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Sample records for aluminide weld overlays

  1. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  2. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  3. Investigation of Iron Aluminide Weld Overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.B.; Levin, B.F.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-08-02

    Conventional fossil fired boilers have been retrofitted with low NO(sub)x burners in order for the power plants to comply with new clean air regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion typically has been enhanced resulting in premature tube failure. To protect the existing panels from accelerated attack, weld overlay coatings are typically being applied. By depositing an alloy that offers better corrosion resistance than the underlying tube material, the wastage rates can be reduced. While Ni-based and stainless steel compositions are presently providing protection, they are expensive and susceptible to failure via corrosion-fatigue due to microsegregation upon solidification. Another material system presently under consideration for use as a coating in the oxidation/sulfidation environments is iron-aluminum. These alloys are relatively inexpensive, exhibit little microsegregation, and show excellent corrosion resistance. However, their use is limited due to weldability issues and their lack of corrosion characterization in simulated low NO(sub)x gas compositions. Therefore a program was initiated in 1996 to evaluate the use of iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in fossil fired boilers with low NO(sub)x burners. Investigated properties included weldability, corrosion behavior, erosion resistance, and erosion-corrosion performance.

  4. Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings for boiler tube protection in coal-fired low NOx boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings are currently being considered for enhanced sulfidation resistance in coal-fired low NO{sub x} boilers. The use of these materials is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility, which generally increases with an increase in aluminum concentration of the deposit. The overall objective of this program is to attain an optimum aluminum content with good weldability and improved sulfidation resistance with respect to conventional materials presently in use. Research has been initiated using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in order to achieve this end. Under different sets of GTAW parameters (wire feed speed, current), both single and multiple pass overlays were produced. Characterization of all weldments was conducted using light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Resultant deposits exhibited a wide range of aluminum contents (5--43 wt%). It was found that the GTAW overlays with aluminum contents above {approximately}10 wt% resulted in cracked coatings. Preliminary corrosion experiments of 5 to 10 wt% Al cast alloys in relatively simple H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S gas mixtures exhibited corrosion rates lower than 304 stainless steel.

  5. Evaluation of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion - corrosion resistant boiler tube coatings in low NO{sub x} boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuPont, J.N.; Banovic, S.W.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Low NOx burners are being installed in many fossil fired power plants in order to comply with new Clean Air Regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion is often enhanced and premature tube failures can occur. Failures due to oxidation and solid particle erosion are also a concern. A program was initiated in early 1996 to evaluate the use of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx boilers. Composite iron/aluminum wires will be used with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process to prepare overlays on boiler tubes steels with aluminum contents from 8 to 16wt%. The weldability of the composite wires will be evaluated as a function of chemical composition and welding parameters. The effect of overlay composition on corrosion (oxidation and sulfidation) and solid particle erosion will also be evaluated. The laboratory studies will be complemented by field exposures of both iron aluminide weld overlays and co-extruded tubing under actual boiler conditions.

  6. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  7. Welding of gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An article made of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, cooling the entire article to a welding temperature of from about 1000.degree. F. to about 1400.degree. F., welding a preselected region in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected region so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected region, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the gamma titanium aluminide alloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  8. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  9. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB's.

  10. Measurement of residual stresses in weld overlay pipe component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weld overlay is one of the improvement methods for austenitic stainless steel suffered intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The weld overlay itself increases the wall thickness and change the stress field from inner to outer surface of pipes. To insure the improvement of the stress field on the pipe after weld overlay, the stress distribution of 10 inches pipes weld overlay mock up specimens were insured in this study. The strain-gage hole-drilling method and FEM analysis were applied to measure and calculate the residual stress along the pipe wall thickness. The results show that it behaves good agreement on the residual stress from the measurement and calculation. The weld overlay also induces a compressive stress field on the inner wall, whereas the tensile stress field is created on the outer wall surface. The mechanical grinding on the weld overlay surface will affect the residual stress distribution about 0.04 inches in depth. (author)

  11. Life extension of boilers using weld overlay protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, G.; Hulsizer, P. [Welding Services Inc., Norcross, GA (United States); Brooks, R. [Welding Services Inc., Welding Services Europe, Spijkenisse (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    The presentation describes the status of modern weld overlay technology for refurbishment, upgrading and life extension of boilers. The approaches to life extension of boilers include field overlay application, shop-fabricated panels for replacement of the worn, corroded waterwall and shop-fabricated overlay tubing for replacement of individual tubes in superheaters, generating banks and other areas. The characteristics of weld overlay products are briefly described. Also discussed are successful applications of various corrosion-resistant overlays for life extension of boiler tubes in waste-to-energy boilers, coal-fired boilers and chemical recovery boilers. Types of corrosion and selection of weld overlay alloys in these systems are also discussed. (orig.) 14 refs.

  12. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  13. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  14. Residual stress measurement in 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welding overlay repair (WOR) is commonly employed to rebuild piping systems suffering from intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). To understand the effects of this repair, it is necessary to investigate the distribution of residual stresses in the welding pipe. The overlay welding technique must induce compressive residual stress at the inner surface of the welded pipe to prevent IGSCC. To understand the bulk residual stress distribution, the stress profile as a function of location within wall is examined. In this study the full destructive residual stress measurement technique -- a cutting and sectioning method -- is used to determine the residual stress distribution. The sample is type 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipe with an outside diameter of 267 mm. A pipe segment is cut from the circular pipe; then a thin layer is removed axially from the inner to the outer surfaces until further sectioning is impractical. The total residual stress is calculated by adding the stress relieved by cutting the section away to the stress relieved by axially sectioning. The axial and hoop residual stresses are compressive at the inner surface of the weld overlay pipe. Compressive stress exists not only at the surface but is also distributed over most of the pipe's cross section. On the one hand, the maximum compressive hoop residual stress appears at the pipe's inner surface. The thermal-mechanical induced crack closure from significant compressive residual stress is discussed. This crack closure can thus prevent IGSCC very effectively

  15. Solidification paths in modified Inconel 625 weld overlay material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Karthik; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hald, John

    2009-01-01

    Inconel 625 is commonly used for overlay welding to protect the base metal against high temperature corrosion. The efficiency of corrosion protection depends on effective mixing of the overlay weld with the base metal and the subsequent segregation of alloy elements during solidification. Metallo......Inconel 625 is commonly used for overlay welding to protect the base metal against high temperature corrosion. The efficiency of corrosion protection depends on effective mixing of the overlay weld with the base metal and the subsequent segregation of alloy elements during solidification....... Metallographic analysis of solidified samples of Inconel 625 with addition of selected elements is compared with thermodynamic modelling of segregation during solidification. The influence of changes in the melt chemistry on the formation of intermetallic phases during solidification is shown. In particular......, focus is put on how the composition of the dendrite core is affected by modifications to the alloy. It has previously been shown that when the overlay material corrodes, the corrosion take place in the dendrite core. Therefore, the discussion will be directed towards explaining the extent to which...

  16. Research on overlaying welding rod of high hardness maraging steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yong-ming; CHEN Shao-wei

    2006-01-01

    The development of new maraging steel overlaying welding rod,which contains Co,Mo,W and V alloy,solved the problems of poor homogeneity of hardness and mechanical process, prolonged the service life of wear-resistant components and increased the productive efficiency of repairing,greatly benefiting the national economy.

  17. MICROSTRUCTURES AND OXIDATION RESISTANCE OF Fe3Al WELD OVERLAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.G.Min; X.Q.Yu; Y.S.Sun; J.R.Sun

    2001-01-01

    Using the Fe3Al electrode through manual arc surfacing (MAS),Fe3Al coatings havebeen deposited on the stainless steel substrate.The microstructures,hardness andoxidation resistance of the weld overlay have been investigated.The results show thatcrack-free overlays can be obtained when pre-heating of the substrate at 500℃ andpostweld heat treatment at 700℃ were used.Elements of Al,Cr,Ni etc.transferredbetween the substrate and the overlay,but this does not influence the microhardnessof the substrate and the Fe3Al overlay.Oxidation tests show that the Fe3Al overlayshave excellent oxidation resistance in comparison with the stainless steel substrate at800℃ and 900℃.

  18. Evaluation of residual stress near the weld overlay cladding by welding and post-weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steel is welded as a cladding on the inner surface of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) made of low alloy steel. In order to assess the structural integrity of the RPV precisely, the residual stress distribution caused by weld-overlay cladding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) is evaluated. Since the cladding layer is very thin compared to vessel wall, it is necessary to evaluate the residual stress distribution around the weld fusion line can be very steep. In this study, cladded specimens were fabricated using different welding methods. Residual stress measurements using both sectioning and deep hole drilling (DHD) methods were then performed to evaluate the residual stress distributions through the weld fusion line. Three-dimensional thermal-elastic-plastic-creep analyses based on finite element method were also conducted to evaluate the residual stress caused by weld-overlay cladding and PWHT. It was shown that analytical results provided reasonable agreements on weld residual stress with experimental results. It was also clarified that the main cause of residual stress due to welding and PWHT was the difference of thermal expansion between weld and base metals. (author)

  19. Three dimensional finite element analysis of weld overlay application on a plastically formed feeder tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a finite element analysis (FEA) model to predict the residual stresses in a tight-radius warm bend feeder tube in a CANDU nuclear reactor coolant system throughout the various stages of the manufacturing and welding processes, including feeder tube forming, Grayloc hub weld, and weld overlay application. The FEA employs 3-D elastic-plastic technology with large deformation capability to predict the residual stresses due to the feeder tube forming and various welding processes. The results demonstrate that the FEA method captures the residual stress trends resulted from warm bending and weld overlay with acceptable accuracy. (author)

  20. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-06-30

    Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

  1. Analysis of mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed RPV weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed outer layer of reactor pressure vessel weld overlay cladding, composed of Cr19Ni10Nb alloy, have been experimentally determined by conventional tensile testing and indentation testing. The constitutive properties of weld overlay cladding are then modelled with two homogenization models of the constitutive properties of elastic-plastic matrix-inclusion composites; numerical and experimental results are then compared. 10 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  2. FEM Analysis and Measurement of Residual Stress by Neutron Diffraction on the Dissimilar Overlay Weld Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much research has been done to estimate the residual stress on a dissimilar metal weld. There are many methods to estimate the weld residual stress and FEM (Finite Element Method) is generally used due to the advantage of the parametric study. And the X-ray method and a Hole Drilling technique for an experimental method are also usually used. The aim of this paper is to develop the appropriate FEM model to estimate the residual stresses of the dissimilar overlay weld pipe. For this, firstly, the specimen of the dissimilar overlay weld pipe was manufactured. The SA 508 Gr3 nozzle, the SA 182 safe end and SA376 pipe were welded by the Alloy 182. And the overlay weld by the Alloy 52M was performed. The residual stress of this specimen was measured by using the Neutron Diffraction device in the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) research reactor, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Secondly, FEM Model on the dissimilar overlay weld pipe was made and analyzed by the ABAQUS Code (ABAQUS, 2004). Thermal analysis and stress analysis were performed, and the residual stress was calculated. Thirdly, the results of the FEM analysis were compared with those of the experimental methods

  3. Field application of phased array ultrasonic testing for structural weld overlay on dissimilar welds of pressurizer nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weld overlay was first used in power plants in the US in the early 1980s as an interim method of repairing the welds of flawed piping joints. Weld overlaid piping joints in nuclear power plants must be examined periodically using ultrasonic examination technology. Portable phased array ultrasonic technology has recently become available. Currently, the application of preemptive weld overlays as a mitigation technique and/as a method to improve the examination surface condition for more complex configurations is becoming more common. These complex geometries may require several focused conventional transducers for adequate inspection of the overlay, the original weld, and the base material. Alternatively, Phased array ultrasonic probes can be used to generate several inspection angles simultaneously at various focal depths to provide better and faster coverage than that possible by conventional methods. Thus, this technology can increase the speed of examinations, save costs, and reduce radiation exposure. In this paper, we explain the general sequence of the inspection of weld overlay and the results of signal analysis for some PAUT (phased array ultrasonic testing) signals detected in on-site inspections

  4. Field application of phased array ultrasonic testing for structural weld overlay on dissimilar welds of pressurizer nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hoi; Kim, Yong Sik [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Ltd., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Weld overlay was first used in power plants in the US in the early 1980s as an interim method of repairing the welds of flawed piping joints. Weld overlaid piping joints in nuclear power plants must be examined periodically using ultrasonic examination technology. Portable phased array ultrasonic technology has recently become available. Currently, the application of preemptive weld overlays as a mitigation technique and/as a method to improve the examination surface condition for more complex configurations is becoming more common. These complex geometries may require several focused conventional transducers for adequate inspection of the overlay, the original weld, and the base material. Alternatively, Phased array ultrasonic probes can be used to generate several inspection angles simultaneously at various focal depths to provide better and faster coverage than that possible by conventional methods. Thus, this technology can increase the speed of examinations, save costs, and reduce radiation exposure. In this paper, we explain the general sequence of the inspection of weld overlay and the results of signal analysis for some PAUT (phased array ultrasonic testing) signals detected in on-site inspections.

  5. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Final technical progress report, July 1992--July 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-10-15

    The erosion behavior of weld overlay coatings has been studied. Eleven weld overlay alloys were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process and erosion tested at 400{degrees}C at 90{degrees} and 30{degrees} particle impact angles. The microstructure of each coating was characterized before erosion testing. A relative ranking of the coatings erosion resistance was developed by determining the steady state erosion rates. Ultimet, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings showed the best erosion resistance at both impact angles. It was found that weld overlays that exhibit good abrasion resistance did not show good erosion resistance. Erosion tests were also performed for selected wrought materials with chemical composition similar to weld overlays. Eroded surfaces of the wrought and weld alloys were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Microhardness tests were performed on the eroded samples below the erosion surface to determine size of the plastically deformed region. It was found that one group of coatings experienced significant plastic deformation as a result of erosion while the other did not. It was also established that, in the steady state erosion regime, the size of the plastically deformed region is constant.

  6. Study on cracking of welding overlay based on the theory of diffusion-induced stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiliang ZHANG; Changyu ZHOU

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion in the wall of hydrogenation reactor for three situations,i.e. operating,normal shutdown and abnormal shutdown,was numerically simulated based on the finite element program-ABAQUS. The formula of diffusion-induced stress was deduced for model of the thin walled cylinder. Distribution of diffusion-induced stress in the wall of hydrogenation reactor was studied. The results showed that the maximum stress was at the fusion surface between welding overlay and base metal,and which would increase with cooling rate. The crack will initiate and propagate from fusion surface to welding overlay when the diffusion-induced stress is higher than yield stress,but it will not propagate to the base metal. Diffusion-induced stress is one of the important factors for crack initiation and propagation of welding overlay of hydrogenation reactor.

  7. Numerical evaluation of weld overlay applied to a pressurized water reactor nozzle mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Gomes, Paulo T.V., E-mail: egr@cdtn.b, E-mail: silvall@cdtn.b, E-mail: gomespt@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Integridade Estrutural

    2011-07-01

    The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is a major mechanism of failure in the primary circuit of PWR type nuclear power plants. The PWSCC is associated with the presence of corrosive environment, the susceptibility to corrosion cracking of the materials involved and the tensile stresses presence. Residual stresses generated during dissimilar materials welding can contribute to PWSCC. An alternative to the PWSCC mitigation is the application of external weld layers in the regions of greatest susceptibility to corrosion cracking. This process, called Weld Overlay (WOL), has been widely used in regions of dissimilar weld (low alloy steel and stainless steel with nickel alloy addition) of nozzles and pipes on the primary circuit in order to promote internal compressive stresses on the wall of these components. This paper presents the steps required to the numerical stress evaluation (by finite element method) during the dissimilar materials welding as well as application of Weld Overlay process in a nozzle mock-up. Thus, one can evaluate the effectiveness of the application of weld overlay process to internal compressive stress generation on the wall nozzle. (author)

  8. Effect of Some Overlay Welding Regime With Longitudinal Magnetic Field on Hardness, Phase Composition And Welded Layer Wear By Arc Method With Flux Metal Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosov, D. G.; Peremitko, V. V.; Barashkin, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    The paper defines the range of overlay welding current, frequencies and induction of a longitudinal magnetic field that enhance the wear resistance of welded layer additing the flux. The conditions of their mutual influence on the process of structure formation are stated as well as the mathematical models linking the overlay welding current, frequency and induction of a longitudinal magnetic field with hardness, wear resistance and phase composition of the welded layer, the use of which will allow to determine the welding modes to provide the necessary properties of the weld metal.

  9. Field Investigation of Various Weld Overlays in a Waste Incineration Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, O. H.

    2005-01-01

    which was present in every test panel. It was observed that all the weld overlay test sections behaved similar to machined alloy 625 in that there was general corrosion and pitting corrosion. In addition, alloy 622 also exhibited preferential corrosion with respect to its dendrite structure....

  10. Hot Corrosion of Inconel 625 Overlay Weld Cladding in Smelting Off-Gas Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Zahrani, E.; Alfantazi, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    Degradation mechanisms and hot corrosion behavior of weld overlay alloy 625 were studied. Phase structure, morphology, thermal behavior, and chemical composition of deposited salt mixture on the weld overlay were characterized utilizing XRD, SEM/EDX, DTA, and ICP/OES, respectively. Dilution level of Fe in the weldment, dendritic structure, and degradation mechanisms of the weld were investigated. A molten phase formed on the weld layer at the operating temperature range of the boiler, which led to the hot corrosion attack in the water wall and the ultimate failure. Open circuit potential and weight-loss measurements and potentiodynamic polarization were carried out to study the hot corrosion behavior of the weld in the simulated molten salt medium at 873 K, 973 K, and 1073 K (600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). Internal oxidation and sulfidation plus pitting corrosion were identified as the main hot corrosion mechanisms in the weld and boiler tubes. The presence of a significant amount of Fe made the dendritic structure of the weld susceptible to preferential corrosion. Preferentially corroded (Mo, Nb)-depleted dendrite cores acted as potential sites for crack initiation from the surface layer. The penetration of the molten phase into the cracks accelerated the cracks' propagation mainly through the dendrite cores and further crack branching/widening.

  11. Leak-before-break analysis of a dissimilar metal welded overlay structure for connecting pipe-nozzle of nuclear reactor pressure vessel to safe end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is commonly produced in the dissimilar metal welded joints for connecting the pipe-nozzles of nuclear reactor pressure vessels to the safe ends. The technology to repair and mitigate PWSCC is usually to make the weld overlay of higher corrosion resistant Alloy52M on the pipe joints. Purpose: We need to assess the integrity of the welded overlay structures, and to make Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses. The effect of the weld overlay thickness on the LBB behavior needs to be studied. Methods: Based on the three-dimensional finite element fracture mechanics analyses, the ABAQUS software was applied to construct the LBB curves and ligament instability lines of the dissimilar metal welded overlay structures. The effects of the weld overlay thickness on the LBB curves and ligament instability lines were analyzed. Results: The results show that the LBB curves and ligament instability lines with the weld overlay are located above those without the weld overlay. With increasing weld overlay thickness, the LBB curves and ligament instability lines both shift upward. Conclusion: The weld overlay can increase the LBB safe margin of the dissimilar metal welded joints. With increasing weld overlay thickness, the LBB safe margin of the joint structure can be further increased. (authors)

  12. Effect of Fe content on the friction and abrasion properties of copper base overlay on steel substrate by TIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Shixiong; Song Jianling; Liu Lei; Yang Shiqin

    2009-01-01

    Copper base alloy was overlaid onto 35CrMnSiA steel plate by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method. The heat transfer process was simulated, the microstructures of the copper base overlay were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and the friction and abrasion properties of the overlay were measured. The results show that the Fe content increases in the overlay with increasing the welding current. And with the increase of Fe content in the overlay, the friction coefficient increases and the wear mechanism changes from oxidation wear to abrasive wear and plough wear, which is related to the size and quantity of Fe grains in the overlay. While with the increase of Fe content in the overlay, the protection of oxidation layer against the oxidation wear on the melted metal decreases.

  13. Effects of irradiation on the fracture properties of stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steel weld overlay cladding was fabricated using the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode, and the three-wire, series-arc methods. Three layers of cladding were applied to a pressure vessel plate to provide adequate thickness for fabrication of test specimens, and irradiations were conducted at temperatures and to fluences relevant to power reactor operation. For the first single-wire method, the first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. The three-wire method used various combinations of types 308, 309, and 304 stainless steel weld wires, and produced a highly controlled weld chemistry, microstructure, and fracture properties in all three layers of the weld. 14 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Assessment of Weld Overlays for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking at Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Edward J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-08-01

    This TLR provides an assessment of weld overlays as a mitigation strategy for PWSCC, and includes an assessment of the WOL-related inspection requirements of Code Case N-770-1, as conditioned in §50.55a.

  15. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  16. Through-Thickness Measurements of Residual Stresses in an Overlay Dissimilar Weld Pipe using Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of residual stresses in dissimilar material joints has been extensively studied because of the wide applications of the dissimilar welds in many inevitable complex design structures. Especially the cracking of dissimilar welding has been a long standing issue of importance in many components of the power generation industries such as nuclear power plant, boiling pressure system, and steam generators. In particular, several failure analysis and direct observations have shown that critical fractures have frequently occurred in one side of the dissimilar welded parts. For example, the heat-affected zone on the ferrite steel side is known to critical in many dissimilar welding pipes when ferrite (low carbon steel) and austenite (stainless) steels are joined. The main cause of the residual stresses can be attributed to the mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the dissimilar metals (ferrite and austenite). Additional cladding over circumferential welds is known to reinforce the mechanical property due to the beneficial compressive residual stress imposed on the weld and heat-affected zone. However, science-based quantitative measurement of the through thickness residual stress distribution is very limited in literature. The deep penetration capability of neutrons into most metallic materials makes neutron diffraction a powerful tool to investigate and map the residual stresses of materials throughout the thickness and across the weld. Furthermore, the unique volume averaged bulk characteristic of materials and mapping capability in three dimensions are suitable for the engineering purpose. Thus, the neutron-diffraction measurement method has been selected as the most useful method for the study of the residual stresses in various dissimilar metal welded structures. The purpose of this study is to measure the distribution of the residual stresses in a complex dissimilar joining with overlay in the weld pipe. Specifically, we measured

  17. Corrosion resistance and microstructure of alloy 625 weld overlay on ASTM A516 grade 70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Mohammad J. [Amirkabir Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Petroleum Engineering Dept.; Ketabchi, Mostafa [Amirkabir Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Mining and Metallurgical Engineering Dept.

    2016-02-01

    Nickel-based alloys are a crucial class of materials because of their excellent corrosion resistance. In the present study, single layer and two layers alloy 625 weld overlays were deposited by GTAW process on A516 grade 70 carbon steel. The dilution in terms of Fe, Ni, Mo and Nb content was calculated in 30 points of weld overlay. Microstructure observations showed that alloy 625 had austenitic structure with two types of Laves and NbC secondary phases. The uniform and pitting corrosion resistance of alloy 625 weld overlay as casted and as forged were evaluated in accordance with ASTM G48-2011 standard at different temperatures to determine the weight loss and critical pitting temperature. For achieving a better comparison, samples from alloy 625 as casted and as forged were tested under the same conditions. The results point out that single layer alloy 625 weld overlay is not suitable for chloride containing environments, two layers alloy 625 weld overlay and alloy 625 as casted have acceptable corrosion resistance and almost the same critical pitting temperature. Alloy 625 as forged has the best corrosion resistance and the highest critical pitting temperature among all test specimens. Also, the corrosion behavior was evaluated in accordance with ASTM G28 standard. The corrosion rate of single layer weld overlay was unacceptable. The average corrosion rate of two layers weld overlay and in casted condition were 35.82 and 33.01 mpy, respectively. [German] Nickellegierungen sind aufgrund ihres exzellenten Korrosionswiderstandes eine bedeutende Werkstoffklasse. In der diesem Beitrag zugrunde liegenden Studie wurden mittels WIG-Schweissens ein- und zweilagige Schweissplattierungen auf den Kohlenstoffstahl A516 (Grade 70) aufgebracht. Die Vermischung in Form des Fe-, Ni-, Mo- und Nb-Gehaltes wurde an 30 Punkten der Schweissplattierungen berechnet. Die mikrostrukturellen Untersuchungen ergaben, dass die Legierung 625 eine austenitische Struktur mit zwei Arten von

  18. Residual stress analysis of an overlay weld on a dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, a dissimilar metal, Alloy 82/182 welds used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components in nuclear reactor piping system have experienced a cracking due to a primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC). It is well known that one reason for the cracking is the residual stress by the weld. But, it is difficult to estimate the weld residual stress exactly due to many parameters of a welding. In this paper, the analysis of 3 FEM models is performed to estimate the weld residual stress on a dissimilar metal weld exactly

  19. Characterisation of the surface over-layer of welded uranium by FIB, SIMS and Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), focused ion beam (FIB) milling and Auger electron spectroscopy have been used to examine the composition and surface structure of uranium welded by an electron beam. Four characteristic areas of the metal surface were designated, these being: body (unaffected by the welding process), heat affected zone (HAZ), weld edge and weld. Surface composition to a depth of a few microns was determined using SIMS profiling, and direct thickness measurements of surface over-layers on the metal were made using FIB. Marked variations in both the thickness and composition of the over-layers were found when comparing the body/HAZ, weld edge and weld material. Additionally, numerous prismatic inclusions, approximately 5 μm2, were observed at the surface of the weld material. Auger and SIMS analyses indicated these inclusions were nitro-carbides. An increased concentration of these inclusions and other elemental impurities at the margins of the weld and within the HAZ indicated that during welding a segregation of impurities from the molten metal had occurred. The results are discussed in terms of processes considered to be occurring during welding and their implications in regard to corrosion in hydrogen atmospheres.

  20. Material development for waste to energy plants. Overlay welding and refractory linings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Hansson, A.

    2011-02-15

    Waste is an extremely corrosive fuel. In order to recover a higher percentage of the energy in waste, waste incineration plants have developed from purely heat producing units to heat and power producing units. The change in concept results in higher material temperatures and thereby faster material degradation. As a result material failures have been observed in many waste incineration plants. The purpose of this project was to develop materials with higher resistance to the corrosive elements, in order to reduce the cost of maintenance, increase the availability, and increase the efficiency. The focus is on overlay welding and refractory linings. Inconel 625, alloy 50, alloy 686, and Super 625 offer equivalent corrosion protection at panel walls. 100% overlay performs better than 50% overlay. The corrosion morphology changes with increasing temperature from pitting and general corrosion to pitting and selective corrosion (dendritic core or grain boundaries). The previously observed detrimental effect of Fe on the corrosion resistance was not confirmed. It probably depends on factors such as microstructure of the alloy and local metal temperature. Ni-overlay also reduces the corrosion rates on superheater tubes. However, the superheater environment is less aggressive than the water wall environment. Failure of refractory linings is linked to excess porosity, detrimental reactions between raw materials and other mix constituents, volume growth reactions between base material and salt depositions, and thermal stress induced crack formation. Free water and not decomposition of hydrates causes spalling and cracking during the initial heating of refractory linings. Finite Element analysis confirms the stress levels between steel and refractory with the higher stress level at the top of the panel wall tube. A number of LCC mixes were formulated, adjusted and tested. Mixes with low open porosities ({approx} 10%) and state of the art resistance to KCl were achieved. (LN)

  1. Research on the Impact of Amplitude of Vibrations on Electrical Parameters of Vibroarc Weld Overlay in Argon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolov Mitko Ivanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The research is taken on the vibroarc welding apparatus ENTON-60 equipped with an axial non-inertial vibrator in argon shield. The criteria used for assessing the flow of the electric arc process and the formation of weld overlay clad surfaces are: short circuit voltage, voltage at the start of arc combustion, short circuit amperage, and amperage at the end of arc combustion. Wire electrode‘s vibrating frequency is considered as an input variable of the cybernetic model. It has been found that amplitude of vibrations has a significant impact on the vibroarc process - voltage parameters and welding current ratio, as the minimum amperage of short circuit and the lowest voltage at the start of arc combustion is realized at 2 mm amplitude of vibrations.

  2. Full structural weld overlay application as a repair or mitigation measure for PWSCC susceptible alloy 82/182 DM welds in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, cracking due to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) have been observed in Alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal (DM) welds both in the United States and abroad. These DM welds are used to connect stainless steel piping to low alloy steel or carbon steel components in Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR) plants. Full Structural weld overlay (FSWOL) was implemented in some cases as a repair technique to mitigate PWSCC at these welds. Such repair technique is an acceptable ASME Code repair method and has already been successfully used to repair Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) at the stainless steel pipe welds in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants in the United States for over twenty years. FSWOL is a repair technique that can be used to reinforce nozzle safe end regions and pipes in PWR plants susceptible to PWSCC with cracks present. Such technique can also be used as a mitigation technique at locations without any cracking but are susceptible to PWSCC. The technique involves the application of a specified thickness and length of PWSCC resistant weld material over the region of interest in a configuration that maintains structural integrity and meets the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI Code margins with cracks present. The reinforcement material forms a structural barrier to PWSCC and produces a compressive residual stress condition at the inner portion of the pipe that mitigates future crack initiation and/or propagation due to PWSCC. In addition, full structural weld overlay improves inspectability of the nozzle safe end weld regions and facilitates volumetric examinations by minimizing discontinuities in the nozzle safe end weld regions. Purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology and criteria for applying FSWOL as either a repair or mitigation measure for PWSCC susceptible Alloy 82/182 DM welds in PWR plants. It is planned by KHNP to have the methodology and criteria be implemented for the

  3. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  4. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steel weld overlay cladding was fabricated using the three-wire, series-arc method. Three layers of cladding were applied to a pressure vessel plate to provide adequate thickness for fabrication of test specimens. Since irradiation of the stainless steel cladding to 5 x 1019 neutrons/cm2 (>1 MeV) was conducted at 288 degrees C for 1605 h, tensile, Charpy V-notch (CVN), precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN), and compact fracture toughness specimens were thermally aged at 288 degrees C for 1605 h. Additional specimens are being aged to 20,000 and 50,000 h. Thermal aging of three-wire, series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288 degrees C for 1604 h resulted in appreciable decrease (16%) in the CVN upper-shelf energy, but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3 degrees C). The combined effect, following neutron irradiation at 288 degrees C to a fluence of 5 x 1019 neutrons/cm2 (>MeV), was a 22% reduction in the CVN upper-shelf energy and a 29 degrees C shift at the 41-J level. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small or negligible. However, the combined effect after neutron irradiation was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to -125 degrees C) and no apparent change in ultimate strength and total elongation. Also, neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (JIc) much more than did thermal aging. However, irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. The effects of long-term thermal exposure times (20,000 and 50,000 h) will be investigated when the specimen become available

  5. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288 degrees C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3 degrees C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288 degrees C to a fluence of 5 x 1019 neutrons/cm2 (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29 degrees C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to -125 degrees C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (JIc) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343 degrees C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288 degrees C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288 degrees C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond

  6. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Suzuki, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The effects of thermal aging of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels on the microstructure and hardness of the claddings were investigated using atom probe tomography and nanoindentation testing. The claddings were aged at 400 °C for periods of 100–10,000 h. The fluctuation in Cr concentration in the δ-ferrite phase, which was caused by spinodal decomposition, progressed rapidly after aging for 100 h, and gradually for aging durations greater than 1000 h. On the other hand, NiSiMn clusters, initially formed after aging for less than 1000 h, had the highest number density after aging for 2000 h, and coarsened after aging for 10,000 h. The hardness of the δ-ferrite phase also increased rapidly for short period of aging, and saturated after aging for longer than 1000 h. This trend was similar to the observed Cr fluctuation concentration, but different from the trend seen in the formation of the NiSiMn clusters. These results strongly suggest that the primary factor responsible for the hardening of the δ-ferrite phase owing to thermal aging is Cr spinodal decomposition.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructures and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructures and the hardness of stainless steel weld overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels subjected to neutron irradiation at a dose of 7.2 × 1019 n cm−2 (E > 1 MeV) and a flux of 1.1 × 1013 n cm−2 s−1 at 290 °C were investigated by atom probe tomography and by a nanoindentation technique. To isolate the effects of the neutron irradiation, we compared the results of the measurements of the neutron-irradiated samples with those from a sample aged at 300 °C for a duration equivalent to that of the irradiation. The Cr concentration fluctuation was enhanced in the δ-ferrite phase of the irradiated sample. In addition, enhancement of the concentration fluctuation of Si, which was not observed in the aged sample, was observed. The hardening in the δ-ferrite phase occurred due to both irradiation and aging; however, the hardening of the irradiated sample was more than that expected from the Cr concentration fluctuation, which suggested that the Si concentration fluctuation and irradiation-induced defects were possible origins of the additional hardening

  8. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of thermal aging of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels on the microstructure and hardness of the claddings were investigated using atom probe tomography and nanoindentation testing. The claddings were aged at 400 °C for periods of 100–10,000 h. The fluctuation in Cr concentration in the δ-ferrite phase, which was caused by spinodal decomposition, progressed rapidly after aging for 100 h, and gradually for aging durations greater than 1000 h. On the other hand, NiSiMn clusters, initially formed after aging for less than 1000 h, had the highest number density after aging for 2000 h, and coarsened after aging for 10,000 h. The hardness of the δ-ferrite phase also increased rapidly for short period of aging, and saturated after aging for longer than 1000 h. This trend was similar to the observed Cr fluctuation concentration, but different from the trend seen in the formation of the NiSiMn clusters. These results strongly suggest that the primary factor responsible for the hardening of the δ-ferrite phase owing to thermal aging is Cr spinodal decomposition

  9. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructures and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Nuclear Safety Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    The microstructures and the hardness of stainless steel weld overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels subjected to neutron irradiation at a dose of 7.2 × 10{sup 19} n cm{sup −2} (E > 1 MeV) and a flux of 1.1 × 10{sup 13} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} at 290 °C were investigated by atom probe tomography and by a nanoindentation technique. To isolate the effects of the neutron irradiation, we compared the results of the measurements of the neutron-irradiated samples with those from a sample aged at 300 °C for a duration equivalent to that of the irradiation. The Cr concentration fluctuation was enhanced in the δ-ferrite phase of the irradiated sample. In addition, enhancement of the concentration fluctuation of Si, which was not observed in the aged sample, was observed. The hardening in the δ-ferrite phase occurred due to both irradiation and aging; however, the hardening of the irradiated sample was more than that expected from the Cr concentration fluctuation, which suggested that the Si concentration fluctuation and irradiation-induced defects were possible origins of the additional hardening.

  10. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  11. The effect of location on the microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium aluminides produced by additive layer manufacturing using in-situ alloying and gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative and low cost additive layer manufacturing (ALM) process is used to produce γ-TiAl based alloy wall components. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) provides the heat source for this new approach, combined with in-situ alloying through separate feeding of commercially pure Ti and Al wires into the weld pool. This paper investigates the morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the additively manufactured TiAl material, and how these are affected by the location within the manufactured component. The typical additively layer manufactured morphology exhibits epitaxial growth of columnar grains and several layer bands. The fabricated γ-TiAl based alloy consists of comparatively large α2 grains in the near-substrate region, fully lamellar colonies with various sizes and interdendritic γ structure in the intermediate layer bands, followed by fine dendrites and interdendritic γ phases in the top region. Microhardness measurements and tensile testing results indicated relatively homogeneous mechanical characteristics throughout the deposited material. The exception to this homogeneity occurs in the near-substrate region immediately adjacent to the pure Ti substrate used in these experiments, where the alloying process is not as well controlled as in the higher regions. The tensile properties are also different for the vertical (build) direction and horizontal (travel) direction because of the differing microstructure in each direction. The microstructure variation and strengthening mechanisms resulting from the new manufacturing approach are analysed in detail. The results demonstrate the potential to produce full density titanium aluminide components directly using the new additive layer manufacturing method

  12. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343{degrees}C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288{degrees}C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond.

  13. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. > Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the {delta}-ferrite phase. > The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% {delta}-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  14. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. → Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the δ-ferrite phase. → The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% δ-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M23C6 type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  15. ASTM 4130自动氩弧焊堆焊 Inconel 625焊接工艺%Procedure of 625 Overlay Weld on ASTM 4130 75K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭必永

    2014-01-01

    通过理论分析及试验结合的方法,确认ASTM 413075K调质钢自动氩弧焊堆焊Inconel 625的工艺确认,根据API 6A Ed 20th和ASME IX-2010的要求进行评定,此结果可为生产提供一定的指导。%T hrough the combination of theoretical analysis and test ,the procedure of 625 overlay weld on ASTM 4130 75K which was quenched and tempered steel ,by automatic argon tungsten arc welding ,was evaluated according to API 6A Ed 20th and ASME IX-2010 requirements ,and provides guidance for production .

  16. Processing and structure of in situ Fe-Al alloys produced by gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-02-14

    Iron aluminide weld overlays are being investigated for corrosion and erosion protection of boiler tubes in low NOx burners. The primary objective of the research is to identify overlay compositions which can be deposited in a crack-free condition and provide corrosion protection in moderately reducing environments. In the current phase of work, Fe-Al alloy weld overlays were produced by depositing commercially pure aluminum wire on to low carbon steel substrates using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. A systematic variation of the wire feed speed and current, two major factors affecting dilution, resulted in a variation in aluminum contents of the welds ranging from 3--42 wt% aluminum. The aluminum content was observed to increase with wire feed speed and a decrease in the current. The aluminum content was also found to affect the cracking susceptibility of the overlays. At 10wt% aluminum, few to no cracks were observed in the deposits. Above this value, cracking was prevalent throughout the weld. In addition, two types of microstructures were found correlating to different concentrations of aluminum. A homogeneous matrix with second phase particles consisting of coarse columnar grains was found for low aluminum concentrations. With higher aluminum contents, a two-phase constituent was observed to surround primary dendrites growing from the substrate. The transition of the microstructures occurred between 24 and 32 wt% Al.

  17. Materials development for waste-to-energy plants. New materials for overlay welding. Final report; Udvikling af materialer til affaldsforbraending - Nye materialer til overlagssvejsning. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skat Tiedje, N.

