals. Beringite and lime doses were applied to contaminated soils and their effects on plants growth and heavy metals uptake were estimated. The test showed a possible better usefulness of 'S' sorbents for waste water treatment. On the soils studied no differences between beringite and lime application were detected

  10. Structural stability of aluminosilicate inorganic polymers: influence of the preparation procedure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobera, Libor; Slavík, R.; Koloušek, D.; Urbanová, Martina; Kotek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), s. 343-354. ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500602; GA ČR GAP108/10/1980 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : aluminosilicate inorganic polymers * solid-state NMR * phase transformation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.382, year: 2011 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2011/2011_04_343.htm

  11. High-aluminum-affinity silica is a nanoparticle that seeds secondary aluminosilicate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravin Jugdaohsingh

    Full Text Available Despite the importance and abundance of aluminosilicates throughout our natural surroundings, their formation at neutral pH is, surprisingly, a matter of considerable debate. From our experiments in dilute aluminum and silica containing solutions (pH ~ 7 we previously identified a silica polymer with an extraordinarily high affinity for aluminium ions (high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer, HSP. Here, further characterization shows that HSP is a colloid of approximately 2.4 nm in diameter with a mean specific surface area of about 1,000 m(2 g(-1 and it competes effectively with transferrin for Al(III binding. Aluminum binding to HSP strongly inhibited its decomposition whilst the reaction rate constant for the formation of the β-silicomolybdic acid complex indicated a diameter between 3.6 and 4.1 nm for these aluminum-containing nanoparticles. Similarly, high resolution microscopic analysis of the air dried aluminum-containing silica colloid solution revealed 3.9 ± 1.3 nm sized crystalline Al-rich silica nanoparticles (ASP with an estimated Al:Si ratio of between 2 and 3 which is close to the range of secondary aluminosilicates such as imogolite. Thus the high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer is a nanoparticle that seeds early aluminosilicate formation through highly competitive binding of Al(III ions. In niche environments, especially in vivo, this may serve as an alternative mechanism to polyhydroxy Al(III species binding monomeric silica to form early phase, non-toxic aluminosilicates.

  12. Catalysts based on mesoporous aluminosilicates for the hydroisomerization and hydrodearomatization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilesov, A.S.; Kulikov, A.B. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis; Ostroumova, V.A.; Baranova, S.V.; Lysenko, S.V.; Kardashev, S.V.; Lasarev, A.V.; Egazaryants, S.V.; Karakhanov, E.A. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Chemistry Dept.; Maximov, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis; Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Chemistry Dept.

    2011-07-01

    In the present work the activity of bifunctional catalysts based on mesoporous aluminosilicates in the hydroisomerization of n-alkanes and the hydrodearomatization (HDA) process has been investigated. The structured mesoporous aluminosilicates (Si/Al = 5/30) were prepared using hexadecylamine and Pluronic P{sub 123} as templates, with a specific surface area up to 1030 m{sup 2}/g and a pore size from 33 to 84 A. Bifunctional catalysts were prepared in the form of extrudates using boehmite as a binder with the platinum content of 0,5% by mass. The experiment was carried out in a flow reactor. The highest selectivity in the isomerization of n-dodecane and n-hexadecane was shown by catalysts based on mesoporous aluminosilicates with Si/Al =10 and 20. In the hydrogenation of a model feed of 10% (wt.) naphthalene in benzene, it was established that, depending on the module aluminosilicate, the conversion of naphthalene to decalin and tetralin may proceed quantitatively with no conversion of benzene to cyclohexane. Selectivity was in the range from 55 to 90% by decalin, and from 10 to 45% by tetralin. We found the conditions under which the only product of the hydrogenation of naphthalene is tetralin, but the conversion of naphthalene was up to 65%. Also, the activity of such catalysts for hydroisomerization and hydrodearomatization processes on the hydrotreated straight-run diesel fraction was investigated. It was established, that due to hydroisomerization, the maximum filtration temperature goes under -38 C, that allows to use it as a component of winter and arctic diesel fuels. (orig.)

  13. Impact Of Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Aluminosilicate, and Gibbsite/Boehmite on ARP Filter Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. SRR requested SRNL to conduct bench-scale filter tests to evaluate whether sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, or aluminum solids (i.e., gibbsite and boehmite) could be the cause of excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter at ARP. The authors conducted the tests by preparing slurries containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 supernate, 2.5 g MST/L slurry, and varying concentrations of sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, and aluminum solids, processing the slurry through a bench-scale filter unit that contains a crossflow primary filter and a dead-end secondary filter, and measuring filter flux and transmembrane pressure as a function of time. Among the conclusions drwn from this work are the following: (1) All of the tests showed some evidence of fouling the secondary filter. This fouling could be from fine particles passing through the crossflow filter. (2) The sodium oxalate-containing feeds behaved differently from the sodium aluminosilicate- and gibbsite/boehmite-containing feeds.

  14. The Effect of Dissolved Humic Acids on Aluminosilicate Formation and Associated Carbon Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashaki A. Rouff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Allophane and imogolite neogenesis in soils may occur in the presence of organic matter. To understand this process under conditions relevant to soils, the influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC as humic acid (HA, on aluminosilicate formation was studied at , pH 6, and low-DOC concentrations. For solutions with initial Al/Si ratios of 1–2.1, and 0–6 mg/L DOC, precipitates recovered after 20 h had Al/Si ratios of 2.2–2.7. The formation of allophane, imogolite-like material, and aluminosilicate gel was confirmed by XRD, FTIR, and NMR. The effect of DOC was to produce a small, but systematic increase in imogolite-like Si in the precipitate, and a decrease in the formation of aluminosilicate gel. Results suggest that the presence of DOC as HA slows the otherwise rapid polymerization of Al and Si at low temperature, and may also promote the formation of imogolite. The high C content of these precipitates indicates that this process may facilitate the sequestration of organic matter, slowing C cycling in soils.

  15. Immobilization of aqueous radioactive cesium wastes by conversion to aluminosilicate minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive cesium (primarily 137Cs) is a major toxic constituent of liquid wastes from nuclear fuel processing plants. Because of the long half-life, highly penetrating radiation, and mobility of 137Cs, it is necessary to convert wastes containing this radioisotope into a solid form which will prevent movement to the biosphere during long-term storage. A method for converting cesium wastes to solid, highly insoluble, thermally stable aluminosilicate minerals is described. Aluminum silicate clays (bentonite, kaolin, or pyrophyllite) or hydrous aluminosilicate gels are reacted with basic waste solutions to form pollucite, cesium zeolite (Cs-D), Cs-F, cancrinite, or nepheline. Cesium is trapped in the aluminosilicate crystal lattice of the mineral and is permanently immobilized. The identity of the mineral product is dependent on the waste composition and the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the clay or gel. The stoichiometry and kinetics of mineral formation reactions are described. The products are evaluated with respect to leachability, thermal stability, and crystal morphology. (U.S.)

  16. Impact Of Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Aluminosilicate, and Gibbsite/Boehmite on ARP Filter Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. SRR requested SRNL to conduct bench-scale filter tests to evaluate whether sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, or aluminum solids (i.e., gibbsite and boehmite) could be the cause of excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter at ARP. The authors conducted the tests by preparing slurries containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 supernate, 2.5 g MST/L slurry, and varying concentrations of sodium oxalate, sodium aluminosilicate, and aluminum solids, processing the slurry through a bench-scale filter unit that contains a crossflow primary filter and a dead-end secondary filter, and measuring filter flux and transmembrane pressure as a function of time. Among the conclusions drwn from this work are the following: (1) All of the tests showed some evidence of fouling the secondary filter. This fouling could be from fine particles passing through the crossflow filter. (2) The sodium oxalate-containing feeds behaved differently from the sodium aluminosilicate- and gibbsite/boehmite-containing feeds.

  17. Mercury Bioaccumulation in Eggs of Hens Experimentally Intoxicated with Methylmercury Chloride and Detoxified with a Humic-Aluminosilicate Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Barej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive-detox preparation (P-dP based on humic and aluminosilicate substances in the diet of laying hens (3% daily dose previously intoxicated with methylmercury chloride (CH3ClHg, 5 mg Hg/kg feed mixture for six weeks. Mercury content in the whole eggs of the group intoxicated with CH3ClHg increased compared to the control group: 488-fold after 1 wk, 622-fold after 2 wks, and 853-fold after 6 wks of intoxication. The use of P-dP in the group previously intoxicated with CH3ClHg reduced he mercury content of whole eggs by 18.4%, on average, whereas the average was 29.9% two weeks after the discontinuation of CH3ClHg and P-dP supply. Maximum Hg content in the whole egg was observed in group III (299.7 g, whereas the highest mercury level was obtained in the egg albumen.

  18. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-03-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3.

  19. Contribution of aluminas and aluminosilicates to the formation of PCDD/Fs on fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Phillip M; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorinated aromatics undergo surface-mediated reactions with metal oxides to form Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) which can further react to produce polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Previous work using laboratory-made fly ash surrogates composed of transition metal oxides deposited on silica powder has confirmed their ability to mimic fly ash in the production of PCDD/Fs. However, little is known about the propensity of aluminas and aluminosilicates, other components of fly ash, to form PCDD/Fs. A fly ash sample containing both alumina and mullite, an aluminosilicate, was tested for PCDD/F formation ability and compared to PCDD/F yields from the thermal degradation of 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP) precursor over γ-alumina, α-alumina, and mullite. A packed-bed flow reactor was used to investigate the thermal degradation of 2-MCP over the various catalysts at 200-600 °C. Fly ash gave similar PCDD/F yields to surrogates made with similar transition metal content. γ-alumina, which is thermodynamically unfavorable, was very catalytically active and gave low PCDD/F yields despite a high destruction of 2-MCP. Mullite and α-alumina, the thermodynamically favorable form of alumina, yielded higher concentrations of dioxins and products with a higher degree of chlorine substitution than γ-alumina. The data suggest that certain aluminas and aluminosilicates, commonly found in fly ash, are active catalytic surfaces in the formation of PCDD/Fs in the post-flame cool zones of combustion systems and should be considered as additional catalytic surfaces active in the process. PMID:26615490

  20. Preparation and characterization of cesium-137 aluminosilicate pellets for radioactive source applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-seven fully loaded 137Cs aluminosilicate pellets were fabricated in a hot cell by the vacuum hot pressing of a cesium carbonate/montmorillonite clay mixture at 15000C and 570 psig. Four pellets were selected for characterization studies which included calorimetric measurements, metallography, scanning electron microscope and electron backscattering (SEM-BSE), electron microprobe, x-ray diffraction, and cesium ion leachability measurements. Each test pellet contained 437 to 450 curies of 137Cs as determined by calorimetric measurements. Metallographic examinations revealed a two-phase system: a primary, granular, gray matrix phase containing large and small pores and small pore agglomerations, and a secondary fused phase interspersed throughout the gray matrix. SEM-BSE analyses showed that cesium and silicon were uniformly distributed throughout both phases of the pellet. This indicated that the cesium-silicon-clay reaction went to completion. Aluminum homogeneity was unconfirmed due to the high background noise associated with the inherent radioactivity of the test specimens. X-ray diffraction analyses of both radioactive and non-radioactive aluminosilicate pellets confirmed the crystal lattice structure to be pollucite. Cesium ion quasistatic leachability measurements determined the leach rates of fully loaded 137Cs sectioned pollucite pellets to date to be 4.61 to 34.4 x 10-10 kg m-2s-1, while static leach tests performed on unsectioned fully loaded pellets showed the leach rates of the cesium ion to date to be 2.25 to 3.41 x 10-12 kg m-2s-1. The cesium ion diffusion coefficients through the pollucite pellet were calculated using Fick's first and second laws of diffusion. The diffusion coefficients calculated for three tracer level 137Cs aluminosilicate pellets were 1.29 x 10-16m2s-1, 6.88 x 10-17m2s-1, and 1.35 x 10-17m2s-1, respectively

  1. High temperature flow behaviour of SiC reinforced lithium aluminosilicate composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Das; V S R Murthy; G S Murty

    2001-04-01

    The compressive flow behaviour of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass, with and without SiC particulate reinforcements, was studied. The LAS glass crystallized to spodumene during high-temperature testing. The flow behaviour of LAS glass changed from Newtonian to non-Newtonian due to the presence of crystalline phase. Further, with the addition of 40 vol.% SiC additions, the strain rate sensitivity of flow stress decreased. While the activation energy for flow in LAS was 300 kJ/mole, it increased to 995 kJ/mole with the addition of 40 vol.% SiC reinforcements.

  2. Optical absorption and luminescence study of cobalt-doped magnesium aluminosilicate glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarevich, A. M.; Denisov, I. A.; Yumashev, K. V.; Dymshits, O. S.; Zhilin, A. A.

    2002-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of cobalt-doped magnesium aluminosilicate transparent glass ceramics that were prepared under different conditions have been studied. It has been shown that absorption and luminescence spectra and absorption bleaching of these glass ceramics are defined mainly by tetrahedrally coordinated Co 2+ ions located in magnesium aluminum spinel nanocrystals. The lifetimes of the 4 T 1 ( 4 F) and 4 T 2 ( 4 F) excited states of the tetrahedral Co 2+ ions were found to be in the ranges 2540 and 120450 ns, respectively, depending on the Co concentration. 2002 Optical Society of America

  3. DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

  4. Evolution of the trapped charge distribution due to trap emptying processes in a natural aluminosilicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the thermoluminescence glow curve of a natural Ca-Be rich aluminosilicate after annealing treatments at different temperatures has been studied in order to evaluate the changes in the trapped charge distribution. The glow curve consists of a single broad peak that continuously shifts toward higher temperatures when the sample is preheated up to increasing temperatures, thus indicating the presence of a continuous trap distribution. The glow curve fitting assuming different distribution functions shows how a gaussian distribution becomes a nearly exponential distribution owing to the thermal leakage of charge carriers from trapping centres. (authors)

  5. Environmental effects on fatigue of alkaline earth aluminosilicate glass with varying fictive temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Striepe, Simon; Deubener, Joachim; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Potuzak, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The influence of relative humidity on microhardness, stress intensity, crack resistance, and sub-critical crack growth of an alkaline earth aluminosilicate glass has been studied by Vickers indentation. Quenched and annealed glasses with a wide range of fictive temperatures (ΔTf ≈ 130 K) are....... The glasses with lower fictive temperature exhibit a larger change in the micromechanical properties when comparing wet and dry conditions. Finally, it is found that sub-critical crack growth is larger in the low fictive temperature glasses, indicating a diminished resistance against fatigue and...

  6. Facile Fabrication of Uniform Polyaniline Nanotubes with Tubular Aluminosilicates as Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Liu, Peng

    2008-08-01

    The uniform polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes, with inner diameter, outer diameter, and tubular thickness of 40, 60, and 10 nm, respectively, were prepared successfully by using natural tubular aluminosilicates as templates. The halloysite nanotubes were coated with PANI via the in situ chemical oxidation polymerization. Then the templates were etched with HCl/HF solution. The PANI nanotubes were characterized using FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The conductivity of the PANI nanotubes was found to be 1.752 × 10-5 (Ω·cm)-1.

  7. Evidence of two erbium sites in standard aluminosilicate glass for EDFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, R; Jurdyc, A M; Jacquier, B; Burov, E; Pastouret, A

    2010-09-27

    Site distributions of Er(3+)-doped aluminosilicate preforms of standard EDFA were studied by the low temperature Resonant Fluorescence Line Narrowing (RFLN) spectroscopy. Two erbium concentration samples with the same glass base were investigated. At very low erbium concentration, two classes of sites were identified, related to the number of AlO(6) octahedral linked by two oxygen edge-sharing to Er(3+) in the coordination sphere. As erbium concentration is increased, the high AlO(6) coordinated class of sites is smeared out by the optical response of the one AlO(6) coordinated class of sites. PMID:20940961

  8. DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2011-07-21

    The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

  9. Uniform upconversion in high-concentration Er3+-doped soda lime silicate and aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniform upconversion in erbium-doped silicate glasses is investigated as a function of glass composition, concentration, and fabrication method. Comparisons of upconversion coefficients are made among soda lime silicate and aluminosilicate bulk glasses and soda lime silicate waveguides. Comparisons are also made with studies performed by other researchers. The results indicate that both the composition and the preparation method of the glass affect the value of the upconversion coefficient, with as much as a factor-of-4 variation observed at fixed Er3+ concentration. Values of the upconversion coefficient are found to be consistent with the Foerster endash Dexter microscopic model. copyright 1997 Optical Society of America

  10. Highly Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel by Sol-Gel Layer-by-Layer Aluminosilicate Thin Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Habazaki, Hiroki; Kimura, Taiki; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Etsushi; Yano, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, aluminosilicate sol-gel coatings were deposited on Type 430 stainless steel by multiple spin casting cycles. Amorphous aluminosilicate coatings, 65 nm thick, were prepared from precursor solutions with 50, 100, and 500 mmol dm(-3) total concentrations of aluminum and silicon species (molar ratio of Al/Si = 1/4) by 10, 5, and 1 spin casting cycles, respectively. Although the obtained coatings had a similar composition with a molar ratio of Al/Si = 25/75, the coatings with increa...

  11. Characterization of ion distributions near the surface of sodium-containing and sodium-depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of cation and anion components of sodium containing calcium aluminosilicate glass was studied by classical molecular dynamics simulations in a high temperature melt in the bulk and at the vacuum-melt interface. A significant redistribution of the sodium and non-bridging oxygen ions was observed. Subsequently, a sodium depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melt was simulated to determine the sensitivity of the redistribution of ions near the vacuum-melt interface to the presence of sodium ions. It is found that the thermodynamic equilibrium condition near a surface favors the enrichment of non-bridging oxygen ions that is closely associated with enrichment of the sodium ions

  12. Aqueous dissolution, solubilities and thermodynamic stabilities of common aluminosilicate clay minerals: Kaolinite and smectites

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Howard M.; Klnniburgh, D.G.; Helmke, P.A.; Jackson, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Determinations of the aqueous solubilities of kaolinite at pH 4, and of five smectite minerals in suspensions set between pH 5 and 8, were undertaken with mineral suspensions adjusted to approach equilibrium from over- and undersaturation. After 1,237 days, Dry Branch, Georgia kaolinite suspensions attained equilibrium solubility with respect to the kaolinite, for which Keq = (2.72 ?? 0.35) ?? 107. The experimentally determined Gibbs free energy of formation (??Gf,2980) for the kaolinite is -3,789.51 ?? 6.60 kj mol-1. Equilibrium solubilities could not be determined for the smectites because the composition of the solution phase in the smectite suspensions appeared to be controlled by the formation of gibbsite or amorphous aluminum hydroxide and not by the smectites, preventing attempts to determine valid ??Gf0 values for these complex aluminosilicate clay minerals. Reported solubility-based ??Gf0 determinations for smectites and other variable composition aluminosilicate clay minerals are shown to be invalid because of experimental deficiencies and of conceptual flaws arising from the nature of the minerals themselves. Because of the variable composition of smectites and similar minerals, it is concluded that reliable equilibrium solubilities and solubility-derived ??Gf0 values can neither be rigorously determined by conventional experimental procedures, nor applied in equilibriabased models of smectite-water interactions. ?? 1986.

  13. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF ALUMINOSILICATE INORGANIC POLYMERS: INFLUENCE OF THE PREPARATION PROCEDURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Kobera

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of amorphous aluminosilicate inorganic polymer (AIP systems with regard to the structural role of water molecules incorporated in inorganic matrix is discussed. Innovative approach to preparation of amorphous AIP systems with identical chemical composition but differing in structural and mechanical behavior is introduced. It is shown that even small changes in the manufacture dramatically affect mechanical properties and the overall structural stability of AIP systems. If the required quantity of water is admixed to the reaction mixture during the initial step of AIPs synthesis the resulting amorphous aluminosilicate matrix undergoes extensive crystallization (zeolitization. On the other hand, if the amount of water is added to the reaction mixture during the last step of the preparation procedure, the inorganic matrix exhibits long-term stability without any structural defects. To find the structural reasons of the observed behavior a combination of traditional solid state NMR (1H and 29Si MAS NMR, 29Si CP/MAS NMR, 29Si inverse-T1-filtered NMR, XRPD and TGA measurements were used. The applied experiments revealed that the structural stability of AIPs can be attributed to the tight binding of water molecules into the inorganic matrix. The structural stability of the prepared amorphous AIP systems thus seems to be affected by the extent of hydration i.e. the strength of binding water into the inorganic framework.

  14. Ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates with low Si/Al ratio: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aifeng; Che, Hongwei; Liu, Chuanzhi; Fu, Quanrong; Jiang, Ruijiao; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Liang

    2014-06-01

    Ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates with lower Si/Al ratio below 5 have been successfully synthesized via the co-assembly of preformed aluminosilicate precursors with Gemini surfactant [C12H25N+(CH3)2(CH2)6N+(CH3)2C12H25] x 2Br(-) as the template. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance, thermogravimetric analysis, and temperature-programmed desorption of cyclohexylamine are employed to characterize the resulting samples. The phenol alkylation reaction is carried out to evaluate their catalytic performances. These studies indicate that the sample with a low Si/Al ratio of 3 still retains a highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous structure. And it also possesses the highest acidity of 0.96 mmol among the samples with lower Si/Al ratios below 5 due to its higher specific surface area together with more content of tetrahedrally coordinated Al in the framework. The catalytic tests confirm that the acidity of the samples plays a key role in determining their catalytic performances. PMID:24738433

  15. A solid state MAS NMR study of the thermal reactions in alkali-leached aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal transformations of aluminosilicate minerals such as kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4) are of importance for the production of both clay-based ceramics and high-technology ceramics such as sialons. Solid-state MAS NMR can provide information about the intermediate stages in the formation of mullite (Al6Si2O13). These intermediates, which are only poorly crystalline and less amenable to XRD study, may include poorly crystalline mullite, a cubic spinel similar to γ-Al2O3 but which has been suggested to contain Si, and other amorphous aluminosilicate phases of variable composition. Since the 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra of all these phases are expected to contain resonances broadly in the same spectral area, unambiguous differentiation of these phases has not so far proved possible by this technique. The work reported here was suggested by the possibility of selective alkali extraction of some of the more silica-rich phases using techniques developed by Chakravorty and Ghosh, which was hoped to reveal the MAS NMR features of the less-leachable phases. NMR study of the leached products after subsequent thermal treatment also provided useful information about the leaching reactions themselves. Copyright (1999) Australasian Ceramic Society

  16. White light emission from Sm3+/Tb3+ codoped oxyfluoride aluminosilicate glasses under UV light excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on the absorption and photoluminescence properties of oxyfluoride aluminosilicate and boro-aluminosilicate glasses codoped with Sm3+ and Tb3+ ions. The differential thermal analysis profiles of these glasses have been obtained to confirm their thermal stability. From the measured absorption spectrum, Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) have been evaluated for the Sm3+ ion. When excited by ultraviolet light these glasses emit a combination of blue, green and orange-red wavelengths forming white light. The ratio of the intensities of orange-red to green emissions can be tuned by varying both the concentration of the Sm3+ ion and the composition of the glass matrix. The excitation and emission spectra have shown a self-quenching effect for the Sm3+ ions and an efficient energy transfer from Tb3+ : 5D4 → Sm3+ : 4G5/2 was observed which was also confirmed by the decay lifetime measurements.

  17. Effect of temperature and aluminium on calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate chemistry under equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There exists limited information regarding the effect of temperature on the structure and solubility of calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H). Here, calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C–(A–)S–H) is synthesised at Ca/Si = 1, Al/Si ≤ 0.15 and equilibrated at 7–80 °C. These systems increase in phase-purity, long-range order, and degree of polymerisation of C–(A–)S–H chains at higher temperatures; the most highly polymerised, crystalline and cross-linked C–(A–)S–H product is formed at Al/Si = 0.1 and 80 °C. Solubility products for C–(A–)S–H were calculated via determination of the solid-phase compositions and measurements of the concentrations of dissolved species in contact with the solid products, and show that the solubilities of C–(A–)S–H change slightly, within the experimental uncertainty, as a function of Al/Si ratio and temperature between 7 °C and 80 °C. These results are important in the development of thermodynamic models for C–(A–)S–H to enable accurate thermodynamic modelling of cement-based materials

  18. Thallium and manganese complexes involved in the luminescence emission of potassium-bearing aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel A., E-mail: miguel.gomez@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, Javier, E-mail: guinea@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garrido, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.garrido@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Townsend, Peter D., E-mail: pdtownsend@gmail.com [School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Marco, Jose-Francisco, E-mail: jfmarco@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química-Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Calle Serrano 119, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    The luminescence emission at 285 nm in natural K-feldspar has been studied by Russian groups and associated with thallium ions in structural positions of K{sup +} sites as artificially thallium-doped feldspars display the same emission band. Here attention is focussed on spectra of CL emission bands centered near 285 and 560 nm from paragenetic adularia, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions. With accesorial thallium they show clear resemblances to each other. Associated sedimentary and hydrothermal aluminosilicate samples collected from Guadalix (Madrid, Spain) were analyzed with a wide range of experimental techniques including Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) with an attached X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and a cathodoluminescence probe (CL) and Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), Differential and Thermogravimetric Analyses (DTA-TG), radioluminescence (RL), Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS). The luminescence emission bands at 285 and 560 nm seem to be associated with hydrous thallium–manganese complexes bonded to potassium-bearing aluminosilicates since various minerals such as K-feldspar, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions display similar CL spectra, accesorial thallium and hydroxyl groups. The presence of iron introduces a brown color which is attributed to submicroscopic iron oxides detectable in the optical and chemical microanalysis, but this does not contribute to the luminescence emission. The XPS Mn 2p spectrum of the adularia sample at room temperature is composed of a spin–orbit doublet plus clear shake-up satellite structure ∼4 eV above the main photoemision lines and is consistent with Mn{sup 2+} in good agreement with the observed luminescence emission at 560 nm for aluminosilicates produced by a {sup 4}T1({sup 4}G)→{sup 6}A1({sup 6}S) transition in tetrahedrally

  19. Thallium and manganese complexes involved in the luminescence emission of potassium-bearing aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The luminescence emission at 285 nm in natural K-feldspar has been studied by Russian groups and associated with thallium ions in structural positions of K+ sites as artificially thallium-doped feldspars display the same emission band. Here attention is focussed on spectra of CL emission bands centered near 285 and 560 nm from paragenetic adularia, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions. With accesorial thallium they show clear resemblances to each other. Associated sedimentary and hydrothermal aluminosilicate samples collected from Guadalix (Madrid, Spain) were analyzed with a wide range of experimental techniques including Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) with an attached X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and a cathodoluminescence probe (CL) and Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), Differential and Thermogravimetric Analyses (DTA-TG), radioluminescence (RL), Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS). The luminescence emission bands at 285 and 560 nm seem to be associated with hydrous thallium–manganese complexes bonded to potassium-bearing aluminosilicates since various minerals such as K-feldspar, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions display similar CL spectra, accesorial thallium and hydroxyl groups. The presence of iron introduces a brown color which is attributed to submicroscopic iron oxides detectable in the optical and chemical microanalysis, but this does not contribute to the luminescence emission. The XPS Mn 2p spectrum of the adularia sample at room temperature is composed of a spin–orbit doublet plus clear shake-up satellite structure ∼4 eV above the main photoemision lines and is consistent with Mn2+ in good agreement with the observed luminescence emission at 560 nm for aluminosilicates produced by a 4T1(4G)→6A1(6S) transition in tetrahedrally coordinated Mn2+. Moscovite samples display

  20. Preparation and characterization of cesium-137 aluminosilicate pellets for radioactive source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, F.J.; Tompkins, J.A.; Haff, K.W.; Case, F.N.

    1981-07-01

    Twenty-seven fully loaded /sup 137/Cs aluminosilicate pellets were fabricated in a hot cell by the vacuum hot pressing of a cesium carbonate/montmorillonite clay mixture at 1500/sup 0/C and 570 psig. Four pellets were selected for characterization studies which included calorimetric measurements, metallography, scanning electron microscope and electron backscattering (SEM-BSE), electron microprobe, x-ray diffraction, and cesium ion leachability measurements. Each test pellet contained 437 to 450 curies of /sup 137/Cs as determined by calorimetric measurements. Metallographic examinations revealed a two-phase system: a primary, granular, gray matrix phase containing large and small pores and small pore agglomerations, and a secondary fused phase interspersed throughout the gray matrix. SEM-BSE analyses showed that cesium and silicon were uniformly distributed throughout both phases of the pellet. This indicated that the cesium-silicon-clay reaction went to completion. Aluminum homogeneity was unconfirmed due to the high background noise associated with the inherent radioactivity of the test specimens. X-ray diffraction analyses of both radioactive and non-radioactive aluminosilicate pellets confirmed the crystal lattice structure to be pollucite. Cesium ion quasistatic leachability measurements determined the leach rates of fully loaded /sup 137/Cs sectioned pollucite pellets to date to be 4.61 to 34.4 x 10/sup -10/ kg m/sup -2/s/sup -1/, while static leach tests performed on unsectioned fully loaded pellets showed the leach rates of the cesium ion to date to be 2.25 to 3.41 x 10/sup -12/ kg m/sup -2/s/sup -1/. The cesium ion diffusion coefficients through the pollucite pellet were calculated using Fick's first and second laws of diffusion. The diffusion coefficients calculated for three tracer level /sup 137/Cs aluminosilicate pellets were 1.29 x 10/sup -16/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, 6.88 x 10/sup -17/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, and 1.35 x 10/sup -17/m/sup 2/s/sup -1

  1. Sol-gel preparation and electrical properties of lithium aluminosilicate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports lithium aluminosilicate ceramics with the formula Li4+xSi1-xAlxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) prepared by sol-gel technique. For the pure orthosilicate (x = 0), the gel was prepared by mixing partially hydrolyzed tetraethyl-orthosilicate (TEOS) with lithium t-butoxide dissolved in hexane. For x > 0, homogeneous alcoholic solution of TEOS and (BuO)2Al-O-Si (0Et)3 was partially hydrolyzed and mixed with lithium precursor. Amorphous dried gel powders led to dense monophase ceramics after sintering at 600 degrees-700 degrees C. At 400 degrees C, the ionic conductivity is about 10-3S/cm-1 for the pure lithium orthosilicate

  2. Corrosion of K-3 glass-contact refractory in sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion of the glass-contact refractory Monofrax K-3 in two sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts has been studied at 1,208 and 1,283 C using a modified ASTM procedure with constant agitation of the melt by air bubbling. The results for the monolithic refractory indicate a fast initial stage involving phase dissolution and transformation and a later passivated stage in which the surface of the refractory has been substantially modified. The composition of the stable spinel phase in the altered layer on monolithic coupons of K-3 is almost identical to the equilibrium composition bracketed by the dissolution of powdered K-3 into under-saturated melts on the other. The temperature and melt shear viscosity were found to have significant effects on the rates of K-3 dissolution and transformation

  3. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of inorganic polymers from the alkali activation of an aluminosilicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of the synthesis and characterization of inorganic polymers (IP) from aluminosilicates: bentonite (BT) and pumice (PP). The synthesis of IP, was carried out by two methods involving alkaline activation, at room temperature and 80 ± 5 °C, using as activating agent sodium silicate both commercial and analytical (Na2SiO3). Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 3 M, 7 M and 12 M was added. A lower degree of polymerization was obtained by using analytical precursors subjected to room temperature and 80 ± 5°C. Replacement of heating by the use of the commercial activating agent with greater alkalinity allows the formation of a 3D network. The materials were structurally characterized by FTIR spectroscopy with Attenuated Reflectance (ATR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X -ray diffraction (DRX)

  5. Tailoring of Boehmite-Derived Aluminosilicate Aerogel Structure and Properties: Influence of Ti Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Sheets, Erik J.; Miller, Derek R.; Newlin, Katy N.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels offer potential for extremely low thermal conductivities at temperatures greater than 900 C, beyond where silica aerogels reach their upper temperature limits. Aerogels have been synthesized at various Al:Si ratios, including mullite compositions, using Boehmite (AlOOH) as the Al source, and tetraethoxy orthosilicate as the Si precursor. The Boehmite-derived aerogels are found to form by a self-assembly process of AlOOH crystallites, with Si-O groups on the surface of an alumina skeleton. Morphology, surface area and pore size varies with the crystallite size of the starting Boehmite powder, as well as with synthesis parameters. Ternary systems, including Al-Si-Ti aerogels incorporating a soluble Ti precursor, are possible with careful control of pH. The addition of Ti influences sol viscosity, gelation time pore structure and pore size distribution, as well as phase formation on heat treatment.

  6. Investigation of Al–O–Al sites in an Na-aluminosilicate glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Erdem Yildirim; Ray Dupree

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports the presence of Al–O–Al linkages in an aluminosilicate glass where Si/Al = 1 by using 2D 17O triple quantum MAS NMR technique (3Q MASNMR). The experiments were performed at external magnetic fields of 8.4 and 14.4T. Despite 17OMAS NMR spectra of the sample in both fields do not give much information about the different kinds of linkages in the sample, 3Q MAS NMR spectrum shows clear evidence that there are some amounts of Al–O–Al linkages in the sample giving two completely resolved peaks. These two peaks were attributed to the Si–O–Al and Al–O–Al linkages on the basis of their chemical shifts and, quadrupolar coupling constants which are quite sensitive to the local structure.

  7. Toxicity of inhaled 144Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles in aged beagle dogs. V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicity of 144Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles inhaled by 8- to 10.5-yr-old dogs is being investigated to provide information on age-related differences in the response of older members of the human population to accidental inhalation of radioactive aerosols. These data on aged dogs will be compared to the results of similar studies of dogs exposed at approximately 3 mo or 12 to 14 mo of age. Six blocks of five female dogs each have been divided into four exposure levels with mean initial lung burdens of 7.2, 14, 28 and 57 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Six blocks of four male dogs have been divided into three exposure levels with mean initial lung burdens of 7.2, 14 and 28 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Controls in each block were exposed to fused aluminosilicate particles containing stable cerium. Fifteen dogs with initial lung burdens ranging from 20 to 75 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and cumulative doses to lung of from 22,000 to 74,000 rads have died or were euthanized 197 to 1207 days after exposure with clinicopathologic findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis.Pulmonary retention of the inhaled 144Ce was similar to that observed previously in dogs exposed at 18 to 22 mo of age in a radiation dose pattern study. Serial observations are continuing on the 19 surviving 144Ce-exposed and eight control dogs

  8. Toxicity of inhaled 90Sr in fused aluminosilicate particles in beagle dogs. VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the metabolism, dosimetry and biological effects of 90Sr inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by Beagle dogs have continued during the past year to define the biological consequences of inhaling this important radionuclide in a form which has a long retention time in the lung. One hundred and six dogs were exposed to a polydisperse aerosol of fused aluminosilicate particles labeled with 90Sr. Initial lung burdens ranged from 0.21 to 94 μCi 90Sr per kilogram of body weight (μCi/kg). Eighteen control dogs were exposed to an aerosol of stable strontium in fused aluminosilicate particles. These 124 dogs were assigned to the longevity study. An additional 26 dogs were exposed similarly to achieve lung burdens of approximately 1.5 to 12 μCi/kg and assigned for sacrifice at intervals after exposure to define metabolism and dosimetry of this aerosol in Beagle dogs. Of the longevity dogs, 33 dogs having initial lung burdens of 16 to 94 μCi 90Sr/kg and cumulative doses to lung of 40,000 to 96,000 rads have died from radiation pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis from 159 to 2373 days after exposure. Thirty-one dogs with initial lung burdens of 3.7 to 36 μCi 90Sr/kg and cumulative doses to lung of 13,000 to 68,000 rads have died from hemangiosarcomas in the lung or heart between 644 and 2565 days after exposure. In addition, one dog developed a bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, another developed epidermoid carcinoma of the lung, another died of pneumonia while recovering from anesthesia, one dog died at 1821 days after exposure with a hemangiosarcoma of the spleen and two dogs developed squamous cell carcinomas in the nasal cavity. The remaining exposed dogs and controls of the longevity study are surviving at 1022 to 2803 days after exposure

  9. Prospects and challenges of iron pyroelectrolysis in magnesium aluminosilicate melts near minimum liquidus temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, N M; Kovalevsky, A V; Mikhalev, S M; Costa, F M; Frade, J R

    2015-04-14

    Although steel production by molten oxide electrolysis offers potential economic and environmental advantages over classic extractive metallurgy, its feasibility is far from being convincingly demonstrated, mainly due to inherent experimental difficulties exerted by harsh conditions and lack of knowledge regarding relevant mechanisms and physico-chemical processes in the melts. The present work was intended to demonstrate the concept of pyroelectrolysis at very high temperature near the minimum liquidus point of magnesium aluminosilicate, being conducted under electron-blocking conditions using yttria-stabilized zirconia cells, and to provide a new insight into electrochemistry behind this process. Significant current yields are possible for pyroelectrolysis performed in electron-blocking mode using a solid electrolyte membrane to separate the anode and the molten electrolyte. Parasitic electrochemical processes rise gradually as the concentration of iron oxide dissolved in the molten electrolytes is depleted, impairing faradaic efficiency. Reduction of silica to metallic silicon was identified as a significant contribution to those parasitic currents, among other plausible processes. Direct pyroelectrolysis without electron blocking was found much less plausible, due to major limitations on faradaic efficiency imposed by electronic leakage and insufficient ionic conductivity of the aluminosilicate melt. Ohmic losses may consume an excessive fraction of the applied voltage, thus failing to sustain the Nernst potential required for reduction to metallic iron. The results suggest the need for further optimization of the molten electrolyte composition to promote ionic conductivity and to suppress electronic transport contribution, possibly, by tuning the Al/Si ratio and altering the network-forming/modifying behaviour of the iron cations. PMID:25760633

  10. Structural Role of Alkali Cations in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses as Examined Using Oxygen-17 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukenaga, Sohei; Kanehashi, Koji; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noritaka; Nakashima, Kunihiko

    2016-08-01

    The structural roles of alkali and calcium cations are important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of aluminosilicate melts and glasses. Recently, oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (17O NMR) studies of calcium-sodium aluminosilicate glasses showed that these structural roles are not randomly given, but rather each cation has its own preferential role. However, the relationship between cation type and role preference in calcium aluminosilicate glass is not completely understood. In the present study, the structural roles of lithium, sodium, and potassium cations in selected calcium aluminosilicate glasses are investigated using 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Data from these experiments clearly show that potassium cations have a notably stronger tendency to act as charge compensators within the network structure, compared to sodium and lithium cations. The result of 17O NMR experiment also showed that sodium and lithium cations in part act as network modifier alongside with calcium cations.

