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Sample records for aluminium gallium indium

  1. Toxicity of indium arsenide, gallium arsenide, and aluminium gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiyo

    2004-08-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium arsenide (InAs), and aluminium gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) are semiconductor applications. Although the increased use of these materials has raised concerns about occupational exposure to them, there is little information regarding the adverse health effects to workers arising from exposure to these particles. However, available data indicate these semiconductor materials can be toxic in animals. Although acute and chronic toxicity of the lung, reproductive organs, and kidney are associated with exposure to these semiconductor materials, in particular, chronic toxicity should pay much attention owing to low solubility of these materials. Between InAs, GaAs, and AlGaAs, InAs was the most toxic material to the lung followed by GaAs and AlGaAs when given intratracheally. This was probably due to difference in the toxicity of the counter-element of arsenic in semiconductor materials, such as indium, gallium, or aluminium, and not arsenic itself. It appeared that indium, gallium, or aluminium was toxic when released from the particles, though the physical character of the particles also contributes to toxic effect. Although there is no evidence of the carcinogenicity of InAs or AlGaAs, GaAs and InP, which are semiconductor materials, showed the clear evidence of carcinogenic potential. It is necessary to pay much greater attention to the human exposure of semiconductor materials.

  2. Extraction of aluminium, gallium and indium by tri-n-octylamine from citric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol'shova, T.A.; Kaplunova, A.M.; Ershova, N.I.; Varshal, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made on aluminium, gallium and indium distribution in triocylam ine(toa)-citric acid system depending on pH of aqueous solution, concentration of components and foreign electrolytes. The methods of equilibrium shift, compe ting ions and isomolar series were used to find the component ratio in toa: Me: citric acid complexes equal to 3:1:2. The equation describing the extraction of citrate gallium, indium and aluminium complexes by trioctylamine was suggested. Using the difference in extraction behavior of the elements of aluminium, yttri um and lanthanum subgroup the extraction-chromatographic method of their separat ion, applied for the analysis of optical glasses was developed. The method is c haracterized by satisfactory reproduction, simplicity and expre

  3. First heats of cerium solution in liquid aluminium, gallium, indium, tin, lead and bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamshchikov, L.F.; Lebedev, V.A.; Nichkov, I.F.; Raspopin, S.P.; Shein, V.G.

    1983-01-01

    Cerium solution heats in liquid alluminium, gallium, indium, tin, lead and bismuth are determined in high temperature mixing calorimeter with an isothermal shell. The statistical analysis carried out proves that values of cerium solution heat in fusible metals obtained by the methods of electric motive forces and calorimety give a satisfactory agreement

  4. Comparative study of highly dense aluminium- and gallium-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    cause of their optoelectronic properties in addition to low cost, high stability and excellent surface uniformity (low roughness). Doping zinc oxide with some elements like aluminium, gallium, boron, niobium and indium has a great impact for having enhancements of its optical and electrical properties. Aluminium and gallium ...

  5. Indium gallium nitride multijunction solar cell simulation using silvaco atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Baldomero

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential use of wurtzite Indium Gallium Nitride as photovoltaic material. Silvaco Atlas was used to simulate a quad-junction solar cell. Each of the junctions was made up of Indium Gallium Nitride. The band gap of each junction was dependent on the composition percentage of Indium Nitride and Gallium Nitride within Indium Gallium Nitride. The findings of this research show that Indium Gallium Nitride is a promising semiconductor for solar cell use. United...

  6. Effect of low-energy gallium-aluminum-arsenide and aluminium gallium indium phosphide laser irradiation on the viability of C2C12 myoblasts in a muscle injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcos Paulo Pinheiro; Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli Mesquita; Gravalos, Erick Diomedesse; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida Biasotto; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of phototherapy on the viability of cultured C2C12 myoblasts under different nutritional conditions (muscle injury model) using low-energy gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) and aluminium-gallium-indium-phosphide (InGaAlP) lasers with different wavelengths and powers. The beneficial effects of phototherapy using low-energy lasers depend on irradiation parameters and type of laser used, but there are no data in the literature on C2C12 myoblasts proliferation after phototherapy with GaAlAs and InGaAlP lasers. A C2C12 cell line cultured in regular (10% fetal bovine serum, FBS) and nutrient-deficient (5% FBS) media were irradiated with low-energy GaAlAs (660 nm) and InGaAlP (780 nm) lasers with energy densities of 3.8, 6.3, and 10 J/cm2, and 3.8, 10, and 17.5 J/cm2, respectively. Cell proliferation was assessed indirectly 24 h after irradiation by measuring the mitochondrial activity and using the crystal violet assay. There were no significant differences in cell viability between laser-treated myoblasts and control cultures for all tested parameters after 24 h of cell culture, although cell cultures grown in regular nutrient medium supplemented with 10% FBS exhibited higher growth rates than cultures, irradiated or not, grown in nutrient-deficient medium. Laser phototherapy did not improve C2C12 viability under regular or nutrient-deficient (muscle injury model) conditions using the above parameters.

  7. Sodium enhances indium-gallium interdiffusion in copper indium gallium diselenide photovoltaic absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombara, Diego; Werner, Florian; Schwarz, Torsten; Cañero Infante, Ingrid; Fleming, Yves; Valle, Nathalie; Spindler, Conrad; Vacchieri, Erica; Rey, Germain; Guennou, Mael; Bouttemy, Muriel; Manjón, Alba Garzón; Peral Alonso, Inmaculada; Melchiorre, Michele; El Adib, Brahime; Gault, Baptiste; Raabe, Dierk; Dale, Phillip J; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2018-02-26

    Copper indium gallium diselenide-based technology provides the most efficient solar energy conversion among all thin-film photovoltaic devices. This is possible due to engineered gallium depth gradients and alkali extrinsic doping. Sodium is well known to impede interdiffusion of indium and gallium in polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 films, thus influencing the gallium depth distribution. Here, however, sodium is shown to have the opposite effect in monocrystalline gallium-free CuInSe 2 grown on GaAs substrates. Gallium in-diffusion from the substrates is enhanced when sodium is incorporated into the film, leading to Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 and Cu(In,Ga) 3 Se 5 phase formation. These results show that sodium does not decrease per se indium and gallium interdiffusion. Instead, it is suggested that sodium promotes indium and gallium intragrain diffusion, while it hinders intergrain diffusion by segregating at grain boundaries. The deeper understanding of dopant-mediated atomic diffusion mechanisms should lead to more effective chemical and electrical passivation strategies, and more efficient solar cells.

  8. Growth and characterization of indium antimonide and gallium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indium antimonide and gallium antimonide were synthesized from the respective component elements using an indigenously fabricated synthesis unit. Bulk crystals of indium antimonide and gallium antimonide were grown using both the vertical and horizontal Bridgman techniques. Effect of ampoule shapes and diameters ...

  9. Combined isovalent alloying gallium arsenide with bismuth and indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, V.V.; Zushinskaya, O.V.; Novikov, S.V.; Savel'ev, I.G.; Chaldyshev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Electric conductivity and the Hall effect at 77 and 300K of gallium arsenide epitaxial films grown from the melted solution with bismuth and indium additions at 77 and 300K. Different mechanisms of bismuth and indium effect on the ensamble of defects and background addition in gallium arsenide, are established. Bismuth effect is conditioned by the change of liquid phase properties, and indium effect is conditioned by the processes taking place in a crystal. The experimental results have shown that the mutual alloying of gallium arsenide with indium and bismuth in the process of liquid-phase epitaxy ensures high electrophysical film properties

  10. Gallium(III) and indium(III) dithiolate complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The chemistry of classical and organometallic complexes of gallium and indium with dithiolate ligands, i.e., dithiocarboxylates, xanthates, dithiocarbamates, dithiophosphates, dithiophophinates and dithioarsenates, has been reviewed. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural aspects of these complexes are described.

  11. Gallium (III) and indium (III) dithiolate complexes: Versatile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The chemistry of classical and organometallic complexes of gallium and indium with dithiolate ligands, i.e., dithiocarboxylates, xanthates, dithiocarbamates, dithiophosphates, dithiophophinates and dithioarsenates, has been reviewed. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural aspects of these complexes are described.

  12. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  13. Removal of sulfate interference in the determination of indium and gallium by graphite furnace AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsusaki, Koji; Sata, Toshikatsu

    1994-01-01

    A mixture of ammonium-EDTA, nickel and aluminium nitrates is suitable as a matrix modifier for the removal of sulfate interference in the determination of indium and gallium by graphite furnace AAS. Nickel and aluminium nitrates act as a thermal stabilizer for the analyte in the furnace before atomization. Since analyte and other cations are masked by EDTA, the coexisting sulfates are converted to ammonium salt, which is readily decomposed and eliminated from the furnace during the ashing step. In the presence of 0.1 M nickel nitrate, 0.001 M aluminium nitrate and 0.1 M ammonium-EDTA, when the concentration of sodium and potassium sulfates are below 0.02 M, the interferences of these sulfates are completely removed. (author)

  14. Organo-gallium and indium complexes with dithiolate and oxo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With 1,1-dithiolate ligands both classical and organometallic complexes of gallium and indium, [M(S ∩ S)3], [RM(S ∩ S)2] and [R2M(S ∩ S)] (where R = Me or Et; M = Ga or In; S ∩ S = RCS2, ROCS2, R2NCS2 and (RO)2PS2) have been isolated. Reactions of internally functionalised oxo ligands with R3MR ⋅ OEt2 ...

  15. Design and Optimization of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Thin Film Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    OPTIMIZATION OF COPPER INDIUM GALLIUM SELENIDE THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS by Daniel B. Katzman September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Sherif Michael Second...for public release; distribution is unlimited DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF COPPER INDIUM GALLIUM SELENIDE THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS Daniel B...7 A. SOLAR CELL PHYSICS

  16. Competitive segregation of gallium and indium at heterophase Cu-MnO interfaces studied with transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogck, S.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the possible segregation of indium and gallium and competitive segregation of gallium and indium at atomically flat parallel {111}-oriented Cu-MnO interfaces. The segregation of gallium at Cu-MnO interfaces after introduction of gallium in the copper matrix of internally

  17. Small lead and indium inclusions in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Hjemsted, K.; Schmidt, B.; Bourdelle, K.K.; Johansen, A.; Andersen, H.H.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports implantation of lead or indium into aluminum results in spontaneous phase separation and formation of lead or indium precipitates. The precipitates grow in topotactical alignment with the matrix, giving TEM images characterized by moire fringes. The size and density of the precipitates increase with increasing fluence until coalescence begins to occur. Implantation at elevated temperatures lead to formation of large precipitates with well developed facets. This is particularly significant for implantation above the bulk melting point of the implanted species. Melting and solidification have been followed by in-situ TEM heating and cooling experiments. Superheating up to ∼50 K above the bulk melting point has been observed, and the largest inclusions melt first. Melting is associated with only partial loss of facetting of the largest inclusion. Initial growth of the inclusions occurs by trapping of atoms retained in supersaturated solution. Further growth occurs by coalescence of neighboring inclusion in the liquid phase. Solidification is accompanied by a strong undercooling ∼30 K below the bulk melting point, where the smallest inclusions solidify first. Solidification is characterized by spontaneous restoration of the facets and the topotactical alignment

  18. Purification of indium, gallium, and antimony by melting with synthetic slug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walis, L.; Rowinska, L.; Nowicki, A.

    1997-01-01

    The tracer technique has been used for metal purification process control. The indium, gallium and antimony have been purified up to semiconductor purity in the melting with synthetic slug process. The 115m Cd, 59 Fe, 204 Tl. 76 As, 210 Bi have been used as tracers. The high effectiveness of proposed purification method have been found in the cases of indium and gallium. 6 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Characterization of Gallium Indium Phosphide and Progress of Aluminum Gallium Indium Phosphide System Quantum-Well Laser Diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Hiroki

    2017-07-28

    Highly ordered gallium indium phosphide layers with the low bandgap have been successfully grown on the (100) GaAs substrates, the misorientation toward [01-1] direction, using the low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. It is found that the optical properties of the layers are same as those of the disordered ones, essentially different from the ordered ones having two orientations towards [1-11] and [11-1] directions grown on (100) gallium arsenide substrates, which were previously reported. The bandgap at 300 K is 1.791 eV. The value is the smallest ever reported, to our knowledge. The high performance transverse stabilized AlGaInP laser diodes with strain compensated quantum well structure, which is developed in 1992, have been successfully obtained by controlling the misorientation angle and directions of GaAs substrates. The structure is applied to quantum dots laser diodes. This paper also describes the development history of the quantum well and the quantum dots laser diodes, and their future prospects.

  20. Organo-gallium and indium complexes with dithiolate and oxo ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    istry of gallium and indium compounds with 1,1- dithiolate and oxo ligands in the last few years. Salient features of this investigation are described here. 2. Results and discussion. 2.1 1,1-Dithiolato-complexes. Both classical and organometallic complexes of gal- lium and indium with 1,1-dithiolate ligands (dithio- phosphate ...

  1. Electronic properties of aluminum, gallium and indium pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Dheerendra Singh; Singh, S P

    2010-01-01

    The Phillips and Van Vechten theory was applied to aluminum, gallium and indium pnictides (AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs and InSb). The values of the homopolar gap, ionic gap and Penn gap were evaluated for these binary semiconductors. The derived values of E h and E p were found to be in good agreement with the values obtained from the Phillips model and the Penn model. Electronic polarizability was investigated using the Chemla relation and the values were found to be in agreement with the results obtained from the Clausius-Mossotti relation. The Phillips ionicity (f i ) was evaluated and the obtained values were compared with the values obtained from the Tubbs model and the Pauling ionicity model. The evaluated values of various ionicities were used to determine the microhardness (H), cohesive energy or total energy (E) and bulk modulus (B) of these materials. The values of these parameters thus obtained are in good agreement with previously reported experimental data and theoretical findings.

  2. Crystallization characteristics of lithium calcium gallium aluminium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, H.; Salama, S.N.; Salman, S.M. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt). Glass Research Dept.

    2002-07-01

    The crystallization processes of lithium calcium gallium borosilicate glass containing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} have been followed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Lithium gallium silicate - LiGaSiO{sub 4} phase was formed as a major constituent during the crystallization of the base glass. Solid solutions of lithium aluminosilicate and lithium aluminium gallium silicate - LiAl{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}SiO{sub 4} phases were mostly formed as a function of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios in the glasses. Varieties of lithium borate phases including Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, {alpha}-Li{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Li{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, {beta}-LiBO{sub 2} and LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} phases were detected together with lithium metasilicate and lithium disilicate. Different calcium bearing phases including wollastonite-CaSiO{sub 3}, calcium borosilicate -Ca{sub 2}B{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}, larnite -Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, rankinite -Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, and calcium borate -CaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} were mainly detected as a function of heat-treatment in the CaO-containing samples. The role played by the glass oxide constituents in determining the crystallization characteristics and the nature of the crystal phases formed in the glasses are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Continuum modelling of silicon diffusion in indium gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Henry Lee, Jr.

    A possible method to overcome the physical limitations experienced by continued transistor scaling and continue improvements in performance and power consumption is integration of III-V semiconductors as alternative channel materials for logic devices. Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) is such a material from the III-V semiconductor family, which exhibit superior electron mobilities and injection velocities than that of silicon. In order for InGaAs integration to be realized, contact resistances must be minimized through maximizing activation of dopants in this material. Additionally, redistribution of dopants during processing must be clearly understood and ultimately controlled at the nanometer-scale. In this work, the activation and diffusion behavior of silicon, a prominent n-type dopant in InGaAs, has been characterized and subsequently modelled using the Florida Object Oriented Process and Device Simulator (FLOOPS). In contrast to previous reports, silicon exhibits non-negligible diffusion in InGaAs, even for smaller thermal budget rapid thermal anneals (RTAs). Its diffusion is heavily concentration-dependent, with broadening "shoulder-like" profiles when doping levels exceed 1-3x1019cm -3, for both ion-implanted and Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE)-grown cases. Likewise a max net-activation value of ˜1.7x1019cm -3 is consistently reached with enough thermal processing, regardless of doping method. In line with experimental results and several ab-initio calculation results, rapid concentration-dependent diffusion of Si in InGaAs and the upper limits of its activation is believed to be governed by cation vacancies that serve as compensating defects in heavily n-type regions of InGaAs. These results are ultimately in line with an amphoteric defect model, where the activation limits of dopants are an intrinsic limitation of the material, rather than governed by individual dopant species or their methods of incorporation. As a result a Fermi level dependent point

  4. Gallium(III) and indium(III) dithiolate complexes: Versatile precursors ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The chemistry of classical and organometallic complexes of gallium and indium with di- thiolate ligands, i.e., dithiocarboxylates, xanthates, dithiocarbamates, dithiophosphates, dithiophophinates and dithioarsenates, has been reviewed. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural aspects of these com- plexes are ...

  5. Impact of atmospheric species on copper indium gallium selenide solar cell stability: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the measurement techniques and results of studies on the stability of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells and their individual layers in the presence of atmospheric species is presented: in these studies, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells, their molybdenum back contact, and their

  6. Chemical composition of cadmium selenochromite crystals doped with indium, silver and gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'skij, N.K.; Ochertyanova, L.I.; Shabunina, G.G.; Aminov, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    The high accuracy chemical analysis Which allows one to observe doping effect on the cadmium selenochromite crystal composition is performed. The problem on the possibility of impurity atom substitution for basic element is considered on the basis of data of atomic-absorption analysis of doped crystals. The crystals of cadmium selenochromite doped with indium by chromium to cadmium ratio are distributed into two groups and probably two types of substitution take place. At 0.08-1.5 at.% indium concentrations the Cr/Cd ratio >2. One can assume that indium preferably takes cadmium tetrahedral positions whereas at 1.5-2.5 at. % concentrations the Cr/Cd ratio =2 and cadmium is substituted for silver which does not contradict crystallochemical and physical properties of this compound. In crystals with gallium the Cr/Cd ratio <2. Gallium preferably substitutes chromium

  7. Analysis on the Performance of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS Based Photovoltaic Thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkepli Afzam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the efficiency improvement of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS Photovoltaic (PV and also solar thermal collector. Photovoltaic thermal (PV/T can improve overall efficiency for PV and also solve the problem of limited roof space at urban area. Objective of this study is to clarify the effect of mass flow rate on the efficiency of the PV/T system. A CIGS solar cell is used with rated output power 65 W and 1.18 m2 of area. 4 set of experiments were carried out, which were: thermal collector with 0.12 kg/s flow rate, PV/T with 0.12 kg/s flow rate, PV/T with 0.09 kg/s flow rate and PV. It was found that PV/T with 0.12 kg/s flow rate had the highest electrical efficiency, 2.92 %. PV/T with 0.09 kg/s flow rate had the lowest electrical efficiency, 2.68 %. It also had 2 % higher overall efficiency. The efficiency gained is low due to several factors. The rated output power of the PV is low for the area of 1.18 m2. The packing factor of the PV also need to be considered as it may not be operated at the optimal packing factor. Furthermore, aluminium sheet of the PV may affect the PV temperature due to high thermal conductivity. Further study on more values of mass flow rate and also other parameters that affect the efficiency of the PV/T is necessary.

  8. Optimal indium-gallium-nitride Schottky-barrier thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tom H.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Monk, Peter B.

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional model was developed to simulate the optoelectronic characteristics of indium-gallium-nitride (InξGa1-ξN), thin-film, Schottky-barrier-junction solar cells. The solar cell comprises a window designed to reduce the reflection of incident light, Schottky-barrier and ohmic front electrodes, an n-doped InξGa1-ξN wafer, and a metallic periodically corrugated back-reflector (PCBR). The ratio of indium to gallium in the wafer varies periodically in the thickness direction, and thus the optical and electrical constitutive properties of the alloy also vary periodically. This material nonhomogeneity could be physically achieved by varying the fractional composition of indium and gallium during deposition. Empirical models for indium nitride and gallium nitride, combined with Vegard's law, were used to calculate the optical and electrical constitutive properties of the alloy. The periodic nonhomogeneity aids charge separation and, in conjunction with the PCBR, enables incident light to couple to multiple surface plasmon-polariton waves and waveguide modes. The profile of the resulting chargecarrier-generation rate when the solar cell is illuminated by the AM1.5G spectrum was calculated using the rigorous coupled-wave approach. The steady-state drift-diffusion equations were solved using COMSOL, which employs finite-element methods, to calculate the current density as a function of the voltage. Mid-band Shockley- Read-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates were taken to be the dominant methods of recombination. The model was used to study the effects of the solar-cell geometry and the shape of the periodic material nonhomogeneity on efficiency. The solar-cell efficiency was optimized using the differential evolution algorithm.

  9. Electron work function and composition of gallium-indium alloy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorova, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The dependences of electron work functions on the composition for gallium-indium alloy obtained under different conditions are compared. An attempt is made to estimate a change in the alloy surface composition caused by a change in temperature and in the boundary phase nature. For the case under consideration it has been shown to be reasonable to compare the dependences of the electron work functions not on the alloy volumetric composition but on the composition of its surface

  10. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. K. Gustafsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be −0.5 V and −0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode, respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective.

  11. Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Salts of Inorganic Group IIIa Metals: Aluminum, Gallium, Indium, and Thallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael M.; Adamson, Richard H.

    1971-01-01

    The toxicity and antitumor activity of salts of the Group IIIa metals aluminum, gallium, indium, and thallium were determined. With the (lethal dose)50 as a measure, the decreasing order of toxicity was TlCl3 ≥ In(NO3)3 > Ga(NO3)3 > Al(NO3)3. All four metals exhibited antitumor activity, but when the tumor was inoculated by a route different from that of the drug, only Ga+3 and, to a lesser extent, In+3 inhibited tumor growth. Ga(NO3)3 was found to inhibit the growth of three out of four rodent solid tumors. Gallium therefore has potential therapeutic usefulness for treatment of solid tumors in man. PMID:5283954

  12. Paired-pulse facilitation achieved in protonic/electronic hybrid indium gallium zinc oxide synaptic transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Li Qiang, E-mail: guoliqiang@ujs.edu.cn; Ding, Jian Ning; Huang, Yu Kai [Micro/Nano Science & Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Zhu, Li Qiang, E-mail: lqzhu@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Neuromorphic devices with paired pulse facilitation emulating that of biological synapses are the key to develop artificial neural networks. Here, phosphorus-doped nanogranular SiO{sub 2} electrolyte is used as gate dielectric for protonic/electronic hybrid indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) synaptic transistor. In such synaptic transistors, protons within the SiO{sub 2} electrolyte are deemed as neurotransmitters of biological synapses. Paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) behaviors for the analogous information were mimicked. The temperature dependent PPF behaviors were also investigated systematically. The results indicate that the protonic/electronic hybrid IGZO synaptic transistors would be promising candidates for inorganic synapses in artificial neural network applications.

  13. The new barium mercuride BaHg6 and ternary indium and gallium derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendorff, Marco; Röhr, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The new binary Hg-rich mercuride BaHg 6 crystallizes with a singular structure type. ► Ternary In substituted compounds are isotypic, whereas Ga substituted compounds are only structurally related. ► Structure relation to other Hg-rich alkali and alkaline earth mercurides. ► Discussion of covalent and metallic bonding aspects, as found by structure features and band structure calculations. - Abstract: The new binary barium mercuride BaHg 6 and the derived ternary indium and gallium containing compounds BaIn 1.2 Hg 4.8 and BaGa 0.8 Hg 5.2 were synthesized from melts of the elements, which were slowly cooled from 500 to 200 °C. Their crystal structures have been determined by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. The binary mercuride BaHg 6 (Pnma, a = 1338.9(3), b = 519.39(13), c = 1042.6(4) pm, Z = 4, R1 = 0.0885) and the isotypic indium substituted compound BaIn 1.2 Hg 4.8 as well as the structurally related gallium mercuride BaGa 0.8 Hg 5.2 (Cmcm, a = 729.77(7), b = 1910.1(2), c = 507.48(5) pm, Z = 4, R1 = 0.0606) crystallize with new structure types. Common features of both structures are planar nets of five- and eight-membered Hg rings, stacked perpendicular to the shortest axes. According to their lengths, the Hg–Hg bonds can be classified into three groups: strong, short ones (I, 285–292 pm), which are only found inside the nets, and longer distances (II), still carrying bond critical points, around 300 pm. Further contacts (III) serve to complete the coordination spheres of Hg/M (320–358 pm). The overall coordination numbers of Hg/M range from 10 to 13. The Ba cations are positioned in the centers of the octagons of the Hg/M nets, thus exhibiting a 5:8:5, i.e. 18, coordination by Hg/M atoms. DFT calculations of the electronic band structure of pure BaHg 6 and ordered models of the indium ( ′ BaInHg 5 ′ ) and the gallium ( ′ BaGaHg 5 ′ ) mercurides were performed using the FP-LAPW method. The calculated Bader charges

  14. Determination of lattice orientation in aluminium alloy grains by low energy gallium ion-channelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, Jonathan R. [Aerospace Metal Composites Ltd., RAE Road, Farnborough, GU14 6XE (United Kingdom); Dashwood, Richard J. [WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chater, Richard J., E-mail: r.chater@imperial.ac.u [Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Polished sections of a fine-grained aluminium, silicon carbide metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy were prepared by sputtering using a low energy gallium ion source and column (FIB). The MMC had been processed by high temperature extrusion. Images of the polished surface were recorded using the ion-induced secondary electron emission. The metal matrix grains were distinguished by gallium ion-channelling contrast from the silicon carbide component. The variation of the contrast from the aluminium grains with tilt angle can be recorded and used to determine lattice orientation with the contrast from the silicon carbide (SiC) component as a reference. This method is rapid and suits site-specific investigations where classical methods of sample preparation fail.

  15. ANALYSIS OF THE WATER-SPLITTING CAPABILITIES OF GALLIUM INDIUM PHOSPHIDE NITRIDE (GaInPN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Head, J.; Turner, J.

    2007-01-01

    With increasing demand for oil, the fossil fuels used to power society’s vehicles and homes are becoming harder to obtain, creating pollution problems and posing hazard’s to people’s health. Hydrogen, a clean and effi cient energy carrier, is one alternative to fossil fuels. Certain semiconductors are able to harness the energy of solar photons and direct it into water electrolysis in a process known as photoelectrochemical water-splitting. P-type gallium indium phosphide (p-GaInP2) in tandem with GaAs is a semiconductor system that exhibits water-splitting capabilities with a solar-tohydrogen effi ciency of 12.4%. Although this material is effi cient at producing hydrogen through photoelectrolysis it has been shown to be unstable in solution. By introducing nitrogen into this material, there is great potential for enhanced stability. In this study, gallium indium phosphide nitride Ga1-yInyP1-xNx samples were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition in an atmospheric-pressure vertical reactor. Photocurrent spectroscopy determined these materials to have a direct band gap around 2.0eV. Mott-Schottky analysis indicated p-type behavior with variation in fl atband potentials with varied frequencies and pH’s of solutions. Photocurrent onset and illuminated open circuit potential measurements correlated to fl atband potentials determined from previous studies. Durability analysis suggested improved stability over the GaInP2 system.

  16. Optical and Micro-Structural Characterization of MBE Grown Indium Gallium Nitride Polar Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    El Afandy, Rami

    2011-07-07

    Gallium nitride and related materials have ushered in scientific and technological breakthrough for lighting, mass data storage and high power electronic applications. These III-nitride materials have found their niche in blue light emitting diodes and blue laser diodes. Despite the current development, there are still technological problems that still impede the performance of such devices. Three-dimensional nanostructures are proposed to improve the electrical and thermal properties of III-nitride optical devices. This thesis consolidates the characterization results and unveils the unique physical properties of polar indium gallium nitride quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy technique. In this thesis, a theoretical overview of the physical, structural and optical properties of polar III-nitrides quantum dots will be presented. Particular emphasis will be given to properties that distinguish truncated-pyramidal III-nitride quantum dots from other III-V semiconductor based quantum dots. The optical properties of indium gallium nitride quantum dots are mainly dominated by large polarization fields, as well as quantum confinement effects. Hence, the experimental investigations for such quantum dots require performing bandgap calculations taking into account the internal strain fields, polarization fields and confinement effects. The experiments conducted in this investigation involved the transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction as well as photoluminescence spectroscopy. The analysis of the temperature dependence and excitation power dependence of the PL spectra sheds light on the carrier dynamics within the quantum dots, and its underlying wetting layer. A further analysis shows that indium gallium nitride quantum dots through three-dimensional confinements are able to prevent the electronic carriers from getting thermalized into defects which grants III-nitrides quantum dot based light emitting diodes superior thermally induced optical

  17. Indium-doped aluminium oxide as a non-radioactive test aerosol for aerosol experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosselmeyer, E.; Mueller, H.L.; Seidel, A.; Pickering, S.

    1986-01-01

    For testing inhalation facilities it is advantageous to use a non-radioactive, low toxicity test aerosol which can be detected at low concentrations. These criteria are met by a mechanically generated aerosol of indium-doped alumina. Although some cases of lung fibroses have been associated with the inhalation of aluminium compounds in industry, aluminum oxide aerosols are generally considered to be non-toxic. Indium was chosen as a dopant material because (a) it is not normally present in the lung in detectable amounts, (b) it is chemically similar to aluminum and (c) it can be detected in trace amounts by neutron activation analysis (Friberg et al., 1979). Indium aerosols have the same advantages as radioactive tracers for ease of detection, but they are non-toxic during use. This combination of properties offers advantages that could be of use in a wider range of applications than hitherto used, e.g. in inhalation experiments. This paper describes nose-only inhalation experiments on rats using an aerosol of alumina doped with indium. (author)

  18. The comparison between gallium arsenide and indium gallium arsenide as materials for solar cell performance using Silvaco application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahari, Suhaila Mohd; Norizan, Mohd Natashah; Mohamad, Ili Salwani; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Taking, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is about the development of single and multilayer solar cells using GaAs and InGaAs in AM1.5 condition. The study includes the modeling structure and simulation of the device using Silvaco applications. The performance in term of efficiency of Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) and GaAs material was studied by modification of the doping concentration and thickness of material in solar cells. The efficiency of the GaAs solar cell was higher than InGaAs solar cell for single layer solar cell. Single layer GaAs achieved an efficiency about 25% compared to InGaAs which is only 2.65% of efficiency. For multilayer which includes both GaAs and InGaAs, the output power, P max was 8.91nW/cm² with the efficiency only 8.51%. GaAs is one of the best materials to be used in solar cell as a based compared to InGaAs

  19. The comparison between gallium arsenide and indium gallium arsenide as materials for solar cell performance using Silvaco application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahari, Suhaila Mohd; Norizan, Mohd Natashah; Mohamad, Ili Salwani; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Taking, Sanna [School of Microelectronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Kampus Pauh Putra, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    The work presented in this paper is about the development of single and multilayer solar cells using GaAs and InGaAs in AM1.5 condition. The study includes the modeling structure and simulation of the device using Silvaco applications. The performance in term of efficiency of Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) and GaAs material was studied by modification of the doping concentration and thickness of material in solar cells. The efficiency of the GaAs solar cell was higher than InGaAs solar cell for single layer solar cell. Single layer GaAs achieved an efficiency about 25% compared to InGaAs which is only 2.65% of efficiency. For multilayer which includes both GaAs and InGaAs, the output power, P{sub max} was 8.91nW/cm² with the efficiency only 8.51%. GaAs is one of the best materials to be used in solar cell as a based compared to InGaAs.

  20. The comparison between gallium arsenide and indium gallium arsenide as materials for solar cell performance using Silvaco application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahari, Suhaila Mohd; Norizan, Mohd Natashah; Mohamad, Ili Salwani; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Taking, Sanna

    2015-05-01

    The work presented in this paper is about the development of single and multilayer solar cells using GaAs and InGaAs in AM1.5 condition. The study includes the modeling structure and simulation of the device using Silvaco applications. The performance in term of efficiency of Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) and GaAs material was studied by modification of the doping concentration and thickness of material in solar cells. The efficiency of the GaAs solar cell was higher than InGaAs solar cell for single layer solar cell. Single layer GaAs achieved an efficiency about 25% compared to InGaAs which is only 2.65% of efficiency. For multilayer which includes both GaAs and InGaAs, the output power, Pmax was 8.91nW/cm² with the efficiency only 8.51%. GaAs is one of the best materials to be used in solar cell as a based compared to InGaAs.

  1. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Reuben J; Benck, Jesse D; Young, James L; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis because MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light-limited current density) after 60 h of operation. This represents a 500-fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  2. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Reuben J.; Benck, Jesse D.; Young, James L.; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis since MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light limited current density) after 60 hours of operation. This represents a five-hundred fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  3. Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S.; Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A.; Quackenbush, N. F.; Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J.; Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C.; White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

  4. Bowtie nanoantenna integrated with indium gallium arsenide antimonide for uncooled infrared detector with enhanced sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sangjo; Sarabandi, Kamal

    2013-12-10

    A novel high-impedance nanoantenna with an embedded matching network is implemented to realize a highly sensitive infrared detector. A bowtie antenna is operated at its antiparallel resonance and loaded with a small low-bandgap (E(g)=0.52  eV) indium gallium arsenide antimonide (InGaAsSb) p-n junction. The structure is optimized for maximum power transfer and significant field enhancement at its terminals for a desired frequency band where the maximum quantum efficiency of InGaAsSb is observed. The sensitivity improvement of the proposed detector is evaluated against the traditional bulk detector and it is shown that the detectivity is improved by the field enhancement factor, which is approximately 20 for the case considered here.

  5. High performance Schottky diodes based on indium-gallium-zinc-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Aimin, E-mail: A.Song@manchester.ac.uk [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Xin, Qian [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) Schottky diodes exhibit excellent performance in comparison with conventional devices used in future flexible high frequency electronics. In this work, a high performance Pt IGZO Schottky diode was presented by using a new fabrication process. An argon/oxygen mixture gas was introduced during the deposition of the Pt layer to reduce the oxygen deficiency at the Schottky interface. The diode showed a high barrier height of 0.92 eV and a low ideality factor of 1.36 from the current–voltage characteristics. Even the radius of the active area was 0.1 mm, and the diode showed a cut-off frequency of 6 MHz in the rectifier circuit. Using the diode as a demodulator, a potential application was also demonstrated in this work.

  6. Measuring systolic ankle and toe pressure using the strain gauge technique--a comparison study between mercury and indium-gallium strain gauges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Rikke; Wiinberg, Niels; Simonsen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    in the European Union. The aim of this study was to compare an indium-gallium strain gauge to the established mercury-containing strain gauge. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred to the Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals for measurements of systolic...... ankle and toe pressures volunteered for the study. Ankle and toe pressures were measured twice with the mercury and the indium-gallium strain gauge in random order. Comparison of the correlation between the mean pressure using the mercury and the indium-gallium device and the difference between the two...... devices was performed for both toe and ankle level. RESULTS: A total of 53 patients were included (36 male). Mean age was 69 (range, 45-92 years). Mean pressures at toe and ankle level with the mercury and the indium-gallium strain gauges were 77 (range, 0-180) mm Hg and 113 (range, 15-190) mm Hg...

  7. Preparation of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor films by electrodeposition for fabricating high efficiency solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Hasoon, Falah S.; Wiesner, Holm; Keane, James; Noufi, Rommel; Ramanathan, Kannan

    1999-02-16

    A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of 13.6% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor thin film. The film is fabricated by first simultaneously electrodepositing copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a glass/molybdenum substrate (12/14). The electrodeposition voltage is a high frequency AC voltage superimposed upon a DC voltage to improve the morphology and growth rate of the film. The electrodeposition is followed by physical vapor deposition to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In.sub.1-n Ga.sub.x)Se.sub.2, with the ratio of Ga/(In+Ga) being approximately 0.39.

  8. Studies on analysis of gallium and indium in zinc ores by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Youn Ok; Sim, Sang Kwon; Sung, Hack Je; Yang, Myung Kwon

    1993-01-01

    The separation of gallium and indium from the matrix elements such as zinc and other ions, especially from Fe(III) ion was studied for the determination of trace level of them in zinc ores and zinc blendes by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry(ICP-AES). Gallium and indium were extracted from the sample solution with a solvent of tributyl phosphate(TBP). The type and concentration of acid, interferences of other ions, the ratio of aqueous phase to organic phase, TBP concentration, sripping efficiency were optimized for the effective extraction. Gallium and indium were separated from other ions in the 5N hydrochloric acid solution of the samples by the extraction with 100% TBP. In this time, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with hydroxylamine hydrochloride to prevent its coextraction prior to the main extraction. After stripped from organic phase by the back-extraction with 0.02N HCl, they were determined in the aqueous phase by ICP-AES. This method was known to be quantitative from the overall extraction of more than 95%. (Author)

  9. Potential aluminium(III)- and gallium(III)-selective optical sensors based on porphyrazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslinski, Tomasz; Tykarska, Ewa; Kryjewski, Michal; Osmalek, Tomasz; Sobiak, Stanislaw; Gdaniec, Maria; Dutkiewicz, Zbigniew; Mielcarek, Jadwiga

    2011-01-01

    Porphyrazines possessing non-coordinating alkyl (propyl) and aralkyl (4-tert-butylphenyl) groups in the periphery were studied as optical sensors for a set of mono-, di- and trivalent cations. Investigated porphyrazines in the UV-Vis monitored titrations revealed significant responses towards aluminium and gallium cations, unlike other metal ions studied. Additionally, porphyrazine possessing 4-tert-butylphenyl peripheral substituents showed sensor property towards ruthenium cation and was chosen for further investigation. The presence of isosbestic points in absorption spectra for its titration with aluminium, gallium and ruthenium cations, accompanied by a linear Benesi-Hildebrand plot, proved complex formation. The continuous variation method was used to determine binding stoichiometry in 1:1 porphyrazine-metal ratio. X-Ray studies and density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate octa(4-tert-butylphenyl)porphyrazine structure. The results helped to explain the observed selectivity towards certain ions. Interaction between ion and porphyrazine meso nitrogen in a Lewis acid-Lewis base manner is proposed.

  10. An Indium Gallium Arsenide Visible/SWIR Focal Plane Array for Low Light Level Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marshall J.; Ettenberg, Martin H.; Lange, Michael J.; Olsen, Gregory H.

    1999-01-01

    PIN photodiodes fabricated from indium gallium arsenide lattice-matched to indium phosphide substrates (In(.53)Ga(.47)As/InP) exhibit low reverse saturation current densities (JD 10(exp 6) omega-sq cm) at T=290K. Backside-illuminated, hybrid-integrated InGaAs FPAs are sensitive from 0.9 micrometers to 1.7 micrometers. 290K detectivities, D(*), greater than 10(exp 14) cm-(square root of Hz/W) are demonstrated. This represents the highest room temperature detectivity of any infrared material. The long wavelength cutoff (1.7 micrometers) makes In(.53)Ga(.47)As an idea match to the available airglow that has major peaks at 1.3 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers. The short wavelength 'cut-on' at 0.9 micrometers is due to absorption in the InP substrate. We will report on new InGaAs FPA epitaxial structures and processing techniques. These have resulted in improved performance in the form of a 10 x increase in detectivity and visible response via removal of the InP substrate. The resulting device features visible and SWIR response with greater than 15% quantum efficiency at 0.5 micrometers while maintaining the long wavelength cutoff. Imaging has been demonstrated under overcast starlight/urban glow conditions with cooling provided by a single stage thermoelectric cooler. Details on the material structure and device fabrication, quantitative characterization of spectral response and detectivity, as well as examples of night vision imagery are presented.

  11. Conventional and rapid thermal annealing of spray pyrolyzed copper indium gallium sulfide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Erkan; Sankir, Mehmet; Sankir, Nurdan Demirci

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Spray pyrolysis of copper indium gallium sulfide (CuInGaS 2 ) thin films. • Environmentally friendly method to produce solar cell quality absorber layers. • Effects of post-annealing process on the film properties of CuInGaS 2 . • Pros-and-cons of conventional and rapid thermal annealing. • Enhanced electrical and optical properties via annealing. - Abstract: With this study for the first time effects of post annealing on morphological, structural, optical and electrical properties of spray pyrolyzed copper–indium–gallium–sulfide (CuInGaS 2 ) thin films have been investigated. Pros-and-cons of conventional (CA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) have been discussed to obtain the high quality thin film absorbers for solar cell applications. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that all of the spray pyrolyzed CuInGaS 2 thin films have chalcopyrite structures with a highly (1 1 2) preferential orientation. Raman spectra also confirmed this structure. However, metal oxide secondary phases such as copper oxide and gallium oxide were detected when the temperature ramp rate was increased during RTA process. Energy dispersive X-ray measurements revealed that both copper and gallium diffused through the surface after annealing processes. Moreover, copper diffusion became pronounced especially at high annealing temperatures. Optical transmission measurements in the wavelength range between 600 and 1100 nm showed that band gap energy of CuInGaS 2 thin films was ranging between 1.36 and 1.51 eV depending on the annealing conditions. Very high mobility values have been observed for both processes. The maximum electrical mobility, 30.9 cm 2 /V s, was observed for the films annealed at 600 °C via CA. This is the highest reported value among the CuInGaS 2 thin film absorbers deposited by both solution and vacuum based techniques. As a result, post-annealing of spray pyrolyzed CuInGaS 2 thin films without usage of highly toxic gases, reported in this

  12. Flexible indium-gallium-zinc-oxide Schottky diode operating beyond 2.45 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Yunpeng; Zhang, Binglei; Wang, Hanbin; Xin, Qian; Song, Aimin

    2015-07-01

    Mechanically flexible mobile phones have been long anticipated due to the rapid development of thin-film electronics in the last couple of decades. However, to date, no such phone has been developed, largely due to a lack of flexible electronic components that are fast enough for the required wireless communications, in particular the speed-demanding front-end rectifiers. Here Schottky diodes based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) are fabricated on flexible plastic substrates. Using suitable radio-frequency mesa structures, a range of IGZO thicknesses and diode sizes have been studied. The results have revealed an unexpected dependence of the diode speed on the IGZO thickness. The findings enable the best optimized flexible diodes to reach 6.3 GHz at zero bias, which is beyond the critical benchmark speed of 2.45 GHz to satisfy the principal frequency bands of smart phones such as those for cellular communication, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and global satellite positioning.

  13. Copper-indium-gallium-diselenide nanoparticles synthesized by a solvothermal method for solar cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou Chuan-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chalcopyrite copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS nanoparticles are useful for photovoltaic applications. In this study, the synthesis of CIGS powder was examined, and the powder was successfully synthesized using a relatively simple and convenient elemental solvothermal route. From the reactions of elemental Cu, In, Se and Ga(NO33 powders in an autoclave with ethylenediamine as a solvent, spherical CIGS nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 20-40 nm, were obtained using a temperature of 200°C for 36h. The structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the as-synthesized CIGS were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In this sample, the mole ratio of Cu:In:Ga:Se was equal to 0.89:0.71:0.29:2.01, and the optical band gap was found to be 1.18 eV. The solar cell obtained a power conversion efficiency of 5.62% under standard air mass 1.5 global illumination.

  14. Photovoltaic characterization of Copper-Indium-Gallium Sulfide (CIGS2) solar cells for lower absorber thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasekar, Parag S.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2010-01-01

    Chalcopyrites are important contenders among thin-film solar cells due to their direct band gap and higher absorption coefficient. Copper-Indium-Gallium Sulfide (CIGS2) is a chalcopyrite material with a near-optimum band gap of ∼ 1.5 eV. Record efficiency of 11.99% has been achieved on a 2.7 μm CIGS2 film prepared by sulfurization at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) PV Materials Lab. In this work, photovoltaic performance analysis has been carried out for a 1.5 μm absorber prepared under similar conditions as that of a 2.7 μm thick absorber sample. It was observed that there is an increase in diode factor and reverse saturation current density when the absorber thickness was decreased. The diode factor increased from 1.69 to 2.18 and reverse saturation current density increased from 1.04 x 10 -10 mA/cm 2 to 1.78 x 10 -8 mA/cm 2 . This can be attributed to a decrease in the grain size when the absorber thickness is decreased. It was also observed that there is an improvement in the shunt resistance. Improvement in shunt resistance can be attributed to optimized value of i:ZnO for lower absorber thickness and less shunting paths due to a smoother absorber.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide-Based Solar Cells by SCAPS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ouédraogo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a one-dimensional simulation program Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator in 1 Dimension (SCAPS-1D to investigate Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide- (CIGS- based solar cells properties. Starting with a conventional ZnO-B/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS structure, we simulated the parameters of current-voltage characteristics and showed how the absorber layer thickness, hole density, and band gap influence the short-circuit current density (Jsc, open-circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and efficiency of solar cell. Our simulation results showed that all electrical parameters are greatly affected by the absorber thickness (w below 1000 nm, due to the increase of back-contact recombination and very poor absorption. Increasing hole density (p or absorber band gap (Eg improves Voc and leads to high efficiency, which equals value of 16.1% when p = 1016 cm−3 and Eg=1.2 eV. In order to reduce back-contact recombination, the effect of a very thin layer with high band gap inserted near the back contact and acting as electrons reflector, the so-called back-electron reflector (EBR, has been investigated. The performances of the solar cells are significantly improved, when ultrathin absorbers (w < 500 nm are used; the corresponding gain of Jsc due to the EBR is 3 mA/cm2. Our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature from experiments.

