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Sample records for alters transcript expression

  1. Tetracycline regulator expression alters the transcriptional program of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Hubert; Rommer, Anna; Konrad, Torsten A; Nassimbeni, Christine; Wieser, Rotraud

    2010-01-01

    Tetracycline regulated ectopic gene expression is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, the tetracycline regulator (tetR) itself has been reported to cause certain phenotypic changes in mammalian cells. We, therefore, asked whether human myeloid U937 cells expressing the tetR in an autoregulated manner would exhibit alterations in gene expression upon removal of tetracycline.

  2. Operator Sequence Alters Gene Expression Independently of Transcription Factor Occupancy in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan G. Garcia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A canonical quantitative view of transcriptional regulation holds that the only role of operator sequence is to set the probability of transcription factor binding, with operator occupancy determining the level of gene expression. In this work, we test this idea by characterizing repression in vivo and the binding of RNA polymerase in vitro in experiments where operators of various sequences were placed either upstream or downstream from the promoter in Escherichia coli. Surprisingly, we find that operators with a weaker binding affinity can yield higher repression levels than stronger operators. Repressor bound to upstream operators modulates promoter escape, and the magnitude of this modulation is not correlated with the repressor-operator binding affinity. This suggests that operator sequences may modulate transcription by altering the nature of the interaction of the bound transcription factor with the transcriptional machinery, implying a new layer of sequence dependence that must be confronted in the quantitative understanding of gene expression.

  3. Ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transcriptional activator Athb-1 alters leaf cell fate in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, T; Dong, C H; Wu, Y; Carabelli, M; Sessa, G; Ruberti, I; Morelli, G; Chua, N H

    1995-11-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Athb-1 is a homeobox gene of unknown function. By analogy with homeobox genes of other organisms, its gene product, Athb-1, is most likely a transcription factor involved in developmental processes. We constructed a series of Athb-1-derived genes to examine the roles of Athb-1 in transcriptional regulation and plant development. Athb-1 was found to transactivate a promoter linked to a specific DNA binding site by transient expression assays. In transgenic tobacco plants, overexpression of Athb-1 or its chimeric derivatives with heterologous transactivating domains of the yeast transcription factor GAL4 or herpes simplex virus transcription factor VP16 conferred deetiolated phenotypes in the dark, including cotyledon expansion, true leaf development, and an inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Expression of Athb-1 or the two chimeric derivatives also affected the development of palisade parenchyma under normal growth conditions, resulting in light green sectors in leaves and cotyledons, whereas other organs in the transgenic plants remained normal. Both developmental phenotypes were induced by glucocorticoid in transgenic plants expressing a chimeric transcription factor comprising the Athb-1 DNA binding domain, the VP16 transactivating domain, and the glucocorticoid receptor domain. Plants with severe inducible phenotypes showed additional abnormality in cotyledon expansion. Our results suggest that Athb-1 is a transcription activator involved in leaf development. PMID:8535134

  4. The Adipocyte-Expressed Forkhead Transcription Factor Foxc2 Regulates Metabolism Through Altered Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Lidell, Martin E.; Seifert, Erin L.; Westergren, Rickard; Heglind, Mikael; Gowing, Adrienne; Sukonina, Valentina; Arani, Zahra; Itkonen, Paula; Wallin, Simonetta; Westberg, Fredrik; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Laakso, Markku; Nilsson, Tommy; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous findings demonstrate that enhanced expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxc2 in adipose tissue leads to a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. These findings prompted us to further investigate the role of Foxc2 in the regulation of genes of fundamental importance for metabolism and mitochondrial function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effects of Foxc2 on expression of genes involved in mitochondriogenesis and mitochondrial function were assessed by quantitati...

  5. Serine 574 phosphorylation alters transcriptional programming of FOXO3 by selectively enhancing apoptotic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Zhao, J; Tikhanovich, I; Kuravi, S; Helzberg, J; Dorko, K; Roberts, B; Kumer, S; Weinman, S A

    2016-04-01

    Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) is a multispecific transcription factor that is responsible for multiple and conflicting transcriptional programs such as cell survival and apoptosis. The protein is heavily post-translationally modified and there is considerable evidence that post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) regulate protein stability and nuclear-cytosolic translocation. Much less is known about how FOXO3 PTMs determine the specificity of its transcriptional program. In this study we demonstrate that exposure of hepatocytes to ethanol or exposure of macrophages to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent phosphorylation of FOXO3 at serine-574. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), mRNA and protein measurements demonstrate that p-574-FOXO3 selectively binds to promoters of pro-apoptotic genes but not to other well-described FOXO3 targets. Both unphosphorylated and p-574-FOXO3 bound to the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) promoter, but the unphosphorylated form was a transcriptional activator, whereas p-574-FOXO3 was a transcriptional repressor. The combination of increased TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and decreased Bcl-2 was both necessary and sufficient to induce apoptosis. LPS treatment of a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) induced FOXO3 S-574 phosphorylation and apoptosis. LPS-induced apoptosis was prevented by knockdown of FOXO3. It was restored by overexpressing wild-type FOXO3 but not by overexpressing a nonphosphorylatable S-574A FOXO3. Expression of an S-574D phosphomimetic form of FOXO3 induced apoptosis even in the absence of LPS. A similar result was obtained with mouse peritoneal macrophages where LPS treatment increased TRAIL, decreased Bcl-2 and induced apoptosis in wild-type but not FOXO3(-/-) cells. This work thus demonstrates that S-574 phosphorylation generates a specifically apoptotic form of FOXO3 with decreased transcriptional activity for other well-described FOXO3 functions. PMID:26470730

  6. Altered gene expression in schizophrenia: findings from transcriptional signatures in fibroblasts and blood.

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    Nadia Cattane

    Full Text Available Whole-genome expression studies in the peripheral tissues of patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ can provide new insight into the molecular basis of the disorder and innovative biomarkers that may be of great utility in clinical practice. Recent evidence suggests that skin fibroblasts could represent a non-neural peripheral model useful for investigating molecular alterations in psychiatric disorders.A microarray expression study was conducted comparing skin fibroblast transcriptomic profiles from 20 SCZ patients and 20 controls. All genes strongly differentially expressed were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR in fibroblasts and analyzed in a sample of peripheral blood cell (PBC RNA from patients (n = 25 and controls (n = 22. To evaluate the specificity for SCZ, alterations in gene expression were tested in additional samples of fibroblasts and PBCs RNA from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD (n = 16; n = 21, respectively and Bipolar Disorder (BD patients (n = 15; n = 20, respectively.Six genes (JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1, TCF4 were significantly upregulated in SCZ compared to control fibroblasts. In blood, an increase in expression levels was confirmed only for EGR1, whereas JUN was downregulated; no significant differences were observed for the other genes. EGR1 upregulation was specific for SCZ compared to MDD and BD.Our study reports the upregulation of JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1 and TCF4 in the fibroblasts of SCZ patients. A significant alteration in EGR1 expression is also present in SCZ PBCs compared to controls and to MDD and BD patients, suggesting that this gene could be a specific biomarker helpful in the differential diagnosis of major psychoses.

  7. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML

  8. Yeast prt1 mutations alter heat-shock gene expression through transcript fragmentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, C.A.; Singer, R A; Johnston, G C

    1993-01-01

    The inhibition of translation initiation by modification or mutation of initiation factors can lead to disproportionate effects on gene expression. Here we report disproportionate decreases in gene expression in cells with mutated Prt1 activity. The PRT1 gene product of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is necessary for translation initiation and is thought to be a component of initiation factor 3. At a restrictive temperature the prt1-1 mutation, in addition to decreasing global pro...

  9. The RUNX2 Transcription Factor Negatively Regulates SIRT6 Expression to Alter Glucose Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Moran; Brusgard, Jessica L; Chumsri, Saranya; Bhandary, Lekhana; Zhao, Xianfeng Frank; Lu, Song; Goloubeva, Olga G; Polster, Brian M; Fiskum, Gary M; Girnun, Geoffrey D; Kim, Myoung Sook; Passaniti, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Activation of genes promoting aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. The RUNX2 transcription factor mediates breast cancer (BC) metastasis to bone and is regulated by glucose availability. But, the mechanisms by which it regulates glucose metabolism and promotes an oncogenic phenotype are not known. RUNX2 expression in luminal BC cells correlated with lower estrogen receptor-α (ERα) levels, anchorage-independent growth, expression of glycolytic genes, increased glucose uptake, and sensitivity to glucose starvation, but not to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Conversely, RUNX2 knockdown in triple-negative BC cells inhibited mammosphere formation and glucose dependence. RUNX2 knockdown resulted in lower LDHA, HK2, and GLUT1 glycolytic gene expression, but upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase-A1 (PDHA1) mRNA and enzymatic activity, which was consistent with lower glycolytic potential. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, SIRT6, a known tumor suppressor, was a critical regulator of these RUNX2-mediated metabolic changes. RUNX2 expression resulted in elevated pAkt, HK2, and PDHK1 glycolytic protein levels that were reduced by ectopic expression of SIRT6. RUNX2 also repressed mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCR), a measure of oxidative phosphorylation (respiration). Overexpression of SIRT6 increased respiration in RUNX2-positive cells, but knockdown of SIRT6 in cells expressing low RUNX2 decreased respiration. RUNX2 repressed SIRT6 expression at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels and endogenous SIRT6 expression was lower in malignant BC tissues or cell lines that expressed high levels of RUNX2. These results support a hypothesis whereby RUNX2-mediated repression of the SIRT6 tumor suppressor regulates metabolic pathways that promote BC progression. PMID:25808624

  10. Transcription factor AP-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Alterations in activity and expression during Human Papillomavirus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) region of India. A substantial proportion of esophageal carcinoma is associated with infection of high-risk HPV type 16 and HPV18, the oncogenic expression of which is controlled by host cell transcription factor Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). We, therefore, have investigated the role of DNA binding and expression pattern of AP-1 in esophageal cancer with or without HPV infection. Seventy five histopathologically-confirmed esophageal cancer and an equal number of corresponding adjacent normal tissue biopsies from Kashmir were analyzed for HPV infection, DNA binding activity and expression of AP-1 family of proteins by PCR, gel shift assay and immunoblotting respectively. A high DNA binding activity and elevated expression of AP-1 proteins were observed in esophageal cancer, which differed between HPV positive (19%) and HPV negative (81%) carcinomas. While JunB, c-Fos and Fra-1 were the major contributors to AP-1 binding activity in HPV negative cases, Fra-1 was completely absent in HPV16 positive cancers. Comparison of AP-1 family proteins demonstrated high expression of JunD and c-Fos in HPV positive tumors, but interestingly, Fra-1 expression was extremely low or nil in these tumor tissues. Differential AP-1 binding activity and expression of its specific proteins between HPV - positive and HPV - negative cases indicate that AP-1 may play an important role during HPV-induced esophageal carcinogenesis

  11. Downregulation of L1 perturbs neuronal migration and alters the expression of transcription factors in murine neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tomokazu; Itoh, Kyoko; Umekage, Masafumi; Tonosaki, Madoka; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fukui, Kenji; Lemmon, Vance P; Fushiki, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    L1 is a cell adhesion molecule associated with a spectrum of human neurological diseases, the most well-known being X-linked hydrocephalus. L1 knockout (L1-KO) mice have revealed a variety of functions of L1 that were crucial in brain development in different brain regions. However; the function of L1 in neuronal migration during cortical histogenesis remains to be clarified. We therefore investigated the corticogenesis of mouse embryos in which L1 molecules were knocked down in selected neurons, by employing in utero electroporation with shRNAs targeting L1 (L1 shRNA). Although more than 50% of the cells transfected with no small hairpin RNA (shRNA; monster green fluorescent protein: MGFP only) vector at embryonic day 13 (E13) reached the cortical plate at E16, significantly fewer (27%) cells transfected with L1 shRNA migrated to the same extent. At E17, 22% of cells transfected with the MGFP-only vector were found in the intermediate zone, and significantly more (34%) cells transfected with L1 shRNA remained in the same zone. Furthermore, the directions of the leading process of neurons transfected with L1 shRNA became more dispersed compared with cells with the MGFP-only vector. In addition, two transcription factors expressed in the neurons, Satb2 and Tbr1, were shown to be reduced or aberrantly expressed in neurons transfected with L1 shRNA. These observations suggest that L1 plays an important role in regulating the locomotion and orientation of migrating neurons and the expression of transcription factors during neocortical development that might partially be responsible for the abnormal tract formation seen in L1-KO mice. PMID:23073969

  12. Grain feeding coordinately alters expression patterns of transcription factor and metabolic genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue of crossbred heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, C N; Perkins, S D; Bratcher, C L; Kriese-Anderson, L A; Brandebourg, T D

    2013-06-01

    The ability to improve meat quality and production efficiency in cattle is limited by an inability to enhance marbling and simultaneously limit undesirable adipose tissue accretion. The objective of this study was to examine expression of regulatory genes in subcutaneous (SCF) adipose tissue of heifers in response to increasing days on feed (DOF) and finishing strategy. Crossbred heifers (n = 24) were allotted as follows: Group 1 = 0 d, Group 2 = 99 d on winter annual ryegrass (grass; Lolium multiflorum Lam.), Group 3 = 218 g on grass, Group 4 = 99 d on grass followed by 119 d on grain. Adipose tissue samples were collected at time of harvest and frozen. Carcass characteristics were measured 24 h postharvest. As expected, HCW (P grade increased (P grade (P meat quality whereas gene expression studies suggest several novel genes are associated with subcutaneous adipose tissue development in growing and finishing cattle. PMID:23482578

  13. Vascular transcriptional alterations produced by juvenile obesity in Ossabaw swine

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Lee, Sewon; Zhang, Hanrui; Cui, Jian; Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Zhang, Cuihua; Hill, Michael A; Perfield, James W.; Jamal A. Ibdah; Booth, Frank W.; Davis, J Wade; Laughlin, M. Harold; Rector, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    We adopted a transcriptome-wide microarray analysis approach to determine the extent to which vascular gene expression is altered as a result of juvenile obesity and identify obesity-responsive mRNAs. We examined transcriptional profiles in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), perivascular fat adjacent to the LAD, and descending thoracic aorta between obese (n = 5) and lean (n = 6) juvenile Ossabaw pigs (age = 22 wk). Obesity was experimentally induced by feeding the animals a ...

  14. Proteasome activity or expression is not altered by activation of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 in cultured fibroblasts or myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David M; Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) with chaperoning function work together with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to prevent the accumulation of misfolded, potentially toxic proteins, as well as to control catabolism of the bulk of cytoplasmic, cellular protein. There is evidence for the involvement of both systems in neurodegenerative disease, and a therapeutic target is the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, which mediates upregulation of Hsps in response to cellular stress. The mechanisms regulating expression of proteasomal proteins in mammalian cells are less well defined. To assess any direct effect of Hsf1 on expression of proteasomal subunits and activity in mammalian cells, a plasmid encoding a constitutively active form of Hsf1 (Hsf1act) was expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Hsf1 and in cultured human myoblasts. Plasmid encoding an inactivatible form of Hsf1 (Hsf1inact) served as control. In cultures transfected with plasmid hsf1act, robust expression of the major stress-inducible Hsp, Hsp70, occurred but not in cultures transfected with hsf1inact. No significant changes in the level of expression of representative proteasomal proteins (structural [20Salpha], a nonpeptidase beta subunit [20Sbeta3], or 2 regulatory subunits [19S subunit 6b, 11 Salpha]) or in chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, and caspaselike activities of the proteasome were measured. Thus, stress-induced or pharmacological activation of Hsf1 in mammalian cells would upregulate Hsps but not directly affect expression or activity of proteasomes. PMID:16184768

  15. Transcriptional stochasticity in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipniacki, Tomasz; Paszek, Pawel; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Brasier, Allan R; Kimmel, Marek

    2006-01-21

    Due to the small number of copies of molecular species involved, such as DNA, mRNA and regulatory proteins, gene expression is a stochastic phenomenon. In eukaryotic cells, the stochastic effects primarily originate in regulation of gene activity. Transcription can be initiated by a single transcription factor binding to a specific regulatory site in the target gene. Stochasticity of transcription factor binding and dissociation is then amplified by transcription and translation, since target gene activation results in a burst of mRNA molecules, and each mRNA copy serves as a template for translating numerous protein molecules. In the present paper, we explore a mathematical approach to stochastic modeling. In this approach, the ordinary differential equations with a stochastic component for mRNA and protein levels in a single cells yield a system of first-order partial differential equations (PDEs) for two-dimensional probability density functions (pdf). We consider the following examples: Regulation of a single auto-repressing gene, and regulation of a system of two mutual repressors and of an activator-repressor system. The resulting PDEs are approximated by a system of many ordinary equations, which are then numerically solved. PMID:16039671

  16. Altered IFN-γ-mediated immunity and transcriptional expression patterns in N-Ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced STAT4 mutants confer susceptibility to acute typhoid-like disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva, Megan M; Yuki, Kyoko E; Dauphinee, Shauna M; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy A; Pyzik, Michal; Paquet, Marilène; Lathrop, Mark; Majewski, Jacek; Vidal, Silvia M; Malo, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a ubiquitous Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that continues to pose a global challenge to human health. The etiology of Salmonella pathogenesis is complex and controlled by pathogen, environmental, and host genetic factors. In fact, patients immunodeficient in genes in the IL-12, IL-23/IFN-γ pathway are predisposed to invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella infection. Using a forward genomics approach by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) germline mutagenesis in mice, we identified the Ity14 (Immunity to Typhimurium locus 14) pedigree exhibiting increased susceptibility following in vivo Salmonella challenge. A DNA-binding domain mutation (p.G418_E445) in Stat4 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Factor 4) was the causative mutation. STAT4 signals downstream of IL-12 to mediate transcriptional regulation of inflammatory immune responses. In mutant Ity14 mice, the increased splenic and hepatic bacterial load resulted from an intrinsic defect in innate cell function, IFN-γ-mediated immunity, and disorganized granuloma formation. We further show that NK and NKT cells play an important role in mediating control of Salmonella in Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) mice. Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) mice had increased expression of genes involved in cell-cell interactions and communication, as well as increased CD11b expression on a subset of splenic myeloid dendritic cells, resulting in compromised recruitment of inflammatory cells to the spleen during Salmonella infection. Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) presented upregulated compensatory mechanisms, although inefficient and ultimately Stat4(Ity14/Ity14) mice develop fatal bacteremia. The following study further elucidates the pathophysiological impact of STAT4 during Salmonella infection. PMID:24285835

  17. MCG101-induced cancer anorexia-cachexia features altered expression of hypothalamic Nucb2 and Cartpt and increased plasma levels of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jonathan R; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Smedh, Ulrika

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore central and peripheral host responses to an anorexia-cachexia producing tumor. We focused on neuroendocrine anorexigenic signals in the hypothalamus, brainstem, pituitary and from the tumor per se. Expression of mRNA for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), nesfatin-1, thyrotropin (TSH) and the TSH receptor were explored. In addition, we examined changes in plasma TSH, CART peptides (CARTp) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MCG101 tumors or sham-treated. A sham-implanted, pair‑fed (PF) group was included to delineate between primary tumor and secondary effects from reduced feeding. Food intake and body weight were measured daily. mRNA levels from microdissected mouse brain samples were assayed using qPCR, and plasma levels were determined using ELISA. MCG101 tumors expectedly induced anorexia and loss of body weight. Tumor-bearing (TB) mice exhibited an increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA as well as a decrease in CART mRNA in the paraventricular area (PVN). The CART mRNA response was secondary to reduced caloric intake whereas nesfatin-1 mRNA appeared to be tumor-specifically induced. In the pituitary, CART and TSH mRNA were upregulated in the TB and PF animals compared to the freely fed controls. Plasma levels for CARTp were significantly elevated in TB but not PF mice whereas levels of TSH were unaffected. The plasma CARTp response was correlated to the degree of inflammation represented by SAP. The increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA in the PVN highlights nesfatin-1 as a plausible candidate for causing tumor-induced anorexia. CART mRNA expression in the PVN is likely an adaptation to reduced caloric intake secondary to a cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS)‑inducing tumor. The MCG101 tumor did not express CART mRNA, thus the elevation of plasma CARTp is host derived and likely driven by inflammation. PMID:26780979

  18. Vascular transcriptional alterations produced by juvenile obesity in Ossabaw swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Lee, Sewon; Zhang, Hanrui; Cui, Jian; Zuidema, Mozow Y; Zhang, Cuihua; Hill, Michael A; Perfield, James W; Ibdah, Jamal A; Booth, Frank W; Davis, J Wade; Laughlin, M Harold; Rector, R Scott

    2013-06-01

    We adopted a transcriptome-wide microarray analysis approach to determine the extent to which vascular gene expression is altered as a result of juvenile obesity and identify obesity-responsive mRNAs. We examined transcriptional profiles in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), perivascular fat adjacent to the LAD, and descending thoracic aorta between obese (n = 5) and lean (n = 6) juvenile Ossabaw pigs (age = 22 wk). Obesity was experimentally induced by feeding the animals a high-fat/high-fructose corn syrup/high-cholesterol diet for 16 wk. We found that expression of 189 vascular cell genes in the LAD and expression of 165 genes in the thoracic aorta were altered with juvenile obesity (false discovery rate ≤ 10%) with an overlap of only 28 genes between both arteries. Notably, a number of genes found to be markedly upregulated in the LAD of obese pigs are implicated in atherosclerosis, including ACP5, LYZ, CXCL14, APOE, PLA2G7, LGALS3, SPP1, ITGB2, CYBB, and P2RY12. Furthermore, pathway analysis revealed the induction of proinflammatory and pro-oxidant pathways with obesity primarily in the LAD. Gene expression in the LAD perivascular fat was minimally altered with juvenile obesity. Together, we provide new evidence that obesity produces artery-specific changes in pretranslational regulation with a clear upregulation of proatherogenic genes in the LAD. Our data may offer potential viable drug targets and mechanistic insights regarding the molecular precursors involved in the origins of overnutrition and obesity-associated vascular disease. In particular, our results suggest that the oxidized LDL/LOX-1/NF-κB signaling axis may be involved in the early initiation of a juvenile obesity-induced proatherogenic coronary artery phenotype. PMID:23592636

  19. Comparative transcript profiling of a male sterile cybrid pummelo and its fertile type revealed altered gene expression related to flower development.

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    Bei-Bei Zheng

    Full Text Available Male sterile and seedless characters are highly desired for citrus cultivar improvement. In our breeding program, a male sterile cybrid pummelo, which could be considered as a variant of male fertile pummelo, was produced by protoplast fusion. Herein, ecotopic stamen primordia initiation and development were detected in this male sterile cybrid pummelo. Histological studies revealed that the cybrid showed reduced petal development in size and width, and retarded stamen primordia development. Additionally, disorganized cell proliferation was also detected in stamen-like structures (fused to petals and/or carpel. To gain new insight into the underlying mechanism, we compared, by RNA-Seq analysis, the nuclear gene expression profiles of floral buds of the cybrid with that of fertile pummelo. Gene expression profiles which identified a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the two lines were captured at both petal primordia and stamen primordia distinguishable stages. For example, nuclear genes involved in nucleic acid binding and response to hormone synthesis and metabolism, genes required for floral bud identification and expressed in particular floral whorls. Furthermore, in accordance with flower morphology of the cybrid, expression of PISTILLATA (PI was reduced in stamen-like structures, even though it was restricted to correct floral whorls. Down-regulated expression of APETALA3 (AP3 coincided with that of PI. These finding indicated that, due to their whorl specific effects in flower development, citrus class-B MADS-box genes likely constituted 'perfect targets' for CMS retrograde signaling, and that dysfunctional mitochondria seemed to cause male sterile phenotype in the cybrid pummelo.

  20. Rapid and selective alterations in the expression of cellular genes accompany conditional transcription of Ha-v-ras in NIH 3T3 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, R D; Ostrowski, M C

    1987-01-01

    Hormone treatment of NIH 3T3 cells that contain recombinant fusions between the mouse mammary virus long terminal repeat and the v-ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus results in conditional expression of the ras p21 gene product. Levels of ras mRNA and p21 are maximal after 2 to 4 h of hormone treatment. Analysis of cellular RNA by Northern blotting and nuclease S1 protection assays indicates that the expression of two cellular RNA species increases with kinetics similar to v-ras: v-sis-r...