  11. Structural Role of Alkali Cations in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses as Examined Using Oxygen-17 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukenaga, Sohei; Kanehashi, Koji; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noritaka; Nakashima, Kunihiko

    2016-05-01

    The structural roles of alkali and calcium cations are important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of aluminosilicate melts and glasses. Recently, oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (17O NMR) studies of calcium-sodium aluminosilicate glasses showed that these structural roles are not randomly given, but rather each cation has its own preferential role. However, the relationship between cation type and role preference in calcium aluminosilicate glass is not completely understood. In the present study, the structural roles of lithium, sodium, and potassium cations in selected calcium aluminosilicate glasses are investigated using 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Data from these experiments clearly show that potassium cations have a notably stronger tendency to act as charge compensators within the network structure, compared to sodium and lithium cations. The result of 17O NMR experiment also showed that sodium and lithium cations in part act as network modifier alongside with calcium cations.

  12. The effect of TiO2/aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives on the mechanical and thermal properties of polyacrylic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Rahimeh; Olad, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The commercial grade polyacrylic latex was modified in order to prepare a mechanical and thermal improved coating. TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposites with montmorillonite, zeolite-A and clinoptilolite aluminosilicates were prepared and used as additive in the matrix of polyacrylic latex to achieve a coating with proper mechanical and thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns and FESEM were used to characterize the composition, structure, and morphology of the nanocomposite additives. Polyacrylic coatings modified by TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives showed higher adhesion strength and hardness compared to unmodified commercial grade polyacrylic coatings. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed lower glass transition temperature for modified polyacrylic coatings than that of unmodified polyacrylic coatings. The tensile tests were also carried out for unmodified and modified polyacrylic coatings. According to the results, the modified polyacrylic based coating with TiO2/Ag-exchanged-clinoptilolite nanocomposite additive was the best coating considering most of useful properties.

  13. Alkali aluminosilicate melts and glasses: structuring at the middle range order of amorphous matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Losq, C.; neuville, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviours. It is well known that several parameters impact strongly these properties, such as for instance the temperature, pressure, chemical composition and volatiles concentration, finally influencing eruptive behaviour of volcanoes. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts, like for instance the Vesuvius (Italy) or Erebus (Antartica) magmas. In an oncoming paper in Chemical Geology (Le Losq and Neuville, 2012), we have communicated results of the study of mixing Na-K in tectosilicate melts containing a high concentration of silica (≥75mol%). In the present communication, we will enlarge this first point of view to tectosilicate melts presenting a lower silica concentration. We will first present our viscosity data, and then the Adam and Gibbs theory that allows theoretically modelling Na-K mixing in aluminosilicate melts by using the so-called "mixed alkali effect". On the basis of the rheological results, the Na-K mixing cannot be explained with the ideal "mixed alkali effect", which involves random exchange of Na-K cationic pairs. To go further and as rheological properties are directly linked with structural properties, we will present our first results obtained by Raman and NMR spectroscopy. These last ones provide important structural pieces of information on the polymerization state of glasses and melts, and also on the environment of tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Rheological and structural results all highlight that Na and K are not randomly distributed in aluminosilicate glasses and melts networks. Na melts present a network with some channels and a non-random distribution of Al and Si. K networks are different. They also present a non-random distribution of Al and Si, but in two sub

  14. Crystallization of LiAlSiO4 Glass in Hydrothermal Environments at Gigapascal Pressures-Dense Hydrous Aluminosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor, Kristina; Fischer, Andreas; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2016-08-15

    High-pressure hydrothermal environments can drastically reduce the kinetic constraints of phase transitions and afford high-pressure modifications of oxides at comparatively low temperatures. Under certain circumstances such environments allow access to kinetically favored phases, including hydrous ones with water incorporated as hydroxyl. We studied the crystallization of glass in the presence of a large excess of water in the pressure range of 0.25-10 GPa and at temperatures from 200 to 600 °C. The p and T quenched samples were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and IR spectroscopy. At pressures of 0.25-2 GPa metastable zeolite Li-ABW and stable α-eucryptite are obtained at low and high temperatures, respectively, with crystal structures based on tetrahedrally coordinated Al and Si atoms. At 5 GPa a new, hydrous phase of LiAlSiO4, LiAlSiO3(OH)2 = LiAlSiO4·H2O, is produced. Its crystal structure was characterized from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (space group P21/c, a = 9.547(3) Å, b = 14.461(5) Å, c = 5.062(2) Å, β = 104.36(1)°). The monoclinic structure resembles that of α-spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) and constitutes alternating layers of chains of corner-condensed SiO4 tetrahedra and chains of edge-sharing AlO6 octahedra. OH groups are part of the octahedral Al coordination and extend into channels provided within the SiO4 tetrahedron chain layers. At 10 GPa another hydrous phase of LiAlSiO4 with presently unknown structure is produced. The formation of hydrous forms of LiAlSiO4 shows the potential of hydrothermal environments at gigapascal pressures for creating truly new materials. In this particular case it indicates the possibility of generally accessing pyroxene-type aluminosilicates with crystallographic amounts of hydroxyl incorporated. This could also have implications to geosciences by representing a mechanism of water storage and transport in the depths of the Earth. PMID:27482770

  15. Pulsed laser deposited amorphous chalcogenide and alumino-silicate thin films and their multilayered structures for photonic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous chalcogenide and alumino-silicate thin films were fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Prepared films were characterized in terms of their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties. Multilayered thin film stacks for reflectors and vertical microcavities were designed for telecommunication wavelength and the window of atmosphere transparency (band II) at 1.54 μm and 4.65 μm, respectively. Bearing in mind the benefit coming from the opportunity of an efficient wavelength tuning or, conversely, to stabilize the photoinduced effects in chalcogenide films as well as to improve their mechanical properties and/or their chemical durability, several pairs of materials from pure chalcogenide layers to chalcogenide/oxide layers were investigated. Different layer stacks were fabricated in order to check the compatibility between dissimilar materials which can have a strong influence on the interface roughness, adhesion, density, and homogeneity, for instance. Three different reflector designs were formulated and tested including all-chalcogenide layers (As40Se60/Ge25Sb5S70) and mixed chalcogenide-oxide layers (As40Se60/alumino-silicate and Ga10Ge15Te75/alumino-silicate). Prepared multilayers showed good compatibility between different material pairs deposited by laser ablation despite the diversity of chemical compositions. As40Se60/alumino-silicate reflector showed the best parameters; its stop band (R > 97% at 8° off-normal incidence) has a bandwidth of ∼ 100 nm and it is centered at 1490 nm. The quality of the different mirrors developed was good enough to try to obtain a microcavity structure for the 1.5 μm telecommunication wavelength made of chalcogenide layers. The microcavity structure consists of Ga5Ge20Sb10S65 (doped with 5000 ppm of Er3+) spacer surrounded by two 10-layer As40Se60/Ge25Sb5S70 reflectors. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies showed a good periodicity, great adherence and smooth interfaces

  16. Chemical and mechanical consequences of environmental barrier coating exposure to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, B.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Almer, J. D.; Kang, L.; Faber, K. (X-Ray Science Division); (NASA Glenn Research Center); (Univ. of Seville); (Rolls-Royce Corp.); (Northwestern Univ.)

    2011-06-01

    The success of Si-based ceramics as high-temperature structural materials for gas turbine applications relies on the use of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with low silica activity, such as Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BSAS), which protect the underlying components from oxidation and corrosion in combustion environments containing water vapor. One of the current challenges concerning EBC lifetime is the effect of sandy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass that melt during engine operation and react with the EBC, changing both its composition and stress state. In this work, we study the effect of CMAS exposure at 1300 C on the residual stress state and composition in BSAS-mullite-Si-SiC multilayers. Residual stresses were measured in BSAS multilayers exposed to CMAS for different times using high-energy X-ray diffraction. Their microstructure was studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Our results show that CMAS dissolves the BSAS topcoat preferentially through the grain boundaries, dislodging the grains and changing the residual stress state in the topcoat to a nonuniform and increasingly compressive stress state with increasing exposure time. The presence of CMAS accelerates the hexacelsian-to-celsian phase transformation kinetics in BSAS, which reacts with the glass by a solution-reprecipitation mechanism. Precipitates have crystallographic structures consistent with Ca-doped celsian and Ba-doped anorthite.

  17. Celsian formation in fiber-reinforced barium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Narottam P

    2003-02-15

    Hot pressing of barium aluminosilcate (BAS) glass or its composites reinforced with large diameter Textron chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide SCS-6 monofilaments or small diameter multifilament Nicalon or Hi-Nicalon fibers resulted in the crystallization of both hexacelsian and monoclinic celsian phases. Effects of additions of monoclinic celsian seeds and strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass on crystal phase formation during hot pressing has been investigated. On doping BAS with 5 wt.% monoclinic celsian seeds or 10 wt.% SAS, only the celsian phase was formed in hot pressed monolithic specimens. However, in fiber-reinforced composites hot pressed under similar conditions, a small concentration of hexacelsian was still present as hexacelsian nucleates preferentially on surfaces and the presence of fibers provides a large surface area. When the additive concentration was increased to 10 wt.% celsian seeds or 20 wt.% SAS, celsian was the only phase detected from X-ray diffraction, with complete elimination of hexacelsian, in the hot pressed composites reinforced with large or small diameter SiC fibers.

  18. Celsian formation in fiber-reinforced barium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot pressing of barium aluminosilcate (BAS) glass or its composites reinforced with large diameter Textron chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide SCS-6 monofilaments or small diameter multifilament Nicalon or Hi-Nicalon fibers resulted in the crystallization of both hexacelsian and monoclinic celsian phases. Effects of additions of monoclinic celsian seeds and strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass on crystal phase formation during hot pressing has been investigated. On doping BAS with 5 wt.% monoclinic celsian seeds or 10 wt.% SAS, only the celsian phase was formed in hot pressed monolithic specimens. However, in fiber-reinforced composites hot pressed under similar conditions, a small concentration of hexacelsian was still present as hexacelsian nucleates preferentially on surfaces and the presence of fibers provides a large surface area. When the additive concentration was increased to 10 wt.% celsian seeds or 20 wt.% SAS, celsian was the only phase detected from X-ray diffraction, with complete elimination of hexacelsian, in the hot pressed composites reinforced with large or small diameter SiC fibers

  19. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Borrell, Olga García-Moreno, Ramón Torrecillas, Victoria García-Rocha and Adolfo Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C. The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  20. Crystallinity and crystallization mechanism of lithium aluminosilicate glass by X-ray diffractometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xing-zhong; YANG hui; CAO Ming; HAN Chen; SONG Fang-fang

    2006-01-01

    The crystallinity of lithium aluminosilicate(LAS) glass after crystallization were studied at different temperatures by X-ray diffractometry and the crystallinity of the standard glass ceramic with known crystal and glass phases was examined. The crystallization mechanism of LAS glass was analyzed by the crystallinity, with a formula relating the crystallinity (Ⅹ) and temperature (7). The results show that the calculated crystallinity of LAS glass by XRD increases with the crystallization temperature,in the range of 40% -50%, which is close to the calculated ones of standard samples with spodumene quartz ratio of 40%-70%. The activation energy of LAS glass is different within different temperature ranges; nEc is 125.44 kJ/mol at 710-810 ℃ and nEc is 17.42 kJ/mol at 810-980 ℃, which indicates different crystallization mechanisms. It has been proved that the required energy for crystallization of glass in the lower temperature range includes the interfacial energy between glass and crystalline phase and the free energy difference of atoms in structures of glass and crystal, and in the higher temperature ranges only the interfacial energy between glass and crystalline phase is considered.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  2. Mesoporous aluminosilicates assembled from dissolved LTA zeolite and triblock copolymer in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shunsuke; Okada, Hiroaki; Nakatani, Norihito; Maruo, Takanori; Nishiyama, Norikazu; Miyake, Yoshikazu

    2009-05-15

    Zeolite Na-A crystals dissolved in a HCl solution were used as a single-source of silicon and aluminum for the synthesis of mesoporous aluminosilicates via a template-assisted method with an organic base tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH). Amphiphilic triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 (EO(106)PO(70)EO(106)) was used as template. Increasing the amount of TMAOH in the synthetic solution resulted in an increase in the aluminum content of the products. On the other hand, mesostructural periodicity was deteriorated with higher content of aluminum incorporated into the mesoporous framework. The samples with low Si/Al ratios less than 5 have wormhole-like pore structure, while the samples with Si/Al ratios more than 7 possess highly ordered mesoporous structure, a body-centered Im3m symmetry, with single crystal like morphology. The samples with Si/Al ratio of 7, which prepared at TMAOH molar concentration of 25 mM in the templating solution, possess BET surface area of 470 m(2)/g, pore size of 6.4 nm, and pore volume of 0.56 cm(3)/g. Aluminum atoms have successfully been incorporated in a tetra-coordinated position and remained stable even after calcination at 600 degrees C. PMID:19223041

  3. Effect of low frequency ultrasound on the surface properties of natural aluminosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Liudmila; Ayrault, Philippe; Fontaine, Claude; Chatel, Gregory; Jérôme, François; Belchinskaya, Larisa

    2016-07-01

    Structural and surface properties of different natural aluminosilicates (layered, chain and framework structural types) exposed of 20kHz ultrasound irradiation (0-120min) in aqueous and 35 wt%. aqueous H2O2 dispersions were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, thermal analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. It was confirmed that sonication caused slight changes in the structure of investigated minerals whereas their textural properties were significantly affected. The aqueous dispersions of montmorillonite (Mt), clinoptilolite (Zlt), glauconite (Glt) and palygorskite (Pal) were represented by several particles size fractions according to DLS-study. Ultrasound irradiation produced a decrease of the average particle diameter by 4-6 times in water and by 1.3-5 times in H2O2 dispersions except for Pal, which underwent strong agglomeration. A significant increase of total pore volume and pore diameter was observed for Glt sonicated in H2O2 dispersions whereas for Pal mainly micropore volume sharply increased in both aqueous and H2O2 dispersions. PMID:26964987

  4. Occurrence mechanism of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals in Sarcheshmeh copper flotation concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R. Barkhordari; E. Jorjani; A. Eslami; M. Noaparast

    2009-01-01

    The Sarcheshmeh copper flotation circuit is producing 5×10~4 t copper concentrate per month with an averaging grade of 28% Cu in rougher, cleaner and reeleaner stages. In recent years, with the increase in the open pit depth, the content of aluminosili- cate minerals increased in plant feed and subsequently in flotation concentrate. It can motivate some problems, such as unwanted consumption of reagents, decreasing of the copper concentrate grade, increasing of Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 in the copper concentrate, and needing a higher temperature in the smelting process. The evaluation of the composite samples related to the most critical working period of the plant shows that quartz, illite, biotite, chlorite, orthoclase, albeit, muscovite, and kaolinite are the major Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 beating minerals that accompany chalcopyrite, chalcoeite, and covellite minerals in the plant feed. The severe alteration to clay min-erals was a general rule in all thin sections that were prepared from the plant feed. Sieve analysis of the flotation concentrate shows that Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 bearing minerals in the flotation concentrate can be decreased by promoting the size reduction from 53 to 38 μm. Interlocking of the Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 beating minerals with ehalcopyrite and ehalcocite is the occurrence mechanism of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals in the flotation concentrate. The dispersed form of interlocking is predominant.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Minmin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hou, Li-an, E-mail: 11liuminmin@tongji.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng [China Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 200012 (China)

    2013-05-15

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  6. Separation of aluminosilicates and diaspore from diasporic-bauxite by selective flocculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chuan-bing; ZHANG Lin; WANG Yu-hua; LAN Ye

    2008-01-01

    The flocculation tests of four pure minerals (diaspore, kaolinite, illite, pyrophyllite) and bauxite ore were investigated by the sedimentation. The dispersion behavior of the four pure minerals shows a very good consistency with the variation of zeta potential. The concentrate with the mass ratio of Al2O3 to SiO2 (m(Al2O3)/m(SiO2)) 8.90 and the recovery of Al2O3 86.98% is obtained from bauxite ore (m(Al2O3)/m(SiO2)=5.68) in pH range of 9.5-10.0 by using sodium carbonate (5 kg/t) and sodium polyacrylate (7 g/t) as dispersant and flocculant respectively. Sodium carbonate acts as both pH modifier and favorable dispersant for aluminosilicates. The high performance of sodium polyacrylate on flocculation for diaspore is contributed to the carboxyl of sodium polyacrylate that interacts with active Al sites on diaspore by chemical absorption, and the hydrogen bond effects between hydroxyl group of macromolecule and surface Al--OH on diaspore to accelerate the sedimentation of diaspore.

  7. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS) are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs)/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C). The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  8. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Amparo; García-Moreno, Olga; Torrecillas, Ramón; García-Rocha, Victoria; Fernández, Adolfo

    2012-02-01

    Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS) are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs)/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (-150 to 450 °C). The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  9. Short-range order changes induced by heat treatment in yttrium aluminosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, V.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Eniu, D.; Simon, S.

    2008-01-01

    Short-range order and local atomic configuration in yttrium-aluminosilicate glasses doped with gadolinium were studied by infrared (IR) spectroscopy, 27Al magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and Gd 3+ electron spin resonance (EPR) on as-prepared and heat-treated samples. A small amount of yttrium was replaced by gadolinium in the host glass because Y 3+ and Gd 3+ cations are quite similar and gadolinium ions can be used as structural sensor in electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. The results evidence weak changes in the structure of as-prepared glasses with respect to the coordination of aluminium atoms produced by gadolinium doping (0.2 and 0.5 mol%). New IR bands recorded from heat-treated samples are associated with stretching modes of hexacoordinated aluminium in AlO 6 octahedra. The effect of the heat treatment on aluminium environment is estimated by analysing the relative intensity of the component lines of simulated 27Al MAS-NMR spectra. High-coordinated AlO n species were identified in all samples. EPR results evidence the increase of the number of gadolinium sites with weak crystal field as effect of the structural relaxation.

  10. Effect of alkali-activation on aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High-performance aluminosilieate-based eementitious materials were produced with fly ash from a coal power plant as one of the major raw materials.The structures of fly ash containing aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials were compared before and after treatment by the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).During the 28 d curing time,the compressive strength of water glass and fly ash samples increased from 9.08 MPa to 26.75 MPa.The results show that most of the stiff shells are destroyed after mechanical grinding and chemical activation.Magic angle spinning (MAS)NMR of 27Al shows that the wide peak becomes narrow and the main peak shifts to the direction of low field,indicating the decrease of polymerization degree,the enhancing of activity,the decrease of six-coordination structure,and the increase of small and symmetrical four-coordination polyhedron structure within the aluminum-oxygen polyhedron network.Comparisons between MAS NMR of 29Si with different treatments suggest that Q0 disappears,the quantity of Q2 increases,and the quantity of Q4 decreases.The polym

  11. In situ structural analysis of calcium aluminosilicate glasses under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, R F; de Ligny, D; Martinet, C; Sandrini, M; Medina, A N; Rohling, J H; Baesso, M L; Lima, S M; Andrade, L H C; Guyot, Y

    2016-08-10

    In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the structural evolution of OH(-)-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses, under high pressure and at room temperature. Evaluation was made of the role of the SiO2 concentration in percalcic join systems, for Al/(Al  +  Si) in the approximate range from 0.9 to 0.2. Under high pressure, the intensity of the main band related to the bending mode of bridging oxygen ([Formula: see text][T-O-T], where T  =  Si or Al) decreased gradually, suggesting that the bonds were severely altered or even destroyed. In Si-rich glasses, compression induced a transformation of Q (n) species to Q (n-1). In the case of Al-rich glass, the Al in the smallest Q (n) units evolved from tetrahedral to higher-coordinated Al (([5])Al and ([6])Al). Permanent structural changes were observed in samples recovered from the highest pressure of around 15 GPa and, particularly for Si-rich samples, the recovered structure showed an increase of three-membered rings in the Si/Al tetrahedral network. PMID:27300313

  12. Effects of Thermal and Pressure Histories on the Chemical Strengthening of Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouritz N. Svenson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Glasses can be chemically strengthened through the ion exchange process, wherein smaller ions in the glass (e.g., Na+ are replaced by larger ions from a salt bath (e.g., K+. This develops a compressive stress (CS on the glass surface, which, in turn, improves the damage resistance of the glass. The magnitude and depth of the generated CS depends on the thermal and pressure histories of the glass prior to ion exchange. In this study, we investigate the ion exchange-related properties (mutual diffusivity, CS, and hardness of a sodium aluminosilicate glass, which has been densified through annealing below the initial fictive temperature of the glass or through pressure-quenching from the glass transition temperature at 1 GPa prior to ion exchange. We show that the rate of alkali interdiffusivity depends only on the density of the glass, rather than on the applied densification method. However, we also demonstrate that for a given density, the increase in CS and increase in hardness induced by ion exchange strongly depends on the densification method. Specifically, at constant density, the CS and hardness values achieved through thermal annealing are larger than those achieved through pressure-quenching. These results are discussed in relation to the structural changes in the environment of the network-modifier and the overall network densification.

  13. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  14. The Influence of Base Concentration on the Surface Particle of Lithium Aluminosilicate System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of base concentration effect toward surface particles of lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic system has been done by using NaOH solution. The parent glass with composition of 60% SiO2, 31% Li2O, 6% Al2O3 and 3% TiO2 in wt% was prepared by melting process at 1250 deg. C prior to quenching rapidly to room temperature. Sintering and crystallization process on this parent glass were carefully examined by Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Based on these analyses, the selected crystal has been chosen as a precursor material. There are two controlling parameter involved in this study i.e. NaOH concentration and leaching period. The morphology of the glass ceramic particle was observed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The result shows that by increasing the basic concentration as well as increasing the soaking leaching period, the tendency of glass ceramic particle to leach out is relatively highs

  15. Mechanisms of optical losses in the 5D4 and 5D3 levels in Tb3+ doped low silica calcium aluminosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, J. F. M.; Terra, I. A. A.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Guimarães, F. B.; Baesso, M. L.; Nunes, L. A. O.; Catunda, T.

    2015-02-01

    Trivalent Tb-doped materials exhibit strong emission in the green and weak emission in the UV-blue levels. Usually, this behavior is attributed to the cross relaxation (CR) process. In this paper, the luminescence properties of Tb3+-doped low silica calcium aluminosilicate glasses are analyzed for UV (λexc = 325 nm) and visible (488 nm) excitations. Under 325 nm excitation, the intensity of green luminescence increases proportionally to Tb3+ concentration. However, the blue luminescence intensity is strongly reduced with the increase of concentration from 0.5-15.0 wt. %. In the case of 488 nm excitation, a saturation behavior of the green emission is observed at intensities two orders of magnitude smaller than expected for bleaching of the ground state population. Using a rate equation model, we showed that this behavior can be explained by an excited state absorption cross section two orders of magnitude larger than the ground state absorption. The blue emission is much weaker than expected from our rate equations (325 nm and 488 nm excitation). We concluded that only the CR process cannot explain the overall feature of measured luminescence quenching in the wide range of Tb3+ concentrations. Cooperative upconversion from a pair of excited ions (5D3:5D3 or 5D3:5D4) and other mechanisms involving upper lying states (4f5d, charge transfer, host matrix, defects, etc.) may play a significant role.

  16. Porous materials based on cenospheres of coal fly ash for fixation of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in mineral-like aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the crystalline matrices being developed for immobilization of 137Cs and 90Sr are framework aluminosilicates like feldspars and feldspathoids. A novel approach to obtain mineral-like aluminosilicate forms of 137Cs and 90Sr with using porous materials based on hollow aluminosilicate microspheres of coal fly ash (cenospheres) has been demonstrated. Two modifications of microspherical porous materials have been developed, (i) moulded porous matrices based on consolidated cenospheres and (ii) zeolite sorbents obtained by hydrothermal zeolitization of cenospheres. The first includes impregnation of Cs- or Sr-containing solutions into porous matrices, drying and calcining at temperatures (700-900 deg. C) lower than the softening point of the porous matrix material, at which solid phase crystallization takes place with formation of framework aluminosilicates, such as Cs-nepheline, pollucite or Sr-anorthite. Using zeolite sorbents, immobilization of Cs+ and Sr2+ proceeds through the step of trapping ions from the solution followed by drying and thermochemical solid-phase transformation of saturated zeolites into pollucite or Sr-anorthite over the same temperature range. Cenosphere-derived porous matrices and zeolite sorbents were tested in fixation of 137Cs using spiked simulants of actual radioactive waste. The durability of crystalline aluminosilicate 137Cs -forms obtained was shown to satisfy Russian (GOST P 50926-96) and international standards. (author)

  17. Aluminosilicate saturation as a solubility control in leaching of nuclear waste-form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the slow flow region, material loss rates of nuclear waste form materials are determined by the solubilities and the flow rates. Present studies show that the solubilities of various, widely different waste forms, as well as of minerals, can be correlated with the Al x Si concentration products. This indicates that in these cases the solubilities are controlled by a combined equimolar aluminosilicate species. This observation serves as a basis for a predictive model for the long-term stability of waste forms under slow flow conditions. This model also provides explanations of other experimental findings, such as the increases in solubility upon departure from a neutral pH in the low as well as in the high pH region, the small magnitude of the temperature dependence, and the observation that the release rate of Cs is low relative to that of Na in the slow flow region. The relative concentrations of Si and of Al, respectively, in the leachates are related to the composition of the leach solids and are shown to depend on the immersion time in different ways in the cases of high-silica solids and of high-alumina solids, respectively. In both cases, however, the dependence of the Si:Al ratio on contact time furnishes another strong indication for the formation of a solid surface with comparable contents of Al and of Si, respectively, upon prolonged immersion in water. The results are shown to form the basis for an accurate long-term prediction of material loss rates. 1 figure, 4 tables

  18. Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports

  19. Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrado, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports.

  20. Modeling the Structure of Complex Aluminosilicate Glasses: The Effect of Zinc Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Andrea; Dapiaggi, Monica; Pavese, Alessandro; Agostini, Giovanni; Bernasconi, Maurizio; Bowron, Daniel T

    2016-03-10

    An empirical potential structure refinement of neutron and X-ray diffraction data combined with extended absorption fine structure evidence has been applied to the investigation of two distinct sets of complex aluminosilicate glasses containing different quantities of zinc. Data come from (i) neutron and X-ray total scattering experiments, which have been performed at the ISIS neutron spallation source (SANDALS beamline) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ID11 beamline), and (ii) EXAFS experiments which have been performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM23 beamline). By careful examination of the modeled ensemble of atoms, a wide range of structural information has been extracted: coordination numbers, bond distances, cluster sizes, type of oxygen sharing, and the preference of large cations to adopt a charge-compensating role. The first series of glasses, which is characterized by a fixed network modifier element content (i.e., Na), shows how the introduction of Zn at the expense of Si and Al network forming elements does not significantly alter the polymerization degree, as a result of its dominant 4-fold coordination. In the case of the second series, which is characterized by fixed network forming element content (i.e., Si and Al), it is shown how the replacement of a network modifier element (i.e., Ca) with the introduction of Zn does not change the propensity of Zn to be mainly 4-fold coordinated by promoting the network. Where appropriate the experimental results have been compared with classical theoretical approaches such as stoichiometric models based on Zachariasen's rules and computational routines. PMID:26848740

  1. Hafnium in peralkaline and peraluminous boro-aluminosilicate glass, and glass subcomponents: a solubility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relationship between the solubility of hafnia (HfO2) and the host glass composition was explored by determining the solubility limits of HfO2 in peralkaline and peraluminous borosilicate glasses in the system SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-Na2O, and in glasses in the system SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3 in air at 1450 C. The only Hf-bearing phase to crystallize in the peralkaline borosilicate melts is hafnia, while in the boron-free melts sodium-hafnium silicates crystallize. All peraluminous borosilicate melts crystallize hafnia, but the slightly peraluminous glasses also have sector-zoned hafnia crystals that contain Al and Si. The more peraluminous borosilicate glasses also crystallize a B-containing mullite. The general morphology of the hafnia crystals changes as peralkalinity (Na2O/(Na2O+Al2O3)) decreases, as expected in melts with increasing viscosity. In all of the glasses with Na2O > Al2O3, the solubility of hafnia is linearly and positively correlated with Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) or Na2O - Al2O3 (excess sodium), despite the presence of 5 to 16 mol% B2O3. The solubility of hafnia is higher in the sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses than in the sodium-aluminosilicate glasses, suggesting that the boron is enhancing the effect that excess sodium has on the incorporation of Hf into the glass structure. The results of this solubility study are compared to other studies of high-valence cation solubility in B-free silicate melts. From this, for peralkaline B-bearing glasses, it is shown that, although the solubility limits are higher, the solution behavior of hafnia is the same as in B-free silicate melts previously studied. By comparison, also, it is shown that in peraluminous melts, there must be a different solution mechanism for hafnia: different than for peralkaline sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses and different than for B-free silicate melts studied by others

  2. White light emission from Sm{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} codoped oxyfluoride aluminosilicate glasses under UV light excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, G; Yang, R; Qiu, J R [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Brik, M G [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, Tartu 51014 (Estonia); Kumar, G A [Department of Material Science and Engineering, State University of New Jersey, NJ 08854-8065 (United States); Kityk, I V [Department of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Marcina Strzody 9, PL-44100 Gliwice (Poland)], E-mail: glnphysics@rediffmail.com

    2009-01-07

    In this paper, we report on the absorption and photoluminescence properties of oxyfluoride aluminosilicate and boro-aluminosilicate glasses codoped with Sm{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions. The differential thermal analysis profiles of these glasses have been obtained to confirm their thermal stability. From the measured absorption spectrum, Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters ({omega}{sub 2}, {omega}{sub 4} and {omega}{sub 6}) have been evaluated for the Sm{sup 3+} ion. When excited by ultraviolet light these glasses emit a combination of blue, green and orange-red wavelengths forming white light. The ratio of the intensities of orange-red to green emissions can be tuned by varying both the concentration of the Sm{sup 3+} ion and the composition of the glass matrix. The excitation and emission spectra have shown a self-quenching effect for the Sm{sup 3+} ions and an efficient energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} : {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} Sm{sup 3+} : {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} was observed which was also confirmed by the decay lifetime measurements.

  3. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin over High-Surface-Area Mesoporous Aluminosilicates: Effect of Porosity and Acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodis, Victoria B F; Karakoulia, Stamatia A; Triantafyllidis, Kostas S; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2016-05-23

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of lignin with amorphous mesoporous aluminosilicates catalysts yields a high fraction of aromatics and a relatively low amount of char/coke. The relationship between the acidity and porosity of Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and Al-MSU-J with product selectivity during lignin CFP is determined. The acid sites (mild Brønsted and stronger Lewis) are able to catalyze pyrolysis intermediates towards fewer oxygenated phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons. A generalized correlation of the product selectivity and yield with the aluminum content and acidity of the mesoporous aluminosilicates is hard to establish. Zeolitic strong acid sites are not required to achieve high conversion and selectivity to aromatic hydrocarbon because nanosized MCM-41 produces a high liquid yield and selectivity. The two most essential parameters are diffusion, which is influenced by pore and grain size, and the active site, which may be mildly acidic, but is dominated by Lewis acid sites. Nanosized grains and mild acidity are essential ingredients for a good lignin CFP catalyst. PMID:27079742

  4. Synthesis of CdTe QDs/single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes hybrid compound and their antimicrobial activity on bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of molecular conjugates of quantum dots (nanocrystalline fluorophores) for biological purposes have received much attention due to their improved biological activity. However, relatively, little is known about the synthesis and application of aluminosilicate nanotubes decorated with quantum dots (QDs) for imaging and treatment of pathogenic bacteria. This paper describes for a first time, the use of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (SWNT) (imogolite) as a one-dimensional template for the in situ growth of mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe QDs. This new nanohybrid hydrogel was synthesized by a simple reaction pathway and their enhanced optical properties were monitored by fluorescence and UV–Vis spectroscopy, confirming that the use of these nanotubes favors the confinement effects of net CdTe QDs. In addition, studies of FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the non-covalent functionalization of SWNT. Finally, the antimicrobial activity of SWNT coated with CdTe QDs toward three opportunistic multi-resistant pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were tested. Growth inhibition tests were conducted by exposing growing bacteria to CdTe QDs/SWNT hybrid compound showing that the new nano-structured composite is a potential antimicrobial agent for heavy metal-resistant bacteria.

  5. Synthesis of CdTe QDs/single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes hybrid compound and their antimicrobial activity on bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldo, Daniela A., E-mail: daniela.geraldo@unab.cl [Universidad Andres Bello, Departamento de Ciencias Quimicas (Chile); Arancibia-Miranda, Nicolas [CEDENNA, Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Chile); Villagra, Nicolas A. [Universidad Andres Bello, Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas (Chile); Mora, Guido C. [Universidad Andres Bello, Unidad de Microbiologia, Facultad de Medicina (Chile); Arratia-Perez, Ramiro [Universidad Andres Bello, Departamento de Ciencias Quimicas (Chile)

    2012-12-15

    The use of molecular conjugates of quantum dots (nanocrystalline fluorophores) for biological purposes have received much attention due to their improved biological activity. However, relatively, little is known about the synthesis and application of aluminosilicate nanotubes decorated with quantum dots (QDs) for imaging and treatment of pathogenic bacteria. This paper describes for a first time, the use of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (SWNT) (imogolite) as a one-dimensional template for the in situ growth of mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe QDs. This new nanohybrid hydrogel was synthesized by a simple reaction pathway and their enhanced optical properties were monitored by fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy, confirming that the use of these nanotubes favors the confinement effects of net CdTe QDs. In addition, studies of FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the non-covalent functionalization of SWNT. Finally, the antimicrobial activity of SWNT coated with CdTe QDs toward three opportunistic multi-resistant pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were tested. Growth inhibition tests were conducted by exposing growing bacteria to CdTe QDs/SWNT hybrid compound showing that the new nano-structured composite is a potential antimicrobial agent for heavy metal-resistant bacteria.