  16. Layer-by-Layer Nanoassembly of Copper Indium Gallium Selenium Nanoparticle Films for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of CIGS nanoparticles interdigited with polymers have been fabricated through a cost-effective nonvacuum film deposition process called layer-by-layer (LbL nanoassembly. CIGS nanoparticles synthesized by heating copper chloride, indium chloride, gallium chloride, and selenium in oleylamine were dispersed in water, and desired surface charges were obtained through pH regulation and by coating the particles with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS. Raising the pH of the nanoparticle dispersion reduced the zeta-potential from +61 mV at pH 7 to −51 mV at pH 10.5. Coating the CIGS nanoparticles with PSS (CIGS-PSS produced a stable dispersion in water with −56.9 mV zeta-potential. Thin films of oppositely charged CIGS nanoparticles (CIGS/CIGS, CIGS nanoparticles and PSS (CIGS/PSS, and PSS-coated CIGS nanoparticles and polyethylenimine (CIGS-PSS/PEI were constructed through the LbL nanoassembly. Film thickness and resistivity of each bilayer of the films were measured, and photoelectric properties of the films were studied for solar cell applications. Solar cell devices fabricated with a 219 nm CIGS film, when illuminated by 50 W light-source, produced 0.7 V open circuit voltage and 0.3 mA/cm2 short circuit current density.

  17. Forward-biased current annealing of radiation degraded indium phosphide and gallium arsenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Sherif; Cypranowski, Corinne; Anspaugh, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary results of a novel approach to low-temperature annealing of previously irradiated indium phosphide and gallium arsenide solar cells are reported. The technique is based on forward-biased current annealing. The two types of III-V solar cells were irradiated with 1-MeV electrons to a fluence level of (1-10) x 10 to the 14th electrons/sq cm. Several annealing attempts were made, varying all conditions. Optimum annealing was achieved when cells were injected with minority currents at a constant 90 C. The current density for each type of cell was also determined. Significant recovery of degraded parameters was achieved in both cases. However, the InP cell recovery notably exceeded the recovery in GaAs cells. The recovery is thought to be caused by current-stimulated reordering of the radiator-induced displacement damage. Both types of cell were then subjected to several cycles of irradiation and annealing. The results were also very promising. The significant recovery of degraded cell parameters at low temperature might play a major role in considerably extending the end of life of future spacecraft.

  18. Study of the Hall effect in gallium and indium arsenides in solid and liquid phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Kol'tsov, V.B.; Sulejmanov, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    Hall effect in gallium and indium arsenides in solid and liquid state is investigated within the framework of a united experiment for the first time. As a result the Hall constant change in the course of these compounds melting is determined experimentally, and on the basis of data obtained and using well-known hopping electric conductivity values, changes of charge carrier density and mobility are estimated. The observed differences in the jumps of pointed characteristics in the course of melting of GaAs compounds on the one hand and InAs - on the other are explained by behaviour peculiarities of the latter in a solid phase dose to the melting temperature. Data on Hall effect in GaAs and InAs melts is abtaned for the first time. Thermal width values of forbidden zone of A 3 As compound calculated on the basis of Hall measurements, conform well with assessment results on the basis of data on electric conductivity

  19. Evaluation of critical materials for five advanced design photovoltaic cells with an assessment of indium and gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. This report presents the results of the screening of the five following advanced PV cell designs: polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide frontwall, polycrystalline gallium arsenide MIS, and advanced concentrator-500X. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 GWe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online cpacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary basline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. Earlier DOE sponsored work on the assessment of critical materials in PV cells conclusively identtified indium and gallium as warranting further investigation as to their availability. Therefore, this report includes a discussion of the future availability of gallium and indium. (WHK)

  20. Synthesis, Characterization, and Processing of Copper, Indium, and Gallium Dithiocarbamates for Energy Conversion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraj, S. A.; Duffy, N. V.; Hepp, A. F.; Cowen, J. E.; Hoops, M. D.; Brothrs, S. M.; Baird, M. J.; Fanwick, P. E.; Harris, J. D.; Jin, M. H.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Ten dithiocarbamate complexes of indium(III) and gallium(III) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra and melting point. Each complex was decomposed thermally and its decomposition products separated and identified with the combination of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Their potential utility as photovoltaic materials precursors was assessed. Bis(dibenzyldithiocarbamato)- and bis(diethyldithiocarbamato)copper(II), Cu(S2CN(CH2C6H5)2)2 and Cu(S2CN(C2H5)2)2 respectively, have also been examined for their suitability as precursors for copper sulfides for the fabrication of photovoltaic materials. Each complex was decomposed thermally and the products analyzed by GC/MS, TGA and FTIR. The dibenzyl derivative complex decomposed at a lower temperature (225-320 C) to yield CuS as the product. The diethyl derivative complex decomposed at a higher temperature (260-325 C) to yield Cu2S. No Cu containing fragments were noted in the mass spectra. Unusual recombination fragments were observed in the mass spectra of the diethyl derivative. Tris(bis(phenylmethyl)carbamodithioato-S,S'), commonly referred to as tris(N,N-dibenzyldithiocarbamato)indium(III), In(S2CNBz2)3, was synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1(bar) with two molecules per unit cell. The material was further characterized using a novel analytical system employing the combined powers of thermogravimetric analysis, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to investigate its potential use as a precursor for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of thin film materials for photovoltaic applications. Upon heating, the material thermally decomposes to release CS2 and benzyl moieties in to the gas phase, resulting in bulk In2S3. Preliminary spray CVD experiments indicate that In(S2CNBz2)3 decomposed on a Cu substrate reacts to produce

  1. Measuring systolic ankle and toe pressure using the strain gauge technique--a comparison study between mercury and indium-gallium strain gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broholm, Rikke; Wiinberg, Niels; Simonsen, Lene

    2014-09-01

    Measurement of the ankle and toe pressures are often performed using a plethysmograph, compression cuffs and a strain gauge. Usually, the strain gauge contains mercury but other alternatives exist. From 2014, the mercury-containing strain gauge will no longer be available in the European Union. The aim of this study was to compare an indium-gallium strain gauge to the established mercury-containing strain gauge. Consecutive patients referred to the Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals for measurements of systolic ankle and toe pressures volunteered for the study. Ankle and toe pressures were measured twice with the mercury and the indium-gallium strain gauge in random order. Comparison of the correlation between the mean pressure using the mercury and the indium-gallium device and the difference between the two devices was performed for both toe and ankle level. A total of 53 patients were included (36 male). Mean age was 69 (range, 45-92 years). Mean pressures at toe and ankle level with the mercury and the indium-gallium strain gauges were 77 (range, 0-180) mm Hg and 113 (range, 15-190) mm Hg, respectively. Comparison between the mercury and the indium-gallium strain gauge showed a difference in toe blood pressure values of - 0.7 mm Hg (SD: 7.0). At the ankle level, a difference of 2.0 mm Hg (SD: 8.6) was found. The two different devices agree sufficiently in the measurements of systolic ankle and toe pressure for the indium-gallium strain gauge to replace the mercury strain gauge.

  2. Blade-coated sol-gel indium-gallium-zinc-oxide for inverted polymer solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Huei Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The inverted organic solar cell was fabricated by using sol-gel indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO as the electron-transport layer. The IGZO precursor solution was deposited by blade coating with simultaneous substrate heating at 120 °C from the bottom and hot wind from above. Uniform IGZO film of around 30 nm was formed after annealing at 400 °C. Using the blend of low band-gap polymer poly[(4,8-bis-(2-ethylhexyloxy-benzo(1,2-b:4,5-b’dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt- (4-(2-ethylhexanoyl-thieno [3,4-b]thiophene--2-6-diyl] (PBDTTT-C-T and [6,6]-Phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester ([70]PCBM as the active layer for the inverted organic solar cell, an efficiency of 6.2% was achieved with a blade speed of 180 mm/s for the IGZO. The efficiency of the inverted organic solar cells was found to depend on the coating speed of the IGZO films, which was attributed to the change in the concentration of surface OH groups. Compared to organic solar cells of conventional structure using PBDTTT-C-T: [70]PCBM as active layer, the inverted organic solar cells showed significant improvement in thermal stability. In addition, the chemical composition, as well as the work function of the IGZO film at the surface and inside can be tuned by the blade speed, which may find applications in other areas like thin-film transistors.

  3. Studies on the hydride formation of Zintl-phases of the alkaline earth metals with aluminium, gallium and silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Wenderoth, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Untersuchung der Hydridbildung von Zintl-Phasen einiger Erdalkalimetalle (Calcium, Strontium, Barium) sowie Europium und Ytterbium mit den elektronegativeren Bindungspartnern Aluminium, Gallium und Silicium. Der Fokus lag dabei auf der Strukturaufklärung mittels Röntgenbeugung, sowie (in situ-)Neutronenbeugung und der damit verbundenen Möglichkeit, Reaktionswege aufzuklären. Hiervon wurde bei CaSi und SrGa2 Gebrauch gemacht, die ex situ berei...

  4. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under positive gate bias stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niang, K.M.; Barquinha, P.M.C.; Martins, R.F.P.; Cobb, B.; Powell, M.J.; Flewitt, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) employing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel layer exhibit a positive shift in the threshold voltage under the application of positive gate bias stress (PBS). The time and temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shift was measured and

  5. Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) : A Liquid Metal Alloy for the Formation of Stable Structures in Microchannels at Room Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickey, Michael D.; Chiechi, Ryan C.; Larsen, Ryan J.; Weiss, Emily A.; Weitz, David A.; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the rheological behavior of the liquid metal eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn) as it is injected into microfluidic channels to form stable microstructures of liquid metal. EGaIn is well-suited for this application because of its rheological properties at room temperature: it

  6. Growths of indium gallium nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei-Che [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan, E-mail: hong@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    InGaN nanowires (NWs) were grown on Si(100) at 700 °C using Au catalyst in a plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor. As the indium vapor pressure was low around 16 mPa during the growths, only the curved GaN NWs could be grown containing indium impurities. By increasing the indium vapor pressure to 53 mPa during the growths, InGaN NWs were transformed to less curved NWs with a broad distribution of NW diameters from 20 to 90 nm. The room temperature photoluminescence of InGaN NWs grown at a high indium vapor pressure showed a broad emission peak at 417 nm, corresponding to an average of 14.5% indium composition in the NWs, with a large full-width at half maximum of 77 nm. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of InGaN NWs showed that the growth orientation was along [100] for the low indium vapor pressure growths and was transformed to along [001] for the high indium vapor pressure growths. - Highlights: • High-quality single-crystalline InGaN nanowires were synthesized. • The indium content of InGaN nanowires grown at 700 °C did not exceed 15%. • A small amount of indium added into the nanowires induced stacking faults.

  7. Optical and micro-structural characterizations of MBE grown indium gallium nitride polar quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2011-12-01

    Comparison between indium rich (27%) InGaN/GaN quantum dots (QDs) and their underlying wetting layer (WL) is performed by means of optical and structural characterizations. With increasing temperature, micro-photoluminescence (μPL) study reveals the superior ability of QDs to prevent carrier thermalization to nearby traps compared to the two dimensional WL. Thus, explaining the higher internal quantum efficiency of the QD nanostructure compared to the higher dimensional WL. Structural characterization (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) reveal an increase in the QD indium content over the WL indium content which is due to strain induced drifts. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. Gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Jaskula, Brian W.; Kimball, Bryn E.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Gallium is a soft, silvery metallic element with an atomic number of 31 and the chemical symbol Ga. Gallium is used in a wide variety of products that have microelectronic components containing either gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium nitride (GaN). GaAs is able to change electricity directly into laser light and is used in the manufacture of optoelectronic devices (laser diodes, light-emitting diodes [LEDs], photo detectors, and solar cells), which are important for aerospace and telecommunications applications and industrial and medical equipment. GaAs is also used in the production of highly specialized integrated circuits, semiconductors, and transistors; these are necessary for defense applications and high-performance computers. For example, cell phones with advanced personal computer-like functionality (smartphones) use GaAs-rich semiconductor components. GaN is used principally in the manufacture of LEDs and laser diodes, power electronics, and radio-frequency electronics. Because GaN power transistors operate at higher voltages and with a higher power density than GaAs devices, the uses for advanced GaN-based products are expected to increase in the future. Gallium technologies also have large power-handling capabilities and are used for cable television transmission, commercial wireless infrastructure, power electronics, and satellites. Gallium is also used for such familiar applications as screen backlighting for computer notebooks, flat-screen televisions, and desktop computer monitors.Gallium is dispersed in small amounts in many minerals and rocks where it substitutes for elements of similar size and charge, such as aluminum and zinc. For example, gallium is found in small amounts (about 50 parts per million) in such aluminum-bearing minerals as diaspore-boehmite and gibbsite, which form bauxite deposits, and in the zinc-sulfide mineral sphalerite, which is found in many mineral deposits. At the present time, gallium metal is derived mainly as a

  9. Fabrication of Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Thin Film Transistor by using Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wencong

    Compared with other transparent semiconductors, amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) has both good uniformity and high electron mobility, which make it as a good candidate for displays or large-scale transparent circuit. The goal of this research is to fabricate alpha-IGZO thin film transistor (TFT) with channel milled by focused ion beam (FIB). TFTs with different channel geometries can be achieved by applying different milling strategies, which facilitate modifying complex circuit. Technology Computer-Aided Design (TCAD) was also introduced to understand the effect of trapped charges on the device performance. The investigation of the trapped charge at IGZO/SiO2 interface was performed on the IGZO TFT on p-Silicon substrate with thermally grown SiO2 as dielectric. The subgap density-of-state model was used for the simulation, which includes conduction band-tail trap states and donor-like state in the subgap. The result shows that the de-trapping and donor-state ionization determine the interface trapped charge density at various gate biases. Simulation of IGZO TFT with FIB defined channel on the same substrate was also applied. The drain and source were connected intentionally during metal deposition and separated by FIB milling. Based on the simulation, the Ga ions in SiO2 introduced by the ion beam was drifted by gate bias and affects the saturation drain current. Both side channel and direct channel transparent IGZO TFTs were fabricated on the glass substrate with coated ITO. Higher ion energy (30 keV) was used to etch through the substrate between drain and source and form side channels at the corner of milled trench. Lower ion energy (16 keV) was applied to stop the milling inside IGZO thin film and direct channel between drain and source was created. Annealing after FIB milling removed the residual Ga ions and the devices show switch feature. Direct channel shows higher saturation drain current (~10-6 A) compared with side channel (~10-7 A) because

  10. Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide: Phase Formation and Crystallization Kinetics during Millisecond Laser Spike Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David Michael

    Flat panel displays have become ubiquitous, enabling products from highresolution cell phones to ultra-large television panels. Amorphous silicon (a- Si) has been the industry workhorse as the active semiconductor in pixeladdressing transistors due to its uniformity and low production costs. However, a-Si can no longer support larger and higher-resolution displays, and new materials with higher electron mobilities are required. Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), which retains the uniformity and low cost of amorphous films, has emerged as a viable candidate due to its enhanced transport properties. However, a-IGZO devices suffer from long-term instabilities--the origins of which are not yet fully understood--causing a drift in switching characteristics over time and affecting product lifetime. More recently, devices fabricated from textured nanocrystalline IGZO, termed c-axis aligned crystalline (CAAC), have demonstrated superior stability. Unfortunately, little is known regarding the phase formation and crystallization kinetics of either the CAAC structure or in the broader ternary IGZO system. Crystallinity and texture of CAAC IGZO films deposited by RF reactive sputtering were studied and characterized over a wide range of deposition conditions. The characteristic CAAC (0 0 9) peak at 2theta = 30° was observed by X-ray diffraction, and nanocrystalline domain texture was determined using a general area detector diffraction system (GADDS). Highly ordered CAAC films were obtained near the InGaZnO4 composition at a substrate temperature of 310 °C and in a 10%O2/90% Ar sputtering ambient. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the formation of CAAC and identified 2-3 nm domains coherently aligned over large ranges extending beyond the field of view (15 nm x 15 nm). Cross-section HRTEM of the CAAC/substrate interface shows formation of an initially disordered IGZO layer prior to CAAC formation, suggesting a nucleation mechanism

  11. High performance solution-deposited amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors by oxygen plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pradipta K.

    2012-05-16

    Solution-deposited amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors(TFTs) with high performance were fabricated using O2-plasma treatment of the films prior to high temperature annealing. The O2-plasma treatment resulted in a decrease in oxygen vacancy and residual hydrocarbon concentration in the a-IGZO films, as well as an improvement in the dielectric/channel interfacial roughness. As a result, the TFTs with O2-plasma treated a-IGZO channel layers showed three times higher linear field-effect mobility compared to the untreated a-IGZO over a range of processing temperatures. The O2-plasma treatment effectively reduces the required processing temperature of solution-deposited a-IGZO films to achieve the required performance.

  12. Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity Regulation in Solution-Gated Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Electric-Double-Layer Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Zhu, Li Qiang; Feng, Ping; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-04-20

    In the biological nervous system, synaptic plasticity regulation is based on the modulation of ionic fluxes, and such regulation was regarded as the fundamental mechanism underlying memory and learning. Inspired by such biological strategies, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) electric-double-layer (EDL) transistors gated by aqueous solutions were proposed for synaptic behavior emulations. Short-term synaptic plasticity, such as paired-pulse facilitation, high-pass filtering, and orientation tuning, was experimentally emulated in these EDL transistors. Most importantly, we found that such short-term synaptic plasticity can be effectively regulated by alcohol (ethyl alcohol) and salt (potassium chloride) additives. Our results suggest that solution gated oxide-based EDL transistors could act as the platforms for short-term synaptic plasticity emulation.

  13. Flexible substrate compatible solution processed P-N heterojunction diodes with indium-gallium-zinc oxide and copper oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Ishan; Deepak, E-mail: saboo@iitk.ac.in

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Both n and p-type semiconductors are solution processed. • Temperature compatibility with flexible substrates such as polyimide. • Compatibility of p-type film (CuO) on n-type film (IZO). • Diode with rectification ratio of 10{sup 4} and operating voltage <1.5 V. • Construction of band alignment using XPS. - Abstract: Printed electronics on flexible substrates requires low temperature and solution processed active inks. With n-type indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) based electronics maturing for thin film transistor (TFT), we here demonstrate its heterojunction diode with p-copper oxide, prepared by sol-gel method and processed at temperatures compatible with polyimide substrates. The phase obtained for copper oxide is CuO. When coated on n-type oxide, it is prone to develop morphological features, which are minimized by annealing treatment. Diodes of p-CuO films with IGZO are of poor quality due to its high resistivity while, conducting indium-zinc oxide (IZO) films yielded good diode with rectification ratio of 10{sup 4} and operating voltage <1.5 V. A detailed measurement at the interface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical absorption ascertained the band alignment to be of staggered type. Consistently, the current in the diode is established to be due to electrons tunnelling from n-IZO to p-CuO.

  14. Comparative acute toxicity of gallium(III), antimony(III), indium(III), cadmium(II), and copper(II) on freshwater swamp shrimp (Macrobrachium nipponense).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jen-Lee

    2014-04-01

    Acute toxicity testing were carried out the freshwater swamp shrimp, Macrobrachium nipponense, as the model animal for the semiconductor applied metals (gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper) to evaluate if the species is an suitable experimental animal of pollution in aquatic ecosystem. The static renewal test method of acute lethal concentrations determination was used, and water temperature was maintained at 24.0 ± 0.5°C. Data of individual metal obtained from acute toxicity tests were determined using probit analysis method. The median lethal concentration (96-h LC50) of gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper for M. nipponense were estimated as 2.7742, 1.9626, 6.8938, 0.0539, and 0.0313 mg/L, respectively. Comparing the toxicity tolerance of M. nipponense with other species which exposed to these metals, it is obviously that the M. nipponense is more sensitive than that of various other aquatic animals.

  15. Influence of acetate ions on aluminium, gallium and indium complexing with lumogallion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatnitskij, I.V.; Boryak, A.K.; Kolomiets, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    The comparative investigation of Al, Ga and In complexing with lumogallion (LG) in the absence and in the presence of acetate ions is performed. The influence of acetate ion concentration of optical density of solutions of formed complexes as well as the pH value effect on their light absorption is studied. It has been found that in the absence of acetate ions stability of the metal complexes with LG is decreased in the Ga>In-Al series, whereas the introduction of acetate ions leads to inversion (Ga>Al>In) in the above series. The latter is explained by In binding into colorless acetate complex at pH<5. In the region of higher pH value the LG competitive ness increases due to concentration increase of coordinating dye anions and in these conditions the In coloured complex with lumogallion is formed also in the presence of acetate ions. The composition of formed complexes is established depending on pH value and acetate ion concentration. Electron absorption spectra of coloured complexes are presented

  16. Extraction of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylammonium-based mixed ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Shoichi; Okai, Miho; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Kudo, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The extractabilities of aluminium(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions were investigated using a mixture of two protic ionic liquids, trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([TOAH][NTf(2)]) and trioctylammonium nitrate ([TOAH][NO(3)]). At a HCl concentration of 4 mol L(-1) or more, gallium(III) was nearly quantitatively extracted and the extractability order was Ga > Al > In. The extractability of gallium(III) increased with increasing [TOAH][NO(3)] content in the mixed ionic liquid. The extracted gallium(III) was quantitatively stripped with aqueous nitric acid solutions. The separation and recovery of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions containing excess indium(III) was demonstrated using the mixed ionic liquid.

  17. Interface Study on Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using High-k Gate Dielectric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsien Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO thin film transistors (TFTs using different high-k gate dielectric materials such as silicon nitride (Si3N4 and aluminum oxide (Al2O3 at low temperature process (<300°C and compared them with low temperature silicon dioxide (SiO2. The IGZO device with high-k gate dielectric material will expect to get high gate capacitance density to induce large amount of channel carrier and generate the higher drive current. In addition, for the integrating process of integrating IGZO device, postannealing treatment is an essential process for completing the process. The chemical reaction of the high-k/IGZO interface due to heat formation in high-k/IGZO materials results in reliability issue. We also used the voltage stress for testing the reliability for the device with different high-k gate dielectric materials and explained the interface effect by charge band diagram.

  18. Contact resistance asymmetry of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Fei, Wu; Yun-Feng, Chen; Hai, Lu; Xiao-Ming, Huang; Fang-Fang, Ren; Dun-Jun, Chen; Rong, Zhang; You-Dou, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a method based on scanning Kelvin probe microscopy is proposed to separately extract source/drain (S/D) series resistance in operating amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. The asymmetry behavior of S/D contact resistance is deduced and the underlying physics is discussed. The present results suggest that the asymmetry of S/D contact resistance is caused by the difference in bias conditions of the Schottky-like junction at the contact interface induced by the parasitic reaction between contact metal and a-IGZO. The overall contact resistance should be determined by both the bulk channel resistance of the contact region and the interface properties of the metal-semiconductor junction. Project supported by the Key Industrial R&D Program of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BE2015155), the Priority Academic Program Development of Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 021014380033).

  19. Analytical drain current model for symmetric dual-gate amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ting; Liao, Congwei; Huang, Shengxiang; Yu, Tianbao; Deng, Lianwen

    2018-01-01

    An analytical drain current model based on the surface potential is proposed for amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-InGaZnO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a synchronized symmetric dual-gate (DG) structure. Solving the electric field, surface potential (φS), and central potential (φ0) of the InGaZnO film using the Poisson equation with the Gaussian method and Lambert function is demonstrated in detail. The compact analytical model of current–voltage behavior, which consists of drift and diffusion components, is investigated by regional integration, and voltage-dependent effective mobility is taken into account. Comparison results demonstrate that the calculation results obtained using the derived models match well with the simulation results obtained using a technology computer-aided design (TCAD) tool. Furthermore, the proposed model is incorporated into SPICE simulations using Verilog-A to verify the feasibility of using DG InGaZnO TFTs for high-performance circuit designs.

  20. Synthesis of Cu-Poor Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide Nanoparticles by Solvothermal Route for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Ping Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS thin films were fabricated using precursor nanoparticle ink and sintering technology. The precursor was a Cu-poor quaternary compound with constituent ratios of Cu/(In+Ga=0.603, Ga/(In+Ga=0.674, and Se/(Cu+In+Ga=1.036. Cu-poor CIGS nanoparticles of chalcopyrite for solar cells were successfully synthesized using a relatively simple and convenient elemental solvothermal route. After a fixed reaction time of 36 h at 180°C, CIGS nanocrystals with diameters in the range of 20–70 nm were observed. The nanoparticle ink was fabricated by mixing CIGS nanoparticles, a solvent, and an organic polymer. Analytical results reveal that the Cu-poor CIGS absorption layer prepared from a nanoparticle-ink polymer by sintering has a chalcopyrite structure and a favorable composition. For this kind of sample, its mole ratio of Cu : In : Ga : Se is equal to 0.617 : 0.410 : 0.510 : 2.464 and related ratios of Ga/(In+Ga and Cu/(In+Ga are 0.554 and 0.671, respectively. Under the condition of standard air mass 1.5 global illumination, the conversion efficiency of the solar cell fabricated by this kind of sample is 4.05%.

  1. Semiconductor to metallic transition in bulk accumulated amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide dual gate thin-film transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyu Chun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of top gate voltage (VTG and temperature (in the range of 25 to 70 oC on dual-gate (DG back-channel-etched (BCE amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO thin film transistors (TFTs characteristics. The increment of VTG from -20V to +20V, decreases the threshold voltage (VTH from 19.6V to 3.8V and increases the electron density to 8.8 x 1018cm−3. Temperature dependent field-effect mobility in saturation regime, extracted from bottom gate sweep, show a critical dependency on VTG. At VTG of 20V, the mobility decreases from 19.1 to 15.4 cm2/V ⋅ s with increasing temperature, showing a metallic conduction. On the other hand, at VTG of - 20V, the mobility increases from 6.4 to 7.5cm2/V ⋅ s with increasing temperature. Since the top gate bias controls the position of Fermi level, the temperature dependent mobility shows metallic conduction when the Fermi level is above the conduction band edge, by applying high positive bias to the top gate.

  2. Electrical Bias as an Alternate Method for Reproducible Measurement of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C.; Stokes, A.; Silverman, T. J.; Rummel, S.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-08-01

    Light-to-dark metastable changes in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can introduce uncertainty when measuring module performance on indoor flash testing equipment. This study describes a method to stabilize module performance through forward-bias current injection rather than light exposure. Measurements of five pairs of thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) PV modules indicate that forward-bias exposure maintained the PV modules at a stable condition (within 1%) while the unbiased modules degraded in performance by up to 12%. It was additionally found that modules exposed to forward bias exhibited stable performance within about 3% of their long-term outdoor exposed performance. This carrier-injection method provides a way to reduce uncertainty arising from fast transients in thin-film module performance between the time a module is removed from light exposure and when it is measured indoors, effectively simulating continuous light exposure by injecting minority carriers that behave much as photocarriers do. This investigation also provides insight into the initial light-induced transients of thin-film modules upon outdoor deployment.

  3. Selective metallization of amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor by using helium plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hun; Lee, Su Jeong; Porte, Yoann; Myoung, Jae-Min

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the effects of helium (He) plasma treatment on amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been investigated. The He plasma treatment induced a dramatic decrease of the resistivity in a-IGZO thin films from 1.25 × 106 to 5.93 mΩ cm. After 5 min He plasma treatment, the a-IGZO films showed an increase in carrier concentration to 6.70 × 1019 cm-3 combined with a high hall mobility of 15.7 cm2 V-1 s-1. The conductivity improvement was linked to the formation of oxygen vacancies during the He plasma treatment, which was observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The a-IGZO films did not appear to be damaged on the surface following the plasma treatment and showed a high transmittance of about 88.3% at a wavelength of 550 nm. The He plasma-treated a-IGZO films were used as source/drain (S/D) electrodes in a-IGZO TFTs. The devices demonstrated promising characteristics, on pair with TFTs using Al electrodes, with a threshold voltage (V T) of -1.97 V, sub-threshold slope (SS) of 0.52 V/decade, saturation mobility (μ sat) of 8.75 cm2 V-1 s-1, and on/off current ratio (I on/I off) of 2.66 × 108.

  4. Temperature-dependent bias-stress-induced electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui-Min; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Tang, Lan-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Liao; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The time and temperature dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias stress (PBS) and the following recovery process are investigated in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. It is found that the time dependence of threshold voltage shift can be well described by a stretched exponential equation in which the time constant τ is found to be temperature dependent. Based on Arrhenius plots, an average effective energy barrier Eτstress = 0.72 eV for the PBS process and an average effective energy barrier Eτrecovery = 0.58 eV for the recovery process are extracted respectively. A charge trapping/detrapping model is used to explain the threshold voltage shift in both the PBS and the recovery process. The influence of gate bias stress on transistor performance is one of the most critical issues for practical device development. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China

  5. Coplanar amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor with He plasma treated heavily doped layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho-young; Lee, Bok-young; Lee, Young-jang; Lee, Jung-il; Yang, Myoung-su; Kang, In-byeong; Mativenga, Mallory; Jang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    We report thermally stable coplanar amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with heavily doped n + a-IGZO source/drain regions. Doping is through He plasma treatment in which the resistivity of the a-IGZO decreases from 2.98 Ω cm to 2.79 × 10 −3 Ω cm after treatment, and then it increases to 7.92 × 10 −2 Ω cm after annealing at 300 °C. From the analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the concentration of oxygen vacancies in He plasma treated n + a-IGZO does not change much after thermal annealing at 300 °C, indicating thermally stable n + a-IGZO, even for TFTs with channel length L = 4 μm. Field-effect mobility of the coplanar a-IGZO TFTs with He plasma treatment changes from 10.7 to 9.2 cm 2 /V s after annealing at 300 °C, but the performance of the a-IGZO TFT with Ar or H 2 plasma treatment degrades significantly after 300 °C annealing

  6. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  7. Comparison of indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging with sequential technetium-gallium scanning in the diagnosis of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel, K.D.; Brown, M.L.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    We prospectively compared sequential technetium-gallium imaging with indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging in fifty patients with suspected low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. Adequate images and follow-up examinations were obtained for forty-two patients. The presence or absence of low-grade sepsis was confirmed by histological and bacteriological examinations of tissue specimens taken at surgery in thirty of the forty-two patients. In these thirty patients, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 48 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 57 per cent, whereas the sensitivity of the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was 83 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 83 per cent. When the additional twelve patients for whom surgery was deemed unnecessary were considered, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 50 per cent, the specificity was 78 per cent, and the accuracy was 62 per cent, as compared with a sensitivity of 83 per cent, a specificity of 94 per cent, and an accuracy of 88 per cent with the indium-labeled-leukocyte method. In patients with a prosthesis the indium-labeled-leukocyte image was 94 per cent accurate, compared with 75 per cent accuracy for sequential Tc-Ga imaging. Statistical analysis of these data demonstrated that the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was superior to sequential Tc-Ga imaging in detecting areas of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis

  8. Comparison of the electronic structure of amorphous versus crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor: structure, tail states and strain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2015-11-01

    We study the evolution of the structural and electronic properties of crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) upon amorphization by first-principles calculation. The bottom of the conduction band (BCB) is found to be constituted of a pseudo-band of molecular orbitals that resonate at the same energy on different atomic sites. They display a bonding character between the s orbitals of the metal sites and an anti-bonding character arising from the interaction between the oxygen and metal s orbitals. The energy level of the BCB shifts upon breaking of the crystal symmetry during the amorphization process, which may be attributed to the reduction of the coordination of the cationic centers. The top of the valence band (TVB) is constructed from anti-bonding oxygen p orbitals. In the amorphous state, they have random orientation, in contrast to the crystalline state. This results in the appearance of localized tail states in the forbidden gap above the TVB. Zinc is found to play a predominant role in the generation of these tail states, while gallium hinders their formation. Last, we study the dependence of the fundamental gap and effective mass of IGZO on mechanical strain. The variation of the gap under strain arises from the enhancement of the anti-bonding interaction in the BCB due to the modification of the length of the oxygen-metal bonds and/or to a variation of the cation coordination. This effect is less pronounced for the amorphous material compared to the crystalline material, making amorphous IGZO a semiconductor of choice for flexible electronics. Finally, the effective mass is found to increase upon strain, in contrast to regular materials. This counterintuitive variation is due to the reduction of the electrostatic shielding of the cationic centers by oxygen, leading to an increase of the overlaps between the metal orbitals at the origin of the delocalization of the BCB. For the range of strain typically met in flexible electronics, the induced

  9. Comparison of the electronic structure of amorphous versus crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor: structure, tail states and strain effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jamblinne de Meux, A; Genoe, J; Heremans, P; Pourtois, G

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of the structural and electronic properties of crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) upon amorphization by first-principles calculation. The bottom of the conduction band (BCB) is found to be constituted of a pseudo-band of molecular orbitals that resonate at the same energy on different atomic sites. They display a bonding character between the s orbitals of the metal sites and an anti-bonding character arising from the interaction between the oxygen and metal s orbitals. The energy level of the BCB shifts upon breaking of the crystal symmetry during the amorphization process, which may be attributed to the reduction of the coordination of the cationic centers. The top of the valence band (TVB) is constructed from anti-bonding oxygen p orbitals. In the amorphous state, they have random orientation, in contrast to the crystalline state. This results in the appearance of localized tail states in the forbidden gap above the TVB. Zinc is found to play a predominant role in the generation of these tail states, while gallium hinders their formation. Last, we study the dependence of the fundamental gap and effective mass of IGZO on mechanical strain. The variation of the gap under strain arises from the enhancement of the anti-bonding interaction in the BCB due to the modification of the length of the oxygen–metal bonds and/or to a variation of the cation coordination. This effect is less pronounced for the amorphous material compared to the crystalline material, making amorphous IGZO a semiconductor of choice for flexible electronics. Finally, the effective mass is found to increase upon strain, in contrast to regular materials. This counterintuitive variation is due to the reduction of the electrostatic shielding of the cationic centers by oxygen, leading to an increase of the overlaps between the metal orbitals at the origin of the delocalization of the BCB. For the range of strain typically met in flexible electronics, the induced

  10. Gallium-Indium ordering in the complex [Ni{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}In] network of GdNi{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galadzhun, Yaroslav V.; Horiacha, Myroslava M.; Nychyporuk, Galyna P.; Zaremba, Vasyl I. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine); Rodewald, Ute C.; Poettgen, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Polycrystalline samples of the isotypic quaternary compounds RENi{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}In (RE = Y, Gd - Tm) were obtained by arc-melting of the elements. Crystals of the gadolinium compound were found by slow cooling of an arc-melted button of the initial composition ''GdNiGa{sub 3}In''. All samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction. The structure of GdNi{sub 2}Ga{sub 2.89}In{sub 1.11} was refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: new type, Pnma, a = 2426.38(7), b = 418.17(2), c = 927.27(3) pm, wR{sub 2} = 0.0430, 1610 F{sup 2} values and 88 variables. Two of the six crystallographically independent gallium sites show a small degree of Ga/In mixing. The nickel atoms show tricapped trigonal prismatic coordination by gadolinium, gallium, and indium. Together, the nickel, gallium, and indium atoms build up a complex three-dimensional [Ni{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}In]{sup δ-} network, which leaves cages for the gadolinium atoms. The indium atoms form zigzag chains with In-In distances of 337 pm. The crystal chemical similarities of the polyhedral packing in the GdNi{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}In and La{sub 4}Pd{sub 10}In{sub 21} structures are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Effect of Electric Field on the Wetting Behavior of Eutectic Gallium-Indium Alloys in Aqueous Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; He, Zhi-Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Room-temperature liquid metals have many intriguing properties that have not previously been fully understood. Among them, surface tension behaviors of such metals are especially critical in a group of newly emerging areas such as printed electronics, functional materials and soft machines, etc. This study is dedicated to clarifying the wettability of liquid metals on various substrate surfaces with varied roughness immersed in solutions when subject to an electric field. The contact angles of Ga75.5In24.5 in several typical liquids were comprehensively measured and interpreted, and were revealed to be affected by the components and concentration of the environmental solution. Meanwhile, the roughness of the substrates is also revealed to be an important parameter dominating the process. The dynamic wetting behaviors of liquid metal in aqueous environment under an electric field were quantified. The contact angle values of eutectic gallium-indium alloys (eGaIn) on titanium substrates with different roughness would lead to better electrowetting performances on rougher surfaces. In particular, using an electrical field to control the wetting status of liquid metal with the matching substrate have been illustrated, which would offer a practical way to flexibly control liquid metal-based functional devices working in an aqueous environment. Furthermore, Lippmann-Young's equation reveals the relationship between contact angle and applied voltage, explaining the excellent electrowetting property of eGaIn. The power law, R = αt β , was adopted to characterize the two-stage wetting process of eGaIn under different voltages. In the initial process, β ≈ 1/2 represents the complete wetting law, while the later one, β ≈ 1/10, meets with Tanner's law of a drop spontaneously spreading on a smooth surface.

  12. A novel bioassay using the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite to evaluate chronic effects of aluminium, gallium and molybdenum in tropical marine receiving environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Joost W; Trenfield, Melanie A; Harries, Simon J; Streten, Claire; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David; van Dam, Rick A

    2016-11-15

    A need exists for appropriate tools to evaluate risk and monitor potential effects of contaminants in tropical marine environments, as currently impact assessments are conducted by non-representative approaches. Here, a novel bioassay is presented that allows for the estimation of the chronic toxicity of contaminants in receiving tropical marine environments. The bioassay is conducted using planktonic larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite and is targeted at generating environmentally relevant, chronic toxicity data for water quality guideline derivation or compliance testing. The developmental endpoint demonstrated a consistently high control performance, validated through the use of copper as a reference toxicant. In addition, the biological effects of aluminium, gallium and molybdenum were assessed. The endpoint expressed high sensitivity to copper and moderate sensitivity to aluminium, whereas gallium and molybdenum exhibited no discernible effects, even at high concentrations, providing valuable information on the toxicity of these elements in tropical marine waters. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular beam epitaxy of germanium nanoclusters and indium gallium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing

    made by electron bean lithography and chlorine plasma etching. By minimizing the sizes of the patterns, laterally well-ordered arrays of Ge islands are achieved, and the mechanisms of the preferential nucleation of Ge islands at certain sites are examined. Next, another important issue of preserving the two-dimensional growth of Ge on silicon by intentionally introducing some impurities (surfactants) during growth to suppress the three-dimensional Ge island formation is investigated. In particular, arsenic as a surfactant is studied. The role of arsenic in MBE of Ge on Si(100) is proposed to be both associated with reduction of Ge adatom surface diffusion and chemically decorating the surface atomic steps to increase the reactivity of the steps with the Ge adatoms. Finally, I present studies of MBE of group III-nitride materials. The bulk strain of InGaN is first calculated using a simplified valence force field method. A phase diagram of InGaN is obtained for an overview of the thermodynamic properties of these materials. MBE experiments of GaN and InGaN thin films are then performed using both an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma and ammonia as the nitrogen sources. Thick GaN films of good crystal qualities and smooth surfaces are obtained by introducing a small amount of indium as a surfactant. InxGa1-xN films with different indium fraction x are also achieved by balancing the major growth parameters such as the substrate temperature and In/Ga flux ratio. The mechanisms of the film growth and evolution are discussed.

  14. Comparative acute toxicity of gallium(III, antimony(III, indium(III, cadmium(II, and copper(II on freshwater swamp shrimp (Macrobrachium nipponense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Lee Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute toxicity testing were carried out the freshwater swamp shrimp, Macrobrachium nipponense, as the model animal for the semiconductor applied metals (gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper to evaluate if the species is an suitable experimental animal of pollution in aquatic ecosystem. RESULTS: The static renewal test method of acute lethal concentrations determination was used, and water temperature was maintained at 24.0 ± 0.5°C. Data of individual metal obtained from acute toxicity tests were determined using probit analysis method. The median lethal concentration (96-h LC50 of gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper for M. nipponense were estimated as 2.7742, 1.9626, 6.8938, 0.0539, and 0.0313 mg/L, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Comparing the toxicity tolerance of M. nipponense with other species which exposed to these metals, it is obviously that the M. nipponense is more sensitive than that of various other aquatic animals.

  15. Neutron diffraction study at 0.3 K of the magnetic properties of rare-earth aluminium or gallium garnets; Etude par diffraction des neutrons a 0,3 K des proprietes magnetiques de grenats de terre rare et d'aluminium ou de gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammann, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    In order to study ordered magnetic states below 1.5 deg. K by neutron diffraction measurements, a helium-3 cryostat has been realised in which the thermalization of a great quantity of powdered sample is performed by a helium-4 superfluid film, and which leaves the possibility of applying an external magnetic field. We thus studied essentially the magnetic phase transitions of rare-earth aluminium or gallium garnets. First we determined the antiferromagnetic structures of the erbium gallium garnet (T{sub N} = 0.79 deg. K) and of the neodymium gallium garnet (T{sub N} = 0.516 deg. K). The metamagnetic behavior of the erbium gallium garnet has been observed and compared to that of the dysprosium aluminium garnet. Second we considered the 'non-Kramers' ions Tb{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} in the aluminium garnets. In this case, only two single ground states (well isolated from upper levels) have to be considered. A molecular field model with purely magnetic dipolar interactions, leads then to the existence of magnetic phase transition with antiferromagnetic ordering. This has been observed for the terbium-aluminium garnet below T{sub N} 1.35 deg. K and for the holmium-aluminium garnet below T{sub N} {approx} 0.98 deg. K. (author) [French] Afin d'acceder a l'etude par diffraction des neutrons des etats magnetiques ordonnes en-dessous de 1,5 deg. K, nous avons realise un cryostat a helium-3 qui assure la mise en temperature de la quantite importante d'echantillon en poudre a l'aide d'un film d'helium-4-superfluide, et qui laisse la possibilite d'application d'un champ magnetique exterieur. Nous avons essentiellement etudie avec cette technique les transitions de phase magnetique de grenats de terre rare et d'aluminium ou de gallium. C'est ainsi qu'on a determine l'ordre antiferromagnetique dans les grenats de gallium-erbium (T{sub N} = 0,79 deg. K) et de gallium-neodyme (T{sub N} = 0,516 deg. K). Le

  16. Photoreflectance et Photoconductivite des Couches Minces de Antimoinure de Indium Deposees Sur Arsenure de Gallium Par Pulverisation Cathodique avec Magnetron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Yves

    L'attrait d'un systeme d'imagerie infrarouge integre, ou les detecteurs et l'electronique peuvent etre construits sur la meme gaufre, a motive l'etude de couches minces d'antimoniure d'indium (InSb) deposees sur des substrats d'arseniure de gallium (GaAs). La croissance epitaxiale de ces couches minces a ete realisee par pulverisation cathodique avec magnetron, en utilisant une approche multi -cibles (MSE) ou sous atmosphere d'un organometallique (MOMS). Malgre la grande difference des mailles cristallines des deux semiconducteurs, la qualite des couches minces est bonne et s'ameliore avec l'epaisseur, comme le demontrent les mesures de diffraction des rayons-X, d'effets Raman et Hall, et de microscopie electronique a transmission et a balayage. Les spectres de photoconductivite resolus en energie et en temps des couches deposees par MOMS ont demontre la coexistence de deux phenomenes de photoconduction en presence d'absorption interbande. Pour les energies de photon inferieures a environ 0.35 eV, la photoconductivite usuelle, due au piegeage rapide du porteur minoritaire excedentaire, est observee. Cependant, pour les energies superieures, une composante negative plus lente coexiste avec la composante positive. Elle est due au piegeage d'electrons chauds generes optiquement, dans les echantillons de type n, par des centres situes a haute energie, principalement dans la region de l'interface. Les mesures de photoreflectance dans la region des transitions E_1 et E _1 + Delta_1 ont ete realisees sur des couches deposees par MSE et des echantillons massifs de InSb. Les variations des elargissements de lignes spectrales ont confirme l'amelioration des couches avec l'epaisseur. De plus, l'analyse des lignes spectrales indique la presence d'effets excitoniques. La photoreflectance dans les echantillons massifs de haute purete de InSb a mis en evidence la presence d'une resonance sous les transitions etudiees. L'allure de la ligne spectrale, la position en energie et l

  17. Organo-gallium/indium chalcogenide complexes of copper(I): molecular structures and thermal decomposition to ternary semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Oliver; Biedermann, Ralf; Holldorf, Joscha; Krautscheid, Harald

    2014-01-27

    Several organo-gallium/indium chalcogenide complexes of copper(I), stabilized by trialkylphosphines, were isolated, structurally characterized by using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and investigated in thermolysis experiments. The syntheses with [E(Me3Si)2] (E=S, Se) as a starting material and a chalcogen source involve the elimination of volatile silyl acetate, silyl ethers, and methane from copper(I) acetate, and Group 13 metal trimethyl compounds, respectively. Chalcogenide complexes, according to the general formulas [(R3PCu)4(MeM)4E6] (1-6) and [(R3PCu)6(MeM)4M4S13] (7-9; with R=alkyl and M=Ga, In), and mixed chalcogenide-phenylchalcogenolate complexes [(iPr3PCuEPh)3(MeGaE)4] (10, 11) were isolated. The heavy atom cores of 1-6 consist of an octahedron of chalcogen atoms, interpenetrated by a cube of metal atoms. Depending on the steric demand of the phosphine ligands, two constitutions are observed; the metal atoms of the same element either forming tetrahedra, or parallelograms, respectively. This constitutional isomerism is further investigated by quantum chemical calculations. Complexes 7-9 contain a central sulfur atom, surrounded by two interpenetrating tetrahedra of Group 13 metal atoms, an octahedron of copper atoms, and an icosahedron of twelve outer sulfur atoms; the heavy atom framework of 10 and 11 is a "cut-out" of this structure. Thermolysis experiments include thermogravimetry measurements and subsequent Rietveld phase analysis of the residues by using powder X-ray diffraction. The homologous compounds 1, 3, 4, and 6 yield the respective crystalline ternary semiconductor material CuME2 at temperatures below 300 °C. Partial release of Me3 M during the thermolysis process results in excess copper in the residue and therefore in small amounts of additional binary copper chalcogenide phases or metallic CuM alloys. Compound 8 produces nanocrystalline CuGaS2 at about 300 °C. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Improvement of Self-Heating of Indium Gallium Zinc Aluminum Oxide Thin-Film Transistors Using Al2O3 Barrier Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Li-Yi; Lee, Hsin-Ying; Lin, Yung-Hao; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2018-02-01

    To study the self-heating effect, aluminum oxide (Al2O3) barrier layers of various thicknesses have been inserted between the channel layer and insulator layer in bottom-gate-type indium gallium zinc aluminum oxide (IGZAO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Each IGZAO channel layer was deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate by using a magnetron radiofrequency cosputtering system with dual targets composed of indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) and Al. The 3 s orbital of Al cation provided an extra transport pathway and widened the conduction-band bottom, thus increasing the electron mobility of the IGZAO films. The Al-O bonds were able to sustain the oxygen stability of the IGZAO films. The self-heating behavior of the resulting IGZAO TFTs was studied by Hall measurements on the IGZAO films as well as the electrical performance of the IGZAO TFTs with Al2O3 barrier layers of various thicknesses at different temperatures. IGZAO TFTs with 50-nm-thick Al2O3 barrier layer were stressed by positive gate bias stress (PGBS, at gate-source voltage V GS = 5 V and drain-source voltage V DS = 0 V); at V GS = 5 V and V DS = 10 V, the threshold voltage shifts were 0.04 V and 0.2 V, respectively, much smaller than for the other IGZAO TFTs without Al2O3 barrier layer, which shifted by 0.2 V and 1.0 V when stressed under the same conditions.