  1. Transcription Factor Oscillations Induce Differential Gene Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Keng Boon; Yio, Wee Kheng; Surana, Uttam; Chiam, Keng Hwee

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular protein levels of diverse transcription factors (TFs) vary periodically with time. However, the effects of TF oscillations on gene expression, the primary role of TFs, are poorly understood. In this study, we determined these effects by comparing gene expression levels induced in the presence and in the absence of TF oscillations under same mean intracellular protein level of TF. For all the nonlinear TF transcription kinetics studied, an oscillatory TF is predicted to induce ge...

  2. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stahlberg, A.; Elbing, K.; Andrade-Garda, J.M.; Sjögreen, B.; Forootan, A.; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 170 (2008), s. 1-41. ISSN 1471-2164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Expression Profiling * Real-time PCR * Yeast Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.926, year: 2008

  3. Ectopic expression of MdSPDS1 in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck reduces canker susceptibility: involvement of H2O2 production and transcriptional alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enormous work has shown that polyamines are involved in a variety of physiological processes, but information is scarce on the potential of modifying disease response through genetic transformation of a polyamine biosynthetic gene. Results In the present work, an apple spermidine synthase gene (MdSPDS1 was introduced into sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck 'Anliucheng' via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of embryogenic calluses. Two transgenic lines (TG4 and TG9 varied in the transgene expression and cellular endogenous polyamine contents. Pinprick inoculation demonstrated that the transgenic lines were less susceptible to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac, the causal agent of citrus canker, than the wild type plants (WT. In addition, our data showed that upon Xac attack TG9 had significantly higher free spermine (Spm and polyamine oxidase (PAO activity when compared with the WT, concurrent with an apparent hypersensitive response and the accumulation of more H2O2. Pretreatment of TG9 leaves with guazatine acetate, an inhibitor of PAO, repressed PAO activity and reduced H2O2 accumulation, leading to more conspicuous disease symptoms than the controls when both were challenged with Xac. Moreover, mRNA levels of most of the defense-related genes involved in synthesis of pathogenesis-related protein and jasmonic acid were upregulated in TG9 than in the WT regardless of Xac infection. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that overexpression of the MdSPDS1 gene prominently lowered the sensitivity of the transgenic plants to canker. This may be, at least partially, correlated with the generation of more H2O2 due to increased production of polyamines and enhanced PAO-mediated catabolism, triggering hypersensitive response or activation of defense-related genes.

  4. GATA-4 transcription factor regulates hepatic hepcidin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Island, Marie-Laure; Fatih, Nadia; Leroyer, Patricia; Brissot, Pierre; Loreal, Olivier

    2011-08-01

    Hepcidin, a hormone mainly synthesized by hepatocytes and secreted in plasma, controls iron bioavailability. Thus, by inducing the internalization of the iron exporter ferroportin, it regulates iron release from macrophages, enterocytes and hepatocytes towards plasma. Abnormal levels of hepcidin expression alter plasma iron parameters and lead to iron metabolism disorders. Understanding the mechanisms controlling hepcidin (HAMP encodes hepcidin) gene expression is therefore an important goal. We identified a potential GATA-binding site within the human hepcidin promoter. Indeed, in hepatic HepG2 cells, luciferase experiments demonstrated that mutation of this GATA-binding site impaired the hepcidin promoter transcriptional activity in basal conditions. Gel-retardation experiments showed that GATA-4 could bind to this site. Co-transfection of a GATA-4 expression vector with a hepcidin promoter reporter construct enhanced hepcidin promoter transcriptional activity. Furthermore, modulation of GATA4 mRNA expression using specific siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) down-regulated endogenous hepcidin gene expression. Finally, we found that mutation of the GATA-binding site impaired the interleukin-6 induction of hepcidin gene expression, but did not prevent the bone morphogenetic protein-6 response. In conclusion, the findings of the present study (i) indicate that GATA-4 may participate in the control of hepcidin expression, and (ii) suggest that alteration of its expression could contribute to the development of iron-related disorders. PMID:21609320

  5. Transcription factor oscillations induce differential gene expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Keng Boon; Yio, Wee Kheng; Surana, Uttam; Chiam, Keng Hwee

    2012-06-01

    Intracellular protein levels of diverse transcription factors (TFs) vary periodically with time. However, the effects of TF oscillations on gene expression, the primary role of TFs, are poorly understood. In this study, we determined these effects by comparing gene expression levels induced in the presence and in the absence of TF oscillations under same mean intracellular protein level of TF. For all the nonlinear TF transcription kinetics studied, an oscillatory TF is predicted to induce gene expression levels that are distinct from a nonoscillatory TF. The conditions dictating whether TF oscillations induce either higher or lower average gene expression levels were elucidated. Subsequently, the predicted effects from an oscillatory TF, which follows sigmoid transcription kinetics, were applied to demonstrate how oscillatory dynamics provide a mechanism for differential target gene transactivation. Generally, the mean TF concentration at which oscillations occur relative to the promoter binding affinity of a target gene determines whether the gene is up- or downregulated whereas the oscillation amplitude amplifies the magnitude of the differential regulation. Notably, the predicted trends of differential gene expressions induced by oscillatory NF-κB and glucocorticoid receptor match the reported experimental observations. Furthermore, the biological function of p53 oscillations is predicted to prime the cell for death upon DNA damage via differential upregulation of apoptotic genes. Lastly, given N target genes, an oscillatory TF can generate between (N-1) and (2N-1) distinct patterns of differential transactivation. This study provides insights into the mechanism for TF oscillations to induce differential gene expressions, and underscores the importance of TF oscillations in biological regulations. PMID:22713556

  6. Alterations in transcriptional responses associated with vascular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oettgen Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vascular aging is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease that can occur in the absence of other traditional risk factors. Inflammation is a hallmark of vascular aging that ultimately leads to structural changes in the vessel wall including an increase in medial thickness and perivascular fibrosis. Several classes of transcription factors have been identified that participate in the regulation of cellular responses associated with vascular aging. Nuclear factor (NF-κB is the prototypic example of a transcriptional activator in the setting of inflammation, being activated in response to multiple inflammatory mediators including pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial endotoxin. In contrast, the activation of the nuclear hormone receptor and transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α results in its translocation from the cell surface to the nucleus where it exerts anti-inflammatory effects. Vascular aging is also associated with endothelial dysfunction. One important repair mechanism for improving endothelial function is the recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. In the setting of aging the number of EPCs diminishes which has been linked to a decrease in the activity and/or expression of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1 alpha. A change in the balance of the activity of pro-inflammatory transcription factors versus those that inhibit inflammation likely contributes to the process of vascular aging. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of these age-related changes in transcriptional responses, and to discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting some of these factors.

  7. Mutation of senataxin alters disease-specific transcriptional networks in patients with ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Brent L.; Cho, Ellen; Wahnich, Amanda; Gao, Fuying; Becherel, Olivier J.; Wang, Xizhe; Fike, Francesca; Chen, Leslie; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Collins, Abigail; Hahn, Angelika F.; Gatti, Richard A.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Senataxin, encoded by the SETX gene, contributes to multiple aspects of gene expression, including transcription and RNA processing. Mutations in SETX cause the recessive disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and a dominant juvenile form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4). To assess the functional role of senataxin in disease, we examined differential gene expression in AOA2 patient fibroblasts, identifying a core set of genes showing altered expression by microarray and ...

  8. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  9. Shadows alter facial expressions of Noh masks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kawai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers' recognition of the emotional expressions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa's smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art "yugen (profound grace and subtlety", which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness.

  10. Alteration in transcription factor binding in murine thymocytes after low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation on gene transcription regulation of murine thymocytes. Methods: Alteration in transcription factor binding in murine thymocytes 4 h after whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays was investigated with gel mobility shift assay. Results: Increased binding to CREB, NF-kB and APl consensus sequences was found with nuclear extracts prepared from thymocytes of irradiated versus sham-irradiated mice. Binding to the CREB, NF-kB and APl consensus sequences by nuclear extracts derived from irradiated mice was 6-fold, 4,3-fold and 2-fold higher than that from sham-irradiated respectively. The present report demonstrates that WBI with 75 mGy X-rays is capable of increasing expression of CREB, NF-kB and APl in murine thymocytes. competition with the cold oligonucleotide containing the consensus sequences for CREB and NF-kB resulted in loss of the shifted band, indicating specific binding. Conclusions: X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction of gene transcription

  11. Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Alters Cancer-associated Transcriptional Signatures in Circulating Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Sina A.; Seiger, Ashley N.; Hayes, Amanda L.; Mehra, Reena; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with a number of chronic disorders that may improve with effective therapy. However, the molecular pathways affected by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment are largely unknown. We sought to assess the system-wide consequences of CPAP therapy by transcriptionally profiling peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Methods: Subjects in whom severe OSA was diagnosed were treated with CPAP, and whole-genome expression measurement of PBLs was performed at baseline and following therapy. We used gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to identify pathways that were differentially enriched. Network analysis was then applied to highlight key drivers of processes influenced by CPAP. Results: Eighteen subjects with significant OSA underwent CPAP therapy and microarray analysis of their PBLs. Treatment with CPAP improved apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), daytime sleepiness, and blood pressure, but did not affect anthropometric measures. GSEA revealed a number of enriched gene sets, many of which were involved in neoplastic processes and displayed downregulated expression patterns in response to CPAP. Network analysis identified several densely connected genes that are important modulators of cancer and tumor growth. Conclusions: Effective therapy of OSA with CPAP is associated with alterations in circulating leukocyte gene expression. Functional enrichment and network analyses highlighted transcriptional suppression in cancer-related pathways, suggesting potentially novel mechanisms linking OSA with neoplastic signatures. Citation: Gharib SA; Seiger AN; Hayes AL; Mehra R; Patel SR. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea alters cancer-associated transcriptional signatures in circulating leukocytes. SLEEP 2014;37(4):709-714. PMID:24688164

  12. Alteration of transcriptional networks in the entorhinal cortex after maternal immune activation and adolescent cannabinoid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Sharon L; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Cairns, Murray J

    2016-08-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) and adolescent cannabinoid exposure (ACE) have both been identified as major environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. We examined the effects of these two risk factors alone, and in combination, on gene expression during late adolescence. Pregnant rats were exposed to the viral infection mimic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day (GD) 15. Adolescent offspring received daily injections of the cannabinoid HU210 for 14days starting on postnatal day (PND) 35. Gene expression was examined in the left entorhinal cortex (EC) using mRNA microarrays. We found prenatal treatment with poly I:C alone, or HU210 alone, produced relatively minor changes in gene expression. However, following combined treatments, offspring displayed significant changes in transcription. This dramatic and persistent alteration of transcriptional networks enriched with genes involved in neurotransmission, cellular signalling and schizophrenia, was associated with a corresponding perturbation in the expression of small non-coding microRNA (miRNA). These results suggest that a combination of environmental exposures during development leads to significant genomic remodeling that disrupts maturation of the EC and its associated circuitry with important implications as the potential antecedents of memory and learning deficits in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26923065

  13. Alterated integrin expression in lichen planopilaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erriquez Roberta

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lichen planopilaris (LPP is an inflammatory disease characterized by a lymphomononuclear infiltrate surrounding the isthmus and infundibulum of the hair follicle of the scalp, that evolves into atrophic/scarring alopecia. In the active phase of the disease hairs are easily plucked with anagen-like hair-roots. In this study we focused on the expression of integrins and basement membrane components of the hair follicle in active LPP lesions. Methods Scalp biopsies were taken in 10 patients with LPP and in 5 normal controls. Using monoclonal antibodies against α3β1 and α6β4 integrins we showed the expression of these integrins and of the basement membrane components of the hair follicle in active LPP lesions and in healthy scalp skin. Results In the LPP involved areas, α3β1 was distributed in a pericellular pattern, the α6 subunit was present with a basolateral distribution while the β4 subunit showed discontinuous expression at the basal pole and occasionally, basolateral staining of the hair follicle. Conclusion: An altered distribution of the integrins in active LPP lesions can explain the phenomenon of easy pulling-out of the hair with a "gelatinous" root-sheath.

  14. Expression of Transcripts for Myelin Related Genes in Postmortem Brain from Cocaine Abusers

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansen, Lars V.; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; Bannon, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic abuse of cocaine is known to cause neuroadaptive changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). In addition, altered expression of the myelin-related genes MBP, MOBP, PLP1 as well as of MAL2 in NAc was recently reported by gene array analysis in brains from cocaine abusers. In the present study we used in situ hybridization to quantify transcript expression of these four genes, as well as for the myelin-related transcripts encoding quaking, EDG2, claudin-11, ...

  15. Mutation of senataxin alters disease-specific transcriptional networks in patients with ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L; Cho, Ellen; Wahnich, Amanda; Gao, Fuying; Becherel, Olivier J; Wang, Xizhe; Fike, Francesca; Chen, Leslie; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Collins, Abigail; Hahn, Angelika F; Gatti, Richard A; Konopka, Genevieve; Perlman, Susan; Lavin, Martin F; Geschwind, Daniel H; Coppola, Giovanni

    2014-09-15

    Senataxin, encoded by the SETX gene, contributes to multiple aspects of gene expression, including transcription and RNA processing. Mutations in SETX cause the recessive disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and a dominant juvenile form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4). To assess the functional role of senataxin in disease, we examined differential gene expression in AOA2 patient fibroblasts, identifying a core set of genes showing altered expression by microarray and RNA-sequencing. To determine whether AOA2 and ALS4 mutations differentially affect gene expression, we overexpressed disease-specific SETX mutations in senataxin-haploinsufficient fibroblasts and observed changes in distinct sets of genes. This implicates mutation-specific alterations of senataxin function in disease pathogenesis and provides a novel example of allelic neurogenetic disorders with differing gene expression profiles. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) demonstrated these senataxin-associated genes to be involved in both mutation-specific and shared functional gene networks. To assess this in vivo, we performed gene expression analysis on peripheral blood from members of 12 different AOA2 families and identified an AOA2-specific transcriptional signature. WGCNA identified two gene modules highly enriched for this transcriptional signature in the peripheral blood of all AOA2 patients studied. These modules were disease-specific and preserved in patient fibroblasts and in the cerebellum of Setx knockout mice demonstrating conservation across species and cell types, including neurons. These results identify novel genes and cellular pathways related to senataxin function in normal and disease states, and implicate alterations in gene expression as underlying the phenotypic differences between AOA2 and ALS4. PMID:24760770

  16. Transcript length mediates developmental timing of gene expression across Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Artieri, Carlo G.; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2013-01-01

    The time required to transcribe genes with long primary transcripts may limit their ability to be expressed in cells with short mitotic cycles, a phenomenon termed intron delay. As such short cycles are a hallmark of the earliest stages of insect development, we used Drosophila developmental timecourse expression data to test whether intron delay affects gene expression genome-wide, and to determine its consequences for the evolution of gene structure. We find that long zygotically expressed,...

  17. Defining transcriptional networks through integrative modeling of mRNA expression and transcription factor binding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussemaker Harmen J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional genomics studies are yielding information about regulatory processes in the cell at an unprecedented scale. In the yeast S. cerevisiae, DNA microarrays have not only been used to measure the mRNA abundance for all genes under a variety of conditions but also to determine the occupancy of all promoter regions by a large number of transcription factors. The challenge is to extract useful information about the global regulatory network from these data. Results We present MA-Networker, an algorithm that combines microarray data for mRNA expression and transcription factor occupancy to define the regulatory network of the cell. Multivariate regression analysis is used to infer the activity of each transcription factor, and the correlation across different conditions between this activity and the mRNA expression of a gene is interpreted as regulatory coupling strength. Applying our method to S. cerevisiae, we find that, on average, 58% of the genes whose promoter region is bound by a transcription factor are true regulatory targets. These results are validated by an analysis of enrichment for functional annotation, response for transcription factor deletion, and over-representation of cis-regulatory motifs. We are able to assign directionality to transcription factors that control divergently transcribed genes sharing the same promoter region. Finally, we identify an intrinsic limitation of transcription factor deletion experiments related to the combinatorial nature of transcriptional control, to which our approach provides an alternative. Conclusion Our reliable classification of ChIP positives into functional and non-functional TF targets based on their expression pattern across a wide range of conditions provides a starting point for identifying the unknown sequence features in non-coding DNA that directly or indirectly determine the context dependence of transcription factor action. Complete analysis results are

  18. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehto Kirsi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs. These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent. Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1 were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S

  19. Probing the transcription mechanisms of reovirus cores with molecules that alter RNA duplex stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidenko, Alexander A; Nibert, Max L

    2009-06-01

    The mammalian reovirus (MRV) genome comprises 10 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments, packaged along with transcriptase complexes inside each core particle. Effects of four small molecules on transcription by MRV cores were studied for this report, chosen for their known capacities to alter RNA duplex stability. Spermidine and spermine, which enhance duplex stability, inhibited transcription, whereas dimethyl sulfoxide and trimethylglycine, which attenuate duplex stability, stimulated transcription. Different mechanisms were identified for inhibition or activation by these molecules. With spermidine, one round of transcription occurred normally, but subsequent rounds were inhibited. Thus, inhibition occurred at the transition between the end of elongation in one round and initiation in the next round of transcription. Dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylglycine, on the other hand, had no effect on transcription by a constitutively active fraction of cores in each preparation but activated transcription in another fraction that was otherwise silent for the production of elongated transcripts. Activation of this other fraction occurred at the transition between transcript initiation and elongation, i.e., at promoter escape. These results suggest that the relative stability of RNA duplexes is most important for certain steps in the particle-associated transcription cycles of dsRNA viruses and that small molecules are useful tools for probing these and probably other steps. PMID:19297468

  20. Probing the Transcription Mechanisms of Reovirus Cores with Molecules That Alter RNA Duplex Stability▿

    OpenAIRE

    Demidenko, Alexander A.; Nibert, Max L.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian reovirus (MRV) genome comprises 10 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments, packaged along with transcriptase complexes inside each core particle. Effects of four small molecules on transcription by MRV cores were studied for this report, chosen for their known capacities to alter RNA duplex stability. Spermidine and spermine, which enhance duplex stability, inhibited transcription, whereas dimethyl sulfoxide and trimethylglycine, which attenuate duplex stability, stimulated transc...

  1. Altered aquaporin expression in glaucoma eyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy Linh; Bek, Toke; la Cour, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    , AQP7 and AQP9 in human glaucoma eyes compared with normal eyes. Nine glaucoma eyes were examined. Of these, three eyes were diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma; three eyes had neovascular glaucoma; and three eyes had chronic angle-closure glaucoma. Six eyes with normal intraocular pressure and...... intensity (p = 0.037). No difference in AQP1, AQP4 and AQP9 expression was found in the optic nerve fibres. This study is the first investigating AQPs in human glaucoma eyes. We found a reduced expression of AQP9 in the retinal ganglion cells of glaucoma eyes. Glaucoma also induced increased AQP7 expression......Aquaporins (AQP) are channels in the cell membrane that mainly facilitate a passive transport of water. In the eye, AQPs are expressed in the ciliary body and retina and may contribute to the pathogenesis of glaucoma and optic neuropathy. We investigated the expression of AQP1, AQP3, AQP4, AQP5...

  2. Alterations of Lymphoid Enhancer Factor-1 Isoform Expression in Solid Tumors and Acute Leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbing WANG; Carsten M(U)LLER-TIDOW; Ping JI; Bj(o)rn STEFFEN; Ralf METZGER; Paul M. SCHNEIDER; Hartmut HALFTER; Mark SCHRADER; Wolfgang E. BERDEL; Hubert SERVE

    2005-01-01

    Two major transcripts of lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF-1) have been described. The long isoform with β-catenin binding domain functions as a transcriptional enhancer factor. The short isoform derives from an intronic promoter and exhibits dominant negative activity. Recently, alterations of LEF- 1isoforms distribution have been described in colon cancer. In the current study we employed a quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR method (TaqMan) to analyze expression of LEF-1 isoforms in a large cohort of human tumor (n=304) and tumor-free control samples (n=56). The highest expression level of LEF-1 was found in carcinoma samples whereas brain cancer samples expressed little. Expression of LEF1 was different in distinct cancer types. For example, the mRNA level of LEF-1 was lower in testicular tumor samples compared with tumor-free control samples. Besides epithelial cancers, significant LEF-1expression was also found in hematopoietic cells. In hematological malignancies, overall LEF-1 level was higher in lymphocytic leukemias compared with myeloid leukemias and normal hematopoiesis. However,acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia showed a significantly increased fraction of the oncogenic LEF-1 compared with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia. Taken together,these data suggest that LEF-1 is abundantly expressed in human tumors and the ratio of the oncogenic and the dominant negative short isoform altered not only in carcinomas but also in leukemia.

  3. Ionizing radiation and bacterial challenge alter splenic cytokine gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation increases susceptibility to bacterial infection. Exogenous proinflammatory cytokines can alter the response of mice to γradiation, but the role of endogenous inflammatory cytokines after bacterial infection in irradiated animals is not known. Gene expression of hematopoietic (GM-CSF) and proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) cytokines were examined in spleens of B6D2F1/J female mice after irradiation alone (1.0- and 7.0-Gy), and after irradiation followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae s.c. challenge 4 days postirradiation by using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. At 4, 8, and 24 h after bacterial challenge in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice, GM-CSF mRNA increased (p<0.05). TNF-α mRNA in irradiated mice were slightly decreased, whereas after bacterial challenge, TNF-α mRNA elevated at 30 h in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice; at 4, and 8 h in 1.0-Gy-irradiated mice, and at 1 h in sham-irradiated mice (p<0.05). IL-6 mRNA displayed a biphasic response in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice, and, after bacterial challenge, in both irradiated mice (1.0- and 7.0-Gy) and sham-irradiated mice. IL-1β mRNA remained at or below normal for 8 h and increased at 24 h after bacterial challenge on day 4 in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice. These results indicate that sublethal gamma radiation alters the patterns of the hematopoietic and proinflammatory cytokine responses to bacterial challenge in vivo. Consequently, treatment protocols may need to take into account changes in cytokine gene responses to resolve infection after irradiation. (author)

  4. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  5. Shadows Alter Facial Expressions of Noh Masks

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuyuki Kawai; Hiromitsu Miyata; Ritsuko Nishimura; Kazuo Okanoya

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers' recognition of the emotional expressio...