  6. Emission tunability and local environment in europium-doped OH−-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses for artificial lighting applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between emission tunability and the local environment of europium ions in OH−-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses was investigated, focusing on the development of devices for artificial lighting. Significant conversion of Eu3+ to Eu2+ was obtained by means of melting the glasses under a vacuum atmosphere and controlling the silica content, resulting in broad, intense, and tunable luminescence ranging from blue to red. Electron spin resonance and X-ray absorption near edge structure measurements enabled correlation of the luminescence behavior of the material with the Eu2+/Eu3+ concentration ratio and changes in the surrounding ions' crystal field. The coordinates of the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram were calculated from the spectra, and the contour maps showed that the light emitted from Eu2+ presented broad bands and enhanced color tuning, ranging from reddish-orange to blue. The results showed that these Eu doped glasses can be used for tunable white lighting by combining matrix composition and the adjustment of the pumping wavelength. - Highlights: • Eu2+-doped OH− free calcium aluminosilicate glass as a new source for white lighting. • Correlation between emission tunability and local environment of europium ions. • Significant reduction of Eu3+ to Eu2+ by melting the glasses under vacuum atmosphere. • Broad, intense and tunable luminescence ranging from blue to red

  7. Optical spectroscopy and optical waveguide fabrication in Eu3+ and Eu3+/Tb3+ doped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical and spectroscopic properties of 2.0% Eu(PO3)3 singly doped and 5.0% Tb(PO3)3–2.0% Eu(PO3)3 codoped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses were investigated. Reddish-orange light emission, with x=0.64 and y=0.36 CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained in the europium singly doped glass excited at 393 nm. Such chromaticity coordinates are close to those (0.67,0.33) standard of the National Television System Committee for the red phosphor. When the sodium–zinc–aluminosilicate glass is co-doped with Tb3+ and Eu3+, reddish-orange light emission, with (0.61,0.37) CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained upon Tb3+ excitation at 344 nm. This reddish-orange luminescence is generated mainly by 5D0→7F1 and 5D0 →7F2 emissions of Eu3+, europium being sensitized by terbium through a non-radiative energy transfer. From an analysis of the Tb3+ emission decay curves it is inferred that the Tb3+→Eu3+ energy transfer might take place between Tb3+ and Eu3+ clusters through a short-range interaction mechanism, so that an electric dipole–quadrupole interaction appears to be the most probable transfer mechanism. The efficiency of this energy transfer is about 62% upon excitation at 344 nm. In the singly doped and codoped glasses multimode optical waveguides were successfully produced by Ag+–Na+ ion exchange, and they could be characterized at various wavelengths. -- Highlights: • Reddish-orange light emission can be generated from Tb3+ and Eu3+ codoped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses excited at 344 nm. • The Eu3+ is sensitized by Tb3+ through a non-radiative energy transfer. • Highly multimode waveguides can be fabricated by diluted silver–sodium exchange. • This type of AlGaN LEDs pumped glass phosphors might be useful for generation of reddish-orange light

  8. Phase evolution of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O gels in synthetic aluminosilicate binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Gehman, John D; van Deventer, Jannie S J; Provis, John L

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates the production of stoichiometrically controlled alkali-aluminosilicate gels ('geopolymers') via alkali-activation of high-purity synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate powders. This method provides for the first time a process by which the chemistry of aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials may be accurately simulated by pure synthetic systems, allowing elucidation of physicochemical phenomena controlling alkali-aluminosilicate gel formation which has until now been impeded by the inability to isolate and control key variables. Phase evolution and nanostructural development of these materials are examined using advanced characterisation techniques, including solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy probing (29)Si, (27)Al and (23)Na nuclei. Gel stoichiometry and the reaction kinetics which control phase evolution are shown to be strongly dependent on the chemical composition of the reaction mix, while the main reaction product is a Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O type gel comprised of aluminium and silicon tetrahedra linked via oxygen bridges, with sodium taking on a charge balancing function. The alkali-aluminosilicate gels produced in this study constitute a chemically simplified model system which provides a novel research tool for the study of phase evolution and microstructural development in these systems. Novel insight of physicochemical phenomena governing geopolymer gel formation suggests that intricate control over time-dependent geopolymer physical properties can be attained through a careful precursor mix design. Chemical composition of the main N-A-S-H type gel reaction product as well as the reaction kinetics governing its formation are closely related to the Si/Al ratio of the precursor, with increased Al content leading to an increased rate of reaction and a decreased Si/Al ratio in the N-A-S-H type gel. This has significant implications for geopolymer mix design for industrial applications. PMID:26911317

  9. Sol–gel dip coating of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia dental ceramic by aluminosilicate nanocomposite as a novel technique to improve the bonding of veneering porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Azamsadat; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Karami, Parisa; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir; Salehi, Sahar; Bagheri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of silica and aluminosilicate nanocomposite coating of zirconia-based dental ceramic by a sol–gel dip-coating technique on the bond strength of veneering porcelain to the yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) in vitro. Thirty Y-TZP blocks (10 mm ×10 mm ×3 mm) were prepared and were assigned to four experimental groups (n=10/group): C, without any further surface treatment as the control group; S, sandblasted using 110 μm alumina powder; Si, silica sol dip coating + calcination; and Si/Al, aluminosilicate sol dip coating + calcination. After preparing Y-TZP samples, a 3 mm thick layer of the recommended porcelain was fired on the coated Y-TZP surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the coating and the nature of the bonding between the coating and zirconia. To examine the zirconia–porcelain bond strength, a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) approach was chosen. FT-IR study showed the formation of silica and aluminosilicate materials. XRD pattern showed the formation of new phases consisting of Si, Al, and Zr in coated samples. SEM showed the formation of a uniform coating on Y-TZP samples. Maximum μTBS values were obtained in aluminosilicate samples, which were significantly increased compared to control and sandblasted groups (P=0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). This study showed that aluminosilicate sol–gel dip coating can be considered as a convenient, less expensive reliable method for improving the bond strength between dental Y-TZP ceramics and veneering porcelain. PMID:27478376

  10. Sol-gel dip coating of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia dental ceramic by aluminosilicate nanocomposite as a novel technique to improve the bonding of veneering porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Azamsadat; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Karami, Parisa; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir; Salehi, Sahar; Bagheri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of silica and aluminosilicate nanocomposite coating of zirconia-based dental ceramic by a sol-gel dip-coating technique on the bond strength of veneering porcelain to the yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) in vitro. Thirty Y-TZP blocks (10 mm ×10 mm ×3 mm) were prepared and were assigned to four experimental groups (n=10/group): C, without any further surface treatment as the control group; S, sandblasted using 110 μm alumina powder; Si, silica sol dip coating + calcination; and Si/Al, aluminosilicate sol dip coating + calcination. After preparing Y-TZP samples, a 3 mm thick layer of the recommended porcelain was fired on the coated Y-TZP surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the coating and the nature of the bonding between the coating and zirconia. To examine the zirconia-porcelain bond strength, a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) approach was chosen. FT-IR study showed the formation of silica and aluminosilicate materials. XRD pattern showed the formation of new phases consisting of Si, Al, and Zr in coated samples. SEM showed the formation of a uniform coating on Y-TZP samples. Maximum μTBS values were obtained in aluminosilicate samples, which were significantly increased compared to control and sandblasted groups (P=0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). This study showed that aluminosilicate sol-gel dip coating can be considered as a convenient, less expensive reliable method for improving the bond strength between dental Y-TZP ceramics and veneering porcelain. PMID:27478376

  11. Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Catalysts for the Selective Isomerization of n-Hexane: The Roles of Surface Acidity and Platinum Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselwhite, Nathan; Na, Kyungsu; Sabyrov, Kairat; Alayoglu, Selim; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2015-08-19

    Several types of mesoporous aluminosilicates were synthesized and evaluated in the catalytic isomerization of n-hexane, both with and without Pt nanoparticles loaded into the mesopores. The materials investigated included mesoporous MFI and BEA type zeolites, MCF-17 mesoporous silica, and an aluminum modified MCF-17. The acidity of the materials was investigated through pyridine adsorption and Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). It was found that the strong Brönsted acid sites in the micropores of the zeolite catalysts facilitated the cracking of hexane. However, the medium strength acid sites on the Al modified MCF-17 mesoporous silica greatly enhanced the isomerization reaction. Through the loading of different amounts of Pt into the mesopores of the Al modified MCF-17, the relationship between the metal nanoparticles and acidic sites on the support was revealed. PMID:26168190

  12. Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization of Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Cross-Linked Silica, Organic Polyimide, and Inorganic Aluminosilicate Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Guo, Haiquan N.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    As aerospace applications become ever more demanding, novel insulation materials with lower thermal conductivity, lighter weight and higher use temperature are required to fit the aerospace application needs. Having nanopores and high porosity, aerogels are superior thermal insulators, among other things. The use of silica aerogels in general is quite restricted due to their inherent fragility, hygroscopic nature, and poor mechanical properties, especially in extereme aerospace environments. Our research goal is to develop aerogels with better mechanical and environmental stability for a variety of aeronautic and space applications including space suit insulation for planetary surface missions, insulation for inflatable structures for habitats, inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for entry, descent and landing (EDL) operations, and cryotank insulation for advance space propulsion systems. Different type of aerogels including organic-inorganic polymer reinforced (hybrid) silica-based aerogels, polyimide aerogels and inorganic aluminosilicate aerogels have been developed and examined.

  13. Striking role of non-bridging oxygen on glass transition temperature of calcium aluminosilicate glass-formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structural and dynamic properties of calcium aluminosilicate, (CaO-Al2O3)1−x(SiO2)x, glass formers along three joins, namely, R = 1, 1.57, and 3, in which the silica content x can vary from 0 to 1. For all compositions, we determined the glass-transition temperature, the abundances of the non-bridging oxygen, triclusters, and AlO5 structural units, as well as the fragility from the temperature evolution of the α-relaxation times. We clearly evidence the role played by the non-bridging oxygen linked either to Al atoms or Si atoms in the evolution of the glass-transition temperature as well as of the fragility as a function of silica content along the three joins

  14. X-ray and MAS NMR characterization of the thermal transformation of Li(Na)-Y zeolite to lithium aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature thermal transformation of Li-exchanged Na-Y zeolite has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and /sup 29/Si MAS NMR studies. At 7000C, the zeolite was transformed into an amorphous phase and upon further heating to 8000C, formation of lithium aluminosilicate with high-quartz structure, in addition to an amorphous phase, was noted. When heated above 9000C, the high-quartz structure was transformed into a β-spodumene related solid solution. X-ray and MAS NMR studies indicate the β-spodumene solid solution formed has the composition close to (Li/sub 0.23/Na/sub 0.06/)A iota /sub 0.29/Si/sub 0.71/O/sub 2/, which is in agreement with chemical analysis

  15. White light generation in Dy3+-and Ce3+/Dy3+-doped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectroscopic investigation of 1% Dy2O3-singly doped and 0.5% Ce2O3-1.0% Dy2O3-codoped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses was performed by analyzing their absorption and photoluminescence spectra, and decay times. Warm white yellow light emission, with (0.419, 0.440) CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates and 3579 K color temperature, is obtained in the Dy3+-singly doped glass excited at 399 nm, which fits to the requirements of GaN LEDs. A quantum efficiency of 74% and a very high optical gain (38.7×10−25 cm2 s) were estimated for the dysprosium 4F9/2 level luminescence, which might also make the Dy3+-doped glass a promising gain medium for solid state yellow laser pumped by GaN LEDs. In the Ce3+/Dy3+-codoped glass a radiative energy transfer from Ce3+ to Dy3+ is observed upon UV excitation (310–365 nm), with a Ce3+ to Dy3+ interaction distance that could be greater than 6–12 Å. The emission color from the codoped glass can be tuned with the excitation wavelength from blue light (0.247, 0.245), upon 310 nm excitation, to cold white light (0.284, 0.300), with a 9052 K color temperature, upon 365 nm excitation. - Highlights: • Zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate (ZN) glasses are optically activated with Dy3+ (ZNDy). • ZN glasses are optically activated with Ce3+/Dy3+ (ZNCeDy). • Dy3+ is sensitized by Ce3+ through a radiative energy transfer. • ZNDy glass can generate 3579 K warm white yellow light emission. • ZNCeDy glass can generate 9052 K cold white light emission

  16. Preparation of hierarchical micro-mesoporous aluminosilicate composites by simple Y zeolite/MCM-48 silica assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hierarchical micro-mesoporous aluminosilicates were synthesized. • Y zeolite core/MCM-48 silica shell structures were obtained. • Y zeolite favors the formation of the mesostructure. • Porosity and structure can be varied by modifying the preparation variables. • Duration of the hydrothermal step has a great effect on the materials properties. -- Abstract: A simple procedure to obtain hierarchical micro-mesoporous aluminosilicate composites was developed by growing MCM-48 silica over commercial Y zeolite. The obtained hierarchical composites have a microporous core and a mesoporous shell. The process consists in assembling dispersed Y zeolite with a mesoporous silica phase that is formed “in situ” by “soft-templating” with cetryltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The Y zeolite/MCM-48 silica ratio and aging time were varied to study their effects on the final porosity and structure of the hierarchical composites. The pore textural and structural characteristics of the composites did not match those of the corresponding Y zeolite/MCM-48 silica physical mixtures. This implies that the synthesized composites integrate micropores and mesopores in the same bulk. The obtained composites exhibited micropore and mesopore volumes ranging between 0.15–0.31 and 0.30–0.51 cm3/g, respectively. X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption results revealed that the presence of zeolite in the reaction medium favors the formation of mesopores in the obtained materials, especially for short hydrothermal treatments. TEM results showed that the obtained adsorbents are constituted by an integrated micro-mesoporous bimodal system in which Y zeolite is surrounded by a thin cover of MCM-48 silica

  17. Preparation of hierarchical micro-mesoporous aluminosilicate composites by simple Y zeolite/MCM-48 silica assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enterría, Marina, E-mail: marina@incar.csic.es; Suárez-García, Fabián; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M.D.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Hierarchical micro-mesoporous aluminosilicates were synthesized. • Y zeolite core/MCM-48 silica shell structures were obtained. • Y zeolite favors the formation of the mesostructure. • Porosity and structure can be varied by modifying the preparation variables. • Duration of the hydrothermal step has a great effect on the materials properties. -- Abstract: A simple procedure to obtain hierarchical micro-mesoporous aluminosilicate composites was developed by growing MCM-48 silica over commercial Y zeolite. The obtained hierarchical composites have a microporous core and a mesoporous shell. The process consists in assembling dispersed Y zeolite with a mesoporous silica phase that is formed “in situ” by “soft-templating” with cetryltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The Y zeolite/MCM-48 silica ratio and aging time were varied to study their effects on the final porosity and structure of the hierarchical composites. The pore textural and structural characteristics of the composites did not match those of the corresponding Y zeolite/MCM-48 silica physical mixtures. This implies that the synthesized composites integrate micropores and mesopores in the same bulk. The obtained composites exhibited micropore and mesopore volumes ranging between 0.15–0.31 and 0.30–0.51 cm{sup 3}/g, respectively. X-ray diffraction and N{sub 2} adsorption results revealed that the presence of zeolite in the reaction medium favors the formation of mesopores in the obtained materials, especially for short hydrothermal treatments. TEM results showed that the obtained adsorbents are constituted by an integrated micro-mesoporous bimodal system in which Y zeolite is surrounded by a thin cover of MCM-48 silica.

  18. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li-na Niu; Devon Watson; Kyle Thames; Carolyn M. Primus; Bergeron, Brian E.; Kai Jiao; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Cutler, Christopher W.; Ji-hua Chen; PASHLEY David H.; Franklin R Tay

    2015-01-01

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA)...

  19. Structural analysis and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kobzi, Balázs; Sinkó, Katalin; Homonnay, Zoltán [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Kuzmann, Ernő [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1512 (Hungary); Ristić, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko [Division of Materials Chemistry, RuđerBošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 11-6 Kayanomori, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan); Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hematite was precipitated by heat treatment of iron aluminosilicate glass. • The hematite phase shows visible light photocatalytic activity. • We could prepare an effective photocatalyst from ‘ubiquitous elements’. - Abstract: A relationship between structure and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate (15Na{sub 2}O⋅15CaO⋅40Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅(30−x)SiO{sub 2}) glass (xNCFAS) was investigated by means of {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and UV–visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV–VIS). The {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectrum of 11NCFAS glass measured after heat-treatment at 1000 °C for 100 min was composed of a paramagnetic doublet due to Fe{sup III}(T{sub d}) and two magnetic sextets due to regular hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and hematite with larger internal magnetic field. X-ray diffraction patterns of heat-treated xNCFAS samples resulted in decrease of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and increase of Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 22}O{sub 33} or CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with alumina content. A quick decrease in methylene blue (MB) concentration from 15.6 to 4.7 μmol L{sup −1} was observed in the photocatalytic reaction test with 40 mg of heat-treated 11NCFAS glass under visible light-exposure. The largest first-order rate constant of MB decomposition (k) was estimated to be 9.26 × 10{sup −3} min{sup −1}. Tauc’s plot yielded a band gap energy (E{sub g}) of 1.88 eV for heat-treated 11NCFAS glass, which is smaller than previously reported E{sub g} of 2.2 eV for α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These results prove that addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into iron-containing soda lime silicate glass is favorable for the preparation of improved visible light-photocatalyst with ‘ubiquitous’ elements.

  20. Structural analysis and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hematite was precipitated by heat treatment of iron aluminosilicate glass. • The hematite phase shows visible light photocatalytic activity. • We could prepare an effective photocatalyst from ‘ubiquitous elements’. - Abstract: A relationship between structure and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate (15Na2O⋅15CaO⋅40Fe2O3⋅xAl2O3⋅(30−x)SiO2) glass (xNCFAS) was investigated by means of 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and UV–visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV–VIS). The 57Fe-Mössbauer spectrum of 11NCFAS glass measured after heat-treatment at 1000 °C for 100 min was composed of a paramagnetic doublet due to FeIII(Td) and two magnetic sextets due to regular hematite (α-Fe2O3) and hematite with larger internal magnetic field. X-ray diffraction patterns of heat-treated xNCFAS samples resulted in decrease of α-Fe2O3 and increase of Ca2Fe22O33 or CaFe2O4 with alumina content. A quick decrease in methylene blue (MB) concentration from 15.6 to 4.7 μmol L−1 was observed in the photocatalytic reaction test with 40 mg of heat-treated 11NCFAS glass under visible light-exposure. The largest first-order rate constant of MB decomposition (k) was estimated to be 9.26 × 10−3 min−1. Tauc’s plot yielded a band gap energy (Eg) of 1.88 eV for heat-treated 11NCFAS glass, which is smaller than previously reported Eg of 2.2 eV for α-Fe2O3. These results prove that addition of Al2O3 into iron-containing soda lime silicate glass is favorable for the preparation of improved visible light-photocatalyst with ‘ubiquitous’ elements

  1. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  2. A simple approach for upconversion determination using low excitation power: the photoluminescence analysis of an Er-doped aluminosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials other than silica can offer better performance in terms of Er solubility and band broadness for integrated Er-doped optical amplifiers and a deep knowledge of their optical properties is therefore fundamental. In this work we describe a simple approach for evaluating upconversion with low pump power excitation, when the standard methods are not very accurate. This is based on the solution of an analytic model which allows the calculation of the 1540 nm (I13/2→I15/2) and the 980 nm (I11/2→I15/2) photoluminescence emissions by considering three energy levels for Erbium. The proposed model has been applied to analyze the luminescence properties of an Er-doped aluminosilicate glass. Firstly some of the system parameters have been evaluated in relation with the lifetimes and with the absorption cross section at 488 nm excitation wavelength. Then the model has been calibrated by comparing the calculated relation between the 980 nm and the 1540 nm emission intensities with the corresponding experimental measurements. This procedure allowed for the determination of the coefficient of cooperative upconversion using pump powers in the range 4-32 mW. An experimental check of the goodness of the method is also presented

  3. Bona-fide method for the determination of short range order and transport properties in a ferro-aluminosilicate slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalis, Konstantinos T.; Dellis, Dimitrios; Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Xenidis, Anthimos

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics, structural and transport properties (density, melting point, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, viscosity and electrical conductivity) of a ferro-aluminosilicate slag have been studied in the solid and liquid state (1273–2273 K) using molecular dynamics. The simulations were based on a Buckingham-type potential, which was extended here, to account for the presence of Cr and Cu. The potential was optimized by fitting pair distribution function partials to values determined by Reverse Monte Carlo modelling of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The resulting short range order features and ring statistics were in tight agreement with experimental data and created consensus for the accurate prediction of transport properties. Accordingly, calculations yielded rational values both for the average heat capacity, equal to 1668.58 J/(kg·K), and for the viscosity, in the range of 4.09–87.64 cP. The potential was consistent in predicting accurate values for mass density (i.e. 2961.50 kg/m3 vs. an experimental value of 2940 kg/m3) and for electrical conductivity (5.3–233 S/m within a temperature range of 1273.15–2273.15 K).

  4. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Claire E., E-mail: whitece@princeton.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton (United States); Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University, Princeton (United States); Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Physics and Chemistry of Materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  5. Application of a low-yield neutron generator for rapid evaluation of alumino-silicate ores from Nigeria by FNAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid analytical procedure based on low-yield of neutrons produced by a sealed-tube; 14 MeV neutron generator has been used for the determination of the Al and Si contents of alumino-silicate ores from Nigeria. Primary fast neutron flux reaching the sample and standard were monitored by high-purity Al foils and checked by a BF3 neutron counter system. Analytical grade Al2O3 and SiO2 chemical powders were used as standards while the analytical quality control of the procedure was checked by Bauxite (BCS-395) and Portland Cement (BCS-372) certified reference materials. The deviations of our measured values from the certified values were found to be 1.6% and 1.3% for Al and Si. Detection limits of the set-up for Al and Si were deduced to be 2.7 and 0.9 wt%; Respectively. Results are hereby presented for some industrial raw materials

  6. Effect of Eu3+ concentration on the grating efficiency and ionic conductivity in sodium-magnesium-aluminosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Abdulatif Y.; Wicksted, James P.; Ascio, Robert; Martin, Joel J.; Hunt, Charles; Dixon, George S.

    2002-09-01

    We report a systematic study of a grating formation in which the Eu2O3 in sodium-magnesium-aluminosilicate glasses is varied from 0.76 to 8.11 mol %. The growth, decay, and erasure of the grating are reported as functions of the Eu2O3. The maximum persistent change in the index of refraction was 3 x10-5. The persistent change in the index of refraction was initially a quadratic function of the Eu2O3 and showed a limiting behavior at the highest Eu2O3. The transient change in the index of refraction Deltantran was a quadratic function of Eu2O3 throughout the range of concentrations studied here. The grating buildup rate increased linearly with Deltantran. The results of this study are consistent with the model published recently by Dixon [et al.] Ionic conductivities were also measured to help separate the effect of the Eu3+ on the glass network from its active role in transferring the optical energy into ionic motion.

  7. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO2 alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C3S), blended C3S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C3S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements

  8. Effect of curing time on microstructure and mechanical strength development of alkali activated binders based on vitreous calcium aluminosilicate (VCAS)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Tashima; L Soriano; M V Borrachero; J Monzó; J Payá

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the influence of curing time on the microstructure and mechanical strength development of alkali activated binders based on vitreous calcium aluminosilicate (VCAS). Mechanical strength of alkali activated mortars cured at 65 °C was assessed for different curing times (4–168 h) using 10 molal NaOH solution as alkaline activator. Compressive strength values around 77MPa after three days of curing at 65 °C were obtained. 1.68MPa/h compressive strength gain rate was observed in the first 12 h, decreasing to 0.95MPa/h for the period of 12–72 h. The progress of geopolymeric reaction was monitored by means of TGA and, electrical conductivity and pH measurements in an aqueous suspension. Significant decrease in pH and electrical conductivity were observed in the 4–72 h period, demonstrating the geopolymerization process. Furthermore, SEM images showed an important amount of (N, C)ASH gel and low porosity of the developed matrix.

  9. Evaluation of aluminosilicate glass sintering during differential scanning calorimetry; Estudo da sinterizacao de vidros aluminossilicatos por calorimetria exploratoria diferencial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Juliana Pereira de

    2015-07-01

    In this work a difference in the baseline in differential scanning calorimetry analyses, observed in a work where aluminosilicate glasses microspheres containing Ho were studied for application in selective internal radiotherapy as hepatocellular carcinoma treatment, was studied. The glasses with nominal composition 53,7 SiO{sub 2} .10,5 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} . 35,8 MgO in %mol were produced from traditional melting. The first obtained were milled and sieved in the range of 45 a 63 μm. The material was used to produce glass microspheres by the gravitational fall method. The glass powder and the microspheres were characterized by X ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser diffraction, X ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry, mass spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy. After the thermal analyses, pellets were formed in the crucibles and were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X ray diffraction, and He pycnometry. The difference in the baseline was associated to the viscous flow sintering process and happens because of the decrease in the detected heat flow due to the sample shrinkage. Other events as concurrent crystallization with the sintering process were also studied. (author)

  10. Electrical behavior of aluminosilicate glass-ceramic sealants and their interaction with metallic solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Kharton, Vladislav V.; Yaremchenko, Aleksey A.; Ferreira, José M. F.

    A series of alkaline-earth aluminosilicate glass-ceramics (GCs) were appraised with respect to their suitability as sealants for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The parent composition with general formula Ca 0.9MgAl 0.1La 0.1Si 1.9O 6 was modified with Cr 2O 3 and BaO. The addition of BaO led to a substantial decrease in the total electrical conductivity of the GCs, thus improving their insulating properties. BaO-containing GCs exhibited higher coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in comparison to BaO-free GCs. An extensive segregation of oxides of Ti and Mn, components of the Crofer22 APU interconnect alloy, along with negligible formation of BaCrO 4 was observed at the interface between GC/interconnects diffusion couples. Thermal shock resistance and gas-tightness of GC sealants in contact with yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte (8YSZ) was evaluated in air and water. Good matching of CTE and strong, but not reactive, adhesion to the solid electrolyte and interconnect, in conjunction with a high level of electrical resistivity, are all advantageous for potential SOFC applications.

  11. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Infiltration and Cyclic Degradations of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Smialek, Jim; Miller, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop higher temperature capable turbine thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) resistance of the advanced coating systems needs to be evaluated and improved. This paper highlights some of NASA past high heat flux testing approaches for turbine thermal and environmental barrier coatings assessments in CMAS environments. One of our current emphases has been focused on the thermal barrier - environmental barrier coating composition and testing developments. The effort has included the CMAS infiltrations in high temperature and high heat flux turbine engine like conditions using advanced laser high heat flux rigs, and subsequently degradation studies in laser heat flux thermal gradient cyclic and isothermal furnace cyclic testing conditions. These heat flux CMAS infiltration and related coating durability testing are essential where appropriate CMAS melting, infiltration and coating-substrate temperature exposure temperature controls can be achieved, thus helping quantify the CMAS-coating interaction and degradation mechanisms. The CMAS work is also playing a critical role in advanced coating developments, by developing laboratory coating durability assessment methodologies in simulated turbine engine conditions and helping establish CMAS test standards in laboratory environments.

  12. Self-rolling of an aluminosilicate sheet into a single walled imogolite nanotube: The role of the hydroxyl arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, R. I.; Rogan, J.; Valdivia, J. A.; Munoz, F.; Valencia, F.; Ramírez, M.; Kiwi, M. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago, 7800024 (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago, 9170124 (Chile); Ramírez, R. [Facultad de Física, Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago, 7820436 (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago, 9170124 (Chile)

    2015-12-31

    Imogolite is an inorganic nanotube, that forms naturally in weathered volcanic ashes, and it can be synthesized in nearly monodisperse diameters. However, long after its successful synthesis, the details of the way it is achieved are not fully understood. Here we elaborate on a model of its synthesis, which starts with a planar aluminosilicate sheet that is allowed to evolve freely, by means of classical molecular dynamics, until it achieves its minimum energy configuration. The minimal structures that the system thus adopts are tubular, scrolled, and more complex conformations, depending mainly on temperature as a driving force. Here we focus on the effect that the arrangement of the hydroxyl groups in the inner wall of the nanotube have on the minimal nanotubular configurations that we obtain are monodispersed in diameter, and quite similar to both from the those of weathered natural volcanic ashes, and to the ones that are synthesized in the laboratory. In this contribution we expand on the atomic mechanisms behind those behaviors.

  13. Selectivity modification by ion memory of magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate as inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate as inorganic ion exchange materials with the formula MgSi5.59O12.18.5.93H2O and MgAl2.32Si5.2O14.88.18.23H2O, respectively, have been found to be suitable for the removal of Cs+, Co2+ and Eu3+ ions with the selectivity sequence Eu3+ > Co2+ > Cs+. Samples of Cs-, Co- and Eu-loaded were prepared and thermally treated at 850 deg. C in a furnace for the creation of specific cavity. Surface area, IR and X-ray diffraction patterns of the products were conducted. Surface area values of OMS, OMAS, TMS, TMAS, ETMS and ETMAS were measured and indicated an increasing in the surface area values for the TMS and TMAS samples and decreasing in the ETMS and ETMAS samples. Desorption studies in nitric acid medium were carried out and reloading of the eluted solids with the studied cations were conduced and the data show an ion memory behaviour for the eluted solids. Finally, the rate of Cs+ ion sorption on OMS, OMAS, ETMS and ETMAS was studied. The diffusion coefficients calculated indicated that the diffusion of Cs+ ion is high for the ETMS and ETMAS samples compared to the OMS and OMAS samples

  14. Crystallization and structural approaches of rare earths aluminosilicate glasses (Ln = La, Y, Sc); Comportement a la cristallisation et approches structurales des verres aluminosilicates de terres rares (Ln = La, Y et Sc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiki, N.; Coutures, J.P. [PROMES, CNRS, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Hennet, L.; Florian, P.; Vaills, Y.; Massiot, D. [CEMHTI, CNRS, 1D av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The crystallization behaviour of aluminosilicate glasses of lanthanum, yttrium and scandium has been studied by DTA, XRD, SEM-EDX and EPMA analysis. Young modulus E and hardness H have been measured by using nano-indentation and elastic modulus C{sub 11} and C{sub 44} by Brillouin scattering. The Young modulus measured by nano-indentation agree to those determined by Brillouin scattering and those calculated using Makishima-Mackenzie and Rocherulle model's. The results of DTA analysis indicate that (a) the glass transition temperatures T{sub g} are higher for yttrium and scandium containing glasses than their lanthanum counterparts, the melting observed in the yttrium glasses and recently in the scandium glasses correspond to the ternary eutectic Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (Ln = Y, Sc) (b) the thermal stability is strongly related to the ionic radii of the rare earth. The last results obtained on scandium containing glasses confirm this hypothesis. The XRD results show that the nature of the observed crystallized phases is consistent with the phase diagrams. We also have investigated by NMR-MAS of {sup 27}Al (high field- 17.6 T) these glasses. The results indicate that Al(V) species are correlated to the ionic radii of the rare earth. X-rays and neutron scattering experiments have been respectively performed on the high energy diffraction beam lines ID11 and ID15 at ESRF. The interatomic distances and first-shell coordination numbers were determined. The results are consistent with those performed by NMR-MAS. (authors)

  15. Structure of aluminosilicate melts produced from granite rocks for the manufacturing of petrurgical glass-ceramics construction materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakin, A. G.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aluminosilicate melt is a partly ordered phase and is the origin of glass for producing glassceramics and petrurgical materials. They are well extended used as construction materials for pavings and coatings. Its structure can be described in the terms of the aluminosilica tetrahedras coordination so-called Q speciation. The proportions of tetrahedra with different degree of connectivity with others (from totally connected to free has been studied by NMR and IR methods for sodium-silicate melts. Medium range structure can be characterized by the sizes of irreducible rings composed of the aluminosilica tetrahedra. Systematic increase of the four member rings proportion in the sequence of the Ab-An glasses were observed. The water dissolution in sodium-silicate glass affects the Q speciation. Cations network-modifiers positions in the melt structure are important to know since these cations stabilize particular structure configurations. Modification of the distribution of Na coordination in the sodium-silicate glass at water dissolution was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The observed modification of the hydrous aluminosilicate melt structure resulted in the shift of the eutectic composition in the granite system with decreasing of the crystallization field of feldspars. The feldspar growth rates show practically no dependence on the water content in the concentration range 2-4 wt.%. Likewise, the solved water has a little influence on the crystal growth rate of the lithium silicate phase in lithium containing glasses in accordance with estimated enhancing of the diffusion transport.

    Los fundidos de alumino-silicato son una fase parcialmente ordenada. Su estructura puede ser descrita en términos de la coordinación de tetraedros de alúmina-sílice también denominados especies Q. La proporción de tetraedros con diferente grado de conectividad entre si se ha investigado por espectroscopias de RMN e IR en fundidos de silicatos

  16. Al/Fe isomorphic substitution versus Fe2O3 clusters formation in Fe-doped aluminosilicate nanotubes (imogolite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Textural, magnetic and spectroscopic properties are reported of Fe-doped aluminosilicate nanotubes (NTs) of the imogolite type, IMO, with nominal composition (OH)3Al2−xFexO3SiOH (x = 0, 0.025, 0.050). Samples were obtained by either direct synthesis (Fe-0.025-IMO, Fe-0.050-IMO) or post-synthesis loading (Fe-L-IMO). The Fe content was either 1.4 wt% (both Fe-0.050-IMO and Fe-L-IMO) or 0.7 wt% (Fe-0.025-IMO). Textural properties were characterized by High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms at 77 K. The presence of different iron species was studied by magnetic moment measurements and three spectroscopies: Mössbauer, UV–Vis and electron paramagnetic resonance, respectively. Fe3+/Al3+ isomorphic substitution (IS) at octahedral sites at the external surface of NTs is the main process occurring by direct synthesis at low Fe loadings, giving rise to the formation of isolated high-spin Fe3+ sites. Higher loadings give rise, besides IS, to the formation of Fe2O3 clusters. IS occurs up to a limit of Al/Fe atomic ratio of ca. 60 (corresponding to x = 0.032). A fraction of the magnetism related to NCs is pinned by the surface anisotropy; also, clusters are magnetically interacting with each other. Post-synthesis loading leads to a system rather close to that obtained by direct synthesis, involving both IS and cluster formations. Slightly larger clusters than with direct synthesis samples, however, are formed. The occurrence of IS indicates a facile cleavage/sealing of Al–O–Al bonds: this opens the possibility to exchange Al3+ ions in pre-formed IMO NTs, a much simpler procedure compared with direct synthesis

  17. The initial step of silicate versus aluminosilicate formation in zeolite synthesis: a reaction mechanism in water with a tetrapropylammonium template

    KAUST Repository

    Trinh, Thuat T.

    2012-01-01

    The initial step for silicate and aluminosilicate condensation is studied in water in the presence of a realistic tetrapropylammonium template under basic conditions. The model corresponds to the synthesis conditions of ZSM5. The free energy profile for the dimer formation ((OH) 3Si-O-Si-(OH) 2O - or [(OH) 3Al-O-Si-(OH) 3] -) is calculated with ab initio molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration. The Si-O-Si dimer formation occurs in a two-step manner with an overall free energy barrier of 75 kJ mol -1. The first step is associated with the Si-O bond formation and results in an intermediate with a five-coordinated Si, and the second one concerns the removal of the water molecule. The template is displaced away from the Si centres upon dimer formation, and a shell of water molecules is inserted between the silicate and the template. The main effect of the template is to slow down the backward hydrolysis reaction with respect to the condensation one. The Al-O-Si dimer formation first requires the formation of a metastable precursor state by proton transfer from Si(OH) 4 to Al(OH) 4 - mediated by a solvent molecule. It then proceeds through a single step with an overall barrier of 70 kJ mol -1. The model with water molecules explicitly included is then compared to a simple calculation using an implicit continuum model for the solvent. The results underline the importance of an explicit and dynamical treatment of the water solvent, which plays a key role in assisting the reaction. © the Owner Societies 2012.

  18. Direct synthesis of Al-SBA-15 containing aluminosilicate species plugs in an acid-free medium and structural adjustment by hydrothermal post-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of Al-SBA-15 with controllable aluminosilicate plug structures inside straight mesopores has been hydrothermally synthesized in a one-step synthesis in an environmentally friendly acid-free medium, using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a structure-directing agent, water as solvent, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and aluminum nitrate (Al(NO)3·9H2O) as silica and aluminum sources, respectively. The effects of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution and aging temperature on the structural properties of the resulting materials were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), FT-IR spectra and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses. The nature of the Al species and the acidity of the resultant samples were studied by solid state 27Al MAS NMR and pyridine adsorption measurements. The specific surface area (935–755 m2g−1), pore volume (1.03–0.56 cm3g−1) and especially the concentration and distribution of open type mesopores (0–68% to the total pores) of the synthesized Al-SBA-15 can be controlled by a simple adjustment of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution. Moreover, increasing the aging temperature higher than 363 K can remarkably decrease the formation of plug structures to obtain “open” form mesopores. The observation by TEM of alternate defined gray and white areas inside the mesopores gives the strong evidence of isolated microporous aluminosilicate plugs inside the channels. In addition, a moderate hydrothermal post-treatment can finely modify the mesostructures through the partial or complete dissolution of the aluminosilicate plugs. - Graphical abstract: The plugs-containing structures can be interpreted as the distribution of individual isolated plugs along the mesoporous channel. - Highlights: • Al-SBA-15 with controllable plug structures was synthesized in an

  19. Direct synthesis of Al-SBA-15 containing aluminosilicate species plugs in an acid-free medium and structural adjustment by hydrothermal post-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Lei [Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals in Universities of Shandong, Shandong Polytechnic University, Daxue Road, Changqing District, Jinan 250353 (China); Xu, Yan [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Laoshan District, Qingdao 266101 (China); Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Changzhou University, Gehu Road, Changzhou 213164 (China); Zhang, Na [Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals in Universities of Shandong, Shandong Polytechnic University, Daxue Road, Changqing District, Jinan 250353 (China); Lin, Sen, E-mail: linsen@qibebt.ac.cn [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Laoshan District, Qingdao 266101 (China); Li, Xiangping; Guo, Peng; Li, Xuebing [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Laoshan District, Qingdao 266101 (China)

    2013-07-15

    A series of Al-SBA-15 with controllable aluminosilicate plug structures inside straight mesopores has been hydrothermally synthesized in a one-step synthesis in an environmentally friendly acid-free medium, using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a structure-directing agent, water as solvent, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and aluminum nitrate (Al(NO){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O) as silica and aluminum sources, respectively. The effects of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution and aging temperature on the structural properties of the resulting materials were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), FT-IR spectra and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses. The nature of the Al species and the acidity of the resultant samples were studied by solid state {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and pyridine adsorption measurements. The specific surface area (935–755 m{sup 2}g{sup −1}), pore volume (1.03–0.56 cm{sup 3}g{sup −1}) and especially the concentration and distribution of open type mesopores (0–68% to the total pores) of the synthesized Al-SBA-15 can be controlled by a simple adjustment of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution. Moreover, increasing the aging temperature higher than 363 K can remarkably decrease the formation of plug structures to obtain “open” form mesopores. The observation by TEM of alternate defined gray and white areas inside the mesopores gives the strong evidence of isolated microporous aluminosilicate plugs inside the channels. In addition, a moderate hydrothermal post-treatment can finely modify the mesostructures through the partial or complete dissolution of the aluminosilicate plugs. - Graphical abstract: The plugs-containing structures can be interpreted as the distribution of individual isolated plugs along the mesoporous channel. - Highlights: • Al-SBA-15 with controllable

  20. High-Temperature Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Aluminosilicates from ZSM-5 Nanoseeds with Improved Acidic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Hoan Vu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analogs with different Si/Al ratios were successfully prepared in a two-step process from self-assembly of ZSM-5 nanoseeds at high temperature in mildly acidic media (473 K, pH 3.5. The obtained products were characterized as SAXS, XRD, N2 sorption, FTIR, TEM, NH3-TPD, AAS and ICP. The results show that the initial Si/Al molar ratio of ZSM-5 precursors strongly affects the final materials’ properties. A highly condensed, well-ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analog with improved hydrothermal stability and acidic properties can be prepared from low aluminum containing ZSM-5 precursors (Si/Al ≥ 20. Reducing the initial Si/Al molar ratio to 10, however, leads to the formation of a disordered mesoporous SBA-15 type material accompanied by degraded textural and acidic properties. The gas phase cracking of cumene, carried out as probe reaction to evaluate Brønsted acidity, reveals that an increased density of Brønsted acid sites has been achieved over the SBA-15 analogs compared to conventional Al-SBA-15 due to the preservation of zeolite building units in the mesopore walls of the SBA-15 analogs.

  1. An improved analysis of coupled multicomponent diffusion of divalent cations in aluminosilicate garnet: An experimental and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinski, S. A.; Chakraborty, S.; Hoppe, U.