    2010-07-01

    This part of the project was to develop a method for rapid benchmarking of new alloys for overlay welding and to apply the method in combination with thermodynamic modeling of microstructures in welded Ni-based alloys. Based on these analyses new, improved alloys were to be developed to be produced in the laboratory and tested using the benchmarking method. Accelerated electrochemical tests proved to be difficult, and the method that was chosen was unreliable. There were two reasons for this. 1: It was difficult to obtain stable experimental conditions in the measuring cell. 2: The sample geometry and various uncontrolled chemical reactions within the welding and in the salt melt surface. The problems of achieving stability turned out to be an Achilles' heel in this part of the project, and it was the cause of significant delays. Thermodynamic modeling gave a number of interesting results, including the coupling between the content of iron and carbon and in terms of how the various alloying elements segregate in the material. The method alone does not tell anything about the risk of corrosion. Here the coupling to the electrostatic experiments were missing which should give information about the phases of greatest importance for corrosion. Calculations of the chemical equilibrium between the alloying elements, oxygen, and chlorine show that all metals react with both chlorine and oxygen at 450 to 500 deg. C. Oxides are the most stable reaction products viz. that once they are formed, they do not participate in further chemical reactions. (LN)

  18. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  19. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  20. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  1. Overlay welding for corrugating roll

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of chemical compositions and microstructures on wearability properties of overlaid corrugating roll were studied, and the factors governing the hardness and the wearability of overlaid layer were explored.The results show that the hardness and wearability of the overlaid layer significantly rise with the increase of the mass fraction of various types of eutectic, but the crack-resistance falls. The chief factor governing the hardness of overlaid layer is the matrix microstructure, especially the amount of austenite; and the second is the amount of carbide. The principal factor governing the wearability of overlaid layer is the amount of special carbide, particularly the amount of eutectic; and the second is the hardness of overlaid layer. Meanwhile, high alloying electrodes may cause the gear-surface hardness of corrugating roll to be higher than 63HRc, and may enhance the wearability of the gear-surface of corrugating roll by a factor of 5.63 and 9.08.

  2. Development of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  3. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  4. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant, weldable FeAl alloys have been developed with improved high-temperature strength industrial applications. Previous processing difficulties with these alloys led to their evaluation as weld-overlay claddings on conventional structural steels to take advantage of their good properties now. Simplified and better processing methods for monolithic FeAl components are also currently being developed so that components for industrial testing can be made. Other avenues for producing FeAl coatings are currently being explored. Neutron scattering experiments residual stress distributions in the FeAl weld-overlay cladding began in FY 1993 and continued this year.

  5. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  6. Aspectos metalúrgicos de revestimentos dissimilares com a superliga à base de níquel inconel 625 Metallurgical aspects of dissimilar weld overlays of inconel 625 nickel based superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Carvalho Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolongar a vida útil e aumentar a confiabilidade de equipamentos e tubulações de plantas de produção e processamento de petróleo é uma busca constante no setor de petróleo e gás. Tais aspectos dependem essencialmente do uso de ligas resistentes à corrosão. Neste contexto, a soldagem de revestimento com superligas à base de níquel tem sido uma alternativa interessante, pois confere aos equipamentos uma alta resistência à corrosão com um custo inferior, se comparado à fabricação de componentes ou tubulações maciças com superligas. Assim, o objetivo do presente trabalho foi investigar o comportamento metalúrgico de revestimento de superliga à base de níquel do tipo Inconel 625 depositados pelo processo TIG com alimentação de arame frio. As soldagens foram realizadas em uma bancada robotizada, empregando uma fonte eletrônica de soldagem com sistema de aquisição de dados para o monitoramento dos sinais de corrente e tensão. A caracterização microestrutural foi realizada através das técnicas de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV e transmissão (MET, espectroscopia de energia dispersiva de raios-X (EDS. Os resultados mostraram que a microestrutura do metal de solda foi constituída por uma matriz γ com fases secundárias ricas em Nb. Foi encontrada a formação de precipitados complexos de carbonetos/nitretos de Ti e Nb.To extend the life and reliability of pipes and equipment in oil & gas production and processing settings is a continuous demand. These aspects are essentially dependent on corrosion resistant alloys used. In this context, the weld overlay with Ni-based superalloys is a great interesting alternative, since improve the corrosion resistance without increase the cost of manufacture when compared to massive equipment. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the metallurgical aspects of Inconel 625 weld overlays deposited by GTAW cold wire feed process. The welds were performed using a

  7. Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y

    2003-11-17

    two-phase microstructure was formed in the outer coating layer on 304L after interdiffusion of 2,000h at 800 C. The interdiffusion behavior was simulated using a computer model COSIM (Coating Oxidation and Substrate Interdiffusion Model), which was originally developed for MCrAlY overlay coatings by NASA. Complimentary modeling work using a mathematic model from Heckel et al. also was conducted. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles, particularly for aluminide coatings on Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. In Task II, the research focused on the CVD aluminide bond coats for thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The martensitic phase transformation in single-phase {beta}-NiAl and (Ni,Pt)Al coatings was studied and compared. After isothermal exposure to 1150 C for 100 hours, the {beta} phase in both types of coatings was transformed to a martensite phase during cooling to room temperature. Martensitic transformation also was observed in the (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat with and without the ceramic top layer after thermal cycling at 1150 C (700 1-h cycles). Such transformation resulted from Al depletion in the coating due to the formation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale on coating surface and interdiffusion between the coating and superalloy substrate. The volume changes associated with the martensitic transformation could affect the coating surface stability (''rumpling'') and thus contributing to TBC failure. To elucidate the effect of Hf levels in the superalloy substrate on the oxidation performance, directionally-solidified Rene 142 superalloys containing three different Hf contents with and without aluminide coatings were cyclically oxidized at 1100 and 1150 C in air. Poor scale adhesion was observed for all bare and NiAl-coated Rene 142 superalloys, as compared with single-crystal superalloys such as Rene N5. Spallation occurred at relatively early stages disregarding the Hf contents in the superalloys. Finally

  8. Seleção de parâmetros através do método Taguchi para soldagem de revestimento com ligas de níquel pelo processo MIG/MAG Using the Taguchi method to select welding parameters for weld overlay with nickel alloy through the GMAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodolfo Paulino Pessoa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho utilizou-se o método Taguchi (planejamento Robusto de experimentos, para cumprir com um reduzido número de ensaios, dois objetivos: obter a influência dos fatores de controle sobre as variáveis respostas e determinar as condições ideais para aplicação das ligas de níquel nas soldagens de revestimentos através do processo MIG/MAG com transferência metálica por curto-circuito. Foram escolhidos seis fatores de controle com três níveis cada: Tensão de referência, Velocidade de soldagem, Tipo de tecimento, Técnica da tocha, Gás de proteção e o Material de adição. Por sua vez as variáveis respostas escolhidas foram: Diluição (D e Razão entre o reforço e a largura (R/L. As soldagens foram realizadas na posição plana por simples deposição sobre chapas de aço ASTM 516 Gr60 com dimensões de 200 x 50 x 12,7 mm. O uso do tecimento proporcionou cordões com baixos valores da razão R/L e obteve valores bastante baixos de diluição chegando à ordem de 5%. A combinação dos níveis dos fatores de controle apontados como ótimos pelo método Taguchi resultaram em valores para as variáveis repostas consideradas adequadas para a soldagem de revestimento.In this work aim the Taguchi method (Robust design of experiments was chosen to achieve with a limited number of tests two objectives: the first was to the influence of the control factors (welding parameters on quality characteristics (weld bead geometry and the second was to determine optimal conditions for weld overlay with nickel alloy through the GMAW process in a short circuiting transfer mode. Six control factors were employed with three levels each: Reference voltage, Welding speed, Arc oscillation, welding gun orientation (Perpendicular, forehand and backhand, Shielding gas and filler metal. Already the employed quality characteristics were: Percent dilution (D and the ration between reinforcement and bead width (R/L. The weldings were accomplished using

  9. Interdiffusion Behavior in Aluminide Coatings for Power Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Pint, B.A.; Haynes, J.A.; Cooley, K.M.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    One of the critical issues for the application of iron aluminide coatings is the loss of Al from the coating into the Fe-base substrate alloys which do not contain aluminum. The interdiffusion behavior between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings and ferritic and austenitic substrates is being studied for times up to 10,000h in the temperature range of 500-800 C. Coatings were synthesized using a laboratory-scale CVD reactor on representative commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys. The aluminide coatings on both alloys typically consisted of a relatively thin (20-25 {micro}m) Al-rich outer layer and a thicker (150- 250 {micro}m) inner layer with less Al. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe-9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys. Particularly, a two-phase microstructure was formed in the outer coating layer on 304L after interdiffusion of 2000h at 800 C. The interdiffusion behavior also was simulated using a computer model COSIM (Coating Oxidation and Substrate Interdiffusion Model), which was originally developed for MCrAlY overlay coatings by NASA. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles although more work is needed to confirm assumptions made in the model.

  10. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Garima Sharma; M Sundararaman; N Prabhu; G L Goswami

    2003-04-01

    Room temperature dry sliding wear behaviour of iron aluminides containing 28% aluminium and various amounts of chromium has been investigated using pin on disk wear tester. The aluminides were heat treated to have ordered 3 structure. It was found that wear rate of the aluminides increased with the increase of applied normal load and sliding speed. Wear resistance of the aluminides increased with increase in chromium content. SEM observation of the worn surface showed that the microcutting and microploughing were the dominant sliding wear mechanisms.

  11. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution...

  12. Development of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Alloys based on the intermetallic compound Fe{sub 3}Al exhibit many attractive properties, particularly excellent resistance to high temperature oxidation. Their use in commercial applications has been limited, however, by the limited workability of wrought material and the susceptibility of weldments to both hot and cold cracking. Prior efforts have systematically evaluated the effect of alloy composition on hot cracking. By the use of the Sigmajig test, we have found that hot cracking can essentially be eliminated by the addition of carbon and the control of maximum levels of niobium, zirconium, and other alloying elements. Cold cracking, however, remains an issue, and recent efforts have been aimed at minimizing its occurrence, concurrent with development of welding filler metals, processes, and procedures aimed at commercial applications.

  13. New holographic overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Anthony I.

    1991-10-01

    This paper discusses a new type of holographic overlay, FLASHPRINT, which may be used in both security and packaging applications. Unlike the more common embossed holograms currently used, FLASHPRINT leads to reduced set-up costs and offers a simpler process. This reduces the long lead times characteristic of the existing technology and requires the customer to provide only two-dimensional artwork. The overlay material contains a covert 2-D image. The image may be switched on or off by simply tilting the overlay in a light source. The overlay is replayed in the 'on' position to reveal the encoded security message as a highly saturated gold colored image. This effect is operable for a wide range of lighting conditions and viewing geometries. In the 'off' position the overlay is substantially transparent. These features make the visual effect of the overlay attractive to incorporate into product design. They may be laminated over complex printed artwork such as labels and security passes without masking the printed message. When switched 'on' the image appears both sharp and more than seven times brighter than white paper. The image remains sharp and clear even in less favorable lighting conditions. Although the technique offers a low set-up cost for the customer, through its simplicity, it remains as technically demanding and difficult to counterfeit as any holographic process.

  14. OXIDATION RESISTANCE OF NANOCRYSTAL ODS ALUMINIDE COATINGS PRODUCED BY PACK ALUMINIZING PROCESS ASSISTED BY BALL PEENING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.L. Zhan; Y.D. He; W. Gao

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystal ODS (oxide dispersion strengthening) aluminide coatings were produced on a stainless steel and nickel-based superalloy by the pack aluminizing process assisted by ball peening. Pure Al powders and 1% of ultra-fine Y2O3 powders were mixed by ball milling. The ultra-fine Y2O3powders were dispersed in Al particles. Ball peening welded the Al particles onto the substrate and accelerated the formation of aluminide coating. Nanocrystal ODS aluminide coatings were produced by the outward growth at a much low temperature (below 600℃) in a short treatment time.The effects of the operation temperature and treatment time on the formation of the coatings were analyzed. SEM (scanning electron microscope), AFM (atomic force microscope), EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), XRF (X-ray fluorescence spectrometer) and XRD (X-ray diffraction )methods were applied to investigate the microstructure of the coatings. High-temperature oxidation tests were carried out to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the ODS aluminide coatings.

  15. Precipitation-strengthening effects in iron-aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; McKamey, C.G.; Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to produce precipitation to improve both high-temperature strength and room-temperature ductibility in FeAl-type(B2 phase) iron-aluminides. Previous work has focused on primarily wrought products, but stable precipitates can also refine the grain size and affect the properties of as-cast and/or welded material as well. New work began in FY 1994 on the properties of these weldable, strong FeAl alloys in the as-cast condition. Because the end product of this project is components for industry testing, simpler and better (cheaper, near-net-shape) processing methods must be developed for industrial applications of FeAl alloys.

  16. Overlay mark optimization for thick-film resist overlay metrology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Liang; Li Jie; Zhou Congshu; Gu Yili; Yang Huayue

    2009-01-01

    For thick resist implant layers, such as a high voltage P well and a deep N well, systematic and uncorrectable overlay residues brought about by the tapered resist profiles were found. It was found that the tapered profile is closely related to the pattern density. Potential solutions of the manufacturing problem include hardening the film solidness or balancing the exposure density. In this paper, instead of focusing on the process change methodology,we intend to solve the issue of the overlay metrology error from the perspective of the overlay mark design. Based on the comparison of the overlay performances between the proposed overlay mark and the original design, it is shown that the optimized overlay mark target achieves better performance in terms of profiles, dynamic precision,tool induced shift (TIS), and residues. Furthermore, five types of overlay marks with dummy bars are studied, and a recommendation for the overlay marks is given.

  17. Prediction of microcracking in laser overly welds of alloy 690 to type 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of ductility-dip crack in the laser overlay welds of alloy 690 to type 316L stainless steel was predicted by the mechanical and metallurgical approaches. Ductility-dip temperature ranges (DTRs) of alloy 690 laser overlay welds were estimated by Varestraint test during GTA welding. The grain boundary segregation of impurity elements such as P and S was numerically analyzed based on the non-equilibrium cosegregation theory when the welding speed and the amounts of P and S in the weld metal were varied. In accordance with the repression approximation between the DTR and the calculated grain boundary concentrations of P and S, the DTRs of alloy 690 were computed in laser overlay welding. The estimated DTR in laser overlay welds was reduced with an increase in welding speed and with a decrease in the amounts of P and S in the weld metal. Ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds was predicted by the plastic strain-temperature curve intersected the DTR. The plastic strain in laser overlay welding was numerically analyzed using the thermo elasto-plastic finite element method. The plastic strain-temperature curve in laser overlay welds intersected the DTR at decreased welding speed and increased (P+S) content in the weld metal. The predicted results of ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds were approximately consistent with experiment results. It follows that ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds could be successfully predicted based on the estimated DTR from grain boundary segregation analysis combined with the computed plastic strain by FEM analysis. (author)

  18. Multi-level overlay techniques for improving DPL overlay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charlie; Pai, Y. C.; Yu, Dennis; Pang, Peter; Yu, Chun Chi; Wu, Robert (Hsing-Chien); Huang, Eros (Chien Jen); Chen, Marson (Chiun-Chieh); Tien, David; Choi, Dongsub

    2012-03-01

    Overlay continues to be one of the key challenges for lithography in semiconductor manufacturing, especially in light of the accelerated pace of device node shrinks. This reality will be especially evident at 20nm node where DPL and multi-layer overlay will require 4nm or less in overlay control across many critical layers in order to meet device yield entitlements. The motivation for this paper is based on improving DPL overlay control in face of the high complexity involved with multi-layer overlay requirements. For example, the DPL-2nd-litho layer will need to achieve tight registration with the DPL-1st-litho layer, and at the same time, it will need to achieve tight overlay to the reference-litho layer, which in some cases can also be a DPL layer. Of course, multi-level overlay measurements are not new, but the combination of increased complexity of multi-DPL layers and extremely challenging overlay specifications for 20nm node together will necessitate a better understanding of multi-level overlay control, specifically in terms of root cause analysis of multi-layer related overlay errors and appropriate techniques for improvement In this paper, we start with the identification of specific overlay errors caused by multi-layer DPL processing on full film stack product wafers. After validation of these findings with inter-lot and intra-lot controlled experiments, we investigate different advanced control techniques to determine how to optimize overlay control and minimize both intra-lot and inter-lot sources of error. A new approach to overlay data analysis will also be introduced that combines empirical data with target image quality data to more accurately determine and better explain the root cause error mechanism as well as provide effective strategies for improved overlay control.

  19. Mask registration and wafer overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chulseung; Bang, Changjin; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kang, Hyosang; Lee, Dohwa; Jeong, Woonjae; Lim, Ok-Sung; Yoon, Seunghoon; Jung, Jaekang; Laske, Frank; Parisoli, Lidia; Roeth, Klaus-Dieter; Robinson, John C.; Jug, Sven; Izikson, Pavel; Dinu, Berta; Widmann, Amir; Choi, DongSub

    2010-03-01

    Overlay continues to be one of the key challenges for lithography in advanced semiconductor manufacturing. It becomes even more challenging due to the continued shrinking of the device node. Some low k1 techniques, such as Double Exposure and Double Patterning also add additional loss of the overlay margin due to the fact that the single layer pattern is created based on more than 1 exposure. Therefore, the overlay between 2 exposures requires very tight overlay specification. Mask registration is one of the major contributors to wafer overlay, especially field related overlay. We investigated mask registration and wafer overlay by co-analyzing the mask data and the wafer overlay data. To achieve the accurate cohesive results, we introduced the combined metrology mark which can be used for both mask registration measurement as well as for wafer overlay measurement. Coincidence of both metrology marks make it possible to subtract mask signature from wafer overlay without compromising the accuracy due to the physical distance between measurement marks, if we use 2 different marks for both metrologies. Therefore, it is possible to extract pure scanner related signatures, and to analyze the scanner related signatures in details to in order to enable root cause analysis and ultimately drive higher wafer yield. We determined the exact mask registration error in order to decompose wafer overlay into mask, scanner, process and metrology. We also studied the impact of pellicle mounting by comparison of mask registration measurement pre-pellicle mounting and post-pellicle mounting in this investigation.

  20. Weld repair of helium degraded reactor vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welding methods for modification or repair of irradiated nuclear reactor vessels are being evaluated at the Savannah River Site. A low-penetration weld overlay technique has been developed to minimize the adverse effects of irradiation induced helium on the weldability of metals and alloys. This technique was successfully applied to Type 304 stainless steel test plates that contained 3 to 220 appm helium from tritium decay. Conventional welding practices caused significant cracking and degradation in the test plates. Optical microscopy of weld surfaces and cross sections showed that large surface toe cracks formed around conventional welds in the test plates but did not form around overlay welds. Scattered incipient underbead cracks (grain boundary separations) were associated with both conventional and overlay test welds. Tensile and bend tests were used to assess the effect of base metal helium content on the mechanical integrity of the low-penetration overlay welds. The axis of tensile specimens was perpendicular to the weld-base metal interface. Tensile specimens were machined after studs were resistance welded to overlay surfaces

  1. Accuracy in optical overlay metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringoltz, Barak; Marciano, Tal; Yaziv, Tal; DeLeeuw, Yaron; Klein, Dana; Feler, Yoel; Adam, Ido; Gurevich, Evgeni; Sella, Noga; Lindenfeld, Ze'ev; Leviant, Tom; Saltoun, Lilach; Ashwal, Eltsafon; Alumot, Dror; Lamhot, Yuval; Gao, Xindong; Manka, James; Chen, Bryan; Wagner, Mark

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the mechanism by which process variations determine the overlay accuracy of optical metrology. We start by focusing on scatterometry, and showing that the underlying physics of this mechanism involves interference effects between cavity modes that travel between the upper and lower gratings in the scatterometry target. A direct result is the behavior of accuracy as a function of wavelength, and the existence of relatively well defined spectral regimes in which the overlay accuracy and process robustness degrades (`resonant regimes'). These resonances are separated by wavelength regions in which the overlay accuracy is better and independent of wavelength (we term these `flat regions'). The combination of flat and resonant regions forms a spectral signature which is unique to each overlay alignment and carries certain universal features with respect to different types of process variations. We term this signature the `landscape', and discuss its universality. Next, we show how to characterize overlay performance with a finite set of metrics that are available on the fly, and that are derived from the angular behavior of the signal and the way it flags resonances. These metrics are used to guarantee the selection of accurate recipes and targets for the metrology tool, and for process control with the overlay tool. We end with comments on the similarity of imaging overlay to scatterometry overlay, and on the way that pupil overlay scatterometry and field overlay scatterometry differ from an accuracy perspective.

  2. PTA Overlaying Process Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.; Chang, J.C.; Kim, J.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This study is concerned with the development of reuse technology for 1100 deg.C class major component of gas turbine. To get the fundamental understanding for the repair techniques by PTAW, the physical properties and microstructures of welding metal and the effect of individual welding parameters are reviewed. Moreover, by extensive analysis on the various problems following the PTAW and try to figure out the solutions, the study will help us to apply the PTAW technology on the repair works of used turbine blades. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Critical issues in overlay metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Neal T.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, following an overview of overlay metrology, the difficult relationship of overlay with device performance and yield is discussed and supported with several examples. This is followed by a discussion of the impending collision of metrology equipment performance and "real" process tolerances for sub 0.18 um technologies. This convergence of tolerance and performance is demonstrated to lead to the current emergence of real-time overlay modeling in a feed-forward/feedback process environment and the associated metrology/sampling implications. This modeling takes advantage of the wealth of understanding concerning the systematic behavior of overlay registration errors. Finally, the impact of new process technologies (RET, OAI, CPSM, CMP, & etc.) on the measurement target is discussed and shown to de-stabilize overlay performance on standard overlay measurement target designs.

  4. Overlay networks toward information networking

    CERN Document Server

    Tarkoma, Sasu

    2010-01-01

    With their ability to solve problems in massive information distribution and processing, while keeping scaling costs low, overlay systems represent a rapidly growing area of R&D with important implications for the evolution of Internet architecture. Inspired by the author's articles on content based routing, Overlay Networks: Toward Information Networking provides a complete introduction to overlay networks. Examining what they are and what kind of structures they require, the text covers the key structures, protocols, and algorithms used in overlay networks. It reviews the current state of th

  5. Large Scale Evaluation fo Nickel Aluminide Rolls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This completed project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem Steel (now Mittal Steel) to demonstrate the effectiveness of using nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated, energy-efficient, commercial annealing furnace system.

  6. Influência da energia de soldagem na microestrutura e na microdureza de revestimentos de aço inoxidável duplex Influence of the heat input on the microstructure and microhardness of weld overlay of duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Barbosa Nunes

    2012-06-01

    influence of the heat input on the microstructure and the microhardness of the weld metal of the DSS. The weld overlay were performed with deposition of two layers on the structural steel ASTM A516 Gr.60, using as filler metal the AWS E2209-17 coated electrode. Three energy levels (15, 20 and 24 kJ/ cm were used, varying the welding current and speed. It was verified that for energy levels used didn't have significant difference on the ferrite content, but the first bead deposited had a higher austenite content in relation to other beads. All conditions got microhardness below the critical value.

  7. Residual Stress Evaluation of Weld Inlay Process on Reactor Vessel Nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kihyun; Cho, Hong Seok [KEPCO KPS, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Weld overlay, weld inlay and stress improvement are mitigation technologies for butt joints. Weld overlay is done on pressurizer nozzles which are the highest potential locations occurring PWSCC due to high temperature in Korea. Reactor vessel nozzles are other big safety concerns for butt joints. Weld overlay and stress improvement should be so difficult to apply to those locations because space is too limited. Weld inlay should be one of the solutions. KEPCO KPS has developed laser welding system and process for reactor nozzles. Welding residual stress analysis is necessary for flaw evaluation. United States nuclear regulatory commission has calculated GTAW(Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) residual stress using ABAQUS. To confirm effectiveness of weld inlay process, welding residual stress analysis was performed. and difference between GTAW and LASER welding process was compared. Evaluation of weld inlay process using ANSYS and ABAQUS is performed. All of the both results are similar. The residual stress generated after weld inlay was on range of 450-500 MPa. Welding residual stresses are differently generated by GTAW and LASER welding. But regardless of welding process type, residual tensile stress is generated on inside surface.

  8. Evaluation of the Cargill Safelane Surface Overlay

    OpenAIRE

    Sprinkel, Michael M.; Daniel S. Roosevelt; Flintsch, Gerardo W.; de León Izeppi, Edgar; Mokarem, David W.

    2009-01-01

    A recent development in polymer concrete overlays is the Cargill SafeLane surface overlay (SafeLane overlay). The 3/8-in-thick overlay is constructed with epoxy and broadcast aggregates, as are typical multiple-layer epoxy overlays that are used to provide a skid-resistant wearing surface for bridge decks that protects the decks again intrusion by chloride ions. Reportedly, the SafeLane overlay is unique in that Cargill indicates that the limestone aggregate used in the overlay can absorb and...

  9. Environmental Studies on Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, William J.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Smialek, James L.; Brady, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Titanium aluminides are attractive alternatives to superalloys in moderate temperature applications (600 to 850 C) by virtue of their high strength-to-density ratio (high specific strength). These alloys are also more ductile than competing intermetallic systems. However, most Ti-based alloys tend to degrade through interstitial embrittlement and rapid oxidation during exposure to elevated temperatures. Therefore, their environmental behavior must be thoroughly investigated before they can be developed further. The goals of titanium aluminide environmental studies at the NASA Lewis Research Center are twofold: characterize the degradation mechanisms for advanced structural alloys and determine what means are available to minimize degradation. The studies to date have covered the alpha 2 (Ti3Al), orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb), and gamma (TiAl) classes of alloys.

  10. Investigation of the weldability of iron-aluminum-chromium overlay coatings for corrosion protection in oxidizing/sulfidizing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Jonathan R.

    The current study investigated the effect of chromium additions on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld overlay claddings containing chromium additions. It was found that the weldability of FeAlCr claddings was a function of both the aluminum and chromium concentrations of the weld coatings. Weld overlay compositions that were not susceptible to hydrogen cracking were identified and the underlying mechanism behind the hydrogen cracking phenomenon was investigated further. It was concluded that the cracking behavior of the FeAlCr welds depended strongly on the microstructure of the weld fusion zone. Although it was found that the cracking susceptibility was influenced by the presence of Fe-Al intermetallic phases (namely Fe3 Al and FeAl), the cracking behavior of FeAlCr weld overlay claddings also depended on the size and distribution of carbide and oxide particles present within the weld structure. These particles acted as hydrogen trapping sites, which are areas where free hydrogen segregates and can no longer contribute to the hydrogen embrittlement of the metal. It was determined that in practical applications of these FeAlCr weld overlay coatings, carbon should be present within these welds to reduce the amount of hydrogen available for hydrogen cracking. Based on the weldability results of the FeAlCr weld claddings, coating compositions that were able to be deposited crack-free were used for long-term corrosion testing in a simulated low NOx environment. These alloys were compared to a Ni-based superalloy (622), which is commonly utilized as boiler tube coatings in power plant furnaces for corrosion protection. It was found that the FeAlCr alloys demonstrated superior corrosion resistance when compared to the Ni-based superalloy. Due to the excellent long-term corrosion behavior of FeAlCr weld overlays that were immune to hydrogen cracking, it was concluded that select FeAlCr weld overlay compositions would make excellent corrosion resistant

  11. Reactive spraying of nickel-aluminide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, S. C.; Sikka, V. K.; Swindeman, C. J.; Seals, R. D.

    1997-09-01

    Reactive spraying of nickel aluminides was accomplished via reaction synthesis techniques in which nickel and aluminum powders were fed through a direct- current plasma torch onto carbon steel substrates. The as- sprayed coatings obtained by reactive spraying were characterized by x- ray diffraction and microscopic techniques. Reactive spraying of nickel and aluminum resulted in coatings consisting of Ni, Al, Ni 3Al, NiAl3, Ni5Al3, NiAl, and Al2O3, depending on the experimental conditions. Nickel aluminide phases observed in plasma spray depositions were compared with the phases obtained by combustion synthesis techniques, and the formation of phases in reactive spraying was attributed to the exothermic reaction between splats of aluminum and nickel. Primary and secondary reactions leading to the formation of nickel aluminides were also examined. The splat thickness and the reaction layer suppressed the formation of desired equilibrium phases such as Ni3Al and NiAl. As- sprayed coatings were annealed to enhance the diffusional reactions between the product phases and aluminum and nickel. Coatings obtained by reactive spraying of elemental powders were compared with as- sprayed and annealed coatings obtained with a bond coat material in which nickel was deposited onto aluminum particles.

  12. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb3Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to ∼750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings

  13. Titanium aluminide intermetallic alloys with improved wear resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun; Lin, Hua-Tay; Blau, Peter J.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2014-07-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy composition having an improved wear resistance, the method comprising heating a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy material in an oxygen-containing environment at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a top oxide layer and underlying oxygen-diffused layer, followed by removal of the top oxide layer such that the oxygen-diffused layer is exposed. The invention is also directed to the resulting oxygen-diffused titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy, as well as mechanical components or devices containing the improved alloy composition.

  14. A study on the porosity of CO2 laser welding of titanium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li; Hu Lunji; Gong Shuili

    2006-01-01

    The CO2 laser welding of BT20 titanium alloy and Ti-23Al-17Nb titanium aluminide was conducted to investigate into the porosity in titanium alloy weld. The results show that there are two sorts of porosities observed in welds of titanium alloy laser welding based on the microscopic characteristics of the porosities. One is the metallurgical porosity with round and smooth inner wall, which results from the surface contamination. The other is the processing porosity with irregular and rough inner wall that displays the trace of the pool flowing, which results from the ruffle on the keyhole wall gathering together locally and closing down the gas in the keyhole into bubbles because of the keyhole fluctuating. The CO2 laser welding could break down easily the surface oxide film and produce little metallurgical porosity, but produces easily processing porosity when partial penetration or unstable-full penetration laser welding is conducted, which always occurs in the center of weld.

  15. Overlay networking:applications and research challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jun-xiu; SHAN Xiu-ming; REN Yong

    2004-01-01

    Overlay networking is one of the perspective solutions to today's Intemet challenges. At basic service level, overlay networks can serve as a supplement and enhancement of existing services, such as routing and addressing. At high application level, overlay networks can be used for applications, which are difficult to deploy in existing IP architecture with some specific reasons, e.g., they need high-level information, which is hard to obtain by underlying layers. To address the heterogeneity of today's Internet, overlay networks provide ways to service availability and desirable performance while retaining scalability. In contrast to changing the existing network layer, overlay networks allow bootstrapping, which is most important in the development of Internet infrastructure. Various applications of overlay networking are clarified in this paper. Research challenges including routing and searching in overlay networking are also identified.

  16. Comparing Maintenance Strategies for Overlays

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Aurell, Erik; Haridi, Seif

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analytical tool for understanding the performance of structured overlay networks under churn based on the master-equation approach of physics. We motivate and derive an equation for the average number of hops taken by lookups during churn, for the Chord network. We analyse this equation in detail to understand the behaviour with and without churn. We then use this understanding to predict how lookups will scale for varying peer population as well as varying the sizes of the routing tables. We then consider a change in the maintenance algorithm of the overlay, from periodic stabilisation to a reactive one which corrects fingers only when a change is detected. We generalise our earlier analysis to underdstand how the reactive strategy compares with the periodic one.

  17. CVD aluminiding process for producing a modified platinum aluminide bond coat for improved high temperature performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of depositing by chemical vapor deposition a modified platinum aluminide diffusion coating onto a superalloy substrate comprising the steps of applying a layer of a platinum group metal to the superalloy substrate; passing an externally generated aluminum halide gas through an internal gas generator which is integral with a retort, the internal gas generator generating a modified halide gas; and co-depositing aluminum and modifier onto the superalloy substrate. In one form, the modified halide gas is hafnium chloride and the modifier is hafnium with the modified platinum aluminum bond coat comprising a single phase additive layer of platinum aluminide with at least about 0.5 percent hafnium by weight percent and about 1 to about 15 weight percent of hafnium in the boundary between a diffusion layer and the additive layer. The bond coat produced by this method is also claimed.

  18. An Oxidation-Resistant Coating Alloy for Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Smialek, James L.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium aluminides based on the g-phase (TiAl) offer the potential for component weight savings of up to 50 percent over conventional superalloys in 600 to 850 C aerospace applications. Extensive development efforts over the past 10 years have led to the identification of "engineering" gamma-alloys, which offer a balance of room-temperature mechanical properties and high-temperature strength retention. The gamma class of titanium aluminides also offers oxidation and interstitial (oxygen and nitrogen) embrittlement resistance superior to that of the alpha(sub 2) (Ti3Al) and orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb) classes of titanium aluminides. However, environmental durability is still a concern, especially at temperatures above 750 to 800 C. Recent work at the NASA Lewis Research Center led to the development of an oxidation-resistant coating alloy that shows great promise for the protection of gamma titanium aluminides.

  19. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, R.; Sieber, M.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their outstanding specific mechanical and high-temperature properties, titanium aluminides exhibit a high potential for lightweight components exposed to high temperatures. However, their application is limited through their low wear resistance and the increasing high-temperature oxidation starting from about 750 °C. By the use of oxide ceramic coatings, these constraints can be set aside and the possible applications of titanium aluminides can be extended. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) represents a process for the generation of oxide ceramic conversion coatings with high thickness. The current work aims at the clarification of different electrolyte components’ influences on the oxide layer evolution on alloy TNM-B1 (Ti43.5Al4Nb1Mo0.1B) and the creation of compact and wear resistant coatings. Model experiments were applied using a ramp-wise increase of the anodic potential in order to show the influence of electrolyte components on the discharge initiation and the early stage of the oxide layer growth. The production of PEO layers with technically relevant thicknesses close to 100 μm was conducted in alkaline electrolytes with varying amounts of Na2SiO3·5H2O and K4P2O7 under symmetrically pulsed current conditions. Coating properties were evaluated with regard to morphology, chemical composition, hardness and wear resistance. The addition of phosphates and silicates leads to an increasing substrate passivation and the growth of compact oxide layers with higher thicknesses. Optimal electrolyte compositions for maximum coating hardness and thickness were identified by statistical analysis. Under these conditions, a homogeneous inner layer with low porosity can be achieved. The frictional wear behavior of the compact coating layer is superior to a hard anodized layer on aluminum.

  20. TES overlayed on MOLA DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This image is TES thermal data (Orbit 222) overlayed on the MOLA DEM. The color scale is TES T18-T25, which is a cold spot index. The grey scale is MOLA elevation in kilometers. Most cold spots can be attributed to surface spectral emissivity effects. Regions that are colored black-violet-blue have near unity emissivity and are coarse grained CO2. Regions that are yellow-red are fined grained CO2. The red-white spot located approximately 300W85N is our most likely candidate for a CO2 snow storm.

  1. Contributions regarding chemical composition variation in ultrasonic field overlaying welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amza, Gh; Petrescu, V.; Niţoi, D. F.; Amza, C. Gh; Dimitrescu, A.; Apostolescu, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Paper presents a new reconditioning method based on ultrasonic field and analyses the modificated structure composition in three zone: filler material, thermal influenced zone, and base material. Also, chemical composition variation as a result of ultrasonic wave influence is studied besides the ultrasonic wave influence on dilution process.

  2. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  3. Welding IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  4. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Z. [Edison Welding Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  5. Analysis Of Overlay Distortion Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, John D.; Kirk, Joseph P.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive geometrical approach is presented for the least-squares analysis of overlay distortion patterns into useful, physically meaningful systematic distortion subpatterns and an essentially non-systematic residue. A scheme of generally useful distortion sub-patterns is presented in graphic and algorithmic form; some of these sub-patterns are additions to those already in widespread use. A graphic and geometric approach is emphasized rather than an algebraic or statistical approach, and an example illustrates the value in utilizing the pattern-detecting ability of the eye-brain system. The conditions are described under which different distortion sub-patterns may interact, possibly leading to misleading or erroneous conclusions about the types and amounts of different distortions present. Examples of typical interaction situations are given, and recommendations are made for analytic procedures to avoid misinterpretation. It is noted that the lower-order distortion patterns preserve straight-line linearity, but that higher-order distortion may result in straight lines becoming curved. The principle of least-squares analysis is outlined and a simple polynomial data-fitting example is used to illustrate the method. Algorithms are presented for least-squares distortion analysis of overlay patterns, and an APL2 program is given to show how this may easily be implemented on a digital computer. The appendix extends the treatment to cases where small-angle approximation is not permissible.

  6. KMPlayer出现Overlay Mixer错误

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    问:我使用KMPlayer播放器播放电影时,经常出现Overlay Mixer错误,有时候不出现,我将Overlay Mixer插件删除了,但它还会自动加载,继续出错。请问这是什么原因?

  7. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a process for making a large number of weld beads as separate contours, spaced out from each other, by means of an automatic welding head. Under this invention, after striking the arc in the prescribed manner and positioning the torch on the first contour to be welded and having made the first weld bead, the torch current is reduced to bring about a part fade out of the arc. The torch is then moved to the starting position on a second contour to be welded where a static timed pre-fusion is effected by resumption of the welding current to carry out the second weld bead by following the second welding contour in the same manner and so forth. The invention particularly applies to the welding of tube ends to a tube plate

  8. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  9. Large-scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rolls in a Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethelehem Steel's (Now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengel, J.

    2003-12-16

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system. Many challenges were involved in this project, including developing welding procedures for joining nickel aluminide intermetallic alloys with H-series austenitic alloys, developing commercial cast roll manufacturing specifications, working with several commercial suppliers to produce a quantity of high quality, reproducible nickel aluminide rolls for a large steel industrial annealing furnace, installing and demonstrating the capability of the rolls in this furnace, performing processing trials to evaluate the benefits of new equipment and processes, and documenting the findings. Updated furnace equipment including twenty-five new automated furnace control dampers have been installed replacing older design, less effective units. These dampers, along with upgraded flame-safety control equipment and new AC motors and roll-speed control equipment, are providing improved furnace control and additional energy efficiency. Energy data shows up to a 34% energy reduction from baseline after the installation of upgraded furnace damper controls along with up to a 34% reduction in greenhouse gases, potential for an additional 3 to 6% energy reduction per campaign of light-up and shutdown, and a 46% energy reduction from baseline for limited trials of a combination of improved damper control and straight-through plate processing. The straight

  10. As-cast titanium aluminides microstructure modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Duarte

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Two cast g titanium aluminides, Ti47Al and Ti50Al (at. %, were obtained by arc melting under an argon atmosphere. The as-cast microstructure modification by annealing under protective argon atmosphere and hot isostatic pressing (HIP was analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy with microanalysis facilities. As-cast structures presented strong microsegregations, being composed of primary a dendrites (with low Al content, which transformed into lamellar a2 + g during solid state cooling, and interdendritic g phase (with high Al content. Annealing in the a + g field was responsible for a partial reduction of microsegregation, a decreasing of the volume fraction of a2 + g lamellar dendrites, an increasing of g volume fraction and the occurrence of a small fraction of a2 particles and plates in some of the g grains. Annealing in the a field at 1400 °C for one hour was insufficient to eliminate the as-cast microstructure in the Ti50Al alloy and produced large equiaxed lamellar colonies of a2+g in the Ti47Al alloy. HIP in the a + g field (to avoid excessive grain growth was responsible for microstructure modifications similar to the ones obtained by heat treating under similar soaking conditions.