  6. Altered expression of neuropeptides in FoxG1-null heterozygous mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frullanti, Elisa; Amabile, Sonia; Lolli, Maria Grazia; Bartolini, Anna; Livide, Gabriella; Landucci, Elisa; Mari, Francesca; Vaccarino, Flora M; Ariani, Francesca; Massimino, Luca; Renieri, Alessandra; Meloni, Ilaria

    2016-02-01

    Foxg1 gene encodes for a transcription factor essential for telencephalon development in the embryonic mammalian forebrain. Its complete absence is embryonic lethal while Foxg1 heterozygous mice are viable but display microcephaly, altered hippocampal neurogenesis and behavioral and cognitive deficiencies. In order to evaluate the effects of Foxg1 alteration in adult brain, we performed expression profiling in total brains from Foxg1+/- heterozygous mutants and wild-type littermates. We identified statistically significant differences in expression levels for 466 transcripts (Pgenes was found a group of genes expressed in the basal ganglia and involved in the control of movements. A relevant (three to sevenfold changes) and statistically significant increase of expression, confirmed by qRT-PCR, was found in two highly correlated genes with expression restricted to the hypothalamus: Oxytocin (Oxt) and Arginine vasopressin (Avp). These neuropeptides have an important role in maternal and social behavior, and their alteration is associated with impaired social interaction and autistic behavior. In addition, Neuronatin (Nnat) levels appear significantly higher both in Foxg1+/- whole brain and in hippocampal neurons after silencing Foxg1, strongly suggesting that it is directly or indirectly repressed by Foxg1. During fetal and neonatal brain development, Nnat may regulate neuronal excitability, receptor trafficking and calcium-dependent signaling and, in the adult brain, it is predominantly expressed in parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons. Overall, these results implicate the overexpression of a group of neuropeptides in the basal ganglia, hypothalamus, cortex and hippocampus in the pathogenesis FOXG1 behavioral impairments. PMID:25966633

  7. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of

  8. Methamphetamine preconditioning alters midbrain transcriptional responses to methamphetamine-induced injury in the rat striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Lud Cadet

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is an illicit drug which is neurotoxic to the mammalian brain. Numerous studies have revealed significant decreases in dopamine and serotonin levels in the brains of animals exposed to moderate-to-large METH doses given within short intervals of time. In contrast, repeated injections of small nontoxic doses of the drug followed by a challenge with toxic METH doses afford significant protection against monoamine depletion. The present study was undertaken to test the possibility that repeated injections of the drug might be accompanied by transcriptional changes involved in rendering the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system refractory to METH toxicity. Our results confirm that METH preconditioning can provide significant protection against METH-induced striatal dopamine depletion. In addition, the presence and absence of METH preconditioning were associated with substantial differences in the identity of the genes whose expression was affected by a toxic METH challenge. Quantitative PCR confirmed METH-induced changes in genes of interest and identified additional genes that were differentially impacted by the toxic METH challenge in the presence of METH preconditioning. These genes include small heat shock 27 kD 27 protein 2 (HspB2, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, c-fos, and some encoding antioxidant proteins including CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1, and heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1. These observations are consistent, in part, with the transcriptional alterations reported in models of lethal ischemic injuries which are preceded by ischemic or pharmacological preconditioning. Our findings suggest that multiple molecular pathways might work in tandem to protect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway against the deleterious effects of the toxic psychostimulant. Further analysis of the molecular and cellular pathways regulated by these genes should help to

  9. Cocaine modulates the expression of transcription factors related to the dopaminergic system in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Valer, K; López-Bellido, R; Rodríguez, R E

    2013-02-12

    Nodal-related protein, Ndr2, and transcription factors such as Lmx1b, Otp, Nurr1 and Pitx3 are very important in the differentiation, function and maintenance of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic neurons, and are necessary for the activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine (DA) transporter expression. Hence, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effects of cocaine on the expression of genes related to the embryogenesis development of the dopaminergic system. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to cocaine hydrochloride at 5h post-fertilization (hpf), and collected at two important stages - 24 and 48hpf - to study the effects of cocaine on the expression of ndr2, the lmx1b.1, lmx1b.2, otpa, otpb, nurr1 transcription factors, and their target genes: TH and DA transporter expression. Our results by qPCR showed that cocaine affects the expression of these genes in different ways, depending on the stage of development. Furthermore by in situ hybridization we observed a change in the spatial distribution of lmx1b.1 and lmx1b.2 at both stages (24 and 48hpf) due to exposure to cocaine. We also show the importance of Lmx1b and Otp in th expression through the knockdown of Lmx1b.1 and Lmx1b.2, and of Otpa and Otpb. Additionally, cocaine produced an increase and a decrease in TH levels at 24 and at 48hpf, respectively, possibly due to the change in the expression of the transcription factors and ndr2 expression. We conclude that cocaine alters the correct development of dopaminergic system affecting the expression of transcription factors, during the embryogenesis. PMID:23219907

  10. Integration of transcript expression, copy number and LOH analysis of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawthorn Lesleyann

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in the interpretation of genomic profiling data generated from breast cancer samples is the identification of driver genes as distinct from bystander genes which do not impact tumorigenesis. One way to assess the relative importance of alterations in the transcriptome profile is to combine parallel analyses that assess changes in the copy number alterations (CNAs. This integrated analysis permits the identification of genes with altered expression that map within specific chromosomal regions which demonstrate copy number alterations, providing a mechanistic approach to identify the 'driver genes'. Methods We have performed whole genome analysis of CNAs using the Affymetrix 250K Mapping array on 22 infiltrating ductal carcinoma samples (IDCs. Analysis of transcript expression alterations was performed using the Affymetrix U133 Plus2.0 array on 16 IDC samples. Fourteen IDC samples were analyzed using both platforms and the data integrated. We also incorporated data from loss of heterozygosity (LOH analysis to identify genes showing altered expression in LOH regions. Results Common chromosome gains and amplifications were identified at 1q21.3, 6p21.3, 7p11.2-p12.1, 8q21.11 and 8q24.3. A novel amplicon was identified at 5p15.33. Frequent losses were found at 1p36.22, 8q23.3, 11p13, 11q23, and 22q13. Over 130 genes were identified with concurrent increases or decreases in expression that mapped to these regions of copy number alterations. LOH analysis revealed three tumors with whole chromosome or p arm allelic loss of chromosome 17. Genes were identified that mapped to copy neutral LOH regions. LOH with accompanying copy loss was detected on Xp24 and Xp25 and genes mapping to these regions with decreased expression were identified. Gene expression data highlighted the PPARα/RXRα Activation Pathway as down-regulated in the tumor samples. Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of the application of

  11. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. ► An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. ► Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. ► Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca2+/calcineurin/NFAT.

  12. RNA-Seq identifies key reproductive gene expression alterations in response to cadmium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hanyang; Lu, Xing; Cen, Xiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Li, Feng; Zhong, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is a common toxicant that is detrimental to many tissues. Although a number of transcriptional signatures have been revealed in different tissues after cadmium treatment, the genes involved in the cadmium caused male reproductive toxicity, and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed that the mice treated with different amount of cadmium in their rodent chow for six months exhibited reduced serum testosterone. We then performed RNA-seq to comprehensively investigate the mice testicular transcriptome to further elucidate the mechanism. Our results showed that hundreds of genes expression altered significantly in response to cadmium treatment. In particular, we found several transcriptional signatures closely related to the biological processes of regulation of hormone, gamete generation, and sexual reproduction, respectively. The expression of several testosterone synthetic key enzyme genes, such as Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp17a1, were inhibited by the cadmium exposure. For better understanding of the cadmium-mediated transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the genes, we computationally analyzed the transcription factors binding sites and the mircoRNAs targets of the differentially expressed genes. Our findings suggest that the reproductive toxicity by cadmium exposure is implicated in multiple layers of deregulation of several biological processes and transcriptional regulation in mice. PMID:24982889

  13. RNA-Seq Identifies Key Reproductive Gene Expression Alterations in Response to Cadmium Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyang Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a common toxicant that is detrimental to many tissues. Although a number of transcriptional signatures have been revealed in different tissues after cadmium treatment, the genes involved in the cadmium caused male reproductive toxicity, and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed that the mice treated with different amount of cadmium in their rodent chow for six months exhibited reduced serum testosterone. We then performed RNA-seq to comprehensively investigate the mice testicular transcriptome to further elucidate the mechanism. Our results showed that hundreds of genes expression altered significantly in response to cadmium treatment. In particular, we found several transcriptional signatures closely related to the biological processes of regulation of hormone, gamete generation, and sexual reproduction, respectively. The expression of several testosterone synthetic key enzyme genes, such as Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp17a1, were inhibited by the cadmium exposure. For better understanding of the cadmium-mediated transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the genes, we computationally analyzed the transcription factors binding sites and the mircoRNAs targets of the differentially expressed genes. Our findings suggest that the reproductive toxicity by cadmium exposure is implicated in multiple layers of deregulation of several biological processes and transcriptional regulation in mice.

  14. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs

  15. Inositol phosphate pathway controls transcription of telomeric expression sites in trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Ken

    2015-05-26

    African trypanosomes evade clearance by host antibodies by periodically changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. They transcribe only one VSG gene at a time from 1 of about 20 telomeric expression sites (ESs). They undergo antigenic variation by switching transcription between telomeric ESs or by recombination of the VSG gene expressed. We show that the inositol phosphate (IP) pathway controls transcription of telomeric ESs and VSG antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei. Conditional knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 5-kinase (TbPIP5K) or phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatase (TbPIP5Pase) or overexpression of phospholipase C (TbPLC) derepresses numerous silent ESs in T. brucei bloodstream forms. The derepression is specific to telomeric ESs, and it coincides with an increase in the number of colocalizing telomeric and RNA polymerase I foci in the nucleus. Monoallelic VSG transcription resumes after reexpression of TbPIP5K; however, most of the resultant cells switched the VSG gene expressed. TbPIP5K, TbPLC, their substrates, and products localize to the plasma membrane, whereas TbPIP5Pase localizes to the nucleus proximal to telomeres. TbPIP5Pase associates with repressor/activator protein 1 (TbRAP1), and their telomeric silencing function is altered by TbPIP5K knockdown. These results show that specific steps in the IP pathway control ES transcription and antigenic switching in T. brucei by epigenetic regulation of telomere silencing. PMID:25964327

  16. Artificial transcription factor-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tol, Niels; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2014-08-01

    The transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes with artificial transcription factors (TFs) can offer new tools for plant biotechnology. Three systems are available for mediating site-specific DNA recognition of artificial TFs: those based on zinc fingers, TALEs, and on the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Artificial TFs require an effector domain that controls the frequency of transcription initiation at endogenous target genes. These effector domains can be transcriptional activators or repressors, but can also have enzymatic activities involved in chromatin remodeling or epigenetic regulation. Artificial TFs are able to regulate gene expression in trans, thus allowing them to evoke dominant mutant phenotypes. Large scale changes in transcriptional activity are induced when the DNA binding domain is deliberately designed to have lower binding specificity. This technique, known as genome interrogation, is a powerful tool for generating novel mutant phenotypes. Genome interrogation has clear mechanistic and practical advantages over activation tagging, which is the technique most closely resembling it. Most notably, genome interrogation can lead to the discovery of mutant phenotypes that are unlikely to be found when using more conventional single gene-based approaches. PMID:25017160

  17. Characterization of GPR101 transcript structure and expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellin, Giampaolo; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Daly, Adrian F; Larco, Darwin O; Palmeira, Leonor; Faucz, Fabio R; Thiry, Albert; Leal, Letícia F; Rostomyan, Liliya; Quezado, Martha; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Janjic, Marija M; Villa, Chiara; Wu, T John; Stojilkovic, Stanko S; Beckers, Albert; Feldman, Benjamin; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-08-01

    We recently showed that Xq26.3 microduplications cause X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG). X-LAG patients mainly present with growth hormone and prolactin-secreting adenomas and share a minimal duplicated region containing at least four genes. GPR101 was the only gene highly expressed in their pituitary lesions, but little is known about its expression patterns. In this work, GPR101 transcripts were characterized in human tissues by 5'-Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and RNAseq, while the putative promoter was bioinformatically predicted. We investigated GPR101 mRNA and protein expression by RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR), whole-mount in situ hybridization, and immunostaining, in human, rhesus monkey, rat and zebrafish. We identified four GPR101 isoforms characterized by different 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) and a common 6.1kb long 3'UTR. GPR101 expression was very low or absent in almost all adult human tissues examined, except for specific brain regions. Strong GPR101 staining was observed in human fetal pituitary and during adolescence, whereas very weak/absent expression was detected during childhood and adult life. In contrast to humans, adult monkey and rat pituitaries expressed GPR101, but in different cell types. Gpr101 is expressed in the brain and pituitary during rat and zebrafish development; in rat pituitary, Gpr101 is expressed only after birth and shows sexual dimorphism. This study shows that different GPR101 transcripts exist and that the brain is the major site of GPR101 expression across different species, although divergent species- and temporal-specific expression patterns are evident. These findings suggest an important role for GPR101 in brain and pituitary development and likely reflect the very different growth, development and maturation patterns among species. PMID:27282544

  18. Glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones transcriptionally regulate growth hormone gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, R M; Birnberg, N C; Rosenfeld, M G

    1982-01-01

    In order to define the molecular mechanisms by which glucocorticoids and thyroid hormone act to regulate growth hormone gene expression, the sites at which they exert their effects on growth hormone biosynthesis were examined in vivo and in a pituitary cell line. Glucocorticoids were shown to rapidly increase accumulation of growth hormone mRNA and nuclear RNA precursors. Glucocorticoids and thyroid hormone were shown to rapidly and independently increase growth hormone gene transcription. Th...

  19. Hydra constitutively expresses transcripts involved in vertebrate neural differentiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandipan Chatterjee; Shweta Lahudkar; N N Godbole; Surendra Ghaskadbi

    2001-06-01

    The diploblastic Hydra is among the most primitive multicellular organisms. Using cross-hybridization with Xenopus probes, noggin-like transcripts were detected in the hypostome and basal disc of adult Hydra (Pelmatohydra oligactis), regions with properties similar to that of the amphibian organizer. This points to the possibility of a close molecular similarity between the Xenopus and Hydra organizers. The constitutive expression of a noggin-like gene in Hydra may be responsible for its regenerative capacity.

  20. Predictive modelling of gene expression from transcriptional regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, David M; Hurley, Daniel G; Crampin, Edmund J

    2015-07-01

    Predictive modelling of gene expression provides a powerful framework for exploring the regulatory logic underpinning transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of such models in identifying dysregulation of gene and miRNA expression associated with abnormal patterns of transcription factor (TF) binding or nucleosomal histone modifications (HMs). Despite the growing popularity of such approaches, a comparative review of the various modelling algorithms and feature extraction methods is lacking. We define and compare three methods of quantifying pairwise gene-TF/HM interactions and discuss their suitability for integrating the heterogeneous chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq binding patterns exhibited by TFs and HMs. We then construct log-linear and ϵ-support vector regression models from various mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) and human lymphoblastoid (GM12878) data sets, considering both ChIP-seq- and position weight matrix- (PWM)-derived in silico TF-binding. The two algorithms are evaluated both in terms of their modelling prediction accuracy and ability to identify the established regulatory roles of individual TFs and HMs. Our results demonstrate that TF-binding and HMs are highly predictive of gene expression as measured by mRNA transcript abundance, irrespective of algorithm or cell type selection and considering both ChIP-seq and PWM-derived TF-binding. As we encourage other researchers to explore and develop these results, our framework is implemented using open-source software and made available as a preconfigured bootable virtual environment. PMID:25231769

  1. Expression of small heat shock proteins in Pisum sativum L. under gravity altered conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talalaiev A. S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Altered gravity induces significant changes in the gene expression profiles of the plant cell, which are indicative of stress conditions. One of the molecular mechanisms of cell adaptation is synthesis of small heat shock proteins (sHsp. The sHsps are chaperones, and as such, they assist in the protein folding and prevent the irreversible protein aggregation. Aim. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of simulated microgravity (clinorotation and hypergravity (centrifugation on the sHsp genes expression in the etiolated pea seedlings. Methods. The gene expression was examined with the reverse transcription and real-time PCR. Results. The qPCR results demonstrated that the altered gravity conditions do not change the expression of sHsp genes which belong to the subfamilies of different subcellular localization – cytosolic-nuclear Pshsp 17.1-CII and Pshsp18.1-CI, plastid – Pshsp26.2-P, endoplasmic reticulum – Pshsp22.7-ER and mitochondrial – Pshsp22.9-M. Conclusions. The relative qPCR results demonstrate that altered gravity and temperature elevation have different effects on the sHsp genes: unlike high temperature, altered gravity does not lead to the denaturation of cell proteins and, therefore, does not modulate the sHsp genes expression.

  2. Increased frequency of single base substitutions in a population of transcripts expressed in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single Base Substitutions (SBS) that alter transcripts expressed in cancer originate from somatic mutations. However, recent studies report SBS in transcripts that are not supported by the genomic DNA of tumor cells. We used sequence based whole genome expression profiling, namely Long-SAGE (L-SAGE) and Tag-seq (a combination of L-SAGE and deep sequencing), and computational methods to identify transcripts with greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Millions of tags produced by 40 healthy and 47 cancer L-SAGE experiments were compared to 1,959 Reference Tags (RT), i.e. tags matching the human genome exactly once. Similarly, tens of millions of tags produced by 7 healthy and 8 cancer Tag-seq experiments were compared to 8,572 RT. For each transcript, SBS frequencies in healthy and cancer cells were statistically tested for equality. In the L-SAGE and Tag-seq experiments, 372 and 4,289 transcripts respectively, showed greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Increased SBS frequencies could not be attributed to known Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP), catalogued somatic mutations or RNA-editing enzymes. Hypothesizing that Single Tags (ST), i.e. tags sequenced only once, were indicators of SBS, we observed that ST proportions were heterogeneously distributed across Embryonic Stem Cells (ESC), healthy differentiated and cancer cells. ESC had the lowest ST proportions, whereas cancer cells had the greatest. Finally, in a series of experiments carried out on a single patient at 1 healthy and 3 consecutive tumor stages, we could show that SBS frequencies increased during cancer progression. If the mechanisms generating the base substitutions could be known, increased SBS frequency in transcripts would be a new useful biomarker of cancer. With the reduction of sequencing cost, sequence based whole genome expression profiling could be used to characterize increased SBS frequency in patient’s tumor and aid diagnostic

  3. Increased frequency of single base substitutions in a population of transcripts expressed in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchetti Laurent

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Base Substitutions (SBS that alter transcripts expressed in cancer originate from somatic mutations. However, recent studies report SBS in transcripts that are not supported by the genomic DNA of tumor cells. Methods We used sequence based whole genome expression profiling, namely Long-SAGE (L-SAGE and Tag-seq (a combination of L-SAGE and deep sequencing, and computational methods to identify transcripts with greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Millions of tags produced by 40 healthy and 47 cancer L-SAGE experiments were compared to 1,959 Reference Tags (RT, i.e. tags matching the human genome exactly once. Similarly, tens of millions of tags produced by 7 healthy and 8 cancer Tag-seq experiments were compared to 8,572 RT. For each transcript, SBS frequencies in healthy and cancer cells were statistically tested for equality. Results In the L-SAGE and Tag-seq experiments, 372 and 4,289 transcripts respectively, showed greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Increased SBS frequencies could not be attributed to known Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP, catalogued somatic mutations or RNA-editing enzymes. Hypothesizing that Single Tags (ST, i.e. tags sequenced only once, were indicators of SBS, we observed that ST proportions were heterogeneously distributed across Embryonic Stem Cells (ESC, healthy differentiated and cancer cells. ESC had the lowest ST proportions, whereas cancer cells had the greatest. Finally, in a series of experiments carried out on a single patient at 1 healthy and 3 consecutive tumor stages, we could show that SBS frequencies increased during cancer progression. Conclusion If the mechanisms generating the base substitutions could be known, increased SBS frequency in transcripts would be a new useful biomarker of cancer. With the reduction of sequencing cost, sequence based whole genome expression profiling could be used to characterize increased SBS frequency in patient’s tumor and aid diagnostic.

  4. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L; Sander, Guy W; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Toward this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a "fine-tune" regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression. PMID:26483828

  5. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yao eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Towards this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a fine-tune regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression.

  6. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the −61 to −42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. - Highlights: • PTH regulation of Nhe3 promoter depends on EGR1 binding. • EGR1, PKA and JAK/STAT are involved in PTH inhibition of the Nhe3 promoter. • PTH alters expression of EGR1 and Sp3. • PTH inhibits the Nhe3 promoter by regulating PKA and JAK/STAT signaling

  7. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Bezerra, Camila Nogueira Alves, E-mail: camilab@icb.usp.br; Queiroz-Leite, Gabriella Duarte; Polidoro, Juliano Zequini; Rebouças, Nancy Amaral

    2015-06-12

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the −61 to −42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. - Highlights: • PTH regulation of Nhe3 promoter depends on EGR1 binding. • EGR1, PKA and JAK/STAT are involved in PTH inhibition of the Nhe3 promoter. • PTH alters expression of EGR1 and Sp3. • PTH inhibits the Nhe3 promoter by regulating PKA and JAK/STAT signaling.

  8. Altered expression and insulin-induced trafficking of Na+-K+-ATPase in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galuska, Dana; Kotova, Olga; Barres, Romain;

    2009-01-01

    . Skeletal muscle insulin resistance was observed after 12 wk of HFD. Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(1)-subunit protein expression was increased 1.6-fold (P <0.05), whereas alpha(2)- and beta(1)-subunits and protein expression were decreased twofold (P <0.01) in parallel with decrease in plasma membrane Na......) and alpha(1) mRNA expression were increased after HFD and restored by ET. DNA binding activity of Sp-1, a transcription factor involved in the regulation of alpha(2)- and beta(1)-subunit expression, was decreased after HFD. ET increased phosphorylation of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase regulatory protein...... phospholemman. Phospholemman mRNA and protein expression were increased after HFD and restored to control levels after ET. Insulin-stimulated translocation of the alpha(2)-subunit to plasma membrane was impaired by HFD, whereas alpha(1)-subunit translocation remained unchanged. Alterations in sodium pump...

  9. A noncoding plant pathogen provokes both transcriptional and posttranscriptional alterations in tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Lisón Párraga, María Purificación; Tarraga Herrero, Susana; López Gresa, Mª Pilar; Sauri Ferrando, Asunción; Torres Vidal, Cristina; Campos Beneyto, Laura; Belles Albert, José Mª; Conejero Tomás, Vicente; Rodrigo Bravo, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    This is the accepted version of the following article: Lisón, P., Tárraga, S., López-Gresa, P., Saurí, A., Torres, C., Campos, L., Bellés, J. M., Conejero, V. and Rodrigo, I. (2013), A noncoding plant pathogen provokes both transcriptional and posttranscriptional alterations in tomato. Proteomics, 13: 833–844, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.201200286.

  10. Mutation of MeCP2 alters transcriptional regulation of select immediate-early genes

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dan; Cha, Young May; West, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-DNA binding protein MeCP2 are associated with neurological dysfunction and impaired neural plasticity. However, the transcriptional changes that underlie these deficits remain poorly understood. Here, we show that mice bearing a C-terminal truncating mutation in Mecp2 (Mecp2308) are hypersensitive to the locomotor stimulating effects of cocaine. Furthermore, these mice have gene-specific alterations in striatal immediate-early gene (IEG) induction foll...

  11. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca2+ interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function

  12. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Yan [Experimental Animal Center, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Sato, Toshinori [Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Yamagata, Sadako [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Yamagata, Tatsuya, E-mail: tcyamagata@gmail.com [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  13. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Berk, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Munkholm K, Vinberg M, Berk M, Kessing LV. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder: a systematic review. Bipolar Disord 2012: 14: 684-696. © 2012 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objective:  Alterations in gene expression in bipolar disorder...... vulnerability pathways. This review therefore evaluated the evidence for whether gene expression in bipolar disorder is state or trait related. Methods:  A systematic review, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline for reporting systematic reviews, based...... on comprehensive database searches for studies on gene expression in patients with bipolar disorder in specific mood states, was conducted. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Library, supplemented by manually searching reference lists from retrieved publications. Results:  A...

  14. Myocardin-related Transcription Factor Regulates Nox4 Protein Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam;

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator of...... translocation of MRTF. Because the Nox4 promoter harbors a serum response factor/MRTF cis-element (CC(A/T)6GG box), we asked if MRTF (and thus cytoskeleton organization) could regulate Nox4 expression. We show that Nox4 protein is robustly induced in kidney tubular cells exclusively by combined application of...... contact uncoupling and TGFβ. Nox4 knockdown abrogates epithelial-myofibroblast transition-associated reactive oxygen species production. Laser capture microdissection reveals increased Nox4 expression in the tubular epithelium also during obstructive nephropathy. MRTF down-regulation/inhibition suppresses...