    2010-12-01

    Garnets in natural rocks show a variety of compositional zoning. These zonings preserve memory of the thermal and growth histories of the minerals which could be retrieved if appropriate cation diffusion data were available. Coupled multicomponent diffusion of major divalent cations in aluminosilicate garnet has been studied experimentally e.g. in [1,2,3]. Diffusion coefficients were retrieved from experimentally induced concentration profiles assuming that (i) garnets behaved thermodynamically ideally at the high temperatures of the experiments and (ii) the convolution effect on microprobe analysis could be approximated by an equation for convolution effect of a profile with a single, constant diffusivity. Further, calculated and measured profiles were matched visually without any statistical criteria. We have now carried out diffusion experiments in a piston cylinder apparatus using diffusion couples made from homogeneous gem quality natural pyrope and almandine garnets. These were annealed within graphite capsules under nominally anhydrous conditions at 25-35 kbar, 1260-1400 °C. The resulting profiles were described by diffusion coefficient matrices that accounted for the effects of thermodynamic non-ideality using the garnet solution model of [4]. Convolution was calculated using a numerical scheme that did not require any assumption of constant D. And finally, results obtained from visual fitting were compared to those obtained by error minimization according to the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method. We find that the visual and error minimization routines yield diffusion coefficients that are within a factor of two of each other. Further, it is shown that for some compositional ranges it is impossible to constrain tracer diffusion coefficients of certain elements. This needs to be consid-ered in future studies designed to determine diffusion coefficients. The effects of thermodynamic non-ideality and a more exact convolution correction are small, but when

  2. Spectroscopic studies and downconversion luminescence in OH−-free Pr3+–Yb3+ co-doped low-silica calcium aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on spectroscopic studies and downconversion luminescence in OH−-free Pr3+–Yb3+ co-doped low-silica calcium aluminosilicate glasses (LSCAS). The dependencies of the visible to near-infrared emissions, photoacoustic signals, luminescence decay times and energy transfer efficiencies from Pr3+→Yb3+ on the doped Yb2O3 concentration were investigated. The results confirmed the occurrence of downconversion processes in the examined samples, followed by a back-energy transfer mechanism from the Yb3+:2F5/2 level to the Pr3+:1G4 level, from where the multiphonon relaxations through the 1G4,3F4→3H4 transitions occurred. The photoacoustic data provided evidence of the energy transfer that resulted in heat generation in the sample, confirming the observations provided by the luminescence data. The energy transfer mechanisms that are involved in the Pr3+:Yb3+ co-doped LSCAS glasses are discussed. -- Highlights: • We report on spectroscopic studies and downconversion luminescence in OH−-free Pr3+–Yb3+ co-doped low-silica calcium aluminosilicate glasses. • The dependencies of downconversion properties and photoacoustic signals on the Yb2O3 concentration provided new insights on energy transfer Pr3+→Yb3+. • The results confirmed the occurrence of downconversion, followed by a back-energy transfer mechanism Yb3+→Pr3+ and multiphonon relaxations in Pr3+

  3. Emission tunability and local environment in europium-doped OH{sup −}-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses for artificial lighting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Aline M.; Sandrini, Marcelo; Viana, José Renato M.; Baesso, Mauro L.; Bento, Antônio C.; Rohling, Jurandir H. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av Colombo, 5790, 87020-900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Guyot, Yannick [Laboratoire de Physico–Chimie des Matériaux Luminescents, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, UMR 5620 CNRS 69622 (France); De Ligny, Dominique [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen Nürnberg, Martens str. 5, 91058, Erlangen (Germany); Nunes, Luiz Antônio O. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador São-Carlense400, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Gandra, Flávio G. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Sampaio, Juraci A. [Lab Ciências Físicas, Universidade Estadual Norte Fluminense, 28013-602, Campos Dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Sandro M.; Andrade, Luis Humberto C. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul-UEMS, Dourados, MS, C. P. 351, CEP 79804-970 (Brazil); and others

    2015-04-15

    The relationship between emission tunability and the local environment of europium ions in OH{sup −}-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses was investigated, focusing on the development of devices for artificial lighting. Significant conversion of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was obtained by means of melting the glasses under a vacuum atmosphere and controlling the silica content, resulting in broad, intense, and tunable luminescence ranging from blue to red. Electron spin resonance and X-ray absorption near edge structure measurements enabled correlation of the luminescence behavior of the material with the Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} concentration ratio and changes in the surrounding ions' crystal field. The coordinates of the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram were calculated from the spectra, and the contour maps showed that the light emitted from Eu{sup 2+} presented broad bands and enhanced color tuning, ranging from reddish-orange to blue. The results showed that these Eu doped glasses can be used for tunable white lighting by combining matrix composition and the adjustment of the pumping wavelength. - Highlights: • Eu{sup 2+}-doped OH{sup −} free calcium aluminosilicate glass as a new source for white lighting. • Correlation between emission tunability and local environment of europium ions. • Significant reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} by melting the glasses under vacuum atmosphere. • Broad, intense and tunable luminescence ranging from blue to red.

  4. Optical spectroscopy and optical waveguide fabrication in Eu{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} doped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldiño, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, 09340 México D.F. (Mexico); Speghini, A. [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie, Università di Verona and INSTM, UdR Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37314 Verona (Italy); Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Berneschi, S. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bettinelli, M. [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie, Università di Verona and INSTM, UdR Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37314 Verona (Italy); Brenci, M. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Pasquini, E. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Pelli, S. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Righini, G.C. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”, Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Optical and spectroscopic properties of 2.0% Eu(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} singly doped and 5.0% Tb(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}–2.0% Eu(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} codoped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses were investigated. Reddish-orange light emission, with x=0.64 and y=0.36 CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained in the europium singly doped glass excited at 393 nm. Such chromaticity coordinates are close to those (0.67,0.33) standard of the National Television System Committee for the red phosphor. When the sodium–zinc–aluminosilicate glass is co-doped with Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+}, reddish-orange light emission, with (0.61,0.37) CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained upon Tb{sup 3+} excitation at 344 nm. This reddish-orange luminescence is generated mainly by {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0} →{sup 7}F{sub 2} emissions of Eu{sup 3+}, europium being sensitized by terbium through a non-radiative energy transfer. From an analysis of the Tb{sup 3+} emission decay curves it is inferred that the Tb{sup 3+}→Eu{sup 3+} energy transfer might take place between Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} clusters through a short-range interaction mechanism, so that an electric dipole–quadrupole interaction appears to be the most probable transfer mechanism. The efficiency of this energy transfer is about 62% upon excitation at 344 nm. In the singly doped and codoped glasses multimode optical waveguides were successfully produced by Ag{sup +}–Na{sup +} ion exchange, and they could be characterized at various wavelengths. -- Highlights: • Reddish-orange light emission can be generated from Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} codoped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses excited at 344 nm. • The Eu{sup 3+} is sensitized by Tb{sup 3+} through a non-radiative energy transfer. • Highly multimode waveguides can be fabricated by diluted silver–sodium exchange. • This type of AlGaN LEDs pumped glass phosphors might be useful for generation of reddish-orange light.

  5. Etude d'une nouvelle famille d'aluminosilicates de baryum et strontium dopés à l'europium : structure, fluorescence, phosphorescence et thermoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Grégoire

    2008-01-01

    Dans le cadre de la recherche de matériaux fluorescents et/ou phosphorescents à émission blanche, une nouvelle famille d'aluminosilicate de baryum/strontium dopée à l'europium (Ba/Sr)13-xAl22+2xSi10+2xO66:Eu a été étudiée. La première partie de ce mémoire rappelle les mécanismes d'émissions de fluorescence de l'ion Eu2+ et les processus de thermoluminescence (TL). La seconde partie est quant-à-elle consacrée aux conditions de synthèse des matériaux étudiés, à leur caractérisation structurale ...

  6. Atomic Description of the Interface between Silica and Alumina in Aluminosilicates through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Maxence; Rossini, Aaron J; Caillot, Maxime; Chizallet, Céline; Raybaud, Pascal; Digne, Mathieu; Chaumonnot, Alexandra; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Copéret, Christophe

    2015-08-26

    Despite the widespread use of amorphous aluminosilicates (ASA) in various industrial catalysts, the nature of the interface between silica and alumina and the atomic structure of the catalytically active sites are still subject to debate. Here, by the use of dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy (DNP SENS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that on silica and alumina surfaces, molecular aluminum and silicon precursors are, respectively, preferentially grafted on sites that enable the formation of Al(IV) and Si(IV) interfacial sites. We also link the genesis of Brønsted acidity to the surface coverage of aluminum and silicon on silica and alumina, respectively. PMID:26244620

  7. Scattering of light by colloidal aluminosilicate particles produces the unusual sky-blue color of Rio Celeste (Tenorio volcano complex, Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Castellón

    Full Text Available Río Celeste (Sky-Blue River in Tenorio National Park (Costa Rica, a river that derives from the confluence and mixing of two colorless streams--Río Buenavista (Buenavista River and Quebrada Agria (Sour Creek--is renowned in Costa Rica because it presents an atypical intense sky-blue color. Although various explanations have been proposed for this unusual hue of Río Celeste, no exhaustive tests have been undertaken; the reasons hence remain unclear. To understand this color phenomenon, we examined the physico-chemical properties of Río Celeste and of the two streams from which it is derived. Chemical analysis of those streams with ion-exchange chromatography (IC and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES made us discard the hypothesis that the origin of the hue is due to colored chemical species. Our tests revealed that the origin of this coloration phenomenon is physical, due to suspended aluminosilicate particles (with diameters distributed around 566 nm according to a lognormal distribution that produce Mie scattering. The color originates after mixing of two colorless streams because of the enlargement (by aggregation of suspended aluminosilicate particles in the Río Buenavista stream due to a decrease of pH on mixing with the acidic Quebrada Agria. We postulate a chemical mechanism for this process, supported by experimental evidence of dynamic light scattering (DLS, zeta potential measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy-dispersive spectra (EDS. Theoretical modeling of the Mie scattering yielded a strong coincidence between the observed color and the simulated one.

  8. The influence of metal aluminium on the reduction of the Sm3+ doped in aluminosilicate glass films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sm3+-doped glass sol was prepared by a sol-gel method and coated on a bare Si substrate and an Al coated Si substrate (Al/Si). The coated glass films were heat treated in a hydrogen atmosphere or air to reduce the Sm3+ to Sm2+ and then the optical properties were examined through a photoluminescence (PL) experiment. While the glass films coated on a bare Si substrate or an Al/Si one were well reduced in hydrogen atmosphere, only the glass films coated on the Al/Si substrate were reduced in air. We thus suggest two possible reducing mechanisms related to hydrogen and the metal aluminium and we found that the metal aluminium coated on a Si substrate plays an important role in the reducing process

  9. The influence of metal aluminium on the reduction of the Sm{sup 3+} doped in aluminosilicate glass films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seongtae [Basic Science Research Institute, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yonghwa [Basic Science Research Institute, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Qin Weiping [Basic Science Research Institute, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyungap [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eunjin [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Kiwan [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sangsu [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Ill [Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changdae [Department of Physics, Mokpo National University, Mokpo 534-729 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-21

    Sm{sup 3+}-doped glass sol was prepared by a sol-gel method and coated on a bare Si substrate and an Al coated Si substrate (Al/Si). The coated glass films were heat treated in a hydrogen atmosphere or air to reduce the Sm{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 2+} and then the optical properties were examined through a photoluminescence (PL) experiment. While the glass films coated on a bare Si substrate or an Al/Si one were well reduced in hydrogen atmosphere, only the glass films coated on the Al/Si substrate were reduced in air. We thus suggest two possible reducing mechanisms related to hydrogen and the metal aluminium and we found that the metal aluminium coated on a Si substrate plays an important role in the reducing process.

  10. White light generation in Dy{sup 3+}-and Ce{sup 3+}/Dy{sup 3+}-doped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldiño, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico); Lira, A. [Departamento de Física , Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del estado de México, C.P. 50000 Toluca (Mexico); Meza-Rocha, A.N. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico); Pasquini, E. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Pelli, S. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Speghini, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Biotecnologie, Università di Verona, and INSTM, UdR Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37314 Verona (Italy); Bettinelli, M. [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie, Università di Verona, and INSTM, UdR Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37314 Verona (Italy); Righini, G.C. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”, Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    A spectroscopic investigation of 1% Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-singly doped and 0.5% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3}-1.0% Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-codoped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses was performed by analyzing their absorption and photoluminescence spectra, and decay times. Warm white yellow light emission, with (0.419, 0.440) CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates and 3579 K color temperature, is obtained in the Dy{sup 3+}-singly doped glass excited at 399 nm, which fits to the requirements of GaN LEDs. A quantum efficiency of 74% and a very high optical gain (38.7×10{sup −25} cm{sup 2} s) were estimated for the dysprosium {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level luminescence, which might also make the Dy{sup 3+}-doped glass a promising gain medium for solid state yellow laser pumped by GaN LEDs. In the Ce{sup 3+}/Dy{sup 3+}-codoped glass a radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} is observed upon UV excitation (310–365 nm), with a Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} interaction distance that could be greater than 6–12 Å. The emission color from the codoped glass can be tuned with the excitation wavelength from blue light (0.247, 0.245), upon 310 nm excitation, to cold white light (0.284, 0.300), with a 9052 K color temperature, upon 365 nm excitation. - Highlights: • Zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate (ZN) glasses are optically activated with Dy{sup 3+} (ZNDy). • ZN glasses are optically activated with Ce{sup 3+}/Dy{sup 3+} (ZNCeDy). • Dy{sup 3+} is sensitized by Ce{sup 3+} through a radiative energy transfer. • ZNDy glass can generate 3579 K warm white yellow light emission. • ZNCeDy glass can generate 9052 K cold white light emission.

  11. Effects of Fiber Content on Mechanical Properties of CVD SiC Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1996-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC(f)(SCS-6) fiber-reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites containing various volume fractions, approximately 16 to 40 volume %, of fibers were fabricated by hot pressing at 1400 C for 2 h under 27.6 MPa. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase formed, with complete absence of the undesired hexacelsian phase, in the matrix. Room temperature mechanical properties were measured in 3-point flexure. The matrix microcracking stress and the ultimate strength increased with increase in fiber volume fraction, reached maximum values for V(sub f) approximately equal to 0.35, and degraded at higher fiber loadings. This degradation in mechanical properties is related to the change in failure mode, from tensile at lower V(sub f) to interlaminar shear at higher fiber contents. The extent of fiber loading did not have noticeable effect on either fiber-matrix debonding stress, or frictional sliding stress at the interface. The applicability of micromechanical models in predicting the mechanical properties of the composites was also examined. The currently available theoretical models do not appear to be useful in predicting the values of the first matrix cracking stress, and the ultimate strength of the SCS-6/SAS composites.

  12. One-step direct synthesis of mesoporous aluminosilicates Al-SBA-15 with cage-like macropores by using micrometer-sized aluminum balls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous aluminosilicate Al-SBA-15 materials with cage-like macropores have been synthesized by using micrometer-sized aluminum balls as an Al source,tetraethyl orthosilicate(TEOS) as a silica source,and triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a template.The resulting materials were fully characterized by XRD,N2 adsorption,SEM,TEM,ICP-AES,and 27Al MAS-NMR.The products(Al-SBA-15) have ordered two-dimensional(2-D) hexagonal mesostructures(space group p6mm).The calcined Al-SBA-15 materials exhibit disordered macropores with diameters of about 70―80 nm and ordered mesopores with a diameter of ~5 nm,a BET surface area of about 500 m2/g,Si/Al ratio of 40―80,and a ratio of tetrahedral Al to octahedral Al sites of about 2:1.This combination of properties gives these materials potential applications in areas such as adsorption,catalysis and separation.

  13. Takovite-aluminosilicate@MnFe2O4 nanocomposite, a novel magnetic adsorbent for efficient preconcentration of lead ions in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardar, Zahra Shakeri; Beyki, Mostafa Hossein; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2016-10-15

    Here in we report preparation of MnFe2O4 and magnetic takovite-aluminosilicate adsorbent via precipitation methodology. The synthesized nanocomposite was applied in preconcentration of Pb(2+) ions from various matrices. The structural, surface, and magnetic characteristics of the adsorbent were investigated by XRD, EDX, FE-SEM, and VSM techniques. Several parameters affecting preconcentration efficiency, including sample pH, contact time, adsorbent amount, and sample volume were studied and optimized. Under optimized conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 2.0-100μgL(-1), the relative standard deviation was 3.00% (n=5), the limit of detection was 0.67μgL(-1), and the enrichment factor was 70.0. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent was calculated to be 69.9mgg(-1). The suggested method was successfully applied in determination of trace amount of Pb(2+) ions in water and food samples. PMID:27173558

  14. Li3AlSiO5: the first aluminosilicate as a potential deep-ultraviolet nonlinear optical crystal with the quaternary diamond-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinglong; Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Lili; Lei, Bing-Hua; Dong, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhihua; Li, Hongyi; Pan, Shilie

    2016-02-14

    Deep-ultraviolet (deep-UV) nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals play a crucial role in modern laser frequency conversion technology. Traditionally, the exploration of deep-UV NLO crystals is mainly focused on borates, while, the use of phosphates recently opened up a novel and promising non-boron pathway for designing new deep-UV NLO crystals. Extending this pathway to aluminosilicates led to the discovery of Li3AlSiO5, the first NLO crystal in this system. It crystallizes in the polar space group Pna21 (no. 33) with a quaternary diamond-like structure composed of LiO4, AlO4 and SiO4 tetrahedral groups. The compound exhibits a deep-UV cut-off edge below 190 nm and is phase matchable with moderate powder second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity (0.8KH2PO4). The band gap calculated using PBE0 is 7.29 eV, indicating that the cut-off edge of the Li3AlSiO5 crystal can be down to 170 nm. In addition, the compound is nonhygroscopic and thermally stable up to ∼1472 K. These results suggest that Li3AlSiO5 is a potential deep-UV NLO crystal. First-principles studies were performed to elucidate the structure-property relationship of Li3AlSiO5. PMID:26788988

  15. SSZ-52, a zeolite with an 18-layer aluminosilicate framework structure related to that of the DeNOx catalyst Cu-SSZ-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dan; McCusker, Lynne B; Baerlocher, Christian; Zones, Stacey I; Wan, Wei; Zou, Xiaodong

    2013-07-17

    A new zeolite (SSZ-52, |(C14H28N)6Na6(H2O)18|[Al12Si96O216]), related to the DeNOx catalyst Cu-SSZ-13 (CHA framework type), has been synthesized using an unusual polycyclic quaternary ammonium cation as the structure-directing agent. By combining X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and molecular modeling techniques, its porous aluminosilicate framework structure (R3m, a = 13.6373(1) Å, c = 44.7311(4) Å), which can be viewed as an 18-layer stacking sequence of hexagonally arranged (Si,Al)6O6 rings (6-rings), has been elucidated. The structure has a three-dimensional 8-ring channel system and is a member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites (those that can be described in terms of 6-ring stacking sequences) like SSZ-13, but it has cavities that are twice as large. The code SFW has been assigned to this new framework type. The large cavities contain pairs of the bulky organic cations. HRTEM and XPD simulations show that stacking faults do occur, but only at the 5-10% level. SSZ-52 has considerable potential as a catalyst in the areas of gas conversion and sequestration. PMID:23782259

  16. A graphene-based mode-locked nano-engineered zirconia–yttria–aluminosilicate glass-based erbium-doped fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a simple, compact and low cost graphene-based mode-locked nano-engineered erbium-doped zirconia–yttria–aluminosilicate (ZYA-EDF) glass-based fiber laser. The fiber preform in a quaternary glass host of silica–zirconia–yttria–aluminum was made through the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process followed by the solution doping technique. The core glass is made of 0.40 mol% of Al2O3, 3.0 mol% of ZrO2 and 0.25 mol% of Er2O3, which give rise to a peak absorption of 30.0 dB m−1 at 978 nm and a fluorescence lifetime of 10.65 ms. Such a doping host provides the high concentration of erbium ions of 4500 ppm without any clustering. Such an active fiber was used as a gain medium for an ultra-fast femtosecond fiber laser, mode locked by a graphene oxide (GO) saturable absorber. This paper describes geometrical and optical characterization of the nano-engineered glass-based erbium-doped optical fiber (ZYA-EDF) as well as the performance of the mode-locked femtosecond laser based on the developed fiber. The all-anomalous cavity laser generated soliton pulses with 8.5 nm bandwidth, 50 MHz repetition frequency and nearly transform-limited 400 fs duration at 1561 nm center wavelength using a new class of EDF. (paper)

  17. Effect of submergence-emergence sequence and organic matter or aluminosilicate amendment on metal uptake by woody wetland plant species from contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site-specific hydrological conditions affect the availability of trace metals for vegetation. In a greenhouse experiment, the effect of submersion on the metal uptake by the wetland plant species Salix cinerea and Populus nigra grown on a contaminated dredged sediment-derived soil and on an uncontaminated soil was evaluated. An upland hydrological regime for the polluted sediment caused elevated Cd concentrations in leaves and cuttings for both species. Emergence and soil oxidation after initial submersion of a polluted sediment resulted in comparable foliar Cd and Zn concentrations for S. cinerea as for the constant upland treatment. The foliar Cd and Zn concentrations were clearly higher than for submerged soils after initial upland conditions. These results point at the importance of submergence-emergence sequence for plant metal availability. The addition of foliar-based organic matter or aluminosilicates to the polluted sediment-derived soil in upland conditions did not decrease Cd and Zn uptake by S. cinerea. - The effect of a wetland hydrological regime on Cd uptake was similar for Populus nigra and Salix cinerea

  18. Different K+–Na+ inter-diffusion kinetics between the air side and tin side of an ion-exchanged float aluminosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The difference between the diffusion characteristics of K+–Na+ ions in float glass on the air and tin sides was first demonstrated. ► The diffusion coefficient is more sensitive to temperature and time on the tin than on the air sides. ► The activation energy on the tin side is about three times larger than that on the air side. - Abstract: The difference between the inter-diffusion kinetics of K+–Na+ in the air and tin sides of an ion-exchanged float aluminosilicate glass was investigated as a function of the exchange temperature and time. The potassium concentration profiles of the ion-exchanged glass surface were experimentally measured by electron microprobe analysis, and the diffusion coefficient was calculated by the Boltzmann-Montano approach. On the tin side of the ion-exchanged glass, the diffusion of K+–Na+ ions is hindered by tin. The diffusion coefficient is also more sensitive to temperature and time on the tin than on the air sides. The results would be useful in guiding the strengthening process of float glass by one step ion-exchange or two step ion-exchange to obtain engineered stress profile (ESP) glasses.

  19. Steam Reforming Technology Demonstration for Conversion of DOE Sodium-Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory into a Leach-Resistant Alkali Aluminosilicate Waste Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patented THORR fluidized-bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), currently under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site.1 SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. The SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, and alkali and aluminum nitrates, along with many other inorganic compounds, including substantial levels of radionuclides. As part of the implementation of the THORR process at INTEC, an engineering-scale technology demonstration (ESTD) was conducted using a specially designed pilot plant located at Hazen Research, Inc. in Golden Colorado. This ESTD confirmed the efficacy of the THORR FBSR process to convert the SBW into a granular carbonate-based waste form suitable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE authorized, as a risk reduction measure, the performance of an additional ESTD to demonstrate the production of an insoluble mineralized product, in the event that an alternate disposition path is required. The additional ESTD was conducted at the Hazen Research facility using the THORR process and the same SBW simulant employed previously. An alkali aluminosilicate mineral product was produced that exhibited excellent leach resistance and chemical durability. The demonstration established general system operating parameters for a full-scale facility; provided process off-gas data that confirmed operation within regulatory limits; determined that the mineralized product exhibits superior leach resistance and durability, compared to Environmental Assessment (EA) and Low-activity Reference Material (LRM) glasses, as indicated by the Product Consistency Test (PCT); ascertained that Cs and Re (a surrogate for Tc) were non-volatile and were retained in

  20. Study of the chemical environment of cerium in low silica calcium aluminosilicate glasses by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Currently, great attention has been given to rare earth doped optical glasses. These elements by having the 4f shell partially filled exhibit a wealth of sharp fluorescent transitions representing almost every region of the visible and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, being of interest in photonics, when embedded in the glass matrix. In addition cerium oxide possess high hardness and stability to high temperatures, and it has been used in industry in different ways such as catalysts, fuel and solar cells, ultraviolet radiation filters, oxygen sensors and in the polishing of materials. In this context, cerium doped low silica calcium aluminosilicate (LSCA) glasses are considered good candidates for solid state laser active medium due to their good mechanical, optical and thermal properties. Recently it was shown that LSCA glasses doped with cerium oxide is a source of emitting white light, which is of technological applications interest. However it is known that increasing the dopant concentration in the glass matrix, an interaction of rare earth ions takes place leading to a closer proximity between the rare earth ions, and thus a reduction in their quantum efficiency. In this work, the local structure of Cerium in LSCA glasses was characterized by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS). The EXAFS and XANES measurements were performed in the Ce LIII-edge at the XAS beam line of LNLS facility (Campinas, Brazil) at room temperature. Structural parameters, coordination numbers (N), interatomic distance (R) and degree of disorder (σ2) were obtained from least squares fitting

  1. Reducing costs by reducing size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper discusses briefly the many factors, including capital cost, which have to be taken into account in determining whether a series of power stations based on a small nuclear plant can be competitive with a series based on traditional large unit sizes giving the guaranteed level of supply. The 320 MWe UK/US Safe Integral Reactor is described as a good example of how the factors discussed can be beneficially incorporated into a design using proven technology. Finally it goes on to illustrate how the overall costs of a generating system can indeed by reduced by use of the 320 MWe Safe Integral Reactor rather than conventional units of around 1200 MWe. (author). 9 figs

  2. Study of the effect of Ca/Mg alkali-oxides ratio on the structure of a glass-ceramic based on an aluminosilicated glass containing 2wt.% of zirconolite crystalline phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souag R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New nuclear glass-ceramics are extensively studied for the radioactive waste confinement, due to the double confinement conferred by the glass-ceramics. In this study, a glass-ceramic constituted by an aluminosilicate glass in the system: SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgOZrO2-TiO2, containing 2wt.% of Ca0.83Ce0.17ZrTi1.66Al0.34O7 zirconolite, has been synthesized by the discontinuous method. Cerium, an actinide surrogate is introduced both in the glass and ceramic phases. The synthesis is performed by a double melting at 1350°C, followed by a nucleation at 564°C, during 2 h, and a crystal growth at 1010°C during 3 h. Then effect of Ca/Mg ratio on the distribution of the crystalline network in the material was studied for Ca / Mg ratios ranging from 0.4 to 5.5. For the whole of the materials, Archimedes density is about 2.80 g/cm3. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis shows that the increase of Ca/Mg ratio leads to the increase of aluminosilicated crystalline phases with high Ca contents; the materials molar volumes remaining constant. The zirconolite phase is not affected by these additive aluminosilicated phases. The scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis confirmed these results; and shows the uniformity of distribution of the ceramics in the bulk of the materials.

  3. Interface induced growth and transformation of polymer-conjugated proto-crystalline phases in aluminosilicate hybrids: a multiple-quantum 23Na-23Na MAS NMR correlation spectroscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Kobera, Libor; Urbanová, Martina; Doušová, B.; Lhotka, M.; Koloušek, D.; Kotek, Jiří; Čuba, P.; Czernek, Jiří; Dědeček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 11 (2016), s. 2787-2797. ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-24155S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14010; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Grant ostatní: European Commission(XE) COST Action MP1202 HINT Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : aluminosilicate hybrids * hybrid geopolymers * interface Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 4.457, year: 2014

  4. Structural characteristics and spectral properties of novel transparent lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics containing (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics based on nanosized crystals of β-quartz solid solutions and Er,Yb orthoniobates are prepared for the first time, to our knowledge. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, parent Er,Yb-codoped glass contains (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanocrystals with the defected fluorite structure while the single Yb-doped glass is X-ray amorphous. The Er,Yb orthoniobates with the tetragonal structure crystallize under heat-treatments at 800–900 °C; and at 1000 °C the transformation to a monoclinic form begins. β-quartz solid solutions are the main crystalline phase of glass-ceramics prepared in the temperature range of 800–1000 °C. These structural transformations are confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The structure evolution is illustrated by the TEM study of the Yb-doped glass and glass-ceramics. The spectral-luminescent properties of glass-ceramics are directly linked to their structure; an appearance of the monoclinic phase has a crucial effect on these properties. Glass-ceramics with tetragonal (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanophase are characterized by the high efficiency of Yb3+→Er3+ energy transfer (85%), strong absorption in the vicinity of 0.98 μm and shorter lifetime of 4I13/2 state (as compared with the parent glass), so they look promising for laser operation in the eye-safe region around 1.53 μm. - Highlights: • Transparent glass-ceramics based on β-quartz ss and (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanocrystals were prepared. • Fluorite-to-tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transition for (Er,Yb)NbO4 was observed. • The spectral-luminescent properties of materials are directly linked to their structure. • High efficiency of Yb3+→Er3+ energy transfer (85%). • Glass-ceramics with tetragonal (Er,Yb)NbO4 are promising for laser operation at 1.53 μm

  5. The Effect of Micro/Nano-metrics Size on the Interaction of Jordanian Aluminosilicate Raw Materials with High pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabsheh, Islam; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Environmental preservation has become a driving force behind the search for new sustainable and environmentally friendly composites to replace conventional concrete produced from ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Current researches concentrate on developing building products (geopolymers) through geopolymerization. The goal is to produce low cost construction materials for green housing. Geopolymerization is the process of polymerizing minerals with high silica and alumina at low temperature by the use of alkali solutions. Dissolution is the most important process for supplying the high initial Al and Si concentrations to produce the gel phase that is responsible for geopolymerization. This study has been focused on the influence of different micrometric particle sizes of three Jordanian raw materials on their dissolution behavior in sodium hydroxide solution. The samples are kaolinite, volcanic tuff and silica sand. The dissolution properties of each material, alone and mixed with the other two materials were studied in different concentrations (5 and 10 M) using (NaOH) at 25ºC, and shaking time for 24 and 168 h. To better understand the dissolution process, the alkaline solution was renewed after the desired time in order to know if the Al-Si raw material is completely dissolved or not. Different analytical techniques were used to characterize raw materials physically, mineralogically, chemically and thermally. All processed samples either centrifuged solutions or solid residues were fully characterized. The leached concentrations of Al and Si were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). X-ray Diffraction Technique (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the solid residue characterization compared with the original ones. The three aluminosilicate raw materials have indicated variable degrees of solubility under highly alkaline conditions. The method for the size reduction of the used raw

  6. Al/Fe isomorphic substitution versus Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters formation in Fe-doped aluminosilicate nanotubes (imogolite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafia, Ehsan [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology and INSTM Unit of Torino-Politecnico (Italy); Esposito, Serena [Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering (Italy); Manzoli, Maela; Chiesa, Mario [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica and Centro Interdipartimentale NIS (Italy); Tiberto, Paola [Electromagnetism, I.N.Ri.M. (Italy); Barrera, Gabriele [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica and Centro Interdipartimentale NIS (Italy); Menard, Gabriel [Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Allia, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.allia@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology and INSTM Unit of Torino-Politecnico (Italy); Freyria, Francesca S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Garrone, Edoardo; Bonelli, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.bonelli@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology and INSTM Unit of Torino-Politecnico (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Textural, magnetic and spectroscopic properties are reported of Fe-doped aluminosilicate nanotubes (NTs) of the imogolite type, IMO, with nominal composition (OH){sub 3}Al{sub 2−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3}SiOH (x = 0, 0.025, 0.050). Samples were obtained by either direct synthesis (Fe-0.025-IMO, Fe-0.050-IMO) or post-synthesis loading (Fe-L-IMO). The Fe content was either 1.4 wt% (both Fe-0.050-IMO and Fe-L-IMO) or 0.7 wt% (Fe-0.025-IMO). Textural properties were characterized by High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms at 77 K. The presence of different iron species was studied by magnetic moment measurements and three spectroscopies: Mössbauer, UV–Vis and electron paramagnetic resonance, respectively. Fe{sup 3+}/Al{sup 3+} isomorphic substitution (IS) at octahedral sites at the external surface of NTs is the main process occurring by direct synthesis at low Fe loadings, giving rise to the formation of isolated high-spin Fe{sup 3+} sites. Higher loadings give rise, besides IS, to the formation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters. IS occurs up to a limit of Al/Fe atomic ratio of ca. 60 (corresponding to x = 0.032). A fraction of the magnetism related to NCs is pinned by the surface anisotropy; also, clusters are magnetically interacting with each other. Post-synthesis loading leads to a system rather close to that obtained by direct synthesis, involving both IS and cluster formations. Slightly larger clusters than with direct synthesis samples, however, are formed. The occurrence of IS indicates a facile cleavage/sealing of Al–O–Al bonds: this opens the possibility to exchange Al{sup 3+} ions in pre-formed IMO NTs, a much simpler procedure compared with direct synthesis.

  7. Potentiated clinoptilolite reduces signs and symptoms associated with veisalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandy JJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Justin John Gandy, Ilze Laurens, Jacques Rene Snyman Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa Introduction: Abundant anecdotal evidence for products claiming to reduce veisalgia after alcohol overindulgence are available on the Internet and as many advertisements in journals. None of these claims are, however, substantiated by research. The aim of this research was to ascertain the validity of such claims for the substance Absorbatox™, a potentiated aluminosilicate (cation exchanger able to bind NH4+, histamine, and other positively charged ions by investigating the signs and symptoms, as well as blood or breath alcohol levels, in healthy volunteers. Methods: Blood or breath alcohol levels were measured in all volunteers in initial controlled experiments, and symptoms were scored on a diary card for gastrointestinal tract symptoms, as well as other symptoms such as headache and light sensitivity. Eighteen volunteers completed the initial blood alcohol study, which investigated the effect of Absorbatox™ on blood alcohol levels after fasting. The follow-up studies researched the effects of the symptoms and signs of alcohol overindulgence. The “night out” study was completed by ten volunteers in a typical controlled environment, which was followed by the real-life four-leg crossover study. In the crossover study, volunteers (number =25 completers had to fill matching diary cards to containers of two placebo and two active drugs after a night out where they themselves decided on the container (color coded to be used and the amount of alcohol to be consumed. Results: Absorbatox™ had no effect on blood alcohol levels, but it significantly reduced the symptoms and signs of veisalgia by approximately 40%–50%. Conclusion: This research indicates that Absorbatox™ does not have an effect on blood- or breath-alcohol levels. Furthermore, treatment with

  8. Composite of Barium Aluminosilicate Reinforced in situ with Silicon Nitride%原位生长β-Si3N4增强BAS基体复合材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾建成; 吴建生; 曹光宇; 周玉; 雷廷权

    2001-01-01

    BAS glass-ceramic powders were prepared by sol-gel processing. The procedure of transformation of BAS was investigated by DTA and XRD. Effects of additional Li2O with NH4F on transformation from H→M of Barium aluminosilicate were also studied. No evidence is found that the addition of BAS or Si3N4 can influence the transformation from α-Si3N4→β-Si3N4 or from H→M of Barium aluminosilicate. The results show that the flexural strength and fracture toughness value of the BAS glass-ceramic matrix composites can be effectively improved by in situ rod-like silicon nitride. The main toughening mechanism is crack deflection, pull-out and bridging. The increased value of flexural strength is contributed to the load transition effect from matrix to rod-like silicon nitride.%用溶胶-凝胶法合成化学定比BAS(BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2)粉末,并用差热分析和XRD法分析基相变过程、氧化锂对BAS相变过程影响、晶种对BAS相变过程的影响,考察了BAS对氮化硅相变的影响以及加入晶种后对氮化硅相变的影响.用热压氮气保护法制备了自生β-Si3N4增强BAS的复合材料,并比较了其力学性能与BAS的力学性能.结果表明,纯BAS相变产物是六方相,氧化锂与氟化物的加入,促进了BAS单斜相的形成,BAS单斜晶种能有效地促进BAS单斜相的形成;BAS能够促进氮化硅由α-Si3N4→β-Si3N4的相变,β-Si3N4能有效地提高BAS微晶玻璃的强度和断裂韧性,分析了增强和增韧机理.

  9. Fabrication of large-scale single-crystal bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanosheet arrays by a single-step electrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Wei; Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Chan, Tsung-Cheng; Chen, Pei-Ju; Chung, Chih-Chun; Yaghoubi, Alireza; Liao, Chien-Neng; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-06-01

    Nanolizing of thermoelectric materials is one approach to reduce the thermal conductivity and hence enhance the figure of merit. Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3)-based materials have excellent figure of merit at room temperature. For device applications, precise control and rapid fabrication for the nanostructure of thermoelectric materials are essential issues. In the present study, we demonstrate a one-step electrolysis process to directly form Bi2Te3 nanosheet arrays (NSAs) on the surface of bulk Bi2Te3 with controllable spacing distance and depth by tuning the applied bias and duration. The single sheet of NSAs reveals that the average thickness and electrical resistivity of single crystalline Bi2Te3 in composition are 399.8 nm and 137.34 μΩ m, respectively. The formation mechanism of NSAs has been proposed. A 1.12% efficiency of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with Bi2Te3 NSAs for counter electrode has been demonstrated, indicating that Bi2Te3 NSAs from top-down processing with a high ratio of surface area to volume are a promising candidate for possible applications such as thermoelectrics, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and lithium-ion batteries.Nanolizing of thermoelectric materials is one approach to reduce the thermal conductivity and hence enhance the figure of merit. Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3)-based materials have excellent figure of merit at room temperature. For device applications, precise control and rapid fabrication for the nanostructure of thermoelectric materials are essential issues. In the present study, we demonstrate a one-step electrolysis process to directly form Bi2Te3 nanosheet arrays (NSAs) on the surface of bulk Bi2Te3 with controllable spacing distance and depth by tuning the applied bias and duration. The single sheet of NSAs reveals that the average thickness and electrical resistivity of single crystalline Bi2Te3 in composition are 399.8 nm and 137.34 μΩ m, respectively. The formation mechanism of NSAs has been proposed. A 1

  10. Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating...... eigenvalues and eigenvectors. We give a number of different applications to regression and time series analysis, and show how the reduced rank regression estimator can be derived as a Gaussian maximum likelihood estimator. We briefly mention asymptotic results...

  11. Electron spin resonance and electron spin echo modulation studies of Cu(II) ions in the aluminosilicate chabazite: A comparison of Cu(II) cation location and adsorbate interaction with isostructural silicoaluminophosphate-34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on Cu(II) ions exchanged in the aluminosilicate zeolite chabazite. The various Cu(II) species formed after dehydration, rehydration, and exposure to adsorbates are characterized by electron spin resonance and electron spin echo modulation spectroscopies. These results are interpreted in terms of Cu(II) ion location and adsorbate interaction. The results of this study are compared to the results found earlier for SAPO-34, chabazite's structural analog from the silicoaluminophosphate group. In a hydrated sample of chabazite the Cu(II) ions are found to be in a near octahedral environment coordinated to three nonequivalent water molecules and three framework oxygens. The most probable location of the Cu(II) ion in a hydrated sample is above the plane of the six-membered ring slightly displaced into the ellipsoidal cavity. A somewhat similar location and coordination is found for Cu(II) ions in H-SAPO-34. A feature common to both CuH-chabazite and CuH-SAPO-34 is the generation of two distinct Cu(II) species upon dehydration. It is found that Cu(II) cations in chabazite interact with the various adsorbate molecules in a similar manner as Cu(II) cation in H-chabazite and three molecules of ethanol and three propanol molecules. Only the Cu(II) ions located in the hexagonal rings after dehydration were found to complex with ethylene. The differences observed in the interaction of the Cu(II) in with water, propanol, and ehtylene between SAPO-34 and chabazite can be related to the differing cation densities of these two materials. 32 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  12. 锂铝硅酸盐玻璃结构与紫外透过性能的研究%Research on UV transmission and structure for lithium aluminosilicate glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡玉叶; 丁明烨; 崔乔乔; 倪亚茹; 陆春华

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the ultraviolet(UV) transmission and structure for lithium aluminosilicate glasses is investigated by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that UV transmission is determined by bridging oxygen bone and non-bridging oxygen bond. In the lithium aluminum silicate glass, with the content of Li2O increasing, the network structure is broken and the account of non-bridging oxygen is raised, which lead to the degradation of UV transmission. However, the anti-symmetric bridging oxygen Si-O-Al is formed when Al3+ of Al2 O3 in the lithium aluminum silicate glass enter into the glass network. The trend of the degradation of UV transmission slows.%采用红外光谱和X射线光电子能谱方法研究了锂铝硅酸盐玻璃结构与紫外透过性能的关系.结果表明:紫外透过性能是桥氧键与非桥氧键共同作用决定的.在锂铝硅酸盐玻璃中随着Li2O含量的增加,产生断网结构,非桥氧数量上升,导致紫外透过性能降低.而Al2O3中的Al3+进入玻璃网络形成了Si-O-Al反对称桥氧,减缓透过率的下降趋势.