  19. Hydrogen Production from Water by Photolysis, Sonolysis and Sonophotolysis with Solid Solutions of Rare Earth, Gallium and Indium Oxides as Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Penconi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the hydrogen production by photolysis, sonolysis and sonophotolysis of water in the presence of newly synthesized solid solutions of rare earth, gallium and indium oxides playing as catalysts. From the experiments of photolysis, we found that the best photocatalyst is the solid solution Y0.8Ga0.2InO3 doped by sulphur atoms. In experiments of sonolysis, we optimized the rate of hydrogen production by changing the amount of water, adding ethanol and tuning the power of our piezoelectric transducer. Finally, we performed sonolysis and sonophotolysis experiments in the presence of S:Y0.8Ga0.2InO3 finding a promising synergistic effect of UV-visible electromagnetic waves and 38 kHz ultrasound waves in producing H2.

  20. Realization of write-once-read-many-times memory device with O2 plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Chen, T. P.; Li, X. D.; Wong, J. I.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    A write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory devices based on O 2 plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin films has been demonstrated. The device has a simple Al/IGZO/Al structure. The device has a normally OFF state with a very high resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2 V is ∼10 9 Ω for a device with the radius of 50 μm) as a result of the O 2 plasma treatment on the IGZO thin films. The device could be switched to an ON state with a low resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2 V is ∼10 3 Ω for the radius of 50 μm) by applying a voltage pulse (e.g., 10 V/1 μs). The WORM device has good data-retention and reading-endurance capabilities

  1. Effects of low-temperature (120 °C) annealing on the carrier concentration and trap density in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-sung; Oh, Byung Su; Piao, Mingxing; Joo, Min-Kyu; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Ahn, Seung-Eon; Kim, Gyu-Tae

    2014-12-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of low-temperature annealing on the electrical properties of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the charge carrier concentration, which is related to the density of oxygen vacancies. The field-effect mobility was found to decrease as a function of the charge carrier concentration, owing to the presence of band-tail states. By employing the transmission line method, we show that the contact resistance did not significantly contribute to the changes in device performance after annealing. In addition, using low-frequency noise analyses, we found that the trap density decreased by a factor of 10 following annealing at 120 °C. The switching operation and on/off ratio of the a-IGZO TFTs improved considerably after low-temperature annealing.

  2. Effect of gallium aluminium arsenide diode laser therapy on Porphyromonas gingivalis in chronic periodontitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoman, H A; Diab, H M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this randomized, controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of 685-nm gallium aluminium arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser therapy (1.6 J cm -2 ) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Thirty-two patients aged 35-60 years old who had chronic periodontitis met the eligibility criteria. They were randomly assigned to two equal groups: scaling and root planing were performed in the SRP group, while scaling, root planing and laser irradiation of periodontal pockets were performed in the SRP + DL group. Subgingival plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect P. gingivalis-colonized sites, and common clinical indices were evaluated before and 2 months after treatment. Clinical examination included gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and gingival bleeding index (GBI), all of which were recorded. Data from 30 patients [19 women and 11 men; mean age, 48.4 (5.4) years old] were analysed. There were statistically significant improvements in GI, PD, CAL and GBI for the SRP + DL group compared to SRP group but no significant difference in PI between the groups. Additionally, the percentage of P. gingivalis-positive sites in the SRP + DL group decreased from 80% (12/15) to 20% (3/15) after laser irradiation (P < 0.05). No significant changes were noted in the SRP group. GaAlAs diode laser irradiation of diseased periodontal pockets at 685 nm and 1.6 J cm -2 seemed to be an effective adjuvant to mechanical instrumentation to treat chronic periodontitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Solvent effects on extraction of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III), with decanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Fujii, Yukio; Mizuta, Masateru

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of aluminum(III) and indium(III) with decanoic acid in 1-octanol was carried out at 25 deg C and at an aqueous ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm -3 (NaClO 4 ). Monomeric and tetrameric aluminum(III) decanoates and monomeric indium(III) decanoate are responsible for the extraction. From a comparison of the present results with those obtained from the previous works, the polymerization of the extracted species was found to be more extensive in benzene than in 1-octanol, and the metal decanoates were highly polymerized in the following order in both solvents: Al > Ga > In. (author)

  4. Real Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Analysis of First Stage CuIn1−xGaxSe2 Growth: Indium-Gallium Selenide Co-Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Pradhan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE has been applied for in-situ monitoring of the first stage of copper indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS thin film deposition by the three-stage co-evaporation process used for fabrication of high efficiency thin film photovoltaic (PV devices. The first stage entails the growth of indium-gallium selenide (In1−xGax2Se3 (IGS on a substrate of Mo-coated soda lime glass maintained at a temperature of 400 °C. This is a critical stage of CIGS deposition because a large fraction of the final film thickness is deposited, and as a result precise compositional control is desired in order to achieve the optimum performance of the resulting CIGS solar cell. RTSE is sensitive to monolayer level film growth processes and can provide accurate measurements of bulk and surface roughness layer thicknesses. These in turn enable accurate measurements of the bulk layer optical response in the form of the complex dielectric function ε = ε1 − iε2, spectra. Here, RTSE has been used to obtain the (ε1, ε2 spectra at the measurement temperature of 400 °C for IGS thin films of different Ga contents (x deduced from different ranges of accumulated bulk layer thickness during the deposition process. Applying an analytical expression in common for each of the (ε1, ε2 spectra of these IGS films, oscillator parameters have been obtained in the best fits and these parameters in turn have been fitted with polynomials in x. From the resulting database of polynomial coefficients, the (ε1, ε2 spectra can be generated for any composition of IGS from the single parameter, x. The results have served as an RTSE fingerprint for IGS composition and have provided further structural information beyond simply thicknesses, for example information related to film density and grain size. The deduced IGS structural evolution and the (ε1, ε2 spectra have been interpreted as well in relation to observations from scanning electron microscopy, X

  5. Real Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Analysis of First Stage CuIn1-xGaxSe₂ Growth: Indium-Gallium Selenide Co-Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Puja; Aryal, Puruswottam; Attygalle, Dinesh; Ibdah, Abdel-Rahman; Koirala, Prakash; Li, Jian; Bhandari, Khagendra P; Liyanage, Geethika K; Ellingson, Randy J; Heben, Michael J; Marsillac, Sylvain; Collins, Robert W; Podraza, Nikolas J

    2018-01-16

    Real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) has been applied for in-situ monitoring of the first stage of copper indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin film deposition by the three-stage co-evaporation process used for fabrication of high efficiency thin film photovoltaic (PV) devices. The first stage entails the growth of indium-gallium selenide (In 1- x Ga x )₂Se₃ (IGS) on a substrate of Mo-coated soda lime glass maintained at a temperature of 400 °C. This is a critical stage of CIGS deposition because a large fraction of the final film thickness is deposited, and as a result precise compositional control is desired in order to achieve the optimum performance of the resulting CIGS solar cell. RTSE is sensitive to monolayer level film growth processes and can provide accurate measurements of bulk and surface roughness layer thicknesses. These in turn enable accurate measurements of the bulk layer optical response in the form of the complex dielectric function ε = ε₁ - iε₂, spectra. Here, RTSE has been used to obtain the (ε₁, ε₂) spectra at the measurement temperature of 400 °C for IGS thin films of different Ga contents ( x ) deduced from different ranges of accumulated bulk layer thickness during the deposition process. Applying an analytical expression in common for each of the (ε₁, ε₂) spectra of these IGS films, oscillator parameters have been obtained in the best fits and these parameters in turn have been fitted with polynomials in x . From the resulting database of polynomial coefficients, the (ε₁, ε₂) spectra can be generated for any composition of IGS from the single parameter, x . The results have served as an RTSE fingerprint for IGS composition and have provided further structural information beyond simply thicknesses, for example information related to film density and grain size. The deduced IGS structural evolution and the (ε₁, ε₂) spectra have been interpreted as well in relation to observations from scanning

  6. C(sp₃)-H bond activation with triel metals: indium and gallium zwitterions through internal hydride abstraction in rigid salan ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudoux, Nicolas; Fang, Jian; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Maron, Laurent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-06-16

    The hydropyrimidine salan (salan=N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methylene]-1,2-diaminoethane) proteo-ligands with a rigid backbone {ON^(CH2)^NO}H2 react with M(CH2SiMe3)3 (M=Ga, In) to yield the zwitterions {ON^(CH(+))^NO}M(-)(CH2SiMe3)2 (M=Ga, 2; In, 3) by abstraction of a hydride from the ligand backbone followed by elimination of dihydrogen. By contrast, with Al2Me6, the neutral-at-metal bimetallic complex [{ON^(CH2)^NO}AlMe]2 ([1]2) is obtained quantitatively. The formation of indium zwitterions is also observed with sterically more encumbered ligands containing o-Me substituents on the phenolic rings, or an N (CHPh) N moiety in the heterocyclic core. Overall, the ease of C(sp3)-H bond activation follows the order Al≪Gahydride species. DFT calculations indicate that the systems {ON^(CH2)^NO}H2+M(CH2SiMe3)3 (M=Al, Ga, In) all initially lead to the formation of the neutral monophenolate dihydrocarbyl species through a single protonolysis. From here, the thermodynamic product, the model neutral-at-metal complex 1, is formed in the case of aluminum after a second protonolysis. On the other hand, lower activation energy pathways lead to the generation of zwitterionic complexes 2 and 3 in the cases of gallium and indium, and the formation of these zwitterions obeys a strict kinetic control; the computations suggest that, as inferred from the experimental data, the reaction proceeds through an instable metal-hydride species, which could not be isolated synthetically. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Confinement - assisted shock-wave-induced thin-film delamination (SWIFD) of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) on a flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Zagoranskiy, Igor; Ehrhardt, Martin; Han, Bing; Bayer, Lukas; Zimmer, Klaus

    2017-12-01

    The laser structuring of CIGS (copper indium gallium (di)selenide) solar cell material without influence and damaging the functionality of the active layer is a challenge for laser methods The shock-wave-induced thin-film delamination (SWIFD) process allows structuring without thermal modifications due to a spatial separation of the laser absorption from the functional layer removal process. In the present study, SWIFD structuring of CIGS solar cell stacks was investigated. The rear side of the polyimide was irradiated with a KrF-Excimer laser. The laser-induced ablation process generates a traverse shock wave, and the interaction of the shock wave with the layer-substrate interface results in a delamination process. The effect of a water confinement on the SWIFD process was studied where the rear side of the substrate was covered with a ∼2 mm thick water layer. The resultant surface morphology was analysed and discussed. At a sufficient number of laser pulses N and laser fluences Φ, the CIGS layer can be selectively removed from the Mo back contact. The water confinement, as well as the increasing laser beam size A0 and N, results in the reduction of the necessary minimal laser fluence Φth. Further, the delaminated CIGS area increased with increasing Φ, N, and A0.

  8. Effect of nitrogen doping on the structural, optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering for gallium nitride light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lifei; Cheng, Guoan; Wang, Hougong; Wu, Yulong; Zheng, Ruiting; Ding, Peijun

    2017-01-01

    The indium tin oxide (ITO) films are prepared by the direct current magnetron sputtering technology with an ITO target in a mixture of argon and nitrogen gas at room temperature. The blue transmittance at 455 nm rises from 63% to 83% after nitrogen doping. The resistivity of the ITO film reduces from 4.6 × 10-3 (undoped film) to 5.7 × 10-4 Ω cm (N-doped film). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data imply that the binding energy of the In3d5/2 peak is declined 0.05 eV after nitrogen doping. The high resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the nitrogen loss density of the GaN/ITO interface with N-doped ITO film is smaller than that of the GaN/ITO interface with undoped ITO film. The forward turn-on voltage of gallium nitride light emitting diode reduces by 0.5 V after nitrogen doping. The fabrication of the N-doped ITO film is conducive to modify the N component of the interface between GaN and ITO layer.

  9. Impact of severe cracked germanium (111 substrate on aluminum indium gallium phosphate light-emitting-diode’s electro-optical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annaniah Luruthudass

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracked die is a serious failure mode in the Light Emitting Diode (LED industry – affecting LED quality and long-term reliability performance. In this paper an investigation has been carried out to find the correlation between severe cracked germanium (Ge substrate of an aluminum indium gallium phosphate (AlInGaP LED and its electro-optical performance after the Temperature Cycle (TC test. The LED dice were indented at several bond forces using a die bonder. The indented dice were analysed using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The result showed that severe cracks were observed at 180 gF onward. As the force of indentation increases, crack formation also becomes more severe thus resulting in the chipping of the substrate. The cracked dies were packaged and the TC test was performed. The results did not show any electro-optical failure or degradation, even after a 1000 cycle TC test. Several mechanically cross-sectioned cracked die LEDs, were analysed using SEM and found that no crack reached the active layer. This shows that severely cracked Ge substrate are able to withstand a −40°C/+100°C TC test up to 1000 cycles and LED optical performance is not affected. A small leakage current was observed in all of the cracked die LEDs in comparison to the reference unit. However, this value is smaller than the product specification and is of no concern.

  10. Scattering and mobility in indium gallium arsenide channel, pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (InGaAs pHEMTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J.L.

    1999-03-01

    Extensive transport measurements have been completed on deep and shallow-channelled InGaAs p-HEMTs of varying growth temperature, indium content, spacer thickness and doping density, with a view to a thorough characterisation, both in the metallic and the localised regimes. Particular emphasis was given to MBE grown layers, with characteristics applicable for device use, but low measurement temperatures were necessary to resolve the elastic scattering mechanisms. Measurements made in the metallic regime included transport and quantum mobility - the former over a range of temperatures between 1.5K to 300K. Conductivity measurements were also acquired in the strong localisation regime between about 1.5K and 100K. Experimentally determined parameters were tested for comparison with those predicted by an electrostatic model. Excellent agreement was obtained for carrier density. Other parameters were less well predicted, but the relevant experimental measurements, including linear depletion of the 2DEG, were sensitive to any excess doping above a 'critical' value determined by the model. At low temperature (1.5K), it was found that in all samples tested, transport mobility was strongly limited at all carrier densities by a large q mechanism, possibly intrinsic to the channel. This was ascribed either to scattering by the long-range potentials arising from the indium concentration fluctuations or fluctuations in the thickness of the channel layer. This mechanism dominates the transport at low carrier densities for all samples, but at high carrier density, an additional mechanism is significant for samples with the thinnest spacers tested (2.5nm). This is ascribed to direct electron interaction with the states of the donor layer, and produces a characteristic transport mobility peak. At higher carrier densities, past the peak, quantum mobility was found only to increase monotonically in value. Remote ionised impurity scattering while significant, particularly for samples

  11. Development of III-nitride semiconductors by molecular beam epitaxy and cluster beam epitaxy and fabrication of LEDs based on indium gallium nitride MQWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Chou Papo

    The family of III-Nitrides (the binaries InN, GaN, AIN, and their alloys) is one of the most important classes of semiconductor materials. Of the three, Indium Nitride (InN) and Aluminum Nitride (AIN) have been investigated much less than Gallium Nitride (GaN). However, both of these materials are important for optoelectronic infrared and ultraviolet devices. In particular, since InN was found recently to be a narrow gap semiconductor (Eg=0.7eV), its development should extend the applications of nitride semiconductors to the spectral region appropriate to fiber optics communication and photovoltaic applications. Similarly, the development of AIN should lead to deep UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). The first part of this work addresses the evaluation of structural, optical and transport properties of InN films grown by two different deposition methods. In one method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of nitrogen radicals by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted source. In an alternative method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of clusters containing approximately 2000 nitrogen molecules. These clusters were produced by adiabatic expansion from high stagnation pressure through a narrow nozzle into vacuum. The clusters were singly or doubly ionized with positive charge by electron impact and accelerated up to approximately 20 to 25 KV prior to their disintegration on the substrate. Due to the high local temperature produced during the impact of clusters with the substrate, this method is suitable for the deposition of InN at very low temperatures. The films are auto-doped n-type with carrier concentrations varying from 3 x 1018 to 1020 cm-3 and the electron effective mass of these films was determined to be 0.09m0. The majority of the AIN films was grown by the cluster beam epitaxy method and was doped n- and p- type by incorporating silicon (Si) and magnesium (Mg) during the film deposition. All films were grown under Al-rich conditions at relatively

  12. Comparative study of the toxic effects of gallium arsenide, indium arsenide and arsenic trioxide following intratracheal instillations to the lung of Syrian golden hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A; Hirata, M; Omura, M; Zhao, M; Makita, Y; Yamazaki, K; Inoue, N; Gotoh, K

    2000-01-01

    Toxic effects of gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium arsenide (InAs) and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) were studied in male Syrian golden hamsters. GaAs (7.7 mg/kg) and As2O3 (1.3 mg/kg) particles were instilled intratracheally twice a week a total of 16 times, while InAs (7.7 mg/kg) was instilled a total of 14 times. As a control, hamsters were treated with the vehicle, phosphate buffer solution. During the instillation period, the cumulative body weight gain of the InAs-, but not the GaAs- or As2O3-treated hamsters was suppressed significantly, when compared with the control group. Slight to severe inflammatory responses were observed in the lung for all treatment groups. The most severe inflammatory change, characterized by an accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages, exudation, thickness of the pleura and fibrotic proliferation was found in the InAs-treated hamsters. Extensive alveolar or bronchiolar cell hyperplasia with or without keratinizing squamous cell metaplasia was observed in almost all the InAs-treated hamsters. Furthermore, squamous cell metaplasia or squamous cell hyperplasia developed in some of the InAs-treated hamsters, but not in the GaAs- or As2O3-treated hamsters. Slight to mild lesions were found in the convoluted tubules of the kidney in both the GaAs and InAs groups. From the present study, the toxic potency of these particles was provisionally estimated to be in the following order: InAs > GaAs > As2O3, at the dosage level used in this study. Furthermore, there was evidence that InAs particles could induce pulmonary, renal or systemic toxicity, and as such, InAs particles may produce pulmonary precancerous change when instilled intratracheally into hamsters.

  13. Magnetic properties of Kramers rare earth ions in aluminium and gallium garnets; Proprietes magnetiques des ions de kramers des terres rares dans les grenats de terres rares et d'aluminium et les grenats de terres rares et de gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capel, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The magnetic properties of Kramers rare earth ions in aluminium and gallium garnets (MAlG and MGaG) are discussed by means of a molecular field treatment. The symmetry properties of the space group permit to establish a parametrization for the magnetic dipolar and exchange couplings. The magnetic properties of the system can be expressed in terms of these parameters and the g factors of the rare earth ions. We have calculated the transition temperatures, the sub-lattice magnetizations, the susceptibility in the paramagnetic region and the antiferromagnetic susceptibility for a special type of magnetic ordering. The influence of the excited Kramers doublets is described by means of a generalization of the usual g tensor. (authors) [French] Les proprietes magnetiques des ions de Kramers des terres rares dans les grenats de terre rare et d'aluminium et les grenats de terre rare et de gallium sont discutees a l'aide d'un traitement du champ moleculaire. Les proprietes de symmetrie du groupe d'espace permettent d'exprimer les couplages dipolaires et les interactions d'echange en fonction de quelques parametres. Les proprietes magnetiques peuvent etre exprimees en fonction de ces parametres et les facteurs g des ions de terre rare. Nous avons calcule les temperatures de transition, les aimantations des sous-reseaux pour 0

  14. Two-stage unified stretched-exponential model for time-dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias-stresses in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan-Yong; Kim, Hee-Joong; Hong, Sae-Young; Song, Sang-Hun; Kwon, Hyuck-In

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we show that the two-stage unified stretched-exponential model can more exactly describe the time-dependence of threshold voltage shift (ΔV TH) under long-term positive-bias-stresses compared to the traditional stretched-exponential model in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). ΔV TH is mainly dominated by electron trapping at short stress times, and the contribution of trap state generation becomes significant with an increase in the stress time. The two-stage unified stretched-exponential model can provide useful information not only for evaluating the long-term electrical stability and lifetime of the a-IGZO TFT but also for understanding the stress-induced degradation mechanism in a-IGZO TFTs.

  15. TEM EDS analysis of epitaxially-grown self-assembled indium islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Sears

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxially-grown self-assembled indium nanostructures, or islands, show promise as nanoantennas. The elemental composition and internal structure of indium islands grown on gallium arsenide are explored using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS. Several sizes of islands are examined, with larger islands exhibiting high (>94% average indium purity and smaller islands containing inhomogeneous gallium and arsenic contamination. These results enable more accurate predictions of indium nanoantenna behavior as a function of growth parameters.

  16. Activation Analysis of Aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, Dag

    1961-01-15

    An analysis of pure aluminium alloyed with magnesium was per- formed by means of gamma spectrometry , Chemical separations were not employed. The isotopes to be determined were obtained in conditions of optimum activity by suitably choosing the time of irradiation and decay. The following elements were detected and measured quantitatively: Iron, zinc, copper, gallium, manganese, chromium, scandium and hafnium.

  17. Gallium In-Depth Profile in Bromine- Etched Copper-Indium-Galium-(Di)selenide (CIGS) Thin Films Inspected Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravicini, Jacopo; Acciarri, Maurizio; Lomuscio, Alberto; Murabito, Matteo; Le Donne, Alessia; Gasparotto, Andrea; Binetti, Simona

    2017-06-01

    In the thin film solar cells domain, copper indium galium (di)selenide (CIGS) is a material with well-established photovoltaic purpose. Here the presence of a suitable [Ga]/([Ga]+[In]) (GGI) in-depth profile has proved to play a key role in the performance of cells. The implementation of a routine method based on reliable but easily available experimental techniques is mandatory to obtain information on the GGI profile of any CIGS layer, in order to achieve high efficiency chalcogenide layers. In this vein, we here propose and systematically test a simple method for the GGI profile determination based on repeated bromine etching of CIGS thin films followed by Raman analysis of the A 1 peak position. The reliability of the proposed approach is verified using a methodical comparison with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles, showing a good agreement with the GGI in-depth profiles determined using Raman analysis on bromine etched samples.

  18. Influence of the charge trap density distribution in a gate insulator on the positive-bias stress instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eungtaek; Kim, Choong-Ki; Lee, Myung Keun; Bang, Tewook; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Park, Sang-Hee Ko

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the positive-bias stress (PBS) instability of thin film transistors (TFTs) composed of different types of first-gate insulators, which serve as a protection layer of the active surface. Two different deposition methods, i.e., the thermal atomic layer deposition (THALD) and plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD) of Al 2 O 3 , were applied for the deposition of the first GI. When THALD was used to deposit the GI, amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs showed superior stability characteristics under PBS. For example, the threshold voltage shift (ΔV th ) was 0 V even after a PBS time (t stress ) of 3000 s under a gate voltage (V G ) condition of 5 V (with an electrical field of 1.25 MV/cm). On the other hand, when the first GI was deposited by PEALD, the ΔV th value of a-IGZO TFTs was 0.82 V after undergoing an identical amount of PBS. In order to interpret the disparate ΔV th values resulting from PBS quantitatively, the average oxide charge trap density (N T ) in the GI and its spatial distribution were investigated through low-frequency noise characterizations. A higher N T resulted during in the PEALD type GI than in the THALD case. Specifically, the PEALD process on a-IGZO layer surface led to an increasing trend of N T near the GI/a-IGZO interface compared to bulk GI owing to oxygen plasma damage on the a-IGZO surface.

  19. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-selenide (CIGS solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Burghoorn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-selenide (CIGS solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the Jsc and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (dCIGS of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (nresist = 1.792 vs. nAZO = 1.913 at 633 nm to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, Jsc increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%. No trend towards a larger relative increase in Jsc with decreasing dCIGS was observed. Ergo, the increase in Jsc can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in Jsc based on an increased photon path length.

  20. The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokanc, Martin [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Eggert, Roderick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Redlinger, Michael [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Demand for indium is likely to increase if the growth in deployment of the copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) and III-V thin-film photovoltaic technologies accelerates. There are concerns about indium supply constraints since it is relatively rare element in the earth's crust and because it is produced exclusively as a byproduct.

  1. Thermal effects from modified endodontic laser tips used in the apical third of root canals with erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet and erbium, chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy; Walsh, Laurence J

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the temperature changes occurring on the apical third of root surfaces when erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser energy was delivered with a tube etched, laterally emitting conical tip and a conventional bare design optical fiber tip. Thermal effects of root canal laser treatments on periodontal ligament cells and alveolar bone are of concern in terms of safety. A total of 64 single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared 1 mm short of the working length using rotary nickel-titanium Pro-Taper files to an apical size corresponding to a F5 Pro-Taper instrument. A thermocouple located 2 mm from the apex was used to record temperature changes arising from delivery of laser energy through laterally emitting conical tips or plain tips, using an Er:YAG or Er,Cr:YSGG laser. For the Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG systems, conical fibers showed greater lateral emissions (452 + 69% and 443 + 64%) and corresponding lower forward emissions (48 + 5% and 49 + 5%) than conventional plain-fiber tips. All four combinations of laser system and fiber design elicited temperature increases less than 2.5 degrees C during lasing. The use of water irrigation attenuated completely the thermal effects of individual lasing cycles. Laterally emitting conical fiber tips can be used safely under defined conditions for intracanal irradiation without harmful thermal effects on the periodontal apparatus.

  2. The Kagomé topology of the gallium and indium metal-organic framework types with a MIL-68 structure: synthesis, XRD, solid-state NMR characterizations, and hydrogen adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkringer, Christophe; Meddouri, Mohamed; Loiseau, Thierry; Guillou, Nathalie; Marrot, Jérôme; Férey, Gérard; Haouas, Mohamed; Taulelle, Francis; Audebrand, Nathalie; Latroche, Michel

    2008-12-15

    The vanadium-based terephthalate analogs of MIL-68 have been obtained with gallium and indium (network composition: M(OH)(O(2)C-C(6)H(4)-CO(2)), M = Ga or In) by using a solvothermal synthesis technique using N,N-dimethylformamide as a solvent (10 and 48 h, for Ga and In, respectively, at 100 degrees C). They have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis; vibrational spectroscopy; and solid-state (1)H and (1)H-(1)H radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR), (1)H-(1)H double quantum correlation (DQ), and (13)C{(1)H} cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The three-dimensional network with a Kagomé-like lattice is built up from the connection of infinite trans-connected chains of octahedral units MO(4)(OH)(2) (M = Ga or In), linked to each other through the terephthalate ligands in order to generate triangular and hexagonal one-dimensional channels. The presence of DMF molecules with strong interactions within the channels as well as their departure upon calcination (150 degrees C under a primary vacuum) of the materials has been confirmed by subjecting MIL-68 (Ga) to solid-state (1)H MAS NMR. The (1)H-(1)H RFDR and (1)H-(1)H DQ spectra revealed important information on the spatial arrangement of the guest species with respect to the hybrid organic-inorganic network. (13)C{(1)H} CPMAS NMR of activated samples provided crystallographically independent sites in agreement with X-ray diffraction structure determination. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas are 1117(24) and 746(31) m(2) g(-1) for MIL-98 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms have been measured at 77 K, and the storage capacities are found to be 2.46 and 1.98 wt % under a saturated pressure of 4 MPa for MIL-68 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. For comparison, the hydrogen uptake for the aluminum trimesate MIL-110, which has an open framework with 16 A channels, is 3 wt % under 4 MPa.

  3. Microstructures of group III-nitrides after implantation with gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kench, P.J.

    2001-05-01

    High doses of gallium have been implanted into layers of aluminium nitride (AIN), indium nitride (InN) and amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN x ) in an attempt to bond gallium with nitrogen and form binary or ternary alloys. The microstructure of the resultant layers have been characterised using, principally, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation of a high dose of Ga ions into AIN was successful in synthesising a GaN/GaAlN compound. The resultant layers were largely uniform but contained aluminium precipitates near the surface. These precipitates were pure Al and were most common in the region associated with the maximum Ga concentration. Deconvolution of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks indicated that Ga existed in a number of chemical states, including the nitride. Electron diffraction patterns from the implanted layers were closely indexed to both AIN and GaN. A further N implant was used to reduce the concentration of the aluminium precipitates and increase the concentration of GaN bonds. The yield of Ga-N bonds dramatically increased and a reduction in the concentration of Al precipitates was observed. Laser and thermal annealing was performed on the implanted AIN substrates. The near surface regions of the implanted specimens appeared to free of precipitates and bubbles. Laser annealing did have a noticeable effect on the electrical and optical properties of the layers. After laser annealing the conductivity of the Ga implanted layer was lower, indicating that the quality of the material had improved. PL measurements showed that a new PL peak at 2.6 eV appeared after laser annealing. It has been found that implanting InN with gallium can yield Ga-N bonds. However, Ga implants into InN were not as successful at synthesising GaN compounds as those by implanting Ga into AIN, due to the low thermal stability of InN. The implanted InN layers were very irregular and contained large indium precipitates and

  4. Indium gallium arsenide microwave power transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gregory A.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shokrani, Mohsen; Messick, Louis J.; Nguyen, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Depletion-mode InGaAs microwave power MISFETs with 1-micron gate lengths and up to 1-mm gate widths have been fabricated using an ion-implantation process. The devices employed a plasma-deposited silicon/silicon dioxide gate insulator. The dc I-V characteristics and RF power performance at 9.7 GHz are presented. The output power, power-added efficiency, and power gain as a function of input power are reported. An output power of 1.07 W with a corresponding power gain and power-added efficiency of 4.3 dB and 38 percent, respectively, was obtained. The large-gate-width devices provided over twice the previously reported output power for InGaAs MISFETs at X-band. In addition, output power stability within 1.2 percent over 24 h of continuous operation was achieved. In addition, a drain current drift of 4 percent over 10,000 sec was obtained.

  5. Running droplets of gallium from evaporation of gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tersoff, J; Jesson, D E; Tang, W X

    2009-04-10

    High-temperature annealing of gallium arsenide in vacuum causes excess evaporation of arsenic, with accumulation of gallium as liquid droplets on the surface. Using real-time in situ surface electron microscopy, we found that these droplets spontaneously run across the crystal surface. Running droplets have been seen in many systems, but they typically require special surface preparation or gradient forces. In contrast, we show that noncongruent evaporation automatically provides a driving force for running droplets. The motion is predicted and observed to slow and stop near a characteristic temperature, with the speed increasing both below and above this temperature. The same behavior is expected to occur during the evaporation of similar III-V semiconductors such as indium arsenide.

  6. [Mechanism of renal elimination of 2 elements of group IIIA of the periodic table : aluminum and indium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, P

    1981-01-05

    Aluminium and indium, two elements of group IIIA of the periodic table, are concentrated by the kidney inside lysosomes of proximal tubule cell. In these lysosomes, aluminium and indium are precipitated as non-soluble phosphate salts and these precipitates are then expelled in the tubular lumen and eliminated with the urinary flow. These data have been visualized by analytical microscopy (ion microscopy and X ray microanalysis). Local acid phosphatases are assumed to permit the concentration of aluminium and indium salts inside the lysosomes.

  7. Aluminium bridges, aluminium bridge decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade. In building and civil engineering the increase of aluminium applications is due to various aspects like light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions, and esthetics. The paper starts

  8. Looking Down Under for a Circular Economy of Indium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Tim T; Ciacci, Luca; Mudd, Gavin Mark; Reck, Barbara K; Northey, Stephen Alan

    2018-02-20

    Indium is a specialty metal crucial for modern technology, yet it is potentially critical due to its byproduct status in mining. Measures to reduce its criticality typically focus on improving its recycling efficiency at end-of-life. This study quantifies primary and secondary indium resources ("stocks") for Australia through a dynamic material-flow analysis. It is based on detailed assessments of indium mineral resources hosted in lead-zinc and copper deposits, respective mining activities from 1844 to 2013, and the trade of indium-containing products from 1988 to 2015. The results show that Australia's indium stocks are substantial, estimated at 46.2 kt in mineral resources and an additional 14.7 kt in mine wastes. Australian mineral resources alone could meet global demand (∼0.8 kt/year) for more than five decades. Discarded material from post-consumer products, instead, is negligible (43 t). This suggests that the resilience of Australia's indium supply can best be increased through efficiency gains in mining (such as introducing domestic indium refining capacity) rather than at the end of the product life. These findings likely also apply to other specialty metals, such as gallium or germanium, and other resource-dominated countries. Finally, the results illustrate that national circular economy strategies can differ substantially.

  9. Recovery of galium and indium from liquid crystal displays and CIGS photovailtaic modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisselink, R.; Steeghs, W.; Brouwer, J.G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The increasing amount of electronics, such as consumer products and green technologies (e.g. solar PV cells) increases the demand of metals such as indium and gallium. This increasing demand together with the dependency on import of these metals drive research on recycling of waste

  10. Investigations in gallium removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated

  11. Investigations in gallium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Beard, C.A. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  12. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Surface Passivation of CIGS Solar Cells Using Gallium Oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Garud, Siddhartha

    2018-02-27

    This work proposes gallium oxide grown by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, as a surface passivation material at the CdS buffer interface of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. In preliminary experiments, a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is used to compare aluminium oxide, gallium oxide, and hafnium oxide as passivation layers at the CIGS-CdS interface. The findings suggest that gallium oxide on CIGS may show a density of positive charges and qualitatively, the least interface trap density. Subsequent solar cell results with an estimated 0.5 nm passivation layer show an substantial absolute improvement of 56 mV in open-circuit voltage (VOC), 1 mA cm−2 in short-circuit current density (JSC), and 2.6% in overall efficiency as compared to a reference (with the reference showing 8.5% under AM 1.5G).

  14. Growth and characterization of indium antimonide and gallium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    from the cyclotron experiments (Dresselhaus et al 1955). The observed mobility has increased steadily with improvement in the purity of the material. For a sample with donor concentration of 8 × 1012 cm–3 an electron mobility of 1⋅1 × 106 cm2/Vs was measured by Grandsen. (1958). However, Keys (1954) had reported a ...

  15. Growth and characterization of indium antimonide and gallium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The wafers were then stored in methanol for use. In fact, the single crystal wafers {110} obtained from InSb (figure 7) grown by both these techniques were used as substrates for growing thin films using liquid phase epitaxy and results have been published elsewhere. Further, the chemical etching was carried out to study.

  16. Czochralski growth of gallium indium antimonide alloy crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaur, S.C.

    1998-02-01

    Attempts were made to grow alloy crystals of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}Sb by the conventional Czochralski process. A transparent furnace was used, with hydrogen purging through the chamber during crystal growth. Single crystal seeds up to about 2 to 5 mole% InSb were grown from seeds of 1 to 2 mole% InSb, which were grown from essentially pure GaSb seeds of the [111] direction. Single crystals were grown with InSb rising from about 2 to 6 mole% at the seed ends to about 14 to 23 mole% InSb at the finish ends. A floating-crucible technique that had been effective in reducing segregation in doped crystals, was used to reduce segregation in Czochralski growth of alloy crystals of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}Sb. Crystals close to the targeted composition of 1 mole% InSb were grown. However, difficulties were encountered in reaching higher targeted InSb concentrations. Crystals about 2 mole% were grown when 4 mole% was targeted. It was observed that mixing occurred between the melts rendering the compositions of the melts; and, hence, the resultant crystal unpredictable. The higher density of the growth melt than that of the replenishing melt could have triggered thermosolutal convection to cause such mixing. It was also observed that the floating crucible stuck to the outer crucible when the liquidus temperature of the replenishing melt was significantly higher than that of the growth melt. The homogeneous Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}Sb single crystals were grown successfully by a pressure-differential technique. By separating a quartz tube into an upper chamber for crystal growth and a lower chamber for replenishing. The melts were connected by a capillary tube to suppress mixing between them. A constant pressure differential was maintained between the chambers to keep the growth melt up in the growth chamber. The method was first tested with a low temperature alloy Bi{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x}. Single crystals of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}Sb were grown with uniform compositions up to nearly 5 mole% InSb.

  17. Solubility of uranium in liquid gallium, indium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Maltsev, Dmitry S.; Yamschikov, Leonid F.; Osipenko, Alexander G.; Kormilitsyn, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) employing molten salts and liquid metals as working media is considered as a possible alternative to the existing liquid extraction (PUREX) processes. Liquid salts and metals allow reprocessing highly irradiated high burn-up fuels with short cooling times, including the fuels of fast neutron reactors. Pyrochemical technology opens a way to practical realization of short closed fuel cycle. Liquid low-melting metals are immiscible with molten salts and can be effectively used for separation (or selective extraction) of SNF components dissolved in fused salts. Binary or ternary alloys of eutectic compositions can be employed to lower the melting point of the metallic phase. However, the information on SNF components behaviour and properties in ternary liquid metal alloys is very scarce

  18. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  19. Characterization and Modeling of Indium Gallium Antimonide Avalanche Photodiode and of Indium Gallium Arsenide Two-band Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A model of the optical properties of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As(y)Sb(1-y) and In(x)Ga(1-x)As(y)Sb(1-y) is presented, including the refractive, extinction, absorption and reflection coefficients in terms of the optical dielectric function of the materials. Energy levels and model parameters for each binary compound are interpolated to obtain the needed ternaries and quaternaries for various compositions. Bowing parameters are considered in the interpolation scheme to take into account the deviation of the calculated ternary and quaternary values from experimental data due to lattice disorders. The inclusion of temperature effects is currently being considered.

  20. Germanium and indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Kimball, Bryn E.; Tolcin, Amy C.; Guberman, David E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Germanium and indium are two important elements used in electronics devices, flat-panel display screens, light-emitting diodes, night vision devices, optical fiber, optical lens systems, and solar power arrays. Germanium and indium are treated together in this chapter because they have similar technological uses and because both are recovered as byproducts, mainly from copper and zinc sulfides.The world’s total production of germanium in 2011 was estimated to be 118 metric tons. This total comprised germanium recovered from zinc concentrates, from fly ash residues from coal burning, and from recycled material. Worldwide, primary germanium was recovered in Canada from zinc concentrates shipped from the United States; in China from zinc residues and coal from multiple sources in China and elsewhere; in Finland from zinc concentrates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo; and in Russia from coal.World production of indium metal was estimated to be about 723 metric tons in 2011; more than one-half of the total was produced in China. Other leading producers included Belgium, Canada, Japan, and the Republic of Korea. These five countries accounted for nearly 95 percent of primary indium production.Deposit types that contain significant amounts of germanium include volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) deposits, Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc deposits (including Irish-type zinc-lead deposits), Kipushi-type zinc-lead-copper replacement bodies in carbonate rocks, and coal deposits.More than one-half of the byproduct indium in the world is produced in southern China from VMS and SEDEX deposits, and much of the remainder is produced from zinc concentrates from MVT deposits. The Laochang deposit in Yunnan Province, China, and the VMS deposits of the Murchison greenstone belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa, provide excellent examples of indium-enriched deposits. The SEDEX deposits at Bainiuchang, China (located in

  1. Lung gallium scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... produced by the gallium. Images display on a computer screen. During the scan, it is important that ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  2. Indium-111 labeled leukocytes in the evaluation of suspected abdominal abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.E.; Black, R.E.; Welch, D.M.; Maxwell, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Sixty-eight indium-111-labeled leukocyte imaging studies were performed in 53 patients with suspected abdominal abscesses. Twenty-nine studies gave abnormal results. Nine wound infections were demonstrated, and 14 abscesses were correctly identified. Four studied demonstrated colonic accumulation, one of which remains unexplained, and two accessory spleens were identified. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging is a sensitive and specific study in evaluating patients with suspected abdominal abscess. Differentiation of abscess from other causes of inflammation has not been a problem. The exact role of leukocyte imaging compared with gallium-67 citrate imaging, ultrasound and computerized tomography remains to be determined

  3. Plastic deformation of indium nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Kim, Ju-Young; Burek, Michael J.; Greer, Julia R.; Tsui, Ting Y.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Indium nanopillars display two different deformation mechanisms. → ∼80% exhibited low flow stresses near that of bulk indium. → Low strength nanopillars have strain rate sensitivity similar to bulk indium. → ∼20% of compressed indium nanopillars deformed at nearly theoretical strengths. → Low-strength samples do not exhibit strength size effects. - Abstract: Mechanical properties and morphology of cylindrical indium nanopillars, fabricated by electron beam lithography and electroplating, are characterized in uniaxial compression. Time-dependent deformation and influence of size on nanoscale indium mechanical properties were investigated. The results show two fundamentally different deformation mechanisms which govern plasticity in these indium nanostructures. We observed that the majority of indium nanopillars deform at engineering stresses near the bulk values (Type I), with a small fraction sustaining flow stresses approaching the theoretical limit for indium (Type II). The results also show the strain rate sensitivity and flow stresses in Type I indium nanopillars are similar to bulk indium with no apparent size effects.

  4. Electrodeposition of gallium for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2016-08-09

    An electroplating solution and method for producing an electroplating solution containing a gallium salt, an ionic compound and a solvent that results in a gallium thin film that can be deposited on a substrate.

  5. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  6. Gallium scintigraphy in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Wall, Hans; Provan, I.; Murray, C.; Dwyer, M.; Jones, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scanning, indicated either for the elucidation of symptoms or for the assessment of appropriate therapy, was performed in 56 AIDS patients who underwent a total of 77 scans from 1986 to 1988. The age range of the patients was 13-66 years with an average age of 39 years. The majority of patients (95%) were male homosexuals. Gallium scanning has been applied to a wide spectrum of malignancies and to the detection of occult infections. Several mechanisms of uptake have been postulated for the localization of gallium. In general, gallium-67 acts as an analogue of the ferric ion, binding to transferrin soon after intravenous injection. It is believed that it is bound to transferrin receptors on the surface of tumour cells with subsequent intracellular transport. In infection, the association is probably with lactoferrin elaborated by polymorphonuclear cells and siderophores elaborated by bacteria. Gallium-67 is normally distributed to bone and bone marrow, liver, spleen, breast and bowel. In particular, the concentration in the ascending and transverse colon necessitates adequate bowel preparation. Lacrimal, nasopharyngeal and genital activity may also be seen. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  7. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  8. Polarity Control and Doping in Aluminum Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Kontrolle der Polarität und Dotierung in Aluminium Gallium Nitrid vorgelegt von Diplom-Physiker Marc Patrick Hoffmann aus Berlin von der...that are either in metalorganic or hydride form. The MOCVD system is specifically designed for AlGaN alloy growth, including pure GaN and AlN. Both...free exciton transitions in nominally undoped GaN samples grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) were found at 3.478 eV (FXA) and 3.484 eV (FXB

  9. Rows of Dislocation Loops in Aluminium Irradiated by Aluminium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1967-01-01

    Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along <110 > directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics......Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics...

  10. Group 13 β-ketoiminate compounds: gallium hydride derivatives as molecular precursors to thin films of Ga2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, David; Marchand, Peter; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2012-06-04

    Bis(β-ketoimine) ligands, [R{N(H)C(Me)-CHC(Me)═O}(2)] (L(1)H(2), R = (CH(2))(2); L(2)H(2), R = (CH(2))(3)), linked by ethylene (L(1)) and propylene (L(2)) bridges have been used to form aluminum, gallium, and indium chloride complexes [Al(L(1))Cl] (3), [Ga(L(n))Cl] (4, n = 1; 6, n = 2) and [In(L(n))Cl] (5, n = 1; 7, n = 2). Ligand L(1) has also been used to form a gallium hydride derivative [Ga(L(1))H] (8), but indium analogues could not be made. β-ketoimine ligands, [Me(2)N(CH(2))(3)N(H)C(R')-CHC(R')═O] (L(3)H, R' = Me; L(4)H, R' = Ph), with a donor-functionalized Lewis base have also been synthesized and used to form gallium and indium alkyl complexes, [Ga(L(3))Me(2)] (9) and [In(L(3))Me(2)] (10), which were isolated as oils. The related gallium hydride complexes, [Ga(L(n))H(2)] (11, n = 3; 12, n = 4), were also prepared, but again no indium hydride species could be made. The complexes were characterized mainly by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The β-ketoiminate gallium hydride compounds (8 and 11) have been used as single-source precursors for the deposition of Ga(2)O(3) by aerosol-assisted (AA)CVD with toluene as the solvent. The quality of the films varied according to the precursor used, with the complex [Ga(L(1))H] (8) giving by far the best quality films. Although the films were amorphous as deposited, they could be annealed at 1000 °C to form crystalline Ga(2)O(3). The films were analyzed by powder XRD, SEM, and EDX.