  15. Altering sensorimotor feedback disrupts visual discrimination of facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Adrienne; Lupyan, Gary; Sherrin, Steven; Niedenthal, Paula

    2016-08-01

    Looking at another person's facial expression of emotion can trigger the same neural processes involved in producing the expression, and such responses play a functional role in emotion recognition. Disrupting individuals' facial action, for example, interferes with verbal emotion recognition tasks. We tested the hypothesis that facial responses also play a functional role in the perceptual processing of emotional expressions. We altered the facial action of participants with a gel facemask while they performed a task that involved distinguishing target expressions from highly similar distractors. Relative to control participants, participants in the facemask condition demonstrated inferior perceptual discrimination of facial expressions, but not of nonface stimuli. The findings suggest that somatosensory/motor processes involving the face contribute to the visual perceptual-and not just conceptual-processing of facial expressions. More broadly, our study contributes to growing evidence for the fundamentally interactive nature of the perceptual inputs from different sensory modalities. PMID:26542827

  16. Mutations that alter the ability of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein to activate transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A; Gaston, K; Williams, R; Chapman, K; Kolb, A; Buc, H; Minchin, S; Williams, J; Busby, S

    1990-12-25

    The effects of a number of mutations in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) have been determined by monitoring the in vivo expression and in vitro open complex formation at two semi-synthetic promoters that are totally CRP-dependent. At one promoter the CRP-binding site is centered around 41.5 base pairs upstream from the transcription start whilst at the other promoter it is 61.5 base pairs upstream. The CRP mutation E171K reduces expression from both promoters whilst H159L renders CRP totally inactive: neither mutation stops CRP binding at either promoter. The mutations K52N and K52Q reverse the effect of H159L and 'reeducate' CRP to activate transcription. CRP carrying both H159L and K52N activates transcription from the promoter with the CRP site at -41.5 better than wild type CRP. In sharp contrast, this doubly changed CRP is totally inactive with respect to the activation of transcription from the promoter carrying the CRP site at -61.5. Our results suggest that CRP can use different contacts and/or conformations during transcription activation at promoters with different architectures. PMID:2259621

  17. Heterologous expression of the transcriptional regulator escargot inhibits megakaryocytic endomitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, A; Frampton, J; Vilaboa, N; Calés, C

    2001-11-16

    Certain cell types escape the strict mechanisms imposed on the majority of somatic cells to ensure the faithful inheritance of parental DNA content. This is the case in many embryonic tissues and certain adult cells such as mammalian hepatocytes and megakaryocytes. Megakaryocytic endomitosis is characterized by repeated S phases followed by abortive mitoses, resulting in mononucleated polyploid cells. Several cell cycle regulators have been proposed to play an active role in megakaryocytic polyploidization; however, little is known about upstream factors that could control endomitosis. Here we show that ectopic expression of the transcriptional repressor escargot interferes with the establishment of megakaryocytic endomitosis. Phorbol ester-induced polyploidization was inhibited in stably transfected megakaryoblastic HEL cells constitutively expressing escargot. Analysis of the expression and activity of different cell cycle factors revealed that Escargot affects the G(1)/S transition by influencing Cdk2 activity and cyclin A transcription. Nuclear proteins that specifically bind the Escargot-binding element were detected in endomitotic and non-endomitotic megakaryoblastic cells, but down-regulation occurred only during differentiation of cells that become polyploid. As Escargot was originally implicated in ploidy maintenance of Drosophila embryonic and larval cells, our results suggest that polyploidization in megakaryocytes might respond to mechanisms conserved from early development to adult cells that need to escape normal control of the diploid state. PMID:11498537

  18. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Gene Expression and Transcriptional Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Enrique Hernández

    2009-12-01

    In recent times whole-genome gene expression analysis has turned out to be a highly important tool to study the coordinated function of a very large number of genes within their corresponding cellular environment, especially in relation to phenotypic diversity and disease. A wide variety of methods of quantitative analysis has been developed to cope with high throughput data sets generated by gene expression profiling experiments. Due to the complexity associated with transcriptomics, especially in the case of gene regulation phenomena, most of these methods are of a probabilistic or statistical nature. Even if these methods have reached a central status in the development of an integrative, systematic understanding of the associated biological processes, they very rarely constitute a concrete guide to the actual physicochemical mechanisms behind biological function, and the role of these methods is more on a hypotheses generating line. An important improvement could lie in the development of a thermodynamic theory for gene expression and transcriptional regulation that will build the foundations for a proper integration of the vast amount of molecular biophysical data and could lead, in the future, to a systemic view of genetic transcription and regulation.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers

  20. Increased expression of AP2 and Sp1 transcription factors in human thyroid tumors: a role in NIS expression regulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) is a key protein in iodide transport by thyroid cells and this activity is a prerequisite for effective radioiodide treatment of thyroid cancer. In the majority of thyroid cancers, however, iodide uptake is reduced, probably as a result of decreased NIS protein expression. To identify the mechanisms that negatively affect NIS expression in thyroid tumors, we performed electrophoresis mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis of nuclear protein extracts from normal and tumoral thyroid tissues from 14 unrelated patients. Two proteins closely related to the transcription factors AP2 and Sp1 were identified in the nuclear extracts. Expression of both AP2 and Sp1 in nuclear extracts from thyroid tumors was significantly higher than that observed in corresponding normal tissues. These observations raise the possibility that NIS expression, and subsequently iodide transport, are reduced in thyroid tumors at least in part owing to alterations in the binding activity of AP2 and Sp1 transcription factors to NIS promoter

  1. Increased expression of AP2 and Sp1 transcription factors in human thyroid tumors: a role in NIS expression regulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlumberger Martin

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium/iodide symporter (NIS is a key protein in iodide transport by thyroid cells and this activity is a prerequisite for effective radioiodide treatment of thyroid cancer. In the majority of thyroid cancers, however, iodide uptake is reduced, probably as a result of decreased NIS protein expression. Methods To identify the mechanisms that negatively affect NIS expression in thyroid tumors, we performed electrophoresis mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis of nuclear protein extracts from normal and tumoral thyroid tissues from 14 unrelated patients. Results Two proteins closely related to the transcription factors AP2 and Sp1 were identified in the nuclear extracts. Expression of both AP2 and Sp1 in nuclear extracts from thyroid tumors was significantly higher than that observed in corresponding normal tissues. Conclusion These observations raise the possibility that NIS expression, and subsequently iodide transport, are reduced in thyroid tumors at least in part owing to alterations in the binding activity of AP2 and Sp1 transcription factors to NIS promoter.

  2. HSF1 transcriptional activity mediates alcohol induction of Vamp2 expression and GABA release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence P. Varodayan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many central synapses are highly sensitive to alcohol, and it is now accepted that short-term alterations in synaptic function may lead to longer term changes in circuit function. The regulation of postsynaptic receptors by alcohol has been well studied, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on the presynaptic terminal are relatively unexplored. To identify a pathway by which alcohol regulates neurotransmitter release, we recently investigated the mechanism by which ethanol induces the Vamp2 gene, but not Vamp1, in mouse primary cortical cultures. These two genes encode isoforms of synaptobrevin, a vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE protein required for synaptic vesicle fusion. We found that alcohol activates the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 to induce Vamp2 gene expression, while Vamp1 mRNA levels remain unaffected. As the Vamp2 gene encodes a SNARE protein, we then investigated whether ethanol exposure and HSF1 transcriptional activity alter neurotransmitter release using electrophysiology. We found that alcohol increased the frequency of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated miniature IPSCs via HSF1, but had no effect on mEPSCs. Overall, these data indicate that alcohol induces HSF1 transcriptional activity to trigger a specific coordinated adaptation in GABAergic presynaptic terminals. This mechanism could explain some of the changes in synaptic function that occur soon after alcohol exposure, and may underlie some of the more enduring effects of chronic alcohol intake on local circuit function.

  3. A weakened transcriptional enhancer yields variegated gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Collins

    Full Text Available Identical genes in the same cellular environment are sometimes expressed differently. In some cases, including the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH locus, this type of differential gene expression has been related to the absence of a transcriptional enhancer. To gain additional information on the role of the IgH enhancer, we examined expression driven by enhancers that were merely weakened, rather than fully deleted, using both mutations and insulators to impair enhancer activity. For this purpose we used a LoxP/Cre system to place a reporter gene at the same genomic site of a stable cell line. Whereas expression of the reporter gene was uniformly high in the presence of the normal, uninsulated enhancer and undetectable in its absence, weakened enhancers yielded variegated expression of the reporter gene; i.e., the average level of expression of the same gene differed in different clones, and expression varied significantly among cells within individual clones. These results indicate that the weakened enhancer allows the reporter gene to exist in at least two states. Subtle aspects of the variegation suggest that the IgH enhancer decreases the average duration (half-life of the silent state. This analysis has also tested the conventional wisdom that enhancer activity is independent of distance and orientation. Thus, our analysis of mutant (truncated forms of the IgH enhancer revealed that the 250 bp core enhancer was active in its normal position, approximately 1.4 kb 3' of the promoter, but inactive approximately 6 kb 3', indicating that the activity of the core enhancer was distance-dependent. A longer segment--the core enhancer plus approximately 1 kb of 3' flanking material, including the 3' matrix attachment region--was active, and the activity of this longer segment was orientation-dependent. Our data suggest that this 3' flank includes binding sites for at least two activators.

  4. Microarray Expression Profiling Identifies Genes with Altered Expression in HDL-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Callow, Matthew J.; Dudoit, Sandrine; Gong, Elaine L.; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the assumption that severe alterations in the expression of genes known to be involved in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism may affect the expression of other genes, we screened an array of >5000 mouse expressed sequence tags for altered gene expression in the livers of two lines of mice with dramatic decreases in HDL plasma concentrations. Labeled cDNA from livers of apolipoprotein AI (apoAI)-knockout mice, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) transgenic mice, and control mice were...

  5. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation. PMID:25216642

  6. Using a cDNA microarray to study cellular gene expression altered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永忠; 谢建平; 李瑶; 乐军; 陈建平; 淳于利娟; 王洪海

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine the global effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection on macrophages. Methods The gene expression profiling of macrophage U937, in response to infection with M.tuberculosis H37Ra, was monitored using a high-density cDNA microarray. Results M.tuberculosis infection caused 463 differentially expressed genes, of which 366 genes are known genes registered in the Gene Bank. These genes function in various cellular processes including intracellular signalling, cytoskeletal rearrangement, apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, cell surface receptors, cell-mediated immunity as well as a variety of cellular metabolic pathways, and may play key roles in M.tuberculosis infection and intracellular survival. Conclusions M.tuberculosis infection alters the expression of host-cell genes, and these genes will provide a foundation for understanding the infection process of M.tuberculosis. The cDNA microarray is a powerful tool for studying pathogen-host cell interaction.

  7. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chi, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Kai; Liu, Ingrid Y.; CHEN, YI-CHENG; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from...

  8. PAH- and PCB-induced Alterations of Protein Tyrosine Kinase and Cytokine Gene Transcription in Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina PBMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. C. Neale

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying in vitro immunomodulatory effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs were investigated in harbor seal peripheral leukocytes, via real-time PCR. We examined the relative genetic expression of the protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs Fyn and Itk, which play a critical role in T cell activation, and IL-2, a cytokine of central importance in initiating adaptive immune responses. IL-1, the macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity, was also included as a measure of macrophage function. Harbor seal PBMC were exposed to the prototypic immunotoxic PAH benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-169, a model immunotoxic PCB, or DMSO (vehicle control. Exposure of Con A-stimulated harbor seal PBMC to both BaP and CB-169 produced significantly altered expression in all four targets relative to vehicle controls. The PTKs Fyn and Itk were both up-regulated following exposure to BaP and CB-169. In contrast, transcripts for IL-2 and IL-1 were decreased relative to controls by both treatments. Our findings are consistent with those of previous researchers working with human and rodent systems and support a hypothesis of contaminant-altered lymphocyte function mediated (at least in part by disruption of T cell receptor (TCR signaling and cytokine production.

  9. Mutations that alter the ability of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein to activate transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, A; Gaston, K; Williams, R.; K. CHAPMAN; Kolb, A; Buc, H; Minchin, S.; Williams, J.; Busby, S

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a number of mutations in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) have been determined by monitoring the in vivo expression and in vitro open complex formation at two semi-synthetic promoters that are totally CRP-dependent. At one promoter the CRP-binding site is centered around 41.5 base pairs upstream from the transcription start whilst at the other promoter it is 61.5 base pairs upstream. The CRP mutation E171K reduces expression from both promoters whilst H159L renders...

  10. Altered chromatin occupancy of master regulators underlies evolutionary divergence in the transcriptional landscape of erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulirsch, Jacob C; Lacy, Jessica N; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2014-12-01

    Erythropoiesis is one of the best understood examples of cellular differentiation. Morphologically, erythroid differentiation proceeds in a nearly identical fashion between humans and mice, but recent evidence has shown that networks of gene expression governing this process are divergent between species. We undertook a systematic comparative analysis of six histone modifications and four transcriptional master regulators in primary proerythroblasts and erythroid cell lines to better understand the underlying basis of these transcriptional differences. Our analyses suggest that while chromatin structure across orthologous promoters is strongly conserved, subtle differences are associated with transcriptional divergence between species. Many transcription factor (TF) occupancy sites were poorly conserved across species (∼25% for GATA1, TAL1, and NFE2) but were more conserved between proerythroblasts and cell lines derived from the same species. We found that certain cis-regulatory modules co-occupied by GATA1, TAL1, and KLF1 are under strict evolutionary constraint and localize to genes necessary for erythroid cell identity. More generally, we show that conserved TF occupancy sites are indicative of active regulatory regions and strong gene expression that is sustained during maturation. Our results suggest that evolutionary turnover of TF binding sites associates with changes in the underlying chromatin structure, driving transcriptional divergence. We provide examples of how this framework can be applied to understand epigenomic variation in specific regulatory regions, such as the β-globin gene locus. Our findings have important implications for understanding epigenomic changes that mediate variation in cellular differentiation across species, while also providing a valuable resource for studies of hematopoiesis. PMID:25521328

  11. The Role of H3K4me3 in Transcriptional Regulation Is Altered in Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjun Dong

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder resulting from expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Previous studies have shown mutant HTT can alter expression of genes associated with dysregulated epigenetic modifications. One of the most widely studied chromatin modifications is trimethylated lysine 4 of histone 3 (H3K4me3. Here, we conducted the first comprehensive study of H3K4me3 ChIP-sequencing in neuronal chromatin from the prefrontal cortex of six HD cases and six non-neurologic controls, and its association with gene expression measured by RNA-sequencing. We detected 2,830 differentially enriched H3K4me3 peaks between HD and controls, with 55% of them down-regulated in HD. Although H3K4me3 signals are expected to be associated with mRNA levels, we found an unexpected discordance between altered H3K4me3 peaks and mRNA levels. Gene ontology (GO term enrichment analysis of the genes with differential H3K4me3 peaks, revealed statistically significantly enriched GO terms only in the genes with down-regulated signals in HD. The most frequently implicated biological process terms are organ morphogenesis and positive regulation of gene expression. More than 9,000 H3K4me3 peaks were located not near any recognized transcription start sites and approximately 36% of these "distal" peaks co-localized to known enhancer sites. Six transcription factors and chromatin remodelers are differentially enriched in HD H3K4me3 distal peaks, including EZH2 and SUZ12, two core subunits of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2. Moreover, PRC2 repressive state was significantly depleted in HD-enriched peaks, suggesting the epigenetic role of PRC2 inhibition associated with up-regulated H3K4me3 in Huntington's disease. In summary, our study provides new insights into transcriptional dysregulation of Huntington's disease by analyzing the differentiation of H3K4me3 enrichment.

  12. The Role of H3K4me3 in Transcriptional Regulation Is Altered in Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labadorf, Adam; Roussos, Panos; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Myers, Richard H.; Akbarian, Schahram; Weng, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder resulting from expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Previous studies have shown mutant HTT can alter expression of genes associated with dysregulated epigenetic modifications. One of the most widely studied chromatin modifications is trimethylated lysine 4 of histone 3 (H3K4me3). Here, we conducted the first comprehensive study of H3K4me3 ChIP-sequencing in neuronal chromatin from the prefrontal cortex of six HD cases and six non-neurologic controls, and its association with gene expression measured by RNA-sequencing. We detected 2,830 differentially enriched H3K4me3 peaks between HD and controls, with 55% of them down-regulated in HD. Although H3K4me3 signals are expected to be associated with mRNA levels, we found an unexpected discordance between altered H3K4me3 peaks and mRNA levels. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis of the genes with differential H3K4me3 peaks, revealed statistically significantly enriched GO terms only in the genes with down-regulated signals in HD. The most frequently implicated biological process terms are organ morphogenesis and positive regulation of gene expression. More than 9,000 H3K4me3 peaks were located not near any recognized transcription start sites and approximately 36% of these “distal” peaks co-localized to known enhancer sites. Six transcription factors and chromatin remodelers are differentially enriched in HD H3K4me3 distal peaks, including EZH2 and SUZ12, two core subunits of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Moreover, PRC2 repressive state was significantly depleted in HD-enriched peaks, suggesting the epigenetic role of PRC2 inhibition associated with up-regulated H3K4me3 in Huntington’s disease. In summary, our study provides new insights into transcriptional dysregulation of Huntington’s disease by analyzing the differentiation of H3K4me3 enrichment. PMID:26636336

  13. Mutant p53 uses p63 as a molecular chaperone to alter gene expression and induce a pro-invasive secretome

    OpenAIRE

    Paul M. Neilsen; Noll, Jacqueline E.; Suetani, Rachel J; Schulz, Renee B.; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Evdokiou, Andreas; Lane, David P; David F. Callen

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene commonly result in the expression of a full-length protein that drives cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Herein, we have deciphered the global landscape of transcriptional regulation by mutant p53 through the application of a panel of isogenic H1299 derivatives with inducible expression of several common cancer-associated p53 mutants. We found that the ability of mutant p53 to alter the transcriptional profile of cancer cells is remarkably conserved across differ...

  14. Gene Expression Profiles are Altered in Human Papillomavirus-16 E6 D25E-Expressing Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Dai-Ho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have reported that the human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 E6 D25E is the most prevalent variant in Korean women at high risk for cervical cancers. Several studies have identified an association between the increased frequency of this variant and the elevated risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma. To investigate whether the HPV-16 E6 D25E variant might influence cervical cancer progression, we used an oligonucleotide microarray approach to identify transcriptionally altered gene expression patterns in recombinant wild-type E6 or E6 D25E variant-expressing HPV-negative cancer cells. We found that 211 genes were significantly up- or down-regulated (at least 1.5-fold, p

  15. Mitral valve prolapse is associated with altered extracellular matrix gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, David G; Murphy, Alison; Mignatti, Paolo; Zavadil, Jiri; Galloway, Aubrey C; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-07-15

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the leading indication for isolated mitral valve surgery in the United States. Disorganization of collagens and glycosaminoglycans in the valvular extracellular matrix (ECM) are histological hallmarks of MVP. We performed a transcriptome analysis to study the alterations in ECM-related gene expression in humans with sporadic MVP. Mitral valve specimens were obtained from individuals undergoing valve repair for MVP (n=7 patients) and from non-beating heart-tissue donors (n=3 controls). Purified RNA was subjected to whole-transcriptome microarray analysis. Microarray results were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Gene ontology enrichment analysis was performed. 2046 unique genes showed significant differential expression (false discovery rate Functional annotation clustering calculated enrichment of ECM-related ontology groups (enrichment score=4.1). ECM-related gene expression is significantly altered in MVP. Our study is consistent with the histologically observed alterations in collagen and mucopolysaccharide profiles of myxomatous mitral valves. Furthermore, whole-transcriptome analyses suggest dysregulation of multiple pathways, including TGF-beta signaling. PMID:27063507

  16. HIV-1 Alters Intestinal Expression of Drug Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Implications for Antiretroviral Drug Disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Olena; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hoque, M Tozammel; Walmsley, Sharon L; Dandekar, Satya; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the expression of intestinal drug efflux transporters, i.e., P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs), in the human upper intestinal tract. Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from HIV-negative healthy volunteers, ART-naive HIV-positive (HIV(+)) subjects, and HIV(+) subjects receiving ART (10 in each group). Intestinal tissue expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was examined by microarray, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry analyses. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly lower expression of CYP3A4 and ABCC2/MRP2 in the HIV(+) ART-naive group than in uninfected subjects. qPCR analysis confirmed significantly lower expression of ABCC2/MRP2 in ART-naive subjects than in the control group, while CYP3A4 and ABCG2/BCRP showed a trend toward decreased expression. Protein expression of MRP2 and BCRP was also significantly lower in the HIV(+) naive group than in the control group and was partially restored to baseline levels in HIV(+) subjects receiving ART. In contrast, gene and protein expression of ABCB1/Pgp was significantly increased in HIV(+) subjects on ART relative to HIV(+) ART-naive subjects. These data demonstrate that the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters is significantly altered in therapy-naive HIV(+) subjects and in those receiving ART. Since CYP3A4, Pgp, MRPs, and BCRP metabolize or transport many antiretroviral drugs, their altered expression with HIV infection may negatively impact drug pharmacokinetics in HIV(+) subjects. This has clinical implications when using data from healthy volunteers to guide ART. PMID:26902756

  17. Real-time transcriptional profiling of cellular and viral gene expression during lytic cytomegalovirus infection.

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    Lisa Marcinowski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During viral infections cellular gene expression is subject to rapid alterations induced by both viral and antiviral mechanisms. In this study, we applied metabolic labeling of newly transcribed RNA with 4-thiouridine (4sU-tagging to dissect the real-time kinetics of cellular and viral transcriptional activity during lytic murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection. Microarray profiling on newly transcribed RNA obtained at different times during the first six hours of MCMV infection revealed discrete functional clusters of cellular genes regulated with distinct kinetics at surprising temporal resolution. Immediately upon virus entry, a cluster of NF-κB- and interferon-regulated genes was induced. Rapid viral counter-regulation of this coincided with a very transient DNA-damage response, followed by a delayed ER-stress response. Rapid counter-regulation of all three clusters indicated the involvement of novel viral regulators targeting these pathways. In addition, down-regulation of two clusters involved in cell-differentiation (rapid repression and cell-cycle (delayed repression was observed. Promoter analysis revealed all five clusters to be associated with distinct transcription factors, of which NF-κB and c-Myc were validated to precisely match the respective transcriptional changes observed in newly transcribed RNA. 4sU-tagging also allowed us to study the real-time kinetics of viral gene expression in the absence of any interfering virion-associated-RNA. Both qRT-PCR and next-generation sequencing demonstrated a sharp peak of viral gene expression during the first two hours of infection including transcription of immediate-early, early and even well characterized late genes. Interestingly, this was subject to rapid gene silencing by 5-6 hours post infection. Despite the rapid increase in viral DNA load during viral DNA replication, transcriptional activity of some viral genes remained remarkably constant until late-stage infection, or was

  18. Transcriptional profiling of cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense highlights gene expression signatures underlying trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility

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    Naessens Jan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT caused by tsetse fly-transmitted protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma is a major constraint on livestock and agricultural production in Africa and is among the top ten global cattle diseases impacting on the poor. Here we show that a functional genomics approach can be used to identify temporal changes in host peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC gene expression due to disease progression. We also show that major gene expression differences exist between cattle from trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible breeds. Using bovine long oligonucleotide microarrays and real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR validation we analysed PBMC gene expression in naïve trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible cattle experimentally challenged with Trypanosoma congolense across a 34-day infection time course. Results Trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle displayed a rapid and distinct transcriptional response to infection, with a ten-fold higher number of genes differentially expressed at day 14 post-infection compared to trypanosusceptible Boran cattle. These analyses identified coordinated temporal gene expression changes for both breeds in response to trypanosome infection. In addition, a panel of genes were identified that showed pronounced differences in gene expression between the two breeds, which may underlie the phenomena of trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility. Gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrate that the products of these genes may contribute to increased mitochondrial mRNA translational efficiency, a more pronounced B cell response, an elevated activation status and a heightened response to stress in trypanotolerant cattle. Conclusion This study has revealed an extensive and diverse range of cellular processes that are altered temporally in response to trypanosome infection in African cattle. Results indicate that the trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle respond more rapidly and with a

  19. Niacin in pharmacological doses alters microRNA expression in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats.