  13. A potentially new type of nonchondritic interplanetary dust particle with hematite, organic carbon, amorphous Na,Ca-aluminosilicate, and FeO-spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Valles-González, Maria Pilar

    2012-02-01

    We used a combination of different analytical techniques to study particle W7190-D12 using microinfrared spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The particle consists mainly of hematite (α-Fe2O3) with considerable variations in structural disorder. It further contains amorphous (Na,K)-bearing Ca,Al-silicate and organic carbon. Iron-bearing spherules (cloud. Atmospheric entry flash-heating caused (1) the formation of microenvironments of reduced iron oxide when indigenous carbon materials reacted with hematite covering its surface resulting in the formation of FeO-spheres and (2) Na-loss from Na,Al-plagioclase. The particle of this study, and other similar particles on this collector, may represent a potentially new type of nonchondritic IDPs associated with Jupiter family comets, although an origin in the asteroid belt cannot be ignored.

  14. Secondary mineral formation associated with respiration of nontronite, NAu-1 by iron reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furukawa Yoko

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental batch and miscible-flow cultures were studied in order to determine the mechanistic pathways of microbial Fe(III respiration in ferruginous smectite clay, NAu-1. The primary purpose was to resolve if alteration of smectite and release of Fe precedes microbial respiration. Alteration of NAu-1, represented by the morphological and mineralogical changes, occurred regardless of the extent of microbial Fe(III reduction in all of our experimental systems, including those that contained heat-killed bacteria and those in which O2, rather than Fe(III, was the primary terminal electron acceptor. The solid alteration products observed under transmission electron microscopy included poorly crystalline smectite with diffuse electron diffraction signals, discrete grains of Fe-free amorphous aluminosilicate with increased Al/Si ratio, Fe-rich grains, and amorphous Si globules in the immediate vicinity of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances. In reducing systems, Fe was also found as siderite. The small amount of Fe partitioned to the aqueous phase was primarily in the form of dissolved Fe(III species even in the systems in which Fe(III was the primary terminal electron acceptor for microbial respiration. From these observations, we conclude that microbial respiration of Fe(III in our laboratory systems proceeded through the following: (1 alteration of NAu-1 and concurrent release of Fe(III from the octahedral sheets of NAu-1; and (2 subsequent microbial respiration of Fe(III.

  15. Pipeline Drag Reducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipeline drag reducers have proven to be an extremely powerful tool in fluid transportation. High molecular weight polymers are used to reduce the frictional pressure loss ratio in crude oil pipelines, refined fuel and aqueous pipelines. Chemical structure of the main used pipeline drag reducers is one of the following polymers and copolymers classified according to the type of fluid to ; low density polyethylene, copolymer of I-hexane cross linked with divinyl benzene, polyacrylamide, polyalkylene oxide polymers and their copolymers, fluorocarbons, polyalkyl methacrylates and terpolymer of styrene, alkyl acrylate and acrylic acid. Drag reduction is the increase in pump ability of a fluid caused by the addition of small amounts of an additive to the fluid. The effectiveness of a drag reducer is normally expressed in terms of percent drag reduction. Frictional pressure loss in a pipeline system is a waste of energy and it costly. The drag reducing additive minimizes the flow turbulence, increases throughput and reduces the energy costs. The Flow can be increased by more than 80 % with existing assets. The effectiveness of the injected drag reducer in Mostorod to Tanta crude oil pipeline achieved 35.4 % drag reduction and 23.2 % flow increase of the actual performance The experimental application of DRA on Arab Petroleum Pipeline Company (Summed) achieved a flow increase ranging from 9-32 %

  16. Reducing Erosion and Runoff

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane

    2009-01-01

    By caring for and improving your soil, you will help it absorb water more readily, reducing runoff and erosion as well as improving plant health. This publication gives the homeowner tips to help prevent runoff and erosion on their property.

  17. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Ga. were the first three We Can! cities. Obesity Research: A New Approach The percentage of children ...

  18. Reduced Extended MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P. J.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Grasso, D.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Lingam, M.; Tassi, E.

    2015-11-01

    Over the years various reduced fluid models have been obtained for modeling plasmas, with the goal of capturing important physics while maintaining computability. Such models have included the physics contained in various generalizations of Ohm's law, including Hall drift and electron inertia. In a recent publication it was shown that full 3D extended MHD is a Hamiltonian system by finding its noncanonical Poisson bracket. Subsequently, this bracket was shown to be derivable from that for Hall MHD by a series of remarkable transformations, which greatly simplifies the proof of the Jacobi identity and allows one to immediately obtain generalizations of the helicity and cross helicity. In this poster we use this structure to obtain exact reduced fluid models with the effects of full two-fluid theory. Results of numerical computations of collisionless reconnection using an exact reduced 4-field model will be presented and analytical comparisons of mode structure of previous reduced models will be made.

  19. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... page please turn Javascript on. The We Can! childhood obesity-prevention program involves parents, caregivers, and community leaders ...

  20. Reduced shear power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  1. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  2. Fabrication of large-scale single-crystal bismuth telluride (Bi₂Te₃) nanosheet arrays by a single-step electrolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Wei; Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Chan, Tsung-Cheng; Chen, Pei-Ju; Chung, Chih-Chun; Yaghoubi, Alireza; Liao, Chien-Neng; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-07-21

    Nanolizing of thermoelectric materials is one approach to reduce the thermal conductivity and hence enhance the figure of merit. Bismuth telluride (Bi₂Te₃)-based materials have excellent figure of merit at room temperature. For device applications, precise control and rapid fabrication for the nanostructure of thermoelectric materials are essential issues. In the present study, we demonstrate a one-step electrolysis process to directly form Bi₂Te₃ nanosheet arrays (NSAs) on the surface of bulk Bi₂Te₃ with controllable spacing distance and depth by tuning the applied bias and duration. The single sheet of NSAs reveals that the average thickness and electrical resistivity of single crystalline Bi₂Te₃ in composition are 399.8 nm and 137.34 μΩ m, respectively. The formation mechanism of NSAs has been proposed. A 1.12% efficiency of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with Bi₂Te₃ NSAs for counter electrode has been demonstrated, indicating that Bi₂Te₃ NSAs from top-down processing with a high ratio of surface area to volume are a promising candidate for possible applications such as thermoelectrics, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:24770854

  3. Tank closure reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  4. Tank closure reducing grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr90, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel

  5. A new titanium-bearing calcium aluminosilicate phase. 2: Crystallography and crystal chemistry of grains formed in slowly cooled melts with bulk compositions of calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, David J.; Beckett, John R.; Paque, Julie M.; Stolper, Edward

    1994-01-01

    The crystallography and crystal chemistry of a new calcium- titanium-aluminosilicate mineral (UNK) observed in synthetic analogs to calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from carbonaceous chondrites was studied by electron diffraction techniques. The unit cell is primitive hexagonal or trigonal, with a = 0.790 +/- 0.02 nm and c = 0.492 +/- 0.002 nm, similar to the lattice parameters of melilite and consistent with cell dimensions for crystals in a mixer furnace slag described by Barber and Agrell (1994). The phase frequently displays an epitactic relationship in which melilite acts as the host, with (0001)(sub UNK) parallel (001)(sub mel) and zone axis group 1 0 -1 0(sub UNK) parallel zone axis group 1 0 0(sub mel). If one of the two space groups determined by Barber and Agrell (1994) for their sample of UNK is applicable (P3m1 or P31m), then the structure is probably characterized by puckered sheets of octahedra and tetrahedra perpendicular to the c-axis with successive sheets coordinated by planar arrays of Ca. In this likely structure, each unit cell contains three Ca sites located in mirror planes, one octahedrally coordinated cation located along a three-fold axis and five tetrahedrally coordinated cations, three in mirrors and two along triads. The octahedron contains Ti but, because there are 1.3-1.9 cations of Ti/formula unit, some of the Ti must also be in tetrahedral coordination, an unusual but not unprecedented situation for a silicate. Tetrahedral sites in mirror planes would contain mostly Si, with lesser amounts of Al while those along the triads correspondingly contain mostly Al with subordinate Ti. The structural formula, therefore, can be expressed as Ca(sub 3)(sup VIII)(Ti,Al)(sup VI)(Al,Ti,Si)(sub 2)(sup IV)(Si,Al)(sub 3)(sup IV)O14 with Si + Ti = 4. Compositions of meteoritic and synthetic Ti-bearing samples of the phase can be described in terms of a binary solid solution between the end-members Ca3TiAl2Si3O14 and Ca3Ti(AlTi)(AlSi2)O14. A Ti

  6. Reduced Braginskii equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite β that we solve the perpendicular component of Ohm's law to conserve the physical energy while ensuring the relation ∇ · j = 0

  7. Reduced Multiplication Modules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karim Samei

    2011-05-01

    An -module is called a multiplication module if for each submodule of , = for some ideal of . As defined for a commutative ring , an -module is said to be reduced if the intersection of prime submodules of is zero. The prime spectrum and minimal prime submodules of the reduced module are studied. Essential submodules of are characterized via a topological property. It is shown that the Goldie dimension of is equal to the Souslin number of Spec (). Also a finitely generated module is a Baer module if and only if Spec () is an extremally disconnected space; if and only if it is a -module. It is proved that a prime submodule is minimal in if and only if for each $x\\in N,\\mathrm{Ann}(x)\

  8. Reducing conspiracy theory beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanov Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to look at possible ways to reduce beliefs in conspiracy theories and increase the intention to have a fictitious child vaccinated. One hundred and sixty participants answered an online questionnaire. Three groups were used. The control group did not read any text prior to answering whereas the two experimental groups read either only debunking information or information about the motives of the conspiracists and the fallacy in their reasoning in addition to the debunking paragraph. The second experimental manipulation was effective in reducing medical conspiracy theories beliefs, but not belief in conspiracy theories in general. Neither intervention was effective in increasing the likelihood to have a fictitious child vaccinated. Those not intending to vaccinate a fictitious child endorsed conspiracy theories to a greater degree. A positive correlation between beliefs in conspiracy theories and the experiential/intuitive information processing system was found.

  9. Reducing rotor weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheney, M.C. [PS Enterprises, Inc., Glastonbury, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  10. Risk-reducing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Federica; Sacchini, Virgilio S

    2016-10-01

    Mastectomy rates have significantly increased over the last decades, likely due to the rising trend of risk-reducing mastectomies (RRM) in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Growing evidence suggests that aggressive risk-reducing surgical strategies are only justified in high-risk breast cancer situations. Notably, in this selected cohort of women, prophylactic mastectomies offer evident benefit for local and contralateral disease control, and may also provide a survival benefit. Nevertheless, the extent of the increasing frequency of this operation is not explained by the broadening of the medical indications alone. Here we analyze the current evidence regarding RRM, its clinical practice, and possible explanations for the rising phenomenon of aggressive surgical locoregional control strategies. PMID:26785281

  11. Reducing Children's Media Viewing

    OpenAIRE

    Erin Clyne; Jason, Leonard A.

    2011-01-01

    This case study evaluates the use of a Restrictive aide and the complementary use of parental mediation techniques to reduce media viewing among children. A family was provided a TV Token Timer, which involved a positive reward in exchange for participating in activities outside of watching television. Media viewing habits decreased from the baseline to the completion of the intervention at week 8 for both children. The parent reported high levels of Instructive mediation and positively evalu...

  12. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Devin G.; Price, Joseph; Wolfers, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  13. Reducing conspiracy theory beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanov Ana

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to look at possible ways to reduce beliefs in conspiracy theories and increase the intention to have a fictitious child vaccinated. One hundred and sixty participants answered an online questionnaire. Three groups were used. The control group did not read any text prior to answering whereas the two experimental groups read either only debunking information or information about the motives of the conspiracists and the fallacy in their reason...

  14. Reducing volcanic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R.; Decker, B.

    1991-01-01

    The last two decades have brought major advances in research on how volcanoes work and how to monitor their changing habits. Geologic mapping as well as studies of earthquake patterns and surface deformation associated with underground movement of magma have given scientists a better view of the inner structure and dynamics of active volcanoes. With the next decade, the time has come to focuses more on applying this knowledge toward reducing the risk from volcanic activity on a worldwide basis. 

  15. Coupling Reduces Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Lindner, John. F.; Sinha, Sudeshna; Ditto, William L.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how coupling nonlinear dynamical systems can reduce the effects of noise. For simplicity we investigate noisy coupled map lattices. Noise from different lattice nodes can diffuse across the lattice and lower the noise level of individual nodes. We develop a theoretical model that explains this observed noise evolution and show how the coupled dynamics can naturally function as an averaging filter. Our numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the model predictions.

  16. Does democracy reduce corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Ivar Kolstad; Arne Wiig

    2011-01-01

    While democracy is commonly believed to reduce corruption, there are obvious endogeneity problems in measuring the impact of democracy on corruption. This paper addresses the endogeneity of democracy by exploiting the common observation that democracies seldom go to war against each other. We instrument for democracy using a dummy variable reflecting whether a country has been at war with a democracy in the period 1946-2009, while controlling for the extent to which countries have been at war...

  17. Gradual extinction reduces Reinstatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eShiban

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated whether gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli during extinction can prevent the return of fear. Thirty-one participants of a three-stage procedure (acquisition, extinction and a reinstatement test on day two were randomly assigned to a standard extinction (SE and gradual extinction (GE procedure. The two groups differed only in the extinction procedure. While the SE group ran through a regular extinction process without any negative events, the frequency of the aversive stimuli during the extinction phase was gradually reduced for the GE group. The unconditioned stimulus was an air blast (5 bar, 10 ms. A spider and a scorpion were used as conditioned stimuli. The outcome variables were contingency ratings and physiological measures (skin conductance response and startle response. There were no differences found between the two groups for the acquisition and extinction phases concerning contingency ratings, SCR, or startle response. Gradual extinction compared to standard extinction significantly reduced the return of fear in the reinstatement test for the startle response but not for skin conductance response or contingency ratings. This study was successful in translating the findings in rodent to humans. The results suggest that the gradual extinction process is suitable for increasing the efficacy of fear extinction.

  18. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  19. Studies of hexacelsian and celsian barium aluminosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo-Tong

    1998-09-01

    The first part of this work (chapter 3) describes the reaction paths leading to the formation of BaAlsb2Sisb2Osb8 (BAS) from a mixture of gamma-BaCOsb3,\\ alpha-Alsb2Osb3, and amorphous SiOsb2 powders. Heat treatments conducted from 600 to 1200sp°C in air were used to transform the powder mixtures into hexacelsian BAS. The phase evolution to BAS was examined by x-ray diffraction. Several experiments were designed to microscopically reproduce the solid-solid interfaces expected during the synthesis of BAS and enabled the author to describe the different stages of the reaction. There exist two reaction paths in formation of BAS in this study: (1) formation of a series of barium silicates leading to BaO*2SiOsb2 (BSsb2) which then reacts with Alsb2Osb3 to form BAS and (2) formation of BaO*Alsb2Osb3 (BA) which then reacts with SiOsb2 to form BAS. The kinetics of the latter is slower than that of the former because the reaction between BaO*Alsb2Osb3 and SiOsb2 to form BAS includes a bond breaking process. The second part (chapter 4) of this research was undertaken to study the role of additives on the kinetics of the transformation of hexacelsian to celsian. Pre-synthesized hexacelsian powders doped with various additives were heated at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1400sp°C for 4 hrs. Semi-quantitative analysis of XRD was used to determine the extent of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation. This work was extended further to investigate the mechanisms involved in the transformation. Defect structures developed in the additive-containing celsian provide insights about the sites occupied by the cations added. Experimental results indicate that the doping of ˜0.99A cations in promoting the conversion of hexacelsian to celsian is by forming an interstitial solid solution in hexacelsian and ˜0.66A cations form a substitutional solid solution. In a kinetic study on the CaO- or MgO-enhanced transformation, values of rate constant, k, and Avlami constant, n, at various temperatures were evaluated from the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Although the hexacelsian-celsian transformation is a framework reconstruction process, the estimated activation energies in previous researches and in this study have the values much lower than the expected value of ˜777 kJ/mol for (Al,Si)-O bond breaking mechanism. A more reasonable mechanism is proposed in this study. The short-range diffusion of barium ions induced by a basal-plane glide in hexacelsian possibly facilitates the (Al,Si)-O bond opening. The basal-plane glide is a rate-determining step in the transformation and could be enhanced by the addition of mineralizers. Finally, in chapter 5 the effect of additives on the in-situ crystallization of celsian and beta-Sisb3Nsb4 was investigated upon cooling from 1800sp°C, in which a liquid-phase sintering of the Sisb3Nsb4 reinforced BAS composites is performed. It was found that the presence of additives no longer stabilizes the celsian phase and is detrimental on the mechanical properties, in particular fluoride additives. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  20. Crystallization of a barium-aluminosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, C.H. III; Lee, W.E.; Bansal, N.P.; Hyatt, M.J.

    1989-10-01

    The crystallization of a celsian glass composition was investigated as a possible high-temperature ceramic matrix material. Heat treatments invariably resulted in crystallization of the hexaclesian phase unless a flux, such as lithia, was added or a nucleating agent used (e.g., celsian seeds). TEM analysis revealed complex microstructures. Glasses with Mo additions contained hexacelsian, mullite, and an Mo-rich glass. Li{sub 2}O additions stabilized celsian but mullite and Mo-rich glass were still present. 15 refs.

  1. Crystallization of a barium-aluminosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, C. H., III; Lee, W. E.; Bansal, N. P.; Hyatt, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    The crystallization of a celsian glass composition was investigated as a possible high-temperature ceramic matrix material. Heat treatments invariably resulted in crystallization of the hexaclesian phase unless a flux, such as lithia, was added or a nucleating agent used (e.g., celsian seeds). TEM analysis revealed complex microstructures. Glasses with Mo additions contained hexacelsian, mullite, and an Mo-rich glass. Li2O additions stabilized celsian but mullite and Mo-rich glass were still present.

  2. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  3. Sorption of tritium by modified natural aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium sorption was studied using natural clays, as well as organic compounds intercalated into alumosilicate matrices, i.e. kaolinite and montmorillonite, to consider interaction of tritium-containing underground water with argillaceous geological barriers and potentiality of the water decontamination in terms of tritium. It was ascertained that montmorillonite samples modified by dodecylpyridinium bromide, dimethylsulfoxide and hydrazine-sulfate, as well as kaolinite samples modified by hydrazine-sulfate, feature the highest sorption capacity towards tritium. A mechanism of tritium sorption is suggested, which consists in its isotopic exchange for hydrogen atoms in organic and inorganic compounds containing unshared electron pairs

  4. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  5. Reduced Google matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Frahm, K M

    2016-01-01

    Using parallels with the quantum scattering theory, developed for processes in nuclear and mesoscopic physics and quantum chaos, we construct a reduced Google matrix $G_R$ which describes the properties and interactions of a certain subset of selected nodes belonging to a much larger directed network. The matrix $G_R$ takes into account effective interactions between subset nodes by all their indirect links via the whole network. We argue that this approach gives new possibilities to analyze effective interactions in a group of nodes embedded in a large directed networks. Possible efficient numerical methods for the practical computation of $G_R$ are also described.

  6. Thin-film CdTe cells: Reducing the CdTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline thin-film CdTe is currently the dominant thin-film technology in world-wide PV manufacturing. With finite Te resources world-wide, it is appropriate to consider the limits to reducing the thickness of the CdTe layer in these devices. In our laboratory we have emphasized the use of magnetron sputtering for both CdS and CdTe achieving AM1.5 efficiency over 13% on 3 mm soda-lime glass with commercial TCO and 14% on 1 mm aluminosilicate glass. This deposition technique is well suited to good control of very thin layers and yields relatively small grain size which also facilitates high performance with ultra-thin layers. This paper describes our magnetron sputtering studies for fabrication of very thin CdTe cells. Our thinnest cells had CdTe thicknesses of 1 μm, 0.5 μm and 0.3 μm and yielded efficiencies of 12%, 9.7% and 6.8% respectively. With thinner cells Voc, FF and Jsc are reduced. Current-voltage (J-V), temperature dependent J-V (J-V-T) and apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) measurements provide valuable information for understanding and optimizing cell performance. We find that the stability under light soak appears not to depend on CdTe thickness from 2.5 to 0.5 μm. The use of semitransparent back contacts allows the study of bifacial response which is particularly useful in understanding carrier collection in the very thin devices.

  7. Reducing GWAS Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelett, Dennis J; Conti, David V; Han, Ying; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Easton, Doug; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Haiman, Christopher A; Coetzee, Gerhard A

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed numerous genomic 'hits' associated with complex phenotypes. In most cases these hits, along with surrogate genetic variation as measure by numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are in linkage disequilibrium, are not in coding genes making assignment of functionality or causality intractable. Here we propose that fine-mapping along with the matching of risk SNPs at chromatin biofeatures lessen this complexity by reducing the number of candidate functional/causal SNPs. For example, we show here that only on average 2 SNPs per prostate cancer risk locus are likely candidates for functionality/causality; we further propose that this manageable number should be taken forward in mechanistic studies. The candidate SNPs can be looked up for each prostate cancer risk region in 2 recent publications in 2015 (1,2) from our groups. PMID:26771711

  8. Reducing Outdoor Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice de Rendinger

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental concept is that public space is not a private property. So, a facade (the outer skin, the last millimeter belongs to the town, not to the owner of the building. Changing the rendering, a window, adding or removing anything from a facade requires a permission delivered by the town's authority.In places like Paris, Bordeaux, Marseilles, Lyon, Strasbourg… everywhere one can find a registrated building such as a cathedral, a castle, or a group of ancient buildings, a national administration is controlling this permission. This administration is called «historical monuments administration» and is locally lead by a specialized architect.In the late seventies, French government decided to reduce advertising on the roads and on the city walls. Advertising on the road was leading to a confusion reducing the efficacy of the roadsigns and direction signs, which is dangerous. The reduction was under control of a national administration: the ministry of equipment in charge of the roads design. Advertising on the walls with publicity boards was under control of the cities. Every city has a townplanning regulation. Many cities included forbidding advertisement boards on the walls in this regulation.A couple of firms, but mainly once (Decaux found clever to give a hand to the cities to control advertising. Decaux developed a line of bus stop shelters including advertisements and advertising panels and paid the cities the right to put rather smaller publicities on the public domain.Now Decaux is no more alone on this market and the cities are comparing offers.Marseille turned to a foreign advertising firm who pays three times the price Decaux paid… for half of the advertising surface. Freiburg erased totally the public domain advertisements, selling the tramways and bus coachwork as advertising spaces. Paris is reopening the advertising market before the end of Deacaux's contract and will pay Deacaux a huge amount

  9. Reduced Order Podolsky Model

    CERN Document Server

    Thibes, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    We perform the canonical and path integral quantizations of a lower-order derivatives model describing Podolsky's generalized electrodynamics. The physical content of the model shows an auxiliary massive vector field coupled to the usual electromagnetic field. The equivalence with Podolsky's original model is studied at classical and quantum levels. Concerning the dynamical time evolution we obtain a theory with two first-class and two second-class constraints in phase space. We calculate explicitly the corresponding Dirac brackets involving both vector fields. We use the Senjanovic procedure to implement the second-class constraints and the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky path integral quantization scheme to deal with the symmetries generated by the first-class constraints. The physical interpretation of the results turns out to be simpler due to the reduced derivatives order permeating the equations of motion, Dirac brackets and effective action.

  10. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  11. Reducing maintenance costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasingly more expensive maintenance measures, cuts in the cost budget, and the loss of know-how on the part of vendors all require a change of policy with respect to maintenance concepts of the part of operators. This also applies to the existing valve concepts, the drives included. Under these aspects, the current drive, which is self-actuated and actuated by outside media, for a parallel-plate valve of a nomial width of 700 was reconsidered. The effort served to reduce maintenance costs and, at the same time, simplify the drive concept as well as cut back on the number of in-service inspections. Moreover, the number of active components were to be minimized and installation conditions in the plant were to be improved. When the boundary conditions to be observed with respect to process technology had been laid down, the competent technical department developed a concept of modification of the drive. A major constituent part was the demonstration of the functioning capability of the new drive under accident conditions. It was achieved mainly by an analytical approach. In the resultant drive concept, the same control valves are employed to actuate a driving cylinder by means of self-actuation or by an outside medium as a function of pressure. (orig.)

  12. Cancer Reduces Transcriptome Specialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Octavio; Reyes-Valdés, M. Humberto; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2010-01-01

    A central goal of cancer biology is to understand how cells from this family of genetic diseases undergo specific morphological and physiological changes and regress to a de-regulated state of the cell cycle. The fact that tumors are unable to perform most of the specific functions of the original tissue led us to hypothesize that the degree of specialization of the transcriptome of cancerous tissues must be less than their normal counterparts. With the aid of information theory tools, we analyzed four datasets derived from transcriptomes of normal and tumor tissues to quantitatively test the hypothesis that cancer reduces transcriptome specialization. Here, we show that the transcriptional specialization of a tumor is significantly less than the corresponding normal tissue and comparable with the specialization of dedifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the drop in specialization in cancerous tissues is largely due to a decrease in expression of genes that are highly specific to the normal organ. This approach gives us a better understanding of carcinogenesis and offers new tools for the identification of genes that are highly influential in cancer progression. PMID:20454660

  13. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics

  14. Shrinkage Reducing Admixture for Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Concrete shrinkage cracking is a common problem in all types of concrete structures, especially for structures and environments where the cracks are prevalent and the repercussions are most severe. A liquid shrinkage reducing admixture for concrete, developed by GRACE Construction Products and ARCO Chemical Company, that reduces significantly the shrinkage during concrete drying and potentially reduces overall cracking over time.

  15. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  16. THz spectrum of reduced glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Weining; YAN; Haitao; YUE; Weiwei; ZHAO; Guozhong; Z

    2005-01-01

    The optical characteristics of reduced glutathione molecules between 0.2 THz and 2.4 THz have been investigated by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The absorption characteristics and optical parameters of the reduced glutathione purged with Nitrogen at room temperature were obtained experimentally. The measured results were fitted well with the theoretical results computed by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) in far-infrared range. Also the conformation of the reduced glutathione molecule was simulated by Gaussian 03. This work has demonstrated significantly that THz-TDS spectroscopy can further be used to study other biological molecules in biological and biomedical engineering.

  17. Reducible braids and Garside theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Meneses, Juan

    2010-01-01

    We show that reducible braids which are, in a Garside-theoretical sense, as simple as possible within their conjugacy class, are also as simple as possible in a geometric sense. More precisely, if a braid belongs to a certain subset of its conjugacy class which we call the stabilized set of sliding circuits, and if it is reducible, then its reducibility is geometrically obvious: it has a round or almost round reducing curve. Moreover, for any given braid, an element of its stabilized set of sliding circuits can be found using the well-known cyclic sliding operation. This leads to a polynomial time algorithm for deciding the Nielsen-Thurston type of any braid, modulo one well-known conjecture on the speed of convergence of the cyclic sliding operation.

  18. Reduced-Dimension Multiuser Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yao; Goldsmith, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    We explore several reduced-dimension multiuser detection (RD-MUD) structures that significantly decrease the number of required correlation branches at the receiver front-end, while still achieving performance similar to that of the conventional matched-filter (MF) bank. RD-MUD exploits the fact that the number of active users is typically small relative to the total number of users in the system and relies on ideas of analog compressed sensing to reduce the number of correlators. We first develop a general framework for both linear and nonlinear RD-MUD detectors. We then present theoretical performance analysis for two specific detectors: the linear reduced-dimension decorrelating (RDD) detector, which combines subspace projection and thresholding to determine active users and sign detection for data recovery, and the nonlinear reduced-dimension decision-feedback (RDDF) detector, which combines decision-feedback orthogonal matching pursuit for active user detection and sign detection for data recovery. The t...

  19. Reducing energy with asynchronous circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas Barragan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Reducing energy consumption using asynchronous circuits. The elastic clocks approach has been implemented along with a closed-feedback loop in order to achieve a lower energy consumption along with more reliability in integrated circuits.

  20. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonney, Matthew S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brake, Matthew R.W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  1. Municipal actions to reduce mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-15

    This paper presented proper management practices for products containing mercury. The measures can help reduce mercury releases, occupational exposure and mercury spills, thereby preventing impacts on human health and the environment. Despite mercury's toxic nature, many common products that contain mercury are commercially available. These include thermostats, thermometers, fluorescent lamps, pressure measuring devices, electrical switches and relays, and dental amalgam. Mercury emissions are also associated with base metal smelting, waste incineration and coal-fired power generation. Mercury in the environment is a global issue, because it can travel in the atmosphere on wind currents. The actions taken by municipalities to address the issue include reducing or eliminating mercury releases from internal municipal operations and sources within the community. This document provided guidance on how to develop a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan that will help reduce mercury releases. It presented information and case studies that will help municipalities manage mercury-containing products found in municipal buildings and street lighting. Information on sources of mercury from within the community was presented along with case studies that can help municipalities determine where community action is needed to reduce mercury releases. The 5 modules of this document were intended to help municipalities identify priorities, timelines and budget requirements for mercury initiatives. It was emphasized that municipalities that adopt a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan formally commit to reducing and eliminating mercury from the environment. tabs., figs.

  2. Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Design concept for ball bearing incorporates small pieces of shim stock, wire spokes like those in bicycle wheels, or other flexing elements to reduce both stiction and friction slope. In flexure bearing, flexing elements placed between outer race of ball bearing and outer ring. Elements flex when ball bearings encounter small frictional-torque "bumps" or even larger ones when bearing balls encounter buildups of grease on inner or outer race. Flexure of elements reduce high friction slopes of "bumps", helping to keep torque between outer ring and inner race low and more nearly constant. Concept intended for bearings in gimbals on laser and/or antenna mirrors.

  3. National compacts to reduce deforestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, M. [Instituto Socioambiental ISA., Brasilia DF (Brazil); Moutinho, P.; Nepstad, D. [Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazonia IPAM, Belem (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Finding ways for developing countries with tropical forests to participate more effectively in international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has become central to the success of any future international agreement. The most obvious means would be the reduction of tropical deforestation and the emissions associated with it. Unless tropical deforestation is reduced it will not be possible to avoid 'dangerous anthropogenic interference' in the planet's climate. In this chapter the necessary conditions for these countries to use reduced deforestation, in the context of 'compensated reduction of deforestation', as an internationally recognized, valid form of mitigation of global climate change and, in return, receive compensation for demonstrated reductions. The proposal for compensated reduction suggests that countries that reduce their emissions from tropical deforestation during a Kyoto Protocol commitment period, in relation to an agreed baseline in accordance with historical deforestation rates, be remunerated with credits equivalent to the volume of emissions avoided, tradable in subsequent commitment periods. As we know, under the current terms of the Kyoto Protocol, covering the first commitment period, there are no means to offer incentives for reducing deforestation, which are a recognized factor in global emissions (25%). Eligible forestry projects in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) include only carbon sequestration. Since tropical deforestation is a problem occurring in non-Annex 1 developing countries, and is associated with development strategies historically linked to global markets, international instruments to encourage reduction of deforestation emissions should consider the objective conditions of these countries in a manner consistent with the principle of mutual, but differentiated responsibilities. The compensated reduction proposal emerges in this context: more effective participation of these

  4. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...... not lived up to the high expectations at the outset. Despite this, the paper concludes that Denmark is likely to reduce emission by 50% from 1990 to 2020 and reach the likely 2020 NEC ceiling....

  5. Reducing chlorination of niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cylindric briquettes of Nb2O5 and carbon are presented. The effects of chlorine flow, dimension of the briquettes, porosity, percentage of the reducing agent in the mixture and temperature are analysed. The volatilization aspect of Nb2O5 by the briquettes and the structural transformations of the samples are described. (M.A.C.)

  6. Does Microfinance Reduce Income Inequality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Niels

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question whether participation of the poor in microfinance contributes to reducing a country’s level of income inequality. Using data from 70 developing countries, we show that higher levels of microfinance participation are indeed associated with a reduction of the income g

  7. Ways to reduce miner absenteeism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    Discussion is presented of the use of attendance programs at mines, to reduce interruptions to production, decrease labour costs, and to improve safety. Techniques described include use of absentee charts, frequency of attendance charts, and rewards for good attendance. 3 figs.

  8. Solitons reduced from Heterotic fivebranes

    CERN Document Server

    La, H S

    1992-01-01

    In view of the expectation that the solitonic sector of the lower dimensional world may be originated from the solitonic sector of string theory, various solitonic solutions are reduced from the heterotic fivebrane solutions in the ten-dimensional heterotic string theory. These solitons in principle can appear after proper compactifications, {\\it e.g.} toroidal compactifications.

  9. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  10. Breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Gamborg, Michael; Heitmann, Berit L;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weight gained during pregnancy and not lost postpartum may contribute to obesity in women of childbearing age. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention (PPWR) in a population among which full breastfeeding is common and breastfeeding d...

  11. Reducing Developing Country Debt Reducing Developing Country Debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Krugman

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a brief primer on the economics of debt reduction for developing countries. It begins by considering the case of unilateral debt forgiveness; such forgiveness is only in the mutual interest of creditors and debtors if the country is on the wrong side of fhe "debt Laffer curve". Current empirical estimafes suggest that problem debtors are in a very flat region of the debt Laffer curve where large changes in face value of debf have only small effcts in expected payments. The paper then considers a variety of market-based debt reduction schemes. It shows that the widespread belief that the markt offers a cheap way to reduce debt is incorrect; unless new market instruments can be made credibly senior to existing debt, debt reductions that impose only small costs to creditors would be very expensive if achieved through buy back. Reducing Developing Country Debt

  12. A reduced-turbulence, reduced-entrainment electrostatic precipitator

    OpenAIRE

    Bahner, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis describes testing of an electrostatic precipitator that has a portion of the main precipitator flow drawn through a porous (fabric) collecting surface. Tests investigated effects of flow through the collecting surface (side flow) on precipitator turbulence and particulate removal efficiency. Particulate removal tests were conducted at both ambient temperature and boiler slipstream conditions. Side flow was shown to reduce turbulence in the boundary layers of the collecting plat...

  13. Reduced modified Chaplygin gas cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianbo; Geng, Danhua; Xu, Lixin; Wu, Yabo; Liu, Molin

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we study cosmologies containing the reduced modified Chaplygin gas (RMCG) fluid which is reduced from the modified Chaplygin gas p = Aρ - Bρ -α for the value of α = -1 /2. In this special case, dark cosmological models can be realized for different values of model parameter A. We investigate the viabilities of these dark cosmological models by discussing the evolutions of cosmological quantities and using the currently available cosmic observations. It is shown that the special RMCG model ( A = 0 or A = 1) which unifies the dark matter and dark energy should be abandoned. For A = 1 /3, RMCG which unifies the dark energy and dark radiation is the favorite model according to the objective Akaike information criteria. In the case of A , RMCG can achieve the features of the dynamical quintessence and phantom models, where the evolution of the universe is not sensitive to the variation of model parameters.

  14. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T. (13609 Verbena Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Warren, William L. (7716 Wm. Moyers Ave., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tuttle, Bruce A. (12808 Lillian Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Dimos, Duane B. (6105 Innsbrook Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Pike, Gordon E. (1609 Cedar Ridge, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  15. Reduced graphene oxide molecular sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeremy T; Perkins, F Keith; Snow, Eric S; Wei, Zhongqing; Sheehan, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate reduced graphene oxide as the active material for high-performance molecular sensors. Sensors are fabricated from exfoliated graphene oxide platelets that are deposited to form an ultrathin continuous network. These graphene oxide networks are tunably reduced toward graphene by varying the exposure time to a hydrazine hydrate vapor. The conductance change of the networks upon exposure to trace levels of vapor is measured as a function of the chemical reduction. The level of reduction affects both the sensitivity and the level of 1/ f noise. The sensors are capable of detecting 10 s exposures to simulants of the three main classes of chemical-warfare agents and an explosive at parts-per-billion concentrations. PMID:18763832

  16. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  17. Structural reducibility of multilayer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Domenico, Manlio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Arenas, Alexandre; Latora, Vito

    2015-04-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks consisting of distinct types of interactions, which can be categorized as links belonging to different layers. For example, a good description of the full protein-protein interactome requires, for some organisms, up to seven distinct network layers, accounting for different genetic and physical interactions, each containing thousands of protein-protein relationships. A fundamental open question is then how many layers are indeed necessary to accurately represent the structure of a multilayered complex system. Here we introduce a method based on quantum theory to reduce the number of layers to a minimum while maximizing the distinguishability between the multilayer network and the corresponding aggregated graph. We validate our approach on synthetic benchmarks and we show that the number of informative layers in some real multilayer networks of protein-genetic interactions, social, economical and transportation systems can be reduced by up to 75%.

  18. Reduced Deforestation and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Doupe

    2014-01-01

    The clearing of forests for agricultural land and other marketable purposes is a well-trodden path of economic development. With these private benefits from deforestation come external costs: emissions from deforestation currently account for 12 per cent of global carbon emissions. A widespread intervention in reducing emissions from deforestation will affect the paths of agricultural expansion and economic growth of lower income nations. To investigate these processes, this paper presents a ...

  19. Numbers for reducible cubic scrolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Vainsencher

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We show how to compute the number of reducible cubic scrolls of codimension 2 in (math blackboard symbol Pn incident to the appropriate number of linear spaces.Mostramos como calcular o número de rolos cúbicos redutíveis de codimensão 2 em (math blackboard symbol Pn incidentes a espaços lineares apropriados.

  20. Reducing the addictiveness of cigarettes

    OpenAIRE

    HENNINGFIELD, J.; Benowitz, N.; Slade, J.; Houston, T; DAVIS, R.; Deitchman, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the feasibility of reducing tobacco-caused disease by gradually removing nicotine from cigarettes until they would not be effective causes of nicotine addiction.
DATA SOURCES—Issues posed by such an approach, and potential solutions, were identified from analysis of literature published by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in its 1996 Tobacco Rule, comments of the tobacco industry and other institutions and individuals on the rule, review of the reference lists of ...