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PERFORMANCE OF ALUMINIDE COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, B.A.; Zhang, Y.; Haynes, J.A.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    In order to determine the potential benefits and limitations of aluminide coatings, coatings made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Fe- and Ni-base alloy substrates are being evaluated in various high-temperature environments. Testing of coatings on representative ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys has found that high frequency thermal cycling (1h cycle time) can significantly degrade the coating. Based on comparison with similar specimens with no thermal cycling or a longer cycle time (100h), this degradation was not due to Al loss from the coating but most likely because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and the substrate. Several coated Ni-base alloys were tested in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO2 environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Coated specimens showed less mass loss than the uncoated specimens after 1000h at 900 C and preliminary characterization examined the post-test coating structure and extent of attack.

  12. Device overlay method for high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Youngsik; Kim, Myoungsoo; Heo, Hoyoung; Jeon, Sanghuck; Choi, DongSub; Nabeth, Jeremy; Brinster, Irina; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    Advancing technology nodes with smaller process margins require improved photolithography overlay control. Overlay control at develop inspection (DI) based on optical metrology targets is well established in semiconductor manufacturing. Advances in target design and metrology technology have enabled significant improvements in overlay precision and accuracy. One approach to represent in-die on-device as-etched overlay is to measure at final inspection (FI) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Disadvantages to this approach include inability to rework, limited layer coverage due to lack of transparency, and higher cost of ownership (CoO). A hybrid approach is investigated in this report whereby infrequent DI/FI bias is characterized and the results are used to compensate the frequent DI overlay results. The bias characterization is done on an infrequent basis, either based on time or triggered from change points. On a per-device and per-layer basis, the optical target overlay at DI is compared with SEM on-device overlay at FI. The bias characterization results are validated and tracked for use in compensating the DI APC controller. Results of the DI/FI bias characterization and sources of variation are presented, as well as the impact on the DI correctables feeding the APC system. Implementation details in a high volume manufacturing (HVM) wafer fab will be reviewed. Finally future directions of the investigation will be discussed.

  13. Steel welding.

    OpenAIRE

    Kučera, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Topic of the thesis concerns the problem of steel welding. The aim was to give acomprehensive overview on the topic, describe the known methods, advantages and disadvantages of welding technology. The introductory part is focused on introducing the basics of the process required to produce high-quality connections. Chapter three offers an overview of known and used welding methods with thein brief description of the method. The next chapter describes steel as material suitable for welding....

  14. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  15. Root cause analysis of overlay metrology excursions with scatterometry overlay technology (SCOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Karsten; Park, Dongsuk; Zhou, Yue; Cho, Winston; Ahn, Ki Cheol; Snow, Patrick; McGowan, Richard; Marciano, Tal; Ramanathan, Vidya; Herrera, Pedro; Itzkovich, Tal; Camp, Janay; Adel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel method to establish a root cause for an overlay excursion using optical Scatterometry metrology. Scatterometry overlay metrology consists of four cells (two per directions) of grating on grating structures that are illuminated with a laser and diffracted orders measured in the pupil plane within a certain range of aperture. State of art algorithms permit, with symmetric considerations over the targets, to extract the overlay between the two gratings. We exploit the optical properties of the target to extract further information from the measured pupil images, particularly information that maybe related to any change in the process that may lead to an overlay excursion. Root Cause Analysis or RCA is being developed to identify different kinds of process variations (either within the wafer, or between different wafers) that may indicate overlay excursions. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a collaboration between Globalfoundries and KLA-Tencor to identify a symmetric process variation using scatterometry overlay metrology and RCA technique.

  16. Routing on Overlay Networks : Developments and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Overlay networks are networks operating on the inter-domain level, where the edge hosts learn of each other and, based on knowledge of underlying network performance, they form loosely coupled neighboring relationships. These relationships can be used to induce a specific graph, where nodes are representing hosts and edges are representing neighboring relationships. Graph abstraction and the associated graph theory can be further used to formulate routing algorithms on overlay networks. The m...

  17. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.;

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  18. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleishhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2003-12-09

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  19. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr.ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  20. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, M.R.; Scorey, C.; Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.; German, R.M.

    2000-02-29

    A powder metallurgical process is disclosed of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as {<=}1% Cr, {>=}0.05% Zr{<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Ni, {<=}0.75% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, and/or {<=}3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 {mu}m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  1. A moving overlay shrinks the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Fook K

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a study examining the effects of overlaying a veil of spots on the letters in a central rapid serial visual presentation stream. Observers identified two target letters (T1 and T2, respectively) embedded in a stream of distractor letters printed in a different color. In Experiment 1, the attentional blink (AB) diminished when a different overlay veiled each letter, such that the spots appeared to move as the letters changed. Experiment 2 concerned whether the performance enhancement occurred because the overlay hampered processing of the lag 1 distractor, thus weakening the distractor's interference with T1. Experiment 3 focused on how changing the overlay at or around T1 affected the AB. The attention disengagement hypothesis was proposed to explain the common theme in the results-that performance was only enhanced when different overlays were applied to the T1 and lag 1 frames. The claim is that the AB reflects a failure of prompt attentional disengagement from T1, which, in turn, delays reengagement when T2 appears shortly thereafter. When T1's disappearance is accompanied by an overlay change, the perceptual system gets an additional cue signaling that the visual scene has changed, thereby inducing attentional disengagement. Apart from facilitating prompt reengagement at the next target, earlier disengagement also improves target recovery by excluding features of the trailing item, likely to be a distractor, from working memory.

  2. Microstructural stability of a nickel-based alloy overlay on a 2.25Cr1Mo steel substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Saghafifar, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Ni-based superalloy weld overlays are widely used in electricity generating plants to significantly reduce high temperature corrosion problems of ferritic steel components under service conditions. Welding a nickel alloy similar to IN625 onto the outer bore of a 2.25Cr1Mo steel tube enhances its service life as a superheater tube in the highly corrosive environment of a Waste-to-Energy boiler. For the purposes of studying the effects of high temperature service on the microstructure of this l...

  3. Synapse: a Scalable Protocol for Interconnecting Heterogeneous Overlay Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Liquori, Luigi; Tedeschi, Cédric; Vanni, Laurent; Ciancaglini, Vincenzo; Bongiovanni, Francesco; Marinkovic, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    International audience This paper presents Synapse, a scalable protocol for information retrieval over the inter-connection of heterogeneous overlay networks. Applications on top of Synapse see those intra-overlay networks as a unique inter-overlay network. Scalability in Synapse is achieved via co-located nodes, i.e. nodes that are part of multiple overlay networks at the same time. Co-located nodes, playing the role of neural synapses and connected to several overlay networks, give a lar...

  4. An assessment of the mechanical strengths of aluminide-based thin coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Li, SY; Ng, HP; Ngan, AHW

    2001-01-01

    Titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide-based thin coatings were synthesized by magnetron sputtering from intermetallic TiAl and Ni3Al alloy targets on nickel substrates. Both types of aluminide coating exhibited high surface hardness values that varied with the degree of heat treatment. The hardness of the coatings was investigated using micro- and nano- indentation techniques. In order to estimate the intrinsic strength of the films, the indentation size effects of the apparent hardness wer...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECTS IN ALLOY 152, 52 AND 52M WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Seffens, Rob J.; Efsing, Pal G.

    2009-08-27

    Defect distributions have been documented by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction in alloy 152 and 52 mockups welds, alloy 52 and 52M overlay mockups and an alloy 52M inlay. Primary defects were small cracks at grain boundaries except for more extensive cracking in the dilution zone of an alloy 52 overlay on 304SS. Detailed characterizations of the dilution zone cracks were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy identifying grain boundary titanium-nitride precipitation associated with the intergranular separations. I. INTRODUCTION Weldments continue to be a primary location of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor systems. While problems related to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) sensitization and intergranular (IG) SCC of austenitic stainless alloys in boiling-water reactors (BWRs) have been significantly reduced, SCC has now been observed in HAZs of non-sensitized materials and in dissimilar metal welds where Ni-base alloy weld metals are used. IGSCC in weld metals has been observed in both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with recent examples for PWR pressure vessel penetrations producing the most concern. This has led to the replacement of alloy 600/182/82 welds with higher Cr, more corrosion-resistant replacement materials (alloy 690/152/52/52M). Complicating this issue has been a known susceptibility to cracking during welding [1-7] of these weld metals. There is a critical need for an improved understanding of the weld metal metallurgy and defect formation in Ni-base alloy welds to effectively assess long-term performance. A series of macroscopic to microscopic examinations were performed on available mockup welds made with alloy 52 or alloy 152 plus selected overlay and inlay mockups. The intent was to expand our understanding of weld metal structures in simulated LWR service components with a focus on as-welded defects. Microstructural features, defect distributions

  6. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  7. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  8. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  9. Exploring overlay journals: the RIOJA project

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Researchers in cosmology and astrophysics depend on the arXiv repository for the registration and dissemination of their work, as well as for current awareness, yet they continue to submit papers to journals for review. Could rapid quality certification be overlaid directly onto the arXiv repository? This presentation introduces the RIOJA (Repository Interface to Overlaid Journal Archives) project, on which a group of cosmology researchers from the UK is working with UCL Library Services and Cornell University. The project is creating a tool to support the overlay of journals onto repositories, and will demonstrate a cosmology journal overlaid on top of arXiv. RIOJA will also work with the cosmology community to explore the social and economic aspects of journal overlay in this discipline: what other value, besides the quality stamp, does journal publication typically add? What are the costs of the ideal overlay journal for this community, and how could those costs be recovered? Would researchers real...

  10. Patent Overlay Mapping: Visualizing Technological Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, Luciano; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L; Rafols, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new global patent map that represents all technological categories, and a method to locate patent data of individual organizations and technological fields on the global map. This second patent overlay map technique is shown to be of potential interest to support competitive intelligence and policy decision-making. The global patent map is based on similarities in citing-to-cited relationships between categories of the International Patent Classification (IPC) of European Patent Office (EPO) patents from 2000 to 2006. This patent dataset, extracted from PatStat database, represents more than 760,000 patent records in more than 400 IPC categories. To illustrate the kind of analytical support offered by this approach, the paper shows the overlay of nanotechnology-related patenting activities of two companies and two different nanotechnology subfields on to the global patent map. The exercise shows the potential of patent overlay maps to visualize technological areas and...

  11. Overlay Technique for Transcatheter Left Atrial Appendage Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Zhu, Mengyun; Lu, Yunlan; Tang, Kai; Zhao, Dongdong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yawei

    2015-08-01

    The Overlay technique is popular in peripheral artery interventions, but not in coronary or cardiac structural procedures. We present an initial experience using three-episode overlays during a transcatheter left atrial appendage closure. The first overlay was applied to facilitate advancement of the delivery sheath into left atrium. The second overlay was used to navigate the advancement of prepped delivery system containing the compressed occluder into its optimal position in the left atrium. The third overlay facilitated the real-time deployment of the closure device. This case report demonstrates the effectiveness of the overlay technique in facilitating each step of the transcatheter left atrial appendage closure.

  12. The Oxidation and Protection of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Brindley, William J.; Smialek, James L.; Locci, Ivan E.

    1996-01-01

    The excellent density-specific properties of the gamma class of titanium aluminides make them attractive for intermediate-temperature (600-850 C) aerospace applications. The oxidation and embrittlement resistance of these alloys is superior to that of the alpha(sub 2) and orthorhombic classes of titanium aluminides. However, since gamma alloys form an intermixed Al2O3/TiO2 scale in air rather than the desired continuous Al2O3 scale, oxidation resistance is inadequate at the high end of this temperature range (i.e., greater than 750-800 C). For applications at such temperatures, an oxidation-resistant coating will be needed; however, a major drawback of the oxidation-resistant coatings currently available is severe degradation in fatigue life by the coating. A new class of oxidation-resistant coatings based in the Ti-Al-Cr system offers the potential for improved fatigue life.

  13. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan (Knoxville, TN); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Sikka, Vinod Kumar (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  14. KML Super Overlay to WMS Translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2007-01-01

    This translator is a server-based application that automatically generates KML super overlay configuration files required by Google Earth for map data access via the Open Geospatial Consortium WMS (Web Map Service) standard. The translator uses a set of URL parameters that mirror the WMS parameters as much as possible, and it also can generate a super overlay subdivision of any given area that is only loaded when needed, enabling very large areas of coverage at very high resolutions. It can make almost any dataset available as a WMS service visible and usable in any KML application, without the need to reformat the data.

  15. A Recent Welding Technique: Laser Welding

    OpenAIRE

    ATİK, Dt.Ezgi; CİĞER, Prof. Dr. Semra

    2013-01-01

    Welding is a process that joins two adjacent metal surfaces with or without using filling material. The latest laser welding technique is a technology based on using infrared light spectrum. Laser welding has numerous advantages considering other conventional welding options used in dentistry and because of these reasons laser welding is used widely. When searching the literature in concern with laser welding, it is observed that this technique is compared with other conventional welding meth...

  16. Deposition of aluminide and silicide based protective coatings on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare aluminide and alumino-silicide composite coatings on niobium using halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique for improving its oxidation resistance. The coated samples are characterized by SEM, EDS, EPMA and hardness measurements. We observe formation of NbAl3 in aluminide coating of Nb, though the alumino-silicide coating leads to formation primarily of NbSi2 in the inner layer and a ternary compound of Nb-Si-Al in the outer layer, as reported earlier (Majumdar et al. ). Formation of niobium silicide is preferred over niobium aluminide during alumino-silicide coating experiments, indicating Si is more strongly bonded to Nb than Al, although equivalent quantities of aluminium and silicon powders were used in the pack chemistry. We also employ first-principles density functional pseudopotential-based calculations to calculate the relative stability of these intermediate phases and the adhesion strength of the Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces. NbSi2 exhibits much stronger covalent character as compared to NbAl3. The ideal work of adhesion for the relaxed Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces are calculated to be 3226 mJ/m2 and 3545 mJ/m2, respectively, indicating stronger Nb-Si bonding across the interface.

  17. Deposition of aluminide and silicide based protective coatings on niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S.; Arya, A.; Sharma, I. G.; Suri, A. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2010-11-01

    We compare aluminide and alumino-silicide composite coatings on niobium using halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique for improving its oxidation resistance. The coated samples are characterized by SEM, EDS, EPMA and hardness measurements. We observe formation of NbAl3 in aluminide coating of Nb, though the alumino-silicide coating leads to formation primarily of NbSi2 in the inner layer and a ternary compound of Nb-Si-Al in the outer layer, as reported earlier (Majumdar et al. [11]). Formation of niobium silicide is preferred over niobium aluminide during alumino-silicide coating experiments, indicating Si is more strongly bonded to Nb than Al, although equivalent quantities of aluminium and silicon powders were used in the pack chemistry. We also employ first-principles density functional pseudopotential-based calculations to calculate the relative stability of these intermediate phases and the adhesion strength of the Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces. NbSi2 exhibits much stronger covalent character as compared to NbAl3. The ideal work of adhesion for the relaxed Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces are calculated to be 3226 mJ/m2 and 3545 mJ/m2, respectively, indicating stronger Nb-Si bonding across the interface.

  18. Preparation of aluminide coatings at relatively low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhao-lin; HE Ye-dong; WANG De-ren; GAO Wei

    2006-01-01

    A method was presented to prepare aluminide coatings on metals by combining the pack aluminizing with the ball impact process. This technique applied mechanical vibration to a retort, which was loaded with pack-aluminizing powder, specimens and alloy balls. Pack aluminizing was carried out with repeated ball impact, which accelerated chemical reactions and atomic diffusion.Aluminide coatings were formed at a relatively lower temperature (below 600 ℃) and in a shorter treatment time, compared with the conventional pack aluminizing. The effects of the operation temperature and the treatment time on the formation of the coatings were analysed. The SEM, EDS and XRD analysis results show that the aluminide coatings appear to be homogeneous, with a high density and free of porosity, and have excellent adherence to the substrate. The coatings mainly consist of Al-rich phases such as η-Fe2Al5,θ-FeAl3 and CrAl5. Oxidation resistance was studied by high-temperature tests. The formation mechanism of the Al-coatings was also investigated. This technique provides a new approach for industrial diffusion coatings with great energy and time savings.

  19. Hybrid overlay metrology for high order correction by using CDSEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Philippe; Halder, Sandip; Lorusso, Gian; Baudemprez, Bart; Inoue, Osamu; Okagawa, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Overlay control has become one of the most critical issues for semiconductor manufacturing. Advanced lithographic scanners use high-order corrections or correction per exposure to reduce the residual overlay. It is not enough in traditional feedback of overlay measurement by using ADI wafer because overlay error depends on other process (etching process and film stress, etc.). It needs high accuracy overlay measurement by using AEI wafer. WIS (Wafer Induced Shift) is the main issue for optical overlay, IBO (Image Based Overlay) and DBO (Diffraction Based Overlay). We design dedicated SEM overlay targets for dual damascene process of N10 by i-ArF multi-patterning. The pattern is same as device-pattern locally. Optical overlay tools select segmented pattern to reduce the WIS. However segmentation has limit, especially the via-pattern, for keeping the sensitivity and accuracy. We evaluate difference between the viapattern and relaxed pitch gratings which are similar to optical overlay target at AEI. CDSEM can estimate asymmetry property of target from image of pattern edge. CDSEM can estimate asymmetry property of target from image of pattern edge. We will compare full map of SEM overlay to full map of optical overlay for high order correction ( correctables and residual fingerprints).

  20. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  1. Dynamic process of angular distortion between aluminum and titanium alloys with TIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui; LIANG Zhen-xin; ZHANG Jian-xun

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic process of welding angular distortion in the overlaying welding of 5A12 aluminum alloy and BT20 titanium alloy was investigated. Information of dynamic distortion was got via self-made welding dynamic measuring system. Research results show that the characteristics of dynamic distortions at various positions of the plate edge parallel to the weld of 5A12 and BT20 alloy are different. Comparison between 5A12 and BT20 alloy shows that transverse shrinkage and downward longitudinal bending are main factors influencing the dynamic angular distortion processes of 5A12 and BT20 alloy under welding heat input of 0.32 kJ/mm. The angular distortion of 5A12 alloy is completely inversed with welding heat input increasing to 0.4 kJ/mm, and the position of weld center and buckling distortion become the primary factors.

  2. Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcangelo eUccula

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we are concerned with the role of colors in reading written texts. It has been argued that colored overlays applied above written texts positively influence both reading fluency and reading speed. These effects would be particularly evident for those individuals affected by the so called Meares-Irlen syndrome, i.e. who experience eyestrain and/or visual distortions – e.g. color, shape or movement illusions – while reading. This condition would interest the 12-14% of the general population and up to the 46% of the dyslexic population. Thus, colored overlays have been largely employed as a remedy for some aspects of the difficulties in reading experienced by dyslexic individuals, as fluency and speed. Despite the wide use of colored overlays, how they exert their effects has not been made clear yet. Also, according to some researchers, the results supporting the efficacy of colored overlays as a tool for helping readers are at least controversial. Furthermore, the very nature of the Meares-Irlen syndrome has been questioned. Here we provide a concise, critical review of the literature.

  3. Network-aware SuperPeers-Peers Geometric Overlay Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lua, E.K.; Zhou, X.

    2007-01-01

    Peer-to-Peer (P2P) overlay networks can be utilized to deploy massive Internet overlay services such as multicast, content distribution, file sharing, etc. efficiently without any underlying network support. The crucial step to meet this objective is to design network-aware overlay network topologie

  4. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  5. Welding robots

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, J. Norberto; Loureiro, Altino; Godinho, T.; Ferreira, P; Fernando, B; Morgado, J

    2003-01-01

    Using robots in industrial welding operations is common but far from being a streamlined technological process. The problems are with the robots, still in their early design stages and difficult to use and program by regular operators; the welding process, which is complex and not really well known and the human-machine interfaces, which are unnatural and not really working. In this article, these problems are discussed, and a system designed with the double objective of serving R&D efforts o...

  6. Degradation of nonmodified and rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Wierzbińska, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Kamil; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-base superalloy CMSX 4 used in the turbine blades of aircraft engines was coated with rhodium layer (0.5-μm thick). Next coated CMSX 4 superalloy was aluminized by the CVD method. The rhodium modified aluminide coating and nonmodified aluminide coating were oxidized at 1100°C at the air atmosphere. The rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. The spallation equal 62% of the total area was observed on the surface of the nonmodified coating whereas only 36% spallation area was observed on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating after the oxidation test. The oxide layer formed on the surface of the nonmodified coating was composed of nonprotective (Ni,Cr)Al2 O4 and (Ni,Cr)O phases. Aluminium in the coating reacts with oxygen, forming a protective α-Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating. When the oxide cracks and spalls due to oxidation, additional aluminium from the coating diffuses to the surface to form the oxide. The presence of protective Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating slows coating degradation. Therefore, rhodium modified aluminide coating has better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one.

  7. The properties and microstructure of padding welds built up on the surface of forging dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pytel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The study presents selected results of the examinations of the properties and microstructure of weld overlays built up with the UTOP38,F-812 and F-818 welding wires on a substrate of the 42CrMo4 structural steel. Among others, the following investigations were carriedout: bend tests, hardness measurements and determination of ferrite content in a bainitic-martensitic microstructure of UTOP38 and F-812layers.

  8. The properties and microstructure of padding welds built up on the surface of forging dies

    OpenAIRE

    Pytel, S.; Turek, J; S. Okoński; K. Zarębski

    2010-01-01

    The study presents selected results of the examinations of the properties and microstructure of weld overlays built up with the UTOP38,F-812 and F-818 welding wires on a substrate of the 42CrMo4 structural steel. Among others, the following investigations were carriedout: bend tests, hardness measurements and determination of ferrite content in a bainitic-martensitic microstructure of UTOP38 and F-812layers.

  9. A Review on the Properties of Iron Aluminide Intermetallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zamanzade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron aluminides have been among the most studied intermetallics since the 1930s, when their excellent oxidation resistance was first noticed. Their low cost of production, low density, high strength-to-weight ratios, good wear resistance, ease of fabrication and resistance to high temperature oxidation and sulfurization make them very attractive as a substitute for routine stainless steel in industrial applications. Furthermore, iron aluminides allow for the conservation of less accessible and expensive elements such as nickel and molybdenum. These advantages have led to the consideration of many applications, such as brake disks for windmills and trucks, filtration systems in refineries and fossil power plants, transfer rolls for hot-rolled steel strips, and ethylene crackers and air deflectors for burning high-sulfur coal. A wide application for iron aluminides in industry strictly depends on the fundamental understanding of the influence of (i alloy composition; (ii microstructure; and (iii number (type of defects on the thermo-mechanical properties. Additionally, environmental degradation of the alloys, consisting of hydrogen embrittlement, anodic or cathodic dissolution, localized corrosion and oxidation resistance, in different environments should be well known. Recently, some progress in the development of new micro- and nano-mechanical testing methods in addition to the fabrication techniques of micro- and nano-scaled samples has enabled scientists to resolve more clearly the effects of alloying elements, environmental items and crystal structure on the deformation behavior of alloys. In this paper, we will review the extensive work which has been done during the last decades to address each of the points mentioned above.

  10. Overlay Tolerances For VLSI Using Wafer Steppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Harry J.; Rice, Rory

    1988-01-01

    In order for VLSI circuits to function properly, the masking layers used in the fabrication of those devices must overlay each other to within the manufacturing tolerance incorporated in the circuit design. The capabilities of the alignment tools used in the masking process determine the overlay tolerances to which circuits can be designed. It is therefore of considerable importance that these capabilities be well characterized. Underestimation of the overlay accuracy results in unnecessarily large devices, resulting in poor utilization of wafer area and possible degradation of device performance. Overestimation will result in significant yield loss because of the failure to conform to the tolerances of the design rules. The proper methodology for determining the overlay capabilities of wafer steppers, the most commonly used alignment tool for the production of VLSI circuits, is the subject of this paper. Because cost-effective manufacturing process technology has been the driving force of VLSI, the impact on productivity is a primary consideration in all discussions. Manufacturers of alignment tools advertise the capabilities of their equipment. It is notable that no manufacturer currently characterizes his aligners in a manner consistent with the requirements of producing very large integrated circuits, as will be discussed. This has resulted in the situation in which the evaluation and comparison of the capabilities of alignment tools require the attention of a lithography specialist. Unfortunately, lithographic capabilities must be known by many other people, particularly the circuit designers and the managers responsible for the financial consequences of the high prices of modern alignment tools. All too frequently, the designer or manager is confronted with contradictory data, one set coming from his lithography specialist, and the other coming from a sales representative of an equipment manufacturer. Since the latter generally attempts to make his

  11. Adaptive Lattice Filters for CDMA Overlay

    OpenAIRE

    Prahatheesan, V; Wang, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the behavior of reflection coefficients of a stochastic gradient lattice (SGL) filter applied to a code-division multiple-access overlay system. Analytic expressions for coefficients for a two-stage filter are derived in a Rayleigh fading channel with the presence of narrow-band interference and additive white Gaussian noise. It is shown that the coefficients of the lattice filter exhibit separate tracking and convergent properties,and that compared to an LMS filter, the l...

  12. Patent Overlay Mapping: Visualizing Technological Distance

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Luciano; Newman, Nils; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Rafols, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new global patent map that represents all technological categories and a method to locate patent data of individual organizations and technological fields on the global map. This overlay map technique may support competitive intelligence and policy decision making. The global patent map is based on similarities in citing-to-cited relationships between categories of the International Patent Classification (IPC) of European Patent Office (EPO) patents from 2000 to 2006. Th...

  13. Süperpozisyon apareyleri (*) (Overlay Dentures)

    OpenAIRE

    MUĞAN, Nuri; Cansevergil, Esengün

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARYRemovable partial or complete prothèses which are used to alleviate maxillary constriction and discrepancies in vertical -dimension are called « overlay dentures». The patients maxillary teeth or ridge is overiayed by acriylic and the artificial teeth are positioned in accordance with the mandibular teeth to establish a better occlusion as well as to improve the estetios of the individual. The improved anterior tooth relationships also provide the anatomic basis for the correct produc...

  14. Nickel aluminide alloy for high temperature structural use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys including nickel, aluminum, chromium, zirconium and boron wherein the concentration of zirconium is maintained in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.35 atomic percent to improve the ductility, strength and fabricability of the alloys at 1200.degree. C. Titanium may be added in an amount equal to about 0.2 to about 0.5 atomic percent to improve the mechanical properties of the alloys and the addition of a small amount of carbon further improves hot fabricability.

  15. Facilitating Service Discovery with Semantic Overlay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jin; Hao Wu; Xiao-Min Ning

    2006-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) computing share many common characteristics.It is believed that the combination of the two emerging techniques is a very promising method in promoting the web services (WS). Because the service discovery plays a key role in the integration, here a P2P-based framework to manage the knowledge of service and locating services is proposed. In this paper, the details of the principle, constructing and maintaining of service semantic overlay architecture have been described, and the way how the semantic overlay facilitates discovery of service resources is illustrated. To enable the semantic web service superiority, Service Ontology, which is considered as the service semantic model, is employed to depict service. The service discovery includes two phases: searching on the service semantic overlay; and local discovery in peer's service repository. Various solutions have been proposed to realize those two phases.Furthermore, tests are carried out to evaluate service discovery on the architecture.

  16. New low-viscosity overlay medium for viral plaque assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garten Wolfgang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plaque assays in cell culture monolayers under solid or semisolid overlay media are commonly used for quantification of viruses and antiviral substances. To overcome the pitfalls of known overlays, we tested suspensions of microcrystalline cellulose Avicel RC/CL™ as overlay media in the plaque and plaque-inhibition assay of influenza viruses. Results Significantly larger plaques were formed under Avicel-containing media, as compared to agar and methylcellulose (MC overlay media. The plaque size increased with decreasing Avicel concentration, but even very diluted Avicel overlays (0.3% ensured formation of localized plaques. Due to their low viscosity, Avicel overlays were easier to use than methylcellulose overlays, especially in the 96-well culture plates. Furthermore, Avicel overlay could be applied without prior removal of the virus inoculum thus facilitating the assay and reducing chances of cross-contamination. Using neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir carboxylate, we demonstrated applicability of the Avicel-based plaque reduction assay for testing of antiviral substances. Conclusion Plaque assay under Avicel-containing overlay media is easier, faster and more sensitive than assays under agar- and methylcellulose overlays. The assay can be readily performed in a 96-well plate format and seems particularly suitable for high-throughput virus titrations, serological studies and experiments on viral drug sensitivity. It may also facilitate work with highly pathogenic agents performed under hampered conditions of bio-safety labs.

  17. Overlay improvement by ASML HOWA 5th alignment strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raf; Chiang, CY; Hsu, Wilson; Yang, Richer; Shih, Todd; Chen, Jackie; Chiu, Jonathan; Lin, Wythe

    2009-12-01

    Overlay control is more challenging when DRAM volume production continues to shrink its critical dimention (CD) to 70nm and beyond. Effected by process, the overlay behavior at wafer edge is quite different from wafer center. The big contribution to worse overlay at wafer edge which causes yield loss is misalignment. The analysis in wafer edge suggests that high order uncorrectable overlay residuals are often observed by certain process impact. Therefore, the basic linear model used for alignment correction is not sufficient and it is necessary to introduce an advanced alignment correction model for wafer edge overlay improvement. In this study, we demonstrated the achievement of moderating the poor overlay at wafer edge area by using a high order wafer alignment strategy. The mechanism is to use non-linear correction methods of high order models ( up to 5th order), with support by the function High Order Wafer Alignment (known as HOWA) in scanner. Instead of linear model for the 6 overlay parameters which come from average result, HOWA alignment strategy can do high order fitting through the wafer to get more accurate overlay parameters which represent the local wafer grid distortion better. As a result, the overlay improvement for wafer edge is achieved. Since alignment is a wafer dependent correction, with HOWA the wafer to wafer overlay variation can be improved dynamically as well. In addition, the effects of different mark quantity and sampling distribution from HOWA are also introduced in this paper. The results of this study indicate that HOWA can reduce uncorrectable overlay residual by 30~40% and improve wafer-to-wafer overlay variation significantly. We conclude that HOWA is a noteworthy strategy for overlay improvement. Moreover, optimized alignment mark numbers and distribution layout are also key factors to make HOWA successful.

  18. Structural formation of aluminide phases on titanium alloy during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aluminum layer on the surface of titanium alloy has been formed by thermal deposition. The structural formation of aluminide phases on the surface has been studied. The sequence of structural transformations at the Ti/Al interface is limited by the reaction temperature and time. The sequence of aluminide phase formation is occurred in compliance with Ti-Al equilibrium phase diagram. At the initial stages at the Ti/Al interface the Al3Ti alloy starts forming as a result of interdiffusion, and gradually the whole aluminum films is spent on the formation of this layer. The Al3Ti layer decomposes with the increase of temperature (>600C). At 800C the two-phase (Ti3Al+TiAl) layer is formed on the titanium surface. The TiAl compound is unstable and later on with the increase of the exposure time at 800C gradually transforms into the Ti3Al. The chain of these successive transformations leads to the formation of the continuous homogeneous layer consisting of the Ti3Al compound on the surface. At temperatures exceeding the allotropic transformation temperature (>900C) the Ti3Al compound starts decomposing. All structural changes taking place at the Ti/Al interface are accompanied by considerable changes in micro hardness. The structure of initial substrate influences on kinetics of phase transformation and microstructure development. (author)

  19. Al2O3 Scale Development on Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Thaidigsmann, Katja; Ager, Joel; Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-11-10

    The structure and phase of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale that forms on an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy (Fe-28Al-5Cr) (at %) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Oxidation was performed at 900 C and 1000 C for up to 190 min. TEM revealed that single-layer scales were formed after short oxidation times. Electron diffraction was used to show that the scales are composed of nanoscale crystallites of the {theta}, {gamma}, and {alpha} phases of alumina. Band-like structure was observed extending along three 120{sup o}-separated directions within the surface plane. Textured {theta} and {gamma} grains were the main components of the bands, while mixed {alpha} and transient phases were found between the bands. Extended oxidation produced a double-layered scale structure, with a continuous {alpha} layer at the scale/alloy interface, and a {gamma}/{theta} layer at the gas surface. The mechanism for the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales on iron aluminide alloys is discussed and compared to that for nickel aluminide alloys.

  20. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voderova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  1. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voděrová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  2. Welding Curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  3. Cyclic-Oxidation Behavior of Multilayered Pt/Ru-Modified Aluminide Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxue Song; Hideyuki Murakami; Chungen Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Multilayered Pt/Ru modified aluminide coating for thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems has been investigated. 2 μm Pt+2μm Ru+2 μm Pt was first deposited on nickel-base superalloy DZ125 by electrodeposition, and then the coating was treated by annealing and a conventional pack-cementation aluminizing process. The cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 1423 K in air. It was found that the thermal cyclic oxidation resistance of Pt/Ru-modified aluminide coating was comparable to that of Pt-modified aluminide coating, which was much better than simply aluminized DZ125. The addition of Ru to Pt-modified aluminide coating increased the resistance to rumpling. The microstructures and phase constitutions of the coating before and after oxidation were investigated.

  4. Topology-aware Overlay Multicast over IP Multicast Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao; SHAO Hua-gang; WANG Wei-nong

    2008-01-01

    Most existing overlay multicast approaches refuse to consider any network layer support no matter whether it is available or not. This design principle greatly increases the complexity of the routing algorithms and makes the overlay topologies incompatible with the underlying network. To address these issues, topology-aware overlay multicast over IP multicast networks (TOMIMN) was proposed as a novel overlay multicast protocol, which exploits the cooperation between end-hosts and IP multicast routers to construct a topology-aware overlay tree. Through a little modification to protocol independent multicast sparse mode (PIM-SM),a multicast router is able to receive registration from nearby group members and redirect passing-by join re-quests to them. Due to the multicast router's support, TOMIMN organizes its group members into an overlay multicast tree efficiently, which matches the physical network topology well.

  5. Layout optimization for multilayer overlay targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, L. A.; Smith, N. P.; Ausschnitt, C. P.; Morningstar, J.; Muth, W.; Schneider, J.; Yerdon, R.

    2006-03-01

    A novel overlay target developed by IBM and Accent Optical Technologies, Blossom, allows simultaneous overlay measurements of multiple layers (currently, up to 28) with a single target. This is achieved by a rotationally symmetric arrangement of small (4 micron) targets in a 50 micron square area, described more fully in a separate paper. In this paper, we examine the lessons learned in developing and testing the Blossom design. We start by examining proximity effects; the spacing of adjacent targets means that both the precision-like Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) and accuracy of a measurement can be affected by proximity of features. We use a mixture of real and modelled data to illustrate this problem, and find that the layout of Blossom reduces the proximity-induced bias. However, we do find that in certain cases proximity effects can increase the TMU of a particular measurement. The solution is to ensure that parts of the target that interact detrimentally are maximally separated. We present a solution to this, viewing the problem as a constrained Travelling Salesman Problem. We have imposed some global constraints, for example printing front-end and back-end layers on separate targets, and consistency with the overlay measurement strategy. Initially, we assume that pairwise measurements are either critical or non-critical, and optimize the layout so that the critical layers are both not placed adjacent to any prior or intermediate-layer features. We then build upon this structure, to consider the effect of low-energy implants (that cannot be seen once processed) and site re-use possibilities. Beyond this, we also investigate the impact of more strategic optimizations, for example, tuning the number of features on each layer. In each case, we present on-product performance data achieved, and modelled data on some additional target variants / extreme cases.

  6. Assessment of a Cambridge Structural Database-driven overlay program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangreco, Ilenia; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Cole, Jason C; Packer, Martin J

    2014-11-24

    We recently published an improved methodology for overlaying multiple flexible ligands and an extensive data set for validating pharmacophore programs. Here, we combine these two developments and present evidence of the effectiveness of the new overlay methodology at predicting correct superimpositions for systems with varying levels of complexity. The overlay program was able to generate correct predictions for 95%, 73%, and 39% of systems classified as easy, moderate, and hard, respectively.

  7. The temperature effect on the reflective cracking of asphalt overlays

    OpenAIRE

    Minhoto, Manuel; Pais, Jorge; Pereira, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study about the influence of temperature on the reflective cracking in a flexible road pavement through the evaluation of the asphalt overlay damage associated to traffic and temperature variations throughout a year. This study was developed from a numerical simulation of the asphalt overlay behaviour based on a three-dimensional finite-element analysis, considering the simultaneous loading of traffic and temperature variations. A mechanistic-based overlay design method ...

  8. CO Chemisorption at Metal Surfaces and Overlayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Morikawa, Y.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1996-01-01

    A database of ab initio calculations of the chemisorption energy of CO over Ni(111), Cu(111), Ru(0001), Pd(111), Ag(111), Pt(111), Au(111), Cu3Pt(111), and some metallic overlayer structures is presented. The trends can be reproduced with a simple model describing the interaction between the metal...... d states and the CO 2 pi* and 5 sigma states, renormalized by the metal sp continuum. Our model rationalizes the results by Rodriguez and Goodman [Science 257, 897 (1992)] showing a strong correlation between the CO chemisorption energy and the surface core level shift....

  9. The hilum overlay sign in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Van Wyk

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A 9-month-old girl presented with a 1-month history of coughing. A chest X-ray (CXR was performed, and the antero-posterior view demonstrated the hilum overlay sign. Furthermore, there was absence of the azygo-oesophageal line and bilateral paraspinal lines. The lateral CXR revealed a posterior mediastinal mass. Subsequently, a computed tomogram of the chest confirmed a posterior mediastinal mass, with calcifications and intraspinal extension consistent with neuroblastoma. Histological analysis confirmed this mass as a neuroblastoma.

  10. CO Chemisorption at Metal Surfaces and Overlayers

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Bjørk; Morikawa, Y.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1996-01-01

    A database of ab initio calculations of the chemisorption energy of CO over Ni(111), Cu(111), Ru(0001), Pd(111), Ag(111), Pt(111), Au(111), Cu3Pt(111), and some metallic overlayer structures is presented. The trends can be reproduced with a simple model describing the interaction between the metal d states and the CO 2 pi* and 5 sigma states, renormalized by the metal sp continuum. Our model rationalizes the results by Rodriguez and Goodman [Science 257, 897 (1992)] showing a strong correlati...