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    Aline Couturier

    Full Text Available Administration of pharmacological niacin doses was recently reported to have pronounced effects on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats, with the molecular mechanisms underlying the alteration of gene expression being completely unknown. Since miRNAs have been shown to play a critical role for gene expression through inducing miRNA-mRNA interactions which results in the degradation of specific mRNAs or the repression of protein translation, we herein aimed to investigate the influence of niacin at pharmacological doses on the miRNA expression profile in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet for 4 wk. miRNA microarray analysis revealed that 42 out of a total of 259 miRNAs were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05, 20 being down-regulated and 22 being up-regulated, between the niacin group and the control group. Using a biostatistics approach, we could demonstrate that the most strongly up-regulated (log2 ratio ≥0.5 and down-regulated (log2 ratio ≤-0.5 miRNAs target approximately 1,800 mRNAs. Gene-term enrichment analysis showed that many of the predicted target mRNAs from the most strongly regulated miRNAs were involved in molecular processes dealing with gene transcription such as DNA binding, transcription regulator activity, transcription factor binding and in important regulatory pathways such as Wnt signaling and MAPK signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that pharmacological niacin doses alter the expression of miRNAs in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats and that the niacin-regulated miRNAs target a large set of genes and pathways which are involved in gene regulatory activity indicating that at least some of the recently reported effects of niacin on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats are mediated through

  20. Transcriptional regulation of bone sialoprotein gene expression by Osx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Huang, Yehong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chi

    2016-08-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. It is due to unbalance between bone formation and bone resorption. Bone formation is a complex process which involves the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. Osteoblasts produce a characteristic extracellular collagenous matrix that subsequently becomes mineralized. Osterix (Osx) is an osteoblast-specific transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation. Bone sialoprotein (Bsp) is a member of the SIBLING gene family. Expression of Bsp correlates with the differentiation of osteoblasts and the onset of mineralization. Our preliminary data showed that Bsp was abolished in Osx-null mice; however, the detailed mechanism of Osx regulation on Bsp is not fully understood. In this study, regulation of Bsp expression by Osx was further characterized. It was shown that overexpression of Osx led to Bsp upregulation. Inhibition of Osx by small interfering RNA resulted in Bsp downregulation in osteoblast. Transfection assay demonstrated that Osx was able to activate Bsp promoter reporter in a dose-dependent manner. To define minimal region of Bsp promoter activated by Osx, a series of deletion mutants of Bsp promoter were generated, and the minimal region was narrowed down to the proximal 100 bp. Point-mutagenesis studies showed that one GC-rich site was required for Bsp promoter activation by Osx. ChIP assays demonstrated that endogenous Osx associated with native Bsp promoter in primary osteoblasts. Our observations provide evidence that Osx targets Bsp expression directly. PMID:27261434

  1. Altered melanocyte differentiation and retinal pigmented epithelium transdifferentiation induced by Mash1 expression in pigment cell precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, Jessica L; Wallace, Jaclyn S; Zhang, Deming; Diwakar, Ganesh; Jiao, Zhongxian; Hornyak, Thomas J

    2005-10-01

    Transcription factor genes governing pigment cell development that are associated with spotting mutations in mice include members of several structural transcription factor classes but not members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class, important for neurogenesis and myogenesis. To determine the effects of bHLH factor expression on pigment cell development, the neurogenic bHLH factor Mash1 was expressed early in pigment cell development in transgenic mice from the dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) promoter. Dct:Mash1 transgenic founders exhibit variable microphthalmia and patchy coat color hypopigmentation. Transgenic F1 mice exhibit microphthalmia with complete coat color dilution. Marker analysis demonstrates that Mash1 expression in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) initiates neurogenesis in this cell layer, whereas expression in remaining neural crest-derived melanocytes alters their differentiation, in part by profoundly downregulating expression of the p (pink-eyed dilution) gene, while maintaining their cell fate. The effects of transcriptional perturbation of pigment cell precursors by Mash1 further highlight differences between pigment cells of distinct developmental origins, and suggest a mechanism for the alteration of melanogenesis to result in marked coat color dilution. PMID:16185282

  2. Identification and expression analysis of heat shock transcription factors in the wild Chinese grapevine (Vitis pseudoreticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Han, Yong-Tao; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Feng-Li; Li, Ya-Juan; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Yue-Jin; Wen, Ying-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) are known to play pivotal roles in the adaptation of plants to heat stress and other stress stimuli. While grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is one of the most important fruit crops worldwide, little is known about the Hsf family in Vitis spp. Here, we identified nineteen putative Hsf genes (VviHsfs) in Vitis spp based on the 12 × grape genome (V. vinifera L.). Phylogenetic analysis revealed three classes of grape Hsf genes (classes A, B, and C). Additional comparisons between grape and Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated that several VviHsfs genes occurred in corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis. Moreover, we examined the expression profiles of the homologs of the VviHsfs genes (VpHsfs) in the wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata accession Baihe-35-1, which is tolerant to various environmental stresses. Among the nineteen VpHsfs, ten VpHsfs displayed lower transcript levels under non-stress conditions and marked up-regulation during heat stress treatment; several VpHsfs also displayed altered expression levels in response to cold, salt, and hormone treatments, suggesting their versatile roles in response to stress stimuli. In addition, eight VpHsf-GFP fusion proteins showed differential subcellular localization in V. pseudoreticulata mesophyll protoplasts. Taken together, our data may provide an important reference for further studies of Hsf genes in Vitis spp. PMID:26689772

  3. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of key genes involved in fracture healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, N. Patrick; Androjna, Caroline; Hill, Esther; Globus, Ruth K.; Midura, Ronald J.

    2013-11-01

    Fracture healing in animal models has been shown to be altered in both ground based analogs of spaceflight and in those exposed to actual spaceflight. The molecular mechanisms behind altered fracture healing as a result of chronic exposure to microgravity remain to be elucidated. This study investigates temporal gene expression of multiple factors involved in secondary fracture healing, specifically those integral to the development of a soft tissue callus and the transition to that of hard tissue. Skeletally mature female rats were subjected to a 4 week period of simulated microgravity and then underwent a closed femoral fracture procedure. Thereafter, they were reintroduced to the microgravity and allowed to heal for a 1 or 2 week period. A synchronous group of weight bearing rats was used as a normal fracture healing control. Utilizing Real-Time quantitative PCR on mRNA from fracture callus tissue, we found significant reductions in the levels of transcripts associated with angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. These data suggest an altered fracture healing process in a simulated microgravity environment, and these alterations begin early in the healing process. These findings may provide mechanistic insight towards developing countermeasure protocols to mitigate these adaptations.

  4. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of eEF1A2 expression during myoblast diffrerentiation

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    Vislovukh A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal development, the switch of the expression from isoform A1 to the isoform A2 of eukaryotic translation elongation factor (eEF1A is observed in neuronal and muscle tissues. The switch of the expression is a vital fundamental process, as mutant mice, with the partial EEF1A2 deletion dies on the 28th day after birth. Mechanism of the inhibition of A1 and stimulation of A2 expression during the first days of postnatal development is unknown. The existence of potential miRNA binding sites in the 3’UTR of mRNAs encoding the isoforms assumes a post-transcriptional control of abovementioned phenomenon. Aim. To check the possibility of post-transcriptional regulation of the isoforms A1 and A2 expression during differentiation of the human immortalized myoblasts cell line LHCN. Methods. The level of gene expression was quantified by qPCR, the existence of post-transcriptional regulation was demonstrated with Dual-Luciferase® Reporter Assay. Results. Using immortalized human myoblasts cell line LHCN, the induction of isoform A2 of eEF1 during differentiation of myoblasts was shown. The existence of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of the abovementioned process was confirmed. Downregulation of mir-661 and mir-744 that have binding sites in the 3’ UTR of EEF1A2 mRNA, during differentiation suggests a potential role of microRNAs in the eEF1A2 induction during myoblast differentiation. Conclusions. Induction of A2 isoform of eEF1 during differentiation of myoblasts occurs on transcriptional and post-transcriptional level.

  5. Transcription profiling reveals stage- and function-dependent expression patterns in the filarial nematode Brugia malayi

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    Li Ben-Wen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brugia malayi is a nematode parasite that causes lymphatic filariasis, a disfiguring and disabiling tropical disease. Although a first draft genome sequence was released in 2007, very little is understood about transcription programs that govern developmental changes required for the parasite’s development and survival in its mammalian and insect hosts. Results We used a microarray with probes that represent some 85% of predicted genes to generate gene expression profiles for seven parasite life cycle stages/sexes. Approximately 41% of transcripts with detectable expression signals were differentially expressed across lifecycle stages. Twenty-six percent of transcripts were exclusively expressed in a single parasite stage, and 27% were expressed in all stages studied. K-means clustering of differentially expressed transcripts revealed five major transcription patterns that were associated with parasite lifecycle stages or gender. Examination of known stage-associated transcripts validated these data sets and suggested that newly identified stage or gender-associated transcripts may exercise biological functions in development and reproduction. The results also indicate that genes with similar transcription patterns were often involved in similar functions or cellular processes. For example, nuclear receptor family gene transcripts were upregulated in gene expression pattern four (female-enriched while protein kinase gene family transcripts were upregulated in expression pattern five (male-enriched. We also used pair-wise comparisons to identify transcriptional changes between life cycle stages and sexes. Conclusions Analysis of gene expression patterns of lifecycle in B. malayi has provided novel insights into the biology of filarial parasites. Proteins encoded by stage-associated and/or stage-specific transcripts are likely to be critically important for key parasite functions such as establishment and maintenance of

  6. Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is associated with an altered temporal pattern of transcription

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    Newton Paul N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria has emerged in Western Cambodia. This is a major threat to global plans to control and eliminate malaria as the artemisinins are a key component of antimalarial treatment throughout the world. To identify key features associated with the delayed parasite clearance phenotype, we employed DNA microarrays to profile the physiological gene expression pattern of the resistant isolates. Results In the ring and trophozoite stages, we observed reduced expression of many basic metabolic and cellular pathways which suggests a slower growth and maturation of these parasites during the first half of the asexual intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC. In the schizont stage, there is an increased expression of essentially all functionalities associated with protein metabolism which indicates the prolonged and thus increased capacity of protein synthesis during the second half of the resistant parasite IDC. This modulation of the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic transcriptome may result from differential expression of regulatory proteins such as transcription factors or chromatin remodeling associated proteins. In addition, there is a unique and uniform copy number variation pattern in the Cambodian parasites which may represent an underlying genetic background that contributes to the resistance phenotype. Conclusions The decreased metabolic activities in the ring stages are consistent with previous suggestions of higher resilience of the early developmental stages to artemisinin. Moreover, the increased capacity of protein synthesis and protein turnover in the schizont stage may contribute to artemisinin resistance by counteracting the protein damage caused by the oxidative stress and/or protein alkylation effect of this drug. This study reports the first global transcriptional survey of artemisinin resistant parasites and provides insight to the complexities of the molecular basis

  7. Abacavir alters the transcription of inflammatory cytokines in virologically suppressed, HIV-infected women

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    Roger L Shapiro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abacavir (ABC may be associated with a small, increased risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected adults, possibly related to cytokine-mediated inflammation. Methods: To evaluate the induction of inflammatory cytokine transcription by ABC, we used samples from women randomized to receive zidovudine/lamivudine/ABC (Trizivir or lopinavir/ritonavir and zidovudine/lamividine (Kaletra/Combivir from the third trimester through six-months postpartum for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT. Women were matched by CD4 count and baseline HIV RNA. All women attained viral suppression (<50 copies/ml by the time of sampling. Results: Four cytokines showed a difference in expression between the treatment arms, all in a proinflammatory direction for the ABC arm: CD40LG 1.82-fold, (p=.027; IL-8 3.16-fold (p=.020; LTA 2.82-fold, (p=.008; and CCL5 −1.67-fold, (p=.035. At 12-months postpartum, 6-months after antiretroviral discontinuation, cytokine expression was similar by treatment arm. Conclusions: We conclude that ABC may upregulate proinflammatory cytokines at the transcriptional level in this population.

  8. A post-transcriptional mechanism regulates calpastatin expression in bovine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattrass, G S; Cafe, L M; McIntyre, B L; Gardner, G E; McGilchrist, P; Robinson, D L; Wang, Y H; Pethick, D W; Greenwood, P L

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the calpain 1 (CAPN1), calpain 3 (CAPN3) and calpastatin (CAST) genes, which have been shown to be associated with shear force and tenderness differences in the skeletal muscle of cattle, contribute to phenotypic variation in muscle tenderness by modulating the transcriptional activity of their respective gene. The mRNA expression of the calpain and CAST genes was assessed in the longissimus lumborum muscle (LLM) of cattle from two herds located in distinct production zones on the east (New South Wales, NSW) and west (Western Australia, WA) of Australia. The cattle in the herds were mainly Brahman cattle (Bos indicus) with smaller populations of Angus cattle (Bos taurus). There were 191 steers in the WA herd and 107 steers and 106 heifers in the NSW herd. These herds were established by choosing cattle from the diverse population which had different single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes at the CAPN1, CAPN3 and CAST loci. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), the transcriptional activities of the CAPN1 and the CAST genes, but not the CAPN3 gene, were found to differ between favorable, positively associated with tenderness, and unfavorable, negatively associated with tenderness, allelic variants of these genes. These findings suggest that the muscle shear force and consumer taste panel differences in tenderness explained by the CAPN1 and CAST gene markers are a consequence of alterations in their mRNA levels, which may ultimately influence the protein activity of these genes, thereby altering the rate and(or) the extent of postmortem proteolysis in skeletal muscle. Of particular importance were the significantly lower type II and type III CAST 5' splice variant mRNA levels that were detected in the LLM muscle of Brahman and Angus cattle with 2 favourable alleles of the CAST:c.2832A > G polymorphism. Moreover, a reduction in

  9. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  10. Alterations in Muscle Mass and Contractile Phenotype in Response to Unloading Models: Role of Transcriptional/Pretranslational Mechanisms

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    Kenneth M Baldwin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest organ system in mammalian organisms providing postural control and movement patterns of varying intensity. Through evolution, skeletal muscle fibers have evolved into three phenotype clusters defined as a muscle unit which consists of all muscle fibers innervated by a single motoneuron linking varying numbers of fibers of similar phenotype. This fundamental organization of the motor unit reflects the fact that there is a remarkable interdependence of gene regulation between the motoneurons and the muscle mainly via activity-dependent mechanisms. These fiber types can be classified via the primary type of myosin heavy chain (MHC gene expressed in the motor unit. Four MHC gene encoded proteins have been identified in striated muscle: slow type I MHC and three fast MHC types, IIa, IIx, and IIb. These MHCs dictate the intrinsic contraction speed of the myofiber with the type I generating the slowest and IIb the fastest contractile speed. Over the last ~35 years, a large body of knowledge suggests that altered loading state cause both fiber atrophy/wasting and a slow to fast shift in the contractile phenotype in the target muscle(s. Hence, this review will examine findings from three different animal models of unloading: 1 space flight (SF, i.e., microgravity; 2 hindlimb suspension (HS, a procedure that chronically eliminates weight bearing of the lower limbs; and 3 spinal cord isolation (SI, a surgical procedure that eliminates neural activation of the motoneurons and associated muscles while maintaining neurotrophic motoneuron-muscle connectivity. The collective findings demonstrate: 1 all three models show a similar pattern of fiber atrophy with differences mainly in the magnitude and kinetics of alteration; 2 transcriptional/pretranslational processes play a major role in both the atrophy process and phenotype shifts; and 3 signaling pathways impacting these alterations appear to be similar in each of the models

  11. Altered microRNA expression following sciatic nerve resection in dorsal root ganglia of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Yu; Songlin Zhou; Tianmei Qian; Yongjun Wang; Fei Ding; Xiaosong Gu

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small,non-coding RNAs (~22 nucleotides) that negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally,either through translational inhibition or degradation of target mRNAs.We uncovered a previously unknown alteration in the expression of miRNAs in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) at 1,4,7,and 14 days after resection of the sciatic nerve in rats using microarray analysis.Thirty-two significantly upregulated and 18 downregulated miRNAs were identified in the DRG at four time points following sciatic nerve injury.The expression of four consecutively deregulated miRNAs,analyzed by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction,was in agreement with the microarray data (upregulated: miR-21,miR-221; downregulated:miR-500,miR-551b),The potential targets for these miRNAs,altered after sciatic nerve resection,are involved mainly in nervous system development,multi-cellular organismal development,and the regulation of cellular processes.This study demonstrated a different involvement of miRNAs in the DRG after resection of the sciatic nerve in a rat model,and it may also contribute in illustrating the molecular mechanisms responsible for nerve regeneration.

  12. Highly expressed genes are associated with inverse antisense transcription in mouse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andras Györffy; Pawel Surowiak; Zsolt Tulassay; Balazs Györffy

    2007-08-01

    There is a growing evidence, that antisense transcription might have a key role in a range of human diseases. Although predefined sense–antisense pairs were extensively studied, the antisense expression of the known sense genes is rarely investigated. We retrieved and correlated the expression of sense and antisense sequences of 1182 mouse transcripts to assess the prevalence and to find the characteristic pattern of antisense transcription. We contrasted three Affymetrix MGU74A version 1 mouse genome chips to six MGU74A version 2 chips. For these 1182 transcripts, the version 1 chips contain the antisense sequences of the transcripts presented on the version 2 chips. The original data was taken from the GEO database (GDS431 and GDS432). As the Affymetrix data are semiquantitative, the relative expression levels of antisense partners were analysed. We detected antisense transcription, although the average antisense expression is shifted towards smaller expression values (MGU74A version 1, 516; version 2, 1688). An inverse direct correlation between sense and antisense expression values could be observed at high expression values. At a very high relative expression—above 40,000—the Pearson correlation coefficient is getting closer to −1. Transcripts with high inverse expression ratio may be correlated to the investigated gene (major histocompatibility complex class II trans activator). The ratio of sense to antisense transcripts varied among different chromosomes; on chromosomes 14 and 1 the level of antisense expression was higher than that of sense. We conclude that antisense transcription is a common phenomenon in the mouse genome. The hypothesis of regulatory role of antisense transcripts is supported by the inverse antisense gene expression of highly expressed genes.

  13. Control of gene expression during T cell activation: alternate regulation of mRNA transcription and mRNA stability

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    Gorospe Myriam

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. The effective correlation of observed changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements remains difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Results In order to investigate the relative contribution of gene transcription and changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression, we used two distinct microarray methods which individually measure nuclear gene transcription and changes in polyA mRNA gene expression. Gene expression profiles were obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin. Comparative analysis revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in polyA mRNA in this system, as inferred by the absence of any corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for these groups of genes. Genes which displayed dramatic elevations in both mRNA and nuclear run-on RNA were shown to be inhibited by Actinomycin D (ActD pre-treatment of cells while large numbers of genes regulated only through altered mRNA turnover (both up and down were ActD-resistant. Consistent patterns across the time course were observed for both transcribed and stability-regulated genes. Conclusion We propose that regulation of mRNA stability contributes significantly to the observed changes in gene expression in response to external stimuli, as measured by high throughput systems.

  14. Extensive evolutionary changes in regulatory element activity during human origins are associated with altered gene expression and positive selection.

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    Yoichiro Shibata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis for phenotypic differences between humans and other primates remains an outstanding challenge. Mutations in non-coding regulatory DNA that alter gene expression have been hypothesized as a key driver of these phenotypic differences. This has been supported by differential gene expression analyses in general, but not by the identification of specific regulatory elements responsible for changes in transcription and phenotype. To identify the genetic source of regulatory differences, we mapped DNaseI hypersensitive (DHS sites, which mark all types of active gene regulatory elements, genome-wide in the same cell type isolated from human, chimpanzee, and macaque. Most DHS sites were conserved among all three species, as expected based on their central role in regulating transcription. However, we found evidence that several hundred DHS sites were gained or lost on the lineages leading to modern human and chimpanzee. Species-specific DHS site gains are enriched near differentially expressed genes, are positively correlated with increased transcription, show evidence of branch-specific positive selection, and overlap with active chromatin marks. Species-specific sequence differences in transcription factor motifs found within these DHS sites are linked with species-specific changes in chromatin accessibility. Together, these indicate that the regulatory elements identified here are genetic contributors to transcriptional and phenotypic differences among primate species.

  15. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  16. Verticillium dahliae alters Pseudomonas spp. populations and HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoste, Nadine J; Gadkar, Vijay J; Filion, Martin

    2010-11-01

    The production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) by beneficial root-associated bacteria is an important mechanism for the biological control of plant pathogens. However, little is known about the biotic factors affecting HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of plants. In this study, real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to investigate the effect of the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae on hcnC (encoding for HCN biosynthesis) gene expression in Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. Strawberry plants were inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 and (or) V. dahliae and grown in pots filled with nonsterilized field soil. RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil sampled at 0, 15, 30, and 45 days following inoculation with V. dahliae and used for qRT-PCR analyses. Populations of V. dahliae and Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 were also monitored using a culture-independent qPCR approach. hcnC expression was detected at all sampling dates. The presence of V. dahliae had a significant stimulation effect on hcnC gene expression and also increased the population of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. However, the V. dahliae population was not altered by the presence of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effect of a plant pathogen on HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere soil. PMID:21076481

  17. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  18. The expression of ELK transcription factors in adult DRG: novel isoforms, antisense transcripts and upregulation by nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Niall; Pintzas, Alexander; Holmes, Fiona; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Pope, Robert; Wallace, Mark; Wasylyk, Christine; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Wynick, David

    2010-01-01

    ELK transcription factors are expressed in brain, but it is unknown whether they are expressed in the peripheral nervous system. We show by RT-PCR that the previously described Elk1, Elk3/Elk3b/Elk3c and Elk4 mRNAs are expressed in adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG), together with the novel alternatively spliced isoforms Elk1b, Elk3d and Elk4c/Elk4d/Elk4e. These isoforms are also expressed in brain, heart, kidney and testis. In contrast to Elk3 protein, the novel Elk3d isoform is cytoplasmic, fa...

  19. Phloem-specific expression of a melon Aux/IAA in tomato plants alters auxin sensitivity and plant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eGolan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phloem sap contains a large repertoire of macromolecules in addition to sugars, amino acids, growth substances and ions. The transcription profile of melon phloem sap contains over 1,000 mRNA molecules, most of them associated with signal transduction, transcriptional control, and stress and defense responses. Heterografting experiments have established the long-distance trafficking of numerous mRNA molecules. Interestingly, several trafficking transcripts are involved in the auxin response, including two molecules coding for auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA. To further explore the biological role of the melon Aux/IAA transcript CmF-308 in the vascular tissue, a cassette containing the coding sequence of this gene under a phloem-specific promoter was introduced into tomato plants. The number of lateral roots was significantly higher in transgenic plants expressing CmF-308 under the AtSUC2 promoter than in controls. A similar effect on root development was obtained after transient expression of CmF-308 in source leaves of N. benthamiana plants. An auxin-response assay showed that CmF-308-transgenic roots are more sensitive to auxin than control roots. In addition to the altered root development, phloem-specific expression of CmF-308 resulted in shorter plants, a higher number of lateral shoots and delayed flowering, a phenotype resembling reduced apical dominance. In contrast to the root response, cotyledons of the transgenic plants were less sensitive to auxin than control cotyledons. The reduced auxin sensitivity in the shoot tissue was confirmed by lower relative expression of several Aux/IAA genes in leaves and an increase in the relative expression of a cytokinin-response regulator, TRR8/9b. The accumulated data suggest that expression of Aux/IAA in the phloem modifies auxin sensitivity in a tissue-specific manner, thereby altering plant development.

  20. Ketamine influences CLOCK:BMAL1 function leading to altered circadian gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina M Bellet

    Full Text Available Major mood disorders have been linked to abnormalities in circadian rhythms, leading to disturbances in sleep, mood, temperature, and hormonal levels. We provide evidence that ketamine, a drug with rapid antidepressant effects, influences the function of the circadian molecular machinery. Ketamine modulates CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation when these regulators are ectopically expressed in NG108-15 neuronal cells. Inhibition occurs in a dose-dependent manner and is attenuated after treatment with the GSK3β antagonist SB21673. We analyzed the effect of ketamine on circadian gene expression and observed a dose-dependent reduction in the amplitude of circadian transcription of the Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 genes. Finally, chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that ketamine altered the recruitment of the CLOCK:BMAL1 complex on circadian promoters in a time-dependent manner. Our results reveal a yet unsuspected molecular mode of action of ketamine and thereby may suggest possible pharmacological antidepressant strategies.

  1. Effects of chronic expression of the HIV-induced protein, transactivator of transcription, on circadian activity rhythms in mice, with or without morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Marilyn J.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Conner, Clayton; Knapp, Pamela E.; Xu, Ruquiang; Nath, Avindra; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection exhibit changes in sleep patterns, motor disorders, and cognitive dysfunction; these symptoms may be secondary to circadian rhythm abnormalities. Studies in mice have shown that intracerebral injection of an HIV protein, transactivator of transcription (Tat), alters the timing of circadian rhythms in a manner similar to light. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that chronic Tat expression alters circadian rhythms, especially their en...