  11. Anelasticity of polycrystalline indium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapozhnikov, K., E-mail: k.sapozhnikov@mail.ioffe.ru [A.F.Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Golyandin, S. [A.F.Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kustov, S. [Dept. de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Cra Valldemossa km 7.5, E 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    Mechanisms of anelasticity of polycrystalline indium have been studied over wide ranges of temperature (7-320 K) and strain amplitude (2 x 10{sup -7}-3.5 x 10{sup -4}). Measurements of the internal friction and Young's modulus have been performed by means of the piezoelectric resonant composite oscillator technique using longitudinal oscillations at frequencies of about 100 kHz. The stages of the strain amplitude dependence of the internal friction and Young's modulus defect, which can be attributed to dislocation - point defect and dislocation - dislocation interactions, have been revealed. It has been shown that thermal cycling gives rise to microplastic straining of polycrystalline indium due to the anisotropy of thermal expansion and to appearance of a 'recrystallization' internal friction maximum in the temperature spectra of amplitude-dependent anelasticity. The temperature range characterized by formation of Cottrell's atmospheres of point defects around dislocations has been determined from the acoustic data.

  12. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium and copper radionuclides have a long history of use in nuclear medicine. Table 1 presents the nuclear properties of several gallium and copper isotopes that either are used in the routine practice of clinical nuclear medicine or exhibit particular characteristics that might make them useful in diagnostic or therapeutic medicine. This paper will provide some historic perspective along with an overview of some current research directions in gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry. A more extensive review of gallium radiopharmaceutical chemistry has recently appeared and can be consulted for a more in-depth treatment of this topic

  13. Gallium imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handmaker, H.; O'Mara, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Gallium-67 citrate imaging was carried out in 59 children from 3 mo to 20 yr of age. Indications for the study included the search for occult inflammatory disease and the detection and staging of malignant disease. The Ga-67 citrate scan had a 96% reliability in confirming or excluding the site of purulent material as a cause of sepsis, and 76% reliability in detecting malignant disease. Tissue distributions in children differ from those in adults primarily in that the epiphyseal plates, spleen, and thymus may show increased activity normally and in the presence of sepsis. These variations are illustrated as possible sources of incorrect interpretation. ''Cold'' defects may be seen in sterile collections and avascular masses. Experience in this age group seems sufficiently encouraging to continue the use of gallium-67 citrate for the purposes described

  14. Phosphorus enhances aluminium tolerance in both aluminium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seedlings growing in acid soils suffer both phosphorus (P) deficiency and aluminium (Al) toxicity stresses. An experiment was conducted to study the effects of Al and P interaction on Al-tolerant (ET8) and Al-sensitive (ES8) wheat genotypes in an acid soil. This study aimed to determine the interactive effect of Al and P in soil ...

  15. Untersuchungen zur Zytotoxizität von dentalen Füllungsmaterialien am Beispiel von Amalgam und Gallium-alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Ungerer, Sebastian Steffen

    2004-01-01

    Amalgam wird in der Zahnheilkunde schon seit 1819 als Füllungsmaterial eingesetzt. Die prob-lematische Biokompatibilität des Amalgams wurde jedoch nicht oder nur wenig beachtet. Galli-um und Indium wurden in den 1950er Jahren als Ersatz für Quecksilber verwendet und ein Fül-lungswerkstoff, Gallium-alloy, entwickelt, der mit dem konventionellen Amalgam vergleichbar war. Die in vitro Untersuchungen zur Biokompatibilität wurden in den 1990er Jahren in erster Linie an Fibroblasten durchgeführt. D...

  16. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gallium--A smart metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium is a soft, silvery metallic element with an atomic number of 31 and the chemical symbol Ga. The French chemist Paul-Emile Lecoq de Boisbaudran discovered gallium in sphalerite (a zinc-sulfide mineral) in 1875 using spectroscopy. He named the element "gallia" after his native land of France (formerly Gaul; in Latin, Gallia). The existence of gallium had been predicted in 1871 by Dmitri Mendeleev, the Russian chemist who published the first periodic table of the elements. Mendeleev noted a gap in his table and named the missing element "eka-aluminum" because he determined that its location was one place away from aluminum in the table. Mendeleev thought that the missing element (gallium) would be very much like aluminum in its chemical properties, and he was right. Solid gallium has a low melting temperature (~29 degrees Celsius, or °C) and an unusually high boiling point (~2,204 °C). Because of these properties, the earliest uses of gallium were in high-temperature thermometers and in designing metal alloys that melt easily. The development of a gallium-based direct band-gap semiconductor in the 1960s led to what is now one of the most well-known applications for gallium-based products--the manufacture of smartphones and data-centric networks.

  18. Optical properties of aluminium-gallium-nitride semiconductors; Optische Eigenschaften von Aluminium-Galliumnitrid-Halbleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeppischer, Marcus

    2011-08-17

    In this work fundamental optical properties of AlN, GaN and their alloys are presented. Spectroscopic ellipsometry from the near infrared (NIR) to the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region was the main tool to investigate these properties. The complete dielectric function (DF) of cubic as well as hexagonal GaN and AlN in the range between 0.6 eV and 20 eV is shown here, for the first time. A layer model including surface roughness and buffer layers was used to separate the DF of the investigated layer from the measured pseudo-DF. Afterwards all absorption structures in the DF's are discussed in detail. Due to the comparison with calculated bandstructures these absorption structures could be connected to interband transitions at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone (BZ). Within this analysis similarities and differences between GaN and AlN are discussed. For zincblende (zb) AlN a pronounced absorption tail below the direct band gap transition was detected. This behaviour is typical for a phonon-assisted indirect absorption. In contrast zb-GaN exhibits a clear direct absorption. Furthermore, a change in the energetic position of the two main interband absorptions E1 and E2 at the L- and X-point of the BZ was found. A detailed analysis of the anisotropic fundamental band gap of hexagonal AlN offers a interchange of the two topmost valance bands at the BZ center compared to GaN. Due to this permutation the fundamental band edge of wurtzit (wz) AlN is only visible for parallel polarized light, while for GaN it can be detect in the perpendicular configuration. By analysing the energetic position of the three excitonic transitions the crystal-field- and spin-orbit-splitting were defined to be {delta}{sub cr}=-226 meV and {delta}{sub so}=14 meV. In addition, the energetic positions for these transitions at T=15 K are 6.0465 eV, 6.2694 eV and 6.2775 eV. The comparison between measurements at room and low temperature shows an energetic shift for both absorption edges of about 80 meV. By comparing the energetic positions of the excitonic transitions with the lattice parameters of different samples on silicon, sapphire and SiC substrate the influence of strain on the optical properties of wz-AlN was investigated. Due to this analysis the deformation potentials within the cubic approximation were calculated. Finally the spectral region below the fundamental band gap absorption of cubic AlGaN layers were studied. Therefore an analytical model was developed to calculate the dispersion in the transparent range for an arbitrary Al-content.

  19. Effects of various grading types of gallium-ion contents on the properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films prepared via the spin coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-Hsien; Chen, Fu-Shan; Lin, Shin-Hom; Ou, Chang-Ying; Lu, Chung-Hsin

    2018-02-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (Cu(In,Ga)Se2) films with different gallium-ion contents were prepared via a spin coating method followed by a selenization process. Increasing the gallium-ion contents of the prepared films decreased the lattice constants and increased the band gaps. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis revealed that Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films with different band gap grading types were successfully fabricated. Increasing the contents of gallium ions near the substrate resulted in an increase in the short-circuit current density. On the other hand, increasing in the contents of gallium ions near the surface of the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films significantly increased open-circuit voltage V oc. By combining a normal and a reverse grading of gallium-ion contents, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films with double grading types of gallium-ions contents exhibited superior electrical properties. The conversion efficiency and fill factor of solar cells with a double grading type of gallium-ion contents reached 6% and 58.7%, respectively.

  20. Gallium Arsenide Domino Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Long, Stephen I.

    1990-01-01

    Advantages include reduced power and high speed. Experimental gallium arsenide field-effect-transistor (FET) domino circuit replicated in large numbers for use in dynamic-logic systems. Name of circuit denotes mode of operation, which logic signals propagate from each stage to next when successive stages operated at slightly staggered clock cycles, in manner reminiscent of dominoes falling in a row. Building block of domino circuit includes input, inverter, and level-shifting substages. Combinational logic executed in input substage. During low half of clock cycle, result of logic operation transmitted to following stage.

  1. Self-assembly surface modified indium-tin oxide anodes for single-layer light-emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Morgado, J; Charas, A; Matos, M; Alcacer, L; Cacialli, F

    2003-01-01

    We study the effect of indium-tin oxide surface modification by self assembling of highly polar molecules on the performance of single-layer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated with polyfluorene blends and aluminium cathodes. We find that the efficiency and light-output of such LEDs is comparable to, and sometimes better than, the values obtained for LEDs incorporating a hole injection layer of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulphonic acid. This effect is attributed to the dipole-induced work function modification of indium-tin oxide.

  2. Self-assembly surface modified indium-tin oxide anodes for single-layer light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, Jorge [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes and Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Barbagallo, Nunzio [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes and Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Charas, Ana [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes and Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Matos, Manuel [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro-1, P-1949-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Alcacer, Luis [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes and Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cacialli, Franco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2003-03-07

    We study the effect of indium-tin oxide surface modification by self assembling of highly polar molecules on the performance of single-layer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated with polyfluorene blends and aluminium cathodes. We find that the efficiency and light-output of such LEDs is comparable to, and sometimes better than, the values obtained for LEDs incorporating a hole injection layer of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulphonic acid. This effect is attributed to the dipole-induced work function modification of indium-tin oxide.

  3. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH 3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  4. Ion nitriding of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, T.

    2002-09-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism of aluminium nitriding by a technique that employs implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions and diffusional transport of atoms. The nitriding of aluminium is investigated, because this is a method for surface modification of aluminium and has a potential for application in a broad spectrum of fields such as automobile, marine, aviation, space technologies, etc. However, at present nitriding of aluminium does not find any large scale industrial application, due to problems in the formation of stoichiometric aluminium nitride layers with a sufficient thickness and good quality. For the purposes of this study, ion nitriding is chosen, as an ion beam method with the advantage of good and independent control over the process parameters, which thus can be related uniquely to the physical properties of the resulting layers. Moreover, ion nitriding has a close similarity to plasma nitriding and plasma immersion ion implantation, which are methods with a potential for industrial application. (orig.)

  5. Aluminium in Fisch und Fischereierzeugnissen

    OpenAIRE

    Ranau, Reiner; Oehlenschläger, Jörg

    1997-01-01

    Recent reports associating aluminium with several skeletal (osteomalacia) and neurological disorders (encephalopathy and Alzheimer’s disease) in humans suggest that exposure to aluminium may pose a hazard to health. This requires the examination of aluminiumcontent in different foodstuffs. Therefore, an analytical method for the determination of aluminium in fish and fishery products, especially in fishery products packaged in aluminium cans, was developed using graphite furnace atomic absorp...

  6. Gallium interstitial contributions to diffusion in gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Joseph T.; Morgan, Caroline G.

    2011-09-01

    A new diffusion path is identified for gallium interstitials, which involves lower barriers than the barriers for previously identified diffusion paths [K. Levasseur-Smith and N. Mousseau, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 113502 (2008), P. A. Schultz and O. A. von Lilienfeld, Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering 17, 084007 (2009)] for the charge states which dominate diffusion over most of the available range of Fermi energies. This path passes through the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration, and has a particularly low diffusion barrier of 0.35 eV for diffusion in the neutral charge state. As a part of this work, the character of the charge states for the gallium interstitials which are most important for diffusion is investigated, and it is shown that the last electron bound to the neutral interstitial occupies a shallow hydrogenic bound state composed of conduction band states for the hexagonal interstitial and both tetrahedral interstitials. How to properly account for the contributions of such interstitials is discussed for density-functional calculations with a k-point mesh not including the conduction band edge point. Diffusion barriers for gallium interstitials are calculated in all the charge states which can be important for a Fermi level anywhere in the gap, q = 0, +1, +2, and +3, for diffusion via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration and via the hexagonal interstitial configuration. The lowest activation enthalpies over most of the available range of Fermi energies are found to correspond to diffusion in the neutral or singly positive state via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration. It is shown that several different charge states and diffusion paths contribute significantly for Fermi levels within 0.2 eV above the valence band edge, which may help to explain some of the difficulties [H. Bracht and S. Brotzmann, Phys. Rev. B 71, 115216 (2005)] which have been

  7. Gallium interstitial contributions to diffusion in gallium arsenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Schick

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A new diffusion path is identified for gallium interstitials, which involves lower barriers than the barriers for previously identified diffusion paths [K. Levasseur-Smith and N. Mousseau, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 113502 (2008, P. A. Schultz and O. A. von Lilienfeld, Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering 17, 084007 (2009] for the charge states which dominate diffusion over most of the available range of Fermi energies. This path passes through the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration, and has a particularly low diffusion barrier of 0.35 eV for diffusion in the neutral charge state. As a part of this work, the character of the charge states for the gallium interstitials which are most important for diffusion is investigated, and it is shown that the last electron bound to the neutral interstitial occupies a shallow hydrogenic bound state composed of conduction band states for the hexagonal interstitial and both tetrahedral interstitials. How to properly account for the contributions of such interstitials is discussed for density-functional calculations with a k-point mesh not including the conduction band edge point. Diffusion barriers for gallium interstitials are calculated in all the charge states which can be important for a Fermi level anywhere in the gap, q = 0, +1, +2, and +3, for diffusion via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration and via the hexagonal interstitial configuration. The lowest activation enthalpies over most of the available range of Fermi energies are found to correspond to diffusion in the neutral or singly positive state via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration. It is shown that several different charge states and diffusion paths contribute significantly for Fermi levels within 0.2 eV above the valence band edge, which may help to explain some of the difficulties [H. Bracht and S. Brotzmann, Phys. Rev. B 71, 115216 (2005] which

  8. Recovery in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the development of a unique experimental method for volume characterisation of individual embedded crystallites down to a radius of 150 nm is presented. This method is applied to in-situ studies of recovery in aluminium. The method is an extension of 3DXRD microscopy, an X...... by the combined use of X-ray micro focusing optics, new scanning algorithms and the use of foils. The ratio of foil thickness to crystallite size should be at least 10 such that the central ones are situated in a bulk environment. To avoid thermal drifts, gold reference markers are deposited onto the sample...... are represented as strings. To identify the strings a combination of a 5D connected component type algorithm and multi-peak fitting was found to be superior. The first use of the method was a study of recovery of a deformed aluminium alloy (AA1050). The aluminium alloy was deformed by cold rolling to a thickness...

  9. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002

  10. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  11. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2003-06-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  12. A review of the world market of indium (Economy of indium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the current state of the world and Russian markets of indium and indium-containing products was made based on the publications of the last years. Main fields of indium application are given, in particular, its using for neutron absorbing regulating rods in nuclear reactors. The second γ-radiation resulted from neutron absorption allows using indium as a neutron detector. Indium market stabilization is expected due to supply from China and South Korea [ru

  13. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  14. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2006-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  15. 10 Gallium Complexes as Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2018-02-05

    Clinical trials have shown gallium nitrate, a group 13 (formerly IIIa) metal salt, to have antineoplastic activity against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and urothelial cancers. Interest in gallium as a metal with anticancer properties emerged when it was discovered that 67Ga(III) citrate injected in tumor-bearing animals localized to sites of tumor. Animal studies showed non-radioactive gallium nitrate to inhibit the growth of implanted solid tumors. Following further evaluation of its efficacy and toxicity in animals, gallium nitrate, Ga(NO3)3, was designated an investigational drug by the National Cancer Institute (USA) and advanced to Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials. Gallium(III) shares certain chemical characteristics with iron(III) which enable it to interact with iron-binding proteins and disrupt iron-dependent tumor cell growth. Gallium's mechanisms of action include the inhibition of cellular iron uptake and disruption of intracellular iron homeostasis, these effects result in inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase and mitochondrial function, and changes in the expression in proteins of iron transport and storage. Whereas the growth-inhibitory effects of gallium become apparent after 24 to 48 hours of incubation of cells, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is seen with 1 to 4 hours of incubation. Gallium-induced ROS consequently triggers the upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1 genes. Beyond the first generation of gallium salts such as gallium nitrate and gallium chloride, a new generation of gallium-ligand complexes such as tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III) (KP46) and gallium maltolate has emerged. These agents are being evaluated in the clinic while other ligands for gallium are in preclinical development. These newer agents appear to possess greater antitumor efficacy and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than the earlier generation of gallium compounds.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of indium substituted nanocrystalline Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Kishor Kr. [Department of Chemistry, ADP College, Nagaon, Assam 782002 (India); Nandi, Mithun [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam 781014 (India); Talukdar, Anup K., E-mail: anup_t@sify.com [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam 781014 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • In situ modification of the MFI zeolite by incorporation of indium. • The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, UV–vis (DRS), SAA, EDX and SEM. • The incorporation of indium was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR, UV–vis (DRS), EDX and TGA. • Hydroxylation of phenol reaction was studied on the synthesized catalysts. - Abstract: A series of indium doped Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite were synthesized hydrothermally with silicon to aluminium and indium molar ratio of 100 and with aluminium to indium molar ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. The MFI zeolite phase was identified by XRD and FT-IR analysis. In XRD analysis the prominent peaks were observed at 2θ values of around 6.5° and 23° with a few additional shoulder peaks in case of all the indium incorporated samples suggesting formation of pure phase of the MFI zeolite. All the samples under the present investigation were found to exhibit high crystallinity (∼92%). The crystallite sizes of the samples were found to vary from about 49 to 55 nm. IR results confirmed the formation of MFI zeolite in all cases showing distinct absorbance bands near 1080, 790, 540, 450 and 990 cm{sup −1}. TG analysis of In-MFI zeolites showed mass losses in three different steps which are attributed to the loss due to adsorbed water molecules and the two types TPA{sup +} cations. Further, the UV–vis (DRS) studies reflected the position of the indium metal in the zeolite framework. Surface area analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out to characterize the synthesized samples The analysis showed that the specific surface area ranged from ∼357 to ∼361 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and the pore volume of the synthesized samples ranged from 0.177 to 0.182 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed the structure of the samples to be rectangular and twinned rectangular shaped. The EDX analysis was carried out for confirmation of Si, Al and In in zeolite frame work. The catalytic activities of

  17. Glutathione role in gallium induced toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asim

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... It is very important and interesting to study the reaction of gallium nitrate and glutathione as biomarker of glutathione ... Key words: Gallium nitrate, reduced glutathione (GSH), whole blood, plasma, cytosolic fraction (CF), oxidized ..... DMSA effect on gallium arsenide induced pathological liver injury in rats.

  18. Medical Applications and Toxicities of Gallium Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Chitambar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two to three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in the fields of medicine and electronics. In clinical medicine, radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human disease while more recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may function as antimicrobial agents against certain pathogens. In a totally different realm, the chemical properties of gallium arsenide have led to its use in the semiconductor industry. Gallium compounds, whether used medically or in the electronics field, have toxicities. Patients receiving gallium nitrate for the treatment of various diseases may benefit from such therapy, but knowledge of the therapeutic index of this drug is necessary to avoid clinical toxicities. Animals exposed to gallium arsenide display toxicities in certain organ systems suggesting that environmental risks may exist for individuals exposed to this compound in the workplace. Although the arsenic moiety of gallium arsenide appears to be mainly responsible for its pulmonary toxicity, gallium may contribute to some of the detrimental effects in other organs. The use of older and newer gallium compounds in clinical medicine may be advanced by a better understanding of their mechanisms of action, drug resistance, pharmacology, and side-effects. This review will discuss the medical applications of gallium and its mechanisms of action, the newer gallium compounds and future directions for development, and the toxicities of gallium compounds in current use.

  19. Recycling process for recovery of gallium from GaN an e-waste of LED industry through ball milling, annealing and leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon

    2015-04-01

    Waste dust generated during manufacturing of LED contains significant amounts of gallium and indium, needs suitable treatment and can be an important resource for recovery. The LED industry waste dust contains primarily gallium as GaN. Leaching followed by purification technology is the green and clean technology. To develop treatment and recycling technology of these GaN bearing e-waste, leaching is the primary stage. In our current investigation possible process for treatment and quantitative leaching of gallium and indium from the GaN bearing e-waste or waste of LED industry dust has been developed. To recycle the waste and quantitative leaching of gallium, two different process flow sheets have been proposed. In one, process first the GaN of the waste the LED industry dust was leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue was mixed with Na2CO3, ball milled followed by annealing, again leached to recover gallium. In the second process, the waste LED industry dust was mixed with Na2CO3, after ball milling and annealing, followed acidic leaching. Without pretreatment, the gallium leaching was only 4.91 w/w % using 4M HCl, 100°C and pulp density of 20g/L. After mechano-chemical processing, both these processes achieved 73.68 w/w % of gallium leaching at their optimum condition. The developed process can treat and recycle any e-waste containing GaN through ball milling, annealing and leaching. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... of the cross rolled volume fraction is found. To further asses this effect, and the anisotropy, it is necessary to acquire knowledge about both texture and microstructure, e.g. by TEM. Roll bonding of pre-strained aluminium is found to be a possible alternative to ARB in the quest for ultra-fine grained...

  1. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  2. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented

  3. Thermodynamic properties of indium-antimony alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, Ya.I.; Goryacheva, V.I.; Gejderikh, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Method of electromotive forces is used to obtain thermodynamic parameters of reaction of In x Sb (1-x) phase formation from liquid indium and solid indium mono-antimonide. For alloy compositions with x=0.75-0.55 liquidus coordinates on phase diagram are determined. Nonmonotonous dependence of partial entropy and enthalpy of indium on composition of liquid alloys, that is connected with ordering, is detected. 20 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  4. Common features of gallium perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksiyko, R; Berkowski, M; Byszewski, P; Dabrowski, B; Diduszko, R; Fink-Finowicki, J; Vasylechko, LO

    2001-01-01

    The Czochralski and floating zone methods have been used to grow single crystals of gallium perovskites solid solutions with rare earth elements La, Pr, Nd, Sm and with Sr. The structure of the crystals has been investigated by powder X-ray, synchrotron radiation and neutron diffraction methods over

  5. Fatigue tests on aluminium bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Traffic bridges are subjected to variable loads and should therefore be checked on fatigue. Especially low weight materials, like aluminium, are sensitive to fatigue, because the variable load is a substantial part of the total load. This paper shows the structural design of an aluminium bridge

  6. Surfactant effects of indium on cracking in AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Miller, C. M.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) superlattice structures are often characterized by a network of cracks resulting from the large lattice mismatch and difference in thermal expansion coefficients, especially as the thickness of the layers increases. This work investigates the influence of indium as a surfactant on strain and cracking in AlN/GaN DBRs grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). DBRs with peak reflectivities ranging from 465 nm to 540 nm were grown and indium was introduced during the growth of the AlN layer. Image processing techniques were used to quantify the crack length per square millimeter and it was observed that indium has a significant effect on the crack formation and reduced the total crack length in these structures by a factor of two.

  7. Advanced shipbuilding in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, H.; Svensson, L.E.; Karlsson, L.

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of two different welding techniques for welding ships in aluminium is discussed. Conventional MIG welding and the recently developed Friction Super Stir Welding (FSSW) are compared concerning weld metal microstructures and mechanical properties. Results from testing of FSSW welds are also presented. It was observed that the grain size was smaller in FSSW welds are also presented. It was observed that the grain size was smaller in FSSW welds than in MIG welds whereas precipitates generally were larger in FSSW welds. The two methods produced welds with comparable mechanical properties. Good fatigue behaviour was obtained for FSSW welds. Advantages of the welding methods are also discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  8. Aluminium in Drinkwater: voorkomen, herkomst en gezondheidsaspecten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh JFM; de Boer JLM; van den Velde-Koerts T

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium can occur in drinking water because of the application of aluminium salts as a coagulant in the treatment of drinking water. In the Netherlands mostly iron salts are used instead of aluminium. Besides this aluminium can be present in the source for drinking water. In shallow groundwater

  9. Reduced thermal quenching in indium-rich self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in optical and structural properties of indium rich (27), indium gallium nitride (InGaN) self-organized quantum dots (QDs), with red wavelength emission, and the two dimensional underlying wetting layer (WL) are investigated. Temperature dependent micro-photoluminescence (?PL) reveals a decrease in thermal quenching of the QDs integrated intensity compared to that of the WL. This difference in behaviour is due to the 3-D localization of carriers within the QDs preventing them from thermalization to nearby traps causing an increase in the internal quantum efficiency of the device. Excitation power dependent ?PL shows a slower increase of the QDs PL signal compared to the WL PL which is believed to be due to the QDs saturation. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Study of indium nitride and indium oxynitride band gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sparvoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the study of the optical band gap of indium oxynitride (InNO and indium nitride (InN deposited by magnetron reactive sputtering. InNO shows multi-functionality in electrical and photonic applications, transparency in visible range, wide band gap, high resistivity and low leakage current. The deposition processes were performed in a magnetron sputtering system using a four-inches pure In (99.999% target and nitrogen and oxygen as plasma gases. The pressure was kept constant at 1.33 Pa and the RF power (13.56 MHz constant at 250 W. Three-inches diameter silicon wafer with 370 micrometer thickness and resistivity in the range of 10 ohm-centimeter was used as substrate. The thin films were analyzed by UV-Vis-NIR reflectance, photoluminescence (PL and Hall Effect. The band gap was obtained from Tauc analysis of the reflectance spectra and photoluminescence. The band gap was evaluated for both films: for InNO the value was 2.48 eV and for InN, 1.52 eV. The relative quantities obtained from RBS spectra analysis in InNO sample are 48% O, 12% N, 40% In and in InN sample are 8% O, 65% N, 27% In.

  11. Process for Patterning Indium for Bump Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    An innovation was created for the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor for integration of low-temperature detector chips with a silicon backshort and a silicon photonic choke through flipchip bonding. Indium bumps are typically patterned using liftoff processes, which require thick resist. In some applications, it is necessary to locate the bumps close to high-aspect-ratio structures such as wafer through-holes. In those cases, liftoff processes are challenging, and require complicated and time-consuming spray coating technology if the high-aspect-ratio structures are delineated prior to the indium bump process. Alternatively, processing the indium bumps first is limited by compatibility of the indium with subsequent processing. The present invention allows for locating bumps arbitrarily close to multiple-level high-aspect-ratio structures, and for indium bumps to be formed without liftoff resist. The process uses the poor step coverage of indium deposited on a silicon wafer that has been previously etched to delineate the location of the indium bumps. The silicon pattern can be processed through standard lithography prior to adding the high-aspect-ratio structures. Typically, high-aspectratio structures require a thick resist layer so this layer can easily cover the silicon topography. For multiple levels of topography, the silicon can be easily conformally coated through standard processes. A blanket layer of indium is then deposited onto the full wafer; bump bonding only occurs at the high points of the topography.

  12. Evaluated neutronic file for indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Chiba, S.; Smith, D.L.; Meadows, J.W.; Guenther, P.T.; Lawson, R.D.; Howerton, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluated neutronic data file for elemental indium is documented. This file, extending from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV, is presented in the ENDF/B-VI format, and contains all neutron-induced processes necessary for the vast majority of neutronic applications. In addition, an evaluation of the 115 In(n,n') 116m In dosimetry reaction is presented as a separate file. Attention is given in quantitative values, with corresponding uncertainty information. These files have been submitted for consideration as a part of the ENDF/B-VI national evaluated-file system. 144 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Gallium-67 scintigraphy and the Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garayt, D.

    1987-01-01

    Although gallium-67 was initially used for tumor imaging, clinical studies suggested its potential use as a method of detecting occult inflammatory lesions. The demonstration of diffuse myocardial uptake of gallium-67 during Lyme disease myocarditis is consistent with a pattern of diffuse myocarditis as seen in sarcoid myocarditis. Two cases are presented. A critical review of the various applications of gallium-67 scintigraphy to myocardium investigation is carried out [fr

  14. Direct electrodeposition of aluminium nano-rods

    OpenAIRE

    Perre, Emilie; Nyholm, Leif; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Edström, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    Electrodeposition of aluminium within an alumina nano-structured template, for use as high surface area current collectors in Li-ion microbatteries, was investigated. The aluminium electrodeposition was carried out in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride:aluminium chloride (1:2 ratio). First the aluminium electrodeposition process was confirmed by combined cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements. Then, aluminium was electrodeposit...

  15. Aluminium in Drinkwater: voorkomen, herkomst en gezondheidsaspecten

    OpenAIRE

    Versteegh JFM; de Boer JLM; van den Velde-Koerts T

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium can occur in drinking water because of the application of aluminium salts as a coagulant in the treatment of drinking water. In the Netherlands mostly iron salts are used instead of aluminium. Besides this aluminium can be present in the source for drinking water. In shallow groundwater high levels have been found probably related to acidification, which is an environmental problem. Aluminium can cause neurological diseases in patients who are on chronic haemodialysis because of ren...

  16. Doped Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs)/Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch (PCSS) Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-27

    ARL-TR-7819 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Doped Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs)/Gallium Arsenide (GaAs...Laboratory Doped Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs)/Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch (PCSS) Fabrication by...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2016–September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Doped Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs)/Gallium Arsenide (GaAs

  17. Efficacy of gallium in tooth loss prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Milena D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in medicine. Radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human diseases. More recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may also function as antimicrobial agents. In the review, the potential application of gallium in the future treatment of periodontitis and prevention of tooth loss will be discussed. Gingival inflammation, bacterial infection, alveolar bone destruction and subsequent tooth loss are characteristic features of periodontal disease. Surgical techniques, mechanical debridement of the denuded root surface, and local or systemic application of antimicrobial agents are currently used treatments for periodontitis. However, the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria has prompted a great need for new and alternative treatment methods for infection. Conclusion: The potential anti-periodontitis benefits of gallium are related to eradicating infection due to bacterial biofilms, increasing bone deposition and downregulating unwanted immune responses. Adjunctive use of gallium laser therapy with mechanical instrumentation in combination with gallium-containing gingival gels, toothpastes and mouth rinses may represent the final solutions for tooth loss prevention.

  18. Gallium-68 in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniova, Lucia; Palatis, Louis De; Etchebehere, Elba; Ravizzini, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging agents labeled with ;68Gallium (68Ga) have undergone a significant increase in clinical utilization. 68Ga is conveniently produced from a germanium-68/gallium-68 (68Ge/68Ga) generator. Because of the compact size and ease of use of the generator, 68Ga labeled compounds may be more cost-effective than PET radioisotopes that are cyclotron-produced. The convenient half-life of 68Ga (T1/2=68 min) provides sufficient radioactivity for various PET imaging applications, while delivering acceptable radiation doses to patients. This chapter summarizes the emerging clinical utilization of 68Ga-based radiotracers in medical imaging. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF GALLIUM OXIDE TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    heterojunction to implement p-n junctions. This would bring a large number of new device types into play, especially for power electronics where Ga2O3 is...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0167 ASSESSMENT OF GALLIUM OXIDE TECHNOLOGY Burhan Bayraktaroglu Devices for Sensing Branch Aerospace... Devices for Sensing Branch Aerospace Component & Subsystems Division *//Signature// ROSS W. DETTMER Chief Devices for Sensing Branch

  20. Peculiarities of the interaction of indium-tin and indium-bismuth alloys with ammonium halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red'kin, A.N.; Smirnov, V.A.; Sokolova, E.A.; Makovej, Z.I.; Telegin, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Peculiarities of fusible metal alloys interaction with ammonium halogenides in vertical reactor are considered using indium-tin and indium-bismuth binary alloys. It is shown that at the end of the process the composition of metal and salt phases is determined by the equilibrium type and constant characteristic of the given salt-metal system. As a result the interaction of indium-tin and indium-bismuth alloys with ammonium halogenides leads to preferential halogenation of indium-bismuth alloys with ammonium halogenides leads to preferential halogenation of indium which may be used in the processes of separation or purification. A model is suggested to calculate the final concentration of salt and metal phase components

  1. Gallium 67 uptake in thymic rebound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, R.; Sabio, H.; Teates, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    We have reported a case of localized thymic enlargement and uptake of gallium 67 in a child who had received antineoplastic chemotherapy. The enlarged thymus showed normal histology, a picture consistent with thymic rebound after nonspecific stress. This case further demonstrates the need to consider thymic rebound as a cause of gallium 67 uptake in children with neoplastic diseases

  2. Gallium-67 citrate scan in extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Wanyu [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Hsieh Jihfang [Chi-Mei Foundation Hospital, Tainan (Taiwan)

    1999-07-01

    Aim: Whole-body gallium scan was performed to evaluate the usefulness of gallium scan for detecting extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) lesions. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with extrapulmonary TB were included in this study. Four patients were found to have two lesions. Totally, 41 lesions were identified, including 19 TB arthritis, 8 spinal TB, 5 TB meningitis, 3 TB lymphadenopathy, 2 TB pericarditis, 1 TB peritonitis, 1 intestinal TB, 1 skin TB and 1 renal TB. Results: Of the 41 extrapulmonary TB lesions, gallium scan detected 32 lesions with a sensitivity of 78%. All the patients with TB meningitis showed negative gallium scan. When the five cases of TB meningitis were excluded, the detection sensitivity of gallium scan increased to 88.9% (32/36). Conclusion: Our data revealed that gallium scan is a convenient and useful method for evaluating extrapulmonary TB lesions other than TB-meningitis. We suggest that gallium scan be included in the clinical routine for patients with suspected extrapulmonary TB. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es wurden Ganzkoerper-Gallium-Szintigramme angefertigt, um den Nutzen der Gallium-Szintigraphie zur Erfassung von extrapulmonalen Tuberkuloseherden (TB) zu erfassen. Methoden: 37 Patienten mit extrapulmonaler TB wurden eingeschlossen. 4 Patienten hatten 2 Laesionen. Insgesamt wurden 41 Laesionen identifiziert, hierunter 19 TB-Arthritis, 8 spinale TB, 5 TB-Meningitis, 3 TB-Lymphadenopathie, 2 TB-Perikarditis, 1 TB-Peritonitis, 1 intestinale TB, 1 Haut-TB und eine Nieren-TB. Ergebnisse: Von den 41 extrapulmonalen TB-Herden erfasste die Gallium-Szintigraphie 32 Herde mit einer Sensitivitaet von 78%. Alle Patienten mit TB-Meningitis zeigten einen negativen Gallium-Scan. Wenn die 5 Faelle mit TB-Meningitis ausgeschlossen wurden, stieg die Sensitivititaet der Gallium-Szintigraphie auf 88,9% (32/36). Schlussfolgerung: Die Daten zeigen, dass die Gallium-Szintigraphie eine einfache und nuetzliche Methode zur Erfassung extrapulmonaler TB-Herde ist

  3. Processing to obtain high-purity gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Renato G.

    2003-03-01

    Gallium has become increasingly popular as a substrate material for electronic devices. Aside from ore, gallium can be obtained from such industrial sources as the Bayer process caustic liquor that is a byproduct of bauxite processing, flue dust removed from the fume-collection system in plants that produce aluminum by the electrolytic process, zinc refinery residues, gallium scrap materials, and coal fly ash. The purification process for gallium can start with solvent-extraction processes where the concentrations of impurities, especially metals, are reduced to the ppm range. This article describes how ultra-purification techniques can be employed to reduce the undesirable impurities to the low ppb range. The various procedures described give an idea as to the extent of work needed to obtain and prepare high-purity gallium for electronic application.

  4. Large grain gallium arsenide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, S. S.; Chu, T. L.; Firouzi, H.; Han, Y. X.; Chen, W. J.; Wang, Q. H.

    Polycrystalline gallium arsenide films deposited on tungsten/graphite substrates have been used for the fabrication of thin film solar cells. Gallium arsenide films deposited on foreign substrates of 10 microns or less thickness exhibit, in most cases, pronounced shunting effects due to grain boundaries. MOS solar cells of 9 sq cm area with an AM1 efficiency of 8.5 percent and p(+)/n/n(+) homojunction solar cells of 1 sq cm area with an AM1 efficiency of 8.8 percent have been prepared. However, in order to further improve the conversion efficiency before the development of effective passivation techniques, gallium arsenide films with large and uniform grain structure are necessary. The large grain gallium arsenide films have been prepared by using (1) the arsine treatment of a thin layer of molten gallium on the substrate surface and (2) the recrystallized germanium films on tungsten/graphite as substrates.

  5. Indium-bridged [1]ferrocenophanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagh, Bidraha; Sadeh, Saeid; Green, Jennifer C; Müller, Jens

    2014-02-17

    Indium-bridged [1]ferrocenophanes ([1]FCPs) and [1.1]ferrocenophanes ([1.1]FCPs) were synthesized from dilithioferrocene species and indium dichlorides. The reaction of Li2fc⋅tmeda (fc = (H4C5)2Fe) and (Mamx)InCl2 (Mamx = 6-(Me2NCH2)-2,4-tBu2C6H2) gave a mixture of the [1]FCP (Mamx)Infc (4(1)), the [1.1]FCP [(Mamx)Infc]2 (4(2)), and oligomers [(Mamx)Infc]n (4(n)). In a similar reaction, employing the enantiomerically pure, planar-chiral (Sp,Sp)-1,1'-dibromo-2,2'-diisopropylferrocene (1) as a precursor for the dilithioferrocene derivative Li2fc(iPr2), equipped with two iPr groups in the α position, gave the inda[1]ferrocenophane 5(1) [(Mamx)Infc(iPr2)] selectively. Species 5(1) underwent ring-opening polymerization to give the polymer 5(n). The reaction between Li2fc(iPr2) and Ar'InCl2 (Ar' = 2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4) gave an inseparable mixture of the [1]FCP Ar'Infc(iPr2) (6(1)) and the [1.1]FCP [Ar'Infc(iPr2)]2 (6(2)). Hydrogenolysis reactions (BP86/TZ2P) of the four inda[1]ferrocenophanes revealed that the structurally most distorted species (5(1)) is also the most strained [1]FCP. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabane, G.; Englander, M.; Lehmann, J.

    1955-01-01

    Uranium, as obtained after spinning in phase γ, presents an heterogeneous structure with large size grains. The anisotropic structure of the metal leads to an important buckling and surface distortion of the fuel slug which is incompatible with its tubular cladding for nuclear fuel uses. Different treatments have been made to obtain an isotropic structure presenting high thermal stability (laminating, hammering and spinning in phase α) without success. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content present important advantage in respect of non allied uranium. The introduction of aluminium in the form of intermetallic compound (UAl 2 ) gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue. Alloys obtained from raw casting present an improved buckling and surface distortion in respect of pure uranium. This improvement is obtained with uranium containing between 0,15 and 0,5 % of aluminium. An even more improvement in thermal stability is obtained by thermal treatments of these alloys. These new characteristics are explained by the fine dispersion of the UAl 2 particles in uranium. The results after treatments obtained from an alloy slug containing 0,4 % of aluminium show no buckling or surface distortion and no elongation. (M.P.)

  7. Mineral resource of the month: indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolcin, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Geologically, the occurrence of indium minerals is rare. The element most often occurs as a sulfide inclusion or substitutes in other base-metal minerals, including cassiterite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and stannite. Indium’s abundance in the crust is estimated to be 0.05 parts per million, which makes it more abundant than silver, but it is so widely disseminated that it does not occur in high enough concentrations to form mineable deposits. Therefore, indium is most often recovered from byproduct residues produced during the refining of lead and zinc. But only about one-quarter of the indium mined worldwide is refined into metal, as many indium-bearing concentrates are sent to refineries that do not have the capability of recovering the metal.

  8. Quantification of indium in steel using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, A.; Miranda, J.; Rickards, J.; Cheang, J.C.

    1989-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of steel endodontics tools was carried out using low-energy protons (/le/ 700 keV). A computer program for a thick-target analysis which includes enhancement due to secondary fluorescence was used. In this experiment the L-lines of indium are enhanced due to the proximity of other elements' K-lines to the indium absorption edge. The results show that the ionization cross section expression employed to evaluate this magnitude is important. (orig.).

  9. Gallium nitride on gallium oxide substrate for integrated nonlinear optics

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Kashif M.

    2017-11-22

    Gallium Nitride (GaN), being a direct bandgap semiconductor with a wide bandgap and high thermal stability, is attractive for optoelectronic and electronic applications. Furthermore, due to its high optical nonlinearity — the characteristic of all 111-V semiconductors — GaN is also expected to be a suitable candidate for integrated nonlinear photonic circuits for a plethora of apphcations, ranging from on-chip wavelength conversion to quantum computing. Although GaN devices are in commercial production, it still suffers from lack of a suitable substrate material to reduce structural defects like high densities of threading dislocations (TDs), stacking faults, and grain boundaries. These defects significandy deteriorate the optical quality of the epi-grown GaN layer, since they act as non-radiative recombination centers. Recent studies have shown that GaN grown on (−201) β-Gallium Oxide (Ga2O3) has superior optical quality due to a better lattice matching as compared to GaN grown on Sapphire (Al2O3) [1-3]. In this work, we report on the fabrication of GaN waveguides on GaiOj substrate and their optical characterization to assess their feasibihty for efficient four-wave mixing (FWM).

  10. Gallium determination in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stulzaft, O.; Maziere, B.; Ly, S.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive, simple and time-saving method has been developed for the neutron activation analysis of gallium at concentrations around 10 -4 ppm in biological tissues. After a 24-hour irradiation in a thermal neutron flux of 2.8x10 13 nxcm -2 xs -1 and a purification by ion-exchange chromatography to eliminate troublesome elements such as sodium, iron and copper, the 72 Ga activity is measured with enough accuracy for the method to be applicable in animal physiology and clinical toxicology. (author)

  11. Gallium arsenide deep-level optical emitter for fibre optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Janet L; McManis, Joseph E; Osadchy, Thomas; Grober, Louise; Woodall, Jerry M; Kindlmann, Peter J

    2003-06-01

    Fibre-optic components fabricated on the same substrate as integrated circuits are important for future high-speed communications. One industry response has been the costly push to develop indium phosphide (InP) electronics. However, for fabrication simplicity, reliability and cost, gallium arsenide (GaAs) remains the established technology for integrated optoelectronics. Unfortunately, the GaAs bandgap wavelength (0.85 microm) is far too short for fibre optics at 1.3-1.5 microm. This has led to work on materials that have a large lattice mismatch on GaAs. Here we demonstrate the first light-emitting diode (LED) that emits at 1.5 microm fibre-optic wavelengths in GaAs using optical transitions from arsenic antisite (As(Ga)) deep levels. This is an enabling technology for fibre-optic components that are lattice-matched to GaAs integrated circuits. We present experimental results showing significant internal optical power (24 mW) and speed (in terahertz) from GaAs optical emitters using deep-level transitions. Finally, we present theory showing the ultimate limit to the efficiency-bandwidth product of semiconductor deep-level optical emitters.

  12. Effect of hydrogen on aluminium and aluminium alloys: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Susceptibility of aluminium and its alloys towards hydrogen embrittlement has been well established. Still a lot of confusion exists on the question of transport of hydrogen and its possible role in stress corrosion cracking. This paper reviews some of the fundamental properties of hydrogen...... in aluminium and its alloys and its effect on mechanical properties. The importance of hydrogen embrittlement over anodic dissolution to explain the stress corrosion cracking mechanism of these alloys is also examined in considerable detail. The various experimental findings concerning the link between...... hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking are also discussed....

  13. Characterizing and engineering tunable spin functionality inside indium arsenide/gallium arsenide quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwen

    The continual downsizing of the basic functional units used in the electronics industry has motivated the study of the quantum computation and related topics. To overcome the limitations of classical physics and engineering, some unique quantum mechanical features, especially entanglement and superpositions have begun to be considered as important properties for future bits. Including these quantum mechanical features is attractive because the ability to utilize quantum mechanics can dramatically enhance computational power. Among the various ways of constructing the basic building blocks for quantum computation, we are particularly interested in using spins inside epitaxially grown InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules as quantum bits (qubits). The ability to design and engineer nanostructures with tailored quantum properties is critical to engineering quantum computers and other novel electro-optical devices and is one of the key challenges for scaling up new ideas for device application. In this thesis, we will focus on how the structure and composition of quantum dot molecules can be used to control spin properties and charge interactions. Tunable spin and charge properties can enable new, more scalable, methods of initializing and manipulating quantum information. In this thesis, we demonstrate one method to enable electric-field tunability of Zeeman splitting for a single electron spin inside a quantum dot molecules by using heterostructure engineering techniques to modify the barrier that separates quantum dots. We describe how these structural changes to the quantum dot molecules also change charge interactions and propose ways to use this effect to enable accurate measurement of coulomb interactions and possibly charge occupancy inside these complicated quantum dot molecules.