  11. Overlay Share Mesh for Interactive Group Communication with High Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-hua; CAI Yun-ze; XU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    An overlay share mesh infrastructure is presented for high dynamic group communication systems, such as distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and distributed virtual environments (DVE). Overlay share mesh infrastructure can own better adapting ability for high dynamic group than tradition multi-tree multicast infrastructure by sharing links among different groups. The mechanism of overlay share mesh based on area of interest (AOI) was discussed in detail in this paper. A large number of simulation experiments were done and the permance of mesh infrastructure was studied. Experiments results proved that overlay mesh infrastructure owns better adaptability than traditional multi-tree infrastructure for high dynamic group communication systems.

  12. Field welding of hydraulic turbines made of martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, A.

    1982-06-15

    Field welding of hydraulic turbines made of 13 Cr-Ni martensitic stainless steels was investigated. Two shielded metal arc welding electrodes, one containing 15 Cr-25 Ni and the other with 50% cobalt, were studied with respect to the criteria of weldability, structural integrity and cavitation erosion resistance. The cavitation erosion resistance of the 15 Cr-25 Ni material, evaluated with an ultrasonic vibratory test method, was found to be poor, being comparable to that of mild steel. Although the 50% cobalt alloy possesses excellent cavitation erosion properties, its cost is ca 10 times higher than that of austenitic stainless steels. Under certain welding conditions, the 50% cobalt alloy produces a hard interface with the martensitic stainless steel base material. These interfaces were systematically investigated using microhardness measurement and scanning electron microscopy. The interfaces between the base metal and the weld deposits as well as that between the two weld metals were subjected to measurements of Charpy impact energy, corrosion fatigue tests and an elastoplastic fracture mechanics analysis. It is concluded that the presence of the hard zone is not detrimental to structural integrity. A field welding procedure is proposed on the basis of these findings. The shallow cavitation damaged areas may be repaired with the 50% cobalt containing material. The cheaper 15 Cr-25 Ni material may be used for the filling of deep cavitation damaged areas and for the repair of cracks followed by an overlay of 50% cobalt weld metal. 20 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  14. Development of Improved Iron-Aluminide Filter Tubes and Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Sutton, T.G.; Miller, C.J.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    2008-01-14

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to explore and develop advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate sintered iron-aluminide intermetallic porous bodies used for gas filtration so as to reduce production costs while maintaining or improving performance in advanced coal gasification and combustion systems. The use of a power turbine fired with coal-derived synthesis gas requires some form of gas cleaning in order to protect turbine and downstream components from degradation by erosion, corrosion, and/or deposition. Hot-gas filtration is one form of cleaning that offers the ability to remove particles from the gases produced by gasification processes without having to substantially cool and, possibly, reheat them before their introduction into the turbine. This technology depends critically on materials durability and reliability, which have been the subject of study for a number of years.

  15. Diffusion bonding of titanium-titanium aluminide-alumina sandwich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickman, H.A.; Chin, E.S.C. [Army Research Lab., Watertown, MA (United States); Biederman, R.R. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Diffusion bonding of a metallic-intermetallic-ceramic sandwich is of interest for potential armor applications. Low cost titanium, titanium diboride reinforced titanium aluminide (Ti-48at.%Al), and aluminum oxide are diffusion bonded in a vacuum furnace between 1,000 C and 1,400 C. Metallographic examination of the prior bonding interface showed excellent metallurgical coupling between the Ti-48at.%Al composite and the low cost Ti. A series of microstructures representative of phases consistent with a hypothetical Ti-Al-B phase diagram is visible. The alumina-Ti-48at.%Al interfacial bond is achieved through penetration of titanium-aluminum phases into the existing alumina porosity. A detailed microstructural analysis identifying mechanisms of interfacial bonding will be presented for each interfacial zone.

  16. Problems associated with the overlaying of austenitic stainless steel lining of WWER pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double-layer austenitic lining is obtained by submerged arc welding using strip electrodes. The first layer is 25/13 CrNi type, the other is 19/10 CrNi type stabilized with Nb. The Sv 08Kh19N10G2B and Sv 04Kh20N10G2B strips with OF-10 flux were tested. The occurrence of crystallization cracks in the overlay metal of the strip depends on the way of its crystallization, expressed via the Cr/Ni ratio. The development of cracks also depends on the niobium, silicon and carbon contents within the (Nb+Si)/C dependence. The formation of slag inclusions in the region of attachment of adjacent beads is affected by the mechanism of motion and solidification of the molten pool and by the properties of the flux. Fluxing agents exhibiting rather high dynamic viscosities and relatively low characteristic temperatures are best suited to this purpose. In the two-strip procedure using strips 60 mm broad, the overlaying rate is about 18 m/hr for viscous flux agents and 15.5 m/hr for low-viscosity flux agents. The side overlap of the beads is 7 to 9 mm, the bead height is up to 4 mm. (M.D.). 16 figs., 6 tabs., 15 refs

  17. EOS: Evolutionary Overlay Service in Peer-to-Peer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Zhijun

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The peer-to-peer (P2P systems nowadays can be mainly classified into two categories: structured and structure-less systems based on their overlay organization. The structured systems can achieve determinate efficiency due to their rigorous structure with the cost of losing robustness and vice versa. We provide a semi-structured overlay based on the separation of routing structures and overlay organizations in this paper and the new overlay can achieve determinate efficiency with high robustness. Moreover, the performance of the existing overlay is determined by the initial design and the overlay can not evolve with the information collected. But the new overlay devised in this paper is evolutionary inherent and accompanied by evolving service (EOS, EOS can improve the performance with the running of the P2P systems. Finally, our evolutionary overlay structure is constructed on the basis of linear algebra. So, the EOS can be theoretically analyzed and the results indicate that EOS can work with preferable integrated performance. The experimental results gained on the simulative platform verify the performance of EOS further.

  18. Community overlays upon real-world complex networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ge, X.; Wang, H.

    2012-01-01

    Many networks are characterized by the presence of communities, densely intra-connected groups with sparser inter-connections between groups. We propose a community overlay network representation to capture large-scale properties of communities. A community overlay Go can be constructed upon a netwo

  19. Multi-level Reconfigurable Self-organization in Overlay Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pournaras, E.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale decentralized systems organized in overlay networks are complex to manage. Such systems integrate organizational complexity in the application-level resulting in low abstraction and modularity in their services. This thesis introduces a multi-level conceptual architecture for overlay ser

  20. Finite elements simulation of reflective cracking in asphaltic overlays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpas, A.; De Bondt, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    Overlaying is one of the most popular and cost effective techniques of rehabilitation of cracked pavements. The placing of reinforcement between the overlay and the top layer of the cracked pavement is currently being utilised as a possible technique for delaying the development of cracks into the o

  1. Effect of Colored Overlays on Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Rosenfield, MCOptom, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colored overlays may produce an improvement in reading when superimposed over printed materials. This study determined whether improvements in reading occur when the overlays are placed over a computer monitor. Methods: Subjects (N=30 read from a computer screen for 10 minutes with either a Cerium or control overlay positioned on the monitor. In a third condition, no overlay was present. Immediately following each trial, subjects reported ocular and visual symptoms experienced during the task. Results: Mean symptom scores following the Cerium, control, and no overlay conditions were 12.83, 17.37, and 15.65, respectively (p=0.47. However, a subgroup of 7 subjects (23% reported significant improvements with the Cerium overlay. The mean symptom scores for the Cerium, control, and no overlay trials for this subgroup were 12.14, 29.86, and 28.93, respectively (p=0.03. No significant improvements in either reading speed or reading errors were observed in this subgroup. Conclusion: The use of colored overlays may provide a treatment method for some subjects reporting symptoms during computer use.

  2. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  3. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  4. Capacity of Intelligent Underlay and Overlay Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ling, Yim; Elling, Jan; Nielsen, Thomas Toftegaard

    1996-01-01

    This paper suggests a method of dimensioning the cell configuration of radio sites in a cellular network using the intelligent overlay and underlay (IOU) technique. The traffic capacity has been analysed by means of a teletraffic model, which is developed based on the classical theory of overflow...... traffic. The formulas of the model have been implemented with the use of MatLab. To verify the model, measurement methods have been developed to collect the teletraffic information in a real-live GSM network. The measured data indicates that the teletraffic model describes the capacity with high accuracy...... and therefore can be used to dimension the network. The model shows that the increase of capacity for a GSM network with 34 frequencies is about 30%. Further capacity enhancement can be achieved by intelligent frequency planning method which is currently being developed...

  5. Decentralized Overlay for Federation of Enterprise Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Rajiv

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes Aneka-Federation, a decentralized and distributed system that combines enterprise Clouds, overlay networking, and structured peer-to-peer techniques to create scalable wide-area networking of compute nodes for high-throughput computing. The Aneka-Federation integrates numerous small scale Aneka Enterprise Cloud services and nodes that are distributed over multiple control and enterprise domains as parts of a single coordinated resource leasing abstraction. The system is designed with the aim of making distributed enterprise Cloud resource integration and application programming flexible, efficient, and scalable. The system is engineered such that it: enables seamless integration of existing Aneka Enterprise Clouds as part of single wide-area resource leasing federation; self-organizes the system components based on a structured peer-to-peer routing methodology; and presents end-users with a distributed application composition environment that can support variety of programming and execu...

  6. Characterization of waferstepper and process related front- to backwafer overlay errors in bulk micro machining using electrical overlay test structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zeijl, H.W.; Bijnen, F.G.C.; Slabbekoorn, J.

    2004-01-01

    To validate the Front- To Backwafer Alignment (FTBA) calibration and to investigate process related overlay errors, electrical overlay test structures are used that requires FTBA [1]. Anisotropic KOH etch through the wafer is applied to transfer the backwafer pattern to the frontwafer. Consequently,

  7. Investigation of Effect of Welding Current on Welding Penetration in Covered Electrode Arc Welding And MIG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Bekir ÇEVİK

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of welding current on penetration in covered electrode arc welding and MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding was investigated. St 37 quality steel materials were used in the experiments. Three different welding current (60, 90 and 120 A with covered electrode arc welding, 100, 125 and 155 A with MIG welding) was selected for welding process and was made 200 mm long weld. The welded specimens were cut particular lengths, then metallographic tests were performed. As a result o...

  8. Laser Welding of Alumina Ceramic Substrates with Two Fixed Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedore, Blake William Clark

    Laser welding was investigated as a potential joining technology for alumina ceramic substrates. The objective of this study was to develop a method to preheat the ceramic using a single defocused laser beam prior to welding. Engineering ceramics are employed in a variety of systems and environments due to their unique properties. Joining technologies must be developed to facilitate the manufacture of complex or large ceramic components. Laser welding is advantageous as it forms joints rapidly, and does not introduce intermediate materials to form the bond, which can have deleterious effects. The Laser Machining System (LMS) at Queen's University was adapted for this study. A defocused far-infrared (FIR) laser beam was positioned to overlay a focused near-infrared (NIR) laser beam; the defocused FIR beam preheated the ceramic substrate and the focused NIR beam formed the weld. A finite element model was developed in COMSOL MultiPhysics to simulate the preheating processes and to develop a preheating protocol. The protocol was implemented using the FIR beam and adjusted to achieve preheating temperatures of 1450, 1525, and 1600°C. Welds were performed on 1 mm thick alumina plates using the preheating protocols and NIR beam powers of 25, 50, and 75 W. Weld speed was held constant throughout the study at 0.5 mm/s. The preheating protocols were successful at achieving near-constant preheating temperatures, with standard deviations below 32 degrees. Partially penetrating welds were formed with the NIR beam at 25 W, and fully penetrating welds at 50 and 75 W. Large pores were present in the 25 W and 50 W welds. Minimal porosity was observed in the welds formed at 75 W. All of the welded plates experienced a transverse fracture that extended perpendicular to weld, and a longitudinal fracture extending parallel to the weld. This study shows that a fixed defocused laser beam can successfully preheat alumina substrates to the high temperatures required for welding; however

  9. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ met

  10. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  11. Laser welding in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  12. Understanding the Properties of the BitTorrent Overlay

    CERN Document Server

    Hamra, Anwar Al; Barakat, Chadi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct extensive simulations to understand the properties of the overlay generated by BitTorrent. We start by analyzing how the overlay properties impact the efficiency of BitTorrent. We focus on the average peer set size (i.e., average number of neighbors), the time for a peer to reach its maximum peer set size, and the diameter of the overlay. In particular, we show that the later a peer arrives in a torrent, the longer it takes to reach its maximum peer set size. Then, we evaluate the impact of the maximum peer set size, the maximum number of outgoing connections per peer, and the number of NATed peers on the overlay properties. We show that BitTorrent generates a robust overlay, but that this overlay is not a random graph. In particular, the connectivity of a peer to its neighbors depends on its arriving order in the torrent. We also show that a large number of NATed peers significantly compromise the robustness of the overlay to attacks. Finally, we evaluate the impact of peer exchange...

  13. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  14. Development of field welding technology for rails; Tetsudo rail no genchi yoyu yosetsu gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M.; Karimine, K.; Uchino, K.; Yurioka, N. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    A new element technology is outlined which is for welding regular rails in the field and making a long rail. A new EAW (Enclosed Arc Welding) has been developed for the purpose of improving vibration and noise due to the local abrasion of the existing EAW and improving the deterioration of resistibility against rolling fatigue breakage and the generation of transverse fissure due to the high temperature liquefaction crack. It has been verified that a highly carbonized metal improves the local abrasion and the generation of crack. Problems were brought up, in the case of welding rails by thermit welding (TW) utilizing the reaction of Al powder and brown iron oxide, such that strength was rather small against the bending fatigue of a joint and that the soundness of internal property of a welded part was likely to fluctuate. A test was carried out concerning the latter problem, and it was revealed that the temperature to pour molten steel dropped, whether the Al compound was insufficient or excessive, possibly causing reaction defects. As a technology to replace EAW and TW techniques, an automatic welding was developed which combinedly used narrow groove electro-slag welding and gas sealed arc welding. Further, as an after-treatment of this technology, a method was developed to remove a weld overlay. 19 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Effects of stop-start features on residual stresses in a multipass austenitic stainless steel weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turski, M., E-mail: Mark.Turski@magnesium-elektron.com [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Francis, J.A. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)] [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hurrell, P.R. [Rolls-Royce Plc., Raynesway, Derby DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Bate, S.K. [Serco Technical Services, Birchwood Park, Warrington, Cheshire WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Hiller, S. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    In this article we describe experiments that characterise and quantify the localised perturbations in residual stress associated with both ramped and abrupt stop-start features in a multipass weld. Residual stress distributions in AISI Grade 304L/308L stainless steel groove-welded specimens, containing weld interruptions that were introduced in a controlled manner, have been characterised using both neutron diffraction and the incremental deep hole drilling method. The extent to which the localised stresses associated with the interruptions were annealed by overlayed passes was also assessed. The results suggest that, regardless of the type of interruption, there can be significant localised increases in residual stress if the stop-start feature is left exposed. If further weld passes are deposited, then the localised increases in stress are likely to persist if the interruption was abrupt, whereas for a ramped interruption they may be dissipated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study the residual stress-field surrounding weld interruptions was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localised stresses were found to increase at weld interruptions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both ramped and abrupt weld interruptions were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses persisted for abrupt interruptions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses dissipated for ramped interruptions.

  16. Asphaltic concrete overlays of rigid and flexible pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, R. W.; Temple, W. H.

    1980-10-01

    The development of a mechanistic approach to overlay thickness selection is described. The procedure utilizes a deflection analysis to determine pavement rehabilitation needs. Design guides for selecting the overlay thickness are presented. Tolerable deflection-traffic load relationships and the deflection attenuation properties of asphaltic concrete were developed, representing the subgrade support conditions and properties of materials used in Louisiana. All deflection measurements on asphaltic concrete were corrected for the effect of temperature. Deflection measurements taken before and after overlay were also adjusted to minimize the effects of seasonal subgrade moisture variation.

  17. Effect of welding heat input on HAZ character in ultra-fine grain steel welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富巨; 许卫刚; 王玉涛; 王燕; 张学刚; 廖永平

    2003-01-01

    In this essay, we studied how heat input affected the microstructure, hardness, grain size and heat-affected zone(HAZ) dimension of WCX355 ultra-fine grain steel which was welded respectively by the ultra narrow-gap welding (UNGW) process and the overlaying process with CO2 as protective atmosphere and laser welding process. The experimental results show when the heat input changed from 1.65kJ/cm to 5.93kJ/cm, the width of its HAZ ranged from 0.6mm to 2.1mm.The average grain size grew up from 2~5μm of base metal to 20~70μm and found no obvious soften phenomenon in overheated zone. The width of normalized zone was generally wide as 2/3 as that of the whole HAZ, and the grain size in this zone is smaller than that in base metal. Under the circumstance of equal heat input, the HAZ width of UNGW is narrower than that of the laser welding.

  18. Welded solar cell interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  19. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  20. Government Districts, Other - MO 2014 Springfield Conditional Overlay Districts (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Conditional Overlay District polygons for the City of Springfield, inside city limits only. Created and maintained by the GIS Division of the Information Systems...

  1. Zoning Districts - MO 2011 Springfield Conditional Overlay Districts (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Conditional Overlay District polygons for the City of Springfield, inside city limits only. Created and maintained by the GIS Division of the Information Systems...

  2. nowCOAST's Map Service for Political Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides map overlays depicting the boundaries of U.S. states, territories, counties and townships/county subdivisions,...

  3. SPHERE: a scalable multicast framework in overlay networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents Sphere, a scalable multicast framework in overlay network. Sphere is a highly efficient, self-organizing and robust multicast protocol overlayed on the Internet. The main contributions of this paper are twofold. First, Sphere organizes the control topology of overlay network in two directions: horizontal and vertical. The horizontal meshes are used to locate and organize hosts in tracks, and the vertical meshes are used to manage the data paths between tracks. Second, Sphere balances stress and stretch of the overlay network by assigning hosts into different tracks and clusters. This structure distributes stress on the multicast trees uniformly, and meantime makes path stretch as small as possible.Simulations results show that Sphere can support multicast with large group size and has good performance on organizing meshes and building data delivery trees.

  4. Phase evolution and alloying mechanism of titanium aluminide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An evolution of phase composition of TiAl alloy nanoparticles was investigated. • An alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. • The alloying reaction was possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al. • The alloying product is determined by the temperature of Ti and Al small clusters. • The alloying mechanism can be explained based on Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction. - Abstract: The evolution of phase composition of titanium aluminide nanoparticles synthesized by the flow-levitation method was systematically investigated by adjustment of the evaporating temperature of the mixed metallic droplet and the X-ray diffraction spectrum. Their alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. ε(h, l)-TiAl3, γ-TiAl and α2-Ti3Al phases are gradually formed in TiAl alloy nanoparticles with the increasing of evaporating temperature of the mixed droplet. The alloying reaction is possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al during the cooling process with high cooling rate. And the alloying mechanism can be explained based on the Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction of Ti and Al small clusters

  5. A respiratory model for uranium aluminide based on occupational data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, R W; Eckerman, K F; Boice, J D

    2005-12-01

    As part of an epidemiological study, doses from intake of radionuclides were estimated for workers employed during a 52-year period at the Rocketdyne/Atomics International facility in California. The facility was involved in a variety of research programmes, including nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel decladding, and reactor operation and disassembly. Most of the documented intakes involved inhalation of enriched uranium (U), fission products, or plutonium (Pu). Highest doses were estimated for a group of workers exposed to airborne uranium aluminide (UAl(x)) during the fabrication of reactor fuel plates. Much of the exposure to UAl(x) occurred early in the fuel fabrication programme, before it was recognised that intake and lung retention were being underestimated from urinary data due to an unexpected delayed dissolution of the inhaled material. In workers who had been removed from exposure, the rate of urinary excretion of U increased for a few months, peaked, and then declined at a rate consistent with moderately soluble material. This pattern differs markedly from the monotonically decreasing absorption rates represented by the default absorption types in the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This paper summarises the findings on the behaviour of UAl(x) in these workers and describes material-specific parameter values of the HRTM based on this information.

  6. Phase evolution and alloying mechanism of titanium aluminide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, J.S.; Li, K.; Li, X.B. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Shu, Y.J. [Institute of Chemical Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, Y.J., E-mail: tangyongjian2000@sina.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • An evolution of phase composition of TiAl alloy nanoparticles was investigated. • An alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. • The alloying reaction was possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al. • The alloying product is determined by the temperature of Ti and Al small clusters. • The alloying mechanism can be explained based on Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction. - Abstract: The evolution of phase composition of titanium aluminide nanoparticles synthesized by the flow-levitation method was systematically investigated by adjustment of the evaporating temperature of the mixed metallic droplet and the X-ray diffraction spectrum. Their alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. ε(h, l)-TiAl{sub 3,} γ-TiAl and α{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al phases are gradually formed in TiAl alloy nanoparticles with the increasing of evaporating temperature of the mixed droplet. The alloying reaction is possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al during the cooling process with high cooling rate. And the alloying mechanism can be explained based on the Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction of Ti and Al small clusters.

  7. Comparison between asphalt rubber and conventional mixtures in overlay design

    OpenAIRE

    Fontes, Liseane P. T. L.; Trichês, Glicério; Pereira, Paulo A. A.; Pais, Jorge C.

    2008-01-01

    Asphalt modified with crumb rubber has been used to produce asphalt rubber mixtures for pavement overlays subjected to heavy loads and high temperatures. Under severe conditions, these mixtures are capable of resisting permanent deformations, having an extended fatigue life and resisting crack propagation in comparison to conventional ones. A laboratory research was conducted to determine the performance properties of overlays with asphalt rubber mixtures produced through wet processes using ...

  8. Improving Resource Discovery in the Arigatoni Overlay Network

    OpenAIRE

    Chand, Raphaël; Liquori, Luigi; Cosnard, Michel

    2007-01-01

    International audience Arigatoni is a structured multi-layer overlay network providing various services with variable guarantees, and promoting an intermittent participation to the virtual organization where peers can appear, disappear and organize themselves dynamically. Arigatoni mainly concerns with how resources are declared and discovered in the overlay, allowing global computers to make a secure, PKI-based, use of global aggregated computational power, storage, information resources,...

  9. Augmenting reality in Direct View Optical (DVO) overlay applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Tim; Edwards, Tim

    2014-06-01

    The integration of overlay displays into rifle scopes can transform precision Direct View Optical (DVO) sights into intelligent interactive fire-control systems. Overlay displays can provide ballistic solutions within the sight for dramatically improved targeting, can fuse sensor video to extend targeting into nighttime or dirty battlefield conditions, and can overlay complex situational awareness information over the real-world scene. High brightness overlay solutions for dismounted soldier applications have previously been hindered by excessive power consumption, weight and bulk making them unsuitable for man-portable, battery powered applications. This paper describes the advancements and capabilities of a high brightness, ultra-low power text and graphics overlay display module developed specifically for integration into DVO weapon sight applications. Central to the overlay display module was the development of a new general purpose low power graphics controller and dual-path display driver electronics. The graphics controller interface is a simple 2-wire RS-232 serial interface compatible with existing weapon systems such as the IBEAM ballistic computer and the RULR and STORM laser rangefinders (LRF). The module features include multiple graphics layers, user configurable fonts and icons, and parameterized vector rendering, making it suitable for general purpose DVO overlay applications. The module is configured for graphics-only operation for daytime use and overlays graphics with video for nighttime applications. The miniature footprint and ultra-low power consumption of the module enables a new generation of intelligent DVO systems and has been implemented for resolutions from VGA to SXGA, in monochrome and color, and in graphics applications with and without sensor video.

  10. Overlay improvements using a real time machine learning algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Weaver, Emil; Kubis, Michael; Henke, Wolfgang; Slotboom, Daan; Hoogenboom, Tom; Mulkens, Jan; Coogans, Martyn; ten Berge, Peter; Verkleij, Dick; van de Mast, Frank

    2014-04-01

    While semiconductor manufacturing is moving towards the 14nm node using immersion lithography, the overlay requirements are tightened to below 5nm. Next to improvements in the immersion scanner platform, enhancements in the overlay optimization and process control are needed to enable these low overlay numbers. Whereas conventional overlay control methods address wafer and lot variation autonomously with wafer pre exposure alignment metrology and post exposure overlay metrology, we see a need to reduce these variations by correlating more of the TWINSCAN system's sensor data directly to the post exposure YieldStar metrology in time. In this paper we will present the results of a study on applying a real time control algorithm based on machine learning technology. Machine learning methods use context and TWINSCAN system sensor data paired with post exposure YieldStar metrology to recognize generic behavior and train the control system to anticipate on this generic behavior. Specific for this study, the data concerns immersion scanner context, sensor data and on-wafer measured overlay data. By making the link between the scanner data and the wafer data we are able to establish a real time relationship. The result is an inline controller that accounts for small changes in scanner hardware performance in time while picking up subtle lot to lot and wafer to wafer deviations introduced by wafer processing.

  11. Diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief recall of the principle, and of the advantages of the method, we give some examples of metallic bonding in a first part where we describe preliminary trials: Ta-Mo, Zr-Zr, Zr-Nb, Nb-stainless steel, Mo-stainless steel, aluminium-aluminium (A5-A5). The second part of the note is devoted to trials on construction elements: on tubular elements for bonding between Mo or Nb on one hand, and stainless steel on the other hand (We indicate in what conditions the bonding are tight and what are their mechanical strength and their resistance to thermic cycles). We indicate, in this chapter, a method to obtain radiation windows in Be welded on an element made of stainless steel. (authors)

  12. Laser Seam welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a laser seam welding method for welding spacers to be used in nuclear fuel assemblies at a stable quality. Namely, the laser seam welding method comprises irradiating, while moving, laser beams to a portion to be welded. In this case, data of the shapes and characteristics of the portion to be welded are inputted to restrict the range of the welding of the portion to be welded. The power, moving speed, distance to a focal point and energy of the laser beams are controlled in the midway of the range for the welding. Then, a welding nugget having a shape defined to a portion to be welded can be formed thereby enabling to keep the portion to be welded to stable quality. As a result, failed welding can be eliminated, and strength of joint can be guaranteed. In addition, auxiliary products of portions to be welded, for example, springs are not failed by laser beams. As a result, satisfactory spacers can be provided. (I.S.)

  13. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  14. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  15. Position welding using disk laser-GMA hybrid welding

    OpenAIRE

    C.-H. Kim; H.-S. Lim; J.-K. Kim

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Position welding technology was developed by using disk laser-GMA hybrid welding in this research.Design/methodology/approach: The effect of hybrid welding parameters such as the shielding gas composition and laser-arc interspacing distance were investigated for the bead-on-plate welding. The pipe girth welding was implemented and the adequate arc welding parameters were selected according to the welding position from a flat position to an overhead position.Findings: The optimized sh...

  16. Laser welding study for further development in essential power plant part repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isarawit Chaopanich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work was to study the effects of laser welding when compared with shield metal arc welding (SMAW process on the heat input, welded deposit rate, residual stress, distortion, microstructure and micro hardness. The martensitic stainless steel grade 431 specimens were overlay welded with the stainless steel filler metals. From the results, the heat input of 0.26 kJ/mm in laser welding calculated was significantly lower than that of 1.66 kJ/mm in SMAW, and contributed to low level residual stress, minimal distortion, very small penetration depth and heat affected zone (HAZ of less than 100 µm. The micro hardness results indicated that the maximum value from laser welding in the HAZ was 370.2 HV lower than the value from SMAW of 525.5 HV. The welded deposit rate for laser welding was with 26.5 mm3 /min remarkably lower than the rate for SMAW of 1,800 mm3 /min.

  17. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  18. The influence of Si on oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings on TiAl alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goral

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Increasing oxidation resistance of TiAl intermetallic alloy by depositing aluminide coating by slurrymethod and investigation of the influence of Si addition on isothermal oxidation of TiAlNb intermetallic alloy.Design/methodology/approach: : The isothermal oxidation resistance tests were done in the chamber furnaceat 900ºC for 500h time in the air atmosphere. The structure of coatings was investigated by light and scanningmicroscopy. The chemical composition of coatings and scales was investigated by EDS method and XRD phaseanalysis was used as well.Findings: In case of all the samples, the increase of the mass has been observed, as a result of the scale growth.The smallest mass changes have been detected in samples containing the coatings formed from 12,5% Sislurries. The largest weight loss took place in samples with the coatings created in 20, 40 and 60% wt siliconslurries. The oxidation test showed increasing of oxidation resistance of TiAl alloy with aluminide coatings andpresence of products of oxidation - Al2O3 on surface.Practical implications: The slurry method can be applied in aerospace and automotive industry as low-costtechnology of producing of aluminide coatings on intermetallics.Originality/value: New method of depositing of aluminide coatings on TiAl alloys

  19. The influence of Si on structure of aluminide coatings deposited on TiAl alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goral

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Increasing oxidation resistance of TiAl intermetallic alloy by depositing aluminide coating by slurrymethod and investigation of the influence of Si addition on structure of obtained coatingsDesign/methodology/approach: The structure of coatings was investigated by light scanning microscopy. Thechemical composition of coatings was investigated by EDS method and XRD phase analysis was used as wellFindings: The investigation has showed that the thickness of the coatings ranged from 30 to 40 μm. Thestructure of the silicon-modified aluminide coatings is as follows:- the outer zone consisting of TiAl3 phase and titanium silicides- the middle zone consisting of columnar titanium silicides in phase TiAl3 matrix- the inner zone consisting of TiAl2 phaseThe analysis of the average chemical composition of the outer zone exhibited the gradual increase of the siliconcontent along with the increase of this element in the slurry. The phase analysis has confirmed Ti5Si3 creationand, in case of the high silicon content in slurry, also other silicides: types Ti5Si4,TiSi2,TiSiPractical implications: The slurry method can be applied in aerospace and automotive industry as low-costtechnology of producing of aluminide coatings on intermetallicsOriginality/value: New method of depositing of aluminide coatings on TiAl alloys

  20. Si-modified aluminide coating deposited on TiAlNb alloy by slurry method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tetsui

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Increasing oxidation resistance of TiAl intermetallic alloy by depositing aluminide coating by slurry method and investigation of the influence of Si addition on structure of obtained coatings.Design/methodology/approach: The structure of coatings was investigated by light scanning microscopy. The chemical composition of coatings was investigated by EDS method and XRD phase analysis was used as well.Findings: The investigation has showed that the thickness of the coatings was 40 μm. The structure of the silicon-modified aluminide coatings is as follows:• the outer zone consisting of TiAl3 phase and titanium silicides,• the middle zone consisting of columnar titanium silicides in phase TiAl3 matrix,• the inner zone consisting of TiAl2 phase.The analysis of the average chemical composition of the outer zone exhibited the gradual increase of the silicon content along with the increase of this element in the slurry.Practical implications: The slurry method can be applied in aerospace and automotive industry as low-cost technology of producing of aluminide coatings on intermetallics.Originality/value: New method of depositing of Si modified aluminide coatings on TiAl alloys.

  1. Development of Oxidation Protection Coatings for Gamma Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, T. A.; Bird, R. K.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic material systems play a key role in meeting the stringent weight and durability requirements for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe hot structures. Gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) have been identified as high-payoff materials for high-temperature applications. The low density and good elevated temperature mechanical properties of gamma-TiAl alloys make them attractive candidates for durable lightweight hot structure and thermal protection systems at temperatures as high as 871 C. However, oxidation significantly degrades gamma-TiAl alloys under the high-temperature service conditions associated with the RLV operating environment. This paper discusses ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to develop durable ultrathin coatings for protecting gamma-TiAl alloys from high-temperature oxidation environments. In addition to offering oxidation protection, these multifunctional coatings are being engineered to provide thermal control features to help minimize heat input into the hot structures. This paper describes the coating development effort and discusses the effects of long-term high-temperature exposures on the microstructure of coated and uncoated gamma-TiAl alloys. The alloy of primary consideration was the Plansee alloy gamma-Met, but limited studies of the newer alloy gamma-Met-PX were also included. The oxidation behavior of the uncoated materials was evaluated over the temperature range of 704 C to 871 C. Sol-gel-based coatings were applied to the gamma-TiAl samples by dipping and spraying, and the performance evaluated at 871 C. Results showed that the coatings improve the oxidation resistance, but that further development is necessary.

  2. The thermographic nondestructive evaluation of iron aluminide green sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Michael Lee

    The recent development of manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of thin iron aluminide sheet requires advanced quantitative methods for on-line inspection. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for flaws and the development of appropriate flaw detection methods are key elements in an effective quality management system. The first step in the fabrication of thin FeAl alloy sheet is the formation of a green sheet by cold rolling FeAl powder mixed with organic binding agents. The green sheet composite has a bulk density, which is typically less than about 3.6 g/cc. The finished sheet, with a density of about 6.1 g/cc, is obtained using a series of process steps involving binder elimination, densification, sintering, and annealing. Non-uniformities within the green sheet are the major contributor to material failure in subsequent sheet processing and the production of non-conforming finished sheet. The production environment and physical characteristics of the composite provide for unique challenges in developing a rapid nondestructive inspection capability. The method must be non-contact due to the fragile nature of the composite. Limited access to the material also demands a one-sided inspection technique. An active thermographic method providing for 100% on-line inspection within an industrial, process has been developed. This approach is cost competitive with alternative technologies, such as x-ray imaging systems, and provides the required sensitivity to the variations in material composition. The mechanism of flaw formation and the transformation of green sheet flaws into defects that appear in intermediate and finished sheet products are described. A mathematical model which describes the green sheet heat transfer propagation, in the context of the inspection technique and the compact heterogeneity, is also presented. The potential for feedback within the production process is also discussed.

  3. Microstructural effects on the oxidation of iron aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Peter M.

    This work addresses the impact of processing and microstructure on the oxide chemistry and short-term isothermal oxidation rate, over the first 24h of oxidation, for the B2 iron aluminide, Fe-40Al. Research interests in iron-aluminum alloys, used for high temperature structural applications, are primarily concerned with the improvement of high temperature oxidation performance and mechanical properties. The oxidation performance of alloys with aluminum contents below 20at% is dependent upon processing and microstructure. Before this work, it was not established if there was any impact of material processing and microstructure on the oxidation performance of the high aluminum content Fe-40Al alloy. This study utilized eight industrial processes to produce six different material conditions. Among the characteristics of the microstructures produced were grain sizes from 2 to ≥500mum, oxygen contents from 0--2.6at%, and powder particle surface area-to-volume ratios from 0--0.6 m2/cm3. For the six materials tested, short-term (24h) isothermal oxidation rates were determined at 700, 750, and 800°C. The resultant rates were then used to determine the relationship between the oxidation rate constant and temperature. The chemistry, physical characteristics, and structure of the oxides formed were then characterized. It was concluded that microstructure has a limited impact on oxidation properties: no practical impact was observed on oxidation rate; an initial transient oxide layer formed independent of microstrucure; microstructure can be used to control the formation of oxide-metal interfacial voids, formed during the oxidation process; and oxide inclusion "pegs" serve to improve oxide adhesion. Additionally it was observed that contamination from hot pressing contributed to the formation of oxide nodules during oxidation. Overall the isothermal oxidation properties during the first 24h of exposure proved to be robust over many combinations of microstructures.

  4. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  5. Characteristics of Welding Fumes

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Gerd; Malmqvist, Klas; Bohgard, Mats; Akselsson, Roland

    1981-01-01

    The aerosols from 13 common electric arc welding processes have been characterized regarding total emission, particle size distribution, elemental composition and, when applicable, the oxidation state of chromium. The characterizations have been performed systematically for different combinations of welding current and welding voltage.

  6. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  7. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  8. Coil Welding Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  9. Overlay metrology solutions in a triple patterning scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Philippe; Mao, Ming; Baudemprez, Bart; Amir, Nuriel

    2015-03-01

    Overlay metrology tool suppliers are offering today several options to their customers: Different hardware (Image Based Overlay or Diffraction Based Overlay), different target designs (with or without segmentation) or different target sizes (from 5 um to 30 um). All these variations are proposed to resolve issues like robustness of the target towards process variations, be more representative of the design or increase the density of measurements. In the frame of the development of a triple patterning BEOL scheme of 10 nm node layer, we compare IBO targets (standard AIM, AIMid and multilayer AIMid). The metrology tools used for the study are KLA-Tencor's nextgeneration Archer 500 system (scatterometry- and imaging-based measurement technologies on the same tool). The overlay response and fingerprint of these targets will be compared using a very dense sampling (up to 51 pts per field). The benefit of indie measurements compared to the traditional scribes is discussed. The contribution of process effects to overlay values are compared to the contribution of the performance of the target. Different targets are combined in one measurement set to benefit from their different strengths (performance vs size). The results are summarized and possible strategies for a triple patterning schemes are proposed.

  10. Instructional geographic information science Map overlay and spatial abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, Thomas Alexander, II

    The fundamental goal of this study is to determine if the complex spatial concept of map overlay can be effectively learned by young adolescents through the utilization of an instructional technique based within the foundations of Instructional Geographic Information Science (InGIScience). Percent correct and reaction times were the measures used to analyze the ability of young adolescents to learn the intersect, erase, and union functions of map overlay. The ability to solve for missing inputs, output, or function was also analyzed. Young adolescents of the test group scored higher percent correct and recorded faster reaction times than those of the control group or adults of the expert group by the end of the experiment. The intersect function of map overlay was more difficult in terms of percent correct and reaction time than the erase or union functions. Solving for the first or second input consistently resulted in lower percent correct and higher reaction times throughout the experiment. No overall performance differences were shown to exist between males and females. Results of a subjective "real-world" test also indicated learning by young adolescents. This study has shown that the practice of repetitive instruction and testing has proven effective for enhancing spatial abilities with regard to the map overlay concept. This study found that with practice, young adolescents can learn the map overlay concept and perform at levels equal to or greater than adults. This study has helped to answer the question of whether this development of spatial abilities is possible.

  11. EXPERIENCE WITH OVERLAY TYMPANOPLASTY IN 83 CHINESE PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Bengang; MIAO Xutao; WANG Xin; ZHU Sixiang; SUN Yiqing

    2014-01-01

    Background In many European and American hospitals, represented by the House Ear Clinic (HEC), the overlay tympanoplasty is used with rare exception, with simultaneous canal wall up or down mastoidectomy being taken if needed. In China, underlay tympanoplasty is used across the country, but the overlay tech-nique is used rarely. The aim of the current study was to report the authors’experience with overlay tympa-noplasty in 83 Chinese patients and study its value. Methods Eight-three patients (86 ears) underwent over-lay tympanoplasty in accordance to the standard of the HEC. The patients were followed up and conditions of the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and hearing were reviewed and analyzed. Results All patients gained stage I incision healing. The size of external auditory canal and tympanic membrane mor-phology were satisfactory. Hearing either remained unchanged or improved. There were no hearing deterio-ration or serious complications. Conclusions Overlay tympanoplasty carries positive value in treating chron-ic otitis media and cholesteatoma with the merits of procedure standardization, adequate operative exposure, thorough disease elimination and extensive adaptation.