  2. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  3. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gia-Ming [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Present address: The University of Chicago, Section of Hematology/Oncology, 900 E. 57th Street, Room 7134, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  4. Transgenic poplar expressing the pine GS1a show alterations in nitrogen homeostasis during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Rueda, Juan Jesús; Kirby, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    Transgenic hybrid poplars engineered to express ectopically the heterologous pine cytosolic GS1a display a number of significant pleiotropic phenotypes including enhanced growth, enhanced nitrogen use efficiency, and resistance to drought stress. The present study was undertaken in order to assess mechanisms whereby ectopic expression of pine GS1a in transgenic poplars results in enhanced agronomic phenotypes. Microarray analysis using the Agilent Populus whole genome array has allowed identification of genes differentially expressed between wild type (WT) and GS transgenics in four tissues (sink leaves, source leaves, stems, and roots) under three growth conditions (well-watered, drought, and recovery). Analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes in functional categories related to nitrogen metabolism show a trend of significant down-regulation in GS poplars compared to the WT, including genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases. The down-regulation of these genes was verified using qPCR, and downstream effects were further tested using NR activity assays. Results suggest that higher glutamine levels in GS transgenics regulate nitrate uptake and reduction. Transcript levels of nitrogen-related genes in leaves, including GS/GOGAT cycle enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase, GABA shunt enzymes, photorespiration enzymes, asparagine synthetase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and PII, were also assessed using qPCR revealing significant differences between GS poplars and the WT. Moreover, metabolites related to these differentially expressed genes showed alterations in levels, including higher levels of GABA, hydroxyproline, and putrescine in the GS transgenic. These alterations in nitrogen homeostasis offer insights into mechanisms accounting for drought tolerance observed in GS poplars. PMID:26113157

  5. Differential screening identifies transcripts with depot-dependent expression in white adipose tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shengli

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-morbidities of obesity are tied to location of excess fat in the intra-abdominal as compared to subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT depot. Genes distinctly expressed in WAT depots may impart depot-dependent physiological functions. To identify such genes, we prepared subtractive cDNA libraries from murine subcutaneous (SC or intra-abdominal epididymal (EP white adipocytes. Results Differential screening and qPCR validation identified 7 transcripts with 2.5-fold or greater enrichment in EP vs. SC adipocytes. Boc, a component of the hedgehog signaling pathway demonstrated highest enrichment (~12-fold in EP adipocytes. We also identified a dramatic enrichment in SC adipocytes vs. EP adipocytes and in SC WAT vs. EP WAT for transcript(s for the major urinary proteins (Mups, small secreted proteins with pheromone functions that are members of the lipocalin family. Expression of Boc and Mup transcript was further assessed in murine tissues, adipogenesis models, and obesity. qPCR analysis reveals that EP WAT is a major site of expression of Boc transcript. Furthermore, Boc transcript expression decreased in obese EP WAT with a concomitant upregulation of Boc transcript in the obese SC WAT depot. Assessment of the Boc binding partner Cdon in adipose tissue and cell fractions thereof, revealed transcript expression similar to Boc; suggestive of a role for the Boc-Cdon axis in WAT depot function. Mup transcripts were predominantly expressed in liver and in the SC and RP WAT depots and increased several thousand-fold during differentiation of primary murine preadipocytes to adipocytes. Mup transcripts were also markedly reduced in SC WAT and liver of ob/ob genetically obese mice compared to wild type. Conclusion Further assessment of WAT depot-enriched transcripts may uncover distinctions in WAT depot gene expression that illuminate the physiological impact of regional adiposity.

  6. Regulation of Nox enzymes expression in vascular pathophysiology: Focusing on transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona-Adriana Manea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases (Nox represent a family of hetero-oligomeric enzymes whose exclusive biological function is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Nox-derived ROS are essential modulators of signal transduction pathways that control key physiological activities such as cell growth, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis, immune responses, and biochemical pathways. Enhanced formation of Nox-derived ROS, which is generally associated with the up-regulation of different Nox subtypes, has been established in various pathologies, namely cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The detrimental effects of Nox-derived ROS are related to alterations in cell signalling and/or direct irreversible oxidative damage of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Thus, understanding of transcriptional regulation mechanisms of Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in an attempt to find ways to counteract the excessive formation of Nox-derived ROS in various pathological states. Despite the numerous existing data, the molecular pathways responsible for Nox up-regulation are not completely understood. This review article summarizes some of the recent advances and concepts related to the regulation of Nox expression in the vascular pathophysiology. It highlights the role of transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms in this process. Identification of the signalling molecules involved in Nox up-regulation, which is associated with the onset and development of cardiovascular dysfunction may contribute to the development of novel strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Comparative serial analysis of gene expression of transcript profiles of tomato roots infected with cyst nematode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Taketo; Sugiyama, Shunpei; Masuta, Chikara

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed global transcripts for tomato roots infected with the cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). SAGE libraries were made from nematode-infected roots and uninfected roots at 14 days after inoculation, and the clones including SAGE tags were sequenced. Genes were identified by matching the SAGE tags to tomato expressed sequence tags and cDNA databases. We then compiled a list of numerous genes according to the mRNA levels that were altered after cyst nematode infection. Our SAGE results showed significant changes in expression of many unreported genes involved in nematode infection. Of these, for discussion we selected five SAGE tags of RSI-1, BURP domain-containing protein, hexose transporter, P-rich protein, and PHAP2A that were activated by cyst nematode infection. Over 20% of the tags that were upregulated in the infected root have unknown functions (non-annotated), suggesting that we can obtain information on previously unreported and uncharacterized genes by SAGE. We can also obtain information on previously reported genes involved in nematode infection (e.g., multicystatin, peroxidase, catalase, pectin esterase, and S-adenosylmethionine transferase). To evaluate the validity of our SAGE results, seven genes were further analyzed by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot hybridization; the results agreed well with the SAGE data. PMID:16983456

  8. Altered miRNAs expression profiling in sperm of mice induced by fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zilong; Zhang, Wen; Li, Sujuan; Xue, Xingchen; Niu, Ruiyan; Shi, Lei; Li, Baojun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wang, Jundong

    2016-07-01

    The reproductive toxicity of fluoride has become a major concern in the world. Fluoride can decrease the abilities of sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, chemotaxis, acrosome reaction and fertilization, but the studies on the responses of sperm small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), especially miRNAs, to fluoride exposure are lacking. miRNAs are demonstrated to influence sperm quality and male fertility by regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional levels or translational repression. The objective of this study is to analyze miRNA profiling in sperm of mice administrated with 25 and 100 mg L(-1) sodium fluoride (NaF) for 60 d using high-throughput sequencing technology. Along with reduced sperm concentration, survival, motility, and mitochondrial membrane potential, 31 differentially expressed known miRNAs were identified in fluoride groups, compared with the control group. 671 predicted target genes against the 16 altered miRNAs were mainly involved in protease inhibitor activity, apoptosis, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, and signaling pathways of calcium, JAK-STAT, MAPK, p53, Wnt, which were proved to be directly related to sperm quality. These findings suggested that the altered sperm miRNAs could be potential biomarkers for fluoride reproductive toxicity. PMID:27108368

  9. Spaceflight alters expression of microRNA during T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Chang, Tammy T; Martinez, Emily M; Li, Chai-Fei

    2015-12-01

    Altered immune function has been demonstrated in astronauts during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab; this could be a major barrier to long-term space exploration. We tested the hypothesis that spaceflight causes changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression. Human leukocytes were stimulated with mitogens on board the International Space Station using an onboard normal gravity control. Bioinformatics showed that miR-21 was significantly up-regulated 2-fold during early T-cell activation in normal gravity, and gene expression was suppressed under microgravity. This was confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR (n = 4). This is the first report that spaceflight regulates miRNA expression. Global microarray analysis showed significant (P < 0.05) suppression of 85 genes under microgravity conditions compared to normal gravity samples. EGR3, FASLG, BTG2, SPRY2, and TAGAP are biologically confirmed targets and are co-up-regulated with miR-21. These genes share common promoter regions with pre-mir-21; as the miR-21 matures and accumulates, it most likely will inhibit translation of its target genes and limit the immune response. These data suggest that gravity regulates T-cell activation not only by transcription promotion but also by blocking translation via noncoding RNA mechanisms. Moreover, this study suggests that T-cell activation itself may induce a sequence of gene expressions that is self-limited by miR-21. PMID:26276131

  10. Addiction and Reward-related Genes Show Altered Expression in the Postpartum Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiu eZhao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motherhood involves a switch in natural rewards, whereby offspring become highly rewarding. Nucleus accumbens (NAC is a key CNS region for natural rewards and addictions, but to date no study has evaluated on a large scale the events in NAC that underlie the maternal change in natural rewards. In this study we utilized microarray and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate postpartum NAC gene expression changes in mice. Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET indicated that postpartum (relative to virgin NAC gene expression profile was significantly enriched for genes related to addiction and reward in 5 of 5 independently curated databases (e.g., Malacards, Phenopedia. Over 100 addiction/reward related genes were identified and these included: Per1, Per2, Arc, Homer2, Creb1, Grm3, Fosb, Gabrb3, Adra2a, Ntrk2, Cry1, Penk, Cartpt, Adcy1, Npy1r, Htr1a, Drd1a, Gria1, and Pdyn. ToppCluster analysis found maternal NAC expression profile to be significantly enriched for genes related to the drug action of nicotine, ketamine, and dronabinol. Pathway analysis indicated postpartum NAC as enriched for RNA processing, CNS development/differentiation, and transcriptional regulation. Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis identified possible networks for transcription factors, including Nr1d1, Per2, Fosb, Egr1, and Nr4a1. The postpartum state involves increased risk for mental health disorders and MSET analysis indicated postpartum NAC to be enriched for genes related to depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Mental health related genes included: Fabp7, Grm3, Penk, and Nr1d1. We confirmed via quantitative PCR Nr1d1, Per2, Grm3, Penk, Drd1a, and Pdyn. This study indicates for the first time that postpartum NAC involves large scale gene expression alterations linked to addiction and reward. Because the postpartum state also involves decreased response to drugs, the findings could provide insights into how to mitigate addictions.

  11. Neuroblastoma and pre-B lymphoma cells share expression of key transcription factors but display tissue restricted target gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transcription factors are frequently involved in the process of cellular transformation, and many malignancies are characterized by a distinct genetic event affecting a specific transcription factor. This probably reflects a tissue specific ability of transcription factors to contribute to the generation of cancer but very little is known about the precise mechanisms that governs these restricted effects. To investigate this selectivity in target gene activation we compared the overall gene expression patterns by micro-array analysis and expression of target genes for the transcription factor EBF in lymphoma and neuroblastoma cells by RT-PCR. The presence of transcription factors in the different model cell lines was further investigated by EMSA analysis. In pre-B cells mb-1 and CD19 are regulate by EBF-1 in collaboration with Pax-5 and E-proteins. We here show that neuroblastoma cells express these three, for B cell development crucial transcription factors, but nevertheless fail to express detectable levels of their known target genes. Expression of mb-1 could, however, be induced in neuroblastoma cells after disruption of the chromatin structure by treatment with 5-azacytidine and Trichostatin A. These data suggest that transcription factors are able to selectively activate target genes in different tissues and that chromatin structure plays a key role in the regulation of this activity

  12. The transcription factor SOX18 regulates the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 7 and guidance molecules in human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Hoeth

    Full Text Available Mutations in the transcription factor SOX18 are responsible for specific cardiovascular defects in humans and mice. In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of its action, we identified target genes of SOX18 and analyzed one, MMP7, in detail.SOX18 was expressed in HUVEC using a recombinant adenoviral vector and the altered gene expression profile was analyzed using microarrays. Expression of several regulated candidate SOX18 target genes was verified by real-time PCR. Knock-down of SOX18 using RNA interference was then used to confirm the effect of the transcription factor on selected genes that included the guidance molecules ephrin B2 and semaphorin 3G. One gene, MMP7, was chosen for further analysis, including detailed promoter studies using reporter gene assays, electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and chromatin-immunoprecipitation, revealing that it responds directly to SOX18. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the co-expression of SOX18 and MMP7 in blood vessels of human skin.The identification of MMP7 as a direct SOX18 target gene as well as other potential candidates including guidance molecules provides a molecular basis for the proposed function of this transcription factor in the regulation of vessel formation.

  13. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  14. High SINE RNA Expression Correlates with Post-Transcriptional Downregulation of BRCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bosco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs are non-autonomous retrotransposons that comprise a large fraction of the human genome. SINEs are demethylated in human disease, but whether SINEs become transcriptionally induced and how the resulting transcripts may affect the expression of protein coding genes is unknown. Here, we show that downregulation of the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 is associated with increased transcription of SINEs and production of sense and antisense SINE small RNAs. We find that BRCA1 mRNA is post-transcriptionally down-regulated in a Dicer and Drosha dependent manner and that expression of a SINE inverted repeat with sequence identity to a BRCA1 intron is sufficient for downregulation of BRCA1 mRNA. These observations suggest that transcriptional activation of SINEs could contribute to a novel mechanism of RNA mediated post-transcriptional silencing of human genes.

  15. Effect of milk hydrolysates on inflammation markers and drug-induced transcriptional alterations in cell-based models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Søvsø Gundelund; Theil, Peter Kappel; Larsen, Lotte Bach;

    2012-01-01

    underlying mechanisms that support inflammation and wound healing are not completely understood, but transcriptional alterations may be used as markers for inflammation and wound healing. The bioactivity of 3 CH prepared by treatment of commercial casein with pepsin (60 min) followed by corolase (0, 10, or......B (NFκB) by real-time PCR. Furthermore, the effect of CH on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation was evaluated in macrophages by measuring PG E2 levels. Casein hydrolysates treated with corolase for 10 or 60 min after pepsin treatment downregulated transcription of TGF-β1 and NFκB (P < 0.05) compared...... with the hydrolysate treated with pepsin only. Hydrolysate prepared by corolase treatment for 60 min after pepsin hydrolysis downregulated transcription of COX-2 (P < 0.05) compared with hydrolysate treated with corolase for only 10 min whereas transcription of PPAR-γ was not affected (P > 0...

  16. Changes in Dietary Fat Content Rapidly Alters the Mouse Plasma Coagulation Profile without Affecting Relative Transcript Levels of Coagulation Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Janna A.; Verhoef, Daniël; Voshol, Peter J.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with a hypercoagulable state and increased risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events. Objective Establish the onset and reversibility of the hypercoagulable state during the development and regression of nutritionally-induced obesity in mice, and its relation to transcriptional changes and clearance rates of coagulation factors as well as its relation to changes in metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (10% kcal as fat; LFD) or high fat diet (45% kcal as fat; HFD) for 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. To study the effects of weight loss, mice were fed the HFD for 16 weeks and switched to the LFD for 1, 2 or 4 weeks. For each time point analyses of plasma and hepatic mRNA levels of coagulation factors were performed after overnight fasting, as well as measurements of circulating metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Furthermore, in vivo clearance rates of human factor (F) VII, FVIII and FIX proteins were determined after 2 weeks of HFD-feeding. Results HFD feeding gradually increased the body and liver weight, which was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose levels from 8 weeks onwards, while insulin levels were affected after 16 weeks. Besides a transient rise in cytokine levels at 2 weeks after starting the HFD, no significant effect on inflammation markers was present. Increased plasma levels of fibrinogen, FII, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FXI and FXII were observed in mice on a HFD for 2 weeks, which in general persisted throughout the 16 weeks of HFD-feeding. Interestingly, with the exception of FXI the effects on plasma coagulation levels were not paralleled by changes in relative transcript levels in the liver, nor by decreased clearance rates. Switching from HFD to LFD reversed the HFD-induced procoagulant shift in plasma, again not coinciding with transcriptional modulation. Conclusions Changes in dietary fat content rapidly alter the mouse plasma coagulation profile, thereby

  17. Sodium arsenite delays the differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblast cells and alters methylation patterns on the transcription factor myogenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies have correlated arsenic exposure with cancer, skin diseases, and adverse developmental outcomes such as spontaneous abortions, neonatal mortality, low birth weight, and delays in the use of musculature. The current study used C2C12 mouse myoblast cells to examine whether low concentrations of arsenic could alter their differentiation into myotubes, indicating that arsenic can act as a developmental toxicant. Myoblast cells were exposed to 20 nM sodium arsenite, allowed to differentiate into myotubes, and expression of the muscle-specific transcription factor myogenin, along with the expression of tropomyosin, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3), prostaglandin I2 synthesis (Ptgis), and myocyte enhancer 2 (Mef2), was investigated using QPCR and immunofluorescence. Exposing C2C12 cells to 20 nM sodium arsenite delayed the differentiation process, as evidenced by a significant reduction in the number of multinucleated myotubes, a decrease in myogenin mRNA expression, and a decrease in the total number of nuclei expressing myogenin protein. The expression of mRNA involved in myotube formation, such as Ptgis and Mef2 mRNA, was also significantly reduced by 1.6-fold and 4-fold during differentiation. This was confirmed by immunofluorescence for Mef2, which showed a 2.6-fold reduction in nuclear translocation. Changes in methylation patterns in the promoter region of myogenin (-473 to + 90) were examined by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite genomic sequencing. Hypermethylated CpGs were found at -236 and -126 bp, whereas hypomethylated CpGs were found at -207 bp in arsenic-exposed cells. This study indicates that 20 nM sodium arsenite can alter myoblast differentiation by reducing the expression of the transcription factors myogenin and Mef2c, which is likely due to changes in promoter methylation patterns. The delay in muscle differentiation may lead to developmental abnormalities.

  18. Elucidating the altered transcriptional programs in breast cancer using independent component analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Teschendorff

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The quantity of mRNA transcripts in a cell is determined by a complex interplay of cooperative and counteracting biological processes. Independent Component Analysis (ICA is one of a few number of unsupervised algorithms that have been applied to microarray gene expression data in an attempt to understand phenotype differences in terms of changes in the activation/inhibition patterns of biological pathways. While the ICA model has been shown to outperform other linear representations of the data such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA, a validation using explicit pathway and regulatory element information has not yet been performed. We apply a range of popular ICA algorithms to six of the largest microarray cancer datasets and use pathway-knowledge and regulatory-element databases for validation. We show that ICA outperforms PCA and clustering-based methods in that ICA components map closer to known cancer-related pathways, regulatory modules, and cancer phenotypes. Furthermore, we identify cancer signalling and oncogenic pathways and regulatory modules that play a prominent role in breast cancer and relate the differential activation patterns of these to breast cancer phenotypes. Importantly, we find novel associations linking immune response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathways with estrogen receptor status and histological grade, respectively. In addition, we find associations linking the activity levels of biological pathways and transcription factors (NF1 and NFAT with clinical outcome in breast cancer. ICA provides a framework for a more biologically relevant interpretation of genomewide transcriptomic data. Adopting ICA as the analysis tool of choice will help understand the phenotype-pathway relationship and thus help elucidate the molecular taxonomy of heterogeneous cancers and of other complex genetic diseases.

  19. Di-(2 ethylhexyl phthalate and flutamide alter gene expression in the testis of immature male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Frank H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We previously demonstrated that the androgenic and anti-androgenic effects of endocrine disruptors (EDs alter reproductive function and exert distinct effects on developing male reproductive organs. To further investigate these effects, we used an immature rat model to examine the effects of di-(2 ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP and flutamide (Flu on the male reproductive system. Immature male SD rats were treated daily with DEHP and Flu on postnatal days (PNDs 21 to 35, in a dose-dependent manner. As results, the weights of the testes, prostate, and seminal vesicle and anogenital distances (AGD decreased significantly in response to high doses of DEHP or Flu. Testosterone (T levels significantly decreased in all DEHP- treated groups, whereas luteinizing hormone (LH plasma levels were not altered by any of the two treatments at PND 36. However, treatment with DEHP or Flu induced histopathological changes in the testes, wherein degeneration and disorders of Leydig cells, germ cells and dilatation of tubular lumen were observed in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, hyperplasia and denseness of Leydig, Sertoli and germ cells were observed in rats given with high doses of Flu. The results by cDNA microarray analysis indicated that 1,272 genes were up-regulated by more than two-fold, and 1,969 genes were down-regulated in response to DEHP, Flu or both EDs. These genes were selected based on their markedly increased or decreased expression levels. These genes have been also classified on the basis of gene ontology (e.g., steroid hormone biosynthetic process, regulation of transcription, signal transduction, metabolic process, biosynthetic process.... Significant decreases in gene expression were observed in steroidogenic genes (i.e., Star, Cyp11a1 and Hsd3b. In addition, the expression of a common set of target genes, including CaBP1, Vav2, Plcd1, Lhx1 and Isoc1, was altered following exposure to EDs, suggesting that they may be marker genes to

  20. Identification of uniquely expressed transcription factors in highly purified B-cell lymphoma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andréasson, Ulrika; Edén, Patrik; Peterson, Carsten; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Jerkeman, Mats; Andersen, Niels Smedegaard; Berglund, Mattias; Sundström, Christer; Rosenquist, Richard; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Ek, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are critical for B-cell differentiation, affecting gene expression both by repression and transcriptional activation. Still, this information is not used for classification of B-cell lymphomas (BCLs). Traditionally, BCLs are diagnosed based on a phenotypic resemblance ...

  1. RNase L Attenuates Mitogen-stimulated Gene Expression via Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Mechanisms to Limit the Proliferative Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E.; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J.; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Hassel, Bret A.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  2. RNase L attenuates mitogen-stimulated gene expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to limit the proliferative response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J; Wilson, Gerald M; Hassel, Bret A

    2014-11-28

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  3. The differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts is a common stress-induced response mechanism that modulates mammalian mRNA expression in a quantitative and qualitative fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerer, Ina; Curk, Tomaz; Haase, Bettina; Benes, Vladimir; Hauer, Christian; Neu-Yilik, Gabriele; Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2016-09-01

    Stress adaptation plays a pivotal role in biological processes and requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we explored the effect of cellular stress on mRNA polyadenylation and investigated the implications of regulated polyadenylation site usage on mammalian gene expression. High-confidence polyadenylation site mapping combined with global pre-mRNA and mRNA expression profiling revealed that stress induces an accumulation of genes with differentially expressed polyadenylated mRNA isoforms in human cells. Specifically, stress provokes a global trend in polyadenylation site usage toward decreased utilization of promoter-proximal poly(A) sites in introns or ORFs and increased utilization of promoter-distal polyadenylation sites in intergenic regions. This extensively affects gene expression beyond regulating mRNA abundance by changing mRNA length and by altering the configuration of open reading frames. Our study highlights the impact of post-transcriptional mechanisms on stress-dependent gene regulation and reveals the differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts as a common stress-induced mechanism in mammalian cells. PMID:27407180

  4. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement of known mRNAs. The presence of such tags in individual SAGE libraries suggested that SAGE datasets contain latent information on antisense transcripts. We raised a collection of virtual tags for mining these data. Tag pairs were assembled by searching for complementarities between 24-nt long sequences centered on the potential SAGE-anchoring sites of well-annotated human expressed sequences. An analysis of their presence in a large collection of published SAGE libraries revealed transcripts expressed at high levels from both strands of two adjacent, oppositely oriented, transcription units. In other cases, the respective transcripts of such cis-oriented genes displayed a mutually exclusive expression pattern or were co-expressed in a small number of libraries. Other tag pairs revealed overlapping transcripts of trans-encoded unique genes. Finally, we isolated a group of tags shared by multiple transcripts. Most of them mapped on to retroelements, essentially represented in humans by Alu sequences inserted in opposite orientations in the 3'UTR of otherwise different mRNAs. Registering these tags in separate files makes possible computational searches focused on unique sense-antisense pairs. The method developed in the present work shows that SAGE datasets constitute a major resource of rapidly investigating with high sensitivity the expression of antisense transcripts, so that a single tag may be detected in one library when screening a large number of biological samples. PMID

  5. Alteration of gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle of rats exposed to microgravity during a spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Wayne E.; Bhasin, Shalender; Lalani, Rukhsana; Datta, Anuj; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting during spaceflights, we investigated whether intramuscular gene expression profiles are affected, by using DNA microarray methods. Male rats sent on the 17-day NASA STS-90 Neurolab spaceflight were sacrificed 24 hours after return to earth (MG group). Ground control rats were maintained for 17 days in flight-simulated cages (CS group). Spaceflight induced a 19% and 23% loss of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle mass, respectively, as compared to ground controls. Muscle RNA was analyzed by the Clontech Atlas DNA expression array in four rats, with two MG/ CS pairs for the tibialis anterior, and one pair for the gastrocnemius. Alterations in gene expression were verified for selected genes by reverse-transcription PCR. In both muscles of MG rats, mRNAs for 12 genes were up-regulated by over 2-fold, and 38 were down-regulated compared to controls. There was inhibition of genes for cell proliferation and growth factor cascades, including cell cycle genes and signal transduction proteins, such as p21 Cip1, retinoblastoma (Rb), cyclins G1/S, -E and -D3, MAP kinase 3, MAD3, and ras related protein RAB2. These data indicate that following exposure to microgravity, there is downregulation of genes involved in regulation of muscle satellite cell replication.