  14. Hall effect and photoconductivity lifetime studies of gallium nitride, indium nitride, and mercury cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Craig H.

    A deep understanding of both carrier recombination and transport is necessary for semiconductor engineering, particularly in defining the ultimate limits of performance for a given device before spending the resources to perfect its fabrication. Hall effect measurements utilizing a variable magnetic field are necessary to discriminate between conduction in epitaxial layers and conduction originating at the surface or at an interfacial layer. For thick hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) grown GaN, variable field Hall measurements revealed the presence of small but significant lower mobility surface and interface electrons which would otherwise lead to errors in interpreting the electrical properties. In addition, QMSA analysis of the measurements indicates that thick GaN samples contain a large spread in electron mobility values, most likely with depth. For molecular beam epitaxial InN, it was found that electrical measurements are affected by surface charge conduction, as well as the non-uniformity of mobility and carrier concentration with depth. Both of these effects mask the surprisingly high quality of the material close to the surface. Photoconductance lifetime and variable-magnetic-field Hall and transient measurements were performed on a series of undoped, In-doped and As-doped HgCdTe grown by MBE and MOCVD. N-type layers often significantly influence the interpretation of the electrical measurements. Even the best Low Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) n-type material still appears to be dominated by defect-related recombination, as intrinsic lifetimes calculated with full band structure can be well above those measured. Mid-Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) lifetimes increase somewhat with carrier concentration, as if the n-type doping process were passivating Schockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. P-type MWIR films lie mainly below the predicted values, and their relationship between concentration and lifetime is essentially unchanged by growth technique, indicating that a fundamental native defect is responsible for the recombination. Those with lifetimes above the predicted values have anomalous temperature dependences when measured, and often a non-exponential photoconductive decay characteristic of minority carrier traps. Deep level trap concentrations in GaN can harm performance in many desired applications. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) measurement on MBE GaN suggest that the trapping center concentration drops with temperature below 770°C.

  15. Investigation of enthalpy and specific heat of the gallium-indium-tin eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchupkin, V.V.; Migaj, L.L.; Fordeeva, L.K.; Perlova, N.L.

    1978-01-01

    Enthalpy and specific heat of the fusible (melting point is 10.6 deg C) eutectic alloy (67% Ga - 20.5% In - 12.5% Sn according to mass) are determined by the mixing method. The determination was carried out in vacuum at the residual pressure of >= 1x10 -5 torr in the temperature range from 59.3 to 437.0 deg C. It is established that temperature dependence of alloy enthalpy is described by the equation: Hsub(t) - Hsub(0degC)=1.014+0.0879t-0.0000129 t 2 , where (Hsub(t) - Hsub(0degC)) is enthalpy, cal/g; t-temperature, deg C. Mean-square dispersion is +-0.6%. Temperature dependence of alloy specific heat in the temperature range under study was determined by differentiation of the equation obtained for enthalpy: Csub(p)=0.0879-0.000026t, where Csub(p)-specific heat, cal/gx deg. It is supposed that temperature increase makes it possible to decrease slightly specific heat

  16. Stripping voltammetry of thallium, indium and gallium on mercury-graphite electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenev, A.I.; Kharitonova, O.I.; Chernova, N.A.; Agasyan, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical Tl(1), In(3) and Ga(3) behaviour in mercury-graphite electrodes by the method of direct-current and alternating-current voltammetry is studied. Comparison of mathematical models and their experimental check are carried out. Possibility to forecast the investigation results is shown, and the procedure for mercury-graphite electrode surface formation necessary in measurements is chosen

  17. Radiation and temperature effects in gallium arsenide, indium phosphide, and silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Statler, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of radiation on performance are determined for both n+p and p+n GaAs and InP cells and for silicon n+p cells. It is found that the radiation resistance of InP is greater than that of both GaAs and Si under 1-MeV electron irradiation. For silicon, the observed decreased radiation resistance with decreased resistivity is attributed to the presence of a radiation-induced boron-oxygen defect. Comparison of radiation damage in both p+n and n+p GaAs cells yields a decreased radiation resistance for the n+p cell attributable to increased series resistance, decreased shunt resistance, and relatively greater losses in the cell's p-region. For InP, the n+p configuration is found to have greater radiation resistance than the p+n cell. The increased loss in this latter cell is attributed to losses in the cell's emitter region. Temperature dependency results are interpreted using a theoretical relation for dVoc/dT, which predicts that increased Voc should result in decreased numerical values for dPm/dT. The predicted correlation is observed for GaAs but not for InP, a result which is attributed to variations in cell processing.

  18. Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) photovoltaic devices made using multistep selenization of nanocrystal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Taylor B; Mori, Isao; Stolle, C Jackson; Bogart, Timothy D; Ostrowski, David P; Glaz, Micah S; Du, Jiang; Pernik, Douglas R; Akhavan, Vahid A; Kesrouani, Hady; Vanden Bout, David A; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-09-25

    The power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic devices made with ink-deposited Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 (CIGS) nanocrystal layers can be enhanced by sintering the nanocrystals with a high temperature selenization process. This process, however, can be challenging to control. Here, we report that ink deposition followed by annealing under inert gas and then selenization can provide better control over CIGS nanocrystal sintering and yield generally improved device efficiency. Annealing under argon at 525 °C removes organic ligands and diffuses sodium from the underlying soda lime glass into the Mo back contact to improve the rate and quality of nanocrystal sintering during selenization at 500 °C. Shorter selenization time alleviates excessive MoSe2 formation at the Mo back contact that leads to film delamination, which in turn enables multiple cycles of nanocrystal deposition and selenization to create thicker, more uniform absorber films. Devices with power conversion efficiency greater than 7% are fabricated using the multiple step nanocrystal deposition and sintering process.

  19. Gallium-doped indium oxide nanoleaves: Structural characterization, growth mechanism and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhu; Chen, Yiqing; Guo, Linliang; Guo, Taibo; Zhu, Yunqing; Su, Yong; Jia, Chong; Wei, Meiqin; Cheng, Yinfen

    2011-11-01

    The novel two-dimensional (2-D) Ga-doped In2O3 nanoleaves are synthesized by a simple one-step carbonthermal evaporation method using Cu-Sn alloy as the substrates. Two basic parts construct this leaf-like nanostructure: a long central trunk and two tapered nanoribbons in symmetric distribution in relation to the trunk. The Ga-In-O alloy particles are located at or close to the tips of the central trunks and serve as catalysts for the central trunk growth by the self-catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. And the homoepitaxial growth of tapered nanoribbon on the surface of the central trunk can be explained by vapor-solid (VS) mechanism. The room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement of this nanoscaled Ga-doped In2O3 transparent conducting oxide (TCO) detected two blue peaks located at 432 nm and 481 nm, respectively, which can be used by Ru-based dye and indicates potential application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The successful preparation of this novel 2-D Ga-doped In2O3 nanoleaves not only enriches the synthesis of TCO materials, but also provides new blocks in future architecture of functional nano-devices.

  20. Indium(III) and Gallium(III) phthalocyanines-based nanohybrid materials for optical limiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Huili; Li, Shuai [Key Lab for Adv. Mater., Institute of Applied Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: jwang@siom.ac.cn [Key Lab of Materials for High-Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Blau, Werner J., E-mail: wblau@tcd.ie [School of Physics and the Centre for Research on Adaptative Nanostructures and Nanodevices(CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Chen, Yu, E-mail: chentangyu@yahoo.com [Key Lab for Adv. Mater., Institute of Applied Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of a phthalocyanine (Pc)-based nanohybrid material PCIGS [Cu{sub 2}(tBu{sub 4}PcGa)(tBu{sub 4}PcIn)S{sub 2}TPP{sub 2}] are described. The overall aggregation of phthalocyanines in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) films was evident, which is indicated by the broadening of linear spectra in the Q-band region and the shift of wavelength. Upon excitation with nanosecond laser pulse at 355 nm, the transient absorption band appeared at about 500 nm is attributed to the triplet-triplet absorption of the Pcs. For PCIGS and its starting materials tBu{sub 4}PcGaCl and tBu{sub 4}PcInCl, all Z-scans exhibit a decrease in transmittance about the focus typical of an induced positive nonlinear absorption of incident light. The absorption mechanism is due to population of excited states through a multi-step nonlinear absorption. When these Pc compounds were embedded into a commercially available polymer PMMA, all the Pc/PMMA composites display much larger nonlinear absorption coefficient and lower saturable fluence for optical limiting when compared to the same Pc molecules in solution. However, in contrast to tBu{sub 4}PcGaCl and tBu{sub 4}PcInCl, PCIGS displayed decreased optical limiting response, possibly due to competing electron accepting processes in the In and Ga metals, and the highly ordered structure of the PCIGS complex itself. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The {alpha}{sub 0} values of PCIGS in the solid state is 150 times that in the dilute solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the Pc/PMMA composites display lower saturable fluence for optical limiting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCIGS showed decreased OL responses when compared to tBu{sub 4}PcMCl (M = Ga, In).

  1. Indium(III) and Gallium(III) phthalocyanines-based nanohybrid materials for optical limiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Huili; Li, Shuai; Wang, Jun; Blau, Werner J.; Chen, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of a phthalocyanine (Pc)-based nanohybrid material PCIGS [Cu 2 (tBu 4 PcGa)(tBu 4 PcIn)S 2 TPP 2 ] are described. The overall aggregation of phthalocyanines in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) films was evident, which is indicated by the broadening of linear spectra in the Q-band region and the shift of wavelength. Upon excitation with nanosecond laser pulse at 355 nm, the transient absorption band appeared at about 500 nm is attributed to the triplet–triplet absorption of the Pcs. For PCIGS and its starting materials tBu 4 PcGaCl and tBu 4 PcInCl, all Z-scans exhibit a decrease in transmittance about the focus typical of an induced positive nonlinear absorption of incident light. The absorption mechanism is due to population of excited states through a multi-step nonlinear absorption. When these Pc compounds were embedded into a commercially available polymer PMMA, all the Pc/PMMA composites display much larger nonlinear absorption coefficient and lower saturable fluence for optical limiting when compared to the same Pc molecules in solution. However, in contrast to tBu 4 PcGaCl and tBu 4 PcInCl, PCIGS displayed decreased optical limiting response, possibly due to competing electron accepting processes in the In and Ga metals, and the highly ordered structure of the PCIGS complex itself. -- Highlights: ► The α 0 values of PCIGS in the solid state is 150 times that in the dilute solution. ► All the Pc/PMMA composites display lower saturable fluence for optical limiting. ► PCIGS showed decreased OL responses when compared to tBu 4 PcMCl (M = Ga, In).

  2. Design and Optimization of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Solar Cells for Lightweight Battlefield Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Photoelectric affect in solar cells , from [15]. ...................................................18 Figure 14. Solar spectral irradiance versus wavelength...depicted in Figure 13. Figure 13. Photoelectric affect in solar cells , from [15]. An in-depth explanation of solar cell losses is found in [20...the load. Since the window layer is on top of the solar cell , it needs to be transparent to the light spectrum that is required for photoelectric

  3. Optical and Electrical Characterization of Bulk Grown Indium-Gallium-Arsenide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    composition had fluctuated and caused polycrystallization throughout the crystal [2]. The mico -Raman spectroscopy compared the strength of the...absorption data and information about the depth of laser penetration, may play a role in the unusual shape. Despite the complexity displayed

  4. Dopant–dopant interactions in beryllium doped indium gallium arsenide: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, Vadym; Liu, Wenyuan; Benistant, Francis; Manzhos, Sergei

    2018-02-01

    We present an ab initio study of dopant-dopant interactions in beryllium-doped InGaAs. We consider defect formation energies of various interstitial and substitutional defects and their combinations. We find that all substitutional-substitutional interactions can be neglected. On the other hand, interactions involving an interstitial defect are significant. Specially, interstitial Be is stabilized by about 0.9/1.0 eV in the presence of one/two BeGa substitutionals. Ga interstitial is also substantially stabilized by Be interstitials. Two Be interstitials can form a metastable Be-Be-Ga complex with a dissociation energy of 0.26 eV/Be. Therefore, interstitial defects and defect-defect interactions should be considered in accurate models of Be doped InGaAs. We suggest that In and Ga should be treated as separate atoms and not lumped into a single effective group III element, as has been done before. We identified dopant-centred states which indicate the presence of other charge states at finite temperatures, specifically, the presence of Beint+1 (as opposed to Beint+2 at 0K).

  5. Size-effects in indium gallium arsenide nanowire field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zota, Cezar B., E-mail: cezar.zota@eit.lth.se; Lind, E. [Department of Electrical and Information Technology, Lund University, Lund 22101 (Sweden)

    2016-08-08

    We fabricate and analyze InGaAs nanowire MOSFETs with channel widths down to 18 nm. Low-temperature measurements reveal quantized conductance due to subband splitting, a characteristic of 1D systems. We relate these features to device performance at room-temperature. In particular, the threshold voltage versus nanowire width is explained by direct observation of quantization of the first sub-band, i.e., band gap widening. An analytical effective mass quantum well model is able to describe the observed band structure. The results reveal a compromise between reliability, i.e., V{sub T} variability, and on-current, through the mean free path, in the choice of the channel material.

  6. Photon and carrier management design for nonplanar thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Harry A.; Callahan, Dennis; Bukowsky, Colton

    2017-11-21

    Photovoltaic structures are disclosed. The structures can comprise randomly or periodically structured layers, a dielectric layer to reduce back diffusion of charge carriers, and a metallic layer to reflect photons back towards the absorbing semiconductor layers. This design can increase efficiency of photovoltaic structures. The structures can be fabricated by nanoimprint.

  7. Gallium-67 citrate scan in extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Wanyu

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Whole-body gallium scan was performed to evaluate the usefulness of gallium scan for detecting extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) lesions. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with extrapulmonary TB were included in this study. Four patients were found to have two lesions. Totally, 41 lesions were identified, including 19 TB arthritis, 8 spinal TB, 5 TB meningitis, 3 TB lymphadenopathy, 2 TB pericarditis, 1 TB peritonitis, 1 intestinal TB, 1 skin TB and 1 renal TB. Results: Of the 41 extrapulmonary TB lesions, gallium scan detected 32 lesions with a sensitivity of 78%. All the patients with TB meningitis showed negative gallium scan. When the five cases of TB meningitis were excluded, the detection sensitivity of gallium scan increased to 88.9% (32/36). Conclusion: Our data revealed that gallium scan is a convenient and useful method for evaluating extrapulmonary TB lesions other than TB-meningitis. We suggest that gallium scan be included in the clinical routine for patients with suspected extrapulmonary TB. (orig.) [de

  8. Recycling process for recovery of gallium from GaN an e-waste of LED industry through ball milling, annealing and leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, Basudev, E-mail: swain@iae.re.kr; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo, E-mail: kspark@iae.re.kr; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon, E-mail: hshong@iae.re.kr

    2015-04-15

    Waste dust generated during manufacturing of LED contains significant amounts of gallium and indium, needs suitable treatment and can be an important resource for recovery. The LED industry waste dust contains primarily gallium as GaN. Leaching followed by purification technology is the green and clean technology. To develop treatment and recycling technology of these GaN bearing e-waste, leaching is the primary stage. In our current investigation possible process for treatment and quantitative leaching of gallium and indium from the GaN bearing e-waste or waste of LED industry dust has been developed. To recycle the waste and quantitative leaching of gallium, two different process flow sheets have been proposed. In one, process first the GaN of the waste the LED industry dust was leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue was mixed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ball milled followed by annealing, again leached to recover gallium. In the second process, the waste LED industry dust was mixed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, after ball milling and annealing, followed acidic leaching. Without pretreatment, the gallium leaching was only 4.91 w/w % using 4 M HCl, 100 °C and pulp density of 20 g/L. After mechano-chemical processing, both these processes achieved 73.68 w/w % of gallium leaching at their optimum condition. The developed process can treat and recycle any e-waste containing GaN through ball milling, annealing and leaching. - Highlights: • Simplest process for treatment of GaN an LED industry waste developed. • The process developed recovers gallium from waste LED waste dust. • Thermal analysis and phase properties of GaN to Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN to NaGaO{sub 2} revealed. • Solid-state chemistry involved in this process reported. • Quantitative leaching of the GaN was achieved.

  9. Design and analysis of aluminium brdiges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade, which is due to various aspects: light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions. The paper starts with a short history of aluminium bridges and then focuses on aluminium bridges in the

  10. Buckwheat stomatal traits under aluminium toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr E. Smirnov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium influence on some stomatal parameters of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. was studied. Significant changes in stomatal density, stomatal index and stomatal shape coefficient under aluminium treatment were revealed. Stomatal closure and no difference in total stomatal potential conductance index of treatment plants were suggested as aluminium resistance characteristics.

  11. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  12. Aluminium phosphide-induced leukopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Mandros, Charalampos; Potolidis, Evangelos; Fanourgiakis, Panagiotis

    2013-10-30

    Acute intoxication from the pesticide aluminium phosphide is a relatively rare, life-threatening condition in which cardiovascular decompensation is the most feared problem. We report the case of a patient exposed to aluminium phosphide-liberated phosphine gas. It resulted in the development of a gastroenteritis-like syndrome accompanied by severe reduction in white blood cell numbers as an early and prominent manifestation. By affecting important physiological processes such as mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species homeostasis, phosphine could cause severe toxicity. After presenting the characteristics of certain leucocyte subpopulations we provide the current molecular understanding of the observed leukopenia which in part seems paradoxical.

  13. Spin Injection in Indium Arsenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eJohnson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In a two dimensional electron system (2DES, coherent spin precession of a ballistic spin polarized current, controlled by the Rashba spin orbit interaction, is a remarkable phenomenon that’s been observed only recently. Datta and Das predicted this precession would manifest as an oscillation in the source-drain conductance of the channel in a spin-injected field effect transistor (Spin FET. The indium arsenide single quantum well materials system has proven to be ideal for experimental confirmation. The 2DES carriers have high mobility, low sheet resistance, and high spin orbit interaction. Techniques for electrical injection and detection of spin polarized carriers were developed over the last two decades. Adapting the proposed Spin FET to the Johnson-Silsbee nonlocal geometry was a key to the first experimental demonstration of gate voltage controlled coherent spin precession. More recently, a new technique measured the oscillation as a function of channel length. This article gives an overview of the experimental phenomenology of the spin injection technique. We then review details of the application of the technique to InAs single quantum well (SQW devices. The effective magnetic field associated with Rashba spin-orbit coupling is described, and a heuristic model of coherent spin precession is presented. The two successful empirical demonstrations of the Datta Das conductance oscillation are then described and discussed.

  14. Gallium-67 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauth, H.A.; Heimes, K.; Schubotz, R.; von Wichert, P.

    1986-01-01

    Roentgenograms and gallium-67 scans and gallium-67 counts of BAL fluid samples, together with differential cell counts, have proved to be useful in assessing activity and lung involvement in sarcoidosis. In active pulmonary sarcoidosis gallium-67 scans are usually positive. Quantitation of gallium-67 uptake in lung scans, however, may be difficult. Because gallium-67 uptake and cell counts in BAL fluid may be correlated, we set out to investigate gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid recovered from patient of different groups. Sixteen patients with recently diagnosed and untreated sarcoidosis, nine patients with healthy lungs, and five patients with CFA were studied. Gallium-67 uptake of the lung, gallium-67 activity in the lavage fluid, SACE and LACE levels, and alpha 1-AT activity were measured. Significantly more gallium-67 activity was found in BAL fluid from sarcoidosis patients than in that from CFA patients (alpha = .001) or patients with healthy lungs (alpha = .001). Gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid could be well correlated with the number of lymphocytes in BAL fluid, but poorly with the number of macrophages. Subjects with increased levels of SACE or serum alpha 1-AT showed higher lavage gallium-67 activity than did normals, but no correlation could be established. High gallium-67 activity in lavage fluid may be correlated with acute sarcoidosis or physiological deterioration; low activity denotes change for the better. The results show that gallium-67 counts in BAL fluid reflects the intensity of gallium-67 uptake and thus of activity of pulmonary sarcoidosis

  15. Properties of gallium lanthanum sulphide glass

    OpenAIRE

    Bastock, P.; Craig, C.; Khan, K.; Weatherby, E.; Yao, J.; Hewak, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses has been studied in order to ascertain properties across the entire glass forming region. This is the first comprehensive study of GLS glass over a wide compositional range.

  16. Glutathione role in gallium induced toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asim

    2012-01-26

    GSH) present in tissues. It is very important and interesting to study the reaction of gallium nitrate and glutathione as biomarker of glutathione role in detoxification and conjugation in whole blood components (plasma and ...

  17. Effect of Bio char on Plant Growth and Aluminium Form of Soil under Aluminium Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lianwen; Li, Qingbiao; Sun, Jingwei; Feng, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Aluminium-enriched acid red soils in South China easily cause aluminium toxicity to plants, but biochip can improve soils and eliminate soil contaminations. In this project, biochip was used in potted plant control test to study the effect of biochip on plant growth in soil under acid aluminium stress and the migration and conversion of aluminium in plant-soil system. The fin dings show that the application of biochip increases the pH value of soil under aluminium stress significantly, changes the existing form of aluminium ion in soil, reduces the plants’ absorption of aluminium, and alleviates the aluminium toxicity to plants, but too much biochip may inhibit the growth of plants. In this case, further study should be carried out as regards the volume and way of biochip input in practical applications as well as the timeliness of aluminium toxicity removal.

  18. Constitutive modelling of aluminium foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, W.M.; Lemmen, P.P.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an aluminium foam model is proposed for a vehicle crash analysis. The model assumes that there is no coupling between stresses and strains in different principal directions. The stress in each principle direction is then interpolated from an experimental recorded uniaxial stress strain

  19. Recovery mechanisms in nanostructured aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tianbo; Hansen, Niels; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    Commercial purity aluminium (99.5%) has been cold rolled to a true strain of 5.5 (99.6% reduction in thickness). The material is very strong but low temperature recovery may be a limiting factor. This has been investigated by isothermal annealing treatments in the temperature range 5–100C. Hardness...

  20. Gallium beam lithography for superconductive structure formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Michael David; Lewis, Rupert M.

    2018-01-30

    The present invention relates to the use of gallium beam lithography to form superconductive structures. Generally, the method includes exposing a surface to gallium to form an implanted region and then removing material adjacent to and/or below that implanted region. In particular embodiments, the methods herein provide microstructures and nanostructures in any useful substrate, such as those including niobium, tantalum, tungsten, or titanium.

  1. Water thermostatic bath to compare gallium cells

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, José Felipe Neves; Petkovic, Slavolhub Garcia; Moreira, Valquimar Marvila

    2001-01-01

    In general, gallium cells can be realised in any water thermostatic bath, however, some manufactures have developed air furnaces or heat-cooling ovens (with peltier cells and heating resistors) to avoid mechanic vibrations, electromagnetic interference, and to allow for easier and dedicated operation mode. Generally, all of these devices are dedicated and they are used with only one cell. As we want to compare two different gallium cells, we have developed a water thermostatic bath, whi...

  2. Gallium arsenide quantum well-based far infrared array radiometric imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Kathrine A.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.

    1991-01-01

    We have built an array-based camera (FIRARI) for thermal imaging (lambda = 8 to 12 microns). FIRARI uses a square format 128 by 128 element array of aluminum gallium arsenide quantum well detectors that are indium bump bonded to a high capacity silicon multiplexer. The quantum well detectors offer good responsivity along with high response and noise uniformity, resulting in excellent thermal images without compensation for variation in pixel response. A noise equivalent temperature difference of 0.02 K at a scene temperature of 290 K was achieved with the array operating at 60 K. FIRARI demonstrated that AlGaAS quantum well detector technology can provide large format arrays with performance superior to mercury cadmium telluride at far less cost.

  3. Strength and microstructure of gallium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B H; Woldu, M; Nakajima, H; Okabe, T

    1999-03-01

    This study investigated the physical and mechanical properties and the microstructure of four different gallium alloys. For all gallium alloys, the compressive strengths measured at one hour (86-223 MPa) and 24 hours (265-286 MPa) after specimen preparation were found to be well within the range exhibited by many high-copper amalgams. The creep values and dimensional change of the gallium alloys were comparable to those of leading amalgams, except for the dimensional change value of one alloy. The set gallium alloys consisted of a multi-phase structure including beta-Sn, CuGa2, In4Ag9, Ag72Ga28, and Ga5Pd (except for one product that did not contain Pd) that was more complicated than the structure of dental amalgams. Although the gallium alloys had physical and mechanical properties comparable to those of high-copper amalgams, the microstructure, coupled with the instability of the element gallium itself, could make these materials more prone to corrosive attack compared to amalgams.

  4. Clinical applications of Gallium-68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting radioisotope that is produced from a 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator. As such it is conveniently used, decoupling radiopharmacies from the need for a cyclotron on site. Gallium-68-labeled peptides have been recognized as a new class of radiopharmaceuticals showing fast target localization and blood clearance. 68 Ga-DOTATOC, 8 Ga-DOTATATE, 68 Ga-DOTANOC, are the most prominent radiopharmaceuticals currently in use for imaging and differentiating lesions of various somatostatin receptor subtypes, overexpressed in many neuroendocrine tumors. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of clinical studies with 68 Ga over the past few years around the world, including within the United States. An estimated ∼10,000 scans are being performed yearly in Europe at about 100 centers utilizing 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs within clinical trials. Two academic sites within the US have also begun to undertake human studies. This review will focus on the clinical experience of selected, well-established and recently applied 68 Ga-labeled imaging agents used in nuclear medicine. - Highlights: ► A summary of the emerging clinical uses of 68 Ga-based radiopharmaceuticals is provided. ► 68 Ga-PET may prove as or more clinically robust than the corresponding 18 F-labeled agents. ► 68 Ga-radiopeptides were studied for targeting of somatostatin receptors subtypes. ► 68 Ga-DOTATOC, 68 Ga-DOTATATE, 68 Ga-DOTANOC, are currently in clinical trials

  5. Control of gallium incorporation in sol–gel derived CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2} thin films for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourlier, Yoan [Institut de Recherche sur les Composants logiciels et matériels pour l’Information et la Communication Avancée (IRCICA), CNRS USR 3380, Université Lille 1, 50 avenue Halley, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Cristini Robbe, Odile [Institut de Recherche sur les Composants logiciels et matériels pour l’Information et la Communication Avancée (IRCICA), CNRS USR 3380, Université Lille 1, 50 avenue Halley, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules (PhLAM), CNRS UMR 8523, Université Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Lethien, Christophe [Institut de Recherche sur les Composants logiciels et matériels pour l’Information et la Communication Avancée (IRCICA), CNRS USR 3380, Université Lille 1, 50 avenue Halley, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules (PhLAM), CNRS UMR 8523, Université Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), CNRS UMR 8520, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2} thin films were prepared by sol–gel process. • Evolution of lattice parameters is characteristic of a solid solution. • Optical band gap was found to be linearly dependent on the gallium rate. - Abstract: In this paper, we report the elaboration of Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} chalcopyrite thin films via a sol–gel process. To reach this aim, solutions containing copper, indium and gallium complexes were prepared. These solutions were thereafter spin-coated onto the soda lime glass substrates and calcined, leading to metallic oxides thin films. Expected chalcopyrite films were finally obtained by sulfurization of oxides layers using a sulfur atmosphere at 500 °C. The rate of gallium incorporation was studied both at the solutions synthesis step and at the thin films sulfurization process. Elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses have shown the efficiency of monoethanolamine used as a complexing agent for the preparation of CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2} thin layers. Moreover, the replacement of diethanolamine by monoethanolamine has permitted the substitution of indium by isovalent gallium from x = 0 to x = 0.4 and prevented the precipitation of copper derivatives. XRD analyses of sulfurized thin films CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2,} clearly indicated that the increasing rate of gallium induced a shift of XRD peaks, revealing an evolution of the lattice parameter in the chalcopyrite structure. These results were confirmed by Raman analyses. Moreover, the optical band gap was also found to be linearly dependent upon the gallium rate incorporated within the thin films: it varies from 1.47 eV for x = 0 to 1.63 eV for x = 0.4.

  6. The indium-oxygen system, ch. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillen, A.J. van

    1977-01-01

    This chapter is divided into three sections: 1) a survey of the literature concerning the indiumoxygen system, 2) the adsorption of oxygen at pure and partially oxidized indium surfaces in the temperature range 20-180degC, and 3) the oxidation of indium at temperatures above 180degC. The oxygen uptake is determined volumetrically and gravimetrically. The influence of the melting point is considered and the results are compared with data from the literature. The oxide layer is amorphous at lower temperatures but above 350degC, crystallisation of In 2 O 3 takes place

  7. Indium 111 leucocyte scintigraphy in abdominal sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, A.A.; McKillop, J.H.; Gray, H.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; Neilson, W.; Anderson, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the clinical utility of indium 111 autologous leucocyte scintigraphy retrospectively in 45 patients presenting with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis. The sensitivity was 95% (21/22) and the specificity was 91% (21/23). Some 34 of the studies (17 positive and 17 negative) were considered helpful in furthering patient management (76%) and 8, unhelpful (18%). In 3, the study results were misleading and led to inappropriate treatment. Indium 111 scintigraphy, whether positive or negative, provides information in patients with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis upon which therapeutic decisions can be based. (orig.)

  8. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  9. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  10. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  11. Partial molar volumes of aluminium chloride, aluminium sulphate and aluminium nitrate in water-rich binary aqueous mixtures of tetrahydrofuran

    OpenAIRE

    R. C. Thakur; Ravi Sharma; Ashish Kumar; Sanjay Kumar; M. L. Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Partial molar volumes of aluminium chloride, aluminium sulphate and aluminium nitrate have been determined in water rich binary aqueous mixtures of tetrahydrofuran (5, 10, 15, 20% by weight of tetrahydrofuran) with the help of density measurements. The density measurements were made by using Ward and Millero method and results have been analysed by Masson’s equation and interpreted in terms of ion-ion or ion –solvent interactions. The partial molar volumes vary with temperature as a power ser...

  12. Speed gallium arsenide photoconductors; Photoconducteurs rapides en arseniure de gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Pochet, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation Nucleaire; Brullot, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    1993-12-31

    Gallium arsenide detectors are one of the most efficient gamma and X ray detectors at room temperature. Due to the high carrier mobility and short carrier lifetime, GaAs can be used for the detection of ultrafast gamma, X or laser pulses. GaAs photoconductors allow both pulse shape and intensity measurements. In this paper, we review the results of studies carried out jointly by the CEA/LETI/DEIN and CEA/DAM/CEM in France to improve the response of such detectors. The geometry of the photodetectors and their electrical contacts have been optimized for specific radiation measurements: low energy X rays (< 1 KeV), gamma rays or protons. It has been shown that a pre-irradiation treatment with fission neutrons at doses above 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} induces a significant improvement of the response speed. This result from defect generation in the material and the subsequent carrier life time decrease. Detectors with sensitivities of about 10{sup -8} A/R.s for gamma rays and 10{sup -16} coulomb/proton, response times below 100 ps and good linearity over more than five decades are currently fabricated in our laboratory. (authors). 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Synthesis of indium-111 mesoprotoporphyrin IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Marshall, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Indium-111 mesoprotoporphyrin IX has been prepared by refluxing suitable proportions of InCl 3 , sodium acetate, and mesoprotoporphyrin IX in glacial acetic acid. The labeled metalloporphyrin is sufficiently water-soluble for use as a scanning agent, and can also be incorporated into heme apoproteins for perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation measurements. (author)

  14. 67Gallium • the D,etection and Localization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-12-11

    Dec 11, 1971 ... radioactivity into areas of increased osteogenic activity. Dudley et al: investigating deposition of "Gallium in ... dency for gallium to localize in areas of bone activity, whether osteoblastic or osteolytic, as well as .... Gallium citrate was obtained from the Nuclear Physics and Radioactivity Division at the National ...

  15. A biokinetic and dosimetric model for ionic indium in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin; Mattsson, Sören; Johansson, Lennart; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews biokinetic data for ionic indium, and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic indium in adult humans. The development of parameter values focuses on human data and indium in the form of ionic indium(III), as indium chloride and indium arsenide. The model presented for systemic indium is defined by five different pools: plasma, bone marrow, liver, kidneys and other soft tissues. The model is based on two subsystems: one corresponding to indium bound to transferrin and one where indium is transported back to the plasma, binds to red blood cell transferrin and is then excreted through the kidneys to the urinary bladder. Absorbed doses to several organs and the effective dose are calculated for 111In- and 113mIn-ions. The proposed biokinetic model is compared with previously published biokinetic indium models published by the ICRP. The absorbed doses are calculated using the ICRP/ICRU adult reference phantoms and the effective dose is estimated according to ICRP Publication 103. The effective doses for 111In and 113mIn are 0.25 mSv MBq-1 and 0.013 mSv MBq-1 respectively. The updated biokinetic and dosimetric models presented in this paper take into account human data and new animal data, which represent more detailed and presumably more accurate dosimetric data than that underlying previous models for indium.

  16. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM COMPOSITE

    OpenAIRE

    T. Albert*, C. Pravin Tamil Selvan

    2017-01-01

    A composite material is the combination of two or more materials, which are having different phases and the properties superior to the base material. Aluminium matrix composite (AMCs) are emerging as advance engineering materials due to their strength, ductility and toughness. The aluminium matrix can strengthened by reinforcing with hard ceramic particles like SiC, Al2o3 , B4C etc. In this paper, an effort is made to enhance the mechanical properties like strength and hardness of aluminium ...

  17. Surface treatments for aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardelean, M.; Lascău, S.; Ardelean, E.; Josan, A.

    2018-01-01

    Typically, in contact with the atmosphere, the aluminium surface is covered with an aluminium oxide layer, with a thickness of less than 1-2μm. Due to its low thickness, high porosity and low mechanical strength, this layer does not protect the metal from corrosion. Anodizing for protective and decorative purposes is the most common method of superficial oxidation processes and is carried out through anodic oxidation. The oxide films, resulted from anodizing, are porous, have a thickness of 20-50μm, and are heat-resistant, stable to water vapour and other corrosion agents. Hard anodizing complies with the same obtains principles as well as decorative and protective anodization. The difference is in that hard anodizing is achieved at low temperatures and high intensity of electric current. In the paper are presented the results of decorative and hard anodization for specimens made from several aluminium alloys in terms of the appearance of the specimens and of the thickness of the anodized.

  18. A biogeochemical cycle for aluminium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2003-09-15

    The elaboration of biogeochemical cycles for elements which are known to be essential for life has enabled a broad appreciation of the homeostatic mechanisms which underlie element essentiality. In particular they can be used effectively to identify any part played by human activities in element cycling and to predict how such activities might impact upon the lithospheric and biospheric availability of an element in the future. The same criteria were the driving force behind the construction of a biogeochemical cycle for aluminium, a non-essential element which is a known ecotoxicant and a suspected health risk in humans. The purpose of this exercise was to examine the concept of a biogeochemical cycle for aluminium and not to review the biogeochemistry of this element. The cycle as presented is rudimentary and qualitative though, even in this nascent form, it is informative and predictive and, for these reasons alone, it is deserving of future quantification. A fully fledged biogeochemical cycle for aluminium should explain the biospheric abundance of this element and whether we should expect its (continued) active involvement in biochemical evolution.

  19. Toxicity of aluminium on five aquatic invertebrates; Aluminiums toksisitet paa 5 akvatiske invertebrater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, J. [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper deals with the experiments done by investigating the effects from the toxicity of aluminium on aquatic invertebrates. The aim of the experiments was to compare the toxicity of unstable aluminium compounds with stable forms of aluminium. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Development of a Multi-layer Anti-reflective Coating for Gallium Arsenide/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells by Kimberley A Olver Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...Development of a Multi-layer Anti-reflective Coating for Gallium Arsenide / Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells by Kimberley A Olver... Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Solar Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kimberley A Olver

  1. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...

  2. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... of a batch of albumin solution, filtration was shown to contribute to contamination, although the largest increase in aluminium as well as nickel concentrations appeared during the bulk concentrating process. To avoid health risks to certain patients, regulations should be established requiring aluminium...

  3. Aluminium in apple juice - no storing of fruit juice in aluminium tanks

    OpenAIRE

    German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

    2017-01-01

    Elevated aluminium levels in fruit juice, particularly in apple juice, were measured by the official food control authorities. The cause was the incorrect storage of juice in aluminium containers that were not coated with varnish. As aluminium is dissolved by acid-containing and salt-containing food, the metal was able to migrate to the juice. In the case of short-term dietary intake, aluminium is scarcely harmful at all. In the case of elevated, long-term intake, aluminium can, howe...

  4. Superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor planar junctions of aluminium on DELTA-doped gallium arsenide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboryski, Rafael Jozef; Clausen, Thomas; Kutchinsky, jonatan

    1997-01-01

    We have fabricated and characterized planar superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor (S-Sm-S) junctions with a high quality (i.e. low barrier) interface between an n++ modulation doped conduction layer in MBE grown GaAs and in situ deposited Al electrodes. The Schottky barrier at the S-Sm inte...

  5. Magnesium, zinc, aluminium and gallium hydride complexes of the transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael J; Crimmin, Mark R

    2017-01-24

    The preparation and applications of heterobimetallic complexes continue to occupy researchers in the fields of organometallic, main group, and coordination chemistry. This interest stems from the promise these complexes hold as precursors to materials, reagents in synthesis and as new catalysis. Here we survey and organise the state-of-the-art understanding of the TM-H-M linkage (M = Mg, Zn, Al, Ga). We discuss the structure and bonding in these complexes, their known reactivity, and their largely unrealised potential in catalysis.

  6. Comparative study of highly dense aluminium-and gallium-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) layers have been deposited by spin coating on glass substrates. The coatings have been sintered in air at 450 °C for 30 min and then post-annealed at 350 °C in a reducing atmosphere for 30 min. The electrical, optical and morphological ...

  7. Studies on deep electronic levels in silicon and aluminium gallium arsenide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis reports on investigations of the electrical and optical properties of deep impurity centers, related to the transition metals (TMs) Ti, Mo, W, V and Ni, in silicon. Emission rates, capture cross sections and photoionization cross sections for these impurities were determined by means of various Junction Space Charge Techniques (JSCTs), such as Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS), dark capacitance transient and photo capacitance transient techniques. Changes in Gibbs free energy as a function of temperature were calculated for all levels. From this temperature dependence, the changes in enthalpy and entropy involved in the electron and hole transitions were deduced. The influence of high electric fields on the electronic levels in chalcogen-doped silicon were investigated using the dark capacitance transient technique. The enhancement of the electron emission from the deep centers indicated a more complex field enhancement model than the expected Poole-Frenkel effect for coulombic potentials. The possibility to determine charge states of defects using the Poole-Frenkel effect, as often suggested, is therefore questioned. The observation of a persistent decrease of the dark conductivity due to illumination in simplified AlGaAs/GaAs high Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) over the temperature range 170K< T<300K is reported. A model for this peculiar behavior, based on the recombination of electrons in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) located at the AlGaAs/GaAs interface with holes generated by a two-step excitation process via the deep EL2 center in the GaAs epilayer, is put forward

  8. Thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.Y.; Jhon, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The significant structure theory of liquids has been successfully applied to liquid gallium. In this work, we have assumed that two structures exist simultaneously in liquid gallium. One is considerec as loosely close packed β-Ga-like structure and the other is remainder of solid α-Ga or α-Ga-like structure. This two structural model is introduced to construct the liquid partition function. Using the partition function, the thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated ever a wide temperature range. The calculated results are quite satisfactory when compared with the experimental results. (Author)

  9. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  10. Aluminium Pneumoconiosis I. In Vitro Comparison of Stamped Aluminium Powders Containing Different Lubricating Agents and a Granular Aluminium Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrin, B.

    1963-01-01

    The discrepancy in previous reports of the action of aluminium on the lung may be explained by differences between stamped and granular aluminium powders. A stamped powder of the variety causing pulmonary fibrosis showed a brisk reaction with water, but a granular powder was unreactive. This difference is primarily due to the granular particles being covered by inert aluminium oxide, the formation of which is partially prevented in the stamping process by stearine and mineral oil. The reactivity of the flake-like stamped particles is also dependent on their large surface area per unit volume. The appearance of aluminium pneumoconiosis in Britain is explained by the introduction of mineral oil into the stamping industry for, in contrast to stearine, mineral oil permits the powder to react with water. The lung damage is believed to be caused by a soluble form of aluminium. PMID:14072616

  11. Two-Dimensional Modeling of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holmes, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMT's) are microwave power devices that have the performance characteristics to improve the capabilities of current and future Navy radar and communication systems...

  12. Rapidly solidified aluminium for optical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, G.P.H.; Venrooy, B.W.H. van; Bosch, A.J.; Senden, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper present the results of a diamond turning study of a rapidly solidified aluminium 6061 alloy grade, known as RSA6061. It is shown that this small grain material can be diamond turned to smaller roughness values than standard AA6061 aluminium grades. Also, the results are nearly as good as

  13. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  14. Thermal formation of corundum from aluminium hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Aluminium hydroxides have been precipitated from various aluminium salts and the differences in their thermal behaviour have been investigated. Pseudoboehmite derived from the nitrate, sulfate and chloride all form γ-Al2O3 at ~ 400°C but the formation of α-Al2O3 at 1200°C occurs more readily in the material ...

  15. Thermal formation of corundum from aluminium hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aluminium hydroxides have been precipitated from various aluminium salts and the differences in their thermal behaviour have been investigated. Pseudoboehmite derived from the nitrate, sulfate and chloride all form -Al2O3 at ∼ 400°C but the formation of -Al2O3 at 1200°C occurs more readily in the material derived ...

  16. Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An aluminium(Al) characterisation study was conducted at a surface water treatment plant (Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant (BPWTP) in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada) to understand better the effect of alum coagulant on various Al fractions. The raw water source for BPWTP is Buffalo Pound Lake water. The Al ...

  17. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  18. Behaviour of millscale reinforced Aluminium Bronze composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the desirable characteristics exhibited by most aluminium bronze, the deficient responses in certain critical applications have necessitated improvement in the mechanical properties. The microstructural and mechanical properties of cast aluminium bronze reinforced with iron millscale particles were investigated in ...

  19. Acoustic properties of aluminium foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, L. E.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses normal incidence sound absorption by aluminium foam manufactured with powder metallurgy technology. Aluminium foams with different surface morphologies were obtained by varying the type of precursor and adding filler materials during the foaming process. The sound absorption coefficients found for these aluminium foams were compared to the coefficient for commercial foams marketed under the name ALPORAS. The effect of foam thickness on the absorption coefficient was studied for each sample prepared. The combination of good acoustic and mechanical properties makes aluminium foams particularly attractive products. The study included an analysis of the effect of 2-, 5- and 10-cm air gaps on the sound absorption coefficient. The results showed that such gaps, which are routinely used in construction to reduce the reverberation period in indoor premises, raised the low frequency absorption coefficient significantly. This increase was found to depend on aluminium foam density and thickness and the depth of the air gap. In this same line, we have investigated the absorption coefficient of the aluminium foams combined with a mineral fiber panel.Se presenta un estudio del coeficiente de absorción acústica a incidencia normal de espumas de aluminio fabricadas mediante la técnica pulvimetalúrgica. Se fabricaron espumas de aluminio de distinta morfología superficial variando el tipo de precursor y usando materiales de relleno durante el proceso de espumación. Se muestra un estudio comparativo del coeficiente de absorción acústica de las espumas de aluminio fabricadas y las espumas comerciales conocidas como ALPORAS. Para cada muestra fabricada se estudió la influencia del espesor sobre el valor del coeficiente de absorción.El atractivo de las espumas de aluminio radica en que en ellas se combinan interesantes propiedades acústicas y mecánicas. Se analizó el efecto de una cámara de aire de 2, 5 y 10 cm de anchura sobre el

  20. Thermopower of dilute alloys of indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudenhoeffer, A.W.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a new theory of electron-diffusion thermopower is discussed. A figure of merit for this ''Nielsen--Taylor'' theory in various metals is established, and it indicates that the effect should be largest in lead, indium, thallium, and aluminum, in that order. Previous investigations have been carried out for lead and aluminum. The thermopower of indium (or any metal) changes when impurity scattering centers are introduced into it. This change in the thermopower as a function of temperature is analyzed in terms of the Nielsen--Taylor theory and in terms of the competing process known as ''phonon drag.'' Definite conclusions as to the validity of the new theory are hampered by the complex nature of this phonon drag, but the experimental data is consistent with the Nielsen--Taylor theory. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  1. Aluminium in foodstuff and the influence of aluminium foil used for food preparation or short time storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Kathrin; Goessler, Walter

    2018-02-28

    Aluminium is an omnipresent part of everyday life. It is widely used in industry and furthermore in products like cosmetics, sun creams or it can be applied for instance as aluminium foil by consumers during food preparation in households. However, over the last decades the toxicity of aluminium for humans has been heavily discussed and is still not completely clarified. Therefore, food aluminium concentrations were investigated in different untreated foodstuff as well as a possible aluminium transfer from aluminium foil to food. The results show that untreated food is not significantly contaminated. Furthermore, short time contact to aluminium foil increases the food aluminium concentration only marginal. Nevertheless, as soon as the food is in contact to aluminium foil and at the same time in contact with metals (alloys) with a higher standard electrode potential than aluminium (-1.66 V) high aluminium contaminations were observed.