  1. Reducing consumption through communal living

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Horace [The Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Energy and Environment Research Unit

    2003-07-01

    This paper examines ways consumers and communities can voluntarily adopt a low consumption (or low carbon) lifestyle, often termed 'voluntary simplicity' or a policy of 'sufficiency'. There is an increasing academic literature within Europe in the last five years on the whole question of 'sustainable consumption', and the relationship between income levels and consumption particularly at the household. This debate has moved beyond 'green consumerism' to look at building 'new concepts of prosperity' through local community actions, or reducing working time to allow more time for the creation of social capital. The paper will concentrate on one aspect of the quest for sustainable communities, the relevance of communal living to reducing consumption through examining energy consumption (both direct and indirect) in one such community in the UK. The results from this preliminary study reveal that it is not the sharing of resources that reduces consumption but the mutual reinforcement of attitudes towards a low consumption lifestyle. Thus it is the creation of social capital in a community that is its key to its ecological lifestyle.

  2. Welfare-Reducing Trade Liberalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Jørgensen, Jan G.

    Recent literature on the workhorse model of intra-industry trade has explored heterogeneous cost structures at the firm level. These approaches have proven to add realism and predictive power. This note shows, however, that this added realism also implies that there may exist a positive bilateral...... tariff that maximizes national and world welfare. Applying one of the simplest specifications possible, namely a symmetric two-country intra-industry trade model with fixed export costs that are heterogeneous across firms, we find that the reciprocal reduction of small tariffs reduces welfare. We explore...

  3. On nonlinear reduced order modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When applied to a model that receives n input parameters and predicts m output responses, a reduced order model estimates the variations in the m outputs of the original model resulting from variations in its n inputs. While direct execution of the forward model could provide these variations, reduced order modeling plays an indispensable role for most real-world complex models. This follows because the solutions of complex models are expensive in terms of required computational overhead, thus rendering their repeated execution computationally infeasible. To overcome this problem, reduced order modeling determines a relationship (often referred to as a surrogate model) between the input and output variations that is much cheaper to evaluate than the original model. While it is desirable to seek highly accurate surrogates, the computational overhead becomes quickly intractable especially for high dimensional model, n ≫ 10. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a novel reduced order modeling method for building a surrogate model that employs only 'local first-order' derivatives and a new tensor-free expansion to efficiently identify all the important features of the original model to reach a predetermined level of accuracy. This is achieved via a hybrid approach in which local first-order derivatives (i.e., gradient) of a pseudo response (a pseudo response represents a random linear combination of original model’s responses) are randomly sampled utilizing a tensor-free expansion around some reference point, with the resulting gradient information aggregated in a subspace (denoted by the active subspace) of dimension much less than the dimension of the input parameters space. The active subspace is then sampled employing the state-of-the-art techniques for global sampling methods. The proposed method hybridizes the use of global sampling methods for uncertainty quantification and local variational methods for sensitivity analysis. In a similar manner to

  4. Welfare-Reducing Trade Liberalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Jørgensen, Jan G.

    Recent literature on the workhorse model of intra-industry trade has explored heterogeneous cost structures at the firm level. These approaches have proven to add realism and predictive power. This paper shows, however, that this added realism also implies that there may exist a positive bilateral...... tariff that maximizes national and world welfare. Applying one of the simplest specifications possible, namely a symmetric two-country intra-industry trade model with fixed export costs that are heterogeneous across firms, we find that the reciprocal reduction of small tariffs reduces welfare....

  5. FIREhose: Reducing Data from FIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fica, Haley Diane; Lambrides, Erini; Faherty, Jackie; Cruz, Kelle L.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are stellar objects that do not have enough mass to ignite hydrogen fusion in their core. Their mass is between 0.08 solar masses and the mass of our sun. Brown dwarfs are very bright in the near-infrared wavelength band (0.8- 2.5 microns). We reduced data from the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) instrument on the Magellan Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory. FIRE is a medium-resolution echelle spectrometer, whose data reduction results in a spectrum of a star. When reducing FIRE data, it is important to account for inconsistencies in the data, such as bad pixels, cosmic rays, and the effects of our atmosphere. Using the FIREhose pipeline, these inconsistencies can be accounted for and corrected using a A0 telluric with a known spectrum. After telluric correcting, the data reduction results in a primed spectrum for an object, which can then be used to determine an object's physical properties, such as atmospheric composition, radial velocity, effective temperature and surface gravity.

  6. Soldering Tested in Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Watson, J. Kevin; Down, Robert S.; Haylett, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    Whether used occasionally for contingency repair or routinely in nominal repair operations, soldering will become increasingly important to the success of future long-duration human space missions. As a result, it will be critical to have a thorough understanding of the service characteristics of solder joints produced in reduced-gravity environments. The National Center for Space Exploration Research (via the Research for Design program), the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the NASA Johnson Space Center are conducting an experimental program to explore the influence of reduced gravity environments on the soldering process. Solder joint characteristics that are being considered include solder fillet geometry, porosity, and microstructural features. Both through-hole (see the drawing and image on the preceding figure) and surface-mounted devices are being investigated. This effort (the low-gravity portion being conducted on NASA s KC-135 research aircraft) uses the soldering hardware currently available on the International Space Station. The experiment involves manual soldering by a contingent of test operators, including both highly skilled technicians and less skilled individuals to provide a skill mix that might be encountered in space mission crews. The experiment uses both flux-cored solder and solid-core solder with an externally applied flux. Other experimental parameters include the type of flux, gravitational level (nominally zero,

  7. Interventions to reduce school bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter K; Ananiadou, Katerina; Cowie, Helen

    2003-10-01

    In the last 2 decades, school bullying has become a topic of public concern and research around the world. This has led to action to reduce the problem. We review interventions targeted at the school level (for example, whole school policy, classroom climate, peer support, school tribunal, and playground improvement), at the class level (for example, curriculum work), and at the individual level (for example, working with specific pupils). Effectiveness of interventions has been sporadically assessed. We review several systematically evaluated, large-scale, school-based intervention programs. Their effectiveness has varied, and we consider reasons for this. We suggest ways to improve the evaluation and comparability of studies, as well as the effectiveness of future interventions. PMID:14631879

  8. Variational Integrators for Reduced Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michael; Grasso, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws are described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify...

  9. Periocular Recognition Using Reduced Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika D R,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biometrics is science of measuring and statistically analyzing biological data. Biometric system establishes identity of a person based on unique physical or behavioural characteristic possessed by an individual. Behavioural biometrics measures characteristics which are acquired naturally over time. Physical biometrics measures inherent physical characteristics on a n individual. Over the last few decades enormous attention is drawn towards ocular biometrics. Cues provided by ocular region have led to exploration of newer traits. Feasibility of periocular region as a useful biometric trait has been explored recently. With the promising results of preliminary examination, research towards periocular region is currently gaining lot of prominence. Researchers have analyzed various techniques of feature extraction and classification in the periocular region. The current paper investigates the effect of using Lower Central Periocular Region (LCPR for identification. The results obtained are comparable with those acquired for the entire periocular region with an advantage of reduced periocular area.

  10. The Gambling Reducing Slot Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Mette Buhl; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer; Linnet, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

      The Gambling Reducing Slot Machine - Preliminary results Mette Buhl Callesen, Kristine Rømer Thomsen, Jakob Linnet and Arne Møller The PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital and Centre of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus, Denmark   Slot machines are among the most addictive forms of...... gambling due to their specific structural characteristics. These include a high event frequency (number of games per minute), a high frequency of small wins and near misses, and auditory as well as visual feedback that reinforce extended gambling behavior [1].   This study focused on gambling behavior in...... pathological gamblers and healthy controls, using one of the most popular slot machines in Denmark, ’Orient Expressen‘. The study included 20 pathological gamblers (10 females) and 20 healthy non-gambling controls (10 females). While being videotaped the subjects played two versions of the slot machine in...

  11. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  12. Reducing catalytic converter pressure loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This article examines why approximately 30--40% of total exhaust-system pressure loss occurs in the catalytic converter and what can be done to reduce pressure loss. High exhaust-system backpressure is of concern in the design of power trains for passenger cars and trucks because it penalizes fuel economy and limits peak power. Pressure losses occur due to fluid shear and turning during turbulent flow in the converter headers and in entry separation and developing laminar-flow boundary layers within the substrate flow passages. Some of the loss mechanisms are coupled. For example, losses in the inlet header are influenced by the presence of the flow resistance of a downstream substrate. Conversely, the flow maldistribution and pressure loss of the substrate(s) depend on the design of the inlet header.

  13. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavik, Charles J. (Rexford, NY); Rhudy, Ralph G. (Scotia, NY); Bushman, Ralph E. (Lathem, NY)

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  14. Reduced gravity multibody dynamics testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpaa, Meija

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on reduced gravity multibody dynamics testing is presented. Tests were conducted on board the NASA KC-135 RGA in Houston, Texas. The objective was to analyze the effects of large angle rotations on flexible, multi-segmented structures. The flight experiment was conducted to provide data which will be compared to the data gathered from ground tests of the same configurations. The flight and ground tested data will be used to validate the TREETOPS software, software which models dynamic multibody systems, and other multibody codes. The flight experiment consisted of seven complete flights on board the KC-135 RGA during two one-week periods. The first period of testing was 4-9 Apr. 1993. The second period of testing was 13-18 Jun. 1993.

  15. The ITER reduced cost design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six years of joint work under the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) EDA agreement yielded a mature design for ITER which met the objectives set for it (ITER final design report (FDR)), together with a corpus of scientific and technological data, large/full scale models or prototypes of key components/systems and progress in understanding which both validated the specific design and are generally applicable to a next step, reactor-oriented tokamak on the road to the development of fusion as an energy source. In response to requests from the parties to explore the scope for addressing ITER's programmatic objective at reduced cost, the study of options for cost reduction has been the main feature of ITER work since summer 1998, using the advances in physics and technology databases, understandings, and tools arising out of the ITER collaboration to date. A joint concept improvement task force drawn from the joint central team and home teams has overseen and co-ordinated studies of the key issues in physics and technology which control the possibility of reducing the overall investment and simultaneously achieving the required objectives. The aim of this task force is to achieve common understandings of these issues and their consequences so as to inform and to influence the best cost-benefit choice, which will attract consensus between the ITER partners. A report to be submitted to the parties by the end of 1999 will present key elements of a specific design of minimum capital investment, with a target cost saving of about 50% the cost of the ITER FDR design, and a restricted number of design variants. Outline conclusions from the work of the task force are presented in terms of physics, operations, and design of the main tokamak systems. Possible implications for the way forward are discussed

  16. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Reduced Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the studies done to reduce neuromuscular strength loss during unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Since there are animals that undergo fairly long periods of muscular disuse without any or minimal muscular atrophy, there is an answer to that might be applicable to human in situations that require no muscular use to diminish the effects of muscular atrophy. Three sets of ULLS studies were reviewed indicated that muscle strength decreased more than the muscle mass. The study reviewed exercise countermeasures to combat the atrophy, including: ischemia maintained during Compound muscle action potential (CMAP), ischemia and low load exercise, Japanese kaatsu, and the potential for rehabilitation or situations where heavy loading is undesirable. Two forms of countermeasures to unloading have been successful, (1) high-load resistance training has maintained muscle mass and strength, and low load resistance training with blood flow restriction (LL(sub BFR)). The LL(sub BFR) has been shown to increase muscle mass and strength. There has been significant interest in Tourniquet training. An increase in Growth Hormone(GH) has been noted for LL(sub BFR) exercise. An experimental study with 16 subjects 8 of whom performed ULLS, and 8 of whom performed ULLS and LL(sub BFR) exercise three times per week during the ULLS. Charts show the results of the two groups, showing that performing LL(sub BFR) exercise during 30 days of ULLS can maintain muscle size and strength and even improve muscular endurance.

  17. The benefits of reduced morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morbidity benefits refer to increases in utility arising from reductions in incidents of acute health impairments and from increases in the probability of developing chronic diseases. The impairments would run the gamut from a cough-day to a bed-disability-day, while the chronic diseases include classic pollution-related diseases, such as cancer, to in utero effects and learning disabilities. As with mortality benefits, there could be benefits to oneself and family and friends as well as benefits based on altruism. A major difference between the mortality and morbidity valuation literatures is that while estimates of the former are always based on risk (one is never trying to obtain values for avoiding certain death), estimates of the latter generally are not. That is, most of the theory and empirical estimates are based on models where the effect to be avoided is certain. This assumption holds reasonably well for estimating common acute effects, for example, the willingness to pay (WTP) for one less cough-day. It works less well, if at all, for chronic illness endpoints, where benefits seem to be appropriately expressed in terms of reduced risk of developing a disease or impairment

  18. Regulating environments to reduce obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Cheryl L; Moran, Patricia A; Ford, Mary M

    2004-01-01

    The marked increase in the prevalence of obesity appears to be attributable to environmental conditions that implicitly discourage physical activity while explicitly encouraging the consumption of greater quantities of energy-dense, low-nutrient foods. In the United States food environment, consumers are bombarded with advertising for unhealthy food, and receive inadequate nutritional information, especially at restaurants. In the US school environment children have access to sugary sodas and unhealthy a la carte foods in their cafeterias, at the same time getting inadequate physical activity and nutrition education. In the built environment, sprawl has reduced active living. We describe these environments and explore the potential effects of regulatory measures on these environments. In the United States, regulatory opportunities exist at the national, state and local levels to mandate action and to allocate funds for promising health-promoting strategies. Regulatory approaches, much like litigation, can transform the entire environment in which corporations operate. Even with incomplete enforcement of rules, they send a public message about what is acceptable behavior for corporations and individuals. Additionally, because the United States is party to many multilateral and bilateral trade agreements and is an active participant in the GATT/WTO framework, US regulatory actions promise to have a beneficial impact both domestically and globally. PMID:15683074

  19. Hamiltonian formulation of reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) has become a principal tool for understanding nonlinear processes, including disruptions, in tokamak plasmas. Although analytical studies of RMHD turbulence have been useful, the model's impressive ability to simulate tokamak fluid behavior has been revealed primarily by numerical solution. The present work describes a new analytical approach, not restricted to turbulent regimes, based on Hamiltonian field theory. It is shown that the nonlinear (ideal) RMHD system, in both its high-beta and low-beta versions, can be expressed in Hanmiltonian form. Thus a Poisson bracket, [ , ], is constructed such that each RMHD field quantitity, xi/sub i/, evolves according to xi/sub i/ = [xi/sub i/,H], where H is the total field energy. The new formulation makes RMHD accessible to the methodology of Hamiltonian mechanics; it has lead, in particular, to the recognition of new RMHD invariants and even exact, nonlinear RMHD solutions. A canonical version of the Poisson bracket, which requires the introduction of additional fields, leads to a nonlinear variational principle for time-dependent RMHD

  20. Bioventing reduces soil cleanup costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An offshoot technology from soil venting, bioventing offers a win-win solution for soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nonvolatile contaminants such as diesel and fuel oil. Using low air flowrates through permeable soils, bioventing injects sufficient oxygen to support naturally-occurring bacteria, which biodegraded the VOCs and other contaminants into benign byproducts. Waste gas can be directly discharged to atmosphere without further treatment. This results in no offgas treatment required. Bioventing is a cost-effective alternative to traditional soil-venting techniques. Soil venting uses air to volatilize organic-compound contamination from the vadose zone, the unsaturated soil layer above groundwater. Unfortunately, this simple-and-fast approach creates a waste offgas that requires further treatment before discharge, thus adding significantly to overall project costs. In contrast, bioventing uses low air flowrates, which require lower capital and operating costs. No offgas treatment further reduces equipment and operating costs and often eliminates air permitting. As in all treatment strategies, the process must meet the cleanup objectives. Bioventing is an alternative technique making inroads into refining and petrochemical soil-remediation applications

  1. Meditation Helps Reduce Hardened Arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sue; Pleming; 林兆佩

    2000-01-01

    沉思冥想可以减少人体冠状动脉内壁的厚度、降低心脏病和中风的危险。这话听上去有点玄乎,可是,这是事实。而且,这不是崇尚气功的国人的结论,而是美国医生的实验所证实的事实。 简称为TM(由Transcendental[超然的;超验的]Meditation的首字母所组成)的方法每日进行两次,每次20分钟。同时还得使用所谓a specific sound or“mental vehicle”(精神媒介物)。其目的是:…enabled the person to experiencequieter states of thinking.其背后的原因是:…heart disease was associated withpsychological stress and that meditating could reduce this。以下一句间接告诉我们:所谓TM,并非一两句话就能交代明白: The meditation group was given five to eight hours of tuition on TM tech—niques… 美国的研究人员常运用“对比法”来作下结论。本文也不例外。 本文给我们的重要启示是:…heart disease was associated with psychologicalstress.而quieter states of thinking是强身健体之关键。

  2. Reducing carbon-in-ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigel S. Dong [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    High levels of carbon-in-ash lead to reduced power plant efficiency and higher fuel costs, degrade the performance of electrostatic precipitators and increase emissions of particulates. Increased carbon levels in the fly ash can lead to problems with ash use in cement/concrete production. This report reviews current measures and technologies that can be used to prevent excessive carbon-in-ash in pulverised coal combustion (PCC) power plants. These include coal cleaning, coal fineness improvement, reduction of distribution imbalance of coal among burners, increasing coal-air mixing rates at both burner and OFA levels and optimising excess air ratios. A plasma-assisted combustion enhancement technology can help achieve better ignition and more stable flame for coals that are normally difficult to burn. Computer-based combustion optimisation using expert systems, neural network systems and coal combustion simulation is becoming an invaluable means to tackle the carbon-in-ash issue. This report also reviews the regulations in nine major coal-consuming countries, which stipulate the maximum unburnt carbon levels permitted for fly ash for use in concrete/cement production. The Loss on Ignition (LOI) parameter is used in all national standards, although it is considered inadequate and may exclude some usable fly ash from being utilised. Performance-based regulations are more appropriate and have been adopted by Canada and USA. The EU and Canada now permit the use of fly ash produced from co-combustion of coal and biomass. China and Russia allow very high LOI levels for certain fly ash but the other countries require similar LOI limits for fly ash for use in concrete. Finally, this report discusses measures and technologies for reduction of carbon-in-ash, including classification, froth flotation, triboelectrostatic separators, thermal processes and carbon surface modification. 146 refs., 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Generalized Reduced Order Model Generation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes to develop a generalized reduced order model generation method. This method will allow for creation of reduced order aeroservoelastic state...

  4. Microwave Antenna With Reduced Noise Leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Gain or gain-to-temperature ratio of dual-shaped subreflector receiving antenna increased when illumination is tapered near aperture edge. Taper imposed in antenna feed reduces spillover in transmitting mode and reduces noise pickup in receiving mode.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of submicron-sized mesoporous aluminosilicate spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Gundiah; M Eswaramoorthy; S Neeraj; Srinivasan Natarajan; C N R Rao

    2001-06-01

    Me soporous a luminosilicate spheres of 0 3-0 4 m diameter, with different Si/Al ratios, have been prepared by surfactant templating. Surface area of these materials is in the 510-970 m2g-1 range and pore diameter in the 15-20 Å range.

  6. Thermodynamic assessment of hydrothermal alkali feldspar-mica-aluminosilicate equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverjensky, D.A.; Hemley, J.J.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of minerals retrieved from consideration of solid-solid and dehydration equilibria with calorimetric reference values, and those of aqueous species derived from studies of electrolytes, are not consistent with experimentally measured high-temperature solubilities in the systems K2O- and Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-HCl (e.g., K-fs - Ms - Qtz - K+ - H+). This introduces major inaccuracies into the computation of ionic activity ratios and the acidities of diagenetic, metamorphic, and magmatic hydrothermal fluids buffered by alkali silicate-bearing assemblages. We report a thermodynamic analysis of revised solubility equilibria in these systems that integrates the thermodynamic properties of minerals obtained from phase equilibria studies (Berman, 1988) with the properties of aqueous species calculated from a calibrated equation of state (Shock and Helgeson, 1988). This was achieved in two separate steps. First, new values of the free energies and enthalpies of formation at 25??C and 1 bar for the alkali silicates muscovite and albite were retrieved from the experimental solubility equilibria at 300??C and Psat. Because the latter have stoichiometric reaction coefficients different from those for solid-solid and dehydration equilibria, our procedure preserves exactly the relative thermodynamic properties of the alkali-bearing silicates (Berman, 1988). Only simple arithmetic adjustments of -1,600 and -1,626 (??500) cal/mol to all the K- and Na-bearing silicates, respectively, in Berman (1988) are required. In all cases, the revised values are within ??0.2% of calorimetric values. Similar adjustments were derived for the properties of minerals from Helgeson et al. (1978). Second, new values of the dissociation constant of HCl were retrieved from the solubility equilibria at temperatures and pressures from 300-600??C and 0.5-2.0 kbars using a simple model for aqueous speciation. The results agree well with the conductance-derived dissociation constants from Franck (1956a,b) for temperatures from 300-550??C. Compared to the conductance-derived results of Frantz and Marshall (1984), our dissociation constants agree well at the highest densities, but are greater at lower densities. At the lowest density, at 600??C and 1 kbar, the discrepancy of 0.9 log units is within the overall uncertainties associated with our experimental results and those associated with deriving dissociation constants from conductance measurements in highly associated solutions (Oelkers and Helgeson, 1988). Finally, we also report an equation of state fit to the standard thermodynamic properties of the aqueous HCl molecule that is consistent with a wide array of independently determined dissociation constants of HCl and permits interpolation and extrapolation of the dissociation constant of HCl to 1000??C and 5.0 kbars. ?? 1991.

  7. Facile synthesis of mesoporous aluminosilicates constructed with crystalline microporous frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hierarchically micro-mesoporous structured ZSM-5 zeolite has been synthesized from assembly of aluminosilcate species with a tetra-quaternary ammonium type surfactant, in which the surfactant acts as two-level structure-directing templates for generating micropores and mesopores simultaneously. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis and Quantum chemical calculation. X-ray diffraction as well as nitrogen sorption analyses indicated the dual-porosity of samples, one is from intra-crystalline micropores, and the other is from mesopores. Quantum chemical calculation results showed that the inner ammonium groups of surfactant had more higher molecular degrees of freedom for the zeolite-structure-directing function. Moreover, on the basis of the same concept, this method could be extended to investigate other hierarchically structured zeolites.

  8. Facile synthesis of mesoporous aluminosilicates constructed with crystalline microporous frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Baoyu, E-mail: liubaoyu084@163.com; Ren, Yanqun; Duan, Qianqian; Chen, Fei; Xi, Hongxia, E-mail: cehxxi@scut.edu.cn; Qian, Yu

    2013-08-15

    A hierarchically micro-mesoporous structured ZSM-5 zeolite has been synthesized from assembly of aluminosilcate species with a tetra-quaternary ammonium type surfactant, in which the surfactant acts as two-level structure-directing templates for generating micropores and mesopores simultaneously. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis and Quantum chemical calculation. X-ray diffraction as well as nitrogen sorption analyses indicated the dual-porosity of samples, one is from intra-crystalline micropores, and the other is from mesopores. Quantum chemical calculation results showed that the inner ammonium groups of surfactant had more higher molecular degrees of freedom for the zeolite-structure-directing function. Moreover, on the basis of the same concept, this method could be extended to investigate other hierarchically structured zeolites.

  9. Synthesis and properties of porous zeolite aluminosilicate adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmentally safe non-energy-intensive methods of the synthesis have been developed and the properties of solid inorganic nanostructured zeolite-like adsorbents of a broad spectrum have been studied. The sorption capacities of the adsorbents with respect to various components of water pollution have been determined

  10. Modeling acidic sites in zeolites and aluminosilicates by aluminosilsesquioxanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchateau, R; Harmsen, RJ; Abbenhuis, HCL; van Santen, RA; Meetsma, A; Thiele, SKH; Kranenburg, M

    1999-01-01

    Protolysis of alkylaluminum compounds with silsesquioxanes is an efficient procedure to synthesize both Lewis and Bronsted acidic aluminosilsesquioxanes. Treatment of AlEt3 with (c-C5H9)(7)Si7O9(OH)(3) and (c-C5H9)(7)Si7O9(OSiMe3)(OH)(2) gives the corresponding Lewis acidic aluminosilsesquioxanes, {

  11. Structure and rheological properties in alkali aluminosilicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviors. In this mind, it is very important to understand which parameters influence these properties. Up to now, we know for example that viscosity of silicate melts is dependent of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts like haplogranitic rhyolitic alkali magmas. We will first present our viscosity measurements and some modelisation concepts based on the Adam and Gibbs theory. From configurational entropy theory we obtain some macroscopic information's that we can link to the structure of glasses and melts. In this mind, we have investigated them with Raman and NMR spectroscopies. These spectroscopies provide information on speciation and polymerization of glasses and melts. We will present and discuss structural and rheological variations as a function of temperature and chemical change.

  12. Microprocessor Protection of Power Reducing Transformers

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. Romanuk; Korolev, S. P.; M. S. Loman

    2011-01-01

    The paper contains analysis of advantages and disadvantages of existing differential protection terminals of power reducing transformers. The paper shows that there are good reasons to develop microprocessor protection of power reducing transformer which contains required functions and settings and which is based on Belarusian principles of relay protection system construction. The paper presents functional structure of microprocessor terminal of power reducing transformer which is developed. 

  13. Microprocessor Protection of Power Reducing Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Romanuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains analysis of advantages and disadvantages of existing differential protection terminals of power reducing transformers. The paper shows that there are good reasons to develop microprocessor protection of power reducing transformer which contains required functions and settings and which is based on Belarusian principles of relay protection system construction. The paper presents functional structure of microprocessor terminal of power reducing transformer which is developed. 

  14. Interpretation of the reduced density gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Boto, Roberto A.; Contreras-García, Julia; Tierny, Julien; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-01-01

    An interpretation of the reduced density gradient in terms of the bosonic kinetic energy density is presented. Contrary to other bonding indicators based on the kinetic energy density such as the localised orbital locator (LOL) or the electron localization function (ELF), the reduced density gradient is not only able to identify covalent bondings, but also ionic and non-covalent interactions. This study reveals that the critical points of the reduced density gradient are closely connected wit...

  15. Characterization of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Some bacteria can use (per)chlorateas terminal electron acceptor for growth. These bacteria convert perchlorate via chlorate and chlorite into chloride and molecular oxygen. Oxygen formation in microbial respiration is unique. In this study two chlorate-reducing strains belonging to the species Pseudomonas chloritidismutans and a (per)chlorate-reducing strain Dechloromonas hortensis were isolated. The characterization of the chlorate-reducing strain AW-1, which was isolated from a bioreactor ...

  16. Reduced, tame and exotic fusion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K.K.S.; Oliver, Bob; Ventura, Joana

    We define here two new classes of saturated fusion systems, reduced fusion systems and tame fusion systems. These are motivated by our attempts to better understand and search for exotic fusion systems: fusion systems which are not the fusion systems of any finite group. Our main theorems say that...... every saturated fusion system reduces to a reduced fusion system which is tame only if the original one is realizable, and that every reduced fusion system which is not tame is the reduction of some exotic (nonrealizable) fusion system....

  17. Study on high Tc superconducting ripple reducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents study on application of high Tc superconductors as a ripple reducer for reduction of the toroidal field (TF) ripple without changing the design of TF coils. The feasibility of the ripple reducer is first demonstrated on the basis of experiments. Next, parameter survey of the ripple reducer is performed for the configuration of the outline design of ITER, and a guideline for the design of the ripple reducer is presented with the consideration of constraints from the technological viewpoint of the fusion reactor. (orig.)

  18. Reduced, tame and exotic fusion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kasper K. S.; Oliver, Bob; Ventura, Joana

    2010-01-01

    We define here two new classes of saturated fusion systems, reduced fusion systems and tame fusion systems. These are motivated by our attempts to better understand and search for exotic fusion systems: fusion systems which are not the fusion systems of any finite group. Our main theorems say that every saturated fusion system reduces to a reduced fusion system which is tame only if the original one is realizable, and that every reduced fusion system which is not tame is the reduction of some...

  19. Chitosan-supported Borohydride Reducing Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new chitosan-supported borohydride reducing reagent (CBER) was prepared by treatment of KBH4 with the resin of chitosan derivative, which was first synthesized fiom the reaction of cross-linked chitosan microsphere with glycidyl trimethylammonium chloride. CBER could reduce aromatic carbonyl compound to corresponding alcohol.

  20. Genus Reducing Knots in 3-Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Rieck, Yo’av

    2001-01-01

    A genus reducing knot is a knot that has infinitely many surgeries after which the Heegaard genus of the manifold reduces. We study certain aspects of this question, in particular solving it for totally orientable Seifert Fibered Spaces, where we find examples of manifolds of arbitrarily high genus containing no such knot.

  1. A small town reduces its energy expenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissac, G.

    1993-12-31

    Langeac, a 4 300 inhabitants community in France, has relied on its resinous forest and on the local wood industry to save energy, reduce its energy expenses and protect environment. A wood-fired heat network exists, supplied by regional manufacturers. On top of that the charges are reduced in the field of energy. (TEC). 1 fig.

  2. Simple Potentiometric Determination of Reducing Sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresco, Henry; Sanson, Pedro; Seoane, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    In this article a potentiometric method for reducing sugar quantification is described. Copper(II) ion reacts with the reducing sugar (glucose, fructose, and others), and the excess is quantified using a copper wire indicator electrode. In order to accelerate the kinetics of the reaction, working conditions such as pH and temperature must be…

  3. Biplots in Reduced-Rank Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.; Looman, C.W.N.

    1994-01-01

    Regression problems with a number of related response variables are typically analyzed by separate multiple regressions. This paper shows how these regressions can be visualized jointly in a biplot based on reduced-rank regression. Reduced-rank regression combines multiple regression and principal c

  4. Welfare Reform and Reducing Teen Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhill, Isabel V.

    2000-01-01

    Most adolescent mothers are unmarried and on welfare. Congress enacted new welfare legislation that emphasizes reducing teen pregnancy and requiring work, but states are reluctant to meet this challenge. Discusses child poverty's new face, public policy and culture wars, welfare reform, and social norms. Concludes that reducing unwed parenthood…

  5. An intervention to reduce playground equipment hazards

    OpenAIRE

    Roseveare, C.; Brown, J.; McIntosh, J.; Chalmers, D

    1999-01-01

    Objectives—A community intervention trial was carried out to evaluate the relative effectiveness of two methods of reducing playground hazards in schools. The study hypotheses were: (1) a health promotion programme addressing barriers to implementing the New Zealand Playground Safety Standard will reduce playground hazards and (2) the intervention programme will be more successful than providing information alone.

  6. Soluble calcium amendments: reducing pathogen losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a byproduct of coal-fired power plants. Its application to agricultural fields may increase water infiltration, reduce soil erosion, and decrease nutrient losses from applications of animal manures. It may also reduce fecal bacterial contamination of surface ...

  7. Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miletto, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis constitutes a pioneer attempt at elucidating the ecology of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains. These are non-typical sulfate-reducing environmental settings, given the generally low sulfate concentration that characterize freshwater habitats, and river flow regulation tha

  8. Method and container for reducing pertechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of reducing the pertechnetate in TcO4- comprises mixing together an aqueous solution of pertechnetate, e.g. the eluant from a technetium generator, metallic tin or an alloy thereof as a reducing agent for the pertechnetate, and a soluble salt of a metal below tin in the electrochemical series, e.g. copper, as an activator for the tin metal reducing agent. A complexing agent for the reduced technetium or a colloid stabiliser may also be included. The pH is preferably 3 to 12. Also claimed is a closed container containing the tin reducing agent, the activator, and the complexant or colloid stabiliser if used, preferably in a freeze-dried sterile state, to which the pertechnetate solution may be added. (author)

  9. Multiclass Reduced-Set Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Benyang; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2006-01-01

    There are well-established methods for reducing the number of support vectors in a trained binary support vector machine, often with minimal impact on accuracy. We show how reduced-set methods can be applied to multiclass SVMs made up of several binary SVMs, with significantly better results than reducing each binary SVM independently. Our approach is based on Burges' approach that constructs each reduced-set vector as the pre-image of a vector in kernel space, but we extend this by recomputing the SVM weights and bias optimally using the original SVM objective function. This leads to greater accuracy for a binary reduced-set SVM, and also allows vectors to be 'shared' between multiple binary SVMs for greater multiclass accuracy with fewer reduced-set vectors. We also propose computing pre-images using differential evolution, which we have found to be more robust than gradient descent alone. We show experimental results on a variety of problems and find that this new approach is consistently better than previous multiclass reduced-set methods, sometimes with a dramatic difference.

  10. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  11. Novel Reduced Parts Online Uninterruptible Power Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Ashrafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents design consideration and performance analysis of novel reduced parts online three-phase uninterruptible power supply (UPS system. The proposed UPS system is based on reduced switch count dual bridge matrix converter. It employs only six power switches and results in reducing the cost of the system compared to conventional online UPS topologies, while achieving excellent performance. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated through simulation in terms of input/output waveforms quality and shows the viability of topology.

  12. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25585767

  13. Reducing nitrogen oxides from power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains 17 individual lectures of the seminar included in databanks. The lectures concern combustion and waste gas measures for reducing the sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emission from coal-fired and gas-fired power stations. (PW)

  14. Spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itinteang, Tinte; Lambe, Gerald Francis; MacKinnon, Craig; Agir, Hakan

    2012-07-01

    We report a case of a spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof blow-in fracture with resolution of associated diplopia and blepharoptosis highlighting the need for a low threshold for reimaging this cohort of facial fracture patients. PMID:22801127

  15. 76 FR 6123 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Reducing Regulatory Burden AGENCY: Office of the General Counsel, Department of Energy. ACTION: Request for... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and..., the President issued Executive Order 13563, ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' to...

  16. Electronic states in systems of reduced dimensionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly discusses the following research: magnetically modulated systems, inelastic magnetotunneling, ballistic transport review, screening in reduced dimensions, raman and electron energy loss spectroscopy; and ballistic quantum interference effects. (LSP)

  17. REDUCING TOXICITY CHEMICALS PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Litvishko, Valery; Myaskovskaya, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The samples of microencapsulated pesticide have been investigated in acute experiments on laboratory animals. The results of the research have determined that microencapsulation can reduce toxicity of plant protection chemicals.

  18. Vaccine Reduces HPV Infections in Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    An international randomized clinical trial has shown that the vaccine Gardasil can reduce the incidence of anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young men 16 to 26 years of age at the time of vaccination.

  19. Goal directed fluid therapy reduces major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Y. Kassim

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: A restrictive strategy of fluid maintenance during optimization of oxygen delivery with early treatment directed to maintain oxygen extraction ratio estimate (O2ERe at <27% reduces major complications and hospital stay of surgical patients undergo abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  20. Cogeneration, renewables and reducing greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MENSA model is used to assess the potential role of cogeneration and selected new renewable energy technologies in cost-effectively reducing Greenhouse gas emissions. The model framework for analyzing these issues is introduced, together with an account of relevant aspects of its application. In the discussion of selected new renewable energy technologies, it is shown how microeconomic reform may encourage these technologies and fuels, and thereby reduce sector wide carbon dioxide emissions. Policy scenarios modelled are described and the simulation results are presented. Certain interventions in microeconomic reform may result in economic benefits while also reducing emissions: no regrets' opportunities. Some renewable energy technologies are also shown to be cost-effective in the event that targets and timetables for reducing Greenhouse gas emissions are imposed. However, ad hoc interventions in support of particular renewables options are unlikely to be consistent with a least cost approach to achieving environmental objectives. (author). 5 tabs., 5 figs., 21 refs

  1. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K.; Biedermann, Sarah V.; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198

  2. Do conditional benefits reduce equilibrium unemployment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van der Ploeg

    2006-01-01

    Although unconditional unemployment benefits destroy jobs in competitive and noncompetitive labor markets, conditional benefits can spur job growth in noncompetitive labor markets. Unconditional benefits reduce the penalty of shirking and misconduct, while conditional benefits increase this penalty.

  3. How Stress Can Reduce Dissipation in Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jiansheng; Yu, Clare C.

    2011-01-01

    We propose that stress can decrease the internal friction of amorphous solids, either by increasing the potential barriers of defects, thus reducing their tunneling and thermal activation that produce loss, or by decreasing the coupling between defects and phonons. This stress can be from impurities, atomic bonding constraints, or externally applied stress. Externally applied stress also reduces mechanical loss through dissipation dilution. Our results are consistent with the experiments, and...

  4. Programming MapReduce with Scalding

    CERN Document Server

    Chalkiopoulos, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-understand, practical guide to designing, testing, and implementing complex MapReduce applications in Scala using the Scalding framework. It is packed with examples featuring log-processing, ad-targeting, and machine learning. This book is for developers who are willing to discover how to effectively develop MapReduce applications. Prior knowledge of Hadoop or Scala is not required; however, investing some time on those topics would certainly be beneficial.

  5. Evaluating Active Interventions to Reduce Student Procrastination

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Joshua Deckert

    2015-01-01

    Procrastination is a pervasive problem in education. In computer science, procrastination and lack of necessary time management skills to complete programming projects are viewed as primary causes of student attrition. The most effective techniques known to reduce procrastination are resource-intensive and do not scale well to large classrooms. In this thesis, we examine three course interventions designed to both reduce procrastination and be scalable for large classrooms. Reflective writ...

  6. Laser welding in a reduced gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results on the effects of reduced gravity on laser welding of stainless steel and other materials are reported. Laser welding experiments using a low power (10-18 watts) Nd-YAG laser have been performed on the NASA KC-135, which flies parabolic maneuvers to simulate reduced gravity conditions. Experiments on 0.005-0.010 inch thick stainless steel samples displayed a pronounced change in weld bead width, depth of penetration and surface ripple with changes in gravity level.

  7. Reducing stereotype threat by blurring intergroup boundaries.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, H. E. S.; Crisp, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors aimed to establish whether interventions designed to reduce intergroup bias could be applied to the stereotype threat domain. In three experiments, the hypothesis was tested that blurring intergroup boundaries would reduce stereotype threat. In the first study, it was found that female participants who thought about characteristics shared between the genders tended to show less preference for stereotypical female careers than did participants in the baseline condition. In. Experim...

  8. Reduced span spray – Part 1: Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Massinon, Mathieu; De Cock, Nicolas; Ouled Taleb Salah, Sofiene; Lebeau, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Maximising treatment efficiency for a given target lies mainly on depositing a maximum part of the spray volume within an optimal droplet size range, which has to be as narrow as possible to reduce retention variability and drift issues. The present work focuses on exploring the effect of span factor of the droplet size distribution on the final retention by a 3D target plant using a modelling approach with the final aim of guiding the development of a reduced span nozzle (Redu...