  6. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP + OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Taniuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The α1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1 enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in the DataBase of Human Transcription Start Sites (DBTSS. Using the dual luciferase assay, FUT1 gene expression was shown to be regulated at the region −91 to −81 nt to the transcriptional start site, which contains the Elk-1 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region revealed the Elk-1 binding site to be essential for FUT1 transcription. Furthermore, transfection of the dominant negative Elk-1 gene, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIp assay, supported Elk-1-dependent transcriptional regulation of FUT1 gene expression in DLD-1 cells. These results suggest that a defined region in the 5′-flanking region of FUT1 is critical for FUT1 transcription and that constitutive gene expression of FUT1 is regulated by Elk-1 in DLD-1 cells.

  8. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  9. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja; Jäntti, Jussi; Mojzita, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  10. Expression, processing and transcriptional regulation of granulysin in short-term activated human lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Groscurth Peter; Dumrese Claudia; Sundstrom Hanna; Walch Michael; Latinovic-Golic Sonja; Ziegler Urs

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Granulysin, a cytotoxic protein expressed in human natural killer cells and activated T lymphocytes, exhibits cytolytic activity against a variety of intracellular microbes. Expression and transcription have been partially characterised in vitro and four transcripts (NKG5, 519, 520, and 522) were identified. However, only a single protein product of 15 kDa was found, which is subsequently processed to an active 9 kDa protein. Results In this study we investigated generatio...

  11. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression

    OpenAIRE

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement...

  12. Chromatin looping as a target for altering erythroid gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivega, Ivan; Dean, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The β-hemoglobinopathies are the most common monogenic disorders in humans, with symptoms arising after birth when the fetal γ-globin genes are silenced and the adult β-globin gene is activated. There is a growing appreciation that genome organization and the folding of chromosomes are key determinants of gene transcription. Underlying this function is the activity of transcriptional enhancers that increase the transcription of target genes over long linear distances. To accomplish this, enhancers engage in close physical contact with target promoters through chromosome folding or looping that is orchestrated by protein complexes that bind to both sites and stabilize their interaction. We find that enhancer activity can be redirected with concomitant changes in gene transcription. Both targeting the β-globin locus control region (LCR) to the γ-globin gene in adult erythroid cells by tethering and epigenetic unmasking of a silenced γ-globin gene lead to increased frequency of LCR/γ-globin contacts and reduced LCR/β-globin contacts. The outcome of these manipulations is robust, pancellular γ-globin transcription activation with a concomitant reduction in β-globin transcription. These examples show that chromosome looping may be considered a therapeutic target for gene activation in β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26918894

  13. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  14. Cryptic Transcription and Early Termination in the Control of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on yeast transcriptome have revealed the presence of a large set of RNA polymerase II transcripts mapping to intergenic and antisense regions or overlapping canonical genes. Most of these ncRNAs (ncRNAs are subject to termination by the Nrd1-dependent pathway and rapid degradation by the nuclear exosome and have been dubbed cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs. CUTs are often considered as by-products of transcriptional noise, but in an increasing number of cases they play a central role in the control of gene expression. Regulatory mechanisms involving expression of a CUT are diverse and include attenuation, transcriptional interference, and alternative transcription start site choice. This review focuses on the impact of cryptic transcription on gene expression, describes the role of the Nrd1-complex as the main actor in preventing nonfunctional and potentially harmful transcription, and details a few systems where expression of a CUT has an essential regulatory function. We also summarize the most recent studies concerning other types of ncRNAs and their possible role in regulation.

  15. Alterations in LMTK2, MSMB and HNF1B gene expression are associated with the development of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullagh Paul

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS have identified several genetic variants that are associated with prostate cancer. Most of these variants, like other GWAS association signals, are located in non-coding regions of potential candidate genes, and thus could act at the level of the mRNA transcript. Methods We measured the expression and isoform usage of seven prostate cancer candidate genes in benign and malignant prostate by real-time PCR, and correlated these factors with cancer status and genotype at the GWAS risk variants. Results We determined that levels of LMTK2 transcripts in prostate adenocarcinomas were only 32% of those in benign tissues (p = 3.2 × 10-7, and that an independent effect of genotype at variant rs6465657 on LMTK2 expression in benign (n = 39 and malignant tissues (n = 21 was also evident (P = 0.002. We also identified that whilst HNF1B(C and MSMB2 comprised the predominant isoforms in benign tissues (90% and 98% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression, HNF1B(B and MSMB1 were predominant in malignant tissue (95% and 96% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression; P = 1.7 × 10-7 and 4 × 10-4 respectively, indicating major shifts in isoform usage. Conclusions Our results indicate that the amount or nature of mRNA transcripts expressed from the LMTK2, HNF1B and MSMB candidate genes is altered in prostate cancer, and provides further evidence for a role for these genes in this disorder. The alterations in isoform usage we detect highlights the potential importance of alternative mRNA processing and moderation of mRNA stability as potentially important disease mechanisms.

  16. Alterations in LMTK2, MSMB and HNF1B gene expression are associated with the development of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic variants that are associated with prostate cancer. Most of these variants, like other GWAS association signals, are located in non-coding regions of potential candidate genes, and thus could act at the level of the mRNA transcript. We measured the expression and isoform usage of seven prostate cancer candidate genes in benign and malignant prostate by real-time PCR, and correlated these factors with cancer status and genotype at the GWAS risk variants. We determined that levels of LMTK2 transcripts in prostate adenocarcinomas were only 32% of those in benign tissues (p = 3.2 × 10-7), and that an independent effect of genotype at variant rs6465657 on LMTK2 expression in benign (n = 39) and malignant tissues (n = 21) was also evident (P = 0.002). We also identified that whilst HNF1B(C) and MSMB2 comprised the predominant isoforms in benign tissues (90% and 98% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression), HNF1B(B) and MSMB1 were predominant in malignant tissue (95% and 96% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression; P = 1.7 × 10-7 and 4 × 10-4 respectively), indicating major shifts in isoform usage. Our results indicate that the amount or nature of mRNA transcripts expressed from the LMTK2, HNF1B and MSMB candidate genes is altered in prostate cancer, and provides further evidence for a role for these genes in this disorder. The alterations in isoform usage we detect highlights the potential importance of alternative mRNA processing and moderation of mRNA stability as potentially important disease mechanisms

  17. Expression liver-directed genes by employing synthetic transcriptional control units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Luise Lemken; Wolfgang A. Wybranietz; Ulrike Schmidt; Florian Graepler; Sorin Armeanu; Michael Bitzer; Ulrich M. Lauer

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To generate and characterize the synthetic transcriptional control units for transcriptional targeting of the liver,thereby compensating for the lack of specificity of currently available gene therapeutic vector systems.METHODS: Synthetic transcriptional control unit constructs were generated and analyzed for transcriptional activities in different cell types by FACS quantification, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blotting. RESULTS: A new bifunctionally-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)/neor fusion gene cassette was generated,and could flexibly be used both for transcript quantification and for selection of stable cell clones. Then, numerous synthetic transcriptional control units consisting of a minimal promoter linked to "naturally" derived composite enhancer elements from liver-specific expressed genes or binding sites of liver-specific transcription factors were inserted upstream of this reporter cassette. Following liposome-mediated transfection, EGFP reporter protein quantification by FACS analysis identified constructs encoding multimerized composite elements of the apolipoprotein B100 (ApoB) promoter or the ornithin transcarbamoylase (OTC) enhancer to exhibit maximum transcriptional activities in liver originating cell lines, but only background levels in non-liver originating cell lines. In contrast, constructs encoding only singular binding sites of liver-specific transcription factors, namely hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)1, HNF3, HNF4, HNF5, or CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) only achieved background levels of EGFP expression. Finally, both semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis of Hep3B cells demonstrated maximum transcriptional activities for a multimeric 4xApoB cassette construct, which fully complied with the data obtained by initial FACS analysis.CONCLUSION: Synthetic transcriptional control unit constructs not only exhibit a superb degree of structural compactness, but also provide new means for liver

  18. Inference of transcription modification in long-live yeast strains from their expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo Valter D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three kinases: Sch9, PKA and TOR, are suggested to be involved in both the replicative and chronological ageing in yeast. They function in pathways whose down-regulation leads to life span extension. Several stress response proteins, including two transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, mediate the longevity extension phenotype associated with decreased activity of either Sch9, PKA, or TOR. However, the mechanisms of longevity, especially the underlying transcription program have not been fully understood. Results We measured the gene expression profiles in wild type yeast and three long-lived mutants: sch9Δ, ras2Δ, and tor1Δ. To elucidate the transcription program that may account for the longevity extension, we identified the transcription factors that are systematically and significantly associated with the expression differentiation in these mutants with respect to wild type by integrating microarray expression data with motif and ChIP-chip data, respectively. Our analysis suggests that three stress response transcription factors, Msn2, Msn4 and Gis1, are activated in all the three mutants. We also identify some other transcription factors such as Fhl1 and Hsf1, which may also be involved in the transcriptional modification in the long-lived mutants. Conclusion Combining microarray expression data with other data sources such as motif and ChIP-chip data provides biological insights into the transcription modification that leads to life span extension. In the chronologically long-lived mutant: sch9Δ, ras2Δ, and tor1Δ, several common stress response transcription factors are activated compared with the wild type according to our systematic transcription inference.

  19. Integrated pathway-based transcription regulation network mining and visualization based on gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibinge, Nelson; Ono, Naoaki; Horie, Masafumi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Saito, Akira; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, workflows examining transcription regulation networks from gene expression data involve distinct analytical steps. There is a need for pipelines that unify data mining and inference deduction into a singular framework to enhance interpretation and hypotheses generation. We propose a workflow that merges network construction with gene expression data mining focusing on regulation processes in the context of transcription factor driven gene regulation. The pipeline implements pathway-based modularization of expression profiles into functional units to improve biological interpretation. The integrated workflow was implemented as a web application software (TransReguloNet) with functions that enable pathway visualization and comparison of transcription factor activity between sample conditions defined in the experimental design. The pipeline merges differential expression, network construction, pathway-based abstraction, clustering and visualization. The framework was applied in analysis of actual expression datasets related to lung, breast and prostrate cancer. PMID:27064123

  20. Abrupt decrease of c—myc expression by antisense transcripts induses terminal differentiation and apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia HL—60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAOXIUJUAN; PEIHSIENTANG; 等

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed using c-myc antisense transcripts to evaluate how alteration of c-myc expression in human myeloid leukemic HL-60 cells could influence the myelomonocytic differentiation and induction of apoptosis.The recombinant plasmid pDACx expressing antisense transcripts to c-myc fragment containing a part of intron 1 and 137 nt exon 2 was constructed.pDACx was transfected into HL-60 cell line by lipofectin reagent.Cytochemical stainings including NBT reduction,peroxidase and α-NAE as well as detection of CD13 and CD33 antigens by flow cytometric analysis indicated occurrence of myelomonocytic differentiation in cells expressing antisense transcripts to c-myc.DNA degradation measured by DNA gel electrophoresis and typical morphological changes observed under electron microscope proved the swith-on of apoptosis in terminally differentiating HL-60 cells.

  1. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46–0.72 mg kg−1, induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4–2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3–1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish. - Highlights: • 48 h-LC50 value of arsenite (AsIII) was 42 mg L−1 for zebrafish. • AsIII exposure elevated oxidative stress and caused oxidative damage in zebrafish. • AsIII exposure increased the content of thyroid hormone thyroxine. • AsIII exposure altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish. - Short-term exposure of arsenite caused oxidative stress, disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in Zebrafish

  2. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu, E-mail: nemoto@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hironori [Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro [Department of Medicinal Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji 192-0392 (Japan); Ohizumi, Yasushi [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Laboratory of Kampo Medicines, Yokohama College of Pharmacy, 601 Matano-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0066 (Japan); Degawa, Masakuni [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  3. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  4. Trypanosoma brucei: Enrichment by UV of intergenic transcripts from the variable surface glycoprotein gene expression site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression site for the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene AnTat 1.3A of Trypanosoma brucei is 45 kilobases long and encompasses seven expression site-associated genes (ESAGs). After UV irradiation, several large transcripts from the putative promoter region were strongly enriched. We report that one such major transcript starts near the poly(A) addition site of the first gene (ESAG 7), spans the intergenic region, and extends to the poly(A) addition site of the second gene (ESAG 6), thus bypassing the normal 3' splice site of the ESAG 6 mRNA. Since this transcript is spliced, we conclude that UV irradiation does not inhibit splicing but stabilizes unstable processing products. This demonstrates that at least some intergenic regions of the VSG gene expression site are continuously transcribed in accordance with a polycistronic transcription model

  5. Chronic administration of cholesterol oximes in mice increases transcription of cytoprotective genes and improves transcriptome alterations induced by alpha-synuclein overexpression in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Franziska; Gao, Fuying; Medvedeva, Vera; Lee, Patrick; Bove, Nicholas; Fleming, Sheila M; Michaud, Magali; Lemesre, Vincent; Patassini, Stefano; De La Rosa, Krystal; Mulligan, Caitlin K; Sioshansi, Pedrom C; Zhu, Chunni; Coppola, Giovanni; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-09-01

    Cholesterol-oximes TRO19622 and TRO40303 target outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and have beneficial effects in preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases leading to their advancement to clinical trials. Dopaminergic neurons degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are prone to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In order to provide insights into the neuroprotective potential of TRO19622 and TRO40303 for dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we assessed their effects on gene expression in laser captured nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons of wildtype mice and of mice that over-express alpha-synuclein, a protein involved in both familial and sporadic forms of PD (Thy1-aSyn mice). Young mice were fed the drugs in food pellets or a control diet from 1 to 4months of age, approximately 10months before the appearance of striatal dopamine loss in this model. Unbiased weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of transcriptional changes revealed effects of cholesterol oximes on transcripts related to mitochondria, cytoprotection and anti-oxidant response in wild-type and transgenic mice, including increased transcription of stress defense (e.g. Prdx1, Prdx2, Glrx2, Hspa9, Pink1, Drp1, Trak1) and dopamine-related (Th, Ddc, Gch1, Dat, Vmat2, Drd2, Chnr6a) genes. Even at this young age transgenic mice showed alterations in transcripts implicated in mitochondrial function and oxidative stress (e.g. Bcl-2, Bax, Casp3, Nos2), and both drugs normalized about 20% of these alterations. Young Thy1-aSyn mice exhibit motor deficits that differ from parkinsonism and are established before the onset of treatment; these deficits were not improved by cholesterol oximes. However, high doses of TRO40303 improved olfaction and produced the same effects as dopamine agonists on a challenging beam test, specifically an increase in footslips, an observation congruent with its effects on transcripts involved in dopamine synthesis. High doses of TRO19622 increased alpha

  6. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: ► Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. ► mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear genes associated with tumorigenesis. ► MMP-9 is up-regulated and

  7. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  8. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dennis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-valueFOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation.

  9. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauman William A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days or 29 days later (35 days attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on

  10. The expression of ELK transcription factors in adult DRG: Novel isoforms, antisense transcripts and upregulation by nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Niall; Pintzas, Alexander; Holmes, Fiona; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Pope, Robert; Wallace, Mark; Wasylyk, Christine; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Wynick, David

    2010-06-01

    ELK transcription factors are known to be expressed in a number of regions in the nervous system. We show by RT-PCR that the previously described Elk1, Elk3/Elk3b/Elk3c and Elk4 mRNAs are expressed in adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG), together with the novel alternatively spliced isoforms Elk1b, Elk3d and Elk4c/Elk4d/Elk4e. These isoforms are also expressed in brain, heart, kidney and testis. In contrast to Elk3 protein, the novel Elk3d isoform is cytoplasmic, fails to bind ETS binding sites and yet can activate transcription by an indirect mechanism. The Elk3 and Elk4 genes are overlapped by co-expressed Pctk2 (Cdk17) and Mfsd4 genes, respectively, with the potential formation of Elk3/Pctaire2 and Elk4/Mfsd4 sense-antisense mRNA heteroduplexes. After peripheral nerve injury the Elk3 mRNA isoforms are each upregulated approximately 2.3-fold in DRG (P<0.005), whereas the natural antisense Pctaire2 isoforms show only a small increase (21%, P<0.01) and Elk1 and Elk4 mRNAs are unchanged. PMID:20304071

  11. Rapid transcriptional pulsing dynamics of high expressing retroviral transgenes in embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Y M Lo

    Full Text Available Single cell imaging studies suggest that transcription is not continuous and occurs as discrete pulses of gene activity. To study mechanisms by which retroviral transgenes can transcribe to high levels, we used the MS2 system to visualize transcriptional dynamics of high expressing proviral integration sites in embryonic stem (ES cells. We established two ES cell lines each bearing a single copy, self-inactivating retroviral vector with a strong ubiquitous human EF1α gene promoter directing expression of mRFP fused to an MS2-stem-loop array. Transfection of MS2-EGFP generated EGFP focal dots bound to the mRFP-MS2 stem loop mRNA. These transcription foci colocalized with the transgene integration site detected by immunoFISH. Live tracking of single cells for 20 minutes detected EGFP focal dots that displayed frequent and rapid fluctuations in transcription over periods as short as 25 seconds. Similarly rapid fluctuations were detected from focal doublet signals that colocalized with replicated proviral integration sites by immunoFISH, consistent with transcriptional pulses from sister chromatids. We concluded that retroviral transgenes experience rapid transcriptional pulses in clonal ES cell lines that exhibit high level expression. These events are directed by a constitutive housekeeping gene promoter and may provide precedence for rapid transcriptional pulsing at endogenous genes in mammalian stem cells.

  12. The expression of petunia strigolactone pathway genes is altered as part of the endogenous developmental program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revel S M Drummond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of mutants with increased branching has revealed the strigolactone synthesis/perception pathway which regulates branching in plants. However, whether variation in this well conserved developmental signalling system contributes to the unique plant architectures of different species is yet to be determined. We examined petunia orthologues of the Arabidopsis MAX1 and MAX2 genes to characterise their role in petunia architecture. A single orthologue of MAX1, PhMAX1 which encodes a cytochrome P450, was identified and was able to complement the max1 mutant of Arabidopsis. Petunia has two copies of the MAX2 gene, PhMAX2A and PhMAX2B which encode F-Box proteins. Differences in the transcript levels of these two MAX2-like genes suggest diverging functions. Unlike PhMAX2B, PhMAX2A mRNA levels increase as leaves age. Nonetheless, this gene functionally complements the Arabidopsis max2 mutant indicating that the biochemical activity of the PhMAX2A protein is not significantly different from MAX2. The expression of the petunia strigolactone pathway genes (PhCCD7, PhCCD8, PhMAX1, PhMAX2A, and PhMAX2B was then further investigated throughout the development of wild-type petunia plants. Three of these genes showed changes in mRNA levels over the development series. Alterations to the expression of these genes over time, or in different regions of the plant, may influence the branching growth habit of the plant. Alterations to strigolactone production and/or sensitivity could allow both subtle and dramatic changes to branching within and between species.

  13. ADAM17 deletion in thymic epithelial cells alters aire expression without affecting T cell developmental progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Gravano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells are critical for normal T cell development. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are important stromal niche cells that provide essential growth factors, cytokines, and present self-antigens to developing thymocytes. The identification of genes that mediate cellular crosstalk in the thymus is ongoing. One candidate gene, Adam17, encodes a metalloprotease that functions by cleaving the ectodomain of several transmembrane proteins and regulates various developmental processes. In conventional Adam17 knockout mice, a non-cell autonomous role for ADAM17 in adult T cell development was reported, which strongly suggested that expression of ADAM17 in TECs was required for normal T cell development. However, knockdown of Adam17 results in multisystem developmental defects and perinatal lethality, which has made study of the role of Adam17 in specific cell types difficult. Here, we examined T cell and thymic epithelial cell development using a conditional knockout approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated an Adam17 conditional knockout mouse in which floxed Adam17 is deleted specifically in TECs by Cre recombinase under the control of the Foxn1 promoter. Normal T cell lineage choice and development through the canonical αβ T cell stages was observed. Interestingly, Adam17 deficiency in TECs resulted in reduced expression of the transcription factor Aire. However, no alterations in the patterns of TEC phenotypic marker expression and thymus morphology were noted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to expectation, our data clearly shows that absence of Adam17 in TECs is dispensable for normal T cell development. Differentiation of TECs is also unaffected by loss of Adam17 based on phenotypic markers. Surprisingly, we have uncovered a novel genetic link between Adam17and Aire expression in vivo. The cell type in which ADAM17 mediates its non-cell autonomous impact and

  14. Transcriptional Expression of the tceA Gene in a Dehalococcoides-Containing Microbial Enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    David R. Johnson; Lee, Patrick K. H.; Holmes, Victor F.; Fortin, Alexander C.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the transcriptional expression of the tceA gene, which encodes a trichloroethene reductive dehalogenase, were characterized in a Dehalococcoides-containing microbial enrichment culture. Expression was quantified by real-time PCR as the number of tceA transcripts per tceA gene. Expression of tceA increased 40-fold after chlorinated ethene-starved cells were exposed to trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (DCE), or 1,1-DCE but did not increase after exposure to tetrachlo...

  15. Encoding four gene expression programs in the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Cellular signaling response pathways often exhibit a bow-tie topology [1,2]: multiple upstream stress signals converge on a single shared transcription factor, which is thought to induce different downstream gene expression programs (Figure 1A). However, if several different signals activate the same transcription factor, can each signal then induce a specific gene expression response? A growing body of literature supports a temporal coding theory where information about environmental signals can be encoded, at least partially, in the temporal dynamics of the shared transcription factor [1,2]. For example, in the case of the budding yeast transcription factor Msn2, different stresses induce distinct Msn2 activation dynamics: Msn2 shows pulsatile nuclear activation with dose-dependent frequency under glucose limitation, but sustained nuclear activation with dose-dependent amplitude under oxidative stress [3]. These dynamic patterns can then lead to differential gene expression responses [3-5], but it is not known how much specificity can be obtained. Thus, a major question of this temporal coding theory is how many gene response programs or cellular functions can be robustly encoded by dynamic control of a single transcription factor. Here we provide the first direct evidence that, simply by regulating the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor, it is possible to preferentially induce four distinct gene expression programs. PMID:27046808

  16. Slow growing pre weaning piglets have altered adipokine gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigs were selected from seven litters were monitored for growth rate from day 1 to 21. Samples of subcutaneous (SQ) and perirenal (PR) adipose tissues were collected at day 21 of age from the fastest and slowest growing piglets within the litter. Total RNA was extracted and reverse transcription a...