  2. Radioassay process using an indium-8-hydroxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedemans, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    There is disclosed an in vivo radioassay process in which a radioactive chelate of indium and an 8-hydroxyquinoline is introduced into a warmblooded animal having an inflammatory reaction in an area in which the chelate would not accumulate to the same extent if the inflammation were not present. The chelate gathers in the inflamed area, for instance, in a body abscess and its location is determined by radio surveying the body by an external imaging technique. (author)

  3. Recent developments in advanced aircraft aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dursun, Tolga; Soutis, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To compete with composites, performance of aluminium alloys should be increased. • Al–Li alloys have higher strength, fracture and fatigue/corrosion resistance. • Improvements of aerospace Al alloys are due to optimised solute content and ratios. • In selecting new materials, there should be no reduction in the level of safety. • The use of hybrid materials could provide additional opportunities for Al alloys. - Abstract: Aluminium alloys have been the primary material for the structural parts of aircraft for more than 80 years because of their well known performance, well established design methods, manufacturing and reliable inspection techniques. Nearly for a decade composites have started to be used more widely in large commercial jet airliners for the fuselage, wing as well as other structural components in place of aluminium alloys due their high specific properties, reduced weight, fatigue performance and corrosion resistance. Although the increased use of composite materials reduced the role of aluminium up to some extent, high strength aluminium alloys remain important in airframe construction. Aluminium is a relatively low cost, light weight metal that can be heat treated and loaded to relatively high level of stresses, and it is one of the most easily produced of the high performance materials, which results in lower manufacturing and maintenance costs. There have been important recent advances in aluminium aircraft alloys that can effectively compete with modern composite materials. This study covers latest developments in enhanced mechanical properties of aluminium alloys, and high performance joining techniques. The mechanical properties on newly developed 2000, 7000 series aluminium alloys and new generation Al–Li alloys are compared with the traditional aluminium alloys. The advantages and disadvantages of the joining methods, laser beam welding and friction stir welding, are also discussed

  4. Preparation of trialkylindium by alkylation of metallic indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, I.V.; Danov, S.M.; Sakhipov, V.R.

    1995-01-01

    The investigation results on production of trialkyl indium by alkylation of metallic indium are presented. In contradistinction to the known techniques for the production of trialkyls on indium by alkylation it is suggested to separate the synthesis into two steps. At the first step indium is alkylated by alkylhalide to alkyl indium halide, and at the second alkylation is carried out using. Grignard reagent. The techniques for preparation of trimethyl- and triethylindium, developed on the bases of this scheme, are noted for good reproducibility, allow to preclude, agglomeration of indium during the synthesis, as well as to reduce the consumption coefficients, and amounts, of the introduced starting reagents, i.e. magnesium and alkylhalide. Refs. 16

  5. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  6. High Q gallium nitride microring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stassen, Erik; Pu, Minhao; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    Summary form only given. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a promising material for nonlinear microresonators. It has large intrinsic χ(2) and χ(3), excellent thermal properties and a relatively large bandgap [1] and can be used for example for parametric conversion and frequency doubling [2]. Furthermore...

  7. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  8. Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

  9. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Polzin, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Discharge current, terminal voltage, and mass bit measurements are performed on a coaxial gallium electromagnetic thruster at discharge currents in the range of 7-23 kA. It is found that the mass bit varies quadratically with the discharge current which yields a constant exhaust velocity of 20 km/s. Increasing the electrode radius ratio of the thruster from to 2.6 to 3.4 increases the thruster efficiency from 21% to 30%. When operating with a central gallium anode, macroparticles are ejected at all energy levels tested. A central gallium cathode ejects macroparticles when the current density exceeds 3.7 10(exp 8) A/square m . A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in the discharge, as well as annular electrode species at higher energy levels. Axial Langmuir triple probe measurements yield electron temperatures in the range of 0.8-3.8 eV and electron densities in the range of 8 x 10(exp )20 to 1.6 x 10(exp 21) m(exp -3) . Triple probe measurements suggest an exhaust plume with a divergence angle of 9 , and a completely doubly ionized plasma at the ablating thruster cathode.

  10. Solvent extraction of indium (III) with alizarin into 1-octanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadhav, S.D.; Turel, Z.R.

    1995-01-01

    The reagent alizarin has been used for the extraction of indium (III) into 1-octanol. The effect of various parameters on the extraction coefficient value of indium (III) has been evaluated. The stoichiometry of metal to reagent, determined by the method of substoichiometric extraction and slope ratio was found to be in the ratio of 1:3. Separation factor for a number of elements in the extraction of indium (III) has been evaluated. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Shot peening of aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guernic, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Shot peening is a process of cold-hammering where a metallic surface is pelted with spherical grains. Each grain bumping into the surface acts as a hammer head and creates a small crater. The overlapping of these craters produces a residual compression layer just underneath the surface. It is well known that cracks cannot spread in a compression zone. In most cases of fatigue rupture and stress corrosion cracks propagate from the surface towards the inside so shot peening allows a longer lifetime of castings. Moreover most materials present a better resistance due to the cold-hammering effect of shot peening. Metallic surfaces can be treated in workshops or directly on site. Typical pieces that undergo shot peening on site are storing tanks, gas and steam turbines, tubes of steam generators and piping in oil or nuclear or chemical industries. This article describes shot peening from a theoretical and general point of view and presents the application to aluminium-lithium alloys. In the case of aluminium alloys shot peening can be used to shape the piece (peen-forming). (A.C.)

  12. Method for aluminium dross utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucheva, B.; Petkov, R.; Tzonev, Tz.

    2003-01-01

    A new hydrometallurgical method has been developed for metal aluminum utilization from secondary aluminum dross. Secondary aluminum dross is a powder product with an average of 35% aluminium content (below 1mm). It is waste from primary aluminum dross pyrometallurgical flux less treatment in rotary DC electric arc furnace. This method is based on aluminum leaching in copper chloride water solution. As a result an aluminum oxychloride solution and solids, consisting of copper and oxides are obtained. In order to copper chloride solution regenerate hydrochloric acid is added to the solids. The process is simple, quick, economic and safe. The aluminum oxychloride solution contains 56 g/l Al 2 O 3 . The molar ratios are Al:Cl=0,5; OH:Al=1. The solution has 32 % basicity and 1,1 g/cm 3 density. For increasing the molar ratio of aluminium to chlorine aluminum hydroxide is added to this solution at 80 o C. Aluminum hydroxide is the final product from the secondary aluminum dross alkaline leaching. As a result aluminum oxychloride solution of the following composition is prepared: Al 2 O 3 - 180 g/l; Al:Cl=1,88; OH:Al=4,64; basicity 82%; density 1,22 g/cm 3 , pH=4 -4,5. Aluminum oxychloride solution produced by means of this method can be used in potable and wastewater treatment, paper making, in refractory mixture as a binder etc. (Original)

  13. Analysis tools for the design of aluminium extrusion dies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The aluminium extrusion process is a forming process where a billet of hot aluminium is pressed through a die to produce long straight aluminium profiles. A large variety of products with different and complex cross-sections can be made. The insight in the mechanics of the aluminium extrusion

  14. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  15. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Epoxy coatings electrodeposited on aluminium and modified aluminium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Zorica Ž.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour and thermal stability of epoxy coatings electrodeposited on modified aluminum surfaces (anodized, phosphatized and chromatized-phosphatized aluminium were monitored during exposure to 3% NaCl solution, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Better protective properties of the epoxy coatings on anodized and chromatized-phosphatized aluminum with respect to the same epoxy coatings on aluminum and phosphatized aluminum were obtained: higher values of Rp and Rct and smaller values of Cc and Cd, from EIS, and a smaller amount of absorbed water inside the coating, from TGA. On the other hand, a somewhat lower thermal stability of these coatings was obtained (smaller values of the ipdt temperature. This behavior can be explained by the less porous structure of epoxy coatings on anodized and chromatized-phosphatized aluminum, caused by a lower rate of H2 evolution and better wet ability.

  17. TRANSPARENT CONDUCTING OXIDE SYNTHESIS OF ALUMINIUM DOPED ZINC OXIDES BY CHEMICAL COPRECIPITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maioco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium doped zinc oxides (AZO are promising replacements for tin doped indium oxides (ITO but thin films show a wide range of physical properties strongly dependent on deposition process conditions. Submicrometric 1% aluminum doped zinc oxide ceramics (AZO are examined, prepared by coprecipitation, from Zn(NO32 and Al(NO33 aqueous solutions, sintered at 1200°C and subsequently annealed in 10-16 atm controlled oxygen fugacity atmospheres, at 1000°C. Electrical resistivity diminishes by two orders of magnitude after two hours of annealing and the Seebeck coefficient gradually changes from -140 to -50 µV/K within 8 h. It is concluded that increased mobility is dominant over the increased carrier density, induced by changes in metal-oxygen stoichiometry

  18. Aluminium in Biological Environments: A Computational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Rezabal, Elixabete; Mercero, Jose M; Ruipérez, Fernando; Costa, Dominique; Ugalde, Jesus M; Lopez, Xabier

    2014-01-01

    The increased availability of aluminium in biological environments, due to human intervention in the last century, raises concerns on the effects that this so far “excluded from biology” metal might have on living organisms. Consequently, the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium has emerged as a very active field of research. This review will focus on our contributions to this field, based on computational studies that can yield an understanding of the aluminum biochemistry at a molecular level. Aluminium can interact and be stabilized in biological environments by complexing with both low molecular mass chelants and high molecular mass peptides. The speciation of the metal is, nonetheless, dictated by the hydrolytic species dominant in each case and which vary according to the pH condition of the medium. In blood, citrate and serum transferrin are identified as the main low molecular mass and high molecular mass molecules interacting with aluminium. The complexation of aluminium to citrate and the subsequent changes exerted on the deprotonation pathways of its tritable groups will be discussed along with the mechanisms for the intake and release of aluminium in serum transferrin at two pH conditions, physiological neutral and endosomatic acidic. Aluminium can substitute other metals, in particular magnesium, in protein buried sites and trigger conformational disorder and alteration of the protonation states of the protein's sidechains. A detailed account of the interaction of aluminium with proteic sidechains will be given. Finally, it will be described how alumnium can exert oxidative stress by stabilizing superoxide radicals either as mononuclear aluminium or clustered in boehmite. The possibility of promotion of Fenton reaction, and production of hydroxyl radicals will also be discussed. PMID:24757505

  19. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  20. Niobium-base grain refiner for aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Pontes, P. da; Robert, M.H.; Cupini, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    A new chemical grain refiner for aluminium has been developed, using inoculation of a niobium-base compound. When a bath of molten aluminium is inoculated whith this refiner, an intermetallic aluminium-niobium compound is formed which acts as a powerful nucleant, producing extremely fine structure comparable to those obtained by means of the traditional grain refiner based on titanium and boron. It was found that the refinement of the structure depends upon the weight percentage of the new refiner inoculated as well as the time of holding the bath after inoculation and before pouring, but mainly on the inoculating temperature. (Author) [pt

  1. Non-Stoichiometric Amorphous Indium Selenide Thin Films as a Buffer Layer for CIGS Solar Cells with Various Temperatures in Rapid Thermal Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Myoung Han; Kim, Nam-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    The conventional structure of most of copper indium gallium diselenide (Culn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2, CIGS) solar cells includes a CdS thin film as a buffer layer. Cd-free buffer layers have attracted great interest for use in photovoltaic applications to avoid the use of hazardous and toxic materials. The RF magnetron sputtering method was used with an InSe2 compound target to prepare the indium selenide precursor. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was conducted in ambient N2 gas to control the concentration of volatile Se from the precursor with a change in temperature. The nature of the RTA-treated indium selenide thin films remained amorphous under annealing temperatures of ≤ 700 degrees C. The Se concentration of the RTA-treated specimens demonstrated an opposite trend to the annealing temperature. The optical transmittance and band gap energies were 75.33% and 2.451-3.085 eV, respectively, and thus were suitable for the buffer layer. As the annealing temperature increased, the resistivity decreased by an order-of-magnitude from 10(4) to 10(1) Ω-cm. At lower Se concentrations, the conductivity abruptly changed from p-type to n-type without crystallite formation in the amorphous phase, with the carrier concentration in the order of 10(17) cm(-3).

  2. Role of Lysosomes in gallium concentration by mammalian tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.P.; Galle, S.; Escaig, F.; Poupon, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Gallium is used as a tracer in nuclear medicine for the localization of malignant tumors. Two microanalytical methods, electron probe X ray analysis (EPMA) and ion mass analysis (IAM) were used to study gallium incorporation in normal tissues (kidney, liver, mammary gland, bone marrow, bone tissue) and in experimental tumors. The very high sensitivity of IMA makes possible the detection of very low cencentration of gallium (1 ppm) with a spatial resolution of 0.5 μm, on the other hand, EPMA of lower sensitivity (100 ppm) makes possible the relation between the gallium concentration and the ultrastructure of the cell. It was shown that gallium is concentrated in the lysosomes of both types of tissues, where it is precipitated in an insoluble form. In addition, gallium is systematically combined with phosphorus in these precipitates. These observations suggest an active intralysosomal concentrating mechanism related to the presence of local phosphatase activity

  3. Determination of gallium in flint clay by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padova, A.; Even, O.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was applied to determine gallium traces in different flint clay samples found in Israel. The principal 835 KeV gamma ray of gallium-72 was measured with a 60 cm 2 Ge(Li) spectrometer in conjunction with a Packard 4000 channel analyzer and Wang table computer, model 720 C. Samples were weighed into polyethylene vials, sealed and inserted into polyethylene rabbit. Gallium metal and gallium oxide used as standards were similarly prepared for irradiation for 10 minutes in the I.R.R.I., at a thermal flux of 3.5x10 12 n/cm 2 sec. Careful calibration of the spectrometer and judicious choice of cooling time eliminate the influence of such elements as europium-152, and sodium-24 and make possible the determination of gallium without prior chemical separation. Representative Israel flint clay samples contain about 55 ppm gallium. (B.G.)

  4. Survey of the market, supply and availability of gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosi, F.D.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the present consumption and supply of gallium, its potential availability in the satellite power system (SPS) implementation time frame, and commercial and new processing methods for increasing the production of gallium. Findings are reported in detail. The findings strongly suggest that with proper long range planning adequate gallium would be available from free-enterprise world supplies of bauxite for SPS implementation.

  5. Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    Gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesion when it undergoes a solid-liquid phase transition. The robustness of gallium is notable as it exhibits strong performance on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces, under both dry and wet conditions. Gallium may therefore find numerous applications in transfer printing, robotics, electronic packaging, and biomedicine. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Interactions of Zircaloy cladding with gallium: 1998 midyear status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; DiStefano, J.R.; Strizak, J.P.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1998-06-01

    A program has been implemented to evaluate the effect of gallium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel derived from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium on Zircaloy cladding performance. The objective is to demonstrate that low levels of gallium will not compromise the performance of the MOX fuel system in a light-water reactor. The graded, four-phase experimental program was designed to evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against (1) liquid gallium (Phase 1), (2) various concentrations of Ga 2 O 3 (Phase 2), (3) centrally heated surrogate fuel pellets with expected levels of gallium (Phase 3), and (4) centrally heated prototypic MOX fuel pellets (Phase 4). This status report describes the results of a series of tests for Phases 1 and 2. Three types of tests are being performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement, and (3) corrosion-mechanical. These tests will determine corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that may delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in the mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Initial results have generally been favorable for the use of WG-MOX fuel. The MOX fuel cladding, Zircaloy, does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at ≥300 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. Although continued migration of gallium into the initially formed intermetallic compound can result in large stresses that may lead to distortion, this was shown to be extremely unlikely because of the low mass of gallium or gallium oxide present and expected clad temperatures below 400 C. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium has been observed

  7. Inflammatory pseudotumor: A gallium-avid mobile mesenteric mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auringer, S.T.; Scott, M.D.; Sumner, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    An 8-yr-old boy with a 1-mo history of culture-negative fever and anemia underwent gallium, ultrasound, and computed tomography studies as part of the evaluation of a fever of unknown origin. These studies revealed a mobile gallium-avid solid abdominal mass subsequently proven to be an inflammatory pseudotumor of the mesentery, a rare benign mass. This report documents the gallium-avid nature of this rare lesion and discusses associated characteristic clinical, pathologic, and radiographic features

  8. Psoas abscess localization by gallium scan in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, M.W.; Gelrud, L.G.; Lotz, M.J.; Herzig, G.P.; Johnston, G.S.

    1975-01-01

    Gallium 67 scanning is an effective method of detecting inflammatory lesions, especially abscesses. A 10-year-old boy with aplastic anemia and severe leukopenia and granulocytopenia had a psoas abscess diagnosed by gallium scan. The patient died with Candida sepsis 18 days after bone marrow transplantation. At autopsy, a chronic psoas abscess with Candida was found. The gallium scan offers a clinically effective and noninvasive means of evaluating suspected infection in the granulocytopenia patient. (U.S.)

  9. Aluminium Toxicity Targets in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium (Al is the third most abundant metallic element in soil but becomes available to plants only when the soil pH drops below 5.5. At those conditions, plants present several signals of Al toxicity. As reported by literature, major consequences of Al exposure are the decrease of plant production and the inhibition of root growth. The root growth inhibition may be directly/indirectly responsible for the loss of plant production. In this paper the most remarkable symptoms of Al toxicity in plants and the latest findings in this area are addressed. Root growth inhibition, ROS production, alterations on root cell wall and plasma membrane, nutrient unbalances, callose accumulation, and disturbance of cytoplasmic Ca2+ homeostasis, among other signals of Al toxicity are discussed, and, when possible, the behavior of Al-tolerant versus Al-sensitive genotypes under Al is compared.

  10. Studies on the biological behaviour of gallium-67 citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sephton, R.G.; Harris, A.

    1975-01-01

    Gallium-67 citrate, though not a universal tumour seeker, has nevertheless a remarkable, unexplained affinity in vivo for some malignant deposits. Its value as a clinical tracer would be enhanced by a clearer understanding of its biological significance. This paper describes studies using gallium-67 in experimental animals and in cell cultures. Mice bearing various transplanted solid tumours (mostly lymphomas and myelomas) have been examined for gallium-67 concentrations in tumour, other soft tissues and bone. Subcellular fractionation confirms intracellular tracer in lysosomes, for gallium-avid and neutral tumours and for liver but, to judge from acid phosphatase burdens of these tissues, gallium-67 uptake may not bear simple correlation with lysosomal activity. Gallium-67 distributions differ between juvenile and mature animals and, in either case, changes favouring soft tissue uptake over bone can occur even within days of tumour inoculation. Mice reacting to allogeneic spleen cell injections (GVH) also show increased soft tissue retention of tracer. Tumour cells exposed in culture to gallium-67 show an increasing uptake with time, reaching 5-10 times the specific activity of the culture medium within 48 hours. For several lines at least, a low (approximately 1%) concentration in the medium of mouse and even human serum can strikingly increase gallium-67 uptake by the cells. Subcellular fractionation shows again a lysosomal spectrum for both stimulated and unstimulated cell-bound gallium. (author)

  11. Inelastic neutron scattering on solid and liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzny, W.; Niziol, S.; Mayer, J.; Natkaniec, I.

    1989-01-01

    In order to find a physical property which would be able to distinguish the liquid gallium obtained by melting the α-phase and the liquid gallium annealed at temperatures higher than 333 K, measurements of incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS) spectra were made with the aim to observe changes in the excitation spectrum occuring during the melting and then annealing of liquid gallium. The results of neutron experiments have shown that the diatomic-type structure of α-Ga is destroyed just in the melting point and that the dynamic properties of liquid gallium do not depend on the thermal history of the sample

  12. Studies on preparation and characterization of indium doped zinc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The preparation of indium doped zinc oxide films is discussed. Variation of structural, electrical and optical properties of the films with zinc acetate concentration and indium concentration in the solution are investigated. XRD studies have shown a change in preferential orientation from (002) to (101) crystal plane with ...

  13. Two-Step Plasma Process for Cleaning Indium Bonding Bumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Harold F.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Jones, Todd J.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    A two-step plasma process has been developed as a means of removing surface oxide layers from indium bumps used in flip-chip hybridization (bump bonding) of integrated circuits. The two-step plasma process makes it possible to remove surface indium oxide, without incurring the adverse effects of the acid etching process.

  14. Selective separation of indium by iminodiacetic acid chelating resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, M.C.B.; Benedetto, J.S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martins, A.H. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais]. E-mail: ahmartin@demet.ufmg.br

    2007-04-15

    - Indium can be recovered by treating residues, flue dusts, slags, and metallic intermediates in zinc smelting. This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of indium and iron on an iminodiacetic acid chelating resin, Amberlite{sup R} IRC748 (Rohm and Haas Co.-USA). High concentrations of iron are always present in the aqueous feed solution of indium recovery. In addition, the chemical behaviour of iron in adsorptive systems is similar to that of indium. The metal concentrations in the aqueous solution were based on typical indium sulfate leach liquor obtained from zinc hydrometallurgical processing in a Brazilian plant. The ionic adsorption experiments were carried out by the continuous column method. Amberlite{sup R} IRC748 resin had a high affinity for indium under acidic conditions. Indium ions adsorbed onto the polymeric resin were eluted with a 0.5 mol/dm{sup 3} sulphuric acid solution passed through the resin bed in the column. 99.5% pure indium sulfate aqueous solution was obtained using the iminodiacetic acid chelating resin Amberlite{sup R} IRC748. (author)

  15. Irradiation effects in magnesium and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure, mechanical properties and swelling of several magnesium and aluminium alloys were studied. The neutron fluences of 2-3 X 10 22 n/cm 2 , >0.2 MeV produced displacement doses of 20 to 45 displacements per atom (dpa). Ductility of the magnesium alloys was severely reduced by irradiation induced recrystallization and precipitation of various forms. Precipitation of transmuted silicon occurred in the aluminium alloys. However, the effect on ductility was much less than for the magnesium alloys. The magnesium and aluminium alloys had excellent resistance to swelling: The best magnesium alloy was Mg/3.0 wt% Al/0.19 wt% Ca; its density decreased by only 0.13%. The best aluminium alloy was 6063, with a density decrease of 0.22%. (Auth.)

  16. Deformation features of aluminium in tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a method to analyse stress-strain curves. Plastic and elastic strains were studied. The strains were done by tensile tests in four types of materials: highly pure aluminium, pure aluminium, commercially pure aluminium and aluminium - uranium. The chemical compositions were obtained by spectroscopy analysis and neutron activation analysis. Tensile tests were carried out at three strain rates, at room temperature, 100,200, 300 and 400 0 C, with knives extensometer and strain-gages to studied the elastic strain region. A multiple spring model based on two springs model to analyse elastic strain caused by tests without extensometers, taking in account moduli of elasticity and, an interactive analysis system with graphic capability were developed. It was suggested a qualitative model to explain the quantized multielasticity of Bell. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Aluminium Process Fault Detection and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazatul Aini Abd Majid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenges in developing a fault detection and diagnosis system for industrial applications are not inconsiderable, particularly complex materials processing operations such as aluminium smelting. However, the organizing into groups of the various fault detection and diagnostic systems of the aluminium smelting process can assist in the identification of the key elements of an effective monitoring system. This paper reviews aluminium process fault detection and diagnosis systems and proposes a taxonomy that includes four key elements: knowledge, techniques, usage frequency, and results presentation. Each element is explained together with examples of existing systems. A fault detection and diagnosis system developed based on the proposed taxonomy is demonstrated using aluminium smelting data. A potential new strategy for improving fault diagnosis is discussed based on the ability of the new technology, augmented reality, to augment operators’ view of an industrial plant, so that it permits a situation-oriented action in real working environments.

  18. Flexible organic light-emitting device based on magnetron sputtered indium-tin-oxide on plastic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, F.L.; Fung, M.K.; Tong, S.W.; Lee, C.S.; Lee, S.T.

    2004-01-01

    A radio-frequency sputtering deposition method was applied to prepare indium tin oxide (ITO) on a plastic substrate, polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The correlation of deposition conditions and ITO film properties was systematically investigated and characterized. The optimal ITO films had a transmittance of over 90% in the visible range (400-700 nm) and a resistivity of 5.0x10 -4 Ω-cm. Sequentially α-napthylphenylbiphenyl diamine, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium, and magnesium-silver were thermally deposited on the ITO-coated PET substrate to fabricate flexible organic light-emitting diodes (FOLEDs). The fabricated devices had a maximum current efficiency of ∼4.1 cd/A and a luminance of nearly 4100 cd/m 2 at 100 mA/cm 2 . These values showed that the FOLEDs had comparable performance characteristics with the conventional organic light-emitting diodes made on ITO-coated glasses with the same device configuration

  19. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan. Phases 1 and 2: Test plan for gallium corrosion tests. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Morris, R.N.

    1998-05-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water-Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The plan summarizes and updates the projected Phases 1 and 2 Gallium-Cladding compatibility corrosion testing and the following post-test examination. This work will characterize the reactions and changes, if any, in mechanical properties that occur between Zircaloy clad and gallium or gallium oxide in the temperature range 30--700 C

  20. Computer simulation of the aluminium extrusion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Śliwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is computer simulation of the aluminium extrusion process using the Finite elements method (FEM. The impact of the speed of a punch falling on the material in the aluminium extrusion process was investigated. It was found that high stresses are created, leading to material destruction, if the punch is falling too fast. The design cycle is significantly reduced in multiple industrial applications if the FEM is applied, which enhances productivity and profits.

  1. Characterization of aluminium alloys rapidly solidified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discussed the investigation of the microstructural and mechanical properties of the aluminium alloys (3003; 7050; Al-9% Mg) rapidly solidified by melt spinning process (cooling rate 10 4 - 10 6 K/s). The rapidly solidification process of the studied aluminium alloys brought a microcrystallinity, a minimum presence of coarse precipitation and, also, better mechanical properties of them comparing to the same alloys using ingot process. (author) [pt

  2. Aluminium phosphide induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaiser Saif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide is one of the most common agricultural poisons being consumed in north India. Consumption of a fresh tablet is lethal as no antidote is available. Acute intoxication primarily presents with cardiovascular collapse due to myocardial toxicity. We report here a case of acute severe poisoning along with cardiovascular collapse and oliguria. The patient developed acute kidney injury during the illness (a rare entity in aluminium phosphide poisoning, which completely resolved following prompt conservative treatment.

  3. Fabrication, structure and mechanical properties of indium nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Kim, Ju-Young; Budiman, Arief Suriadi; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Burek, Michael J.; Greer, Julia R.; Tsui, Ting Y.

    2010-01-01

    Solid and hollow cylindrical indium pillars with nanoscale diameters were prepared using electron beam lithography followed by the electroplating fabrication method. The microstructure of the solid-core indium pillars was characterized by scanning micro-X-ray diffraction, which shows that the indium pillars were annealed at room temperature with very few dislocations remaining in the samples. The mechanical properties of the solid pillars were characterized using a uniaxial microcompression technique, which demonstrated that the engineering yield stress is {approx}9 times greater than bulk and is {approx}1/28 of the indium shear modulus, suggesting that the attained stresses are close to theoretical strength. Microcompression of hollow indium nanopillars showed evidence of brittle fracture. This may suggest that the failure mode for one of the most ductile metals can become brittle when the feature size is sufficiently small.

  4. Chemistry and Pharmacokinetics of Gallium Maltolate, a Compound With High Oral Gallium Bioavailability

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Lawrence R.; Tanner, Trevor; Godfrey, Claire; Noll, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Gallium maltolate, tris(3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-onato)gallium (GaM), is an orally active gallium compound for therapeutic use. It is moderately soluble in water (10.7 ± 0.9 mg/mL at 25∘C) with an octanol partition coefficient of 0.41±0.08. The molecule is electrically neutral in aqueous solution at neutral pH; a dilute aqueous solution (2.5 ×10−-5 M) showed little dissociation at pH 5.5-8.0. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis found the GaM molecule to consist of three maltolate l...

  5. Conduction electrons in solid and liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuter, F.; Oelhafen, P.

    1979-01-01

    We have studied the photoemission properties of liquid, supercooled and crystalline gallium with photon energies up to 6.5 eV. The spectra of the liquid phase are well described by the free electron model, whereas in the solid the density of states is reduced near the Fermi level. The observed changes in the electronic structure at the melting point are explained by the essential change in the ionic short range order. (orig.)

  6. A Gallium multiphase equation of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crockett, Scott D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greeff, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A new SESAME multiphase Gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. The equation of state includes three of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga II, Ga III) and a fluid phase (liquid/gas). The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniol data. We also explore the possibility of re-freezing via dynamic means such as isentropic and shock compression.

  7. Synthesis of double condensed cesium gallium phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudinova, N.N.; Grunze, I.; Guzeeva, L.S.; Avaliani, M.A.

    1987-09-01

    By crystallization from melts of polyphosphoric acids there are obtained double condensed phosphates of cesium and gallium of the following compositions: Cs/sub 2/GaH/sub 3/(P/sub 2/O/sub 7/)/sub 2/, CsGaHP/sub 3/O/sub 10/, Cs/sub 3/Ga/sub 3/P/sub 12/O/sub 36/. Their x-ray characteristics are given.

  8. Optical and electrical properties of transparent conducting gallium-doped ZnO electrodes prepared by atomic layer deposition for application in organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yoon Seog; Seong, Nak Jin; Choi, Kyu Jeong; Ryu, Sang Ouk

    2013-01-01

    Transparent and conducting gallium-doped ZnO electrodes were fabricated by means of atomic layer deposition. The electrode showed the lowest resistivity of 7.19 × 10 −4 Ω cm at a 5% cyclic layer deposition ratio of Trimethyl-gallium and Diethyl-zinc chemicals. The electrodes showed minimum resistivity when deposited at a temperature of 250 °C. The electrode also showed optical transmittance of about 82%–89% with film thicknesses between 100 nm and 300 nm. An organic solar cell made with a 300-nm-thick gallium-doped ZnO electrode exhibited 2.5% power conversion efficiency, and an efficiency equivalent to that of cells made with conventional indium tin oxide electrodes. - Highlights: • Ga-doped ZnO thin films were successfully grown by atomic layer deposition • The grown thin film has low resistivity compatible to conventional ITO electrodes • The Ga-doped ZnO films were successfully integrated into organic solar cells • The power conversion efficiency was equivalent to the cells with ITO electrodes

  9. Boron, phosphorus, and gallium determination in silicon crystals doped with gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklyar, B.L.; Dankovskij, Yu.V.; Trubitsyn, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    When studying IR transmission spectra of silicon doped with gallium in the range of concentrations 1 x 10 14 - 5 x 10 16 cm -3 , the possibility to quantity at low (∼ 20 K) temperatures residual impurities of boron and phosphorus is ascertained. The lower determination limit of boron is 1 x 10 12 cm -3 for a sample of 10 nm thick. The level of the impurities in silicon crystals, grown by the Czochralski method and method of crucible-free zone melting, is measured. Values of boron and phosphorus concentrations prior to and after their alloying with gallium are compared

  10. State and prospects of Russian and world gallium market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Larichkin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the state of Russian and world mineral and raw materials base of gallium, the main spheres of application in various branches and industries of the national economy. The article presents the generalization and analysis of trends in world and Russian production, consumption of rare metal and its compounds, the world trade and global market of gallium and products based on it, consuming it in new science-intensive innovative industries, including the production of military equipment. The unique chemical properties of gallium remained unclaimed for a long time. Only after the discovery of the semiconductor properties of gallium compounds has the situation radically changed: the rate of growth in production and consumption of metallic gallium at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the 21st century amounted to an average of more than 8% per year. The largest area of consumption of gallium is the production of semiconductor materials – gallium arsenide (GaAs and gallium nitride (GaN. The areas of application of gallium not related to the semiconductor industry are very small. Industry structure of consumption of GaAs and GaN: in integrated circuits is 66%; optoelectronic devices (light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, photodetectors and solar batteries – 20%; the remaining 14% – scientific research, special alloys, etc. Optoelectronic devices are used in aerospace industry, consumer goods, industrial and medical equipment and telecommunications. Integral circuits are used in the military industry, high-power computers and electronic communications. The most significant growing sectors of the market are LEDs, electronics based on gallium nitride and solar cells. Solar energy has become the fastest growing branch of the world economy. The volumes of gallium production in Russia do not correspond to its raw material, scientific and technological potential as the country and require the development activation based on state

  11. Aluminium exclusion and aluminium tolerance in woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivano eBrunner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aluminium (Al cation Al3+ is highly rhizotoxic and is a major stress factor to plants on acid soils, which cover large areas of tropical and boreal regions. Many woody plant species are native to acid soils and are well adapted to high Al3+ conditions. In tropical regions, both woody Al accumulator and non-Al accumulator plants occur, whereas in boreal regions woody plants are non-Al accumulators. The mechanisms of these adaptations can be divided into those that facilitate the exclusion of Al3+ from root cells (exclusion mechanisms and those that enable plants to tolerate Al3+ once it has entered the root and shoot symplast (internal tolerance mechanisms. The biochemical and molecular basis of these mechanisms have been intensively studied in several crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis. In this review, we examine the current understanding of Al3+ exclusion and tolerance mechanisms from woody plants. In addition, we discuss the ecology of woody non-Al accumulator and Al accumulator plants, and present examples of Al3+ adaptations in woody plant populations. This paper complements previous reviews focusing on crop plants and provides insights into evolutionary processes operating in plant communities that are widespread on acid soils.

  12. TEM investigation of aluminium containing precipitates in high aluminium doped silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong-Leung, J.; FitzGerald, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Silicon carbide is a promising semiconductor material for applications in high temperature and high power devices. The successful growth of good quality epilayers in this material has enhanced its potential for device applications. As a novel semiconductor material, there is a need for studying its basic physical properties and the role of dopants in this material. In this study, silicon carbide epilayers were grown on 4H-SiC wafers of (0001) orientation with a miscut angle of 8 deg at a temperature of 1550 deg C. The epilayers contained regions of high aluminium doping well above the solubility of aluminium in silicon carbide. High temperature annealing of this material resulted in the precipitation of aluminium in the wafers. The samples were analysed by secondary ion mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Selected area diffraction studies show the presence of aluminium carbide and aluminium silicon carbide phases. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  13. Gallium in the detection and localization of tumours | Berelowitz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Gallium c:trate and gamma-imaging with a gamma camera as a diagnostic procedure for the detection and localization of malignant disease has been evaluated in 64 patients with malignant disease. From the results obtained it can be concluded that Gallium citrate can play an extremely useful diagnostic role as ...

  14. Magnetostriction and Magnetic Heterogeneities in Iron-Gallium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laver, Mark; Mudivarthi, C.; Cullen, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Iron-gallium alloys Fe1-xGax exhibit an exceptional increase in magnetostriction with gallium content. We present small-angle neutron scattering investigations on a Fe0.81Ga0.19 single crystal. We uncover heterogeneities with an average spacing of 15 nm and with magnetizations distinct from...

  15. Quantitative pulmonary gallium scanning in interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, S.C.; Yeates, M.G.; Burke, W.M.J.; Morgan, G.W.; Breit, S.N.; Bryant, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for gallium uptake in chronic, non-infective, diffuse lung disease are not completely understood. This study attempted to clarify some of them. A lung/liver gallium index was calculated in 113 subjects, some normal and some with various interstitial lung diseases, predominantly those associated with connective tissue disease. The mean gallium index was significantly higher in the groups with active interstitial lung disease (5.7) and non-infective bronchiolitis (4.1) compared with non-smoking normals (3.0; P<0.05). To investigate the mechanisms responsible for gallium uptake, the gallium index was correlated with bronchoalveolar lavage findings, respiratory function tests and clinical features. Significant correlations (P<0.05) were found with age in non-smoking normals; lavage macrophages in smoking normals; age but no other parameter in bronchiolitis; lavage lymphocytes, lavage albumin and improvement in diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide in those with active interstitial lung disease. It is concluded that in normal smokers gallium uptake may be due to a macrophage-mediated process. Gallium uptake in active interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue disease appears to be an immunological process in which transport and retention of gallium is associated with that of albumin. (orig.)

  16. Design and fabrication of a gallium arsenide composite operational amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Carson, David B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon (Si) processes remain the dominant technology in integrated circuit (IC) design, but gallium arsenide (GaAs) is gaining ground. Gallium arsenide's electron mobility is five times greater than Si, so GaGs circuits are faster and have a greater rang U.S. Navy (U.S.N.) author.

  17. Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0048 TR-2015-0048 SUPERLATTICE INTERMEDIATE BAND SOLAR CELL ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE Alexandre Freundlich...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0232 Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  18. Aluminium toxicity in winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium is the most frequent metal of the earth crust; it occurs mainly as biologically inactive, insoluble deposit. Environmental problems, industrial contaminations and acid rains increase the soil acidity, leading to the mobilization of Al. Half of the world’s potential arable lands are acidic; therefore, Al-toxicity decreases crop productivity. Wheat is a staple food for 35% of the world population. The effects of Al-stress (0.1 mM were studied on winter wheat; seedlings were grown hydroponically, at acidic pH. After two weeks, the root weight was decreased; a significant difference was found in the P- and Ca-content. The shoot weight and element content changed slightly; Al-content in the root was one magnitude higher than in the shoot, while Al-translocation was limited. The root plasma membrane H+-ATPase has central role in the uptake processes; Al-stress increased the Mg2+-ATPase activity of the microsomal fraction.

  19. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Deves, Guillaume

    2003-01-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material

  20. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Crystalline Gallium Nitride Nanopowder from Gallium Nitrate Hydrate and Melamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gallium nitride (GaN nanopowder used as a blue fluorescent material was synthesized by using a direct current (DC non-transferred arc plasma. Gallium nitrate hydrate (Ga(NO33∙xH2O was used as a raw material and NH3 gas was used as a nitridation source. Additionally, melamine (C3H6N6 powder was injected into the plasma flame to prevent the oxidation of gallium to gallium oxide (Ga2O3. Argon thermal plasma was applied to synthesize GaN nanopowder. The synthesized GaN nanopowder by thermal plasma has low crystallinity and purity. It was improved to relatively high crystallinity and purity by annealing. The crystallinity is enhanced by the thermal treatment and the purity was increased by the elimination of residual C3H6N6. The combined process of thermal plasma and annealing was appropriate for synthesizing crystalline GaN nanopowder. The annealing process after the plasma synthesis of GaN nanopowder eliminated residual contamination and enhanced the crystallinity of GaN nanopowder. As a result, crystalline GaN nanopowder which has an average particle size of 30 nm was synthesized by the combination of thermal plasma treatment and annealing.

  1. Measurement of arsenic and gallium content of gallium arsenide semiconductor waste streams by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Keith W; Keenan, Helen E; Hursthouse, Andrew S; Stirling, David

    2010-01-01

    The chemistry of semiconductor wafer processing liquid waste, contaminated by heavy metals, was investigated to determine arsenic content. Arsenic and gallium concentrations were determined for waste slurries collected from gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafer processing at three industrial sources and compared to slurries prepared under laboratory conditions. The arsenic and gallium content of waste slurries was analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) and it is reported that the arsenic content of the waste streams was related to the wafer thinning process, with slurries from wafer polishing having the highest dissolved arsenic content at over 1,900 mgL(-1). Lapping slurries had much lower dissolved arsenic (manufacturing process, with limited recycling. Although gallium can be economically recovered from waste slurries, there is little incentive to recover arsenic, which is mostly landfilled. Options for treating GaAs processing waste streams are reviewed and some recommendations made for handling the waste. Therefore, although the quantities of hazardous waste generated are miniscule in comparison to other industries, sustainable manufacturing practices are needed to minimize the environmental impact of GaAs semiconductor device fabrication.

  2. Fluorimetric analysis of gallium in bauxite, by-products, products from gallium processing and its control solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C.A.M.; Medeiros, V.

    1987-01-01

    The gallium processing since raw material analysis until end-products analysis is studied. Gallium presence in by-products and products, as well as the fluorimetric method is analyzed. Equipments and materials used in laboratory, reagents and chemical solutions are described. (M.J.C.) [pt

  3. Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of admixing of aluminium phosphate on oxychloride cement in the matrix has been investigated. It is shown that aluminium phosphate retards the setting process of the cement and improves water-tightness.

  4. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-04

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Indium-111 octreotide scintigraphy in neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maini, C.L.; Cioffi, R.P.; Tofani, A.; Sciuto, R.; Fontana, M.; Carapella, C.M.; Crecco, M.

    1995-01-01

    Scintigraphy with the radiolabelled somatostatin analogue indium-111-DTPA-D-Phe-1-octreotide has recently been proposed for the imaging of CNS neoplasms expressing somatostatin receptors. While meningiomas are imaged with high sensitivity, neurinomas do not take up octreotide owing to the lack of somatostatin receptors. Neurofibromatosis is a relatively uncommon disorder in which meningiomas and neurinomas often occur in the same patient. Differential diagnosis between these two tumours by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can be difficult. This study reports on 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy in four patients with neurofibromatosis. 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy was shown to be very helpful in the in vivo differential diagnosis: all four meningiomas showed intense tracer uptake, while all 15 neurinomas were negative (P 111 In-octreotide is a useful diagnostic procedure in neurofibromatosis, complementing standard neuroradiological imaging procedures. (orig.)

  6. Steam Assisted Accelerated Growth of Oxide Layer on Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Yuksel, Serkan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of aluminium alloys is related to the composition and morphology of the oxide film on the surface of aluminium. In this paper we investigated the use of steam on the surface modification of aluminium to produce boehmite films. The study reveals a detailed investigation...... of the effect of vapour pressure, structure of intermetallic particles and thickness of boehmite films on the corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloys....

  7. Aluminium contents in infant and follow-on formula

    OpenAIRE

    German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

    2012-01-01

    The presence of aluminium in food can have different causes. Thus, for example, it can be due to natural contents in certain food ingredients or aluminium-containing additives. Another source can be the transfer of aluminium from food packaging, cooking utensils, or kitchen equipment etc. Below, the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) assesses aluminium contents in baby food with regard to their potential health effects. The trigger for the BfR opinion was a British study which me...

  8. Graphene on gallium arsenide: Engineering the visibility

    OpenAIRE

    Friedemann, M.; Pierz, K.; Stosch, R.; Ahlers, F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Graphene consists of single or few layers of crystalline ordered carbon atoms. Its visibility on oxidized silicon (Si/SiO\\_2) enabled its discovery and spawned numerous studies of its unique electronic properties. The combination of graphene with the equally unique electronic material gallium arsenide (GaAs) has up to now lacked such easy visibility. Here we demonstrate that a deliberately tailored GaAs/AlAs (aluminum arsenide) multi-layer structure makes graphene just as visible on GaAs as o...

  9. Development of gallium arsenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The potential of ion implantation as a means to the development of high efficiency gallium arsenide solar cells is investigated. Summaries are included of the results of computer calculations of GaAs cell characteristics, based on a model which includes the effects of surface recombination, junction space-charge region recombination, and built-in fields produced by nonuniform doping in the region; of the fabrication technology developed under the program; and of the results of electrical and optical measurements on the samples produced during the program. It was determined that measured AMO efficiencies were more than a factor of two lower than the calculated values.

  10. Proton Irradiation-Induced Metal Voids in Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Gallium nitride / aluminum gallium nitride high electron mobility transistors with nickel/gold (Ni/Au) and...Engineering iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT Gallium nitride / aluminum gallium nitride high electron mobility transistors with...ABBREVIATIONS 2DEG two-dimensional electron gas AlGaN aluminum gallium nitride AlOx aluminum oxide CCD charged coupled device CTE coefficient of

  11. Triethylborane-induced radical reactions with gallium hydride reagent HGaCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, S; Fujita, K; Nakamura, T; Yorimitsu, H; Shinokubo, H; Matsubara, S; Oshima, K

    2001-06-14

    [see reaction]. A gallium hydride reagent, HGaCl2, was found to act as a radical mediator, like tributyltin hydride. Treatment of alkyl halides with the gallium hydride reagent, generated from gallium trichloride and sodium bis(2-methoxyethoxy)aluminum hydride, provided the corresponding reduced products in excellent yields. Radical cyclization of halo acetals was also successful with not only the stoichiometric gallium reagent but also a catalytic amount of gallium trichloride combined with stoichiometric aluminum hydride as a hydride source.

  12. Analysis of aluminium in rat following administration of allergen immunotherapy using either aluminium or microcrystalline-tyrosine-based adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Stuart A; Heath, Matthew D; Kramer, Matthias F; Skinner, Murray A

    2016-03-01

    Investigation into the absorption, distribution and elimination of aluminium in rat after subcutaneous aluminium adjuvant formulation administration using ICP-MS is described. Assays were verified under the principles of a tiered approach. There was no evidence of systemic exposure of aluminium, in brain or in kidney. Extensive and persistent retention of aluminium at the dose site was observed for at least 180 days after administration. This is the first published work that has quantified aluminium adjuvant retention based on the quantity of aluminium delivered in a typical allergy immunotherapy course. The results indicate that the repeated administration of aluminium-containing adjuvants will likely contribute directly and significantly to an individual's body burden of aluminium.

  13. Aluminium toxicity tolerance in crop plants: Present status of research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tolerance of which genes of the Aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) families are prominent. In this review, the progress of research in identifying aluminium toxicity tolerant genes is discussed. Keywords: Aluminium toxicity, soil acidity, hydroponic screening, ...

  14. Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie O; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site - vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we...... examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark....