  12. High-order distortion control using a computational prediction method for device overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Seog; Affentauschegg, Cedric; Mulkens, Jan; Kim, Jang-Sun; Shin, Ju-Hee; Kim, Young-Ha; Nam, Young-Sun; Choi, Young-Sin; Ha, Hunhwan; Lee, Dong-Han; Lee, Jae-il; Rizvi, Umar; Geh, Bernd; van der Heijden, Rob; Baselmans, Jan; Kwon, Oh-Sung

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the continuously shrinking features of the integrated circuit, the overlay budget requirements have become very demanding. Historically, overlay has been performed using metrology targets for process control, and most overlay enhancements were achieved by hardware improvements. However, this is no longer sufficient, and we need to consider additional solutions for overlay improvements in process variation using computational methods. In this paper, we present the limitations of third-order intrafield distortion corrections based on standard overlay metrology and propose an improved method which includes a prediction of the device overlay and corrects the lens aberration fingerprint based on this prediction. For a DRAM use case, we present a computational approach that calculates the overlay of the device pattern using lens aberrations as an additional input, next to the target-based overlay measurement result. Supporting experimental data are presented that demonstrate a significant reduction of the intrafield overlay fingerprint.

  13. Effect of CMT multi-layer narrow gap welding parameters on weld formation%CMT窄间隙多层多道焊接工艺参数对焊缝成形的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周方明; 孙红辉; 宋辉; 周涌明; 张军

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce spatter, welding heat input, welding residual stress and welding distortion, the influences of welding space of CMT flat overlaying and torch angle on welding formation are studied, and the welding test of CMT multi-layer narrow gap welding is carried out. The results show that good welding formation can be got when the welding space is 2/3 of the single weld width of the first layer and 5/9 of the single weld width of the other layers in the narrow gap welding. In the narrow gap sidewall welding, the good welding formation and sidewall penetration depth can be got when the welding torch at 75°to the horizontal and wire ends 1~2 mm are away from the sidewall. The multi-layer narrow gap welding with low welding heat input can be executed by adopting CMT welding system. A feasible and simple method is provided for reducing welding residual stress and welding distortion.%为了减少焊接热输入和飞溅,降低焊接残余应力和焊接变形,研究了CMT平板堆焊道间距及焊枪倾角对焊缝成形的影响,进行了CMT窄间隙多层多道焊接试验.结果表明,在窄间隙焊接时,第1层焊道间距为单-焊缝熔宽的2/3,以后各层焊道间距为单-焊缝熔宽的5/9,可以获得良好的焊缝成形;在窄间隙侧壁焊接时,焊枪与水平面夹角为75°,焊丝端部距侧壁1~2 mm时,侧壁熔深都在1 mm以上,成形较好,适于侧壁的焊接.采用CMT焊接系统,能够以较低的热输入进行窄间隙多层多道焊,从而为降低焊接残余应力和减少焊接变形提供了一种简单可行的方法.

  14. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    OpenAIRE

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100 Hz indicates excessive welding through; the occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components above 100 Hz indicates in sufficient welding through; a welding process showing proper we...

  15. Effect of welding parameters of Gas Metal Arc welding on weld bead geometry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushp Kumar Baghel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality. The responsefactors, namely bead penetration, weld width, reinforcement height, weld penetration shape factor and weld reinforcement form factor as affected by arc voltage, wire feed rate, welding speed, gas flow rate and nozzle-toplate distance has also been analysed

  16. Optically controlled welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  17. A Proactive Tree Recovery Mechanism for Resilient Overlay Multicast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poorna Satyanarayana B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Overlay multicast constructs a multicast delivery tree among end hosts. An important problem for making overlay multicast more dependable is how to recover from node departures in order to minimize the disruption of service to those affected nodes. In this paper, we propose a proactive tree recovery mechanism to make the overlay multicast resilient to these failures and unexpected events. The salient feature of the approach is that rescue plans for multiple non-leaf nodes can work together for their respective children when they fail or leave at the same time. Extensive simulations demonstrate that our proactive approach can recover from node departures much faster than reactive methods, while the quality of trees restored and the cost of recovery are reasonable

  18. Structural Design of Pavement Overlays Based on Functional Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports a practical pavement overlay design methodbased on PCI (Pavement Condition Index). Current pavement investigation method (JTJ 073-96) is compared to the ASTM D 5340, which is the standard test method for airport pavement condition evaluation initially developed for US Air Force. The deficiency in the calculation of PCI based on field data in JTJ 073 is discussed. The proposed design method is compared to AASHTO overlay design method with good agreement. The paper concludes with an example illustrating how the existing pavement structural capacity is related to pavement distress survey results. The presented design method can be used in the design for overlay rehabilitation of pavements of highways, urban streets and airports.

  19. Tuning carrier density at complex oxide interface with metallic overlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Shi, Y. J.; Jiang, S. W.; Yue, F. J.; Wang, P.; Ding, H. F.; Wu, D.

    2016-06-01

    We have systematically investigated the electronic transport properties of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces with several different metal capping layers. The sheet carrier density can be tuned in a wide range by the metallic overlayer without changing the carrier mobility. The sheet carrier density variation is found to be linearly dependent on the size of metal work function. This behavior is explained by the mechanism of the charge transfer between the oxide interface and the metal overlayer across the LaAlO3 layer. Our results confirm the existence of a built-in electric field in LaAlO3 film with an estimated value of 67.7 eV/Å. Since the metallic overlayer is essential for devices, the present phenomena must be considered for future applications.

  20. Cooperative Resource Pricing in Service Overlay Networks for Mobile Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tadashi; Okaie, Yutaka

    The success of peer-to-peer overlay networks depends on cooperation among participating peers. In this paper, we investigate the degree of cooperation among individual peers required to induce globally favorable properties in an overlay network. Specifically, we consider a resource pricing problem in a market-oriented overlay network where participating peers sell own resources (e.g., CPU cycles) to earn energy which represents some money or rewards in the network. In the resource pricing model presented in this paper, each peer sets the price for own resource based on the degree of cooperation; non-cooperative peers attempt to maximize their own energy gains, while cooperative peers maximize the sum of own and neighbors' energy gains. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate that the network topology is an important factor influencing the minimum degree of cooperation required to increase the network-wide global energy gain.

  1. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordill, M.J. [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria); Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C. [Max-Plank-Insitut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-11-28

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems. - Highlights: • Measuring the adhesion energies of ductile metal–polymer interfaces is difficult. • A Cu film would plastically deform under tensile strain without a Cr overlayer. • A Cr overlayer forces cracking and induces buckling between the crack fragments. • The adhesion energy of the metal–polymer interface can be measured.

  2. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  3. In-situ evaluation for corrosion process at fusion boundary of stainless steel strip overlay joints in H2S containing solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yang; PAN Chun-xu; FU Qiang

    2004-01-01

    The present work studied the corrosion properties around the fusion boundaries of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel with stainless steel strip overlay joints under as welded condition and after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) in H2 S containing solution (NACE TM-01-77 standard) with different time. An in-situ observation method was introduced for evaluating corrosive progress in the fusion boundary in H2 S containing solution, that is, the samples were marked firstly at the boundary and then treated in the solution for variant time. Each time after the corrosion treatment, the observations were kept to focus at the same marked area by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the corrosion progress. The results reveal that the fusion boundary is the worst region for corrosion resistance when comparing with other boundaries, and a broad fusion boundary has a stronger resistance for "hydrogen induced disbonding" than a narrow one.

  4. Advances in process overlay: alignment solutions for future technology nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megens, Henry; van Haren, Richard; Musa, Sami; Doytcheva, Maya; Lalbahadoersing, Sanjay; van Kemenade, Marc; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Hinnen, Paul; van Bilsen, Frank

    2007-03-01

    Semiconductor industry has an increasing demand for improvement of the total lithographic overlay performance. To improve the level of on-product overlay control the number of alignment measurements increases. Since more mask levels will be integrated, more alignment marks need to be printed when using direct-alignment (also called layer-to-layer alignment). Accordingly, the alignment mark size needs to become smaller, to fit all marks into the scribelane. For an in-direct alignment scheme, e.g. a scheme that aligns to another layer than the layer to which overlay is being measured, the number of needed alignment marks can be reduced. Simultaneously there is a requirement to reduce the size of alignment mark sub-segmentations without compromising the alignment and overlay performance. Smaller features within alignment marks can prevent processing issues like erosion, dishing and contamination. However, when the sub-segmentation size within an alignment mark becomes comparable to the critical dimension, and thus smaller than the alignment-illuminating wavelength, polarization effects might start to occur. Polarization effects are a challenge for optical alignment systems to maintain mark detectability. Nevertheless, this paper shows how to actually utilize those effects in order to obtain enhanced alignment and overlay performance to support future technology nodes. Finally, another challenge to be met for new semiconductor product technologies is the ability to align through semi-opaque materials, like for instance new hard-mask materials. Enhancement of alignment signal strength can be reached by adapting to new alignment marks that generate a higher alignment signal. This paper provides a description of an integral alignment solution that meets with these emerging customer application requirements. Complying with these requirements will significantly enhance the flexibility in production strategies while maintaining or improving the alignment and overlay

  5. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of friction-welded joints in tial turbocharger components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. G.; Kropf, A. J.; Vissers, D. R.; Sun, W. M.; Katsoudas, J.; Yang, N.; Fei, D.

    2012-05-01

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) is an advanced intermetallic material and is being investigated for application in turbocharger components for diesel engines. A TiAl turbocharger rotor consists of a cast TiAl turbine wheel and a Ti-alloy shaft that are joined by friction welding. Although friction welding is an established industrial process, it is still challenging to join dissimilar materials especially for brittle intermetallics. These joints are therefore required to be inspected using a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. In this study, synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (CT) developed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory was used for NDE characterization of friction-welded joint in three TiAl turbocharger rotors. The filtered synchrotron X-ray source has high peak energies to penetrate thick metallic materials, and the detector (imager) has high spatial resolutions to resolve small flaws. The CT inspections revealed detailed 3D crack distributions within poorly welded joints. The crack detection sensitivity and resolution was calibrated and found to be correlated well with destructive examination.

  6. Position welding using disk laser-GMA hybrid welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-H. Kim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Position welding technology was developed by using disk laser-GMA hybrid welding in this research.Design/methodology/approach: The effect of hybrid welding parameters such as the shielding gas composition and laser-arc interspacing distance were investigated for the bead-on-plate welding. The pipe girth welding was implemented and the adequate arc welding parameters were selected according to the welding position from a flat position to an overhead position.Findings: The optimized shielding gas composition and laser-arc interspacing distance for disk laser-GMA hybrid welding were 80% Ar- 20% CO2 and 2mm, respectively for the bead-on-plate welding. The sound welds could be achieved even in the pipe girth welding, but the proper joint shape should be prepared.Research limitations/implications: The laser-arc hybrid welding was implemented for pipe girth welding as a kind of 3-dimensional laser welding and the process parameters could be optimized according to the various target materials and sizes.Practical implications: The optimized process parameters for the disk laser-arc hybrid welding can extend the application of the laser hybrid welding technology.Originality/value: This research showed the possibility of the disk laser-GMA hybrid welding as new pipe girth welding technique. The behaviour of molten pool and droplet transfer could enhance understanding of the hybrid welding.

  7. QUANTIFIED COST-BALANCED ROUTING SCHEME FOR OVERLAY MULTICAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jun; Ruan Qiuqi

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the quantitative analysis issue of the routing metrics tradeoff problem, and presents a Quantified Cost-Balanced overlay multicast routing scheme (QCost-Balanced) to the metric tradeoff problem between overlay path delay and access bandwidth at Multicast Server Nodes (MSN) for real-time applications over Internet. Besides implementing a dynamic priority to MSNs by weighing the size of its service clients for better efficiency, QCost-Balanced tradeoffs these two metrics by a unified tradeoff metric based on quantitative analysis. Simulation experiments demonstrate that the scheme achieves a better tradeoff gain in both two metrics, and effective performance in metric quantitative control.

  8. Implementing a Trust Overlay Framework for Digital Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Paul; McGibney, Jimmy; Botvich, Dmitri; McLaughlin, Mark

    Digital Ecosystems, being decentralised in nature, are inherently untrustworthy environments. This is due to the fact that these environments lack a centralised gatekeeper and identity provider. In order for businesses to operate in these environments there is a need for security measures to support accountability and traceability. This paper describes a trust overlay network developed in the OPAALS project to allow entities participating in digital ecosystems to share experience through the exchange of trust values and to leverage on this network to determine reputation based trustworthiness of unknown and initially untrusted entities. An overlay network is described together with sample algorithms and a discussion on implementation.

  9. OVERLAY DENTURES: A REVIEW AND REPORT OF FOUR CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha SHARMA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with ectodermal dysplasia or having under‑ gone cleft surgery with anodontia or hypodontia, hypo‑ plastic conical teeth and patients with severely worn dentition are difficult to treat because of the poor remaining tooth structure. These patients often exhibit loss of vertical dimension of occlusion and aesthetic problems and usually need complex prosthetic treatments. Financial constraints or other priorities often restrict one from choosing the most desirable treatment. The overlay removable denture is a covering prosthesis partially supported by natural teeth, tooth roots, or dental implants, providing an efficient alter‑ native of treatment. Clinical reports describe the various applications of overlay dentures.

  10. Flexible TWDM PON with WDM overlay for converged services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ning

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews recent developments of flexible TWDM PON (time- and wavelength-division multiplexed passive optical network) with pluggable transceivers for pay-as-you-grow deployment, load balancing, channel protection and power saving. Different architectures for TWDM PON with WDM (wavelength division multiplexed) overlay for converged broadband services are discussed and experimental results are presented for WDM overlay using low-cost self-seeded RSOA (reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers). Challenging issues and possible solutions for future evolution toward software defined flexible PONs (FlexPONs) are also discussed with respect to dynamic lambda flow, elastic bandwidth and flexible reach.

  11. Scalable, Self-Healing, and Self-Optimizing Routing Overlays

    OpenAIRE

    Brun, Olivier; Hassan, Hassan; Vallet, Josselin

    2015-01-01

    After Internet routing was shown in a number of classic measurement papers to result in paths that are sub-optimal with respect to a number of metrics, routing overlays were proposed as a method for improving performance, without the need to re-engineer the underlying network. In this paper, we present SMART, a self-healing, self-optimizing and highly scalable routing overlay, which has a number of advantages with respect to existing solutions. First, SMART can run with off-the-shelf applicat...

  12. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  13. Effect of tungsten carbides properties of overlay welded WC/NiSiB composite coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Seger, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To get a long life of a product which is subjected to heavy mechanical wear, materials with particularly good properties such as high hardness and the ability to resist high temperature is required. Tungsten carbide is a material which has these properties, but to manufacture large products for mining industry or agriculture entirely of this material is neither practical nor quite beneficial when the disadvantages of the materials such as brittleness, high weight and high price will have a ma...

  14. Development of temper bead welding by under water laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshiba has developed temper bead welding by under water laser welding as SCC counter measure for aged components in PWR and BWR nuclear power plants. Temper bead welding by under water laser welding technique recovers toughness of low alloy steel reactor vessel by employing proper the number of cladding layers and their welding conditions. In this report, some evaluation results of material characteristics of temper bead welded low alloy steel are presented. (author)

  15. New welding technologies for car body frame welding

    OpenAIRE

    T. Węgrzyn; J. Piwnik; R. Burdzik; G. Wojnar; D. Hadryś

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: of that paper was analysing main welding process for car body welding. The main reason of it was investigate possibilities of getting varied amount of acicular ferrite (AF) in WMD (weld metal deposit). High amount of acicular ferrite influences positively impact toughness of weld. For optimal amount of AF it is necessary to have optimal chemical composition in WMD. Important role plays especially Ni. There were also tested new welding technology: welding with micro-jet cooling.Design...

  16. Peculiarities of weld crystallization in the process of laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the process of laser welding of 08Kh18N10T steel on weld formation and crystallization is investigated. It is shown that at vsub(weld.) >= 40 m/h the lower sinked part of the weldpool stretched along the weld axis is crystallized quickly. Improvement in hot cracking resistance of weld metal in the process of laser welding results from the additional feeding with a liquid metal of the crystallizing part of the weldpool

  17. Aluminide coatings on iron-chromium-molybdenum steel synthesized by pack cementation for power generation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqing

    Aluminide coatings on ferritic/martensite Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel substrates for power generation applications were developed via a pack cementation process at both high temperatures (1050°C) and low temperatures (650 and 700°C). Thermodynamic analysis was first conducted using HSC 5.0 software to provide a guideline for the selection of a masteralloy and the amount of the activator in the pack. Equilibrium partial pressures of halide gaseous species were calculated for packs containing Cr-Al binary alloys with Al contents varying from 5wt%Al to pure Al at both 1050°C and 700°C (Except for 650°C, at which only pure Al masteralloy was used). The calculation was also made for packs containing Hf, HfO2 or HfCl4 for developing Hf-modified aluminide coatings. At 1050°C, both simple and Hf-modified aluminide coatings were synthesized using a Cr-25wt.%Al binary masteralloy with a noncontact pack arrangement. Oxidation testing in air + 10vol.% H2O at 700°C indicates that simple pack aluminide coatings exhibited similar oxidation behavior to the model coatings fabricated via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). For up to 4,600h, Hf-modified aluminide coatings showed an improved oxidation resistance to CVD coatings. Low temperature aluminide coatings were synthesized at temperatures of 650 and 700°C, below the tempering temperature of the ferritic/martensite steel substrate. Initial coating development showed that a continuous Fe 2Al5 coating layer was deposited at 650°C with pure Al masteralloy. However, the coating thickness was not uniform and cracks were observed in the coatings. Cr-25wt%Al and Cr-15wt.%Al binary alloys with reduced Al activities were used to reduce the tendency of forming the brittle, Al-rich Fe2Al5 phase. With Cr-25wt.%Al masteralloy at 700°C, the synthesized coating consisted of a thin layer of Fe2Al 5 and an underlying layer of FeAl. The masteralloy of Cr-15wt.%Al was then utilized to further reduce the Al activity, and FeAl coatings with improved

  18. VPPA weld model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-07-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  19. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  20. New technologies for Management of PWSCC in Dissimilar Metal Weld in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    One of big issues to increase structural integrity and operating efficiency of nuclear power plants(NPPs) is now primary water stress corrosion cracking(PWSCC) occurring in dissimilar metal weld(DMW) regions, such as, inlet and outlet nozzles, and J-welds of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetration and bottom-mounted instrumentation(BMI) nozzles in a reactor pressure vessel, and other nozzles in a primary system. In order to manage the PWSCC occurring in DMW, many technologies, for example, an induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) process, a mechanical stress improvement process(MSIP), overlay and inlay welding processes using conventional welding methods, water jet or laser peening processes, etc., have been developed in nuclear-advanced counties. Many of them have been being applied to some operating NPPs in the world. The most reliable, relatively new, and effective technologies are, however, thought to be a laser peening and an inlay welding process using a under-water laser welding(UWLW) method. In this talk, the laser peening process and inlay welding process using UWLW method will be introduced and their advantages will be discussed

  1. Incidental Learning of Geospatial Concepts across Grade Levels: Map Overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Sarah E.; Golledge, Reginald G.; Marsh, Meredith J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors evaluate map overlay, a concept central to geospatial thinking, to determine how it is naively and technically understood, as well as to identify when it is leaner innately. The evaluation is supported by results from studies at three grade levels to show the progression of incidentally learned geospatial knowledge as…

  2. 3D Align overlay verification using glass wafers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, E.M.J.; Bijnen, F.C.G.; Slabbekoorn, J.; Van Zeijl, H.W.

    2004-01-01

    In the MEMS world, increasing attention is being given to 3D devices requiring dual-sided processing. This requires lithography tools that are able to align a wafer to both its back side as front side. Overlay describes how well front and back side layers are positioned with respect to each other. C

  3. Crosslayer Survivability in Overlay-IP-WDM Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacharintanakul, Peera

    2010-01-01

    As the Internet moves towards a three-layer architecture consisting of overlay networks on top of the IP network layer on top of WDM-based physical networks, incorporating the interaction between and among network layers is crucial for efficient and effective implementation of survivability. This dissertation has four major foci as follows:…

  4. Promoting Learning of Instructional Design via Overlay Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Andrew Jacob

    2012-01-01

    I begin by introducing Virtual Design Apprenticeship (VDA), a learning model--built on a solid foundation of education principles and theories--that promotes learning of design skills via overlay design tools. In VDA, when an individual needs to learn a new design skill or paradigm she is provided accessible, concrete examples that have been…

  5. Dynamic adaptable overlay networks for personalised service delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathieu, B.; Stiemerling, M.; Soveri, M.C.; Galis, A.; Jean, K.; Ocampo, R.; Lai, Z.; Kampmann, M.; Tariq, M.A.; Balos, K.; Ahmed, O.K.; Busropan, B.J.; Prins, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Overlay Networks have been designed as a promising solution to deliver new services via the use of intermediate nodes, acting as proxies or relays. This concept enables to hide the heterogeneity and variability of the underlying networks. In the Ambient Networks (ANs) project, the objectives are to

  6. Mapping (USPTO) patent data using overlays to Google Maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Leydesdorff; L. Bornmann

    2012-01-01

    A technique is developed using patent information available online (at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office) for the generation of Google Maps. The overlays indicate both the quantity and the quality of patents at the city level. This information is relevant for research questions in technology anal

  7. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  8. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors......This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...

  9. Underwater YAG laser welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When planning preventive maintenance of reactor components using welding, it is necessary to consider special environments such as narrow space or difficult accessibility while minimizing exposure to radiation in the reactor pressure vessel. Toshiba has developed an underwater neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd: YAG) laser welding technique. The features of this welding technique are low-heat-input welding and compact welding machine dimensions for welding in narrow spaces. This paper provides a summary of the new welding technique as a reliable welding technology. (author)

  10. A Many-Core Overlay for High-Performance Embedded Computing on FPGAs

    OpenAIRE

    Véstias, Mário; Neto, Horácio

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we propose a configurable many-core overlay for high-performance embedded computing. The size of internal memory, supported operations and number of ports can be configured independently for each core of the overlay. The overlay was evaluated with matrix multiplication, LU decomposition and Fast-Fourier Transform (FFT) on a ZYNQ-7020 FPGA platform. The results show that using a system-level many-core overlay avoids complex hardware design and still provides good performance resu...

  11. Manganese Content Control in Weld Metal During MAG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the welding current and method of gas shielding in MAG welding on the content of manganese is considered in the paper. Results of study of the welded specimens of steels 45 when applying welding wire of different formulas and different types of gas shielding (traditional shielding and double-jet shielding) are given. It is found that in MAG welding the value of the welding current and the speed of the gas flow from the welding nozzle have a considerable impact on the chemical composition of the weld metal. The consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding provides the directed gas-dynamics in the welding area and enables controlling the electrode metal transfer and the chemical composition of a weld.

  12. Welding by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laser which does not require a vacuum and the beam from which can be projected over a distance without loss of power is sited outside a welding zone and the beam projected through a replaceable laser transparent window. The window is designed and shaped to facilitate access of the beam of workpiece items to be welded in containment. Either the workpiece or the laser beam may be moved during welding. (author)

  13. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  14. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  15. Microstructure and kinetic growth of aluminide coatings deposited by the CVD method on Re 80 superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nowotnik

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The preliminary results of research on forming the aluminide coatings using CVD method were presented in the article.Design/methodology/approach: The coatings were obtained in low activity process on the surface of Rene 80 superalloy. The microstructure analysis and chemical composition analysis were performed applying different values of aluminizing process parameters.Findings: The authors present in the article the results of oxidation resistance analysis of aluminide coatings which were obtained on the surface of Rene 80 superalloy using various techniques.Research limitations/implications: The research results revealed the possibility of obtaining coatings by low activity aluminizing.Practical implications: This process can be used in aerospace industry to form oxidation resistant coatings.Originality/value: It was shown that the coating created during the CVD process was characterized by a good oxidation resistance at the temperature of 1100°C.

  16. An investigation of fracture and fatigue crack growth behavior of cast niobium aluminide intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, F.; Soboyejo, W.O. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 213 Holden Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0237 (United States)

    1999-05-31

    This paper presents the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study of fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth in cast Nb-15Al-xTi (x=10, 25 and 40 at%) niobium aluminide-based intermetallics. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth resistance are shown to improve significantly in the cast alloy containing 40 at% Ti. The improvements in the fracture toughness of the 40Ti alloy are shown to be due to the combined effects of ligament toughening, crack-tip plasticity and crack-tip blunting. The atomistic simulations show that the increased plasticity in these alloys is associated with their higher Ti content. The micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth are also elucidated. The implications of the results are discussed for potential structural application of niobium aluminide intermetallics. (orig.) 19 refs.

  17. Tape casting as a fabrication process for iron aluminide (FeAl) thin sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistler, R.E. [Richard E. Mistler Inc., Morrisville, PA (United States); Sikka, V.K. [ORNL, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Scorey, C.R.; McKernan, J.E. [Ametek Inc., 21 Toelles Road, Wallingford, CT 06492 (United States); Hajaligol, M.R. [Research and Development Center, Philip Morris USA, PO Box 26581, Richmond, VA 23261 (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The conversion of iron aluminide powder into a slurry followed by tape casting into a green sheet was investigated. Casting parameters affecting green sheet properties were studied. Application of thermo-mechanical processing including sintering, cold rolling, annealing and heat treating resulted in sheets with a fine-grain structure at essentially 100% of theoretical density. The various microstructures developed throughout the process are described, along with tensile property measurements on the fully dense product. Differences in property with sheets made by other processes are explained, and it is demonstrated that tape casting is a viable method of making thin gauge sheets of iron aluminide with a wide range of compositions. (orig.) 9 refs.

  18. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hall, F.; Valykeo, J. [Hoskins Mfg. Co., Hamburg, MI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  19. Effect of Microstructure on Wear Behavior of Iron Aluminide Based Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUZi-xin; LIUYan; XUBin-shi; ZHANGWei; MAShi-ning

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to investigate the effect of microstructure on sliding wear behavior of Fe-Al coatings and Fe-Al/WC composite coatings produced by high velocity arc spraying (HVAS) and cored wires. After heat treatment at 300℃, 450℃, 550℃, 650℃ and 800℃, the microstructure of the coatings will be changed. The changes of microstructure have obvious effects on the microhardness of the coatings, which may be the most important factor influencing the coatings sliding wear behavior. After heat treated at 450℃-650℃, increasing of the amounts of iron aluminides (including Fe3Al and FeAl ) and dispersion strengthening of FeEWEC and Fe6W6C will lead to a rise of microhardness of the coatings. Increasing the microhardness through heat treatment would improve the sliding wear resistance of the iron aluminide based coatings coatings.

  20. Effect of Microstructure on Wear Behavior of Iron Aluminide Based Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zi-xin; LIU Yan; XU Bin-shi; ZHANG Wei; MA Shi-ning

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to investigate the effect of microstructure on sliding wear behavior of Fe-Al coatings and Fe-Al/WC composite coatings produced by high velocity arc spraying (HVAS) and cored wires. After heat treatment at 300℃, 450℃, 550℃, 650℃ and 800℃, the microstructure of the coatings will be changed. The changes of microstructure have obvious effects on the microhardness of the coatings, which may be the most important factor influencing the coatings sliding wear behavior. After heat treated at 450℃-650℃, increasing of the amounts of iron aluminides (including Fe3Al and FeAl ) and dispersion strengthening of Fe2W2C and Fe6W6C will lead to a rise of microhardness of the coatings. Increasing the microhardness through heat treatment would improve the sliding wear resistance of the iron aluminide based coatings coatings.

  1. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  2. Throughput and Packet Delay Analysis of the Intermittent DCF for Overlay Access Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamis, Athanassios V.; Maliatsos, Konstantinos N.; Constantinou, Philip

    Overlay Access Technology can compensate for the spectrum underutilization problem by exploiting Cognitive Radios capabilities. MAC design is an important aspect of Overlay Access research. In this paper we present the overlay access environment and the challenges it poses to MAC design. Then, we propose the use of a modified Distributed Coordination Function as the MAC protocol for distributed Overlay Access networks. The resulted Intermittent DCF performs with robustness in the demanding overlay access environment, which is characterized by frequent spectrum scan procedure interruptions and low achievable transmission rates. The most recent DCF Markov Chain Model is extended in order to include the overlay operation modifications. Our extension concerns the slot duration expectations calculation which, in the overlay environment, have not constant values but depend on overlay operation parameters. Using the analytical model we evaluate the performance of the DCF under the effect of certain overlay access parameters. The new analytical model predictions are validated with simulations, and are found to accurately capture many interesting features of the overlay operation. Our model can be used in feasibility studies of realistic overlay scenarios and in admission control algorithms of QoS enabled distributed overlay access networks that engage the Intermittent DCF.

  3. Two-Phase (TiAl+TiCrAl) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)Al(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)

  4. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; McKamey, Claudette G.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; David, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium.

  5. A New Process for Titanium Aluminides Production from TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.R.Kamali; H. Razavizadeh; S.M.M. Hadavi

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new process for producing titanium aluminides, in particular TiAl, from TiO2 raw material. On the basis of obtained results, the non-completed reaction of TiO2 with Al and Ca in a special reaction vessel results in the production of granulates of titanium aluminides especially Ti3Al and other TiAl phases as the metallic product and Ca12Al14O33 as the non-metallic product. By adding KClO4 in the mixture, a nearly completed reaction can be carried out. The products of this reaction are titanium aluminide particularly TiAl as the metallic part and CaAl4O7 (grossite) as the non-metallic slag part. Both product and slag are produced in a separated form. This process, called KRH-method is described in this article.The scanning electron microscopic microstructure of metallic part of the product shows different phases: the matrix phase is TiAl, where the needle form precipitation is TiAl2 and the plate form precipitation includes TiAl and Ti3Al phases. The microstructure of the remelted metallic part indicates dendritic phase with a lamellar structure comprising of TiAl and Ti3Al phases. The interdendritic phase of TiAl is also seen.

  6. The Effect of Zirconium Addition on the Oxidation Resistance of Aluminide Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Pytel, Maciej; Romanowska, Jolanta; Sieniawski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Nickel, Mar M247, and Mar M200 superalloys were coated with zirconium-doped aluminide deposited by the chemical vapor deposition method. All coatings consisted of two layers: an additive one, comprising of the β-NiAl phase and the interdiffusion one. The interdiffusion layer on pure nickel consisted of the γ'-Ni3Al phase and β-NiAl phase on superalloys. Precipitations of zirconium-rich particles were found near the coating's surface and at the interface between the additive and the interdiffusion layer. Zirconium doping of aluminide coating improved the oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings deposited both on the nickel substrate and on the Mar M200 superalloy. Precipitations of ZrO2 embedded by the Al2O3 oxide were formed during oxidation. It seems that the ZrO2 oxide increases adhesion of the Al2O3 oxide to the coating and decreases the propensity of the Al2O3 oxide rumpling and spalling.

  7. Neural network analysis for erosion wear of nickel-aluminide coatings on steel by plasma spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. C.; Chaithanya, M.; Satapathy, Alok; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Sreekumar, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the present investigation plasma spray inter metallic coating of Nickel-aluminide was deposited on mild steel substrates. The response of plasma sprayed nickel-aluminide coatings to the impingement of such solid particles has been presented in this work. Nickel pre-mixed with alumina powder is deposited on mild steel substances by atmospheric plasma spraying at various operating power level. The coatings are subjected to erosion wear test. An erosion test setup developed in our laboratory is used to simulate real time erosive situations. Dry silica sand of average particle size 400 micron is used as the erodent. The erosion rate is calculated on the basis of 'coating mass losses. The erosion studies are made and different velocities and impingement angles. A computational technique (ANN analysis) is used to predict the rate of erosion wear under various operational conditions. This technique involves database training to predict property parameter evolutions in process having large number of interdependent variables. This paper presents the database construction, implementation protocol and also the set of predicted results related to the erosion wear rate of nickel-aluminide coating. It is shown that the erosion wear is strongly influenced by the angle of impact. The test is conducted at room temperature i.e.27°C and 60% RH. Ni3Al coatings deposited at different power levels (10, 12, 16, 20, 24 kW) are found to exhibit different wear rate under similar test conditions.

  8. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways

  9. Characterization of the alumina film with cerium doped on the iron-aluminide diffusion coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Q., E-mail: zhanqin1983@163.com; Yang, H.G.; Zhao, W.W.; Yuan, X.M.; Hu, Y.

    2013-11-15

    An iron-aluminide layer with a thin alumina film on the top as a composite tritium permeation barrier (TPB) coating was characterized under different oxidation conditions. The TPB coating was prepared initially on a China Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (CLAM) steel by a pack cementation aluminizing process and then an alumina film was formed on the surface of this iron-aluminide diffusion layer by an oxidizing process. To modify the properties of the FeAl/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite TPB coatings, the rare earth element (cerium) was introduced as a dopant while oxidizing. Characterization showed that a continuous oxide scale with a thickness of about 300–400 nm was formed on the FeAl diffusion layer. The film was mainly composed of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped with a little CeO{sub 2}. In addition, the concentration of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increased with elevated temperature while oxidizing. The phase transformation behavior of alumina scale on the surface of an iron-aluminide layer was studied in this paper.

  10. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, S.C.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.; Sikka, V.K.; Hajaligol, M.R.

    2000-03-07

    A powder metallurgical process is dislosed for preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as {<=}1% Cr, {>=}05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1 % rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, and/or {<=}3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  11. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hajaligol, Mohammed R. (Richmond, VA)

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  12. Improved diffusion welding and roll welding of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Auto-vacuum cleaning technique was applied to titanium parts prior to welding. This provides oxide-free welding surfaces. Diffusion welding can be accomplished in as little as five minutes of hot pressing. Roll welding can be accomplished with only ten percent deformation.

  13. A Review: Welding Of Dissimilar Metal Alloys by Laser Beam Welding & Friction Stir Welding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Deepika Harwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar metals has attracted attention of the researchers worldwide, owing to its many advantages and challenges. There is no denial in the fact that dissimilar welded joints offer more flexibility in the design and production of the commercial and industrial components. Many welding techniques have been analyzed to join dissimilar metal combinations. The objective of this paper is to review two such techniques – Laser welding and Friction stir welding. Laser beam welding, a high power density and low energy-input process, employs a laser beam to produce welds of dissimilar materials. Friction stir welding, a solid-state joining process, is also successfully used in dissimilar welding applications like aerospace and ship building industries. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of these two welding processes in the field of dissimilar welding. Future aspects of the study are also discussed.

  14. Welding machine and welding process for nuclear fuel assembly structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The welding device comprises a mounting jig which receives the guide tubes and the assembly supporting structures in the desired spatial orientation. It also comprises a welding head which can travel on rails along the length of the guide tubes and has at least a welding spring chuck movable in two axes and rotatable relative to the welding machine; the spring chuck can pass between two adjacent tube rows and takes a tubes where a weld is necessary. The welding spring chuck can apply spot-welding pulses. This is used for the assembly of guide tubes and bundles for water-cooled nuclear reactors

  15. Al-Si-Mn Alloy Coating on Aluminum Substrate Using Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) Welding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, G. P.; Kamaraj, M.; Bakshi, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The cold metal transfer (CMT) process was explored as a weld overlay technique for synthesizing Al-Si-Mn alloy coating on a commercially pure Al plate. The effect of welding speed on the bead geometry, deposition rate, and the dilution were studied and the best parameter was used to synthesize the coatings. The CMT process can be used to produce thick coatings (>2.5 mm) without porosity and with low dilution levels. The Vickers hardness number of the Al substrate increased from 28 in the bulk to 57 in the coating. It is suggested that the CMT process can be an effective and energy-efficient technique for depositing thick coatings and is useful in weld repair of aluminum alloy components.

  16. Welding Tubes In Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, R.

    1984-01-01

    Special welding equipment joins metal tubes that carry pressurized cyrogenic fluids. Equipment small enough to be used in confined spaces in which such tubes often mounted. Welded joints lighter in weight and more leak-proof than joints made with mechanical fittings.

  17. Simulation of welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Song WU; Michael RETHMEIER; Christopher SCHWENK

    2011-01-01

    @@ Welding has become the most important materials processing technology in manufacturing, and has critical effects on the quality, reliability and life of products as well as production cost, efficiency and response speed to market.As various kinds of high performance metallic materials are widely used in engineering, there are more demands in manufacturing industry for advanced welding technology.

  18. Laser welding in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the design and construction, as well as typical results from performing low gravity laser welding experiments on NASA's KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic maneuvers to simulate low gravity. Results of the experiments are reported and some new concepts regarding the implementation of laser technology suitable for laser welding in space are presented

  19. Removing Welding Fumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lloyd J.; Hall, Vandel L.

    1987-01-01

    Portable exhaust duct for machining and welding shops removes oil mist, dust, smoke, and fumes. Duct used with shop exhaust system, inlets of which placed at various convenient locations in shop floor. Flanged connector on underside of wheeled base links flexible tube to exhaust system under floor. Made especially for welding in room with low ceiling.

  20. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  1. Analysis of an Orthotropic Deck Stiffened with a Cement-Based Overlay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Rasmus; Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    decks. A solution might be to enhance the stiffness of the traditional orthotropic bridge deck by using a cement-based overlay. In this paper, an orthotropic steel bridge deck stiffened with a cement-based overlay is analyzed. The analysis is based on nonlinear fracture mechanics, and utilizes...... the finite-element method. The stiffness of the steel deck reinforced with an overlay depends highly on the composite action. The composite action is closely related to cracking of the overlay and interfacial cracking between the overlay and underlying steel plate (debonding). As an example, a real size...... can influence the cracking behavior of the cement-based overlay system. Both mechanical and environmental loading have to be considered, and effects such as shrinkage, temperature gradients, and traffic loading are taken into account. The performance of four overlay materials are investigated in terms...