  9. Acetate reduces microglia inflammatory signaling in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Mahmoud L; Puig, Kendra L.; Combs, Colin K.; Rosenberger, Thad A.

    2012-01-01

    Acetate supplementation increases brain acetyl-CoA and histone acetylation and reduces lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroglial activation and interleukin (IL)-1β expression in vivo. To determine how acetate imparts these properties, we tested the hypothesis that acetate metabolism reduces inflammatory signaling in microglia. To test this, we measured the effect acetate treatment had on cytokine expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, histone H3 at lysine 9 acetylati...

  10. Reduced form of a Mueller matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Jose J.; Jose, Ignacio San

    2015-01-01

    Through a simple procedure based on the Lu-Chipman decomposition [S-Y. Lu and R. C. Chipman, J. Opt. Soc. Am A 13, 1106 (1996)] any depolarizing Mueller matrix can be transformed into a reduced form which accumulates the depolarization and polarizance properties into a set of six parameters. The simple structure of this reduced form provides straightforward ways for the general characterization of Mueller matrices as well as for the analysis of singular Mueller matrices.

  11. Reduced form of a Mueller matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, Jose J

    2015-01-01

    Through a simple procedure based on the Lu-Chipman decomposition [S-Y. Lu and R. C. Chipman, J. Opt. Soc. Am A 13, 1106 (1996)] any depolarizing Mueller matrix can be transformed into a reduced form which accumulates the depolarization and polarizance properties into a set of seven parameters. The simple structure of this reduced form provides straightforward ways for the general characterization of Mueller matrices as well as for the analysis of singular Mueller matrices.

  12. Boiler burden reduced at Bedford site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Chris

    2011-10-01

    With the NHS aiming to reduce its 2007 carbon footprint by 10% by 2015, Chris Horsley, managing director of Babcock Wanson UK, a provider of industrial boilers and burners, thermal oxidisers, air treatment, water treatment, and associated services, looks at how one NHS Trust has approached the challenge, and considerably reduced its carbon emissions, by refurbishing its boiler house and moving from oil to gas-fired steam generation. PMID:22049674

  13. A Reducing Resistance to Change Model

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Braduţanu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this scientific paper is to present an original reducing resistance to change model. After analyzing the existent literature, I have concluded that the resistance to change subject has gained popularity over the years, but there are not too many models that could help managers implement more smoothly an organizational change process and at the same time, reduce effectively employees’ resistance. The proposed model is very helpful for managers and change agents who are c...

  14. Multiple polylogarithms and linearly reducible Feynman graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Bogner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We review an approach for the computation of Feynman integrals by use of multiple polylogarithms, with an emphasis on the related criterion of linear reducibility of the graph. We show that the set of graphs which satisfies the linear reducibility with respect to both Symanzik polynomials is closed under taking minors. As a step towards a classification of Feynman integrals, we discuss the concept of critical minors and exhibit an example at three loops with four on-shell legs.

  15. Reduced sulfur compound oxidation by Thiobacillus caldus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallberg, K. B.; Dopson, M; Lindström, E B

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds was studied by using resting cells of the moderate thermophile Thiobacillus caldus strain KU. The oxygen consumption rate and total oxygen consumed were determined for the reduced sulfur compounds thiosulfate, tetrathionate, sulfur, sulfide, and sulfite in the absence and in the presence of inhibitors and uncouplers. The uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone had no affect on the oxidation of thiosulfate, ...

  16. IHadoop: Asynchronous iterations for MapReduce

    KAUST Repository

    Elnikety, Eslam Mohamed Ibrahim

    2011-11-01

    MapReduce is a distributed programming frame-work designed to ease the development of scalable data-intensive applications for large clusters of commodity machines. Most machine learning and data mining applications involve iterative computations over large datasets, such as the Web hyperlink structures and social network graphs. Yet, the MapReduce model does not efficiently support this important class of applications. The architecture of MapReduce, most critically its dataflow techniques and task scheduling, is completely unaware of the nature of iterative applications; tasks are scheduled according to a policy that optimizes the execution for a single iteration which wastes bandwidth, I/O, and CPU cycles when compared with an optimal execution for a consecutive set of iterations. This work presents iHadoop, a modified MapReduce model, and an associated implementation, optimized for iterative computations. The iHadoop model schedules iterations asynchronously. It connects the output of one iteration to the next, allowing both to process their data concurrently. iHadoop\\'s task scheduler exploits inter-iteration data locality by scheduling tasks that exhibit a producer/consumer relation on the same physical machine allowing a fast local data transfer. For those iterative applications that require satisfying certain criteria before termination, iHadoop runs the check concurrently during the execution of the subsequent iteration to further reduce the application\\'s latency. This paper also describes our implementation of the iHadoop model, and evaluates its performance against Hadoop, the widely used open source implementation of MapReduce. Experiments using different data analysis applications over real-world and synthetic datasets show that iHadoop performs better than Hadoop for iterative algorithms, reducing execution time of iterative applications by 25% on average. Furthermore, integrating iHadoop with HaLoop, a variant Hadoop implementation that caches

  17. Biplots in Reduced-Rank Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Braak, ter, C.J.F.; Looman, C.W.N.

    1994-01-01

    Regression problems with a number of related response variables are typically analyzed by separate multiple regressions. This paper shows how these regressions can be visualized jointly in a biplot based on reduced-rank regression. Reduced-rank regression combines multiple regression and principal components analysis and can therefore be carried out with standard statistical packages. The proposed biplot highlights the major aspects of the regressions by displaying the least-squares approxima...

  18. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states ''Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction

  19. Contralateral Risk-Reducing Mastectomy: Review of Risk Factors and Risk-Reducing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, N. N.; Barr, L; Ross, G. L.; Evans, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy have increased substantially over the last decade. Surgical oncologists are often in the frontline, dealing with requests for this procedure. This paper reviews the current evidence base regarding contralateral breast cancer, assesses the various risk-reducing strategies, and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy.

  20. Effect of additives in reducing ash sintering and slagging in biomass combustion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang

    2012-07-01

    marble sludge was considered as the main reason to prevent sintering of two biomass ashes. Addition of sewage sludge enhanced contents of inert minerals and reduced melted fraction in two biomass ashes. These inert minerals are (1) directly from the added sludge and (2) formed due to reaction between aluminosilicates in sludge and K containing species in the biomass ashes. Therefore, sintering degrees of the two biomass ashes were reduced upon sewage sludge addition. Clay sludge addition resulted in more severe sintering behaviors of the wood waste ash, as a result of formation of more Si rich melts upon heating. Effects of additives on ash slagging behaviors were further investigated during combustion of wood waste pellets in an industry scale boiler. It was found that the wood waste ash had a high slagging tendency and silicate-alkali chemistry played a dominating role during the ash sintering process. The addition of marble sludge significantly reduced the slag formation during wood waste pellets combustion. This occurred because marble sludge restrained accumulation of melted ash and contributed to formation of high temperature melting potassium/sodium calcium silicates. The sewage sludge addition gave a less pronounced anti-slagging effect on wood waste pellets combustion. The composition of the formed slag was changed from low temperature melting silicates to high temperature melting mineral phases. In addition, the size and sintering degree of the formed slag decreased considerably, improving the operation conditions of the boiler.(Author)

  1. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  2. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  3. Understanding Uranium Behavior in a Reduced Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, N.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Williams, K. H.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Long, P. E.; Davis, J. A.; Fox, P. M.; Yang, L.; Giammar, D.; Cerrato, J. M.; Bargar, J.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwater is a concern at several US Department of Energy sites, such Old Rifle, CO. Uranium transport in the environment is mainly controlled by its oxidation state, since oxidized U(VI) is relatively mobile, whereas U(IV) is relatively insoluble. Bio-remediation of contaminated aquifers aims at immobilizing uranium in a reduced form. Previous laboratory and field studies have shown that adding electron donor (lactate, acetate, ethanol) to groundwater stimulates the activity of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which promotes U(VI) reduction in contaminated aquifers. However, obtaining information on chemical and physical forms of U, Fe and S species for sediments biostimulated in the field, as well as kinetic parameters such as U(VI) reduction rate, is challenging due to the low concentration of uranium in the aquifers (typically bio-remediation experiment at the Old Rifle site, CO, from early iron-reducing conditions to the transition to sulfate-reducing conditions. Several in-well chromatographic columns packed with sediment were deployed and were sampled at different days after the start of bio-reduction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microscopy were used to obtain information on Fe, S and U speciation and distribution. Chemical extractions of the reduced sediments have also been performed, to determine the rate of Fe(II) and U(IV) accumulation.

  4. Bioremediation: Effectiveness in reducing the ecological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation becomes an important technique in oil spill combat programmes. The purpose is to shorten the exposure time of biota to oil compounds, in order to reduce long term environmental effects. Although bioremediation products have the advantage of stimulating the natural capacity to degrade oil, there are some limitations to be considered. Application as a technique for first emergency actions following an oil spill is not effective, and can therefore be no alternative for dispersion or mechanical removal of floating or freshly stranded oil slicks. Acute toxic effects are related to the short term exposure to unweathered oils. An immediate removal of oil is necessary to reduce the extent of the environmental impact of an oil spill. Physical processes (transport, dilution and evaporation) are determining the initial fate of environmentally released oil. Biodegradation only becomes important as a process of removing oil in the next phase. It is the only effective way to further reduce the concentration of oil that is left in (intertidal) coastal areas. Bioremediation thus reduces the duration of the environmental impact of an oil spill. This is especially important in ecosystems with a low recovery potential (e.g., salt marshes, rocky shores). The experimental evaluation of bioremediation products is mainly based on the capacity to reduce fresh oil and the acute toxicity of the product itself, rather than on the capacity to enhance the further reduction of weathered oil and the toxicological consequences of higher release rates of intermediate metabolites produced during the biotransformation processes

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizas reduce nitrogen loss via leaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Asghari

    Full Text Available The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO₃⁻ and ammonium (NH₄⁺ loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone.

  6. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Carilli

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  7. Reducing the convective losses of cavity receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Robert; Grobbel, Johannes; Stadler, Hannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Convective losses reduce the efficiency of cavity receivers used in solar power towers especially under windy conditions. Therefore, measures should be taken to reduce these losses. In this paper two different measures are analyzed: an air curtain and a partial window which covers one third of the aperture opening. The cavity without modifications and the usage of a partial window were analyzed in a cryogenic wind tunnel at -173°C. The cryogenic environment allows transforming the results from the small model cavity to a large scale receiver with Gr≈3.9.1010. The cavity with the two modifications in the wind tunnel environment was analyzed with a CFD model as well. By comparing the numerical and experimental results the model was validated. Both modifications are capable of reducing the convection losses. In the best case a reduction of about 50 % was achieved.

  8. Moral elevation reduces prejudice against gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Calvin K; Haidt, Jonathan; Nosek, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is linked to social evaluation. People with higher disgust sensitivity exhibit more sexual prejudice, and inducing disgust increases sexual prejudice. We tested whether inducing moral elevation, the theoretical opposite of disgust, would reduce sexual prejudice. In four studies (N = 3622), we induced elevation with inspiring videos and then measured sexual prejudice with implicit and explicit measures. Compared to control videos that elicited no particular affective state, we found that elevation reduced implicit and explicit sexual prejudice, albeit very slightly. No effect was observed when the target of social evaluation was changed to race (Black-White). Inducing amusement, another positive emotion, did not significantly affect sexual prejudice. We conclude that elevation weakly but reliably reduces prejudice towards gay men. PMID:24320065

  9. Outcomes of a program to reduce depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyung Hee; Kim, Kyeha; Park, Hyojung

    2011-06-01

    Depression is increasing among Korean college students. Moreover, it is common for depressed individuals to consider attempting suicide. The purpose of this study therefore was to develop and examine the effectiveness of an intervention to reduce suicidal ideation and depression among female college students. Study participants were assigned to either an intervention (n = 27) or control (n = 31) group. The intervention group received a depression-reducing program in eight 1-hr weekly sessions. Measures of suicidal ideation and depression were administered. The program has effects on suicidal ideation and depression among female college students. The findings suggest that the study program may be useful in reducing suicidal ideation and depression among female college students. PMID:21078916

  10. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  11. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  12. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Ido

    2016-01-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of $5$. A general, fluid-model based, analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations.

  13. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P <.001) in both knee extension and flexion at all angular velocities. The reduction in muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension and...

  14. Does Formal Employment Reduce Informal Caregiving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daifeng; McHenry, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine the impact of formal employment on informal caregiving. We instrument for individual work hours with state unemployment rates. We find that, among women of prime caregiving ages (40-64 years), working 10% more hours per week reduces the probability of providing informal care by about 2 percentage points. The effects are stronger for more time-intensive caregiving and if care recipients are household members. Our results imply that work-promoting policies have the unintended consequence of reducing informal caregiving in an aging society. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26017375

  15. Comments on the height reducing property

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    A complex number alpha is said to satisfy the height reducing property if there is a finite subset F of the ring Z of the rational integers such that Z[alpha]=F[alpha]. This problem of finding F has been considered by several authors, especially in contexts related to self affine tilings, and expansions of real numbers in non-integer bases. We continue, in this note, the description of the numbers satisfying the height reducing property, and we specify a related characterization of the roots of integer polynomials with dominant term.

  16. Formal derivation of distributed MapReduce

    OpenAIRE

    Pereverzeva, Inna; Butler, Michael; Salehi Fathabadi, Asieh; Laibinis, Linas; Troubitsyna, Elena

    2014-01-01

    MapReduce is a powerful distributed data processing model that is currently adopted in a wide range of domains to efficiently handle large volumes of data, i.e., cope with the big data surge. In this paper, we propose an approach to formal derivation of the MapReduce framework. Our approach relies on stepwise refinement in Event-B and, in particu- lar, the event refinement structure approach – a diagrammatic notation facilitating formal development. Our approach allows us to derive the system...

  17. Reducing Transmitted Vibration Using Delayed Hysteretic Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahcen Mokni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous numerical and experimental works show that time delay technique is efficient to reduce transmissibility of vibration in a single pneumatic chamber by controlling the pressure in the chamber. The present work develops an analytical study to demonstrate the effectiveness of such a technique in reducing transmitted vibrations. A quarter-car model is considered and delayed hysteretic suspension is introduced in the system. Analytical predictions based on perturbation analysis show that a delayed hysteretic suspension enhances vibration isolation comparing to the case where the nonlinear damping is delay-independent.

  18. Reduced Multiplicative Tolerance Ranking and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Sitarz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a reduced multiplicative tolerance - a measure of sensitivity analysis in multi-objective linear programming (MOLP is presented. By using this new measure a method for ranking the set of efficient extreme solutions is proposed. The idea is to rank these solutions by values of the reduced tolerance. This approach can be applied to many MOLP problems, where sensitivity analysis is important for a decision maker. In the paper, applications of the presented methodology are shown in the market model and the transportation problem.

  19. Legislation analysis on reducing GHG in Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiqi Mao; Li Chen

    2014-01-01

    ‘Greenhouse Effect’ derived from human activities has caused many concerns. This dissertation mainly analysis existing GHG reduction regulations in Australia, the relationship between those regulations, and the effectiveness of the regulatory framework to see whether the CPR Scheme and other complementary strategies can effectively improve the regulatory outcomes, namely reduces GHG emissions.

  20. Scientist Researches Way to Reduce Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the last four years, scientists at the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Northern Plains Agricultural Research Laboratory have been searching for alternative soil and crop management practices to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon and nitrogen sequestration. “If we can redu...

  1. Reducing Abstraction When Learning Graph Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzan, Orit; Hadar, Irit

    2005-01-01

    This article presents research on students' understanding of basic concepts in Graph Theory. Students' understanding is analyzed through the lens of the theoretical framework of reducing abstraction (Hazzan, 1999). As it turns out, in spite of the relative simplicity of the concepts that are introduced in the introductory part of a traditional…

  2. Reducing methane emissions from ruminant animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathison, G.W.; Okine, E.K.; McAllister, T.A.; Dong, Y.; Galbraith, J.; Dmytruk, O.I.N. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Science

    1998-09-01

    In 1992 it was estimated that 30 x 10{sup 12}g more methane was emitted into the atmosphere than was removed, with animals being considered the largest single anthropogenic source. Ruminants produce 97% of the methane generated in enteric fermentation by animals. Estimates for methane emissions from animal wastes vary between 6 and 31% of that produced directly by the animal, with the most likely value being between 5 and 10% globally. Methane inhibitors can reduce methane emissions to zero in the short term but due to microbial adaptation the effects of these compounds are quickly neutralized and feed intake is often depressed. Methane emissions per unit of feed consumed from sheep and cattle fed hay diets appear to be quite similar but differences between other ruminants have been measured. The most practical way of influencing methane emissions per unit product is to increase productivity level since the proportion of feed energy required to just maintain the animal will be reduced, methane production falls with increased intake level, and the animal may go to market sooner. The most promising avenues for future research for reducing methanogenesis are the development of new products for reducing protozoal numbers in the rumen and the use of bacterocins or other compounds which specifically target methanogenic bacteria.

  3. Engaging to reduce emissions and solidarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different negotiations about the reduction of greenhouse gases emissions is studied in this article. The problem of developing countries or fast developing countries such asian countries is evoked. The rate of carbon dioxide emission could be calculated in function of GDP (gross domestic product) to allow to reduce the gaps between the different countries. (N.C.)

  4. QUIESST Guidebook to Noise Reducing Devices optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clairbois, J.P.; Roo, F. de; Garai, M.; Conter, M.; Defrance, J.; Oltean-Dumbrava, C.A.; Durso, C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this guidebook is to become a reference tool for noise mitigation through a better use of Noise Reducing Devices (NRD) (e.g.: Noise Barriers or sound Absorptive Claddings). It targets all the stakeholders involved in NRD projects (designers, manufacturers, authorities, construction compan

  5. Reduced-dimension clustering for vegetation segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steward, B.L.; Tian, L.F.; Nettleton, D.; Tang, L.

    2004-01-01

    Segmentation of vegetation is a critical step in using machine vision for field automation tasks. A new method called reduced-dimensionclustering (RDC) was developed based on theoretical considerations about the color distribution of field images. RDC performed unsupervised classification of pixels

  6. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...

  7. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.; Glasser, Fred P.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations and...

  8. Sodium Valproate Withdrawal Correlates with Reduced Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Duncan; Hoerger, Marguerite; Dyer, Tim; Graham, Nicola; Penney, Heather; Mace, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are sometimes prescribed psychotropic medication to help manage their challenging behaviour. This case study describes how a multicomponent behavioural intervention in conjunction with the systematic withdrawal of sodium valproate was strongly correlated with reduced aggression. No symptoms of bipolar disorder or…

  9. Sexual Harassment at Camp: Reducing Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakleaf, Linda; Grube, Angela Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Employers are responsible for sexual harassment perpetrated by a supervisor. Camps may be responsible for sexual harassment between campers. Steps to reduce liability include providing multiple channels for reporting sexual harassment; having written policies prohibiting sexual harassment and procedures for reporting it; posting these policies and…

  10. Ways to reduce contamination of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium is one of the most important radionuclides released into the environment. Possibilities of study of reducing the content of radionuclides directly in food have been analysed less. However, a significant reduction of content such as radiocesium we can achieve by leaching, marinating, steeping and cooking to allow in selected foods reach acceptable values. Observation was mainly focused on the mushrooms and meat. (author)

  11. 77 FR 31548 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 5 CFR Chapter XXII 10 CFR Chapters II, III, X Reducing Regulatory Burden AGENCY: Office... Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' is extended to June 19, 2012. DATES: DOE will accept comments, data, and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and...

  12. 77 FR 28518 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 5 CFR Chapter XXII 10 CFR Chapters II, III, X Reducing Regulatory Burden AGENCY: Office... its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' issued by... INFORMATION CONTACT: Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and...

  13. 77 FR 47328 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 5 CFR Chapter XXII 10 CFR Chapters II, III, X Reducing Regulatory Burden AGENCY: Office... its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' issued by... . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel for Legislation,...

  14. 76 FR 75798 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 5 CFR Chapter XXIII 10 CFR Chapters II, III, X Reducing Regulatory Burden AGENCY: Office... its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' issued by... General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency, U.S. Department of Energy, Office...

  15. Device and Method for Reducing Aircraft Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Lin, John C. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A noise abatement device that is positioned adjacent to a body. The noise abatement device generally includes tabs or cavities which thicken the shear layer created by fluid flow over, around, or near the body, by creating horseshoe-shaped vortices; this thickening of the shear layer reduces the strength of fluctuations in the flow which produce noise.

  16. On reduced density matrices for disjoint subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglói, F.; Peschel, I.

    2010-02-01

    We show that spin and fermion representations for solvable quantum chains lead in general to different reduced density matrices if the subsystem is not singly connected. We study the effect for two sites in XX and XY chains as well as for sublattices in XX and transverse Ising chains.

  17. Reducing Dogmatism among Undergraduate Counselor Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkay, Forrest W.

    Previous research has emphasized the significant negative correlation between counselor effectiveness and dogmatism, or closemindedness. To reduce levels of dogmatism in counselor trainees, a program was developed and tested at Southwest Texas State University. The new course, "Guidance to Meet the Needs of Multicultural Students," gave counseling…

  18. Reducing Mathematics Anxiety with Computer Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Albert L.; Harris, Jacqueline M.

    1987-01-01

    Student, teacher, and teaching causes of mathematics anxiety are discussed. Computer-assisted instruction can reduce mathematics anxieties due to lack of confidence, negative attitudes, teacher bias, authoritarian teaching, lack of variety, lack of relationship with the real world, emphasis on memorization or on speed, or computer phobia. (MNS)

  19. Vitamin D with Calcium Reduces Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir;

    2012-01-01

    ,528 randomized participants (86.8% females) with a median age of 70 (interquartile range, 62-77) yr. Vitamin D with or without calcium reduced mortality by 7% [hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-0.99]. However, vitamin D alone did not affect mortality, but risk of death was reduced if vitamin...... D was given with calcium (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.98). The number needed to treat with vitamin D plus calcium for 3 yr to prevent one death was 151. Trial level meta-analysis (24 trials with 88,097 participants) showed similar results, i.e. mortality was reduced with vitamin D plus...... calcium (odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-0.99), but not with vitamin D alone (odds ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.91-1.06).Conclusion:Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality in the elderly, whereas available data do not support an effect of vitamin D alone....

  20. Reducing Alcohol Consumption through Television Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, James G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed impact of television commercial based on controlled-drinking principles. Measures were taken 12 months prior to start of campaign and 3 weeks after campaign from regular drinkers of general public whose drinking behavior was known to be unaffected by previous antidrug advertising campaign. Found that advertisement reduced intake provided…

  1. Involutions and Representations for Reduced Quantum Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Gutt, Simone

    2009-01-01

    In the context of deformation quantization, there exist various procedures to deal with the quantization of a reduced space M_red. We shall be concerned here mainly with the classical Marsden-Weinstein reduction, assuming that we have a proper action of a Lie group G on a Poisson manifold M, with a moment map J for which zero is a regular value. For the quantization, we follow [BHW] (with a simplified approach) and build a star product *_red on M_red from a strongly invariant star product * on M. The new questions which are addressed in this paper concern the existence of natural *-involutions on the reduced quantum algebra and the representation theory for such a reduced *-algebra. We assume that * is Hermitian and we show that the choice of a formal series of smooth densities on the embedded coisotropic submanifold C = J^{-1}(0), with some equivariance property, defines a *-involution for *_red on the reduced space. Looking into the question whether the corresponding *-involution is the complex conjugation ...

  2. Strategies for Reducing Text Book Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the price of college textbooks has become a growing concern for students and others who care about keeping college costs affordable. As policymakers and higher education systems explore the issue further, there are actions that can be taken immediately on college campuses to reduce the cost of textbooks. This brief presents…

  3. Reduced Voltage Scaling in Clock Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel circuit technique to generate a reduced voltage swing (RVS signals for active power reduction on main buses and clocks. This is achieved without performance degradation, without extra power supply requirement, and with minimum area overhead. The technique stops the discharge path on the net that is swinging low at a certain voltage value. It reduces active power on the target net by as much as 33% compared to traditional full swing signaling. The logic 0 voltage value is programmable through control bits. If desired, the reduced-swing mode can also be disabled. The approach assumes that the logic 0 voltage value is always less than the threshold voltage of the nMOS receivers, which eliminate the need of the low to high voltage translation. The reduced noise margin and the increased leakage on the receiver transistors using this approach have been addressed through the selective usage of multithreshold voltage (MTV devices and the programmability of the low voltage value.

  4. Reducing Cholesterol Intake: Are the recommendations valid?

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Joanna K.; McDonald, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors question dietary recommendations for the general public calling for reduced cholesterol intake. Metabolic studies have shown that dietary cholesterol normally induces only small increases in blood cholesterol level. There is evidence that only a portion of the population responds to a change in cholesterol intake; hence lowering dietary cholesterol will be effective for only some.

  5. Reducing Research Anxiety among MSW Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einbinder, Susan Dana

    2014-01-01

    Research anxiety significantly declined in a diverse sample of 59 MSW students in their first-year hybrid online research course in which the instructor used an array of innovative educational techniques empirically proven to reduce this phenomenon. The pretest/posttest study, the standardized survey instruments used, and a summary of these…

  6. Reduced Component Count RGB LED Driver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Pedro, I.; Ackermann, B.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this master thesis is to develop new drive and contrololutions, for creating white light from mixing the light of different-color LEDs, aiming at a reduced component count resulting in less space required by the electronics and lower cost. It evaluates the LED driver concept proposed in

  7. Reduced local energy surface profiles for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional molecular reduced local energy error surface profiles are reported. The calculations are carried out for the hydrogen molecule using the Hartree-Fock wavefunctions of Coulson, Goodisman and Kolos and Roothaan. These surfaces provide both a complete and a simple way to interpret local errors in these wavefunctions. (author)

  8. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  9. A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus (FPA) was constructed in order to study the effects of gravity on glass fiber formation. The apparatus was specifically designed and built for use on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. To date, four flights have been completed during which E-glass fiber was successfully produced in simulated lunar gravity.

  10. Reducing the Risk of Methadone Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-03

    This podcast is based on the July 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Approximately 14 people die every day of overdoses related to methadone. Listen to learn how to reduce your risk of an overdose.  Created: 7/3/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/3/2012.

  11. Reduced alphabet for protein folding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jitao T; Wang, Titi; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2015-04-01

    What are the key building blocks that would have been needed to construct complex protein folds? This is an important issue for understanding protein folding mechanism and guiding de novo protein design. Twenty naturally occurring amino acids and eight secondary structures consist of a 28-letter alphabet to determine folding kinetics and mechanism. Here we predict folding kinetic rates of proteins from many reduced alphabets. We find that a reduced alphabet of 10 letters achieves good correlation with folding rates, close to the one achieved by full 28-letter alphabet. Many other reduced alphabets are not significantly correlated to folding rates. The finding suggests that not all amino acids and secondary structures are equally important for protein folding. The foldable sequence of a protein could be designed using at least 10 folding units, which can either promote or inhibit protein folding. Reducing alphabet cardinality without losing key folding kinetic information opens the door to potentially faster machine learning and data mining applications in protein structure prediction, sequence alignment and protein design. PMID:25641420

  12. Identifying and reducing constraints to potato productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato yield in Maine has remained relatively constant for over 50 years, despite increased inputs of pesticides, nutrients, and water. Research is needed to identify and reduce the constraints to potato productivity. We evaluated Status Quo, Soil Conserving, Soil Improving, and Disease Suppressive ...

  13. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  14. Reducing Depression in Pregnancy: Designing Multimodel Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Maddy; Zayas, Luis H.

    2002-01-01

    High levels of stress on low-income, inner-city women from ethnic minority groups often causes both poor maternal functioning and infant development outcomes. This article reviews literature that proposes using several social work treatment options instead a single approach to reduce maternal depression, expand mothers' social networks, and…

  15. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone…

  16. Reducing the diameters of computer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

  17. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  18. Finding Strategic Solutions to Reduce Truancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on recent developments to find strategic solutions to the problem of truancy. It considers issues related to defining truancy and why reducing truancy matters before considering what causes truancy. The article concentrates upon seven areas where further work is needed: the role of parents (and carers); early intervention,…

  19. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  20. Penerapan Reduced Impact Logging Menggunakan Monocable Winch (Pancang Tarik) (Implementing Reduced Impact Logging with Monocable Winch)

    OpenAIRE

    Yosep Ruslim

    2012-01-01

    Forest harvesting still encounters many problems especially concerning impact to the residual stand  and environmental damage. Implementing the reduced impact monocable winch and planning of good skid trails should have a positive impact on work efficiency as well as, reducing damage to the residual stand and soil during felling and skidding activities. Reduced impact logging (RIL) with a monocable winch (Pancang Tarik) system has been tried in several IUPHHKs and it can be concluded that RIL...

  1. Human Performance in Simulated Reduced Gravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently designing a new space suit capable of working in deep space and on Mars. Designing a suit is very difficult and often requires trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. Our current understanding of human performance in reduced gravity in a planetary environment (the moon or Mars) is limited to lunar observations, studies from the Apollo program, and recent suit tests conducted at JSC using reduced gravity simulators. This study will look at our most recent reduced gravity simulations performed on the new Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) compared to the C-9 reduced gravity plane. Methods: Subjects ambulated in reduced gravity analogs to obtain a baseline for human performance. Subjects were tested in lunar gravity (1.6 m/sq s) and Earth gravity (9.8 m/sq s) in shirt-sleeves. Subjects ambulated over ground at prescribed speeds on the ARGOS, but ambulated at a self-selected speed on the C-9 due to time limitations. Subjects on the ARGOS were given over 3 minutes to acclimate to the different conditions before data was collected. Nine healthy subjects were tested in the ARGOS (6 males, 3 females, 79.5 +/- 15.7 kg), while six subjects were tested on the C-9 (6 males, 78.8 +/- 11.2 kg). Data was collected with an optical motion capture system (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and was analyzed using customized analysis scripts in BodyBuilder (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). Results: In all offloaded conditions, variation between subjects increased compared to 1-g. Kinematics in the ARGOS at lunar gravity resembled earth gravity ambulation more closely than the C-9 ambulation. Toe-off occurred 10% earlier in both reduced gravity environments compared to earth gravity, shortening the stance phase. Likewise, ankle, knee, and hip angles remained consistently flexed and had reduced peaks compared to earth gravity. Ground reaction forces in lunar gravity (normalized to Earth body weight) were 0.4 +/- 0.2 on

  2. Reducing Tariffs According to WTO Accession Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Henrik Barslund; Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis

    2012-01-01

    When Vietnam joined the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2007 it was granted an accession period up to 2014. During this period tariffs would have to fall according to the accession agreement. This paper evaluates this 2007–2014 trade liberalization by building an applied general equilibrium model...... and calibrating it to the Vietnamese data. The model pays careful attention to the fact that Vietnam has many state-owned enterprises. The model simulations show that the WTO tariff reductions will reduce overall welfare. Moreover, the biggest loss will take place among the poor rural households in...... Vietnam. This paper proposes other tariff reforms that will both raise overall welfare and reduce income inequality....

  3. Reducing CQI Signalling Overhead in HSPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied M. Abd El-atty

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of adaptive modulation and coding (AMC procedure in high speed Downlink packet access (HSDPA depends on the frequency of the channel quality information (CQI reports transmitted by the UE to Node B. The more frequent the reports are the more accurate the link adaptation procedure is. On the other hand, the frequent CQI reports increase uplink interference, reducing thus the signal reception quality at the uplink. In this study, we propose an improved CQI reporting scheme which aims to reduce the required CQI signaling by exploiting a CQI prediction method based on a finite-state Markov chain (FSMC model of the wireless channel. The simulation results show that under a high downlink traffic load, the proposed scheme has a near-to-optimum performance while produces less interference compared to the respective periodic CQI scheme.

  4. Behavioral Simulations in MapReduce

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guozhang; Sowell, Benjamin; Wang, Xun; Cao, Tuan; Demers, Alan; Gehrke, Johannes; White, Walker

    2010-01-01

    In many scientific domains, researchers are turning to large-scale behavioral simulations to better understand important real-world phenomena. While there has been a great deal of work on simulation tools from the high-performance computing community, behavioral simulations remain challenging to program and automatically scale in parallel environments. In this paper we present BRACE (Big Red Agent-based Computation Engine), which extends the MapReduce framework to process these simulations efficiently across a cluster. We can leverage spatial locality to treat behavioral simulations as iterated spatial joins and greatly reduce the communication between nodes. In our experiments we achieve nearly linear scale-up on several realistic simulations. Though processing behavioral simulations in parallel as iterated spatial joins can be very efficient, it can be much simpler for the domain scientists to program the behavior of a single agent. Furthermore, many simulations include a considerable amount of complex comp...

  5. Continuous flash suppression reduces negative afterimages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Koch, Christof

    2005-08-01

    Illusions that produce perceptual suppression despite constant retinal input are used to manipulate visual consciousness. Here we report on a powerful variant of existing techniques, continuous flash suppression. Distinct images flashed successively at approximately 10 Hz into one eye reliably suppress an image presented to the other eye. The duration of perceptual suppression is at least ten times greater than that produced by binocular rivalry. Using this tool we show that the strength of the negative afterimage of an adaptor was reduced by half when it was perceptually suppressed by input from the other eye. The more completely the adaptor was suppressed, the more strongly the afterimage intensity was reduced. Paradoxically, trial-to-trial visibility of the adaptor did not correlate with the degree of reduction. Our results imply that formation of afterimages involves neuronal structures that access input from both eyes but that do not correspond directly to the neuronal correlates of perceptual awareness. PMID:15995700

  6. Costs of reducing nutrient losses in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Abildtrup, Jens; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård;

    The economic calculations carried out prior to the Plan for the Aquatic Environment III included a comparison of regulation systems aimed at reducing nitrogen leaching, analyses of measures for reducing phosphorus losses and estimation of administrative costs. The conclusions were that taxation of...... the N-surplus introduced at the sector level was the most cost effective regulation when compared with administrative regulation and set a side. For phosphorus a balance between incoming and outgoing phosphorus is very costly as this requires that much slurry is transported from the western to the...... eastern part of Denmark. The final plan for the Aquatic Environment III from 2004 included a 13% reduction of N-leaching until 2015 based on cost effective administrative measures like wetlands and catch crops. Also a tax on mineral phosphorus in feedstuffs was included in order to half the phosphorus...

  7. Designing reduced beacon trajectory for sensor localization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Localization is one of the substantial issues in wireless sensor networks. The key problem for the mobile beacon localization is how to choose the appropriate beacon trajectory. However, little research has been done on it. In this paper, firstly,we deduce the number of positions for a beacon to send a packet according to the acreage of ROI (region of interest); and next we present a novel method based on virtual force to arrange the positions in arbitrary ROI; then we apply TSP (travelling salesman problem) algorithm to the positions sequence to obtain the optimal touring path, i.e. the reduced beacon trajectory. When a mobile beacon moves along the touring path, sending RF signals at every position, the sensors in ROI can work out their position with trilateration. Experimental results demonstrate that the localization method, based on the beacon reduced path, is efficient and has flexible accuracy.

  8. COMPUTER SIMULATION SYSTEM OF STRETCH REDUCING MILL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Y. Sun; S.J. Yuan

    2007-01-01

    The principle of the stretch reducing process is analyzed and three models of pass design areestablished. The simulations are done about variables, such as, stress, strain, the stretches betweenthe stands, the size parameters of the steel tube, and the roll force parameters. According to itsproduct catalogs the system can automatically divide the pass series, formulate the rolling table,and simulate the basic technological parameters in the stretch reducing process. All modules areintegrated based on the developing environment of VB6. The system can draw simulation curvesand pass pictures. Three kinds of database including the material database, pass design database,and product database are devised using Microsoft Access, which can be directly edited, corrected,and searched.

  9. Reducing stillbirths in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Robert L; Saleem, Sarah; Pasha, Omrana; Harrison, Margo S; Mcclure, Elizabeth M

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide, 98% of stillbirths occur in low-income countries (LIC), where stillbirth rates are ten-fold higher than in high-income countries (HIC). Although most HIC stillbirths occur prenatally, in LIC most stillbirths occur at term and during labor/delivery. Conditions causing stillbirths include those of maternal origin (obstructed labor, trauma, antepartum hemorrhage, preeclampsia/eclampsia, infection, diabetes, other maternal diseases), and fetal origin (fetal growth restriction, fetal distress, cord prolapse, multiples, malpresentations, congenital anomalies). In LIC, aside from infectious origins, most stillbirths are caused by fetal asphyxia. Stillbirth prevention requires recognition of maternal conditions, and care in a facility where fetal monitoring and expeditious delivery are possible, usually by cesarean section (CS). Of major causes, only syphilis and malaria can be managed prenatally. Targeting single conditions or interventions is unlikely to substantially reduce stillbirth. To reduce stillbirth rates, LIC must implement effective modern antepartum and intrapartum care, including fetal monitoring and CS. PMID:26577070

  10. Producing Knowledge to Reduce Rhetorical Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    foot, the radio an extension of the ear, the television an extension of the eye. From this perspective, exploring the internet as an extension of identity produces fruitful questions about the role of on-line writing in Web presences. The Web changes writing as a knowledge-making practice by offering......Producing Knowledge to Reduce Rhetorical Distance: Extending Identity and Engaging Mainstream Ideology via the Web Constance Kampf, Department of Research Knowledge Communication, Aarhus School of Business, Denmark McLuhan describes technologies as extensions -the wheel being an extension of the...... writers a larger public forum into which they can extend their identity. When the identity being extended represents a minority group, the web offers an opportunity for members of that group to engage mainstream ideology and work at reducing the rhetorical distance between their identity and mainstream...

  11. Countermeasures for Reducing Alcohol-Related Crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voas, R B

    2000-01-01

    Programs to prevent alcohol-related crashes occur at several levels. Although most of the public thinks of drunk-driving prevention only in terms of the criminal justice system, much can be done to prevent alcohol-related highway deaths before the drinking-and-driving offender gets on the road. In recent years, the field of alcohol safety has merged with the area of public health concerned with preventing alcohol- and drug-related traumatic injury and death. This paper provides an overview of the status of road safety programs directed at reducing impaired driving. It covers ten topics falling into the three levels of prevention: primary programs to reduce alcohol consumption; secondary programs to prevent driving after drinking; and tertiary programs to prevent recidivism among convicted drinking drivers. PMID:26256029

  12. Reduced central blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Bendtsen, Flemming; Sørensen, T I;

    1989-01-01

    was inversely correlated to the systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.49, p less than 0.001), the latter being significantly reduced in the patient group. Patients with cirrhosis apparently are unable to maintain a normal central blood volume. This may be due to arteriolar vasodilation, portosystemic collateral......The pathogenesis of ascites formation in cirrhosis is uncertain. It is still under debate whether the effective blood volume is reduced (underfilling theory) or whether the intravascular compartment is expanded (overflow theory). This problem has not yet been solved because of insufficient tools...... for measuring the central blood volume. We have developed a method that enables us to determine directly the central blood volume, i.e., the blood volume in the heart cavities, lungs, and central arterial tree. In 60 patients with cirrhosis and 16 control subjects the central blood volume was assessed according...