  15. Design and Analysis of Butterfly Valve Disc Using Aluminium (1100 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminium (1100) is an extensively used material in the application of water line and drainage applications. If the aluminium (1100) surface contacts the water, an oxide layer will be formed and it prevents the corrosion of aluminium (1100) when compared to other metal and also it has less weight. But due to their low ...

  16. [Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie Ø; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2015-04-27

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.

  17. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  18. Aluminium and the human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasmonic heating from indium nanoparticles on a floating microporous membrane for enhanced solar seawater desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Xing, Jun; Wen, Xinglin; Chai, Jianwei; Wang, Shijie; Xiong, Qihua

    2017-09-14

    Passive solar evaporation represents a promising and environmentally benign method of water purification/desalination. Plasmonic nanoparticles have been demonstrated as an effective approach for enhancing solar steam generation through a plasmonic heating effect, nonetheless the efficiency is constrained by unnecessary bulk heating of the entire liquid volume, while the noble metals commonly used are not cost-effective in terms of availability and their sophisticated preparation. Herein, a paper-like plasmonic device consisting of a microporous membrane and indium nanoparticles (In NPs/MPM) is fabricated through a simple thermal evaporation method. Due to the light-weight and porous nature of the device, the broadband light absorption properties, and theoretically the excellent plasmonic heating effect from In NP which could be even higher than gold, silver and aluminium nanoparticles, our device can effectively enhance solar water evaporation by floating on the water surface and its utility has been demonstrated in the solar desalination of a real seawater sample. The durability of the device in solar seawater desalination has also been investigated over multiple cycles with stable performances. This portable device could provide a solution for individuals to do water/seawater purification in under-developed areas with limited/no access to electricity or a centralized drinking water supply.

  20. Steam Initiated Surface Modification of Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud

    The extensive demand of aluminium alloys in various industries such as in transportationis mainly due to the high strength to weight ratio, which could be translated into fuel economy and efficiency. Corrosion protection of aluminium alloys is an important aspect for all applications which includes...... to 12 present various experimental results in the form of appended papers. The chapters consist of the experimental results obtained by the use of steam-based process and its effect on microstructureand corrosion resistance of the alloy as a function of steam pressure, use of various chemicals...... the use of aluminium alloys in the painted form requiring a conversion coating to improve the adhesion. Chromate based conversion coating processes are extremely good for these purposes, however the carcinogenic and toxic nature of hexavalent chromium led to the search for more benign and eco...

  1. Steam generated conversion coating on aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    Aluminium and its alloys are widely used in aerospace industry owing to their high strength to weight ratio. The surface of aluminium under normal conditions has a thin oxide film (2.5-10 nm) responsible for its inherent corrosion resistance. This oxide film can further be converted or transformed...... into functional conversion coatings in order to enhance corrosion resistance and adhesion to paint systems. Chromium based conversion coatings have been extensively used on aluminium alloys to improve adhesion of subsequent paint layers and corrosion resistance. However, the use of hexavalent chromium is strictly...... and growth of oxide film on different intermetallic particles and corrosion behaviour of such alloys.Surface morphology was observed by using FEG-SEM, EDX and FIB-SEM. Metal oxide surface characterization and compositional depth profiling were investigated by using XPS and GD-OES respectively...

  2. Internal friction in iron-aluminium alloys having a high aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Delaplace, J.; Silvent, A.

    1966-01-01

    By using a torsion pendulum to measure the internal friction of iron-aluminium alloys containing between 25 and 50 atom per cent of aluminium, it has been possible to show the existence of three damping peaks due to interstitial carbon. Their evolution is followed as a function of the carbon content, of the thermal treatment and of the aluminium content. A model based on the preferential occupation of tetrahedral sites is proposed as an interpretation of the results. A study of the Zener peak in these substitution alloys shows also that a part of the short distance disorder existing at high temperatures can be preserved by quenching. (author) [fr

  3. TITANIUM CARBON ALUMINIUM : A NOVEL GRAIN REFINER FOR ALUMINIUM-LITHIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Birch , M.; Cowell , A.

    1987-01-01

    This work explores the possibility of achieving grain size control in aluminium-lithium alloys with the titanium carbon aluminium (TiCAl) master alloys invented at the Technical University of Berlin and developed by London and Scandinavian Metallurgical Co Ltd (LSM). Grain refining tests were conducted on a single batch of 8090 alloy using addition rates of 0.2wt% and 0.4wt% of TiCAl and 3/1 titanium boron aluminium (TiBAl). Other tests using 0.4wt% of binary TiAl gave poor results, showing t...

  4. Indium-111 granulocyte scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, A.; Moisan, A.; Heresbach, D.; Darnault, P.; Bretagne, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper reports our experience since 1963 concerning 111-indium labeled autologous granulocytes scanning in the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases and in the assessment of activity in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (authors). 94 refs., 3 figs

  5. Development of indium bumping technology through AZ9260 resist electroplating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Qiuping; Xu, Gaowei; Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Xiao; Luo, Le

    2010-01-01

    Indium bumping is very critical technology in the application of high-density interconnection between a FPA (focal plane array) and a Si ROIC (read-out integrated circuit) by flip-chip bonding. In this paper, the indium BGA (ball grid array) chips are prepared with an electroplating method on the Si substrate. With such a method, the first difficulty arises in removing the seed layer. Two ways, including IBE (ion beam etching) and lift-off, are adopted to overcome it. The results show that the lift-off process is effective but not IBE. During the reflow process, many indium bumps fall off the substrate. Two ways are tried to solve this problem: one is to optimize the reflow profile and the other is to thicken the wetting layer. The results show that these two ways can effectively improve such status. The barrier effects of the UBM (under bump metallization) for indium, which are Ti/Pt (300 Å/200 Å) and Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), are also investigated. Experimental results indicate that both of them can be used in application of integration of the FPA and ROIC. Reliability of indium bumps with these two kinds of UBM is evaluated by the shear test. The results show that their shear strength has a significant increase after reflow. For the indium bump with UBM of Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), IMC (intermetallic compounds) at the interface of Au–In can strengthen the indium bump but may change the plasticity of indium.

  6. Development of indium bumping technology through AZ9260 resist electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuping; Xu, Gaowei; Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Xiao; Luo, Le

    2010-05-01

    Indium bumping is very critical technology in the application of high-density interconnection between a FPA (focal plane array) and a Si ROIC (read-out integrated circuit) by flip-chip bonding. In this paper, the indium BGA (ball grid array) chips are prepared with an electroplating method on the Si substrate. With such a method, the first difficulty arises in removing the seed layer. Two ways, including IBE (ion beam etching) and lift-off, are adopted to overcome it. The results show that the lift-off process is effective but not IBE. During the reflow process, many indium bumps fall off the substrate. Two ways are tried to solve this problem: one is to optimize the reflow profile and the other is to thicken the wetting layer. The results show that these two ways can effectively improve such status. The barrier effects of the UBM (under bump metallization) for indium, which are Ti/Pt (300 Å/200 Å) and Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), are also investigated. Experimental results indicate that both of them can be used in application of integration of the FPA and ROIC. Reliability of indium bumps with these two kinds of UBM is evaluated by the shear test. The results show that their shear strength has a significant increase after reflow. For the indium bump with UBM of Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), IMC (intermetallic compounds) at the interface of Au-In can strengthen the indium bump but may change the plasticity of indium.

  7. Recovery of indium from LCD screens of discarded cell phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, A V M; Fuchs, M S; Pinheiro, D K; Tanabe, E H; Bertuol, D A

    2015-11-01

    Advances in technological development have resulted in high consumption of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE), amongst which are cell phones, which have LCD (liquid crystal display) screens as one of their main components. These multilayer screens are composed of different materials, some with high added value, as in the case of the indium present in the form of indium tin oxide (ITO, or tin-doped indium oxide). Indium is a precious metal with relatively limited natural reserves (Dodbida et al., 2012), so it can be profitable to recover it from discarded LCD screens. The objective of this study was to develop a complete process for recovering indium from LCD screens. Firstly, the screens were manually removed from cell phones. In the next step, a pretreatment was developed for removal of the polarizing film from the glass of the LCD panels, because the adherence of this film to the glass complicated the comminution process. The choice of mill was based on tests using different equipment (knife mill, hammer mill, and ball mill) to disintegrate the LCD screens, either before or after removal of the polarizing film. In the leaching process, it was possible to extract 96.4 wt.% of the indium under the following conditions: 1.0M H2SO4, 1:50 solid/liquid ratio, 90°C, 1h, and stirring at 500 rpm. The results showed that the best experimental conditions enabled extraction of 613 mg of indium/kg of LCD powder. Finally, precipitation of the indium with NH4OH was tested at different pH values, and 99.8 wt.% precipitation was achieved at pH 7.4. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Amperometric titration of indium with edta solution in propanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.M.; Talipov, Sh.T.; Khadeev, V.A.; Kostylev, V.S.; Khadeeva, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Optimum conditions have been chosen for titration of indium with EDTA solution in anhydrous propanol and its mixtures with some aprotic solvents using amperometric and point detection. A procedure is suggested of determining indium microcontents in the presence of large amounts of other elements. The procedure is based on its extraction preseparation followed by direct titration in the extract with a standard EDTA solution [ru

  9. Studies on preparation and characterization of indium doped zinc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    solution of zinc acetate. To achieve indium doping, indium trichloride (InCl3) was added to the solution. The In/Zn ratio was varied from zero to 1⋅6 at.%. The resulting solu- tion was sprayed onto heated substrates held at 723 ± 5 K. The upper limit for dopant concentration was fixed at. 1⋅6 at.%. Compressed air was used ...

  10. An advanced case of indium lung disease with progressive emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Makiko; Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Kamada, Dan; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-30

    To report the occurrence of an advanced case of indium lung disease with severely progressive emphysema in an indium-exposed worker. A healthy 42-year-old male smoker was employed to primarily grind indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates, exposing him to indium for 9 years (1998-2008). In 2004, an epidemiological study was conducted on indium-exposed workers at the factory in which he worked. The subject's serum indium concentration (In-S) was 99.7 μg/l, while his serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 level was 2,350 U/ml. Pulmonary function tests showed forced vital capacity (FVC) of 4.17 l (91.5% of the JRS predicted value), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) of 3.19 l (80.8% of predicted), and an FEV 1 -to-FVC ratio of 76.5%. A high-resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) scan showed mild interlobular septal thickening and mild emphysematous changes. In 2008, he was transferred from the ITO grinding workplace to an inspection work section, where indium concentrations in total dusts had a range of 0.001-0.002 mg/m 3 . In 2009, the subject's In-S had increased to 132.1 μg/l, and pulmonary function tests revealed obstructive changes. In addition, HRCT scan showed clear evidence of progressive lung destruction with accompanying severe centrilobular emphysema and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields. The subject's condition gradually worsened, and in 2015, he was registered with the Japan Organ Transplant Network for lung transplantation (LTx). Heavy indium exposure is a risk factor for emphysema, which can lead to a severity level that requires LTx as the final therapeutic option.

  11. Photoluminescence of monovalent indium centres in phosphate glass

    OpenAIRE

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okumura, Shun; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Ina, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Valence control of polyvalent cations is important for functionalization of various kinds of materials. Indium oxides have been used in various applications, such as indium tin oxide in transparent electrical conduction films. However, although metastable In+ (5 s2 configuration) species exhibit photoluminescence (PL), they have attracted little attention. Valence control of In+ cations in these materials will be important for further functionalization. Here, we describe In+ species using PL ...

  12. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized

  13. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  14. Time-dependent changes in copper indium gallium (di)selenide and cadmium telluride photovoltaic modules due to outdoor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Sato, Ritsuko; Ishii, Tetsuyuki; Chiba, Yasuo; Masuda, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    The performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules deteriorates with time due to outdoor exposure. We investigated the time-dependent changes in PV modules and evaluated the amount of power generated during their lifetime. Once a year, the exposed modules were removed and measured under standard test conditions using a solar simulator. Their outputs were measured indoors and normalized to nominal values. In addition, the relationship between the indoor measurement and the energy yield for thin-film PV modules will be reported. In CIGS PV modules, the normalized maximum power (P MAX) and performance ratio (PR) differ with the type of module. The P MAX and PR of CdTe PV modules significantly decrease after outdoor exposure for three years. These results help to determine the characteristics of the time-dependent changes in the P MAX of PV modules due to outdoor exposure.

  15. Application of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Photovoltaic Cells to Extend the Endurance and Capabilities of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    13 Figure 13. Queen Bee Reusable Target UAV 1935 (From [18]). .....................................13 Figure 14. DC-130 with Two AQM-34...83 Figure 87. Parkzone and Venom Balanced Chargers (From [104...86 Figure 89. 11.1 V Lithium Polymer Battery Charge Cycle Using Venom Pro Charger...87

  16. The Mobility, Resistivity and Carrier Density in p-Type Silicon Doped with Boron, Gallium and Indium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    considered. It would also be of great benefit to extend this study into the heavy doped region. I..0 I APPENDIX A FABRICATION PROCEDURES AND TEST STRUCTURES...1Q(F 7.5. 1XI 400 READ5s.12)( CROP (L)#LxI,10) 410012 FORMAT(10(F6e491X5R 420 C 430C READ IN DOPANT CONCENTRATIONS 129 31 MAY 1979 440C 450 READ (5*13...00908*GM**3* 560 F2MI.,.01I667*G,’M4.041369* GMO [12. ,.00090679*GM**3., 570 1.00091959*GM***.4.0000206*iM**5. Sao ZP;o~;gf67GP~OOO3 9 O& 7*4 OO90GPG**3

  17. Reclamation of gallium, indium and rare-earth elements from photovoltaics, lightning and electronic waste : Reclaim project and outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, M. van; Bisselink, R.; Ansems, T.; Kopacek, B.

    2014-01-01

    Modern technologies for green electronics like photovoltaic systems and solidstate lighting require increasing amounts of scarce metals. Global demand and price of these materials is expected to increase significantly the coming decades. If not controlled well some of these resources may be

  18. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas; Anthony Vortherms; Robert P. Doyle

    2008-01-01

    The development of gallium(III) compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III) as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III) compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA) with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 'spacers’. Th...

  19. Solidification of subcooled gallium poured into a vertical cylindrical mold

    OpenAIRE

    Dubovsky, Vadim; Harary, Itay; Assis, Eli; Ziskind, Gennady; Letan, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation is aimed at the solidification of subcooled liquid gallium. The gallium, in its liquid state, is contained in a cylindrical shell of copper or polypropylene, and poured into the shell, which is immersed in a cold bath. The experimental degree of subcooling varied between 5°C and 45°C. The phenomena empirically observed have been simulated in four stages: subcooling of the liquid gallium down to its nucleation temperature, a rapid transfer from nucleation to the stabl...

  20. Effect of flyash particles with aluminium melt on the wear of aluminium metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin K. Sharma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the fabrication and tribological testing of an aluminium flyash composite. The metal matrix selected was aluminium and flyash contents in different percentages were reinforced in it to fabricate the required metal matrix composite (MMC. Stir casting method was used to fabricate the MMC with 2–4–6% weight of flyash contents in aluminium. Tribological analysis of the tribo pairs formed between the smooth surfaces of cast iron disc and smooth MMC pin has been considered and friction force and wear of the MMC were investigated by using a Pin-on-disc setup. It was observed that the MMC with 6% weight of flyash content in aluminium matrix results in less wear (0.32 g and 4% weight of flyash content gives the low coefficient of friction (0.12 between the tribopairs of cast iron surface and MMC surface.

  1. Bragg Reflector-Induced Increased Nonradiative Lifetime in Gallium Arsenide (GaAs)/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Double Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    GaAs)/ Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Double Heterostructures by Patrick A Folkes, Blair Connelly, Harry Hier, William Beck, and Brenda Van...Lifetime in Gallium Arsenide (GaAs)/ Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Double Heterostructures by Patrick A Folkes, Blair Connelly, Harry Hier...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bragg Reflector-Induced Increased Nonradiative Lifetime in Gallium Arsenide (GaAs)/ Aluminum

  2. Thermal formation of corundum from aluminium hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This contains a higher concentration of anionic impurities related to differences in the solubility of the original aluminium salts. The sulfate is retained in the gel to higher temperatures at which its eventual decomposition may lead to the formation of a reactive pore structure which facilitates the nucleation of -Al2O3.

  3. Indentation of aluminium foam at low velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The indentation behaviour of aluminium foams at low velocity (10 m/s ∼ 30 m/s was investigated both in experiments and numerical simulation in this paper. A flat-ended indenter was used and the force-displacement history was recorded. The Split Hopkinson Pressure bar was used to obtain the indentation velocity and forces in the dynamic experiments. Because of the low strength of the aluminium foam, PMMA bar was used, and the experimental data were corrected using Bacon's method. The energy absorption characteristics varying with impact velocity were then obtained. It was found that the energy absorption ability of aluminium foam gradually increases in the quasi-static regime and shows a significant increase at ∼10 m/s velocity. Numerical simulation was also conducted to investigate this process. A 3D Voronoi model was used and models with different relative densities were investigated as well as those with different failure strain. The indentation energy increases with both the relative density and failure strain. The analysis of the FE model implies that the significant change in energy absorption ability of aluminium foam in indentation at ∼10 m/s velocity may be caused by plastic wave effect.

  4. Performance evaluation of aluminium test piece against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Image processing with Catphan 700 uses the automated Quality Assurance software restricted to only Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images. For this reason, an aluminium (Al) test piece device was fabricated for image processing in different image format for spatial resolution measurement.

  5. Warm Deep Drawing of Aluminium Sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, P.J.; Werkhoven, R.J.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminium sheet drawing processes can be improved by manipulating local flow behaviour by means of elevated temperatures and temperature gradients in the tooling. Forming tests showed that a substantial improvement is possible not only for 5xxx but also for 6xxx series alloys. Finite element method

  6. Flexural buckling of fire exposed aluminium columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Twilt, L.; Soetens, F.

    2009-01-01

    In order to study buckling of fire exposed aluminium columns, a finite element model is developed. The results of this model are verified with experiments. Based on a parametric study with the finite element model, it is concluded that the simple calculation model for flexural buckling of fire

  7. Aluminium hydroxide-induced granulomas in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valtulini, S; Macchi, C; Ballanti, P

    2005-01-01

    The effect of intramuscular injection of 40 mg/2 ml aluminium hydroxide in the neck of pigs was examined in a number of ways. The investigation followed repeated slaughterhouse reports, according to which 64.8% of pigs from one particular farm were found at slaughter to have one or more nodules i...

  8. Generation and characterization of nano aluminium powder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. In the present study, nano aluminium particles were produced by wire explosion process (WEP) in nitrogen, argon and helium atmospheres. Thus produced nano particles were characterized through certain physico-chemical diagnostic studies using wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and by energy dispersive.

  9. Impact toughness of laser surface alloyed Aluminium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4kW Nd:YAG laser and the impact resistance of the alloys was investigated. The alloying powders were a mixture of Ni, Ti and SiC in different proportions. Surfaces reinforced...

  10. Shape rheocasting of high purity aluminium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is demonstrated experimentally that using the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Rheo Casting System and high pressure die casting it is possible to semi-solid process and cast into a shape high purity aluminium without a...

  11. Generation and characterization of nano aluminium powder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    as a combustion product. This could be useful in reduced smoke applications, since the visibility ... combustion instability due to appropriate particulate damping. A low concentration of regular-sized aluminium ... tance and L the contribution by the internal inductance of the capacitor and the lead inductance. The basic circuit.

  12. Dissolution of aluminium-cladded fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, G.; Boessert, W.; Hladik, O.; Schwarzbach, R.

    1984-01-01

    In the molybdenum production plant at Rossendorf (AMOR) short-term irradiated aluminium-cladded fuel elements from the Rossendorf research reactor RFR are dissolved for the purpose of molybdenum 99 production. The dissolution behaviour of these fuel elements and the appropriate dissolver are described. (author)

  13. COMBINED ALUMINIUM SULFATE/HYDROXIDE PROCESS FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    process has higher fluoride removal efficiency than the Nalgonda Technique with an additional advantage of minimizing ... disadvantages of this technique include high residual aluminium concentration (2–7 mg/L) in the treated ... thermogravimetric analyzer (Mettler Toledo AG–TGA/SDTA851e, Switzerland) using ceramic.

  14. Molecular breeding of cereals for aluminium resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop production on acidic soils worldwide. In addition to an application of lime for soil amelioration, Al3+ resistant plant varieties have been deployed to raise productivity on such hostile soils. This has been possible due to the exploita...

  15. Improving mechanical properties of aluminium alloy through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy (Al-Si-Fe) reinforced with coconut shell-ash particulate. The aluminium (Al-Si-Fe) alloy composite was produced by a double-stir casting process at a speed of 700 rpm for 10 and 5 minutes at first and second stirring respectively.

  16. Creep properties of aluminium processed by ECAP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Petr; Dvořák, Jiří; Jäger, Aleš; Kvapilová, Marie; Horita, Z.; Sklenička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2016), s. 441-451 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) * aluminium * ultrafine-grained microstructure * creep Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy; JG - Metallurgy (FZU-D) Impact factor: 0.366, year: 2016

  17. Constant structure creep experiments on aluminium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milička, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2011), s. 307-318 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : mechanical properties * high temperature deformation * creep * aluminium Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.451, year: 2011

  18. Subnanometer Thin β-Indium Sulfide Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shinjita; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan

    2012-12-20

    Nanosheets are a peculiar kind of nanomaterials that are grown two-dimensionally over a micrometer in length and a few nanometers in thickness. Wide varieties of inorganic semiconductor nanosheets are already reported, but controlling the crystal growth and tuning their thickness within few atomic layers have not been yet explored. We investigate here the parameters that determine the thickness and the formation mechanism of subnanometer thin (two atomic layers) cubic indium sulfide (In2S3) nanosheets. Using appropriate reaction condition, the growth kinetics is monitored by controlling the decomposition rate of the single source precursor of In2S3 as a function of nucleation temperature. The variation in the thickness of the nanosheets along the polar [111] direction has been correlated with the rate of evolved H2S gas, which in turn depends on the rate of the precursor decomposition. In addition, it has been observed that the thickness of the In2S3 nanosheets is related to the nucleation temperature.

  19. Glutathione role in gallium induced toxicity | Ahmad | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GSH) present in tissues. It is very important and interesting to study the reaction of gallium nitrate and glutathione as biomarker of glutathione role in detoxification and conjugation in whole blood components (plasma and cytosolic fraction).

  20. Multiple scaling power in liquid gallium under pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Renfeng; Wang, Luhong; Li, Liangliang; Yu, Tony; Zhao, Haiyan; Chapman, Karena W.; Rivers, Mark L.; Chupas, Peter J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Liu, Haozhe

    2017-06-01

    Generally, a single scaling exponent, Df, can characterize the fractal structures of metallic glasses according to the scaling power law. However, when the scaling power law is applied to liquid gallium upon compression, the results show multiple scaling exponents and the values are beyond 3 within the first four coordination spheres in real space, indicating that the power law fails to describe the fractal feature in liquid gallium. The increase in the first coordination number with pressure leads to the fact that first coordination spheres at different pressures are not similar to each other in a geometrical sense. This multiple scaling power behavior is confined within a correlation length of ξ ≈ 14–15 Å at applied pressure according to decay of G(r) in liquid gallium. Beyond this length the liquid gallium system could roughly be viewed as homogeneous, as indicated by the scaling exponent, Ds, which is close to 3 beyond the first four coordination spheres.

  1. Compatibility of candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-01-01

    Scoping tests were conducted on compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chronimum. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant to corrosion in static gallium. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/y for Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than does nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥90 and 17 mm/y, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds

  2. Computer simulation of radiation damage in gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stith, John J.; Davenport, James C.; Copeland, Randolph L.

    1989-01-01

    A version of the binary-collision simulation code MARLOWE was used to study the spatial characteristics of radiation damage in proton and electron irradiated gallium arsenide. Comparisons made with the experimental results proved to be encouraging.

  3. Gallium accumulation in early pulmonary Pneumocystis carinii infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.A.; Allegra, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The accumulation of gallium 67 citrate in pulmonary Pneumocystis carinii is well known. The sensitivity of gallium uptake in detecting early inflammatory processes, even when conventional roentgenograms are normal, would seem to make it possible in immunocompromised patients to make a presumptive diagnosis of this serious infection early in its course without using invasive techniques to demonstrate the organism. However, the presence of gallium uptake in radiation pneumonitis, pulmonary drug toxicity, and other processes that also occur in this group limit its usefulness. In our two patients--a young woman with Hodgkin's disease and an elderly woman with small cell lung cancer--this technique proved helpful. Although the latter patient was successfully treated empirically, such empiric treatment should be reserved for patients unable or unwilling to undergo invasive tests. Pulmonary gallium uptake in patients with respiratory symptoms, even with a normal chest film, should prompt attempts to directly demonstrate the organism

  4. Optical Parametric Oscillation in Orientation-Patterned Gallium Arsenide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shell, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    .... Orientation patterned gallium arsenide (OPGaAs) is a promising nonlinear conversion material because it has broad transparency and can be engineered for specific pump laser and output wavelengths using quasi-phase matching techniques...

  5. Optical Characterization of Thick Growth Orientation-Patterned Gallium Arsenide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyer, Joshua W

    2006-01-01

    .... Orientation patterned gallium arsenide (OPGaAs) is a promising nonlinear conversion material because it has broad transparency and can be engineered for specific pump laser and output wavelengths using quasi-phase matching techniques...

  6. Development of gallium-nitride-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes for energy-efficient lighting and displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DenBaars, Steven P.; Feezell, Daniel; Kelchner, Katheryn; Pimputkar, Siddha; Pan, Chi-Chen; Yen, Chia-Chen; Tanaka, Shinichi; Zhao, Yuji; Pfaff, Nathan; Farrell, Robert; Iza, Mike; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated from gallium nitride (GaN) have led to the realization of high-efficiency white solid-state lighting. Currently, GaN white LEDs exhibit luminous efficacy greater than 150 lm W −1 , and external quantum efficiencies higher than 60%. This has enabled LEDs to compete with traditional lighting technologies, such as incandescent and compact fluorescent (CFL) lighting. Further improvements in materials quality and cost reduction are necessary for widespread adoption of LEDs for lighting. A review of the unique polarization anisotropy in GaN is included for the different crystal orientations. The emphasis on nonpolar and semipolar LEDs highlights high-power violet and blue emitters, and we consider the effects of indium incorporation and well width. Semipolar GaN materials have enabled the development of high-efficiency LEDs in the blue region and recent achievements of green laser diodes at 520 nm

  7. Recovery of gallium from coal fly ash by a dual reactive extraction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, B.; Pazos, C.; Coca, J. [University of Oviedo, Oviedo (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the extraction of gallium from coal fly ash by leaching and extraction with commercial extractants Amerlite LA-2 and LIX-54N dissolved in kerosene. Leaching of gallium and other metals from the fly ash was carried out with 6 M hydrochloric acid. The leaching liquor is first contacted with Amerlite LA-2 which extracts the gallium and iron. The iron is then precipitated with sodium hydroxide, while gallium remains in solution. Gallium is extracted selectively from the base solution with LIX 54; the resulting stripped solution contains 83% of the gallium present in the leaching liquor.

  8. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  9. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  10. Surface magnetism of gallium arsenide nanofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huan; Yu, Jin; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-11-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is the most widely used second-generation semiconductor with a direct band gap, and it is being increasingly used as nanofilms. However, the magnetic properties of GaAs nanofilms have never been studied. Here we find by comprehensive density-functional-theory calculations that GaAs nanofilms cleaved along the 〈111 〉 and 〈100 〉 directions become intrinsically metallic films with strong surface magnetism and the magnetoelectric effect. Surface magnetism and electrical conductivity are realized via a combined effect of charge transfer induced by spontaneous electric polarization through the film thickness and spin-polarized surface states. The surface magnetism of 〈111 〉 nanofilms can be significantly and linearly tuned by a vertically applied electric field, endowing the nanofilms with unexpectedly high magnetoelectric coefficients, which are tens of times higher than those of ferromagnetic metals and transition-metal oxides.

  11. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  12. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E.; Hryciw, Aaron C.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 10 5 and mode volumes 3 , and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 10 4 intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g 0 /2π∼30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz

  13. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  14. Method of fabricating germanium and gallium arsenide devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhabvala, Murzban (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of semiconductor diode fabrication is disclosed which relies on the epitaxial growth of a precisely doped thickness layer of gallium arsenide or germanium on a semi-insulating or intrinsic substrate, respectively, of gallium arsenide or germanium by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The method involves: depositing a layer of doped or undoped silicon dioxide on a germanium or gallium arsenide wafer or substrate, selectively removing the silicon dioxide layer to define one or more surface regions for a device to be fabricated thereon, growing a matched epitaxial layer of doped germanium or gallium arsenide of an appropriate thickness using MBE or MOCVD techniques on both the silicon dioxide layer and the defined one or more regions; and etching the silicon dioxide and the epitaxial material on top of the silicon dioxide to leave a matched epitaxial layer of germanium or gallium arsenide on the germanium or gallium arsenide substrate, respectively, and upon which a field effect device can thereafter be formed.

  15. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Min; Zhang Guoguang; Fu Kai; Yu Guohao; Su Dan; Hu Jifeng

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. → Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. → The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. → The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 ( 63 Ni), which emits β particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm -2 . The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the β particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  16. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  17. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (pdiatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated aluminium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Association between serum aluminium level and methylation of amyloid precursor protein gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X J; Yuan, Y Z; Niu, Q

    2016-04-20

    To investigate the association between serum aluminium level and methylation of the promoter region of amyloid precursor protein (APP)gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis. In 2012, 366 electrolysis workers in an aluminium factory were enrolled as exposure group (working years >10 and age >40 years)and divided into low-exposure group and high-exposure group based on the median serum aluminium level. Meanwhile, 102 workers in a cement plant not exposed to aluminium were enrolled as control group. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure serum aluminium level, methylation specific PCR was used to measure the methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene, and ELI-SA was used to measure the protein expression of APP in lymphocytes in peripheral blood. The exposure group had a significantly higher serum aluminium level than the control group (45.07 μg/L vs 30.51 μg/L, P0.05). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that with reference to the control group, low aluminium exposure (OR=1.86, 95% CI 1.67~3.52)and high aluminium exposure (OR=2.98, 95% CI 1.97~4.15)were risk factors for a reduced methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene. Reduced methylation of the promoter region of APP gene may be associated with increased serum aluminium level, and downregulated methylation of the promoter region of APP gene may accelerate APP gene transcription.

  19. Determination of trace impurities of aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper and nickel in indium phosphate by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chruscinska, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The sample (0.25 g) was treated with a nitric (0.9 ml) + hydrochloric (0.25 ml) acid mixture, heated to syrup under glass and then dissolved with 5 mol · 1 -1 HNO 3 (1 ml). The traces were determined in 0.2 mol · 1 -1 HNO 3 using Perkin-Elmer Model 430 Atomic Absorption Spectrometer equipped with a HGA 76B Graphite Furnace and an AS-1 Auto Sampling System. Pyrolytically coated and then tantalum treated tubes was employed. Additive errors due to contamination with, and loss of, the analyte element were controlled by estimation of the blank value and recovery. Background was corrected throughout. The background correction system efficiency was checked for the continuum background by two line method and for structured background by decreasing the slit or choosing different analytical lines. No other multiplicative (influencing the slope of the analytical curve) matrix interferences were found except for cadmium. (author). 12 refs, 4 tabs, 3 figs

  20. Thermal expansion and volumetric changes during indium phosphide melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Davletov, K.; Nashel'skij, A.Ya.; Mamedov, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the measurements of a thermal expansion were summed up at various temperatures as a diagram in coordinates (Δ 1/1) approximately F(t). It was shown that an appreciable deviation of the relationship (Δ1/1) approximately f(t) from the linear law corresponded to a temperature of 500-550 deg C. It was noted that the said deviation was related to an appreciable thermal decomposition of indium phosphide as temperature increased. The strength of the inter-atomic bond of indium phosphide was calculated. Investigated were the volumetric changes of indium phosphide on melting. The resultant data were analyzed with the aid of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation

  1. Properties of Polydisperse Tin-doped Dysprosium and Indium Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinovskaya Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the complex permittivity, diffuse-reflectance, and characteristics of crystal lattices of tin-doped indium and dysprosium oxides are presented. Using the methods of spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, it is shown that doping of indium oxide with tin results in a significant increase of the components of the indium oxide complex permittivity and an appearance of the plasma resonance in its diffuse-reflectance spectra. This indicates the appearance of charge carriers with the concentration of more than 1021 cm−3 in the materials. On the other hand, doping of the dysprosium oxide with the same amount of tin has no effect on its optical and electromagnetic properties.

  2. Demethylation of Quinine Using Anhydrous Aluminium Trichloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyi Asnawi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinine is a natural alkaloid having a methoxy group bound to quinoline ring and an allyl group bound to quinuclidine ring. Demethylation of quinine applying strong acid such as HBr or HI at high temperature was unsuccessful. The aim of this research was to obtain demethylated quinine by means of mild and selective demethylation procedure to prevent the addition reaction of allyl group. Selective demethylation of quinine has been carried out using anhydrous aluminium trichloride as reagent. The demethylation product was achieved in 68.12% yield by mole ratio of quinine to anhydrous aluminium trichloride of 1 to 4 in dried methylene chloride under nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction was firstly carried out at 0°C for 4 h and after the reaction mixture reached room temperature, the reaction was continued up to 24 h.

  3. Diagnostics of ytterbium/aluminium laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, J.; Lee, R.W.; Landen, O.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Lewis, C.L.; Busquet, M.

    1986-11-01

    Microdot spectroscopy was used to study the x-ray emission from laser-produced plasmas consisting of 10% ytterbium, 90% aluminium. Spectra were recorded with a space-resolving flat crystal (PET) mini-spectrometer in the 4.0-8.0 A range. The Janus research laser at LLNL irradiated the targets with green (0.53 μm) light in a 1 nsec pulse. The power density was varied between 4x10 13 and 3x10 14 W/cm 2 . The plasma electron density and temperature were determined from the aluminium XI, XII and XIII line emission. By examining correlations between changes in the plasma conditions with changes in the ytterbium spectra, we will determine the potential for using ytterbium line emission as a plasma diagnostic

  4. ALUHAB — The Superior Aluminium Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsan, N.; Beke, S.; Makk, P.; Soki, P.; Számel, Gy; Degischer, H. P.; Mokso, R.

    A new metal foaming technology has been developed to produce aluminum foams with controlled cell sizes, a wide range of alloy compositions, and attractive mechanical properties. ALUHAB aluminium foams are manufactured from a special foamable aluminium alloy containing ultrafine particles (80-3000 nm). The technology uses high temperature ultrasonication to homogeneously disperse the particles and thus create a stable, foamable aluminum melt. Oscillating gas injector (loud-nozzle) technology permits the injection of optimally sized bubbles into the melt that are independent of the injector orifice diameter. Using this direct gas injection method, bubble size is regulated by the frequency and the power of the ultrasound, producing uniform bubble sizes in the sub-millimeter range. The technology results in extremely stable metal foams which can be cast into complex forms and re-melted without loss of foam integrity. Processing methods and properties of the ALUHAB foams will be discussed.

  5. Melt spun aluminium alloys for moulding optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, G.; Tegelaers, L.; Senden, R.

    2013-09-01

    Melt spinning is a rapid quenching process that makes it possible to create materials with a very fine microstructure. Due to this very fine microstructure the melt spinning process is an enabler for diamond turning optics and moulds without the need of post-polishing. Using diamond turning of melt spun aluminium one can achieve coating concept RSA-905 can be upgraded to a competitive alternative to steel in terms of price, performance and logistics. This paper presents some recent developments for improved mould performance of such concept. Hardness, wear resistance and adhesion are topics of interest and they can be applied by special coatings such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) and chromium nitride (CrN). These coatings make the aluminium alloy suitable for moulding mass production of small as well as larger optics, such as spectacle lenses.

  6. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. What is the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium is neurotoxic. Its free ion, Al(3+) (aq), is highly biologically reactive and uniquely equipped to do damage to essential cellular (neuronal) biochemistry. This unequivocal fact must be the starting point in examining the risk posed by aluminium as a neurotoxin in humans. Aluminium is present in the human brain and it accumulates with age. The most recent research demonstrates that a significant proportion of individuals older than 70 years of age have a potentially pathological accumulation of aluminium somewhere in their brain. What are the symptoms of chronic aluminium intoxication in humans? What if neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are the manifestation of the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin? How might such an (outrageous) hypothesis be tested?

  8. Simulation of aluminium STIR casting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafizal Yazid; Mohd Harun; Hanani Yazid; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Muhammad Rawi Muhammad Zain; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar; Muhamad Jalil; Ismail Mustapha; Razali Kasim

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the objective is to determine the optimum impeller speed correlated with holding time to achieve homogeneous reinforcement distribution for a particular set of experimental condition. Attempts are made to simulate the flow behaviourof the liquid aluminium using FLUENT software. Stepwise impeller speed ranging from 50 to 300 rpm.with 2 impeller angle blades of 45 and 90 degree with respect to the rotational plane were used

  9. Aluminium phosphide poising: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirani, S.A.A.; Rahman, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the case of a family in which three children were presented at Emergency Room (ER) with poisoning after the use of a pesticide at home. Initially, the cases were managed as routine cases of organophosphorus poisoning; however, the death of two children made the health team members realise that the poison's effects were delayed and devastating. Later, the compound was identified as Aluminium Phosphide (ALP), and the life of the last surviving child in the family was saved. (author)

  10. Helium behaviour in aluminium under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokurskij, Yu.N.; Tebus, V.N.; Zudilin, V.A.; Tumanova, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of hydrostatic compression on equilibrium helium bubbles in low aluminium-lithium alloy irradiated in reactor at 570 K is investigated. Measurements of hydrostatic density and electron-microscopic investigations have shown, that application of up to 2 GPa pressure reduces equilibrium size of helium bubbles and reduces helium swelling. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the process are considered with application of 'rigid sphere' equation which describes helium state in bubbles

  11. Swedish research on aluminium reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsen, Bjoern

    1960-02-01

    A historical survey of the work done in Sweden this subject is given in the first part of the paper. The second part is elevated to a brief outline of the authors view of the present status of corrosion theories for aluminium in high temperature water. A theory where the crystallization of boehemite from the barrier layer is considered as an important control of the corrosion reaction is presented

  12. Transient response of superconducting indium microbridges to supercritical current pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, D.J.; Tinkham, M.; Davidson, A.; Faris, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting sampling circuits have been used to investigate the transient response of long indium microbridges to current pulses in excess of their critical currents. For the first time, the rising-edge kinetic inductance spike and the nonzero minimum voltage have been observed, as well as the delay time until the normal state appears. These results are in reasonable agreement with a detailed theoretical model of the experiment and yield an estimate of 140 ps for tau/sub E/, the inelastic scattering time, in indium

  13. Interaction of indium trichloride with calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetkova, N.V.; Toptygina, G.M.; Soklakova, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    Interaction of indium trichloride with calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions was studied, using methods of potentiometry, isothermal solubility and physicochemical computer simulating. The Gibb's energy value for crystal indium trihydroxide formation was calculated on the basis of experimental data on In(OH) 3 solubility. The value obtained was used for estimating equilibrium composition of InCl 3 -HCl-CaCO 3 -CO 2 -H 2 O system at a temperature of 25 deg C and carbon dioxide partial pressure of 0.05 to 1 at

  14. Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesic, B.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

  15. Role of Gallium and labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in AIDS patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestro, C.J.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Because AIDS patients frequently present with minimal symptomatology, radionuclide imaging with its ability to survey the entire body, is especially valuable. Gallium-67 citrate, the most commonly performed radionuclide study for localizing infection in these patients, is most useful for detecting opportunistic infections, especially in the thorax. A negative gallium scan, particularly when the chest X-ray is unremarkable, rules strongly against pulmonary disease. A negative gallium scan in a patient with an abnormal chest X-ray and Kaposi's sarcoma, suggests that the patient's respiratory distress is related to the neoplasm. Diffuse pulmonary parenchymal uptake of gallium in the HIV (+) patient is most often associated with PCP. While there are other causes of diffuse pulmonary uptake, the more intense or heterogeneous the uptake, the more likely the patient is to have PCP. Focal pulmonary uptake is usually associated with bacterial pneumonia although PCP may occasionally present in this fashion. Lymph node uptake of gallium is usually associated with Mycob acterium avium complex, tuberculosis, or Iymphoma. When corresponding abnormalities are present on thallium scintigraphy lymphoma is likely. Gallium positive, thallium negative, studies suggest mycobacterial disease. Labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for detecting opportunistic infections probably because of the inflammatory response incited by these organisms. Leukocyte imaging is, however, more sensitive for detecting bacterial pneumonia. In the abdomen, gallium imaging is most useful for identifying lymphadenopathy, while labeled leukocyte imaging is superior for detecting AlDS-associated colitides. In summary, radionuclide studies are valuable diagnostic modalities in AIDS. Their success can be maximized by tailoring the study to the individual's needs

  16. Role of Gallium and labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in AIDS patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestro, C.J. [Division of nuclear medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Goldsmith, S.J. [Division of nuclear medicine, New York Hospital, Cornell Medical Center, New York (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Because AIDS patients frequently present with minimal symptomatology, radionuclide imaging with its ability to survey the entire body, is especially valuable. Gallium-67 citrate, the most commonly performed radionuclide study for localizing infection in these patients, is most useful for detecting opportunistic infections, especially in the thorax. A negative gallium scan, particularly when the chest X-ray is unremarkable, rules strongly against pulmonary disease. A negative gallium scan in a patient with an abnormal chest X-ray and Kaposi`s sarcoma, suggests that the patient`s respiratory distress is related to the neoplasm. Diffuse pulmonary parenchymal uptake of gallium in the HIV (+) patient is most often associated with PCP. While there are other causes of diffuse pulmonary uptake, the more intense or heterogeneous the uptake, the more likely the patient is to have PCP. Focal pulmonary uptake is usually associated with bacterial pneumonia although PCP may occasionally present in this fashion. Lymph node uptake of gallium is usually associated with Mycob acterium avium complex, tuberculosis, or Iymphoma. When corresponding abnormalities are present on thallium scintigraphy lymphoma is likely. Gallium positive, thallium negative, studies suggest mycobacterial disease. Labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for detecting opportunistic infections probably because of the inflammatory response incited by these organisms. Leukocyte imaging is, however, more sensitive for detecting bacterial pneumonia. In the abdomen, gallium imaging is most useful for identifying lymphadenopathy, while labeled leukocyte imaging is superior for detecting AlDS-associated colitides. In summary, radionuclide studies are valuable diagnostic modalities in AIDS. Their success can be maximized by tailoring the study to the individual`s needs.

  17. Multiply-negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Noelle

    2008-07-15

    Multiply negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes were generated in a Penning trap using the 'electron-bath' technique. Aluminium monoanions were generated using a laser vaporisation source. After this, two-, three- and four-times negatively charged aluminium clusters were generated for the first time. This research marks the first observation of tetra-anionic metal clusters in the gas phase. Additionally, doubly-negatively charged fullerenes were generated. The smallest fullerene dianion observed contained 70 atoms. (orig.)

  18. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  19. No risk of Alzheimer's disease from aluminium in consumer products

    OpenAIRE

    German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

    2007-01-01

    Aluminium is the third most frequent element in the earth's crust and occurs naturally in drinking water and other foods, particularly in fruit and vegetables. For consumers the main uptake route is food. There may be additional exposure from aluminium-containing food-contact articles like kitchen utensils, cans, foils or tubes from which the light metal migrates into the food. Furthermore, aluminium may also be contained in medicinal products to neutralise gastric acid, so-called antacids an...

  20. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchu, Nancy; Patel, Bhavini; Sebastian, Blaise; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium.

  1. Improving the Crashworthiness of Aluminium Rail Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangani, Donato; Robinson, Mark; Kotsikos, George

    An experimental and modelling programme of work have been undertaken to predict the performance of aluminium welds in rail vehicles under highly dynamic loading conditions and provide design guidelines to reduce the likelihood of the occurrence of weld unzipping. Modelling of weld unzipping in large rail structures is a challenging task since it requires to deal with material instability, to take into account the uncertainties in material parameters and to address the problem of mesh resolution which together pose severe challenges to computability. The proposed methodology to the prediction of weld failure is based on the validation of the numerical models through correlation with laboratory scale tearing tests. The tearing tests were conducted on samples taken from real rail extrusions with the purpose of obtaining the failure parameters under dynamic loading and understanding the effect of weld material composition on joint behaviour. The validated material models were used to construct a FEA simulation of the collision of an aluminium rail car and investigate the effect of both joint geometry and welding techniques on the failure mechanism. Comparisons of the model with the failures observed in an aluminium rail vehicle that was involved in a high speed collision, have shown that it is possible to model the phenomenon of weld unzipping with good accuracy. The numerical models have also been used as a tool for the optimisation of joint design to improve crashworthiness.