  2. A comparative study of overlay generation methods in bite mark analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Khatri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the best method of overlay generation out of the three methods, i.e., manual, photocopying, and computer assisted method. Materials and Methods: Impressions of maxillary and mandibular arches of 25 individuals participating in the study were made and dental study models were prepared. Overlay production was done by manual, photocopying, and computer assisted methods. Finally, the overlays obtained by each method were compared. Results: Kruskal Wallis ANOVA H test was used for the comparison of manual, photocopying, and computer assisted overlay generation methods. H value being highest in case of computer assisted overlays, thus, making it the best method of overlay generation out of the three methods. Conclusion: We conclude that the method of computer assisted overlay generation is the best among the three methods used in our study.

  3. Virtual Private Overlays: Secure Group Commounication in NAT-Constrained Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolinsky, David Isaac; Choi, Tae Woong; Boykin, P Oscar; Figueiredo, Renato

    2010-01-01

    Structured P2P overlays provide a framework for building distributed applications that are self-configuring, scalable, and resilient to node failures. Such systems have been successfully adopted in large-scale Internet services such as content delivery networks and file sharing; however, widespread adoption in small/medium scales has been limited due in part to security concerns and difficulty bootstrapping in NAT-constrained environments. Nonetheless, P2P systems can be designed to provide guaranteed lookup times, NAT traversal, point-to-point overlay security, and distributed data stores. In this paper we propose a novel way of creating overlays that are both secure and private and a method to bootstrap them using a public overlay. Private overlay nodes use the public overlay's distributed data store to discover each other, and the public overlay's connections to assist with NAT hole punching and as relays providing STUN and TURN NAT traversal techniques. The security framework utilizes groups, which are cr...

  4. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...... in the weld causing expulsion of the melt pool. Trailing beams were applied to melt additional material and ensure a melt pool. The method showed good results for increasing tolerances to impurities and reduction of scrapped parts from blowouts during laser welding....

  5. Vacuum welding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new welding process has been developed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) in France. The edges of the work-pieces are melted by the impact of an electron beam produced by an electron gun. Welding is carried out in a vacuum of 10-4 to 10-8 mm of mercury. The welding machine consists, diagrammatically, of: a) a metal enclosure in which a vacuum is produced; b) a cathode for electron emission, a high-voltage generator for accelerating these electrons, a focusing device; c) a mechanical device for moving (rotating) the work-piece. Advantages of the process: 1) possible welding of highly oxidizable metals (e.g. zirconium); 2) fabrication of high-vacuum-sealed metal containers; 3) production of very deeply penetrated welds. Therefore, this new process is particularly advantageous for atomic power applications, the fabrication of electron tubes and, more generally, for all industries in which very special metals are used. (author)

  6. Rutting Resistance of Asphalt Overlay with Multilayer Wheel Tracking Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Weidong; CHEN Zheng; WU Shaopeng; MO Liantong; LIU Gang

    2006-01-01

    The rutting resistance of multilayer asphalt overlay was researched by using laboratory wheel tracking test. The effects of loading level and test temperature on rutting resistance of asphalt overlay structure were evaluated by means of multilayer specimens .In comparison with multilayer tests, standard specimens of various layers were also conducted to evaluate the rutting resistance. Experimental results indicated that the test temperature and applied load have a significant effect on rutting resistance of asphalt concrete. Higher test temperature and heavier applied load resulted in higher rut depths. In addition, the mutilayer wheel tracking test has been demonstrated to be a more reasonable solution in evaluation on rutting resistance of asphatt pavement structure beasuse it reflects the cumulative permanent deformation in all of asphalt layers.

  7. Ion beam mixing of titanium overlayers with hydroxyapaptite substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, T.E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Nastasi, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Alford, T.L.; Suchicital, C.; Russell, S.; Luptak, K.; Pizziconi, V.; Mayer, J.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The mixing of titanium overlayers with hydroxyapatite (HA) substrates via ion irradiation has been demonstrated. Analysis via secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) indicates an interfacial broadening of titanium and calcium of the implanted sample compared to that of the unimplanted sample. Attendant to the observed ion beam mixing of titanium into the HA, the oxygen signal of the titanium overlayer increases as a result of ion irradiation. It is supposed that this change is evident of diffusion through the metal layer and possibly from titania formation at the free surface and perovskite formation at the film/substrate interface. This possibility is consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Additionally, the force required to separate the film from the substrate increased as a result of ion irradiation, validating the continued study of ion beam processing of Ti/HA systems towards the improvement of long term fixation of implant devices.

  8. On-demand Overlay Networks for Large Scientific Data Transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Guok, Chin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kissel, Ezra [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Swany, D. Martin [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-10-12

    Large scale scientific data transfers are central to scientific processes. Data from large experimental facilities have to be moved to local institutions for analysis or often data needs to be moved between local clusters and large supercomputing centers. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a network overlay architecture to enable highthroughput, on-demand, coordinated data transfers over wide-area networks. Our work leverages Phoebus and On-demand Secure Circuits and AdvanceReservation System (OSCARS) to provide high performance wide-area network connections. OSCARS enables dynamic provisioning of network paths with guaranteed bandwidth and Phoebus enables the coordination and effective utilization of the OSCARS network paths. Our evaluation shows that this approach leads to improved end-to-end data transfer throughput with minimal overheads. The achievedthroughput using our overlay was limited only by the ability of the end hosts to sink the data.

  9. Flutter Analysis of the Shuttle Tile Overlay Repair Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Kim S.; Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Waters, William A.; Chen, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle tile overlay repair concept, developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is designed for on-orbit installation over an area of damaged tile to permit safe re-entry. The thin flexible plate is placed over the damaged area and secured to tile at discreet points around its perimeter. A series of flutter analyses were performed to determine if the onset of flutter met the required safety margins. Normal vibration modes of the panel, obtained from a simplified structural analysis of the installed concept, were combined with a series of aerodynamic analyses of increasing levels of fidelity in terms of modeling the flow physics to determine the onset of flutter. Results from these analyses indicate that it is unlikely that the overlay installed at body point 1800 will flutter during re-entry.

  10. Modeling the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks

    CERN Document Server

    Marceau, Vincent; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemics seldom occur as isolated phenomena. Typically, two or more viral agents spread within the same host population and may interact dynamically with each other. We present a general model where two viral agents interact via an immunity mechanism as they propagate simultaneously on two networks connecting the same set of nodes. Exploiting a correspondence between the propagation dynamics and a dynamical process performing progressive network generation, we develop an analytic approach that accurately captures the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks. The formalism allows for overlay networks with arbitrary joint degree distribution and overlap. To illustrate the versatility of our approach, we consider a hypothetical delayed intervention scenario in which an immunizing agent is disseminated in a host population to hinder the propagation of an undesirable agent (e.g. the spread of preventive information in the context of an emerging infectious disease).

  11. Multipair Massive MIMO Relaying with Pilot-Data Transmission Overlay

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Leyuan; Dai, Yongyu; Xu, Wei; Dong, Xiaodai

    2016-01-01

    We propose a pilot-data transmission overlay scheme for multipair massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) relaying systems employing either half- or full-duplex (HD or FD) communications at the relay station (RS). In the proposed scheme, pilots are transmitted in partial overlap with data to decrease the channel estimation overhead. The RS can detect the source data with minimal destination pilot interference by exploiting the asymptotic orthogonality of massive MIMO channels. Then pilo...

  12. A Novel Overlay IDS For Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Sumanta; Islam, Md. Safiqul; Hossen, Md. Sakhawat; Mamun, Mohammad Saiful Islam

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) consists of low cost sensor nodes which cannot afford to implement sophisticated security system in it. That is why intrusion detection architecture for WSN is considerably different and difficult to implement. Most of the current implementations are based on exchanging anomaly signals among the leaf level sensors resulting in too much power consumption. We propose a novel architecture for Intrusion Detection System (IDS) in WSN based on Hierarchical Overlay Desi...

  13. Perceived effects of coloured overlays on reading material in persons with albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Makgaba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons with albinism often complain of glare when reading. They may therefore benefit from coloured filter overlays just as they benefit from tinted lenses. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectof coloured overlays on print perception in persons with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA.   Fifty subjects were included in this study, their ages ranged from 12 to 31 years with a mean of 16.12 years (SD = ± 4.56 years.  Following refraction and subsequent compensation for refractive errors, subjective perception of print was examined with the subject looking at the Wilkins® reading rate test chart with and without colored filter overlay/s.  The subjects were asked to respond to questions previously used in a questionnaire by Wilkins (2001. The percentage frequencies of positive (beneficial responses were used to decide whether or not a particular overlay would enhance reading performance.  McNemar’s test was used to establish significant differences between responses to questions without and with overlays. All single overlays gave greater percentages of positive responses (92.0-97.2% than without overlay (85.2%.  The single overlay that provided the highest positive responses was blue (97.2% and the least was purple (92.0%. All double overlays, except grey/grey (82.0% gave greater positive responses than without overlay (85.2%. Aqua/blue gave the greatest positive responses (possible benefits (97.2%, followed by rose/rose (96.8%.  Comparing the responses without overlay with single and double overlays, the difference in responses to the five questions was only significant (p < 0.05 with regard to brightness of the surface. The results suggest that overlays provided a more glare-free reading surface than without an overlay. It was, therefore concluded that the best advantage of the coloured overlays was in glare reduction.  Although this study showed that there were more subjects who preferred single blue and aqua/blue double

  14. Scalable Overlay Multicasting in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (SOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariza Kamboj

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many crucial applications of MANETs like the battlefield, conference and disaster recovery defines the needs for group communications either one-to-many or many-to-many form. Multicast plays an important role in bandwidth scarce multihop mobile ad hoc networks comprise of limited battery power mobile nodes. Multicast protocols in MANETs generate many controls overhead for maintenance of multicast routingstructures due to frequent changes of network topology. Bigger multicast tables for the maintenance of network structures resultsin inefficient consumption of bandwidth of wireless links andbattery power of anemic mobile nodes, which in turn, pose thescalability problems as the network size is scaled up. However,many MANET applications demands scalability from time to time. Multicasting for MANETs, therefore, needs to reduce the state maintenance. As a remedy to these shortcomings, this paper roposes an overlay multicast protocol on application layer. In the proposed protocol titled “Scalable Overlay Multicasting in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (SOM” the network nodes construct overlay hierarchical framework to reduce the protocols states and constrain their distribution within limited scope. Based on zone around each node, it constructs a virtual structure at application layer mapped with the physical topology at network layer, thus formed two levels of hierarchy. The concept of two level hierarchies reduces the protocol state maintenance and hence supports the vertical scalability. Protocol depends on the location information obtained using a distributed location service, which effectively reduces the overhead for route searching and updating the source based multicast tree.

  15. Ground truth data generation for skull-face overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, O; Cavalli, F; Campomanes-Álvarez, B R; Campomanes-Álvarez, C; Valsecchi, A; Huete, M I

    2015-05-01

    Objective and unbiased validation studies over a significant number of cases are required to get a more solid picture on craniofacial superimposition reliability. It will not be possible to compare the performance of existing and upcoming methods for craniofacial superimposition without a common forensic database available for the research community. Skull-face overlay is a key task within craniofacial superimposition that has a direct influence on the subsequent task devoted to evaluate the skull-face relationships. In this work, we present the procedure to create for the first time such a dataset. We have also created a database with 19 skull-face overlay cases for which we are trying to overcome legal issues that allow us to make it public. The quantitative analysis made in the segmentation and registration stages, together with the visual assessment of the 19 face-to-face overlays, allows us to conclude that the results can be considered as a gold standard. With such a ground truth dataset, a new horizon is opened for the development of new automatic methods whose performance could be now objectively measured and compared against previous and future proposals. Additionally, other uses are expected to be explored to better understand the visual evaluation process of craniofacial relationships in craniofacial identification. It could be very useful also as a starting point for further studies on the prediction of the resulting facial morphology after corrective or reconstructive interventionism in maxillofacial surgery.

  16. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  17. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  18. Development of new engine bearings with overlay consisting of solid lubricants; Kotai junkatsu overlay tsuki engine yo suberi jikuuke zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanayama, H.; Kawakami, S.; Gohara, C. [Taiho Kogyo Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan); Fuwa, Y.; Michioka, H. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Recently, modern engines have a tendency for higher output and longer periods. As a result , higher bearing performance is required. For this reason, we have developed the new conceptual overlay consisting of solid lubricants and thermosetting plastics. This paper describes the performance of engine bearings with the new overlay. 5 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  20. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  1. A Review: Welding Of Dissimilar Metal Alloys by Laser Beam Welding & Friction Stir Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Deepika Harwani; Mr. Kapil Banker

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar metals has attracted attention of the researchers worldwide, owing to its many advantages and challenges. There is no denial in the fact that dissimilar welded joints offer more flexibility in the design and production of the commercial and industrial components. Many welding techniques have been analyzed to join dissimilar metal combinations. The objective of this paper is to review two such techniques – Laser welding and Friction stir welding. Laser beam we...

  2. Imaging The Leading Edge Of A Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical system integrated into plasma arc welding torch provides image of leading edge of weld pool and welding-arc-initiation point. Welding torch aligned better with joint. System includes coherent bundle of optical fibers and transparent cup.

  3. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  4. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  5. Welding of tailored blanks of different materials

    OpenAIRE

    Suban, Marjan; Tušek, Janez; Kampuš, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    This paper treats welding of tailored blanks made of different materials. In general, fusion welding and welding with pressure, practically without fusion, are described. Fusion welding may be carried out with or without the addition of filler material. In Section 3, general characteristics of tailored blanks are described. In Section 4, MIG welding and laser welding of austenitic stainless steel with ferrite non-stainless steel are described. After welding, hardness of the welded joints was ...

  6. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  7. Effect of grit blasting on the thermal cycling behavior of diffusion aluminide/YSZ TBCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TBCs including of CVD NiAl bond coat and EB-PVD YSZ ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. • Ridges are removed, and no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode are suppressed. • Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. -- Abstract: Thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited NiAl bond coat and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y2O3–stabilized-ZrO2 (YSZ) ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, cyclic oxidation behaviors of these coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges form on the surface of aluminide bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating by EB-PVD, which are shown to be the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. When these ridges are removed, there is no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode is suppressed. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface with additional cycling. From the result of thermal cycling, an averaged four folds lifetime improvement can be achieved with samples after grit blasting of bond coat surface as compared with those samples existence in ridges on the bond coats’ surface

  8. Differential scanning calorimetry and reaction kinetics studies of {gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2} Ti aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India)

    2012-12-14

    Reaction synthesis method for titanium aluminide processing consists of an exothermic reaction among alloying elements present and primarily between titanium and aluminium particles at specific temperature range. Study of this reaction helps in understanding the process of aluminide formation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study is the suitable method to study such reactions. In the present work, five different alloy mixtures based on Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B are prepared and DSC study is carried out. Onset temperature, peak temperature and completion temperature of the major exothermic reaction is analyzed at different heating rates. Further, kinetics of the reaction is studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Activation energy and Avrami parameter are calculated and compared with the reported works on binary alloy. It has been observed that exothermic reaction is triggered by melting of aluminium. Boron assists in increasing the enthalpy of reaction by boride formation. Primary reaction product is found to be TiAl{sub 3}. Activation energy as well as Avrami parameter is found to have marginal variation due to small change in alloying elements in different alloys and due to heating rates in the same alloy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction kinetics studies of Ti-aluminide alloy powder mixtures carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five compositions studied through non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of minor boron addition and role of Ti particle size is noted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation energies using JMA equations are between 169.5 and 192.49 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  9. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  10. Customized orbital welding meets the challenge of titanium welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium has emerged as the material of choice for tubing used in surface condensers around the world in both new and retrofit configurations. A major worldwide supplier of steam surface condensers to the electric utility industry, Senior Engineering is finding an increased use of titanium tubes and tube sheets in condenser specifications. When compared to other alloys, titanium's light weight is efficient in design, handling, transportation and installation activities. Additionally, it maintains a stable price structure. Senior Engineering implements an orbital welding process using fusion gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) for its titanium tube-to-tube sheet welding. Orbital welding involves the use of a welding apparatus placed inside a tube or pipe to automatically and precisely weld a 360-deg joint. When welding manually, a welder stops several times during the weld due to the large amount of time and fatigue involved in achieving 360-deg welds, which results in lack of fusion. An automated orbital welding system, however, can accomplish the task as one continuous weld. This reduces process time and decreases lack of fusion. The orbital welding systems, featuring a microprocessor-based controller, an inverter-based power supply, an expandable mandrel and a customized torch shroud, reduced welding labor by 35%. The improved labor efficiency justified the addition of two more of the systems in January 1996

  11. Magnetic Pulse Welding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Jassim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the benefits of using Magnetic Pulse machine which is belong to Non-conventional machine instead of conventional machine. Magnetic Pulse Technology is used for joining dissimilar metals, and for forming and cutting metals. It is a non contact technique. Magnetic field is used to generate impact magnetic pressure for welding and forming the work piece by converted the electrical energy to mechanical energy. It is enable us to design previously not possible by welding dissimilar materials and allowing to welds light and stronger materials together. It can be used to weld metallic with non metallic materials to created mechanical lock on ceramics, polymers, rubbers and composites. It is green process; there is no heat, no radiation, no gas, no smoke and sparks, therefore the emissions are negligible.

  12. Laser welding of venotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R A; Abergel, R P; Klein, S R; Kopchok, G; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1986-08-01

    We investigated the histologic and biochemical effects of carbon dioxide and neodymium (Nd)-YAG laser welding on the healing of venotomies. Ten canine femoral venotomies 2 cm in length were approximated and welded with 10 600-nm wavelength, 1-W power over 20 to 25 s for CO2 laser, and 1060-nm wavelength, 1-W power over 30 to 40 s for Nd-YAG laser. On removal at one to three weeks, all veins (4/4 welded by CO2 and 6/6 by Nd-YAG) were patent without hematomas. Histologic and biochemical analyses of the venous tissues demonstrated active healing at the venotomy sites. We conclude that the CO2 and Nd-YAG lasers can be used successfully to weld venotomies and may provide an alternative to conventional suture techniques for repair of vascular lesions. PMID:3089196

  13. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  14. Welding Qualification Sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASME Section IX, 'Welding Qualifications', requires that each organization qualify its own welders and welding procedures. Qualification responsibility cannot be subcontracted, and qualifications administered by one organization cannot be transferred to another organization. This requirement has become the subject of close scrutiny as the demand for efficiency, particularly among nuclear plant owners, has increased. Two recent Code Cases change procedure and performance qualification requirements for the better. The first, N-573, enables nuclear plant owners to share welding procedure qualifications. The second, N-600, enables nuclear plant owners to share welder performance qualifications. Several owners have reduced costs using N-573. N-600, because it is relatively new, has not yet been implemented. Its potential for cost savings, though, is equivalent to that afforded by N-573. This paper discusses ASME Section IX's procedure and performance qualification philosophy, assesses that philosophy in light of today's welding environment, and discusses implementation of Code Cases N-573 and N-600. (authors)

  15. Effect of texture on the cold rolling behavior of an alpha-two titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the texture on the cold rolling behavior of an alpha-2 titanium aluminide, Ti-14AL-21Nb (wt pct), was investigated by measuring pole figures, Knoop hardness yield loci, tensile ductility, and the starting microstructure of a number of lots of the cold-rolled material. Results showed that measurements of tensile ductility do not necessarily correlate with the cold rolling performance. On the other hand, the Knoop hardness yield locus provides a convenient quality control tool to assess lot-to-lot variations in texture and plastic anisotropy, and hence to estimate the rollability of sheet and foil specimens. 8 refs

  16. Characterization of hydrogen interactions with the surface of alpha-2 titanium aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of hydrogen at the surface of alpha-2 titanium aluminide alloys with Nb additions has been investigated with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and reflected electron energy loss (REELS) spectroscopy. The hydrogen was either adsorbed onto the alloy surface from the gas phase or it was pre-charged into the alloy forming an alpha-2 hydride. No effect of either adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen was observed in the Auger spectra. A shift in the bulk plasmon loss energy (observed with REELS) was measured for both conditions. The potential significance of these results in relation to hydrogen interactions in this alloy is discussed.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides. Final contractor report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified

  18. On high-speed turning of a third-generation gamma titanium aluminide

    OpenAIRE

    Settineri, Luca; Priarone, Paolo Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides are heat-resistant intermetallic alloys predestined to be employed in components suffering from high mechanical stresses and thermal loads. These materials are regarded as difficult to cut, so this makes process adaptation essential in order to obtain high-quality and defect-free surfaces suitable for aerospace and automotive parts. In this paper, an innovative approach for longitudinal external high-speed turning of a third-generation Ti-45Al-8Nb- 0.2C-0.2B gamma ti...

  19. Saturated bonds and anomalous electronic transport in transition-metal aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.

    2006-05-22

    This thesis deals with the special electronic properties of the transition-metal aluminides. Following quasicrystals and their approximants it is shown that even materials with small elementary cells exhibit the same surprising effects. So among the transition-metal aluminides also semi-metallic and semiconducting compounds exist, although if they consist of classic-metallic components like Fe, Al, or Cr. These properties are furthermore coupled with a deep pseusogap respectively gap in the density of states and strongly covalent bonds. Bonds are described in this thesis by two eseential properties. First by the bond charge and second by the energetic effect of the bond. It results that in the caes of semiconducting transition-metal aluminides both a saturation of certain bonds and a bond-antibond alteration in the Fermi level is present. By the analysis of the near-order in form of the so-calles coordination polyeders it has been succeeded to establish a simple rule for semiconductors, the five-fold coordination for Al. This rule states that aluminium atoms with their three valence electrons are not able to build more than five saturated bonds to their nearest transition-metal neighbours. In excellent agreement with the bond angles predicted theoretically under assumption of equal-type bonds it results that all binary transition-element aluminide semiconductors exhibit for the Al atoms the same near order. Typical values for specific resistances of the studied materials at room temperature lie in the range of some 100 {mu}{omega}cm, which is farly larger than some 10 {mu}{omega}cm as in the case of the unalloyed metals. SUrprising is furthermore a high transport anisotropy with a ratio of the specific resistances up to 3.0. An essential result of this thesis can be seen in the coupling of the properties of the electronic transport and the bond properties. The small conducitivities could be explained by small values in the density of states and a bond

  20. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, B.S.; Yao, Qizhou; Cooper, B.R. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Comparative creep crack growth tests of FA-186 and FA-187 iron aluminides under either dry oxygen or air environment showed that both alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Test results also revealed that FA-187 is intrinsically a more brittle material than FA-186. Atomistic computational modeling is being undertaken to find the preferred geometries, structures and formation energies of iron vacancies and vacancy pairs (Fe-Fe) in FeAl and Fe{sub 3}Al. An indication of vacancy clustering in Fe{sub 3}Al, with consequences for dislocation behavior, may be important for understanding the role of dislocation assisted diffusion in the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  3. Welding unit - Metallurgical Research Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the activities of the Metallurgical Research Department's Welding Unit during 1984. Major research programs during the year included nuclear waste container welding, pulsed-current gas-metal-arc welding procedure development, welding automation and robotics, and repair welding technology, particularly temperbead. Smaller research projects, and the substantial amount of field support and service work performed in 1984, are also summarized. Reports issued by the Welding Unit, as well as externally published papers and presentations are listed. Finally, the proposed activities and objectives for the Unit's 1985 work program are outlined, with particular reference to the major research areas carrying on from 1984

  4. Evaluation of parameters affecting reflection cracking in geogrid-reinforced overlay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahab Fallah; Ali Khodaii

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the most important parameters on the service life of reinforced asphalt overlay with geogrid materials in bending mode was examined by employing the Taguchi method and analysis of variance techniques. The objectives of this experiment was to investigate the effects of grid stiffness, tensile strength, coating type, amount of tack coat, overlay thickness, crack width and stiffnesses of asphalt overlay and existing asphalt concrete on propagation of the reflection cracking. Results indicate that the stiffnesses of cracked layer and overlay are the main significant factors that can directly improve the service life of an overlay against the reflection cracking. Generally, glass grid is more effective in reinforced overlay than polyester grid. Effect of crack width of the existing layer is significant when its magnitude increases from 6 to 9 mm.

  5. A Popularity-Aware Semantic Overlay for Efficient Peer-to-Peer Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE, C.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel semantic overlay scheme that connects peers based on the similarity of their contents. Semantic closeness among overlay peers can effectively be determined via the exchanges of their content summary using Bloom filters. The overlay link quality is further improved by carefully selecting semantic neighbors according to their potential to contribute to content-based searches. The basic idea behind the semantic neighbor selection is that highly replicated documents should not excessively dominate the overlay topology, overshadowing rare to modestly-replicated items whose query efficiency is often more critical for overall search performance. The efficacy of the proposed semantic overlay is validated through our simulation study which demonstrates superior overlay link quality and query routing performance.

  6. Explosive Welding with Nitroguanidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadwin, L D

    1964-03-13

    By using the explosive nitroguanidine, continuous welds can be made between similar and dissimilar metals. Since low detonation pressures are attainable, pressure transfer media are not required between the explosive and the metal surface. The need for either a space or an angle between the metals is eliminated, and very low atmospheric pressures are not required. Successful welds have been made between tantalum and 4140 steel, 3003H14 aluminum and 4140 steel, and 304 stainless steel and 3003H14 aluminum.

  7. Magnetic Pulse Welding Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad K. Jassim

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the benefits of using Magnetic Pulse machine which is belong to Non-conventional machine instead of conventional machine. Magnetic Pulse Technology is used for joining dissimilar metals, and for forming and cutting metals. It is a non contact technique. Magnetic field is used to generate impact magnetic pressure for welding and forming the work piece by converted the electrical energy to mechanical energy. It is enable us to design previously not possible by weld...

  8. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  9. Weld radiograph enigmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1986-01-01

    Weld radiograph enigmas are features observed on X-ray radiographs of welds. Some of these features resemble indications of weld defects, although their origin is different. Since they are not understood, they are a source of concern. There is a need to identify their causes and especially to measure their effect on weld mechanical properties. A method is proposed whereby the enigmas can be evaluated and rated, in relation to the full spectrum of weld radiograph indications. Thie method involves a signature and a magnitude that can be used as a quantitive parameter. The signature is generated as the diference between the microdensitometer trace across the radiograph and the computed film intensity derived from a thickness scan along the corresponding region of the sample. The magnitude is the measured difference in intensity between the peak and base line values of the signature. The procedure is demonstated by comparing traces across radiographs of a weld sample before and after the introduction of a hole and by a system based on a MacIntosh mouse used for surface profiling.

  10. Questioning the benefits that coloured overlays can have for reading in students with and without dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Lisa-Marie; Tsogka, Natassa; Snowling, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Visual stress (the experience of visual distortions and discomfort during prolonged reading) is frequently identified and alleviated with coloured overlays or lenses. Previous studies have associated visual stress with dyslexia and as a consequence, coloured overlays are widely distributed to children and adults with reading difficulty. However, this practice remains controversial. We investigated whether overlays have advantageous and reliable benefits for reading in undergraduate students w...

  11. Influence of temperature variation on the reflective cracking behaviour of asphalt overlays

    OpenAIRE

    Minhoto, Manuel; Pais, Jorge; Pereira, Paulo

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a study about the influence of temperature on the reflective cracking behavior through the evaluation of the overlay damage associated to the temperature variation during the year. The development of this study war based on the numerical simulation of the overlay behaviour, based on a three-dimensional finite-element analysis, considering the simultaneous loading of traffic and temperature variation and considering the most predominant type of overlay...

  12. Effect of PCC Joint Skew on Reflective Cracking in HMA Overlays

    OpenAIRE

    Ghauch, Ziad G.

    2011-01-01

    Reflective cracking is a relatively premature distress that occurs in HMA materials overlaying cracked and jointed underlying pavements. The high concentration of stresses and strains in the vicinity of the discontinuity of the old pavement causes the cracks to reflect into the newly placed HMA overlay. While it is a common practice to use skewed transverse joints in rigid pavements to improve the latter's performance, the impact of such a practice on the cracking of a potential HMA overlay h...

  13. A Popularity-Aware Semantic Overlay for Efficient Peer-to-Peer Search

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, C.(Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan); Choi, J.; Kim, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel semantic overlay scheme that connects peers based on the similarity of their contents. Semantic closeness among overlay peers can effectively be determined via the exchanges of their content summary using Bloom filters. The overlay link quality is further improved by carefully selecting semantic neighbors according to their potential to contribute to content-based searches. The basic idea behind the semantic neighbor selection is that highly replica...

  14. Autologous adventitial overlay method reinforces anastomoses in aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Naoki; Okada, Takayuki; Sumida, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Kenichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Kusunose, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we present an inexpensive and effective method for providing a secure and hemostatic anastomosis using autologous adventitia obtained from a dissected or aneurysmal wall. The resected aortic wall is separated between the adventitia and media, and a soft, 2 × 10-cm adventitial strip is overlaid to cover the anastomotic margin. A graft is sutured to the aortic stump. This autologous adventitial overlay method can inexpensively and strongly reinforce the anastomosis during aortic surgery for dissection or aneurysm and will contribute to anastomotic hemostasis and long-term stability.

  15. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordill, M.J.; Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems. PMID:25641995

  16. Opportunistic transmitter selection for selfless overlay cognitive radios

    KAUST Repository

    Shaqfeh, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    We propose an opportunistic strategy to grant channel access to the primary and secondary transmitters in causal selfless overlay cognitive radios over block-fading channels. The secondary transmitter helps the primary transmitter by relaying the primary messages opportunistically, aided by a buffer to store the primary messages temporarily. The optimal channel-aware transmitter- selection strategy is the solution of the maximization of the average secondary rate under the average primary rate requirement and the buffer stability constraints. Numerical results demonstrate the gains of the proposed opportunistic selection strategy. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. An Evaluation on the Residual Stresses Induced by EFR Welding of CEDM Nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Park, Gi Yeol; Kim, Tae Ryong [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, carried out the welding analysis to use the SYSWELD as welding interpretation code based on the reactor upper head nozzle. In this paper, evaluated the residual stress in CEDM nozzle by EFR through the SYSWELD which is the welding interpretation code. The conclusion are same as below. 1) When comparing with Hoop Stress and Axial Stress by J-Groove and EFR, after welding residual stress by EFR is lower than after J-Groove. 2) After EFR, it was confirmed that the tensile stress is reduced after increasing over the point3. The PWSCC of Dissimilar Metal Zone of reactor can degrade the integrity of the main device in nuclear power plant, and according to the power plant stopped for inspection, it can cause an enormous amount of lost sales when the crack is occurred. Various methods have been developed to reduce residual stress to prevent the PWSCC like Weld Overlay (WOL), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (Msp), Laser Peening, Inlay Weld, etc. Among them, Wol is the most commonly used welding method in nuclear power plant. When performing a Wol, structure rigidity will be increase, and residual stress of welding zone will be changed into compressive stress from the tensile stress. This has the advantage that improved resistance to PWSCC. The most commonly used material in nuclear power plant is Inconel 600. Inconel 600 consist of a Ni-Cr-Fe and it has 14-17% of Cr content, 10% of Fe content and susceptible to PWSCC. The more Cr content is more stronger against PWSCC. Inconel 690 which has 2 times more Cr content than Inconel 600 has very strong resistance to PWSCC than Inconel 600. Embedded Flaw Repair (EFR) has been developed in Westinghouse by 1994. The welding metal with high corrosion resistance is embedded on the surface of component, and could protect cracking part from the PWSCC. It is permanent repair method that isolates the flaw from the environment, eliminating further crack propagation due to PWSCC. EFR method is that at least three layers

  18. Infrared differential interference contrast microscopy for 3D interconnect overlay metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yi-sha; Shyu, Deh-Ming; Lin, Yeou-Sung; Cho, Chia-Hung

    2013-08-12

    One of the main challenges for 3D interconnect metrology of bonded wafers is measuring through opaque silicon wafers using conventional optical microscopy. We demonstrate here the use infrared microscopy, enhanced by implementing the differential interference contrast (DIC) technique, to measure the wafer bonding overlay. A pair of two dimensional symmetric overlay marks were processed at both the front and back sides of thinned wafers to evaluate the bonding overlay. A self-developed analysis algorithm and theoretical fitting model was used to map the overlay error between the bonded wafers and the interconnect structures. The measurement accuracy was found to be better than 1.0 micron.

  19. WELD FORMATION CONTROL AT ELECTRON BEAM WELDING WITH BEAM OSCILLATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; Shcherbakov, A.

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  20. Electronic spectroscopy and electronic structure of the smallest metal clusters: the diatomic 3D transition metal aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-06-01

    A systematic study of the electronic spectroscopy, electronic structure, and chemical bonding has been initiated for the 3d series of diatomic transition metal aluminides. This report provides a review of the progress to date, with specific emphasis on AlCa, AlV, AlCr, AlMn, AlCo, AlNi, AlCu, and AlZn.

  1. Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam

    2002-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of two carbon-alloyed iron aluminides was studied. Weakening of some carbide–metal interfaces in the presence of hydrogen was indicated. The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the microstructure has also been addressed.

  2. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  3. Microscopic weld evaluation of FBTR end plug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SS316 Stainless steel has been chosen as a reference cladding material for Fast Breeder Test Reactor. Both the ends of the clad tubes are encapped with a solid stainless steel plug by Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Due to the thick-thin geometry of the end plug and the fuel clad tube, getting defect free weld joint is a challenging task. Microscopic weld evaluation of the weld defects of these end plug welds have been carried out as per standard ASTM metallography practice. Requirement of the good quality weld joint is very essential to contain the fission gas release and to enable it to sustain the high burn up of the fuel in the nuclear reactor. This paper presents the typical weld defects encountered during the development and fabrication of the actual fuel pin and it also shows some of the weld characteristics like multiple weld pool, spherical weld pool, through and through weld penetration, outer edge depression at the tube side and the plug side of the weld pool observed during the pin fabrication campaign. (author)

  4. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  5. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J. B.; Yu, C.; Shiue, R. K.; Tsay, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray.

  7. Dissimilar joining of nickel aluminide intermetallic compound with spheroidal graphite cast iron by using combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimata, T.; Uenishi, K.; Kobayashi, K.F. [Dept. of Manufacture Science, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ikenaga, A. [Dept. of Metallurgy and Material Science, Osaka Prefecture Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Nickel aluminide based intermetallic compounds were combustion synthesized from a powder mixture of elemental Al, Ni, and Si and were simultaneously bonded with spheroidal graphite cast iron substrate (FCD). Addition of Si to the elemental mixture of Al and Ni was confirmed to be effective both to the densification of combustion synthesized intermetallic compounds and to the joining between compounds and FCD. When the composition of precursor was Ni-69at%Al-9at%Si (Al/Si is the ratio of the eutectic composition), Al{sub 3}Ni and Al{sub 6}Ni{sub 3}Si were mainly combustion synthesized. In the interface between compounds and FCD, reaction layers were formed to the thickness of 10 {mu}m and the constitutent phases were identified as Al{sub 7}Fe{sub 2}Si, FeAl{sub 3} respectively. In the four point bending test of the dissimilar joints prepared by heating at 973 K for 300 s, the brittle fracture did not occurred around the joint interface but mainly in the inside of nickel aluminide coating. The interface of reaction layers with 10 {mu}m were chemically well bonded. The sample with Ni-69at%Al-9at%Si coating exhibited highest bonding strength of about 56 MPa because of the smallest void ratio of the obtained compounds. (orig.)

  8. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  9. Formation of alumina-aluminide coatings on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, alumina-aluminide coatings were formed on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel substrate. First, coatings of aluminum were deposited electrochemically on T91 steel in a room temperature AlCl3-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid, then the obtained coating was subjected to a two stage heat treatment procedure consisting of prolonged heat treatment of the sample in vacuum at 300 ○C followed by oxidative heat treatment in air at 650 ○C for 16 hours. X-ray diffraction measurement of the oxidatively heat treated samples indicated formation of Fe-Al and Cr-Al intermetallics and presence of amorphous alumina. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurement confirmed 50 wt- % O in the oxidized coating. Microscratch adhesion test conducted on alumina-aluminide coating formed on T91 steel substrate showed no major adhesive detachment up to 20 N loads. However, adhesive failure was observed at a few discrete points on the coating along the scratch track.

  10. Studies on precursor transport by carrier gas and process optimization in CVD of aluminide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminide coatings have been produced over pure iron and nickel substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using anhydrous aluminum chloride as precursor. The success of ensuring the quality of the product often depends upon the ability to maintain a controlled rate of formation of the product. Generally three types of precursors are used in CVD, namely, gases, liquids and solids. The activity of the gaseous precursors can be easily controlled using a mass flow controller. The liquid and solid precursors are heated to a suitable temperature and the vapor is carried in a stream of carrier gas into the CVD reactor. In this case the activity of the precursor may depend upon a number of factors including temperature and flow rate. In this paper the transport characteristics of the anhydrous AlCl3 and optimization of other process parameters in the chemical vapor deposition of aluminide coatings on iron, nickel and their alloys have been described. The experiments show that the carrier gas gets saturated to about 85% of the saturated vapor pressure under the experimental conditions. (author)

  11. Optimization Of Laboratory Hot Rolling Of Brittle Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B Aluminide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schindler I.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of the protective steel capsules enabled to manage the laboratory hot flat rolling of the extremely brittle as-cast aluminide Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B with the total height reduction of almost 70 %. The hot rolling parameters were optimized to obtain the best combination of deformation temperature (from 1160°C up to 1240°C and rolling speed (from 0.14 m·s−1 to 0.53 m·s−1. The resistance against cracking and refinement of the highly heterogeneous cast microstructure were the main criteria. Both experiments and mathematical simulations based on FEM demonstrated that it is not possible to exploit enhanced plasticity of the investigated alloy at low strain rates in the hot rolling process. The heat flux from the sample to the working rolls is so intensive at low rolling speed that even the protective capsule does not prevent massive appearance of the surface transverse cracking. The homogeneity and size of product’s grain was influenced significantly by temperature of deformation, whereas the effect of rolling speed was relatively negligible. The optimal forming parameters were found as rolling temperature 1200°C and the rolling speed 0.35 m·s−1. The effective technology of the iron aluminide Fe-40at.% Al-Zr-B preparation by simple processes of melting, casting and hot rolling was thus established and optimized.

  12. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.D.Xiang; S.R.Rose; P.K.Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-1Mo (wt.%) alloy steel by pack cementation at 650℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ~C in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential A1 oxidation.

  13. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650 ℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. D. Xiang; S. R. Rose; P. K. Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-lMo (wt.%)alloy steel by pack cementation at 650 ℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ℃ in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential Al oxidation.