  13. FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called 'greenhouse gases.' Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth's atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide

  14. Reducing NOx emissions with Group IIIB compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes improvement in a process for the catalytic cracking of a heavy hydrocarbon feed containing nitrogen compounds by contact with a circulating inventory of catalytic cracking catalyst to produce catalytically cracked products and spent catalyst containing coke comprising nitrogen compounds. The spent catalyst is regenerated by contact with oxygen or an oxygen-containing gas in a catalyst regeneration zone operating at catalyst regeneration conditions to produce hot regenerated catalyst which is recycled to catalytically crack the heavy feed and the catalyst regeneration zone produces a flue gas comprising CO, CO2 and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). The improvement comprises: reducing the NOx content of the flue gas by adding to the circulating catalyst inventory an additive comprising discrete particles comprising oxides of Group IIIB elements, exclusive of Group III elements which are ion exchanged or impregnated into the cracking catalyst, the additive being added in an amount sufficient to reduce the production of NOx relative to operation without the additive

  15. Direct reducing method for metal ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a high temperature steam electrolysis device using solid electrolyte, a hydrogen gas is generated from steams by using nuclear heat at high temperature from a high temperature gas cooling reactor (HTGR) and electric power generated by the nuclear temperature, to directly reduce metal ores by the hydrogen gas. With such procedures, no CO2 is evolved. Further, steams in a gas mixture of the hydrogen gas and the steams generated from the high temperature steam electrolysis device are adsorbed by a pressure swing type (PSA) steam adsorbing device to be separated from the hydrogen gas. Metal ores are directly reduced by the hydrogen gas separated from steams. With such procedures, since the steams are adsorbed and separated from hydrogen gas in the PSA without condensation, it is possible to reutilize separated steams as a heat source, thereby enabling to improve thermal efficiency. (T.M.)

  16. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUALITY IN REDUCING POVERTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenal Muttaqin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In some developing countries, the instrument to alleviate the poverty is by using the economic growth. So, the increasing in investment, infrastructure development, and macroeconomics stability always be priority from developing countries. In this article explain that economic growth is not the important factor to alleviate the poverty, because equality sometimes is more important rather than the economic growth. In this context, its measure by inequality growth trade off index (IGTI. This method is to measure the influence of economic growth to reducing the inequality, with this method every country can measure which one is better to reducing the poverty whether the economic growth or equality. With this method, Laos in 2000 show that economic growth is more important than equality, but in the same year in Thailand show that equality is more important than economic growth.DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v1i1.2592

  17. Deciding for Others Reduces Loss Aversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Holm, Håkan J.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl;

    2014-01-01

    We study risk taking on behalf of others, both when choices involve losses and when they do not. A large-scale incentivized experiment with subjects randomly drawn from the Danish population is conducted. We find that deciding for others reduces loss aversion. When choosing between risky prospect...... others when losses loom. This finding is consistent with an interpretation of loss aversion as a bias in decision making driven by emotions and that these emotions are reduced when making decisions for others....... for which losses are ruled out by design, subjects make the same choices for themselves as for others. In contrast, when losses are possible, we find that the two types of choices differ. In particular, we find that subjects who make choices for themselves take less risk than those who decide for...

  18. A Reducing Resistance to Change Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Braduţanu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is to present an original reducing resistance to change model. After analyzing the existent literature, I have concluded that the resistance to change subject has gained popularity over the years, but there are not too many models that could help managers implement more smoothly an organizational change process and at the same time, reduce effectively employees’ resistance. The proposed model is very helpful for managers and change agents who are confronted with a high degree of resistance when trying to implement a new change, as well as for researches. The key contribution of this paper is that resistance is not necessarily bad and if used appropriately, it can actually represent an asset. Managers must use employees’ resistance.

  19. Gratitude: a tool for reducing economic impatience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSteno, David; Li, Ye; Dickens, Leah; Lerner, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    The human mind tends to excessively discount the value of delayed rewards relative to immediate ones, and it is thought that "hot" affective processes drive desires for short-term gratification. Supporting this view, recent findings demonstrate that sadness exacerbates financial impatience even when the sadness is unrelated to the economic decision at hand. Such findings might reinforce the view that emotions must always be suppressed to combat impatience. But if emotions serve adaptive functions, then certain emotions might be capable of reducing excessive impatience for delayed rewards. We found evidence supporting this alternative view. Specifically, we found that (a) the emotion gratitude reduces impatience even when real money is at stake, and (b) the effects of gratitude are differentiable from those of the more general positive state of happiness. These findings challenge the view that individuals must tamp down affective responses through effortful self-regulation to reach more patient and adaptive economic decisions. PMID:24760144

  20. Distraction from emotional information reduces biased judgements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lench, Heather C; Bench, Shane W; Davis, Elizabeth L

    2016-06-01

    Biases arising from emotional processes are some of the most robust behavioural effects in the social sciences. The goal of this investigation was to examine the extent to which the emotion regulation strategy of distraction could reduce biases in judgement known to result from emotional information. Study 1 explored lay views regarding whether distraction is an effective strategy to improve decision-making and revealed that participants did not endorse this strategy. Studies 2-5 focused on several established, robust biases that result from emotional information: loss aversion, desirability bias, risk aversion and optimistic bias. Participants were prompted to divert attention away from their feelings while making judgements, and in each study this distraction strategy resulted in reduced bias in judgement relative to control conditions. The findings provide evidence that distraction can improve choice across several situations that typically elicit robustly biased responses, even though participants are not aware of the effectiveness of this strategy. PMID:25787937

  1. Advanced technology development reducing CO2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sup

    2010-09-15

    Responding to Korean government policies on green growth and global energy/ environmental challenges, SK energy has been developing new technologies to reduce CO2 emissions by 1) CO2 capture and utilization, 2) efficiency improvement, and 3) Li-ion batteries. The paper introduces three advanced technologies developed by SK energy; GreenPol, ACO, and Li-ion battery. Contributing to company vision, a more energy and less CO2, the three technologies are characterized as follows. GreenPol utilizes CO2 as a feedstock for making polymer. Advanced Catalytic Olefin (ACO) reduces CO2 emission by 20% and increase olefin production by 17%. Li-ion Batteries for automotive industries improves CO2 emission.

  2. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  3. Advanced technology for reducing aircraft engine pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The proposed EPA regulations covering emissions of gas turbine engines will require extensive combustor development. The NASA is working to develop technology to meet these goals through a wide variety of combustor research programs conducted in-house, by contract, and by university grant. In-house efforts using the swirl-can modular combustor have demonstrated sizable reduction in NO emission levels. Testing to reduce idle pollutants has included the modification of duplex fuel nozzles to air-assisted nozzles and an exploration of the potential improvements possible with combustors using fuel staging and variable geometry. The Experimental Clean Combustor Program, a large contracted effort, is devoted to the testing and development of combustor concepts designed to achieve a large reduction in the levels of all emissions. This effort is planned to be conducted in three phases with the final phase to be an engine demonstration of the best reduced emission concepts.

  4. Climatology: Contrails reduce daily temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, David J.; Carleton, Andrew M.; Lauritsen, Ryan G.

    2002-08-01

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period.

  5. Reduced TCA Flux in Diabetic Myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    production in isolated mitochondria from substrates entering the TCA cycle at various points. ATP production was measured by luminescence with or without concomitant ATP utilisation by hexokinase in mitochondria isolated from myotubes established from eight lean and eight type 2 diabetic subjects. The ATP...... production of investigated substrate combinations was significantly reduced in mitochondria isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean. However, when ATP synthesis rates at different substrate combinations were normalized to the corresponding individual pyruvate-malate rate, there was no......The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux but at present it is unclear in which part of the TCA cycle the defect is localised. In order to localise the defect we studied ATP...

  6. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Wayne W; Bucher, Jerome I; Shuh, David K; Edelstein, Norman M

    2005-10-15

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to stabilize nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U. S. Department of Energy. Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs because of the high solubility and mobility of Tc(VII), pertechnetate (TcO4-), the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively stabilize 99Tc if they contain additives that chemically reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. The 99Tc leach rate of reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much lower than that for CWFs that contain TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure studies showed that Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be of concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, referred to as "permeable samples", the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were sealed in cuvettes made of polystyrene, which has a relatively large O2 diffusion coefficient. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as a Tc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The EXAFS data is consistent with a structure consisting of triangular clusters of Tc(IV) centers linked together through a combination of disulfide and sulfide bridges as in MoS3. From the EXAFS model, the stoichiometry of TcSx is TC3S10, which is presumably the compound generally referred to as "Tc2S7". The TcSX initially present in the permeable samples was steadily

  7. Pyruvate reduces 4-aminophenol in vitro toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyruvate has been observed to reduce the nephrotoxicity of some agents by maintaining glutathione status and preventing lipid peroxidation. This study examined the mechanism for pyruvate protection of p-aminophenol (PAP) nephrotoxicity. Renal cortical slices from male Fischer 344 rats were incubated for 30-120 min with 0, 0.1, 0.25 or 0.5 mM PAP in oxygenated Krebs buffer containing 0 or 10 mM pyruvate or glucose (1.28 or 5.5 mM). LDH leakage was increased above control by 0.25 and 0.5 mM PAP beginning at 60 min and by 0.1 mM PAP at 120 min. Pyruvate prevented an increase in LDH leakage at 60- and 120-min exposure to 0.1 and 0.25 mM PAP. Pyruvate also prevented a decline in ATP levels. Glucose (1.28 and 5.5 mM) provided less protection than pyruvate from PAP toxicity. Total glutathione levels were diminished by 0.1 and 0.25 mM PAP within 60 and 30 min, respectively. Pyruvate prevented the decline in glutathione by 0.1 mM PAP at both time periods and at 30 min for 0.25 mM PAP. Pyruvate reduced the magnitude of glutathione depletion by 0.25 mM PAP following a 60-min incubation. Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels in renal slices were increased at 60 min by exposure to 0.25 mM PAP, while pyruvate prevented increased GSSG levels by PAP. Pyruvate also reduced the extent of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-adducted proteins present after a 90-min incubation with PAP. These results indicate that pyruvate provided protection for PAP toxicity by providing an energy substrate and reducing oxidative stress

  8. Forewarning reduces fraud susceptibility in vulnerable consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Scheibe, Susanne; Notthoff, Nanna; Menkin, Josephine; Ross, Lee; Shadel, Doug; Deevy, Martha; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Telemarketing fraud is pervasive and older consumers are disproportionally targeted. Given laboratory research showing that forewarning can effectively counter influence appeals, we conducted a field experiment to test whether forewarning could protect people who had been victimized in the past. A research assistant with prior experience as a telemarketer pitched a mock scam two or four weeks after participants were warned about the same scam or an entirely different scam. Both warnings reduc...

  9. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  10. BF topological theories and infinitely reducible systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caicedo, M I; Bol, S; Bol, Simon

    1996-01-01

    We present a rigurous disscusion for abelian BF theories in which the base manifold of the U(1) bundle is homeomorphic to a Hilbert space. The theory has an infinte number of stages of reducibility. We specify conditions on the base manifold under which the covarinat quantization of the system can be performed unambiguously. Applications of the formulation to the superparticle and the supertstring are also discussed.

  11. Reducing stigma and discrimination: Candidate interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Kassam Aliya; Brohan Elaine; Thornicroft Graham; Lewis-Holmes Elanor

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper proposes that stigma in relation to people with mental illness can be understood as a combination of problems of knowledge (ignorance), attitudes (prejudice) and behaviour (discrimination). From a literature review, a series of candidate interventions are identified which may be effective in reducing stigmatisation and discrimination at the following levels: individuals with mental illness and their family members; the workplace; and local, national and international. The ...

  12. Leveraging Technology to Reduce Patient Transaction Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Medical practices are under significant pressure to provide superior customer service in an environment of declining or flat reimbursement. The solution for many practices involves the integration of a variety of third-party technologies that conveniently interface with one's electronic practice management and medical records systems. Typically, the applications allow the practice to reduce the cost of each patient interaction. Drilling down to quantify the cost of each individual patient interaction helps to determine the practicality of implementation. PMID:26665478

  13. Role of Insurance in Reducing Flood Risk

    OpenAIRE

    David Crichton

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the problems of flood risk management in the context of public and private insurance. It demonstrates the important role of insurance in reducing flood risk with examples from the U.K. and France. It includes a brief description of the summer 2007 floods in England. The Geneva Papers (2008) 33, 117–132. doi:10.1057/palgrave.gpp.2510151

  14. Reduced Variation in Drosophila Simulans Mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, JWO.; Hatzidakis, J.; Karr, T L; Kreitman, M

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of infection of a Drosophila simulans population by a maternally inherited insect bacterial parasite, Wolbachia, by analyzing nucleotide variability in three regions of the mitochondrial genome in four infected and 35 uninfected lines. Mitochondrial variability is significantly reduced compared to a noncoding region of a nuclear-encoded gene in both uninfected and pooled samples of flies, indicating a sweep of genetic variation. The selective sweep of...

  15. Improved regularization from Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alesci, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The choice of the regularization scheme in Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) is crucial for the predicted phenomenology. We outline how the improved scheme can be naturally realized in Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity, describing the Universe as an ensemble of microstates labeled by different graphs. The new effective dynamics presents corrections to LQC, which do not significantly affect the bouncing scenario for the most relevant kinds of matter fields in cosmology $(w \\leq 1)$.

  16. Natural Supersymmetry From Dynamically Reduced Radiative Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Huayong

    2015-01-01

    New natural supersymmetry is explored in the light of dynamically reduced radiative correction. Unlike in the conventional natural supersymmetry, the range of supersymmetric mass spectrum can be far above the TeV scale instead. For the illustrating model of non-universal gaugino masses, the parameter space which satisfies the Higgs mass and other LHC constraints is shown explicitly. We propose that this example can be realized by employing the no-scale supergravity.

  17. Reducing murder to manslaughter: whose job?

    OpenAIRE

    Griew, E

    1986-01-01

    This paper compares two versions of the diminished responsibility defence, which reduces murder to manslaughter: the present statutory formulation and a proposed reformulation. The comparison confirms that evidence such as psychiatrists are commonly invited to give in murder cases takes them beyond their proper role. Paradoxically, although the two formulations mean essentially the same thing, the proposed change of wording must have the practical effect of subduing the psychiatrist's evidenc...

  18. Reducing the surface deviation of stereolithography components

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Philip E.

    1998-01-01

    The Stereolithography (SL) process has developed into an accurate method of replicating 3D CAD images into tactile objects used for functions such as product evaluation, preproduction testing or as patterns around which tool cavities can be formed. One of the main limitations with the SL process is the surface roughness of parts resulting from the layer manufacturing process. To-date surface roughness has only been reduced using techniques such as additive coating or abrasive finishing. Resea...

  19. Reducing the Genotoxic Potential of Retroviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani, Ali; Hawley, Teresa S.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The recent development of leukemia in gene therapy patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease due to retroviral vector insertional mutagenesis has prompted reassessment of the genotoxic potential of integrating vector systems. In this chapter, various strategies are described to reduce the associated risks of retroviral genomic integration. These include deletion of strong transcriptional enhancer-promoter elements in the retroviral long terminal repeats, flanking the ret...

  20. Customized notched music training reduces tinnitus loudness

    OpenAIRE

    Stracke, Henning; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Pantev, Christo

    2010-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a symptom with high prevalence. There is evidence that the tinnitus perception is related to unfavorable cortical plastic changes. In our recent study we have developed and evaluated a customized music training strategy that appears capable of both reducing cortical tinnitus related neuronal activity and alleviating subjective tinnitus perception. We hypothesize that the regular and enjoyable music training reverses unprofitable cortical reorganization to a certain degree ...

  1. Local Stressors Reduce Coral Resilience to Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D.; Black, Bryan A.; Walsh, Sheila M.; McField, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following...

  2. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Plugge, Caroline M.; Zhang, Weiwen; Scholten, Johannes C. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB) are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas me...

  3. Incentives for reducing emissions in Krakow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This effort is identifying, specific incentives that may be used by Krakow city officials to encourage, residents to change the way they heat their homes and businesses in order to reduce pollution. This paper describes the incentives study for converting small coal or coke-fired boilers to gas in the Old Town area. A similar study looked at incentives for expanding the district heating system and future analyses will be performed for home stove options

  4. Glucocorticoids reduce phobic fear in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Soravia, Leila M; Heinrichs, Markus; Aerni, Amanda; Maroni, Caroline; Schelling, Gustav; Ehlert, Ulrike; Roozendaal, Benno; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.

    2006-01-01

    Phobias are characterized by excessive fear, cued by the presence or anticipation of a fearful situation. Whereas it is well established that glucocorticoids are released in fearful situations, it is not known whether these hormones, in turn, modulate perceived fear. As extensive evidence indicates that elevated glucocorticoid levels impair the retrieval of emotionally arousing information, they might also inhibit retrieval of fear memory associated with phobia and, thereby, reduce phobic fea...

  5. Reducing Complexity and Consumption in Future Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Tosi Beleffi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the main results of the EU FP7 SARDANA project, a future network architecture able to provide large bandwidth to the end user in a flexible and intelligent way. The remote amplification for network reach extension, the remote monitoring of the network infrastructure, and the possibility of remotely powering ONUs are fundamental capabilities to maintain the passiveness of the network outside plant, so important for reducing power consumption and maintenance costs, without compromising network reach and coverage.

  6. Reduced Palm Intensity for Track Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Bozdogan, Ali Onder; Streit, Roy; EFE, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The pair correlation function is introduced to target tracking filters that use a finite point process target model as a means to investigate interactions in the Bayes posterior target process. It is shown that the Bayes posterior target point process of the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter-before using the Poisson point process approximation to close the recursion-is a spatially correlated process with weakly repulsive pair interactions. The reduced Palm target point process is in...

  7. Nonuniform Banking for Reducing Memory Energy Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, Ozcan; Kandemir, Mahmut

    2005-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDAA (http://www.edaa.com/) International audience Main memories can consume a large percentage of overall energy in many data-intensive embedded applications. The past research proposed and evaluated memory banking as a possible approach for reducing memory energy consumption. One of the common characteristics/assumptions made by most of the past work on banking is that all the banks are of the same size. While this makes the formulation of the problem easy, it a...

  8. A proportional counter with reduced wall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proportional counter, using gaseous sources, in which the wall effects are considerably reduced, is described. The counter is fitted with a ring of internal shielding counters in anti-coincidence, separated from the main central counter only by a number of cathode wires. The counter can be readily assembled, giving flexibility in research investigations. Applications to a measurement of the L/K capture ratio in A37 and Fe55 are described. (author)

  9. Reduced energy conservation law for magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global energy conservation law for a magnetized plasma is studied within the context of a quasiparticle description. A reduced energy conservation law is derived for low-frequency, as compared to the gyromagnetic frequency, plasma motions with regard to both non-uniform mean flows and fluctuations in the plasma. The mean value of plasma energy is calculated and sufficient stability conditions for non-equilibrium plasmas are derived. (orig.)

  10. Reducing hazards for animals from humans

    OpenAIRE

    Paul-Pierre Pastoret

    2012-01-01

    If animals may be a source of hazards for humans, the reverse is equally true. The main sources of hazards from humans to animals, are the impact of human introduction of transboundary animal diseases, climate change, globalisation, introduction of invasive species and reduction of biodiversity.There is also a trend toward reducing genetic diversity in domestic animals, such as cattle; there are presently around 700 different breeds of cattle many of which at the verge of extinction (less tha...

  11. Reduce Demand Rather than Increase Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2006-01-01

    The logic behind off-street parking requirements is simple: development increases the demand for parking, so cities require enough off-street spaces to satisfy this new demand. Off-street parking requirements thus ensure that cars will not spill over onto the neighborhood streets. This logic suggests another potential reform within the existing system of off-street parking requirements: if developers reduce parking demand, cities should allow them to provide fewer parking spaces; that is, cit...

  12. Personalized music to reduce patient anxiety (abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    Zwaag, M. van der; Tijs, T.J.W.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Patient anxiety is a frequently occurring concern as it decreases patient satisfaction, increases consultation duration, and can influence successful medical outcome. To illustrate, for some diagnosis methods as PET scans patients need to be relaxed for successful medicaloutcome. Music can possibly reduce patients stress. However, hospital selected music has not always shown its effectiveness, and patient selected music has shown it could be arousing instead of relaxing.In two experiments the...

  13. Causal transmission in reduced-form models

    OpenAIRE

    Vassili Bazinas; Bent Nielsen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to explore the causal transmission of a catalyst variable through two endogenous variables of interest. The method is based on the reduced-form system formed from the conditional distribution of the two endogenous variables given the catalyst. The method combines elements from instru- mental variable analysis and Cholesky decomposition of structural vector autoregressions. We give conditions for uniqueness of the causal transmission.

  14. Whole Grain Intake Reduces Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Qiucheng; Zheng, Huazhen; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Xu, Min; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Li; Ning LI; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mounting evidence from epidemiology studies suggests that whole grain intake may reduce pancreatic cancer risk, but convincing evidence is scarce. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between whole grain intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Relevant observational studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane library databases for the period from January 1980 to July 2015, with no restrictions. We calculated the summary odds ratios (ORs) for...

  15. Do Hedge Funds Reduce Idiosyncratic Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Namho Kang; Peter Kondor; Ronnie Sadka

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of hedge-fund trading on idiosyncratic risk. We hypothesize that while hedge-fund activity would often reduce idiosyncratic risk, high initial levels of idiosyncratic risk might be further amplified due to fund loss limits. Panel-regression analyses provide supporting evidence for this hypothesis. The results are robust to sample selection and are further corroborated by a natural experiment using the Lehman bankruptcy as an exogenous adverse shock to hedge-fund ...

  16. How Damage Diversification Can Reduce Systemic Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of risk diversification in complex networks. Nodes represent e.g. financial actors, whereas weighted links represent e.g. financial obligations (credits/debts). Each node has a risk to fail because of losses resulting from defaulting neighbors, which may lead to large failure cascades. Classical risk diversification strategies usually neglect network effects and therefore suggest that risk can be reduced if possible losses (i.e., exposures) are split among many neighbo...

  17. Testosterone therapy for reduced libido in women

    OpenAIRE

    Basson, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    Modest benefit has been shown from transdermal testosterone therapy given to postmenopausal women with reduced sexual desire. An increased frequency of satisfying sexual encounters and intensity of sexual desire and response has been shown in medically and psychiatrically healthy women able to have 2–3 satisfying sexual experiences each month before therapy commences. Women more clearly sexually dysfunctional in keeping with currently proposed definitions of sexual disorder have not been stud...

  18. Reducing Product Diversity in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kelchtermans, Stijn; Verboven, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Public systems of higher education have recently attempted to cut costs by providing financial incentives to cut duplicated programs, i.e. programs that are offered at different institutions. We study the profit and welfare effects of reducing program duplication, against the background of a funding system reform in Flanders (Belgium). We find that dropping duplicated programs at individual institutions tends to be socially undesirable, due to the students' low willingness to travel to other ...

  19. Phenelzine reduces plasma vitamin B6.

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm, D E; Yu, P H; Bowen, R.C.; O'Donovan, C.; Hawkes, J; Hussein, M

    1994-01-01

    Plasma levels of the active form of vitamin B6 (pyridoxal phosphate) in 19 patients taking phenelzine were found to be reduced on the average to approximately 54% of the value in a control group. There was no correlation of pyridoxal phosphate level with phenelzine daily dosage over the range of 30 mg to 90 mg. No symptoms of vitamin B6 deficiency peripheral neuropathy were found.

  20. Reducing mother-to-child HIV transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In developing countries,mother-to-child trans mission of human immune deficiency virus (HIV)is responsible for 5 to 10 percen t o f all new HIV infections.Most children born to HIV-positive mothers are not HIV positive,but one quarter to one third are.The following instert looks at the p o ssibilities for reducing mother-to-child HIV transmission,and discusses some of the questions that are still unanswered.

  1. Can Alcohol Prohibition Reduce Violence against Women?

    OpenAIRE

    Dara Lee Luca; Emily Owens; Gunjan Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Violence against women is a critical problem across the world. In this paper, we exploit state and temporal variation in alcohol control in India to examine the impact of prohibition on alcohol consumption and violent crimes against women. We first use detailed household survey data to show that prohibition policies are associated with substantially lower rates of drinking among men and domestic violence. Next, we provide evidence that alcohol prohibition reduces aggregate violence against wo...

  2. European Community Measures to Reduce Nitrate Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Al-hedny, Suhad

    2010-01-01

    Water protection proves to be a difficult task, whether it is dealt with through legislation or the implementation of a process to reduce further pollution. This study considers how the issue of water pollution from nitrates in agricultural practices has become better understood through the reforms of the common agriculture policy (CAP) and the enactment of various regulations and directives by EU. The implementation of the EC Nitrate Directive is a main focus of this study because it was a m...

  3. Penerapan Reduced Impact Logging Menggunakan Monocable Winch (Pancang Tarik (Implementing Reduced Impact Logging with Monocable Winch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosep Ruslim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest harvesting still encounters many problems especially concerning impact to the residual stand  and environmental damage. Implementing the reduced impact monocable winch and planning of good skid trails should have a positive impact on work efficiency as well as, reducing damage to the residual stand and soil during felling and skidding activities. Reduced impact logging (RIL with a monocable winch (Pancang Tarik system has been tried in several IUPHHKs and it can be concluded that RIL monocable winch system could be applied practically and reduce impact on residual stand and soil damage. Using this technology has many advantages, among others: cost efficiency, locally made, environmental friendly, and high local community participation. Application of  the monocable winch  system in reduced impact logging is an effort to reduce economical and environment  damages when compared to conventional system of ground based skidding with bulldozer system. The aim of this research is to verify the efficiency (operational cost, effectiveness (productivity and  time consumption of monocable winch system. The results  indicate that the implementation monocable winch system, has reduced the soil damage as much as 8% ha-1.  The skidding cost  with monocable system is Rp95.000 m-3. This figure is significantly cheaper if compare with ground base skidding with bulldozer system in which the skidding cost around Rp165.000 m-3.Keywords: mononocable winch, productivity,  skidding cost, reduced impact logging, local community

  4. Detecting reduced renal function in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine Borup; Jødal, Lars; Erlandsen, Erland J;

    2013-01-01

    using two cut-off levels, dividing renal function into normal or reduced, with an intermediate "gray zone" of indeterminable results.Methods Glomerular filtration rate was measured by plasma clearance of 51Cr-EDTA (13.7–147.4 mL/min/1.73 m2) in 119 children (age range 2.3–14.9 years).Reduced renal...... function was defined as a GFR of<82 mL/min/1.73 m2. SCr, SCysC, age-normalized creatinine (SCr-ratio), and eight published GFR-models were compared for their ability to correctly classify renal function as normal or reduced. Cut-off levels were determined so as to give 99 % certainty outside the gray zone.......Results The multivariable GFR-models by Schwartz et al. (J Am Soc Nephrol 2009; 20:629–637) and Zappitelli et al. (Am J Kidney Dis 2006; 48:221–230) and two models by Andersen et al. [Am J Kidney Dis 2012; 59(1):50–57: body cell mass (BCM)-model and Weight-model] performed significantly better than all other...

  5. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanxi [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Massoudieh, Arash [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Liang, Xiaomeng [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hu, Dehong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kamai, Tamir [Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan (Israel); Ginn, Timothy R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zilles, Julie L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nguyen, Thanh H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  6. Climate change - reducing emissions/VCR update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the December 1997 Kyoto Conference serving as background, this presentation examined the problem of carbon dioxide emissions by the petroleum, natural gas, and oil sands industries, and by the electric utilities. Global warming, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change are seen as being among the most serious problems facing the oil and natural gas industries. Since the heavy oil industry is more energy intensive than either the petroleum or natural gas industries, the heavy oil industry faces an even more serious problem. The author also reviewed and updated Canadian achievements in reducing green house gas emissions under the Voluntary Change Registry Program, established following the 1992 Rio de Janeiro Environmental Summit. The expectation at this meeting was that at the Kyoto Conference Canada's negotiating position will be similar to that of the United States, i.e. reducing emissions to 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012, but not so as to adversely affect the economy. It is widely expected that the Kyoto Conference will call for legally binding emission targets for the countries of the developed world, including the countries of the former Soviet Union. Developing countries, including China, will be exempt, on the grounds that their economies are too feeble to withstand the cost of implementing emission control measures at this time. Developing countries apparently agree to install new technologies that reduce emissions, but expect the developing countries to foot the bill

  7. A breakthrough in reducing RCM costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary findings from two industry projects indicate how to reduce the costs of reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) applied on a large scale and how to reduce maintenance costs at nuclear plants while meeting new Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. The projects involve the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and, separately, Philadelphia Electric Co, (PECo) and Boston Edison Co. (BECo). Industry experience has shown that numerous benefits can be obtained by using RCM. These include eliminating unnecessary preventive maintenance (PM) tasks, decreasing corrective maintenance, reducing forced outages, improving plant availability, and increasing the focus of maintenance resources on critical equipment. RCM is an approach to maintenance that involves consideration of which components support important system functions, and the consequent choice of PM tasks based on the best available engineering judgment. It was developed for utility use by the nuclear industry with the support of EPRI. About 50 nuclear power plants in the United States are now investigating this maintenance optimization process. Many tools, guidelines, and lessons learned have been produced by EPRI during the last six years, as the industry has learned how RCM evaluations can be done more cost-effectively

  8. Reduced particle settling speed in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fornari, Walter; Sardina, Gaetano; Brandt, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We study the settling of finite-size rigid spheres in sustained homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT) using Direct Numerical Simulations. In particular, an immersed boundary method is used to account for the dispersed solid phase. We study semi-dilute suspensions of spheres at different Galileo numbers, Ga. The Galileo number is the ratio between buoyancy and viscous forces, and is here varied via the solid-to-fluid density ratio. The focus is on particles that are slightly heavier than the fluid. We find that in HIT, the mean settling speed is less than in quiescent fluid and it reduces by 6 to 60\\% with respect to the terminal velocity of an isolated sphere in quiescent fluid "Vt", as the ratio between "Vt" and the turbulent velocity fluctuations u' is decreased. Analysing the fluid-particle relative motion, we find that the mean settling speed is progressively reduced while reducing due to the increase of the vertical drag induced by the particle cross-flow velocity. Unsteady effects contribute to the mea...

  9. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  10. Reducing NOx emissions with antimony additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes improvement in a process for the catalytic cracking of a heavy hydrocarbon feed containing Ni and nitrogen compounds by contact with a circulating inventory of catalytic cracking catalyst to produce catalytically cracked products and spent catalyst. It comprises: Ni or Ni compounds and coke comprising nitrogen compounds, and wherein the spent catalyst is regenerated by contact with oxygen or an oxygen-containing gas in a catalyst regeneration zone operating at catalyst regeneration conditions to produce hot regenerated catalyst comprising Ni or Ni compounds which is recycled to catalytically crack the heavy feed and the catalyst regeneration zone produces a flue gas comprising CO, CO2 and oxides of nitrogen, NOx. The improvement comprises: adding to the circulating catalyst inventory CO combustion promoter in an amount equivalent to 0.01 to 50 wt ppm Pt to reduce the CO content of the flue gas and reducing the NOx content of the flue gas by adding to the circulating catalyst inventory a separate particle additive comprising antimony. The additive being added in an amount sufficient to reduce the production of NOx relative to operation without the additive, and wherein the additive comprises a compound of antimony which does not substantially passivate the Ni or Ni compounds present on the cracking catalyst, nor deactivate the CO combustion promoter

  11. Reduced barrier efficiency in axillary stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, A; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Pudney, P D A; Paterson, S E; Rawlings, A V

    2002-06-01

    The skin of the axilla is cosmetically important with millions of consumers daily applying antiperspirant/deodorant products. Despite this, we know virtually nothing about axillary skin or how antiperspirant (AP) use impacts upon it. To characterize the axillary stratum corneum and determine whether this is a unique skin type, we have looked at stratum corneum composition and function, particularly its barrier properties, and compared it with other body sites. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneosurfametry (CSM) revealed a reduced barrier function in the axilla. HPTLC analysis of the stratum corneum lipids demonstrated statistically elevated levels of fatty acids, ceramides, and particularly cholesterol in the axilla. Both ceramide and cholesterol did not appear to change with depth, indicating that they were predominantly of stratum corneum origin. On the other hand, at least some of the fatty acid had a sebaceous origin. We hypothesized that the reduced barrier function might be owing to the changes in the crucial ceramide : cholesterol ratio. To address this, we used a combination of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with cyanoacrylate sampling. These results demonstrated more ordered lipid-lamellae phase behaviour in the axilla, suggesting that the elevated cholesterol might form crystal microdomains within the lipid lamellae, allowing an increase in water flux. Since an exaggerated application of antiperspirant had no effect upon the axilla barrier properties, it is concluded that this region of skin physiologically has a reduced barrier function. PMID:18498507

  12. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, Dymitr; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2007-11-01

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  13. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  14. Uranium Immobilization by Sulfate-reducing Biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized using biofilms of the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in flat-plate continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. U(VI) was continuously fed into the reactor for 32 weeks at a concentration of 126 ?M. During this time, the soluble U(VI) was removed (between 88 and 96% of feed) from solution and immobilized in the biofilms. The dynamics of U immobilization in the sulfate-reducing biofilms were quantified by estimating: (1) microbial activity in the SRB biofilm, defined as the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production rate and estimated from the H2S concentration profiles measured using microelectrodes across the biofilms; (2) concentration of dissolved U in the solution; and (3) the mass of U precipitated in the biofilm. Results suggest that U was immobilized in the biofilms as a result of two processes: (1) enzymatically and (2) chemically, by reacting with microbially generated H2S. Visual inspection showed that the dissolved sulfide species reacted with U(VI) to produce a black precipitate. Synchrotron-based U L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of U precipitated abiotically by sodium sulfide indicated that U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV). Selected-area electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic analysis of transmission electron microscope lattice-fringe images confirmed the structure of precipitated U as being that of uraninite

  15. Environment, Renewable Energy and Reduced Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Khazanov, G.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Increased energy security and reduced carbon emissions pose significant challenges for science and technology. However, they also create substantial opportunities for innovative research and development. In this review paper, we highlight some of the key opportunities and mention public policies that are needed to enable the efforts and to maximize the probability of their success. Climate is among the uttermost nonlinear behaviors found around us. As recent studies showed the possible effect of cosmic rays on the Earth's climate, we investigate how complex interactions between the planet and its environment can be responsible for climate anomalies.

  16. Reduce proton energy spread by target ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shuan; Chen, Jiaer; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    It's shown that, with strong target ablation monoenergetic protons along the laser direction is available during the laser aluminum foil interaction, which is different from the classic TNSA theory. When the laser pre-pulse is too strong that the whole target is vaporized, the energetic electrons generated in the gas preplasma will play an important role for the ion acceleration because the sheath field will not be available. These electrons beam, which is highly directional, will setup triangle envelope acceleration field along the laser direction at the target rear, reducing the ion energy spread.

  17. Spectroscopic Speciation of Plutonium Reduced by Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation state of plutonium should be carefully controlled to understand the chemical behaviors of plutonium. Pu(III) is not stable in aqueous solutions and easily oxidized in the atmosphere. In deep geological environments excluded oxygen, reducing condition is expected and will lead to rather stable Pu(III), which is very soluble compared to Pu(IV). Pu(III) ions are expected to form hydrolysis complexes in neutral and basic solutions similar to Am(III), Cm(III) and Eu(III). The reported formation constants of Pu(OH)n3-n (n=1-4) had been critically discussed, and only the first hydrolysis constant (log*β011 = -6.9 ± 0.3) was selected in a review. The main reason for the large discrepancy of the formation constants for Pu(OH)n3-n (n=2-4) is the high tendency of oxidation of Pu(III). In the present study, the reduction condition of Pu(III) was controlled by electrolysis. The electrolysis reactor was specially designed to investigate hydrolysis, colloid formation, and solubility of Pu(III) at different pHs. Pu(III) was reduced from higher oxidation states at acidic conditions, and the H+ ion concentration in solutions was simultaneously decreased without the addition of alkaline solution by electrolysis. The soluble species was investigated using spectrophotometry adopting a capillary cell (LWCC, Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell, WPI) and the formation of plutonium colloid and solubility was determined using LIBD (Laser Induced Breakdown Detection). In this study, an electrolysis system for the reduction of plutonium and H+ ions in a solution with small volume (> 2 mL) was installed in a glove box to investigate the hydrolysis, colloid formation and solubility of Pu(III) under a reducing condition. Pu(III) was reduced from the mixed plutonium oxidation states without the generation of Pu(IV) colloidal particles or precipitates under weak acidic conditions. A coulometric titration method was applied to adjust the pH without the addition of NaOH. The change of

  18. Automatic differentiation for reduced sequential quadratic programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Liangcai; Li Jin; Tan Yuejin

    2007-01-01

    In order to slove the large-scale nonlinear programming (NLP) problems efficiently, an efficient optimization algorithm based on reduced sequential quadratic programming (rSQP) and automatic differentiation (AD) is presented in this paper. With the characteristics of sparseness, relatively low degrees of freedom and equality constraints utilized, the nonlinear programming problem is solved by improved rSQP solver. In the solving process, AD technology is used to obtain accurate gradient information. The numerical results show that the combined algorithm, which is suitable for large-scale process optimization problems, can calculate more efficiently than rSQP itself.

  19. A Generalization of Chaplygin's Reducibility Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, O E; Bloch, A M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study Chaplygin's Reducibility Theorem and extend its applicability to nonholonomic systems with symmetry described by the Hamilton-Poincare-d'Alembert equations in arbitrary degrees of freedom. As special cases we extract the extension of the Theorem to nonholonomic Chaplygin systems with nonabelian symmetry groups as well as Euler-Poincare-Suslov systems in arbitrary degrees of freedom. In the latter case, we also extend the Hamiltonization Theorem to nonholonomic systems which do not possess an invariant measure. Lastly, we extend previous work on conditionally variational systems using the results above. We illustrate the results through various examples of well-known nonholonomic systems.

  20. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations and...... experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...