  2. Aluminium in the rail transportation market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, J. [Alcan Alesa Engineering Ltd., Zurich (Switzerland). Alcan Mass Transportation Systems

    2002-07-01

    Rail-transportation is not, as one might expect, a homogeneous market but extremely fragmented and even with huge differences from continent to continent, i.e. in North America freight transport is dominating whereas in Europe passenger transport prevails. A first segmentation splits infrastructure from vehicles. In a second layer of segmentation we distinguish between light rail vehicles, heavy metros, regional trains, intercity trains, high speed trains with and without tilting, maglev trains, freight vehicles and locomotives. Finally, we find aluminium applications in wheels, suspension parts, brake equipment, traction equipment, body structure, hang on parts and interior trim. On the infrastructure side best use of aluminium is in the field of power supply. In order to have the best solution for each application, all forms of products such as castings, forgings, flat rolled products and extrusions are needed and the engineers are using a broad choice or different alloys for all the requirements such as structural strength, decorative aspect, electrical conductivity, wear resistance, weldability, corrosion resistance etc. Innovation cycles in rail transportation are very slow, mainly because the expected life of vehicles is over 30 years and so no fleet owner will run the risk of getting vehicles with non-proven components, i.e. where a safe life of over 30 years cannot be shown. In the following the most important aluminium applications are shown and discussed. (orig.)

  3. Elastic properties of indium nitrides grown on sapphire substrates determined by nano-indentation: In comparison with other nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yonenaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The hardness of wurtzite indium nitride (α-InN films of 0.5 to 4 μm in thickness was measured by the nano-indentation method at room temperature. After investigation of crystalline quality by x-ray diffraction, the hardness and Young’s modulus were determined to be 8.8 ± 0.4 and 184 ± 5 GPa, respectively, for the In (0001- and N ( 000 1 ̄ -growth faces of InN films. The bulk and shear moduli were then derived to be 99 ± 3 and 77 ± 2 GPa, respectively. The Poisson’s ratio was evaluated to be 0.17 ± 0.03. The results were examined comprehensively in comparison with previously reported data of InN as well as those of other nitrides of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride. The underlying physical process determining the moduli and hardness was examined in terms of atomic bonding and dislocation energy of the nitrides and wurtzite zinc oxide.

  4. Characterization and Reliability of Vertical N-Type Gallium Nitride Schottky Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    aluminum / gallium arsenide Schottky diodes,” J. Appl. Phys., vol. 69, no. 10, pp. 7142–7145, May, 1991. 80 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...EECP equilibrium of electrochemical potential GaAs gallium arsenide GaN gallium nitride HEMT high-electron mobility transistor HF hydrofluoric acid...only one of the mechanisms [8]-[11]. For high mobility n-type Schottky contacts like Si, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and GaN, thermionic emission is

  5. Gallium a unique anti-resorptive agent in bone: Preclinical studies on its mechanisms of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockman, R.; Adelman, R.; Donnelly, R.; Brody, L.; Warrell, R. (Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (USA)); Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of gallium as a new and unique agent for the treatment of metabolic bone disorders was in part fortuitous. Gallium is an exciting new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pathologic states characterized by accelerated bone resorption. Compared to other therapeutic metal compounds containing platinum or germanium, gallium affects its antiresorptive action without any evidence of a cytotoxic effect on bone cells. Gallium is unique amongst all therapeutically available antiresorptive agents in that it favors bone formation. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  7. Numerical predicting of recycling friendly wrought aluminium alloy compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varužan Kevorkijan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The model presented in this work enables the design of optimal (standard and non-standard “recycling-friendly” compositions and properties of wrought aluminium alloys with significantly increased amounts of post-consumed scrap. The following two routes were modelled in detail: (i the blending of standard and non-standard compositions of wrought aluminium alloys starting from post-consumed aluminium scrap sorted to various degrees simulated by the model; and (ii changing the initial standard composition of wrought aluminium alloys to non-standard “recycling friendly” ones - with broader concentration tolerance limits of alloying elements, without influencing the selected alloy properties, specified in advance.

  8. Investigation process of alcoholysis of hydride aluminium-adobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numanov, M.I.; Normatov, I.Sh.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2001-01-01

    Considering of that process of acid treatment of aluminium-adobe hydride realizes in the ethyl alcohol media it was necessary study the process of alcoholysis of AlH 3 and aluminium additives. In the end of article authors became to conclusion that deficiency of spontaneous alcoholysis of AlH 3 in adobe caused by protective action of fiber; solvate ability of LiCl and alkoxy aluminium hydride of lithium-LiCl·CO 2 H 5 OH, Li Al(OC 2 H 5 ) 4 ·nC 2 H 5 OH decreasing the expectancy of responding of alcohol with aluminium hydride

  9. Serum aluminium levels of workers in the bauxite mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kom, J F; Dissels, H M; van der Voet, G B; de Wolff, F A

    1997-01-01

    Aluminium is produced from the mineral bauxite. Occupational exposure is reported during the industrial processing of aluminium and is associated with pulmonary and neurotoxicity. However, data on exposure and toxicity of workers in the open bauxite mining industry do not exist. Therefore, a study was performed to explore aluminium exposure in employees involved in this bauxite mining process in a Surinam mine. A group of workers occupationally exposed to aluminium in an open bauxite mine were compared with a group of nonexposed wood processors. Serum aluminium was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrometry Data from the clinical chemistry of the blood and a questionnaire were used to explore determinants for aluminium exposure. No significant difference between serum aluminium in the exposed (4.4 +/- 2.0 micrograms/L, n = 27) and control group (5.1 +/- 1.5 micrograms/L, n = 27) was detected. For the serum concentration of the clinical chemical variables (calcium, citrate, and creatinine), a statistically significant difference was computed (p < or = 0.02) between the exposed and control group. All levels were slightly higher in the exposed group; no statistically significant correlations with serum aluminium were found. In this study, serum aluminium values were in the normal range, no significant difference between the groups could be detected despite long-term occupational exposure.

  10. Trial finds better haemostasis with aluminium chloride during periapical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Goldrick, Niall; Ross, Carly; Nelson, James

    2017-06-23

    DesignRandomised controlled trial in a university setting.InterventionPatients were randomised to epinephrine impregnated gauze or aluminium chloride for periapical surgery involving a single tooth with a periapical area of aluminium chloride group were analysed. Adequate haemostasis was achieved in 25 (52.1%) of the epinephrine group and 37 (72.5%) of the aluminium chloride group, a statistically significant difference.ConclusionsThe outcome showed better efficacy of haemostasis in the aluminium chloride group than in the gauze impregnated epinephrine group. The analysis of the patients and tooth-dependent variables showed no relationship with the effectiveness of haemostasis.

  11. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  12. Determination of Aluminium Content in Aluminium Hydroxide Formulation by FT-NIR Transmittance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Xuxin; Zheng, Yiwu; Søndergaard, Ib

    2007-01-01

    A method for determining the aluminium content of an aluminium hydroxide suspension using near infrared (NIR) transmittance spectroscopy has been developed. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was used as reference method. The factors influencing the NIR analysis......-AES and NIR transmittance spectroscopy exhibit comparable precision and accuracy. The NIR method provides several advantages: no complicated sample preparation; easy to operate; fast and non-destructive. In conclusion, NIR transmittance spectroscopy can be an alternative analytical method for determining...

  13. Pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P- type gallium arsenide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Stephen J.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components an n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffused layer and the substrate layer, wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

  14. Rutherford backscatter measurements on tellurium and cadmium implanted gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, E.C.

    1979-10-01

    The primary aim of the work described in this thesis was to examine implanted layers of the dopant impurities cadmium and tellurium in gallium arsenide and to experimentally assess their potential for producing electrically active layers. 1.5 MeV Rutherford backscattering measurements of lattice disorder and atom site location have been used to assess post implantation thermal annealing and elevated temperature implantations to site the dopant impurities on either gallium or arsenic lattice positions in an otherwise undisordered lattice. Pyrolitically deposited silicon dioxide was used as an encapsulant to prevent thermal dissociation of the gallium arsenide during annealing. It has been shown that high doses of cadmium and tellurium can be implanted without forming amorphous lattice disorder by heating the gallium arsenide during implantation to relatively low temperatures. Atom site location measurements have shown that a large fraction of a tellurium dose implanted at 180 0 C is located on or near lattice sites. Channeled backscatter measurements have shown that there is residual disorder or lattice strain in gallium arsenide implanted at elevated temperatures. The extent of this disorder has been shown to depend on the implanted dose and implantation temperature. The channeling effect has been used to measure annealing of the disorder. (author)

  15. Gallium scintigraphy in a case of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestro, C.J.; Malat, J.; Gladstone, A.G.; Richman, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis, a relatively uncommon disease entity, frequently can be fatal. Early diagnosis is imperative in order that appropriate treatment be instituted. A 59-year-old woman who was admitted to our institution with complaints of diplopia, blurred vision and fevers that developed following a tooth extraction is presented. Initial CT and lumbar puncture on the day of admission were totally normal. A repeat CT performed 48 hours after admission, on the same day as gallium imaging, demonstrated findings consistent with cavernous sinus thrombosis. Gallium imaging demonstrated intense uptake in the left cavernous sinus and left orbit as well as moderately increased activity in the right cavernous sinus and orbit, confirming infection. The patient was treated with antibiotics, and repeat CT and gallium imaging were performed ten days later, both of which demonstrated near total resolution of the disease process. Conceivably, if gallium imaging had been initiated on the day of admission it may have been the first study to demonstrate an infectious process in the cavernous sinus. Gallium imaging should be considered as a diagnostic tool in the noninvasive workup of this entity

  16. The role of gallium-67 scanning in febrile patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouratidis, B.; Lomas, F.

    1994-01-01

    The source of sepsis in febrile patients can be a difficult diagnostic problem. Gallium-67 has been utilized as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of these patients. A retrospective review was done of 47 patients who presented with pyrexia of unknown origin (27 patients), postoperative fever (11 patients), septicaemia (4 patients) and miscellaneous sepsis (5 patients). Whole body imaging with Gallium-67 gave an overall sensitivity and specificity of 86 and 77%, respectively, which compares favourably with previous studies. The sensitivity and specificity was similar in all patient subgroups. Gallium-67 allowed for more effective and directed use of organ-specific imaging modalities, such as computed tomography, ultrasound and guided intervention, in localizing and defining the source of sepsis. Where more than one possible source of fever was present, Gallium-67 scanning correctly identified the activity of the different foci. Gallium-67 scanning should be used early in the evaluation of patients presenting with fever of uncertain origin. 9 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  17. Preliminary Spectroscopic Measurements for a Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Glumac, Nick G.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    As a propellant option for electromagnetic thrusters, liquid ,gallium appears to have several advantages relative to other propellants. The merits of using gallium in an electromagnetic thruster (EMT) are discussed and estimates of discharge current levels and mass flow rates yielding efficient operation are given. The gallium atomic weight of 70 predicts high efficiency in the 1500-2000 s specific impulse range, making it ideal for higher-thrust, near-Earth missions. A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma and estimate electron temperature. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in a 20 J, 1.8 kA (peak) are discharge. With graphite present on the insulator to facilitate breakdown, singly and doubly ionized carbon atoms are also present, and emission is observed from molecular carbon (CZ) radicals. A determination of the electron temperature was attempted using relative emission line data, and while the spatially and temporally averaged, spectra don't fit well to single temperatures, the data and presence of doubly ionized gallium are consistent with distributions in the 1-3 eV range.

  18. A new synthesis process for aluminium nitride. Nouveau procede de synthese du nitrure d'aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haussonne, J.M. (CNET, Centre Lannion B, 22 (France)); Lostec, J. (CNET, Centre Lannion B, 22 (France)); Bertot, J.P. (CNET, Centre Lannion B, 22 (France)); Lostec, L. (CNET, Centre Lannion B, 22 (France)); Sadou, S. (CNET, Centre Lannion B, 22 (France))

    1993-04-01

    Thermodynamic considerations show that, even at room temperature, pure aluminium can react with nitrogen to form the aluminium nitride AlN. However, pure aluminium does not exist: it is always surrounded by an alumina shell that protects the metal from further reactions. Furthermore, in the hypothesis where one has been able to make aluminium react with nitrogen, an aluminium nitride shell will protect as well the metal core from further oxidation. Prompted by the Lanxide process allowing to form Al/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] composites, we have mixed aluminium powders with lithium salts, and easily synthesized pure aluminium nitride by heating the mixed powders in nitrigen at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1200 C. Starting from aluminium powders with a specific area ranging from 0.3 to 4 m[sup 2]/g, we have been able to produce aluminium nitride with specific are ranging from 1 to 20 m[sup 2]/g. Mixed with Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]-CaO and sintered at 1720 C in N[sub 2], we obtained AlN ceramics owning 92% density and 160 W/m.K thermal conductivity. (orig.).

  19. Solvent extraction atomic absorption determination of indium in minerals and rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Samchuk, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    A method of the atomic-absorption determination of indium in minerals and rocks after extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone of an indium complex with N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylamine (CAPHA) has been developed. The characteristic indium concentration in the dispersion of the extract into the acetylene-air flame is 0.08 mcg/ml. The indium-CAPHA complex is extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone practically completely at pH 3.5-7.6, Ksub(ex)=10sup(-0.92). Consideration is given to the effect of organic solvents on the absorption of indium

  20. Gallium nitride photocathode development for imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; McPhate, Jason B.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Malloy, James; Dabiran, Amir M.

    2008-07-01

    Recent progress in Gallium Nitride (GaN, AlGaN, InGaN) photocathodes show great promise for future detector applications in Astrophysical instruments. Efforts with opaque GaN photocathodes have yielded quantum efficiencies up to 70% at 120 nm and cutoffs at ~380 nm, with low out of band response, and high stability. Previous work with semitransparent GaN photocathodes produced relatively low quantum efficiencies in transmission mode (4%). We now have preliminary data showing that quantum efficiency improvements of a factor of 5 can be achieved. We have also performed two dimensional photon counting imaging with 25mm diameter semitransparent GaN photocathodes in close proximity to a microchannel plate stack and a cross delay line readout. The imaging performance achieves spatial resolution of ~50μm with low intrinsic background (below 1 event sec-1 cm-2) and reasonable image uniformity. GaN photocathodes with significant quantum efficiency have been fabricated on ceramic MCP substrates. In addition GaN has been deposited at low temperature onto quartz substrates, also achieving substantial quantum efficiency.

  1. Gallium nitride photocathodes for imaging photon counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Tremsin, Anton S.; McPhate, Jason B.; Dabiran, Amir M.

    2010-07-01

    Gallium nitride opaque and semitransparent photocathodes provide high ultraviolet quantum efficiencies from 100 nm to a long wavelength cutoff at ~380 nm. P (Mg) doped GaN photocathode layers ~100 nm thick with a barrier layer of AlN (22 nm) on sapphire substrates also have low out of band response, and are highly robust. Opaque GaN photocathodes are relatively easy to optimize, and consistently provide high quantum efficiency (70% at 120 nm) provided the surface cleaning and activation (Cs) processes are well established. We have used two dimensional photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors, with an active area of 25 mm diameter, to investigate the imaging characteristics of semitransparent GaN photocathodes. These can be produced with high (20%) efficiency, but the thickness and conductivity of the GaN must be carefully optimized. High spatial resolution of ~50 μm with low intrinsic background (~7 events sec-1 cm-2) and good image uniformity have been achieved. Selectively patterned deposited GaN photocathodes have also been used to allow quick diagnostics of optimization parameters. GaN photocathodes of both types show great promise for future detector applications in ultraviolet Astrophysical instruments.

  2. Thermal stability of gallium arsenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papež, Nikola; Škvarenina, Ľubomír.; Tofel, Pavel; Sobola, Dinara

    2017-12-01

    This article summarizes a measurement of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells during their thermal processing. These solar cells compared to standard silicon cells have better efficiency and high thermal stability. However, their use is partly limited due to high acquisition costs. For these reasons, GaAs cells are deployed only in the most demanding applications where their features are needed, such as space applications. In this work, GaAs solar cells were studied in a high temperature range within 30-650 °C where their functionality and changes in surface topology were monitored. These changes were recorded using an electron microscope which determined the position of the defects; using an atomic force microscope we determined the roughness of the surface and an infrared camera that showed us the thermal radiated places of the defected parts of the cell. The electrical characteristics of the cells during processing were determined by its current-voltage characteristics. Despite the occurrence of subtle changes on the solar cell with newly created surface features after 300 °C thermal processing, its current-voltage characteristic remained without a significant change.

  3. Gallium nitride at the millennial transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankovo, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of gallium nitride were uncovered in the early years of exploratory research and endowed with negative electron affinity that could be used to make efficient cold cathodes and even dynodes for electron multipliers. GaN has another property i.e. polar nature of the crystal which makes this material piezo-electric and has non-linear optical properties. The piezo-electric properties led to new piezo electric effect may cause interfacial charge. The non-uniform distribution of acceptors, there is also presence of threading and other dislocation in GaN. Defects reappear where two adjacent overgrowth merge, but the good lateral overgrow region is large enough to make lasers. Injection lasers benefit from strong electrical and optical environment. This was achieved by using quantum wells of InGaN in GaN and this can be doped with rare earth elements to exploit the atomic transition between core levels in these elements. The emission efficiency of electrically excited Er in GaN is nearly temperature incentive from 80K to room temperature. An other application of GaN is as a heterojunction emitter for a bi-polar transistor (HBT) that can operate at high temperatures. (A.B.)

  4. Diagnosis of abdominal abscesses with 67gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, E.C.; Mothe, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty six patients were studied with 67 Gallium to detect and localize the site of intra-abdominal and intraperitoneal infection. They were divided in two groups: a) with and b) without physical symptoms that could localize an abcess in the abdominal cavity. All the patients with suppuration had persistent up-take of 67 Ga in one anatomic area of the abdomen, subsequently documented by computarized axial tomography (CAT) in 58% of the cases or by laparotomy in 88% of them. Scintigraphy with 67 Ga in the patients with recent surgery not only detected focal infection in 67% of the cases but excluded subphernic collection. In 78% of patients with prolonged fever, the infection was localized. There was no false positive result. The comparison in 56% of the cases with CAT demonstrated that both techniques are 100% sensitive for the diagnosis of abdominal suppurative processes. Three of the 26 patients, after six weeks of medical treatment, were restudied with 67 Ga and CAT, showing total resolution of their previous abnormalities. It is concluded that 67 Ga scintigraphy performed as the first study in febrile patients independent of the presence or absence of physical symptoms that could localize the abdominal infection, is sensitive for the detection and localization of an abdominal abscess and that a negative result excludes it. (Author) [es

  5. Evaluation of the carcinogenicity of gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomhard, Ernst M; Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Schenk, Hermann; Williams, Gary M; Cohen, Samuel M

    2013-05-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is an important semiconductor material. In 2-year inhalation studies, GaAs increased the incidence of lung tumors in female rats, but not in male rats or male and female mice. Alveolar proteinosis followed by chronic active inflammation was the predominant non-neoplastic pulmonary findings. IARC classified GaAs as carcinogenic to humans (group 1) based on the assumption that As and Ga ions are bioavailable. The European Chemical Agency Risk Assessment Committee concluded that GaAs should be classified into Carcinogenicity Category 1B (presumed to have carcinogenic potential for humans; ECHA). We evaluate whether these classifications are justified. Physico-chemical properties of GaAs particles and the degree of mechanical treatment are critical in this evaluation. The available data on mode of action (MOA), genotoxicity and bioavailability do not support the contribution of As or Ga ions to the lung tumors in female rats. Most toxicological studies utilized small particles produced by strong mechanical treatment, destroying the crystalline structure. The resulting amorphous GaAs is not relevant to crystalline GaAs at production and processing sites. The likely tumorigenic MOA is lung toxicity related to particulate-induced inflammation and increased proliferation. It is concluded that there is no evidence for a primary carcinogenic effect of GaAs.

  6. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom) and Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mistry@surrey.ac.uk; Gomez-Morilla, I. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Smith, R.C. [Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thomson, D. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Grime, G.W. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Webb, R.P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Cansell, A. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Merchant, M. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kirkby, K.J. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed.

  7. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, P.; Gomez-Morilla, I.; Smith, R.C.; Thomson, D.; Grime, G.W.; Webb, R.P.; Gwilliam, R.; Jeynes, C.; Cansell, A.; Merchant, M.; Kirkby, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed

  8. Gallium plasmonics: deep subwavelength spectroscopic imaging of single and interacting gallium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Mark W; Coenen, Toon; Yang, Yang; Brenny, Benjamin J M; Losurdo, Maria; Brown, April S; Everitt, Henry O; Polman, Albert

    2015-02-24

    Gallium has recently been demonstrated as a phase-change plasmonic material offering UV tunability, facile synthesis, and a remarkable stability due to its thin, self-terminating native oxide. However, the dense irregular nanoparticle (NP) ensembles fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy make optical measurements of individual particles challenging. Here we employ hyperspectral cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy to characterize the response of single Ga NPs of various sizes within an irregular ensemble by spatially and spectrally resolving both in-plane and out-of-plane plasmonic modes. These modes, which include hybridized dipolar and higher-order terms due to phase retardation and substrate interactions, are correlated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) electrodynamics calculations that consider the Ga NP contact angle, substrate, and native Ga/Si surface oxidation. This study experimentally confirms previous theoretical predictions of plasmonic size-tunability in single Ga NPs and demonstrates that the plasmonic modes of interacting Ga nanoparticles can hybridize to produce strong hot spots in the ultraviolet. The controlled, robust UV plasmonic resonances of gallium nanoparticles are applicable to energy- and phase-specific applications such as optical memory, environmental remediation, and simultaneous fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies.

  9. There is (still too much aluminium in infant formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burrell Shelle-Ann M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant formulas are sophisticated milk-based feeds for infants which are used as a substitute for breast milk. Historically they are known to be contaminated by aluminium and in the past this has raised health concerns for exposed infants. We have measured the aluminium content of a number of widely used infant formulas to determine if their contamination by aluminium and consequent issues of child health persists. Methods Samples of ready-made milks and powders used to make milks were prepared by microwave digestion of acid/peroxide mixtures and their aluminium content determined by THGA. Results The concentration of aluminium in ready-made milks varied from ca 176 to 700 μg/L. The latter concentration was for a milk for preterm infants. The aluminium content of powders used to make milks varied from ca 2.4 to 4.3 μg/g. The latter content was for a soya-based formula and equated to a ready-to-drink milk concentration of 629 μg/L. Using the manufacturer's own guidelines of formula consumption the average daily ingestion of aluminium from infant formulas for a child of 6 months varied from ca 200 to 600 μg of aluminium. Generally ingestion was higher from powdered as compared to ready-made formulas. Conclusions The aluminium content of a range of well known brands of infant formulas remains high and particularly so for a product designed for preterm infants and a soya-based product designed for infants with cow's milk intolerances and allergies. Recent research demonstrating the vulnerability of infants to early exposure to aluminium serves to highlight an urgent need to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas to as low a level as is practically possible.

  10. Long-term effects of aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Reid, Alison; Fritschi, Lin; de Klerk, Nicholas; Musk, A W Bill

    2013-12-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, aluminium dust inhalation was used as a potential prophylaxis against silicosis in underground miners, including in Australia. We investigated the association between aluminium dust inhalation and cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's diseases in a cohort of Australian male underground gold miners. We additionally looked at pneumoconiosis mortality to estimate the effect of the aluminium therapy. SMRs and 95% CI were calculated to compare mortality of the cohort members with that of the Western Australian male population (1961-2009). Internal comparisons on duration of aluminium dust inhalation were examined using Cox regression. Aluminium dust inhalation was reported for 647 out of 1894 underground gold miners. During 42 780 person-years of follow-up, 1577 deaths were observed. An indication of increased mortality of Alzheimer's disease among miners ever exposed to aluminium dust was found (SMR=1.38), although it was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.69 to 2.75). Rates for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular death were above population levels, but were similar for subjects with or without a history of aluminium dust inhalation. HRs suggested an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease with duration of aluminium dust inhalation (HR=1.02, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.04, per year of exposure). No difference in the association between duration of work underground and pneumoconiosis was observed between the groups with or without aluminium dust exposure. No protective effect against silicosis was observed from aluminium dust inhalation. Conversely, exposure to aluminium dust may possibly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

  11. Highly conducting and transparent sprayed indium tin oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, M.; Benamar, E.; Messaoudi, C.; Sayah, D.; Ennaoui, A. (Faculte des Sciences, Rabat (Morocco). Lab. de Physique des Materiaux)

    1998-03-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) has a wide range of applications in solar cells (e.g. by controlling the resistivity, we can use low conductivity ITO as buffer layer and highly conducting ITO as front contact in thin films CuInS[sub 2] and CuInSe[sub 2] based solar cells) due to its wide band gap (sufficient to be transparent) in both visible and near infrared range, and high carrier concentrations with metallic conduction. A variety of deposition techniques such as reactive electron beam evaporation, DC magnetron sputtering, evaporation, reactive thermal deposition, and spray pyrolysis have been used for the preparation of undoped and tin doped indium oxide. This latter process which makes possible the preparation of large area coatings has attracted considerable attention due to its simplicity and large scale with low cost fabrication. It has been used here to deposit highly transparent and conducting films of tin doped indium oxide onto glass substrates. The electrical, optical and structural properties have been investigated as a function of various deposition parameters namely dopant concentrations, temperature and nature of substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns have shown that deposited films are polycrystalline without second phases and have preferred orientation [400]. INdium tin oxide layers with small resistivity value around 7.10[sup -5] [omega].cm and transmission coefficient in the visible and near IR range of about 85-90% have been easily obtained. (authors) 13 refs.

  12. Development of nano indium tin oxide (ITO) grains by alkaline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 25, No. 6, November 2002, pp. 505–507. © Indian Academy of Sciences. 505. Development of nano indium tin oxide (ITO) grains by alkaline hydrolysis of In(III) and Sn(IV) salts. NIMAI CHAND ... et al 1996; Yanagisawa and Udawatte 2000; Denoy and. Pradeep 1997) with low Sn content (In : Sn ≥ 90 ...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of five-coordinated indium amidinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riahi, Yasaman

    2016-07-29

    The focus of this work is synthesis, characterization and exploring the reactivity of new indium amidinate compounds of the type R{sub 2}InX (R = R''NCR'NR''; R' = Ph, R'' = SiMe{sub 3}, iPr, dipp; X = Br, Cl) with the coordination number of five and R{sub 3}In (R = Me{sub 3}SiNCPhNSiMe{sub 3}) with the coordination number of six. By using amidinates as chelating ligands the electron deficiency of indium atom will be resolved. Additionally, by using different substituents the study of the different synthesized indium amidinates has become possible. The selected method for the synthesis allows the carbodiimides to react with organolithium compounds to get the corresponding lithium amidinates. Afterwards the resulting lithium amidinates take part in transmetalation reactions with InBr{sub 3} and InCl{sub 3}. The study of the reactivity of indium amidinate complexes including nucleophilic reactions as well as their reduction were also examined. Beside crystal structure analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as elemental analysis has been applied to characterize the compounds.

  14. Detection of accessory spleens with indium 111-labeled autologous platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, H.H. II; Varki, A.; Heaton, W.A.; Siegel, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    In two patients with recurrent immune thrombocytopenia, accessory splenic tissue was demonstrated by radionuclide imaging following administration of indium 111-labeled autologous platelets. In one of these patients, no accessory splenic tissue was seen on images obtained with technetium 99m sulfur colloid. This new technique provides a simple means for demonstrating accessory spleens and simultaneously evaluating the life-span of autologous platelets

  15. (111)Indium Labelling of Recombinant Activated Coagulation Factor VII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Buch, Inge; Sigvardt, Maibritt

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether (111)Indium-labelled recombinant FVIIa (rFVIIa) could be a potential radiopharmaceutical for localization of bleeding sources. DTPA-conjugated rFVIIa was radiolabelled with (111)In chloride. In vitro binding efficiency of (111)In-DTPA-rFVIIa to F1A2...

  16. Characterization of molybdenum-doped indium oxide thin films by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this research, indium oxide nanostructure undoped and doped with Mo were prepared on glass substrates using spray pyrolysis technique. Various parameters such as dopant concentration and deposition tem- peratures were studied. Structural properties of these films were investigated by X-ray diffraction and ...

  17. Characterization of molybdenum-doped indium oxide thin films by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this research, indium oxide nanostructure undoped and doped with Mo were prepared on glass substrates using spray pyrolysis technique. Various parameters such as dopant concentration and deposition temperatures were studied. Structural properties of these films were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning ...

  18. Development of nano indium tin oxide (ITO) grains by alkaline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    As the indium tin oxide (ITO) is an advanced ceramic material with many electronic and optical applications due to its high electrical conductivity and transparency .... Caulton K G and Hubert-Pfalzgraf L G 1990 Chem. Rev. 90. 969. Denoy M D and Pradeep B 1997 Bull. Mater. Sci. 20 1029. Gehman B L, Jonson S, Rudolf T, ...

  19. Indium-111 leukocyte accumulation in intramuscular injection sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swayne, L.C.; Dolgin, C.; Kabnick, L.S.; Filippone, A.

    1986-01-01

    We report four cases of indium-111 leukocyte concentration in previous intramuscular injection sites. Three patterns were observed: (1) small, discrete, and round; (2) linear; (3) irregular and large. The scintigraphic appearance did not necessarily correlate with the number of injections that the patient had received. (orig.)

  20. Hydrogen Production via Steam Reforming of Ethyl Alcohol over Palladium/Indium Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Umegaki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synergetic effect between palladium and indium oxide on hydrogen production in the steam reforming reaction of ethyl alcohol. The palladium/indium oxide catalyst shows higher hydrogen production rate than indium oxide and palladium. Palladium/indium oxide affords ketonization of ethyl alcohol with negligible by-product carbon monoxide, while indium oxide mainly affords dehydration of ethyl alcohol, and palladium affords decomposition of ethyl alcohol with large amount of by-product carbon monoxide. The catalytic feature of palladium/indium oxide can be ascribed to the formation of palladium-indium intermetallic component during the reaction as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements.

  1. Thoracic gallium uptake in patients with lymphomatoid granulomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tien, R.; Moore, W.H.; Glasser, L.M.; Dhekne, R.D.; Long, S.E.

    1988-12-01

    Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LG) is a rare condition with histological similarities to Wegener's granulomatosis and malignant lymphoma. Characteristically there is an angiocentric, angiodestructive lymphoreticular cell infiltrate. The lungs are usually affected, and, less frequently, the skin, nervous system, kidney, and bowel are involved. The prognosis is poor and frank lymphoma develops, in some cases terminally. The usual radiological appearance of the lungs consists of bilateral nodular lower zone opacities. The authors report two patients (siblings) with LG, and their gallium scans are presented. In each case there was a significant accumulation of gallium in the lungs at times of clinically active disease. The limited role of gallium imaging in this disease is discussed.

  2. Nonlinear optics of light induced structural transitions in confined gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Kevin Francis

    2002-01-01

    An ultra-high-vacuum system has been constructed to facilitate atomic-beam deposition of gallium on cryogenically cooled substrates, including optical fibre tips. Alongside this, a fibre-optic pump-probe diagnostic system, based on semiconductor lasers, has been developed to perform in-situ measurements of the linear and transient nonlinear optical properties of gallium nanostructures, both during and after deposition. This unique combination of deposition and optical diagnostic techniques has provided a new means of studying the growth and optical characteristics of gallium nanostructures under highly controlled conditions. The linear and nonlinear optical properties of a new material structure, namely gallium/glass interfaces prepared by ultrafast pulsed laser deposition (UPLD), have been studied for the first time. The reflectivity characteristics of these high-quality interfaces were measured under varying conditions of temperature and light intensity at 810 nm: At temperatures several degrees below gallium's melting point T m , excitation intensities of just a few kW.cm -2 were seen to induce reflectivity changes of more than 30%. Experiments performed with a nanosecond optical parametric oscillator have illustrated that UPLD gallium/silica interfaces show a nonlinear response to optical excitation in the 440-680 nm wavelength range: Fluences of less than 10 mJ.cm -2 were seen to induce reflectivity changes of up to 35%, even at temperatures 15 deg below T m . It has been found that low power (17 μW average) laser illumination of cryogenically cooled substrates during atomic-beam deposition of gallium leads to the formation of uniformly sized gallium nanoparticles. This phenomenon is believed to be the result of a non-thermal light-assisted particle self-assembly process. Gallium nanoparticles have been seen to show a strongly temperature-dependent nonlinear response to low intensity, infrared (1550 nm) optical excitation: 1 μs pulses with peak intensities

  3. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  4. Gallium scan in recurrent Hodgkin's disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.D.; Benua, R.S.; Tan, C.T.

    1979-01-01

    In 18 of 88 children with biopsy proven and previously untreated Hodgkin's disease, recurrence developed during a period from four to 53 months after therapy (median period, 22 months). In 16 patients in whom gallium scans were performed, 21 positive gallium scans were obtained during 26 episodes of recurrence. Abnormalities were noted in half of them during a period from one to 10 months prior to physical, laboratory, radiographic or histologic confirmation of recurrence (median period about 5 months). We have concluded that the gallium scan is very useful in initial workup and is sensitive in detecting early recurrence in children with Hodgkin's disease. Such scans are indicated when there is clinical suspicion of recurrence, when other modalities are unavailable or when the results of other studies are equivocal

  5. Gallium-67 scanning in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Takashi; Maeda, Juichiro; Iwahashi, Noriaki; Tamura, Shinsuke; Hada, Toshikazu; Higashino, Kazuya

    1990-01-01

    The findings of gallium-67 scans in eleven patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were reviewed and compared to those of chest CT findings. All patients had an abnormal thoracic Ga-67 accumulation. Six out of 11 showed a diffuse accumulation over the entire involved hemithorax and a localized uptake was shown in 5. A marked diffuse thickening of pleura in the absence of adequate gallium accumulation was observed in one patient. Two out of 11 had a reduction of gallium uptake after having combination chemotherapy. These results suggest that a diffusely increased uptake over the entire involved hemithorax is the most characteristic finding of Ga-67 scan in malignant pleural mesothelioma, and that Ga-67 scans may be helpful as a valuable indicator of the proper therapy. However, the superiority of Ga-67 scan to thoracic CT as a means of determining the extent of disease process could not be verified. (author)

  6. Optimization of Indium Bump Morphology for Improved Flip Chip Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Todd J.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Dickie, Matthew R.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Greer, Harold F.

    2011-01-01

    Flip-chip hybridization, also known as bump bonding, is a packaging technique for microelectronic devices that directly connects an active element or detector to a substrate readout face-to-face, eliminating the need for wire bonding. In order to make conductive links between the two parts, a solder material is used between the bond pads on each side. Solder bumps, composed of indium metal, are typically deposited by thermal evaporation onto the active regions of the device and substrate. While indium bump technology has been a part of the electronic interconnect process field for many years and has been extensively employed in the infrared imager industry, obtaining a reliable, high-yield process for high-density patterns of bumps can be quite difficult. Under the right conditions, a moderate hydrogen plasma exposure can raise the temperature of the indium bump to the point where it can flow. This flow can result in a desirable shape where indium will efficiently wet the metal contact pad to provide good electrical contact to the underlying readout or imager circuit. However, it is extremely important to carefully control this process as the intensity of the hydrogen plasma treatment dramatically affects the indium bump morphology. To ensure the fine-tuning of this reflow process, it is necessary to have realtime feedback on the status of the bumps. With an appropriately placed viewport in a plasma chamber, one can image a small field (a square of approximately 5 millimeters on each side) of the bumps (10-20 microns in size) during the hydrogen plasma reflow process. By monitoring the shape of the bumps in real time using a video camera mounted to a telescoping 12 magnifying zoom lens and associated optical elements, an engineer can precisely determine when the reflow of the bumps has occurred, and can shut off the plasma before evaporation or de-wetting takes place.

  7. Plasma Treatment to Remove Carbon from Indium UV Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Harold F.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Beasley, Matthew; Gantner, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    The sounding rocket experiment FIRE (Far-ultraviolet Imaging Rocket Experiment) will improve the science community fs ability to image a spectral region hitherto unexplored astronomically. The imaging band of FIRE (.900 to 1,100 Angstroms) will help fill the current wavelength imaging observation hole existing from approximately equal to 620 Angstroms to the GALEX band near 1,350 Angstroms. FIRE is a single-optic prime focus telescope with a 1.75-m focal length. The bandpass of 900 to 1100 Angstroms is set by a combination of the mirror coating, the indium filter in front of the detector, and the salt coating on the front of the detector fs microchannel plates. Critical to this is the indium filter that must reduce the flux from Lymanalpha at 1,216 Angstroms by a minimum factor of 10(exp -4). The cost of this Lyman-alpha removal is that the filter is not fully transparent at the desired wavelengths of 900 to 1,100 Angstroms. Recently, in a project to improve the performance of optical and solar blind detectors, JPL developed a plasma process capable of removing carbon contamination from indium metal. In this work, a low-power, low-temperature hydrogen plasma reacts with the carbon contaminants in the indium to form methane, but leaves the indium metal surface undisturbed. This process was recently tested in a proof-of-concept experiment with a filter provided by the University of Colorado. This initial test on a test filter showed improvement in transmission from 7 to 9 percent near 900 with no process optimization applied. Further improvements in this performance were readily achieved to bring the total transmission to 12% with optimization to JPL's existing process.

  8. Aluminium and iron air pollution near an iron casting and aluminium foundry in Turin district (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Salvatore; Ferrara, Mauro; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Barbero, Domenico; Baccolo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    This work reports the results of an environmental survey carried out in an industrial area in the Province of Turin: its main aim is to assess the levels of iron and aluminium in the outside air during the period from July to September to assess the influence of industrial activity (a cast-iron and aluminium foundry) which is interrupted during the month of August, on the level of metals present in the air. Conducting the analysis during this period of time made it possible to avoid the confounding effect of pollution due to domestic central heating. The measurements were taken from nine areas at different distances from the foundry in the area and according to the direction of the prevailing winds, as deduced from the historical data. The results of this survey show a statistically significant difference in iron and aluminium levels in the outside air in the geographic areas between the two main periods examined: during August (no foundry activity) v/s July-September (foundry activity). The values recorded are: Aluminium 0.4+/-0.45 microg/m(3) v/s 1.12+/-1.29 microg/m(3) (pIron 0.95+/-0.56 microg/m(3) v/s 1.6+/-1.0 microg/m(3) (piron tended to be higher in the areas farther away from the foundry site in the areas located along the path of the prevailing winds.

  9. Mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed layers of aluminium and aluminium alloy on AZ 91

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubatík, Tomáš František; Ctibor, Pavel; Mušálek, Radek; Janata, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2017), s. 323-327 ISSN 1580-2949 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-31538P Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma spraying of aluminium * adhesion of coating * wear * magnesium alloy AZ91 Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 0.436, year: 2016

  10. Speciation analysis of aluminium and aluminium fluoride complexes by HPIC-UVVIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta

    2010-10-15

    The study presents a new analytical method for speciation analysis in fractionation of aluminium fluoride complexes and free Al(3+) in soil samples. Aluminium speciation was studied in model solutions and soil extract samples by means of high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with UV-VIS detection using post-column reaction with tiron for the separation and detection of aluminium fluoride complex and Al(3+) forms during one analysis. The paper presents particular stages of the chromatographic process optimization involving selecting the appropriate eluent strength, type of elution or concentration and quantity of derivatization reagent. HPIC was performed on a bifunctional analytical column Dionex IonPac CS5A. The use of gradient elution and the eluents A: 1M NH(4)Cl and B: water acidified to pH of eluent phase, enabled full separation of fluoride aluminium forms as AlF(2)(+), AlF(3)(0), AlF(4)(-) (first signal), AlF(2+) (second signal) and form Al(3+) in a single analytical procedure. The proposed new method HPIC-UVVIS was applied successfully in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of soil samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross-current leaching of indium from end-of-life LCD panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Laura; Amato, Alessia; Fonti, Viviana; Ubaldini, Stefano; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Indium is a critical element mainly produced as a by-product of zinc mining, and it is largely used in the production process of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. End-of-life LCDs represent a possible source of indium in the field of urban mining. In the present paper, we apply, for the first time, cross-current leaching to mobilize indium from end-of-life LCD panels. We carried out a series of treatments to leach indium. The best leaching conditions for indium were 2M sulfuric acid at 80°C for 10min, which allowed us to completely mobilize indium. Taking into account the low content of indium in end-of-life LCDs, of about 100ppm, a single step of leaching is not cost-effective. We tested 6 steps of cross-current leaching: in the first step indium leaching was complete, whereas in the second step it was in the range of 85-90%, and with 6 steps it was about 50-55%. Indium concentration in the leachate was about 35mg/L after the first step of leaching, almost 2-fold at the second step and about 3-fold at the fifth step. Then, we hypothesized to scale up the process of cross-current leaching up to 10 steps, followed by cementation with zinc to recover indium. In this simulation, the process of indium recovery was advantageous from an economic and environmental point of view. Indeed, cross-current leaching allowed to concentrate indium, save reagents, and reduce the emission of CO2 (with 10 steps we assessed that the emission of about 90kg CO2-Eq. could be avoided) thanks to the recovery of indium. This new strategy represents a useful approach for secondary production of indium from waste LCD panels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of and occupational exposure to indium in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Cynthia J; Roberts, Jennifer L; Andrews, Ronnee N; Jackson, Matthew V; Deddens, James A

    2013-01-01

    Indium use has increased greatly in the past decade in parallel with the growth of flat-panel displays, touchscreens, optoelectronic devices, and photovoltaic cells. Much of this growth has been in the use of indium tin oxide (ITO). This increased use has resulted in more frequent and intense exposure of workers to indium. Starting with case reports and followed by epidemiological studies, exposure to ITO has been linked to serious and sometimes fatal lung disease in workers. Much of this research was conducted in facilities that process sintered ITO, including manufacture, grinding, and indium reclamation from waste material. Little has been known about indium exposure to workers in downstream applications. In 2009-2011, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) contacted 89 potential indium-using companies; 65 (73%) responded, and 43 of the 65 responders used an indium material. Our objective was to identify current workplace applications of indium materials, tasks with potential indium exposure, and exposure controls being used. Air sampling for indium was either conducted by NIOSH or companies provided their data for a total of 63 air samples (41 personal, 22 area) across 10 companies. Indium exposure exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) of 0.1 mg/m(3) for certain methods of resurfacing ITO sputter targets, cleaning sputter chamber interiors, and in manufacturing some inorganic indium compounds. Indium air concentrations were low in sputter target bonding with indium solder, backside thinning and polishing of fabricated indium phosphide-based semiconductor devices, metal alloy production, and in making indium-based solder pastes. Exposure controls such as containment, local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and tool-mounted LEV can be effective at reducing exposure. In conclusion, occupational hygienists should be aware that the manufacture and use of indium materials can result in indium air concentrations that exceed the NIOSH

  13. Layer-by-layer composition and structure of silicon subjected to combined gallium and nitrogen ion implantation for the ion synthesis of gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Belov, A. I.; Vasiliev, V. K.; Guseinov, D. V.; Okulich, E. V. [Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation); Shemukhin, A. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Surodin, S. I.; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Nezhdanov, A. V.; Pirogov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Tetelbaum, D. I., E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The composition and structure of silicon surface layers subjected to combined gallium and nitrogen ion implantation with subsequent annealing have been studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, electron spin resonance, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. A slight redistribution of the implanted atoms before annealing and their substantial migration towards the surface during annealing depending on the sequence of implantations are observed. It is found that about 2% of atoms of the implanted layer are replaced with gallium bonded to nitrogen; however, it is impossible to detect the gallium-nitride phase. At the same time, gallium-enriched inclusions containing ∼25 at % of gallium are detected as candidates for the further synthesis of gallium-nitride inclusions.

  14. Aluminium and Alzheimer's disease: the science that describes the link

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Exley, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    ... that has been encircled is the gene for the amyloid precursor protein. (Thanks to Walter Lukiw for supplying this information.) Aluminium and Alzheimer's Disease: The Science that Describes the LinkAluminium and Alzheimer's Disease The Science that Describes the Link Edited by Christopher Exley Birchall Centre for Inorganic Chemistry and Materials Scienc...

  15. Enhanced corrosion protection by microstructural control of aluminium brazing sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminium brazing sheet is a sandwich material made out of two aluminium alloys (AA4xxx/AA3xxx) and is widely used in automotive heat exchangers. One of the main performance criteria for heat exchanger units is the lifetime of the product. The lifetime of the heat exchanger units is determined by

  16. An interesting and efficient green corrosion inhibitor for aluminium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An interesting and efficient green corrosion inhibitor for aluminium from extracts of Moringa oleifera in acidic solution. ... L.A. Nnanna, I.O. Owate ... using gravimetric and thermometric techniques at 30 and 60oC. Results obtained showed that Moringa oleifera functioned as an excellent corrosion inhibitor for aluminium in the ...

  17. Effects and mechanisms of grain refinement in aluminium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Grain refinement plays a crucial role in improving characteristics and properties of cast and wrought aluminium alloys. Generally Al–Ti and Al–Ti–B master alloys are added to the aluminium alloys to grain refine the solidified product. The mechanism of grain refinement is of considerable controversy in the scientific ...

  18. Three body abrasion of laser surface alloyed aluminium AA1200

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4 kW Nd:YAG laser to improve the abrasion wear resistance. Aluminium surfaces reinforced with metal matrix composites and intermetallic phases were achieved. The phases present depended...

  19. Laser cladding of aluminium using TiB2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Modification of Aluminium surface by injecting, dispersing and melting TiB2 powder with the help of a laser beam promises to enhance tribological properties of Aluminium. The present work consists of making single lines and various overlapping lines...

  20. The effects of aluminium and selenium supplementation on brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This in vivo study was designed to investigate the potential of aluminium (Al), in the absence of added iron, to participate in either antioxidant or pro-oxidant events. Some markers of oxidative stress were determined in liver and brain of rats exposed to aluminium lactate, either alone or in the presence of dietary supplements ...