  14. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernieres, Jerome, E-mail: Jerome.vernieres@oist.jp; Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E. [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Bobo, Jean-François [Centre d’Elaboration de Materiaux et d’Etudes Structurales (CEMES), 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Sowwan, Mukhles, E-mail: Mukhles@oist.jp [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Nanotechnology Research Laboratory, Al-Quds University, P.O. Box 51000, East Jerusalem, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  15. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Kang, B.S. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1998-07-27

    Iron aluminides have excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperatures with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides has been undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component has been on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}Al and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}Al. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large for one of the two types of iron sites. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences for hydrogen diffusion. Indeed, the ab-initio-based estimate of the divacancy binding energy indicates a likely tendency toward such clustering for iron vacancies on the sites with large lattice relaxation. The experimental work has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior.

  16. Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jun-Gyu; Southgate, Richard D.; Fitzsimmons, James S.; O' Driscoll, Shawn W. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a simple overlay device can be used on radiographs to measure radial head and neck height. Thirty anteroposterior elbow radiographs from 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were examined to measure radial head and neck height. Three methods using different points along the bicipital tuberosity as a landmark were used. Method 1 used the proximal end of the bicipital tuberosity, method 2 used the most prominent point of the bicipital tuberosity, and method 3 used a simple overlay device (SOD) template that was aligned with anatomic reference points. All measurements were performed three times by three observers to determine interobserver and intraobserver reliability. Intraclass correlation coefficients revealed higher interobserver and intraobserver correlations for the SOD template method than for the other two methods. The 95% limits of agreement between observers were markedly better (-1.8 mm to +1.0 mm) for the SOD template method than for the proximal point method (-3.8 mm to +3.4 mm) or the prominent point method (-5.9 mm to +4.9 mm). We found that the SOD template method was reliable for assessing radial head and neck height. It had less variability than other methods, its 95% limit of agreement being less than 2 mm. This method could be helpful for assessing whether or not the insertion of a radial head prosthesis has resulted in over-lengthening of the radius. (orig.)

  17. Lightweight storage and overlay networks for fault tolerance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, Ron A.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation of capability-class, massively parallel processing (MPP) systems is expected to have hundreds of thousands to millions of processors, In such environments, it is critical to have fault-tolerance mechanisms, including checkpoint/restart, that scale with the size of applications and the percentage of the system on which the applications execute. For application-driven, periodic checkpoint operations, the state-of-the-art does not provide a scalable solution. For example, on today's massive-scale systems that execute applications which consume most of the memory of the employed compute nodes, checkpoint operations generate I/O that consumes nearly 80% of the total I/O usage. Motivated by this observation, this project aims to improve I/O performance for application-directed checkpoints through the use of lightweight storage architectures and overlay networks. Lightweight storage provide direct access to underlying storage devices. Overlay networks provide caching and processing capabilities in the compute-node fabric. The combination has potential to signifcantly reduce I/O overhead for large-scale applications. This report describes our combined efforts to model and understand overheads for application-directed checkpoints, as well as implementation and performance analysis of a checkpoint service that uses available compute nodes as a network cache for checkpoint operations.

  18. Algorithms for Constructing Overlay Networks For Live Streaming

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Konstantin; Meyerson, Adam; Saks, Jevan; Sitaraman, Ramesh K

    2011-01-01

    We present a polynomial time approximation algorithm for constructing an overlay multicast network for streaming live media events over the Internet. The class of overlay networks constructed by our algorithm include networks used by Akamai Technologies to deliver live media events to a global audience with high fidelity. We construct networks consisting of three stages of nodes. The nodes in the first stage are the entry points that act as sources for the live streams. Each source forwards each of its streams to one or more nodes in the second stage that are called reflectors. A reflector can split an incoming stream into multiple identical outgoing streams, which are then sent on to nodes in the third and final stage that act as sinks and are located in edge networks near end-users. As the packets in a stream travel from one stage to the next, some of them may be lost. A sink combines the packets from multiple instances of the same stream (by reordering packets and discarding duplicates) to form a single in...

  19. Creep of welded branched pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Rayner, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Creep failure of welds in high-temperature power plant steam piping systems is known to be a potential cause of plant failure. Creep behaviour of plain pipes with circumferential welds and cross-weld specimens have received fairly extensive attention. However, research into the creep behaviour of welded thick-walled branched steam pipes has received less attention. Consequently, this thesis addresses improving the understanding of the creep behaviour for this type of geometry. Numerical and a...

  20. Laser welding of cylindrical parts

    OpenAIRE

    Närhi-Ratkovskaia, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conduct the laser welding work of the cylindrical parts, particularly fuel filters, according to the safety instructions. The welding was followed by the additional test for a gas resistance of filters. The topic was commissioned by the company Laserplus Oy, located in Hämeenlinna. The aim of the project on laser welding of filters was to find out optimum parameters for the company’s welding. Optimum parameters include the minimum laser power with optimum ...

  1. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  2. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  3. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    OpenAIRE

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F.; Ostendorf, A.; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as well as the quality of the welding result. In this paper the focus is on seam tracking. It is difficult to measure three-dimensional parameters of a ream during a robotic laser welding task, espec...

  4. ON INTELLIGENTIZED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MODERN WELDING MANUFACTURING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shanben; Qiu Tao; Lin Tao; Wu Yixiong

    2003-01-01

    A short survey on researching and developing status of intelligent technologies in modem welding manufacturing is given. According to the developing trend of advanced manufacturing technology, a concept on intelligentized welding manufacturing engineering (IWME), is presented for systematization of researching and developing domains on welding automation, intelligentized welding,robotic and flexible welding and advanced welding manufacturing technologies. And key technologies of welding intelligent manufacturing and its developing trend in the future are investigated.

  5. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  6. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  7. Control of weld quality in large welded populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of factorial experimental design during weld procedure development, as a statistical tool for the control of weld quality in large welded populations, is investigated. As an example, it is applied to single pass welds made in the laboratory using the spacer to tube attachment geometry present in AGR boilers. The welds have been deposited using a robotic cold wire TIG technique. A replicated 25 factorial welding trial has been designed and evaluated experimentally. Transverse sections have been examined to determine weld penetration quality features. The means and variances of each quality feature have been calculated. Using a standard factorial analysis program the significant effects have been identified and incorporated into control equations. Using these data and having established minimum acceptance criteria. defect rates have been calculated as a function of weld position. The control equations have also been used to revise working point welding conditions, to achieve acceptable weld quality. These equations have also been used in conjunction with the reproducibility measurements to estimate the amount of weld quality variability that can be attributed to process control. (author)

  8. Welding technologies for nuclear machinery and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main welding methods applied to nuclear machinery and equipment are shielded metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, MAG welding and TIG welding. But in the last 10 years, in order to improve the reliability required for the welding of nuclear machinery and equipment, the welding technologies aiming at the reduction of heat input, the decrease of the number of welding pass and the automatic control of welding factors have been applied for the main purpose of bettering the quality and excluding human errors. The merits and the technology of narrow gap, pulsed MAG welding and melt-through welding are explained. As the automation of TIG welding, image processing type narrow gap, hot wire TIG welding and remote control type automatic TIG welding are described. For the longitudinal welding of active metal sheet products, plasma key-hole welding is applied. Since the concentration of its arc is good, high speed welding with low heat input can be done. For the stainless steel cladding by welding, electroslag welding has become to be employed in place of conventional submerged arc welding. Arc is not generated in the electroslag welding, and the penetration into base metal is small. (K.I.)

  9. Weld pool image sensor for pulsed MIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Pengfei; Sun Zhenguo; Huang Cao; Chen Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Visual image sensor is developed to detect the weld pool images in pulsed MIG welding. An exposure controller, which is composed of the modules of the voltage transforming, the exposure parameters presetting, the complex programmable logic device (CPLD) based logic controlling, exposure signal processing, the arc state detecting, the mechanical iris driving and so on, is designed at first. Then, a visual image sensor consists of an ordinary CCD camera, optical system and exposure controller is established. The exposure synchronic control logic is described with very-high-speed integrated circuit hardware description language (VHDL) and programmed with CPLD, to detect weld pool images at the stage of base current in pulsed MIG welding. Finally, both bead on plate welding and V groove filled welding are carried out, clear and consistent weld pool images are acquired.

  10. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  11. Development of multifunction laser welding head (1). Evaluation of under water laser welding with multifunction laser welding head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifunction laser welding head has been developed. The head is able to perform not only underwater laser welding as repair, but also laser peening as preventive maintenance and laser ultrasonic testing as inspection. Laser transmission test with multifunction laser welding head and optical fiber was carried out. The result showed that laser power needed for welding was transmitted without any damage to them. Under water laser welding onto EDM slits with this welding head was carried out. EDM slits were sealed by deposited weld metal. It was confirmed that multifunction laser welding head was applied to under water laser welding. (author)

  12. 用于网格计算的Overlay Network 设计算法的研究%Research on Overlay Network Topology Design Algorithm Used in Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹怀虎; 余镇危; 潘耘

    2006-01-01

    针对如何提供丰富的通信交互提出了一种基于Overlay Network 的网格架构,设计Overlay Network,给出了一种动态环境中分布式拉格朗日启发式算法DLagrOTDP,计算的结果显示该算法具有更快的适应性.

  13. Toward 7nm target on product overlay for C028 FDSOI technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatefait, Maxime; Le-Gratiet, Bertrand; Goirand, Pierre Jerome; Lam, Auguste; Van Haren, Richard; Pastol, Anne; Doytcheva, Maya; Liu, Xing Lan; Beltman, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The continuous need for lithography overlay performance improvement is a key point for advanced integrated circuit manufacturing. Overlay control is more and more challenging in the 2x nm process nodes regarding functionality margin of the chip and tool capability. Transistor architecture rules which are set, confirm poly to contact space as the most critical one for 28nm technology node. Critical Dimension variability of these layers, even with best in class process stability, in addition to design constraint lead to on product overlay specifications of around 7nm. In order to ensure that the target is met in production environment and to identify potential ways for improvement, identification of the contributors to overlay errors is essential. We have introduced a novel budget breakdown methodology using both bottom-up and top-down overlay data. For the bottom up part, we have performed extensive testing with very high sampling scheme so as to quantify the main effects. In-line overlay metrology data has been used for top down approach to verify the overall performance in production. In this paper we focused on the 28nm contact to gate overlay in a FDSOI process. The initial inconsistency between bottom up and top down results led us to further exploration of the root cause of these inconsistencies. We have been able to highlight key figures to focus on, like reticle heating, wafer table contamination and etch processing effects. Finally, we conclude on 7nm overlay target achievement feasibility in high volume manufacturing environment.

  14. Viral concentration determination through plaque assays: using traditional and novel overlay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Alan; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2014-11-04

    Plaque assays remain one of the most accurate methods for the direct quantification of infectious virons and antiviral substances through the counting of discrete plaques (infectious units and cellular dead zones) in cell culture. Here we demonstrate how to perform a basic plaque assay, and how differing overlays and techniques can affect plaque formation and production. Typically solid or semisolid overlay substrates, such as agarose or carboxymethyl cellulose, have been used to restrict viral spread, preventing indiscriminate infection through the liquid growth medium. Immobilized overlays restrict cellular infection to the immediately surrounding monolayer, allowing the formation of discrete countable foci and subsequent plaque formation. To overcome the difficulties inherent in using traditional overlays, a novel liquid overlay utilizing microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium has been increasingly used as a replacement in the standard plaque assay. Liquid overlay plaque assays can be readily performed in either standard 6 or 12 well plate formats as per traditional techniques and require no special equipment. Due to its liquid state and subsequent ease of application and removal, microculture plate formats may alternatively be utilized as a rapid, accurate and high throughput alternative to larger scale viral titrations. Use of a non heated viscous liquid polymer offers the opportunity to streamline work, conserves reagents, incubator space, and increases operational safety when used in traditional or high containment labs as no reagent heating or glassware are required. Liquid overlays may also prove more sensitive than traditional overlays for certain heat labile viruses.

  15. Live 3D image overlay for arterial duct closure with Amplatzer Duct Occluder II additional size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreczny, Sebstian; Morgan, Gareth J; Dryzek, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    Despite several reports describing echocardiography for the guidance of ductal closure, two-dimensional angiography remains the mainstay imaging tool; three-dimensional rotational angiography has the potential to overcome some of the drawbacks of standard angiography, and reconstructed image overlay provides reliable guidance for device placement. We describe arterial duct closure solely from venous approach guided by live three-dimensional image overlay.

  16. FLUORESCENCE OVERLAY ANTIGEN MAPPING OF THE EPIDERMAL BASEMENT-MEMBRANE ZONE .1. GEOMETRIC ERRORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, S; DEJONG, MCJM; HEERES, K; WILKINSON, MHF; JONKMAN, MF; VANDERMEER, JB

    1994-01-01

    To identify in tissue sections the relative positions of antigen distributions close to the resolving power of the microscope, we have developed the fluorescence overlay antigen mapping (FOAM) procedure. As this technique makes high demands on the geometric fidelity of the overlay image, it is essen

  17. A cortical locus for anisotropic overlay suppression of stimuli presented at fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bruce C; Richard, Bruno; Andres, Kristin; Johnson, Aaron P; Thompson, Benjamin; Essock, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Human contrast sensitivity for narrowband Gabor targets is suppressed when superimposed on narrowband masks of the same spatial frequency and orientation (referred to as overlay suppression), with suppression being broadly tuned to orientation and spatial frequency. Numerous behavioral and neurophysiological experiments have suggested that overlay suppression originates from the initial lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) inputs to V1, which is consistent with the broad tuning typically reported for overlay suppression. However, recent reports have shown narrowly tuned anisotropic overlay suppression when narrowband targets are masked by broadband noise. Consequently, researchers have argued for an additional form of overlay suppression that involves cortical contrast gain control processes. The current study sought to further explore this notion behaviorally using narrowband and broadband masks, along with a computational neural simulation of the hypothesized underlying gain control processes in cortex. Additionally, we employed transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in order to test whether cortical processes are involved in driving narrowly tuned anisotropic suppression. The behavioral results yielded anisotropic overlay suppression for both broadband and narrowband masks and could be replicated with our computational neural simulation of anisotropic gain control. Further, the anisotropic form of overlay suppression could be directly modulated by tDCS, which would not be expected if the suppression was primarily subcortical in origin. Altogether, the results of the current study provide further evidence in support of an additional overlay suppression process that originates in cortex and show that this form of suppression is also observable with narrowband masks.

  18. Questioning the Benefits That Coloured Overlays Can Have for Reading in Students with and without Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lisa M.; Tsogka, Natassa; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2013-01-01

    Visual stress (the experience of visual distortions and discomfort during prolonged reading) is frequently identified and alleviated with coloured overlays or lenses. Previous studies have associated visual stress with dyslexia and as a consequence, coloured overlays are widely distributed to children and adults with reading difficulty. However,…

  19. Viral concentration determination through plaque assays: using traditional and novel overlay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Alan; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2014-01-01

    Plaque assays remain one of the most accurate methods for the direct quantification of infectious virons and antiviral substances through the counting of discrete plaques (infectious units and cellular dead zones) in cell culture. Here we demonstrate how to perform a basic plaque assay, and how differing overlays and techniques can affect plaque formation and production. Typically solid or semisolid overlay substrates, such as agarose or carboxymethyl cellulose, have been used to restrict viral spread, preventing indiscriminate infection through the liquid growth medium. Immobilized overlays restrict cellular infection to the immediately surrounding monolayer, allowing the formation of discrete countable foci and subsequent plaque formation. To overcome the difficulties inherent in using traditional overlays, a novel liquid overlay utilizing microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium has been increasingly used as a replacement in the standard plaque assay. Liquid overlay plaque assays can be readily performed in either standard 6 or 12 well plate formats as per traditional techniques and require no special equipment. Due to its liquid state and subsequent ease of application and removal, microculture plate formats may alternatively be utilized as a rapid, accurate and high throughput alternative to larger scale viral titrations. Use of a non heated viscous liquid polymer offers the opportunity to streamline work, conserves reagents, incubator space, and increases operational safety when used in traditional or high containment labs as no reagent heating or glassware are required. Liquid overlays may also prove more sensitive than traditional overlays for certain heat labile viruses. PMID:25407402

  20. New welding technologies for car body frame welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Węgrzyn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of that paper was analysing main welding process for car body welding. The main reason of it was investigate possibilities of getting varied amount of acicular ferrite (AF in WMD (weld metal deposit. High amount of acicular ferrite influences positively impact toughness of weld. For optimal amount of AF it is necessary to have optimal chemical composition in WMD. Important role plays especially Ni. There were also tested new welding technology: welding with micro-jet cooling.Design/methodology/approach: During research with varied micro-jet parameters the chemical analysis, micrograph tests and Charpy V impact test of the metal weld deposit on pendulum machine were carried out. The Charpy V impact test was prepared according to standard ISO EN 148-1 Metallic materials - Charpy pendulum impact test - Part 1: Test method. Samples for impact testing were prepared according to standard ASTM A370.Findings: Varied amount of acicular ferrite in weld metal deposit (in range 55-75% in terms of microjet cooling parameters (numbers of jet, gas pressure. This high amount of acicular ferrite is unheard in weld metal deposit in another way or other methods of welding like MAG or TIG.Research limitations/implications: That research was made for MIG method (according to PN-EN ISO 4063:2009 only. Another method of welding in this article was not tested. Other methods (for eg. MAG, TIG have not been tested, but it is suspected that similar phenomena are taking place.Originality/value: In this research new method of cooling weld joint during welding was used. At the present time use of micro-jet cooling while MIG is in the testing phase and requires an accurate diagnosis.This method is very promising and capable of industrial application, mainly due to the significant improvement of weld quality and reduces costs.

  1. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature......Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...

  2. Welding Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolf, Cyril R R; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-12-16

    Both for fundamental and applied sciences, the design of complex molecular systems in the crystalline phase with strict control of order and periodicity at both microscopic and macroscopic levels is of prime importance for development of new solid-state materials and devices. The design and fabrication of complex crystalline systems as networks of crystals displaying task-specific properties is a step toward smart materials. Here we report on isostructural and almost isometric molecular crystals of different colors, their use for fabrication of core-shell crystals, and their welding by 3D epitaxial growth into networks of crystals as single-crystalline entities. Welding of crystals by self-assembly processes into macroscopic networks of crystals is a powerful strategy for the design of hierarchically organized periodic complex architectures composed of different subdomains displaying targeted characteristics. Crystal welding may be regarded as a first step toward the design of new hierarchically organized complex crystalline systems. PMID:26581391

  3. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...

  4. The Effect of Welding Speed on the Microstructure and Penetration in Arc Welding

    OpenAIRE

    DURGUTLU, Ahmet; GÜLENÇ, Behçet

    1999-01-01

    The effect of welding speed on the microstructure and penetration in MAG, SMAW and MMA welding was investigated in a low carbon steel. Experimental results revealed that the penetration decreased when the welding speed was lower or higher than the optimum speed. It was also observed that when the welding speed was high, undercuttings occurred at the edge of welding bead and microstructure of weld metals consisted of fine grains, but when the welding speed was low, at the edge of weld...

  5. Physicochemical laws of the interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements: II. Interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements and/or interstitial phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povarova, K. B.; Kazanskaya, N. K.; Drozdov, A. A.; Morozov, A. E.

    2007-10-01

    The Ni-Al- X ( X is an interstitial element or phase) phase diagrams are analyzed to reveal systems that can be used as the basis for designing promising alloys and natural composites based on nickel aluminides reinforced by interstitial phases (natural composites I). The most thermally stable materials are shown to be heterophase alloys and composite materials (CMs) located in the eutectic-type (including degenerate eutectic) pseudobinary sections of ternary or multicomponent phase diagrams. They exhibit insignificant (or zero) dissolution of interstitial phases at operating temperatures and the absence of an intense interaction between CM components (natural composites II). Natural composites I based on the NiAl-or Ni3Al-interstitial phase alloys produced upon cooling from a melt can be reinforced by the refractory thermally stable rigid interstitial phases, namely, borides and carbides, that are present in pseudobinary sections in equilibrium with these nickel aluminides, since the elements forming these phases dissolve completely in matrix melts and the mutual solubility of these phases in the solid state is low. Such borides are TiB2 and HfB2 in equilibrium with β-NiAl, and such carbides are, e.g., TiC and HfC in equilibrium with β-NiAl and La2C3, NbC, and TaC in equilibrium with γ'-Ni3Al. Natural composites II should be produced using solid-phase methods (NiAl with AlN, Y2O3, Al2O3) or a combination of methods, where a refractory interstitial phase of the Al2O3 or Y2O3 type is solid and the intermetallic NiAl or Ni3Al matrix is liquid. NiAl-TiB2 (HfB2), NiAl-Al2O3 (Y2O3), and Ni3Al-La2C3 (NbC, TaC) composites are considered as examples.

  6. Effect of PCC Joint Skew on Reflective Cracking in HMA Overlays

    CERN Document Server

    Ghauch, By Ziad G

    2011-01-01

    Reflective cracking is a relatively premature distress that occurs in HMA materials overlaying cracked and jointed underlying pavements. The high concentration of stresses and strains in the vicinity of the discontinuity of the old pavement causes the cracks to reflect into the newly placed HMA overlay. While it is a common practice to use skewed transverse joints in rigid pavements to improve the latter's performance, the impact of such a practice on the cracking of a potential HMA overlay has not been examined so far. In this context, this study investigates the effect of using skewed transverse joints in rigid pavements on reflective cracking development in the HMA overlay. Advanced three-dimensional Finite Element models including viscoelastic material properties for the HMA overlay, 3D beam modeling of dowel bars, non-uniform tire-pavement contact stresses, friction interfaces, and infinite boundary elements were constructed for both normal and skewed transverse joints using ABAQUS v-6.11. The potential ...

  7. Strain Response of Hot-Mix Asphalt Overlays for Bottom-Up Reflective Cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Ghauch, Ziad G

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the strain response of typical HMA overlays above jointed PCC slabs prone to bottom-up reflective cracking. The occurrence of reflective cracking under the combined effect of traffic and environmental loading significantly reduces the design life of the HMA overlays and can lead to its premature failure. In this context, viscoelastic material properties combined with cyclic vehicle loadings and pavement temperature distribution were implemented in a series of FE models in order to study the evolution of horizontal tensile and shear strains at the bottom of the HMA overlay. The effect of several design parameters, such as subbase and subgrade moduli, vehicle speed, overlay thickness, and temperature condition, on the horizontal and shear strain response was investigated. Results obtained show that the rate of horizontal and shear strain increase at the bottom of the HMA overlay drop with higher vehicle speed, higher subgrade modulus, and higher subbase modulus. Moreover, the rate of horizon...

  8. Exact and reliable overlay metrology in nanoscale semiconductor devices using an image processing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinkook; Shin, ChaeHo; Kim, Minkook; Kim, Junghwan; Park, JeongKyun; Kim, JungSoo; Jun, ChungSam; Yim, Yeny; Lee, Janghee

    2014-10-01

    As semiconductor processing becomes more complicated and pattern sizes shrink, the overlay metrology has become one of the most important issues in the semiconductor industry. Therefore, in order to obtain correct, reliable overlay values in semiconductor fabrication facilities (fab), quantization methods for the efficient management and implementation of a measurement algorithm are required, as well as an understanding of the target structures in the semiconductor device. We implemented correct, reliable overlay values in the pattern using the image processing method. The quantization method, through correlation analysis and a new algorithm for target structures, were able to improve the sensitivity to misalignment in the pattern and enable more stable and credible in-line measurement by decreasing the distribution of the residuals in overlay values. Since overlay values of the pattern in the fab were measured and managed more reliably and quickly, it is expected that our study will be able to contribute to the yield enhancement of semiconductor companies.

  9. Overlaying alloys for sealing surfaces of valves for primary circuits in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements are presented for cobalt-free overlaying alloys such as hardness, a low friction coefficient, resistance to rapid temperature changes, structural stability. Alloy E-C-1111 was tested for the said requirements. Its composition is C max. 0.11%, Mn 4.3-4.5%, Si 4.2-5.3%, Cr 17.0-19.0%, Ni 7.5-9.0%, Mo 5.0-5.8%, and Nb 0.9-1.2%. It was found to show acceptable technological and mechanical properties for operation. Overlaying up to an inner diameter of 40 mm can be done without pre-heating, large semi-products should be preheated to 500 to 550 degC. After overlaying to a certain height, heat treatment and capillary testing are necessary to check that the overlay does not show cracks. It is recommended that small inner diameter parts should be overlayed layer by ayer. (J.P.)

  10. Fundamentals of overlay measurement and inspection using scanning electron-microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Okagawa, Y.; Inoue, O.; Arai, K.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2013-04-01

    Scanning electron-microscope (SEM) has been successfully applied to CD measurement as promising tools for qualifying and controlling quality of semiconductor devices in in-line manufacturing process since 1985. Furthermore SEM is proposed to be applied to in-die overlay monitor in the local area which is too small to be measured by optical overlay measurement tools any more, when the overlay control limit is going to be stringent and have un-ignorable dependence on device pattern layout, in-die location, and singular locations in wafer edge, etc. In this paper, we proposed new overlay measurement and inspection system to make an effective use of in-line SEM image, in consideration of trade-off between measurement uncertainty and measurement pattern density in each SEM conditions. In parallel, we make it clear that the best hybrid overlay metrology is in considering each tool's technology portfolio.

  11. Signed Simplicial Decomposition and Overlay of n-D Polytope Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Polytope complexes are the generalisation of polygon meshes in geo-information systems (GIS) to arbitrary dimension, and a natural concept for accessing spatio-temporal information. Complexes of each dimension have a straight-forward dimension-independent database representation called "Relational Complex". Accordingly, complex overlay is the corresponding generalisation of map overlay in GIS to arbitrary dimension. Such overlay can be computed by partitioning the cells into simplices, intersecting these and finally combine their intersections into the resulting overlay complex. Simplex partitioning, however, can expensive in dimension higher than 2. In the case of polytope complex overlay /signed/ simplicial decomposition is an alternative. This paper presents a purely combinatoric polytope complex decomposition which ignores geometry. In particular, this method is also a decomposition method for /non-convex/ polytopes. Geometric n-D-simplex intersection is then done by a simplified active-set-method---a wel...

  12. Explosive Welding with Nitroguanidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadwin, L D

    1964-03-13

    By using the explosive nitroguanidine, continuous welds can be made between similar and dissimilar metals. Since low detonation pressures are attainable, pressure transfer media are not required between the explosive and the metal surface. The need for either a space or an angle between the metals is eliminated, and very low atmospheric pressures are not required. Successful welds have been made between tantalum and 4140 steel, 3003H14 aluminum and 4140 steel, and 304 stainless steel and 3003H14 aluminum. PMID:17833901

  13. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Woon Suk [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  14. Overlay removable denture for treatment of worn teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyth, Nurit; Tamari, Israel; Buller Sharon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients with excessively worn dentitions can be challenging. Factors including medical history as well as the cost of the treatment and patient wishes for simpler approaches must be considered. This manuscript describes the use of an overlay partial denture to treat patients with excessive wear of the maxillary teeth. We describe a technique to restore severely worn teeth using heat-cured acrylic as part of a partial or full denture. Minimal preparations of the teeth are required, and the restoration provides protection from further wear, and stabilizes the occlusion. This solution was functionally and esthetically suitable to the patients. The technique can be used in medically complex patients where extractions are contraindicated, such as post radiation therapy or bisphosphonate treatment.

  15. Range of slow positrons in metal overlayers on Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Leung, T.C. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (USA)); Van der Kolk, G.J.; Van Ijzendoorn, L.J. (Philips Research Laboratories, 5600 JA Eindhoven, (Netherlands))

    1990-02-19

    Polycrystalline Pd and amorphous PdTa films on Al substrates were studied by a variable energy positron beam and by Rutherford backscattering. Since positron diffusion in the overlayers is limited, the range follows directly from the Doppler broadening as a function of incident positron energy. To observe possible effects of positron backscattering, a sandwich of Al/Pd/Al was studied as well. It was found that the mean penetration depth is not described well by {bar {ital z}}({ital E})={ital A}({mu}g/cm{sup 2}){times}{ital E}{sup {ital n}({ital E})}, if {ital A} and {ital n} are assumed to be material and energy independent.

  16. Complete Imageless solution for overlay front-end manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herisson, David; LeCacheux, Virginie; Touchet, Mathieu; Vachellerie, Vincent; Lecarpentier, Laurent; Felten, Franck; Polli, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Imageless option of KLA-Tencor RDM system (Recipe Data Management) is a new method of recipe creation, using only the mask design to define alignment target and measurement parameters. This technique is potentially the easiest tool to improve recipe management of a large amount of products in logic fab. Overlay recipes are created without wafer, by using a synthetic image (copy of gds mask file) for alignment pattern and target design like shape (frame in frame) and size for the measurement. A complete gauge study on critical CMOS 90nm Gate level has been conducted to evaluate reliability and robustness of the imageless recipe. We show that Imageless limits drastically the number of templates used for recipe creation, and improves or maintains measurement capability compare to manual recipe creation (operator dependant). Imageless appears to be a suitable solution for high volume manufacturing, as shown by the results obtained on production lots.

  17. Performance Analysis of Vertical Handover Strategy for Heterogeneous Overlay Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BINGHongyan; HEChen; JIANGLingge

    2004-01-01

    Future wireless networks are envisioned to integrate cellular network and hot spots (e.g. ultrawideband network, UWB) in virtue of the individual coverage and capacity complementary characteristics. In this heterogeneous overlay network, seamless Vertical handover (VHO) is one of the important issues because users expect to be provided with continuous service at anytime, anywhere. This paper presents an analytical vertical handover initiation model based on Received signal strength(RSS) criterion and network blocking probability criterion. Meanwhile, the handover performance criteria of interest are: the handover probability and call-dropping probability. The analytical formulas are derived in details and the handover performance is evaluated by computer simulations. The simulation results show that our model can give improved performance compared with vertical HO algorithm only based on RSS criterion and can perform well when UWB hot spot is in heavy network load.

  18. Overlay cognitive radio systems with adaptive two-way relaying

    KAUST Repository

    Hyadi, Amal

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a spectrum sharing mechanism with a two-phase two-way relaying protocol for an overlay cognitive network. The system comprises two primary users (PUs) and two secondary users (SUs). One of the SUs acts as a relay for the PUs and gains spectrum sharing as long as he respects outage probability constraints of the primary system. Moreover, we consider that the relaying node performs an optimal power allocation scheme that minimizes the outage performance of the secondary receiver. Closed form expressions for the outage probability are derived for the cases of Decode-and-Forward (DF), Amplify-and-Forward (AF), and adaptive relaying. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate and compare the obtained results. © 2013 IEEE.

  19. Infrared-Controlled Welding of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, R.; Finnell, S. E.; Decker, H. J.; Hodor, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed apparatus for welding large arrays of solar cells to flexible circuit substrates would sense infrared emission from welding spot. Emission would provide feedback for control of welding heat. Welding platform containing optical fibers moves upward through slots in movable holding fixture to contact solar cells. Fibers pick up infrared radiation from weld area.

  20. Welding Development: Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the basic understanding of the friction stir welding process. It covers process description, pin tool operation and materials, metal flow theory, mechanical properties, and materials welded using the process. It also discusses the thermal stir welding process and the differences between thermal stir and friction stir welding. MSFC weld tools used for development are also presented.

  1. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, Dimitrios; Aarts, Ronald; Meijer, Johan

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  2. Computer vision and soft computing for automatic skull-face overlay in craniofacial superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes-Álvarez, B Rosario; Ibáñez, O; Navarro, F; Alemán, I; Botella, M; Damas, S; Cordón, O

    2014-12-01

    Craniofacial superimposition can provide evidence to support that some human skeletal remains belong or not to a missing person. It involves the process of overlaying a skull with a number of ante mortem images of an individual and the analysis of their morphological correspondence. Within the craniofacial superimposition process, the skull-face overlay stage just focuses on achieving the best possible overlay of the skull and a single ante mortem image of the suspect. Although craniofacial superimposition has been in use for over a century, skull-face overlay is still applied by means of a trial-and-error approach without an automatic method. Practitioners finish the process once they consider that a good enough overlay has been attained. Hence, skull-face overlay is a very challenging, subjective, error prone, and time consuming part of the whole process. Though the numerical assessment of the method quality has not been achieved yet, computer vision and soft computing arise as powerful tools to automate it, dramatically reducing the time taken by the expert and obtaining an unbiased overlay result. In this manuscript, we justify and analyze the use of these techniques to properly model the skull-face overlay problem. We also present the automatic technical procedure we have developed using these computational methods and show the four overlays obtained in two craniofacial superimposition cases. This automatic procedure can be thus considered as a tool to aid forensic anthropologists to develop the skull-face overlay, automating and avoiding subjectivity of the most tedious task within craniofacial superimposition.

  3. Study of thin organic overlayers by local probe microscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), the interaction of a very sharp tip with a surface is used to gather information on the latter. In STM, the interaction is measured as an electric current, and in AFM as a force acting on the tip. AFM, which does not require the sample to be electrically conducting, is more general than STM which does, so the study of organic overlayers by STM is limited to very thin layers (thickness comparable to a tunnelling distance i.e. 10 A), onto conducting substrates. On the other hand, spatial resolution to the atomic scale can hardly be obtained in AFM, and the corresponding mechanism is poorly understood. In all cases, the information obtained is mainly topographic, i.e. crystallographic (at the atomic scale) or morphological (at larger scales). Several examples will be discussed. Monomolecular layers on conducting substrates in air, under vacuum, or in contact with the corresponding bulk liquid, have been studied by STM. Two-dimensional periodic structures, not found in the bulk crystals, are observed, as well as different kinds of point or line defects. This emphasizes the importance of molecule-substrate interactions in competition with the usual intermolecular interactions. There are few STM studies of thin continuous polymeric overlayers. Early studies of biological macromolecules have been frustrated by artefacts due to substrate surface defects which mimic the expected polymer images, so AFM is now preferred, at the expense of resolution. AFM is now intensively used for studying the surface morphology of thicker (more than one molecule thick) films of organic molecules or polymers. However, the force exerted by the tip on the surface is often large enough to modify organic surfaces; a more recent variant of AFM, the so-called ''tapping mode'', in which that interaction is reduced, will be presented. A few examples of polymer surface studies using AFM will be discussed

  4. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  5. Repair welding process of friction stir welding groove defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-jie; ZHANG Hui-jie

    2009-01-01

    The groove defect formed in the friction stir welding dramatically deteriorates weld appearances and mechanical properties of the joints owing to its larger size and penetration. Therefore, the friction stir repair welding was utilized to remove such a groove defect, and the focus was placed on the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the repair joints so as to obtain an optimum repair welding process. The experimental results indicate that the groove defect can be removed by friction stir repair welding, and the offset repair welding process is superior to the symmetrical repair welding process. In the symmetrical repair welding process, a large number of fine cavity defects and an obvious aggregation of hard-brittle phase Al2Cu occur, accordingly the mechanical properties of the repair joint are weakened, and the fracture feature of repair joint is partially brittle and partially plastic. A good-quality repair joint can be obtained by the offset repair welding process, and the repair joint is fractured near the interface between the weld nugget zone and thermal-mechanically affected zone.

  6. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  7. Welding in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3rd international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering', organized in 1978 by the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V., was, like the two foregoing conferences in 1970 and 1974, an absolute success. The noteworthy echo to this meeting in the international technical world - the number of 650 participants from 26 countries is self-evidence - and this fact, was for the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V. occasion and at the same time an obligation now to follow in the same way, the meeting that was started 12 years ago, by organizing the international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering'. The conference this year offers in addition to the two plenary session lectures, 34 short reports and a further 28 single contributions in the form of two poster-sessions. Unfortunately, it was again not possible to accept all the papers submitted because the conference was limited to 2 days only. Nevertheless, the papers will offer a representative cross-section through the total range of welding engineering. In particular, the poster session, which take place for the first time within the scope of a meeting organized by the Working Group 'Welding in Nuclear Engineering', should contribute to the aim that this time again the discussions will form the main point of the conference. (orig./RW)

  8. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  9. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  10. Characterization of titanium aluminide alloy components fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermetallic, γ-TiAl, equiaxed, small-grain (∼2 μm) structures with lamellar γ/α2-Ti3Al colonies with average spacing of 0.6 μm have been fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) of precursor, atomized powder. The residual microindentation (Vickers) hardness (HV) averaged 4.1 GPa, corresponding to a nominal yield strength of ∼1.4 GPa (∼HV/3), and a specific yield strength of 0.37 GPa cm3 g-1 (for a density of 3.76 g cm-3), in contrast to 0.27 GPa cm3 g-1 for EBM-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V components. These results demonstrate the potential to fabricate near net shape and complex titanium aluminide products directly using EBM technology in important aerospace and automotive applications.

  11. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  12. The oxidation behavior of aluminide-coated γ'/ δ directional eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhedwar, H. C.; Heckel, R. W.; Laughlin, D. E.

    1980-08-01

    The relationship between the process variables and the property of oxidation resistance was investigated for aluminide-coated γ'/δ directional eutectics by the control of the surface composition and the coating microstructure. The oxidation behavior of coated and uncoated substrates was found to belong to three main groups, depending on the surface composition of the coated or uncoated substrate prior to oxidation and irrespective of the manner in which the coating was processed. The coatings with surface composition in Group I formed protective external scales of A12O3; those with surface compositions in Group II formed nonprotective external scales of niobium-rich oxides; those substrates with surface compositions in Group III formed nonprotective external scales of NiO. The oxidation behavior within each group is herein explained in terms of the coating microstructure. Coatings that possessed a single-phase surface layer demonstrated better oxidation resistance than those with a two-phase lamellar morphology.

  13. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-19

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  14. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings deposited on nickel substrate by CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jolanta Romanowska; Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Jan Sieniawski

    2013-11-01

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel substrate has been investigated in this study. The coatings with and without zirconium were deposited by CVD method. The cross-section chemical composition investigations revealed that during the coatings formation, there is an inward aluminum diffusion and outward nickel diffusion in both types of coatings (with and without zirconium), whereas zirconium is located far below the coating surface, at a depth of ∼17 m, between -NiAl phase and '-Ni3Al phase. XRD examinations showed that -NiAl, -NiAl and '-Ni3Al were the main components of the deposited coatings. -NiAl phase is on the surface of the coatings, whereas -NiAl and '-Ni3Al form deeper parts of the coatings. Zirconium is dissolved in NiAl on the border between -NiAl and '-Ni3Al.

  15. Performance of aluminide coatings applied on alloy CF8C plus at 800 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Deepak [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Shyam, Amit [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The cost effective, austenitic stainless steel CF8C plus is an attractive alloy for massive cast structures such as steam turbine casings. The microstructure stability and creep strength of this alloy are better than commercial high-performance heat-resistant steels such as NF709 and Super 304H, and are comparable to the Ni-based superalloy Inconel 617. The oxidation resistance of the alloy in atmosphere rich in water vapor is however insufficient at T>800 C, and the use of diffusion aluminide coatings is considered for potential high temperature applications. The thermal stability and protectiveness of coatings applied on the CF8C plus substrate by pack cementation and slurry process were investigated in air + 10% H2O environment at 800 C. Further, the coating effect on the fatigue life of the alloy was assessed via low-cycle-fatigue experiments.

  16. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  17. Comparison between field and laboratory steam oxidation testing on aluminide coatings on P92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agueero, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Gutierrez, M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Ctra. Ajalvir Km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz (Spain); Knoedler, R.; Straub, S. [Alstom Power Systems GmbH, Boveristrasse 22, 68309 Mannheim (Germany); Muelas, R. [Ingenieria y Servicios Aeroespaciales, P Pintor Rosales 34, 28008 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Steam oxidation has become an important issue for steam power plants as operating temperatures increase from the current 550 to 600-650 C. For the last 10 years several groups have been carrying out steam oxidation testing of both uncoated substrates and coatings in the laboratory. On the other hand, field testing results are very scarce. In this paper, a comparison of laboratory steam oxidation testing with field test results carried out by Alstom at the Kraftwerk Westfalen power station located in Hamm, Germany will be presented. Both slurry deposited aluminide coatings and uncoated P92 steel have been included in the study. Under steam (atmospheric pressure) and isothermal conditions in the laboratory at 650 C, spallation of oxides formed on ferritic steels occurs after significantly longer time when compared to exposure to real operating conditions. Oxide spallation results in serious damage in steam power plants by obstructing heat exchanger tubes, erosion of valves and turbine blades, etc. Moreover, the thickness of the oxide scales formed under field testing conditions is significantly higher after similar exposure. On the other hand, aluminide coated P92, which exhibit thickness through cracks, have shown to be stable in the laboratory for up to 60 000 h at 650 C under steam, without evidence of crack propagation. However, field test results indicate that some degree of crack propagation occurs but without causing substrate attack up to 21 700 h of exposure. Moreover, the aluminium oxide observed in both laboratory and field tested specimens is different. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  19. Evaluation of the Intrinsic and Extrinsic Fracture Behavior of Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.

    2001-01-11

    In this paper, we first present the status of our computational modeling study of the thermal expansion coefficient of Fe/Al over a wide range of temperature and evaluate its dependence on selected additives. This will be accomplished by applying an isobaric Monte Carlo technique. The required total energy of the sample will be computed by using a tight-binding (TB) method that allows us to significantly increase the size of the computational data base without reducing the accuracy of the calculations. The parameters of the TB Hamiltonian are fitted to reproduce the band structure obtained by our quantum mechanical full-potential LMTO calculations. The combination of the three methods mentioned above creates an effective approach to the computation of the physical properties of the transition-metal aluminides and it can be extended to alloys with more than two components. At present, we are using a simplified approach for a first-round of results; and as a test of the simplified approach, have obtained excellent agreement with experiment for aluminum. Our previous experimental results showed that, because of their smaller grain size, FA-187 and FA-189 are extrinsically more susceptible to environmental embrittlement than FA-186 under low strain loading condition. To further investigate the grain boundary size effect as related to the susceptibility of hydrogen embrittlement, we conducted comparative finite element modeling simulations of initial intergranular fracture of two iron aluminides (FA186 and FA189) due to hydrogen embrittlement. Sequentially coupled stress and mass diffusion analyses are carried out to determine crack-tip stress state and the extent of hydrogen diffusion at the crack tip region, and a proper failure criteria is then adopted to simulate the intergranular fracture. Good qualitative agreement between the modeling predictions and experimental results is observed.

  20. L360QS/316L不锈钢复合钢管焊接工艺和性能研究%Welding Process and Performance Study on L360QS/316L Stainless Steel Clad Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付现桥; 徐敬; 卜明哲; 刘志田; 项祖义; 郭旭

    2014-01-01

    This paper described new welding process on the L360QS/316L clad pipe with size of Ø355.6mm ×(10+3) mm. Firstly, it adopted TIG welding to conduct overlaying on the pipe end, and then, using TIG welding process for butt welding with argon gas protection. The tensile strength, charpy impact test, hardness, intergranular corrosion test and SCC were carried out to study the properties of the circumferential weld. The results indicated that the welded joint performance of the circumferential weld is good; it is with resistance to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion. The overlay welding layer plays a good role in isolation function to ensure the weld quality.%介绍了准355.6 mm×(10+3) mm规格L360QS+316L不锈钢复合钢管的新型焊接工艺,即首先采用TIG焊在复合钢管管端进行堆焊预处理,然后再采用氩气保护TIG焊进行对焊操作。为评价环焊缝的性能,焊后对其焊接接头进行了拉伸试验、冲击试验、硬度测试、晶间腐蚀及应力腐蚀试验。试验结果表明,采用该工艺焊接的L360QS+316L不锈钢复合钢管环焊缝焊接接头性能良好,且具备耐晶间腐蚀和应力腐蚀性能;堆焊层起到了很好的隔离作用,保证了焊缝的质量。

  1. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests

  2. Reduction of wafer-edge overlay errors using advanced correction models, optimized for minimal metrology requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Suk; Won, Hwa-Yeon; Jeong, Jong-Mun; Böcker, Paul; Vergaij-Huizer, Lydia; Kupers, Michiel; Jovanović, Milenko; Sochal, Inez; Ryan, Kevin; Sun, Kyu-Tae; Lim, Young-Wan; Byun, Jin-Moo; Kim, Gwang-Gon; Suh, Jung-Joon

    2016-03-01

    In order to optimize yield in DRAM semiconductor manufacturing for 2x nodes and beyond, the (processing induced) overlay fingerprint towards the edge of the wafer needs to be reduced. Traditionally, this is achieved by acquiring denser overlay metrology at the edge of the wafer, to feed field-by-field corrections. Although field-by-field corrections can be effective in reducing localized overlay errors, the requirement for dense metrology to determine the corrections can become a limiting factor due to a significant increase of metrology time and cost. In this study, a more cost-effective solution has been found in extending the regular correction model with an edge-specific component. This new overlay correction model can be driven by an optimized, sparser sampling especially at the wafer edge area, and also allows for a reduction of noise propagation. Lithography correction potential has been maximized, with significantly less metrology needs. Evaluations have been performed, demonstrating the benefit of edge models in terms of on-product overlay performance, as well as cell based overlay performance based on metrology-to-cell matching improvements. Performance can be increased compared to POR modeling and sampling, which can contribute to (overlay based) yield improvement. Based on advanced modeling including edge components, metrology requirements have been optimized, enabling integrated metrology which drives down overall metrology fab footprint and lithography cycle time.

  3. Design and realization of a welding oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Özcan, Muciz

    2014-01-01

    Welding is one of the most popular methods to combine metal pieces in manufacturing processes. Arc welding, among all welding techniques, is the most commonly used in manufacturing due to its cost and flexibility. During the manufacturing process, arc welding is either performed by an operator or by automatic tools such as welding oscillators. Using automatic tools has advantages over manual use, as the process will be faster, cheaper, and have less welding flaws. In this paper, a homem...

  4. Fundamental Difficulties Associated With Underwater Wet Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua E. Omajene,; Jukka Martikainen

    2014-01-01

    The offshore industries carry out welding activities in the wet environment. It is evident that the wet environments possess difficulties in carrying out underwater welding. Therefore there is the need to improve the quality of weld achieved in underwater welding. This paper investigates the difficulties associated with underwater welding. The objective of this research paper is to identify and analyze the different difficulties in underwater welding so as to make a clear back...

  5. Synthesis of iron aluminide-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites by in-situ displacement reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, R.; McKamey, C.G.; Buck, L.R.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1997-09-01

    Composites consisting of an iron aluminide matrix with ceramic particle reinforcements, such as alumina, could improve the high temperature strength without compromising the oxidation resistance. In this paper, the feasibility of processing Fe-Al alloy/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites by an in-situ displacement reaction between Fe-40 at.% Al and iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is investigated. Simple powder metallurgical processing was performed without resorting to an externally applied pressures or deformations during the high temperature processing step. The microstructural features of the composites are rationalized based on results from diffusion couples. Preliminary mechanical properties such as fracture toughness, yield strength and hardness are determined and compared with the values obtained for monolithic iron aluminide - Fe-28 at.% Al. Results suggest that a significant improvement in the properties is needed and further avenues for modifications, such as changes in the interface strength and externally applied forces during processing, are suggested.

  6. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  7. Analysis of Welding Technology about Bimetal-lined Pipe%双金属复合管焊接技术分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李发根; 孟繁印; 郭霖; 常泽亮

    2014-01-01

    双金属复合管的焊接接头结构复杂,焊接难度较大。通过对双金属复合管端面处理工艺和对接焊接工艺分析,提出了端部堆焊工艺较端部封焊工艺易于焊接但不够经济的现状,指出对于薄壁小直径双金属复合管道的焊接宜采用合金焊丝对接焊工艺,而对于厚壁大直径双金属复合管道则宜采用过渡焊方法焊接。另外,还分析了当前的焊接评定标准,强调了制定适宜复合管的焊接工艺评定标准的必要性。%The welded joint structure of bimetal-lined pipe is complex and is difficult to be welded. Through analysis on pipe end treatment and butt welding procedure for bimetal-lined pipe, it indicated the overlaying was easy to weld but not to be economic comparing with seal welding, it also pointed out that alloy wire butt welding might be used to weld thin wall and small diameter bimetal-lined pipes, while for thick wall and large diameter pipes the buffer layer welding method can be used. Additionally, the existing standards about welding procedure qualification were analyzed in the paper, and the necessity of drafting welding procedure qualification standard about bimetal-lined pipes was emphasized.

  8. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  9. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  10. Prosthodontic management of worn dentition in pediatric patient with complete overlay dentures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prince; Rastogi, Jyoti; Jain, Chandni; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2012-11-01

    Overlay complete dentures are simple, reversible and economical treatment modality for patients with congenital or acquired disorders that severely affect the tooth development. It satisfies both the esthetic and functional demands where the extraction of teeth is not generally indicated. In pediatric patients, the overlay dentures establish a relatively stable occlusion that improves patient's tolerance to the future treatment procedures for worn dentition. This clinical report highlights the imperative need of appropriate treatment strategy and application of maxillary and mandibular overlay dentures in a pediatric patient who suffered from congenitally mutilated and worn dentition.

  11. Influence of Au and Cu overlayers on the magnetic structure of Co films on W(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duden, T.; Bauer, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The dependence of the angular distribution of the magnetization in ultrathin epitaxial Co layers upon the thickness of Au and Cu overlayers is studied {ital in situ} by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy in the thickness range from 0 to 3 monolayers. Only Cu overlayers cause a peak in the coverage dependence of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at 1.5 ML coverage. The relation between the nanostructure of the overlayers and the anisotropy is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. The performances of different overlay mark types at 65nm node on 300-mm wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, H. T.; Lin, Ling-Chieh; Huang, I. H.; Lin, Benjamin S.; Huang, Chin-Chou K.; Huang, Chien-Jen

    2005-05-01

    The integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing factories have measured overlay with conventional "box-in-box" (BiB) or "frame-in-frame" (FiF) structures for many years. Since UMC played as a roll of world class IC foundry service provider, tighter and tighter alignment accuracy specs need to be achieved from generation to generation to meet any kind of customers' requirement, especially according to International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) 2003 METROLOGY section1. The process noises resulting from dishing, overlay mark damaging by chemical mechanism polishing (CMP), and the variation of film thickness during deposition are factors which can be very problematic in mark alignment. For example, the conventional "box-in-box" overlay marks could be damaged easily by CMP, because the less local pattern density and wide feature width of the box induce either dishing or asymmetric damages for the measurement targets, which will make the overlay measurement varied and difficult. After Advanced Imaging Metrology (AIM) overlay targets was introduced by KLA-Tencor, studies in the past shown AIM was more robust in overlay metrology than conventional FiF or BiB targets. In this study, the applications of AIM overlay marks under different process conditions will be discussed and compared with the conventional overlay targets. To evaluate the overlay mark performance against process variation on 65nm technology node in 300-mm wafer, three critical layers were chosen in this study. These three layers were Poly, Contact, and Cu-Metal. The overlay targets used for performance comparison were BiB and Non-Segmented AIM (NS AIM) marks. We compared the overlay mark performance on two main areas. The first one was total measurement uncertainty (TMU)3 related items that include Tool Induced Shift (TIS) variability, precision, and matching. The other area is the target robustness against process variations. Based on the present study AIM mark demonstrated an equal or better

  13. Effects of cutting angle, edge preparation, and nano-structured coating on milling performance of a gamma titanium aluminide

    OpenAIRE

    Settineri, Luca; Priarone, Paolo Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides are intermetallic alloys. Recently, they have been evaluated as important contenders for structural applications in the automotive and aerospace sectors. This is due to their excellent high-temperature performances and their significantly lower density compared to Nickel-based superalloys. In this paper, an analysis of machinability of a gamma TiAl obtained via an electron beam melting (EBM) process is presented. The effects of tool geometry modifications, in terms o...

  14. Welding zircaloy thin tubes to end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aimed at optimizing parameters while welding zircaloy-2 tubes with end plugs, as a simulation of a part of the fabrication of the nuclear fuel pins. Samples were welded by tungsten-inert gas-arc welding (TIC) process under controlled atmosphere of pure argon. Some samples were welded using electron beam (EB) welding process. For samples welded using TIC process both the design of the welding chamber (size and tightness) , and the purity of the shielding atmosphere were found to have appreciable effect on the quality of the welded joint. Increasing the are length and/or the welding current increases grain growth and extends both fusion and heat-affected zones. However, heat input (are length and welding current) must be high enough to give complete penetration welds. Optimum are length of 1.2 mm was found to give good welds with the smallest possible heat affected and fusion zones. Optimum parameters of EB welding process (vacuum, welding current and EB amplitude) were determined. welds prepared by EB welding were found to have finer grain size and less extended fusion and heat-affected zones. Welds prepared by both TIC and EB processes were inspected visually, metallo graphically and by using X-ray radiography. Welds integrity were tested using helium leak and pressure tests. 7 figs

  15. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Kolařík; Miroslav Sahul; Marie Kolaříková; Martin Sahul; Milan Turňa; Michal Felix

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA). Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to e...

  16. Collection of arc welding process data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Luksa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the research was to examine the possibility of detecting welding imperfections by recording the instant values of welding parameters. The microprocessor controlled system for real-time collection and display of welding parameters was designed, implemented and tested.Design/methodology/approach: The system records up to 4 digital or analog signals collected from welding process and displays their run on the LCD display. To disturb the welding process artificial disturbances were introduced.Findings: The occurrence of some welding imperfections is followed by changes of the welding parameters. In this case they can be revealed by the analysis of the instant values of the welding parameters.Research limitations/implications: In the paper results of monitoring manual metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding are presented.Practical implications: Monitoring of gas metal arc welding is a good tool for evaluation of the quality of weld. All introduced, artificial disturbances of the welding process destabilize the welding arc and produce changes in the instant values of the welding parameters.Originality/value: The paper presents a modern microprocessor controlled system for real-time collection and display of welding parameters. Results of tests show that simple statistical approach to welding parameters can help in evaluation of weld quality.

  17. Fuel rod welding (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures were developed to weld both ends of approximately 25,000 fuel rods for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core. The rods were welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) method in high-purity helium at 1 atmosphere. Welding parameters, including weld current, arc gap, and speed of rotation, were established to control the size of the weld. Electrode and chill positioning with respect to the endclosure/tube joint controlled the location of the weld. Weld quality of the fuel rods was ensured by 100-percent nondestructive testing by ultrasonic and radiographic inspection and the destructive evaluation of process control samples in each weld lot

  18. An algorithm of multi-model spatial overlay based on three-dimensional terrain model TIN and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王少安; 张子平; 龚健雅

    2001-01-01

    3D-GIS spatial overlay analysis is being broadly concerned about in international academe and is a research focus. It is one of the important functions of spatial analysis using GIS technology. An algorithm of multi-model spatial overlay based on three-dimensional terrain model TIN is introduced in this paper which can be used to solve the TIN-based thrcc-dimensional overlay operation in spatial analysis. The feasibility arid validity of this algorithm is identified. This algorithm is used successfully in three-dimensional overlay and region variation overlay analysis.

  19. An algorithm of multi-model spatial overlay based on three-dimensional terrain model TIN and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-an; ZHANG Zi-ping; GONG Jian-ya

    2001-01-01

    3D-GIS spatial overlay analysis is being broadly concerned about in in ternational academe and is a research focus. It is one of the important function s of spatial analysis using GIS technology. An algorithm of multi-model spatial overlay based on three-dimensional terrain model TIN is introduced in this pape r which can be used to solve the TIN-based three-dimensional overlay operation in spatial analysis. The feasibility and validity of this algorithm is identified. This algorithm is used successfully in three-dimensional overlay and region va riation overlay analysis.

  20. Spot Welding Parameter Optimization to Improve Weld Characteristics for Dissimilar Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Aravinthan Arumugam; MohdAmizi Nor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resistance spot welding is a process which is widely used in the automotive industry to join steel parts of various thicknesses and types. The current practice in the automotive industry in determining the welding schedule which will be used in the welding process is based on welding table or experiences. This however may not be the optimum welding schedule that will give the best spot weld quality. This work concentrates on the parameter optimization when spot welding steels with di...

  1. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.;

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th......This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot...

  2. Residual stresses in welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of residual stresses in welded structures is discussed in terms of their magnitude, directionality, spatial distribution, range and variability. The effects of the following factors on the residual stresses are considered: material properties, material manufacture, structural geometry, fabrication procedure, welding procedure, post-weld treatments and service conditions. Examples are given of residual stress distributions in plate butt welds, circumferential butt welds and weld cladding. These illustrate the different magnitudes and distributions of residual stress that can be found in different joint geometries, and demonstrate the effects of the mechanical, thermal and metallurgical properties of the constituent materials and the sensitivity of residual stresses to pass sequence and to the restraints applied during welding. Further examples for the common case of circumferential butt welds in pipes and pressure vessels are used to illustrate the extent of residual stresses as a function of distance from the weld and the effects of post-weld heat treatment. Measurements or analytical predictions of residual stresses are often subject to significant scatter or variability. This scatter may be due to systematic factors such as variability in measurement location or material properties, or to experimental error in measured data, erroneous assumptions in analytical modelling or unknown factors such as pre-existing residual stresses, inadequately documented welding or fabrication procedures or unrecorded local repairs. Improved prediction and reduction of uncertainty of residual stresses will require better recording of the whole manufacturing and service history of the welded structure and its component materials and better understanding and analysis of the many processes that may affect the residual stresses

  3. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  4. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... effect of the post-welding conditions when subjecting a friction stir weld to loading transverse to the weld line. The numerical model of the friction stir welded joint, employs a step-wise modeling approach to combine an in-situ weld simulation with a post-welding failure analysis. Using the commercial...... the weld performance. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the main conflicts that arise when taking both the post-welding material conditions and stressestrain state into account in a subsequent structural analysis. The discussion is here based on a preliminary numerical study of the possible...

  5. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  6. Diffusion welding multifilament superconductive composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1978-02-27

    Diffusion welding is shown to be a feasible method for joining composites of niobium-titanium superconductor alloy filaments in a pure copper matrix. Good results were repeatedly obtained using 15/sup 0/ scarf joints welded with externally heated tooling and simple uniaxial compression loading in a conventional hydraulic press. Weld cycles of less than one hour total elapsed time were readily attainable. Through proper closed-die design, it was possible to increase welding pressure sufficiently to use relatively low temperatures to coincide with the optimum aging heat treatment of the superconductor alloy. This temperature limitation is important to retain optimal superconductor properties. Confirming measurements of critical current density of welded joints at 4.2/sup 0/K are in progress. In the welded joints made under optimum conditions, there is bonding of all constituents, including superconductor filaments. Weld tooling which effectively contains the relatively fluid matrix, and resists deformation during repeated weld cycles, is essential to the successful application of the diffusion welding process to these composites.

  7. Augmented Endoscopic Images Overlaying Shape Changes in Bone Cutting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Megumi; Endo, Shota; Nakao, Shinichi; Yoshida, Munehito; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    In microendoscopic discectomy for spinal disorders, bone cutting procedures are performed in tight spaces while observing a small portion of the target structures. Although optical tracking systems are able to measure the tip of the surgical tool during surgery, the poor shape information available during surgery makes accurate cutting difficult, even if preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images are used for reference. Shape estimation and visualization of the target structures are essential for accurate cutting. However, time-varying shape changes during cutting procedures are still challenging issues for intraoperative navigation. This paper introduces a concept of endoscopic image augmentation that overlays shape changes to support bone cutting procedures. This framework handles the history of the location of the measured drill tip as a volume label and visualizes the remains to be cut overlaid on the endoscopic image in real time. A cutting experiment was performed with volunteers, and the feasibility of this concept was examined using a clinical navigation system. The efficacy of the cutting aid was evaluated with respect to the shape similarity, total moved distance of a cutting tool, and required cutting time. The results of the experiments showed that cutting performance was significantly improved by the proposed framework. PMID:27584732

  8. Nondestructive testing of weldings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today the nondestructive testing of materials with transverse weldings would be often neglect. Because the production of this parts will get more expensive it is interesting to test the parts eg. cans with ultrasound. Within this research program we developed a testing device for automatically testing of materials with transverse weldings, e.g. tubes. Functional characteristics: after putting in the test tube in the testing device the transducer is adjusted automatically to the best adjustment. This takes place with three step motors. The mechanic of adjustments gets its information from an optimal computer. The optimal computer processes the signals, which it gets from the automatic evaluator during the adjustment and stores the optimal adjustment parameters. With an additional equipment on can identify the exact source of error, if the testing device turns out and the repairing of the part can take place very fast. With an appropiate mechanical science the devide is useable in a production line with high flow rate. (orig.)

  9. Tubing weld cracking test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tubing weld cracking (TWC) test was developed for applications involving advanced austenitic alloys (such as modified 800H and 310HCbN). Compared to the Finger hot cracking test, the TWC test shows an enhanced ability to evaluate the crack sensitivity of tubing materials. The TWC test can evaluate the cracking tendency of base as well as filter materials. Thus, it is a useful tool for tubing suppliers, filler metal producers and fabricators

  10. Steels and welding nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This ENEA Data-Base regards mechanical properties, chemical composition and heat treatments of nuclear pressure vessel materials: type A533-B, A302-B, A508 steel plates and forgings, submerged arc welds and HAZ before and after nuclear irradiation. Irradiation experiments were generally performed in high flux material test reactors. Data were collected from international available literature about water nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials embrittlement

  11. 3D Finite Element Analysis of HMA Overlay Mix Design to Control Reflective Cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Ghauch, Ziad G

    2011-01-01

    One of the most common rehabilitation techniques of deteriorated pavements is the placement of an HMA overlay on top of the existing Asphalt Concrete (AC) or Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) pavement. However, shortly after pavement resurfacing, HMA overlays exhibit a cracking pattern similar to that of the underlying pavement. This phenomenon is known as reflective cracking. This study examines the effectiveness of several HMA overlay mix design strategies for the purpose of controlling the development of reflective cracking. A parametric study was conducted using a 3D Finite Element (FE) model of a rigid pavement section including a Linear Viscoelastic (LVE) model for Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) materials and non-uniform tire-pavement contact stresses. Results obtained show that for the intermediate and surface courses, using a Dense Graded (DG) or Polymer Modified (PM) asphalt mixture instead of a Standard Binder (SB) mixture results in reduced tensile stresses at the bottom of the HMA overlay but higher levels of...

  12. An optimal algorithm based on extended kalman filter and the data fusion for infrared touch overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, AiGuo; Cheng, ShuYi; Pan, Qiang Biao; Sun, Dong Yu

    2016-01-01

    Current infrared touch overlay has problems on the touch point recognition which bring some burrs on the touch trajectory. This paper uses the target tracking algorithm to improve the recognition and smoothness of infrared touch overlay. In order to deal with the nonlinear state estimate problem for touch point tracking, we use the extended Kalman filter in the target tracking algorithm. And we also use the data fusion algorithm to match the estimate value with the original target trajectory. The experimental results of the infrared touch overlay demonstrate that the proposed target tracking approach can improve the touch point recognition of the infrared touch overlay and achieve much smoother tracking trajectory than the existing tracking approach.

  13. The Effect of Colored Overlays on Reading Fluency in Individuals with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Tiffany Freeze; Meindl, James N

    2016-09-01

    Colored overlays, one type of tinted filter, are plastic reading sheets tinted with color and placed over text to eliminate or alleviate a wide range of reading difficulties such as low reading rate, accuracy, and comprehension. The effects of colored overlays on reading problems associated with dyslexia were investigated in this study via a multielement design. Reading fluency was assessed when participants read with and without colored overlays. Undifferentiated responding, or decreased accuracy, resulted across three participants, suggesting that colored overlays were ineffective and potentially detrimental to participants' reading abilities. As a result, empirically validated reading techniques were implemented across individuals. These findings are discussed and recommendations are made in regards to the use of research-based reading interventions. PMID:27622123

  14. The Effect of Colored Overlays on Reading Fluency in Individuals with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Tiffany Freeze; Meindl, James N

    2016-09-01

    Colored overlays, one type of tinted filter, are plastic reading sheets tinted with color and placed over text to eliminate or alleviate a wide range of reading difficulties such as low reading rate, accuracy, and comprehension. The effects of colored overlays on reading problems associated with dyslexia were investigated in this study via a multielement design. Reading fluency was assessed when participants read with and without colored overlays. Undifferentiated responding, or decreased accuracy, resulted across three participants, suggesting that colored overlays were ineffective and potentially detrimental to participants' reading abilities. As a result, empirically validated reading techniques were implemented across individuals. These findings are discussed and recommendations are made in regards to the use of research-based reading interventions.

  15. Digitizing geographic data with GRIDOT; a generalized program for drawing overlay grids in various map projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GRIDOT computer program draws overlay grids on a Calcomp plotter for use in digitizing information from maps, rectified aerial photographs, and other sources of spatially distributed data related to regional environmental problems. The options of the program facilitate use of the overlays with standard maps and map projections of the continental United States. The overlay grid may be defined as a latitude-longitude grid (geodetic grid), a Universal Transverse Mercator Grid, or one of the standard state-plane coordinate system grids. The map for which the overlay is intended may be in an Albers Equal Area projection, a Lambert Conformal projection, a Polyconic projection, a Transverse Mercator projection, a Universal Transverse Mercator projection, or any of the standard state-plane projections

  16. Computing a single cell in the overlay of two simple polygons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M. de; Devillers, O.; Dobrindt, K.T.G.; Schwarzkopf, O.

    2001-01-01

    This note combines the lazy randomized incremental construction scheme with the technique of \\connectivity acceleration" to obtain an O ( n (log ? n ) 2 ) time randomized algorithm to compute a single face in the overlay oftwo simple polygons in the plane.

  17. OVERLAY NETWORKS APPLICATION MODEL FOR MILITARY TRAFFIC%Overlay Networks在军事通信中的应用模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓; 王晖

    2008-01-01

    首先简单介绍了Overlay Networks,然后分析了当前军事通信的弊端和未来发展趋势,提出采用Overlay Networks的思想,提升军事通信网络的性能,为未来信息化战争提供网络基础架构.最后分析了该应用模型的优点和亟待解决的几个问题.

  18. Welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods available for the repair welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment and with particular reference to service in a sour environment have been reviewed. All the available techniques have the common aim of providing adequate properties in the weld metal and heat affected zone without the need for a full post weld stress relief. The heat that is required to provide the necessary metallurgical changes comes, therefore, from an alternate source. The two sources used are heat from suitably placed subsequent weld passes or from localized external heat sources. The technique presently being used by Ontario Hydro to repair vessels subject to sour service utilizes both a high preheat and a welding technique which is designed to temper the heat affected zone formed in the base material by the first weld pass. This technique is an improvement over the 'half bead' techniques given in the ASME X1 code and has been shown to be capable of reducing the hardness of the heat affected zone to an acceptable level. Certain recommendations have been made which could improve control of the technique presently used by Ontario Hydro and provide measurable parameters between procedural tests and the actual weld repairs

  19. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  20. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  1. A Novel Low-Temperature Fiffusion Aluminide Coating for Ultrasupercritical Coal-Fried Boiler Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-12-31

    An ultrasupercritical (USC) boiler with higher steam temperature and pressure is expected to increase the efficiency of the coal-fired power plant and also decrease emissions of air pollutants. Ferritic/martensitic alloys have been developed with good creep strength for the key components in coal-fired USC plants. However, they typically suffer excessive steam-side oxidation, which contributes to one of main degradation mechanisms along with the fire-side corrosion in coal-fired boilers. As the steam temperature further increases in USC boilers, oxidation of the tube internals becomes an increasing concern, and protective coatings such as aluminide-based diffusion coatings need to be considered. However, conventional aluminizing processes via pack cementation or chemical vapor deposition are typically carried out at elevated temperatures (1000-1150 C). Thermochemical treatment of ferritic/martensitic alloys at such high temperatures could severely degrade their mechanical properties, particularly the alloy's creep resistance. The research focus of this project was to develop an aluminide coating with good oxidation resistance at temperatures {le} 700 C so that the coating processing would not detrimentally alter the creep performance of the ferritic/martensitic alloys. Nevertheless, when the aluminizing temperature is lowered, brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases, such as Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3}, tend to form in the coating, which may reduce the resistance to fatigue cracking. Al-containing binary masteralloys were selected based on thermodynamic calculations to reduce the Al activity in the pack cementation process and thus to prevent the formation of brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases. Thermodynamic computations were carried out using commercial software HSC 5.0 for a series of packs containing various Cr-Al binary masteralloys. The calculation results indicate that the equilibrium partial pressures of Al halides at 700 C were a function of Al

  2. Experimental determination of the critical welding speed in high speed MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhikun; Wu Chuansong

    2008-01-01

    In high speed MAG welding process, some weld formation defects may be encountered. To get good weld quality, the critical welding speed beyond which humping or undercutting weld bead can occur must be known for different conditions. In this research, high speed MAG welding tests were carried out to check out the effects of different factors on the critical welding speed. Through observing the weld bead profiles and the macrographs of the transverse sections of MAG welds, the occurrence tendency of humping weld was analyzed, and the values of critical welding speed were determined under different levels of welding current or voltage, and the effect of shielding gas compositions on the critical welding speed was also investigated.

  3. A control system for uniform bead in fillet arc welding on tack welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positioning a workpiece accurately and preventing weld distortion, tack welding is often adopted before main welding in the construction of welded structures. However, this tack weld deteriorates the final weld bead profile, so that the grinding process is usually performed for a uniform weld bead profile. In this study, a control system for uniform weld bead is proposed for the fillet arc welding on tack welds. The system consists of GMA welding machine, torch manipulator, laser vision sensor for measuring the tack weld size and the database for optimal welding conditions. Experiments have been performed for constructing the database and for evaluating the control capability of the system. It has been shown that the system has the capability to smooth the bead at the high level of quality

  4. Oxidation of Slurry Aluminide Coatings on Cast Stainless Steel Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC in Water Vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, James A [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Kumar, Deepak [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University

    2013-01-01

    A new, cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, has been developed for a wide range of high temperature applications, including diesel exhaust components, turbine casings and turbocharger housings. CF8C-Plus offers significant improvements in creep rupture life and creep rupture strength over standard CF8C steel. However, at higher temperatures and in more aggressive environments, such as those containing significant water vapor, an oxidation-resistant protective coating will be necessary. The oxidation behavior of alloys CF8C and CF8C-Plus with various aluminide coatings were compared at 800oC in air plus 10 vol% water vapor. Due to their affordability, slurry aluminides were the primary coating system of interest, although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation coatings were also compared. Additionally, a preliminary study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminized CF8C-Plus was conducted at 800oC. Each type of coating provided substantial improvements in oxidation behavior, with simple slurry aluminides showing very good oxidation resistance after 4,000 h testing in water vapor. Preliminary low cycle fatigue results indicated that thicker aluminide coatings degraded high temperature fatigue properties of CF8C-Plus, whereas thinner coatings did not. Results suggest that appropriately designed slurry aluminide coatings are a viable option for economical, long-term oxidation protection of austenitic stainless steels in water vapor.

  5. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  6. RIAPPA: a robust identity assignment protocol for P2P overlays

    OpenAIRE

    Caubet Fernández, Juan; Esparza Martín, Óscar; Muñoz Tapia, José Luis; Alins Delgado, Juan José; Mata Diaz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) overlay networks have been proposed to solve routing problems of big distributed infrastructures, even for Internet scale. But the research community has been questioning the security of these networks for years. Most prior work in security services was focused on trust and reputation systems, anonymity, and secure routing. However, the proper management of identities in overlays is an important prerequisite to provide most of these security services. In this paper, we prop...

  7. Prosthodontic management of worn dentition in pediatric patient with complete overlay dentures: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Prince; Rastogi, Jyoti; Jain, Chandni; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2012-01-01

    Overlay complete dentures are simple, reversible and economical treatment modality for patients with congenital or acquired disorders that severely affect the tooth development. It satisfies both the esthetic and functional demands where the extraction of teeth is not generally indicated. In pediatric patients, the overlay dentures establish a relatively stable occlusion that improves patient's tolerance to the future treatment procedures for worn dentition. This clinical report highlights th...

  8. Orbital TIG (GTAW) welding for highest weld joint quality requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its many advantages orbital TIG (GTAW) welding has become the major standard for mechanised tube and pipe weldings in various industries such as: Semiconductor, food and beverage, dairy and brewery, chemical and bio-/pharmaceutical industry, vessel construction, aerospace, offshore and shipbuilding, heat-exchanger, fossil and nuclear power generation. Today's state-of-the-art technology allows orbital weldings of tubes, pipes, fittings or similar parts from 2,3 mm O.D. up to unlimited sizes (including flat plate). Wall thicknesses from 0,3 mm to 175 mm (narrow groove) can easily be accommodated. For difficult applications like inbore weldings, valve seat repairs or video-controlled remote welds, special equipment can be provided or individually manufactured on customer's demand. (orig.)

  9. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  10. Inverter DC resistance spot welding of magnesium alloy AZ31

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, I. S.; D. C. Kim; Kang, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The welding lobes of AC resistance spot welding and inverter DC resistance spot welding for the magnesium alloy sheet AZ31 were compared and analyzed.Design/methodology/approach: Using the welding lobe in terms of electrode force, weld time, and weld current which are process variables of the resistance spot welding, optimal welding conditions were determined. The lower limit of the range of the optimal welding condition was decided by minimum shear tension strength for the magnesium...

  11. Vision-based detection of MAG weld pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jinqiang; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Min; Zhao Yanhua

    2007-01-01

    Weld pool contains significant information about the welding process. The weld pool images of MAG welding are detected by LaserStrobe system. An algorithm for extracting weld pool edge is proposed according to the characteristics of MAG weld pool images. The maximum weld pool length and width are calculated. The measurement data can be used to verify the results of welding process simulation and to provide a good foundation for automatic control of MAG welding process.

  12. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weidong; Zhang, Xinchang; Gong, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member's departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs), i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs) and compensation VMs (CVMs). MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD), and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast). The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution.

  13. Assessment and prediction of drying shrinkage cracking in bonded mortar overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beushausen, Hans, E-mail: hans.beushausen@uct.ac.za; Chilwesa, Masuzyo

    2013-11-15

    Restrained drying shrinkage cracking was investigated on composite beams consisting of substrate concrete and bonded mortar overlays, and compared to the performance of the same mortars when subjected to the ring test. Stress development and cracking in the composite specimens were analytically modeled and predicted based on the measurement of relevant time-dependent material properties such as drying shrinkage, elastic modulus, tensile relaxation and tensile strength. Overlay cracking in the composite beams could be very well predicted with the analytical model. The ring test provided a useful qualitative comparison of the cracking performance of the mortars. The duration of curing was found to only have a minor influence on crack development. This was ascribed to the fact that prolonged curing has a beneficial effect on tensile strength at the onset of stress development, but is in the same time not beneficial to the values of tensile relaxation and elastic modulus. -- Highlights: •Parameter study on material characteristics influencing overlay cracking. •Analytical model gives good quantitative indication of overlay cracking. •Ring test presents good qualitative indication of overlay cracking. •Curing duration has little effect on overlay cracking.

  14. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Gu

    Full Text Available Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member's departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs, i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs and compensation VMs (CVMs. MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD, and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast. The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution.

  15. Health hazards of welding fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even in the twenty -first century , welding is still a common and high skilled occupation. The hazardous agents associated with welding processes are acetylene, carbomonoxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone, phosgene, tungsten, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, iron, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, silver,tin and zinc.All welding processes involve the potential hazards for inhalation exposures that may lead to acute or chronic respiratory diseases. According to literature described earlier it has been suggested that welding fumes cause the lung function impairment, obstructive and restrictive,lungs diseases diseases, cough, dyspnea, rhinitis, asthama, pneumoconiosis, carcinoma of the lungs. In additon,welding workers suffer from eye problems like irritation, phtokeratitis, cataract, skin irritation, erythema, petrygium, non-melanosytic skin cancer, malignant melanoma, reduced sperm count , motility and infertility. Most of the studies have been attempted previously to evaluate the effects of weldig fumes.However no cllectively effort illuminating the general effects of welding fumes on differnt organs or systems or both in humans has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of welding fumes documented by individual efforts and provides information to community on hazards of welding. (author)

  16. Microstructure and Microsegregation of an Inconel 625 Weld Overlay Produced on Steel Pipes by the Cold Metal Transfer Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozmus-Górnikowska M.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the development of microstructure and variations in chemical composition in commercial Inconel 625 coatings on a ferritic-pearlitic steel overlaid by the CMT method.

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF PULSE ARC WELDING PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    KRAMPIT A.G.; KRAMPIT N.Y.; KRAMPIT M.A.; DMITRIEVA A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Pulse welding processes improve productivity; also they allow welding of thin sheets of metal without penetration. Splashing and expenses for cleaning surfaces from droplets are also reduced. Pulse welding processes have a wholesome effect on seam formation at the expenses of thermal exposure on welding puddle and HAZ.

  18. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch....

  19. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved...

  20. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhi-hong; HE Di-qiu; WANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding(FSW), a new solid-state welding technology invited in the early 1990s,enables us weld aluminum alloys and titanium alloys etc. The processing of FSW, the microstructure in FSW alloysand the factors influencing weld quality are introduced. The complex factors affecting the properties are researched.