  17. Alteration of the exopolysaccharide production and the transcriptional profile of free-living Frankia strain CcI3 under nitrogen-fixing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-In; Donati, Andrew J; Hahn, Dittmar; Tisa, Louis S; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of different nitrogen (N) sources on exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and composition by Frankia strain CcI3, a N2-fixing actinomycete that forms root nodules with Casuarina species. Frankia cells grown in the absence of NH4Cl (i.e., under N2-fixing conditions) produced 1.7-fold more EPS, with lower galactose (45.1 vs. 54.7 mol%) and higher mannose (17.3 vs. 9.7 mol%) contents than those grown in the presence of NH4Cl as a combined N-source. In the absence of the combined N-source, terminally linked and branched residue contents were nearly twice as high with 32.8 vs. 15.1 mol% and 15.1 vs. 8.7 mol%, respectively, than in its presence, while the content of linearly linked residues was lower with 52.1 mol% compared to 76.2 mol%. To find out clues for the altered EPS production at the transcriptional level, we performed whole-gene expression profiling using quantitative reverse transcription PCR and microarray technology. The transcription profiles of Frankia strain CcI3 grown in the absence of NH4Cl revealed up to 2 orders of magnitude higher transcription of nitrogen fixation-related genes compared to those of CcI3 cells grown in the presence of NH4Cl. Unexpectedly, microarray data did not provide evidence for transcriptional regulation as a mechanism for differences in EPS production. These findings indicate effects of nitrogen fixation on the production and composition of EPS in Frankia strain CcI3 and suggest posttranscriptional regulation of enhanced EPS production in the absence of the combined N-source. PMID:24097014

  18. A single-nucleotide deletion in the POMP 5' UTR causes a transcriptional switch and altered epidermal proteasome distribution in KLICK genodermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Johanna; Klar, Joakim; Tiwari, Neha; Schuster, Jens; Törmä, Hans; Badhai, Jitendra; Pujol, Ramon; van Steensel, Maurice A M; Brinkhuizen, Tjinta; Brinkhuijzen, Tjinta; Gijezen, Lieke; Chaves, Antonio; Tadini, Gianluca; Vahlquist, Anders; Dahl, Niklas

    2010-04-01

    KLICK syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive skin disorder characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, linear hyperkeratotic papules, and ichthyosiform scaling. In order to establish the genetic cause of this disorder, we collected DNA samples from eight European probands. Using high-density genome-wide SNP analysis, we identified a 1.5 Mb homozygous candidate region on chromosome 13q. Sequence analysis of the ten annotated genes in the candidate region revealed homozygosity for a single-nucleotide deletion at position c.-95 in the proteasome maturation protein (POMP) gene, in all probands. The deletion is included in POMP transcript variants with long 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) and was associated with a marked increase of these transcript variants in keratinocytes from KLICK patients. POMP is a ubiquitously expressed protein and functions as a chaperone for proteasome maturation. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsies from KLICK patients revealed an altered epidermal distribution of POMP, the proteasome subunit proteins alpha 7 and beta 5, and the ER stress marker CHOP. Our results suggest that KLICK syndrome is caused by a single-nucleotide deletion in the 5' UTR of POMP resulting in altered distribution of POMP in epidermis and a perturbed formation of the outermost layers of the skin. These findings imply that the proteasome has a prominent role in the terminal differentiation of human epidermis. PMID:20226437

  19. The Transcription Cofactor Swi6 of the Fusarium graminearum Is Involved in Fusarium Graminearum Virus 1 Infection-Induced Phenotypic Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Moonil; Lee, Yoonseung; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    The transcription cofactor Swi6 plays important roles in regulating vegetative growth and meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functions of Swi6 ortholog were also characterized in Fusarium graminearum which is one of the devastating plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we report possible role of FgSwi6 in the interaction between F. graminearum and Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1) strain DK21. FgV1 perturbs biological characteristics of host fungi such as vegetative growth, sporulation, pigmentation, and reduction of the virulence (hypovirulence) of its fungal host. To characterize function(s) of FgSWI6 gene during FgV1 infection, targeted deletion, over-expression, and complementation mutants were generated and further infected successfully with FgV1. Deletion of FgSwi6 led to severe reduction of vegetative growth even aerial mycelia while over-expression did not affect any remarkable alteration of phenotype in virus-free isolates. Virus-infected (VI) FgSWI6 deletion isolate exhibited completely delayed vegetative growth. However, VI FgSWI6 over-expression mutant grew faster than any other VI isolates. To verify whether these different growth patterns in VI isolates, viral RNA quantification was carried out using qRT-PCR. Surprisingly, viral RNA accumulations in VI isolates were similar regardless of introduced mutations. These results provide evidence that FgSWI6 might play important role(s) in FgV1 induced phenotype alteration such as delayed vegetative growth. PMID:27493603

  20. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy M. Martinez- Vaz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation.

  1. INK4/ARF transcript expression is associated with chromosome 9p21 variants linked to atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have linked common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on chromosome 9p21 near the INK4/ARF (CDKN2A/B tumor suppressor locus with risk of atherosclerotic diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To explore the mechanism of this association, we investigated whether expression of proximate transcripts (p16(INK4a, p15(INK4b, ARF, ANRIL and MTAP correlate with genotype of representative 9p21 SNPs.We analyzed expression of 9p21 transcripts in purified peripheral blood T-cells (PBTL from 170 healthy donors. Samples were genotyped for six selected disease-related SNPs spanning the INK4/ARF locus. Correlations among these variables were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Significantly reduced expression of all INK4/ARF transcripts (p15(INK4b, p16(INK4a, ARF and ANRIL was found in PBTL of individuals harboring a common SNP (rs10757278 associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease, stroke and aortic aneurysm. Expression of MTAP was not influenced by rs10757278 genotype. No association of any these transcripts was noted with five other tested 9p21 SNPs.Genotypes of rs10757278 linked to increased risk of atherosclerotic diseases are also associated with decreased expression in PBTL of the INK4/ARF locus, which encodes three related anti-proliferative transcripts of known importance in tumor suppression and aging.

  2. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  3. Expression of influenza virus hemagglutinin activates transcription factor NF-kappa B.

    OpenAIRE

    Pahl, H L; Baeuerle, P A

    1995-01-01

    Influenza virus infection initiates transcription of a variety of genes for cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta, interleukin 1 alpha, (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and gamma interferon. However, the mechanism by which virus infection elicits cytokine expression remains unknown. Six influenza virus-induced cytokine genes are targets for the inducible transcription factor NF-kappa B, a central ...

  4. Expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A in endometrial carcinomas: clinicopathologic correlations and prognostic significance

    OpenAIRE

    Toki, Naoyuki; Kagami, Seiji; Kurita, Tomoko; Kawagoe, Toshinori; Matsuura, Yusuke; Hachisuga, Toru; Matsuyama, Atsuji; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Izumi, Hiroto; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is necessary for both transcription and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. This study was conducted to elucidate the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of mtTFA in patients with endometrial carcinoma. This study investigated the relationship between the immunohistochemical expression of mtTFA and various clinicopathological variables in 276 endometrial carcinomas, including 245 endometrioid adenocarcinomas and 31 nonendometrioid carcinoma...

  5. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcri...

  6. ProbeSelect: selecting differentially expressed probes in transcriptional profile data

    OpenAIRE

    Hosur, Raghavendra; Szak, Suzanne; Thai, Alice; Allaire, Norm; Bienkowska, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Transcriptional profiling still remains one of the most popular techniques for identifying relevant biomarkers in patient samples. However, heterogeneity in the population leads to poor statistical evidence for selection of most relevant biomarkers to pursue. In particular, human transcriptional differences can be subtle, making it difficult to tease out real differentially expressed biomarkers from the variability inherent in the population. To address this issue, we propose a simpl...

  7. Transcriptional identification and characterization of differentially expressed genes associated with embryogenesis in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Lulu Zhai; Liang Xu; Yan Wang; Xianwen Zhu; Haiyang Feng; Chao Li; Xiaobo Luo; Muleke M. Everlyne; Liwang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Embryogenesis is an important component in the life cycle of most plant species. Due to the difficulty in embryo isolation, the global gene expression involved in plant embryogenesis, especially the early events following fertilization are largely unknown in radish. In this study, three cDNA libraries from ovules of radish before and after fertilization were sequenced using the Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling strategy. A total of 5,777 differentially expressed transcripts were det...

  8. A Bayesian model selection approach for identifying differentially expressed transcripts from RNA-Seq data

    OpenAIRE

    Papastamoulis, Panagiotis; Rattray, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology allow the quantification of the transcriptome and scoring transcripts as differentially or equally expressed between two biological conditions. Although these two tasks are closely linked, the available inference methods treat them separately: a primary model is used to estimate expression and its output is post-processed using a differential expression model. In this paper, both issues are simultaneously addressed by proposing the joint estimation of expr...

  9. Progress of transcription factor Twist expression in breast cancer and its biological effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Qian

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor in women and the pathogenesis is not fully elucidated. Proliferation, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis are the links closely related to the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Twist is a type of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that can affect cell proliferation and invasion process, epithelial-mesenchymal transition process and angiogenesis process through regulating the transcription of downstream target genes. In the research, the study of transcription factor Twist expression in breast cancer and its biological effect is reviewed.

  10. EGFR soluble isoforms and their transcripts are expressed in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaudeau, Angélique; Durand, Karine; Bessette, Barbara; Chaunavel, Alain; Pommepuy, Isabelle; Projetti, Fabrice; Robert, Sandrine; Caire, François; Rabinovitch-Chable, Hélène; Labrousse, François

    2012-01-01

    The EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) is involved in the oncogenesis of many tumors. In addition to the full-length EGFR (isoform a), normal and tumor cells produce soluble EGFR isoforms (sEGFR) that lack the intracellular domain. sEGFR isoforms b, c and d are encoded by EGFR variants 2 (v2), 3 (v3) and 4 (v4) mRNA resulting from gene alternative splicing. Accordingly, the results of EGFR protein expression analysis depend on the domain targeted by the antibodies. In meningiomas, EGFR expression investigations mainly focused on EGFR isoform a. sEGFR and EGFRvIII mutant, that encodes a constitutively active truncated receptor, have not been studied. In a 69 meningiomas series, protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using extracellular domain targeted antibody (ECD-Ab) and intracellular domain targeted antibody (ICD-Ab). EGFRv1 to v4 and EGFRvIII mRNAs were quantified by RT-PCR and EGFR amplification revealed by MLPA. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical data, tumor resection (Simpson grade), histological type, tumor grade, and patient outcome.Immunochemical staining was stronger with ECD-Ab than with ICD-Ab. Meningiomas expressed EGFRv1 to -v4 mRNAs but not EGFRvIII mutant. Intermediate or high ECD-Ab staining and high EGFRv1 to v4 mRNA levels were associated to a better progression free survival (PFS). PFS was also improved in women, when tumor resection was evaluated as Simpson 1 or 2, in grade I vs. grade II and III meningiomas and when Ki67 labeling index was lower than 10%. Our results suggest that, EGFR protein isoforms without ICD and their corresponding mRNA variants are expressed in meningiomas in addition to the whole isoform a. EGFRvIII was not expressed. High expression levels seem to be related to a better prognosis. These results indicate that the oncogenetic mechanisms involving the EGFR pathway in meningiomas could be different from other tumor types. PMID:22623992

  11. EGFR soluble isoforms and their transcripts are expressed in meningiomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Guillaudeau

    Full Text Available The EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in the oncogenesis of many tumors. In addition to the full-length EGFR (isoform a, normal and tumor cells produce soluble EGFR isoforms (sEGFR that lack the intracellular domain. sEGFR isoforms b, c and d are encoded by EGFR variants 2 (v2, 3 (v3 and 4 (v4 mRNA resulting from gene alternative splicing. Accordingly, the results of EGFR protein expression analysis depend on the domain targeted by the antibodies. In meningiomas, EGFR expression investigations mainly focused on EGFR isoform a. sEGFR and EGFRvIII mutant, that encodes a constitutively active truncated receptor, have not been studied. In a 69 meningiomas series, protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using extracellular domain targeted antibody (ECD-Ab and intracellular domain targeted antibody (ICD-Ab. EGFRv1 to v4 and EGFRvIII mRNAs were quantified by RT-PCR and EGFR amplification revealed by MLPA. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical data, tumor resection (Simpson grade, histological type, tumor grade, and patient outcome.Immunochemical staining was stronger with ECD-Ab than with ICD-Ab. Meningiomas expressed EGFRv1 to -v4 mRNAs but not EGFRvIII mutant. Intermediate or high ECD-Ab staining and high EGFRv1 to v4 mRNA levels were associated to a better progression free survival (PFS. PFS was also improved in women, when tumor resection was evaluated as Simpson 1 or 2, in grade I vs. grade II and III meningiomas and when Ki67 labeling index was lower than 10%. Our results suggest that, EGFR protein isoforms without ICD and their corresponding mRNA variants are expressed in meningiomas in addition to the whole isoform a. EGFRvIII was not expressed. High expression levels seem to be related to a better prognosis. These results indicate that the oncogenetic mechanisms involving the EGFR pathway in meningiomas could be different from other tumor types.

  12. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  13. Post-transcriptional block in oxytocin gene expression within the seminiferous tubules of the bovine testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungefroren, H; Davidoff, M; Ivell, R

    1994-01-01

    Northern blot hybridization showed that bovine and sheep testis, unlike testes from other mammals, contain moderate levels of an apparently normal oxytocin gene transcript. In situ hybridization localized this mRNA to within the seminiferous tubules, possibly in the Sertoli cells. Conflicting with this result, immunohistochemistry showed that both oxytocin and the syngeneic neurophysin I epitopes are both clearly restricted to the Leydig cells, being expressed here at a low level. Since illegitimate transcription from spurious start sites can lead to a lack of translation product, the integrity of the major ruminant testicular transcripts of the oxytocin gene was checked using differential hybridization. RNase protection and multiple polymerase chain reaction assays. All tests showed the transcripts to have a normal, translatable composition and to be transcribed from the conventional 5' initiation site. Therefore, the block in oxytocin gene expression within the tubules is probably due to a lesion at the post-transcriptional level. The low level peptide expression in the Leydig cells can probably be attributed to the presence of functional transcripts in these cells, which are below the level of significant detection for the in situ hybridization assay. PMID:8138753

  14. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression clusters in motor neurons following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryge, J.; Winther, Ole; Wienecke, J.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord injury leads to neurological dysfunctions affecting the motor, sensory as well as the autonomic systems. Increased excitability of motor neurons has been implicated in injury-induced spasticity, where the reappearance of self-sustained plateau potentials in the absence of...... modulatory inputs from the brain correlates with the development of spasticity. Results: Here we examine the dynamic transcriptional response of motor neurons to spinal cord injury as it evolves over time to unravel common gene expression patterns and their underlying regulatory mechanisms. For this we use a...... late phase of the injury response. Transcription factor motif analysis identifies differentially expressed transcription factors involved in the regulation of each gene cluster, shaping the expression of the identified biological processes and their associated genes underlying the changes in motor...

  15. STAT6 Transcription Factor Is a Facilitator of the Nuclear Receptor PPARγ-Regulated Gene Expression in Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szanto, Attila; Balint, Balint L.; Nagy, Zsuzsanna S.; Barta, Endre; Dezso, Balazs; Pap, Attila; Szeles, Lajos; Poliska, Szilard; Oros, Melinda; Ronald M. Evans; Barak, Yaacov; Schwabe, John; Nagy, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    Summary Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a lipid-activated transcription factor regulating lipid metabolism and inflammatory response in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). These immune cells exposed to distinct inflammatory milieu show cell type specification as a result of altered gene expression. We demonstrate here a mechanism how inflammatory molecules modulate PPARγ signaling in distinct subsets of cells. Proinflammatory molecules inhibited whereas interleukin-...

  16. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2016-04-01

    During development, transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b, and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), spiral and vestibular ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. The present study investigates the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII, and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, and X as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3b(KO) RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However, loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. PMID:26356988

  17. Differential expression analysis of transcripts related to oil metabolism in maturing seeds of Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Divya; Sankararamasubramanian, H M; Kumar, M Ashok; Parida, Ajay

    2014-04-01

    Jatropha curcas has been widely studied at the molecular level due to its potential as an alternative source of fuel. Many of the reports till date on this plant have focussed mainly on genes contributing to the accumulation of oil in its seeds. A suppression subtractive hybridization strategy was employed to identify genes which are differentially expressed in the mid maturation stage of J. curcas seeds. Random expressed sequence tag sequencing of the cDNA subtraction library resulted in 385 contigs and 1,428 singletons, with 591 expressed sequence tags mapping for enzymes having catalytic roles in various metabolic pathways. Differences in transcript levels in early and mid-to-late maturation stages of seeds were also investigated using sequence information obtained from the cDNA subtraction library. Seven out of 12 transcripts having putative roles in central carbon metabolism were up regulated in early seed maturation stage while lipid metabolism related transcripts were detected at higher levels in the later stage of seed maturation. Interestingly, 4 of the transcripts revealed putative alternative splice variants that were specifically present or up regulated in the early or late maturation stage of the seeds. Transcript expression patterns from the current study using maturing seeds of J. curcas reveal a subtle balancing of oil accumulation and utilization, which may be influenced by their energy requirements. PMID:24757322

  18. Directional gene expression and antisense transcripts in sexual and asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Barragán María J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that nearly a quarter of the initial predicted gene models in the Plasmodium falciparum genome contain errors. Although there have been efforts to obtain complete cDNA sequences to correct the errors, the coverage of cDNA sequences on the predicted genes is still incomplete, and many gene models for those expressed in sexual or mosquito stages have not been validated. Antisense transcripts have widely been reported in P. falciparum; however, the extent and pattern of antisense transcripts in different developmental stages remain largely unknown. Results We have sequenced seven bidirectional libraries from ring, early and late trophozoite, schizont, gametocyte II, gametocyte V, and ookinete, and four strand-specific libraries from late trophozoite, schizont, gametocyte II, and gametocyte V of the 3D7 parasites. Alignment of the cDNA sequences to the 3D7 reference genome revealed stage-specific antisense transcripts and novel intron-exon splicing junctions. Sequencing of strand-specific cDNA libraries suggested that more genes are expressed in one direction in gametocyte than in schizont. Alternatively spliced genes, antisense transcripts, and stage-specific expressed genes were also characterized. Conclusions It is necessary to continue to sequence cDNA from different developmental stages, particularly those of non-erythrocytic stages. The presence of antisense transcripts in some gametocyte and ookinete genes suggests that these antisense RNA may play an important role in gene expression regulation and parasite development. Future gene expression studies should make use of directional cDNA libraries. Antisense transcripts may partly explain the observed discrepancy between levels of mRNA and protein expression.

  19. RNA-seq Analysis of δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-treated T Cells Reveals Altered Gene Expression Profiles That Regulate Immune Response and Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Bam, Marpe; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-07-22

    Marijuana has drawn significant public attention and concern both for its medicinal and recreational use. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the main bioactive component in marijuana, has also been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties by virtue of its ability to activate cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB-2) expressed on immune cells. In this study, we used RNA-seq to quantify the transcriptomes and transcript variants that are differentially regulated by THC in super antigen-activated lymph node cells and CD4(+) T cells. We found that the expressions of many transcripts were altered by THC in both total lymph node cells and CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the abundance of many miRNA precursors and long non-coding RNAs was dramatically altered in THC-treated mice. For example, the expression of miR-17/92 cluster and miR-374b/421 cluster was down-regulated by THC. On the other hand miR-146a, which has been shown to induce apoptosis, was up-regulated by THC. Long non-coding RNAs that are expressed from the opposite strand of CD27 and Appbp2 were induced by THC. In addition, THC treatment also caused alternative promoter usage and splicing. The functions of those altered transcripts were mainly related to immune response and cell proliferation. PMID:27268054

  20. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fumiko Taniuchi; Koji Higai; Tomomi Tanaka; Yutaro Azuma; Kojiro Matsumoto

    2013-01-01

    The α 1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1) enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α 1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT) activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in...

  1. Regulation of expression of two LY-6 family genes by intron retention and transcription induced chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallya Meera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of the expression of particular genes can rely on mechanisms that are different from classical transcriptional and translational control. The LY6G5B and LY6G6D genes encode LY-6 domain proteins, whose expression seems to be regulated in an original fashion, consisting of an intron retention event which generates, through an early premature stop codon, a non-coding transcript, preventing expression in most cell lines and tissues. Results The MHC LY-6 non-coding transcripts have shown to be stable and very abundant in the cell, and not subject to Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. This retention event appears not to be solely dependent on intron features, because in the case of LY6G5B, when the intron is inserted in the artificial context of a luciferase expression plasmid, it is fully spliced but strongly stabilises the resulting luciferase transcript. In addition, by quantitative PCR we found that the retained and spliced forms are differentially expressed in tissues indicating an active regulation of the non-coding transcript. EST database analysis revealed that these genes have an alternative expression pathway with the formation of Transcription Induced Chimeras (TIC. This data was confirmed by RT-PCR, revealing the presence of different transcripts that would encode the chimeric proteins CSNKβ-LY6G5B and G6F-LY6G6D, in which the LY-6 domain would join to a kinase domain and an Ig-like domain, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, the LY6G5B and LY6G6D intron-retained transcripts are not subjected to NMD and are more abundant than the properly spliced forms. In addition, these genes form chimeric transcripts with their neighbouring same orientation 5' genes. Of interest is the fact that the 5' genes (CSNKβ or G6F undergo differential splicing only in the context of the chimera (CSNKβ-LY6G5B or G6F-LY6G6C and not on their own.

  2. EGF activates TTP expression by activation of ELK-1 and EGR-1 transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florkowska Magdalena

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tristetraprolin (TTP is a key mediator of processes such as inflammation resolution, the inhibition of autoimmunity and in cancer. It carries out this role by the binding and degradation of mRNA transcripts, thereby decreasing their half-life. Transcripts modulated by TTP encode proteins such as cytokines, pro-inflammatory agents and immediate-early response proteins. TTP can also modulate neoplastic phenotypes in many cancers. TTP is induced and functionally regulated by a spectrum of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, mitogens and drugs in a MAPK-dependent manner. So far the contribution of p38 MAPK to the regulation of TTP expression and function has been best described. Results Our results demonstrate the induction of the gene coding TTP (ZFP36 by EGF through the ERK1/2-dependent pathway and implicates the transcription factor ELK-1 in this process. We show that ELK-1 regulates ZFP36 expression by two mechanisms: by binding the ZFP36 promoter directly through ETS-binding site (+ 883 to +905 bp and by inducing expression of EGR-1, which in turn increases ZFP36 expression through sequences located between -111 and -103 bp. Conclusions EGF activates TTP expression via ELK-1 and EGR-1 transcription factors.

  3. Genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with an altered redox metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Christoffer; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deleted in GDH1 that encodes a NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was compared to a wild-type strain under anaerobic steady-state conditions. The GDH1-deleted strain has a significantly reduced NADPH requirement,...

  4. Levonorgestrel exposure to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) alters survival, growth, steroidogenic gene expression and hormone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overturf, Matthew D; Overturf, Carmen L; Carty, Dennis R; Hala, David; Huggett, Duane B

    2014-03-01

    Human pharmaceuticals are commonly detected in the environment. Concern over these compounds in the environment center around the potential for pharmaceuticals to interfere with the endocrine system of aquatic organisms. The main focus of endocrine disruption research has centered on how estrogenic and androgenic compounds interact with the endocrine system to elicit reproductive effects. Other classes of compounds, such as progestins, have been overlooked. Recently, studies have investigated the potential for synthetic progestins to impair reproduction and growth in aquatic organisms. The present study utilizes the OECD 210 Early-life Stage (ELS) study to investigate the impacts levonorgestrel (LNG), a synthetic progestin, on fathead minnow (FHM) survival and growth. After 28 days post-hatch, survival of larval FHM was impacted at 462 ng/L, while growth was significantly reduced at 86.9 ng/L. Further analysis was conducted by measuring specific endocrine related mRNA transcript profiles in FHM larvae following the 28 day ELS exposure to LNG. Transcripts of 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP17, AR, ERα, and FSH were significantly down-regulated following 28d exposure to 16.3 ng/L LNG, while exposure to 86.9 ng/L significantly down-regulated 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP19A, and FSH. At 2,392 ng/L of LNG, a significant down-regulation occurred with CYP19A and ERβ transcripts, while mPRα and mPRβ profiles were significantly induced. No significant changes occurred in 11β-HSD, CYP11A, StAR, LHβ, and VTG mRNA expression following LNG exposure. An ex vivo steroidogenesis assay was conducted with sexually mature female FHM following a 7 day exposure 100 ng/L LNG with significant reductions observed in pregnenolone, 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20-DHP), testosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone. Together these data suggest LNG can negatively impact FHM larval survival and growth, with significant alterations in endocrine related responses. PMID:24503577

  5. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27219347

  6. Specific genes involved in synthesis and editing of heparan sulfate proteoglycans show altered expression patterns in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of a specific set of genes controls the different structures of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which are involved in the growth, invasion and metastatic properties of cancerous cells. The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge of HSPG alterations in breast cancer. Twenty-three infiltrating ductal adenocarcinomas (IDCs), both metastatic and non-metastatic were studied. A transcriptomic approach to the structure of heparan sulfate (HS) chains was used, employing qPCR to analyze both the expression of the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and editing, as well as the proteoglycan core proteins. Since some of these proteoglycans can also carry chondroitin sulfate chains, we extended the study to include the genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycosaminoglycans. Histochemical techniques were also used to analyze tissular expression of particular genes showing significant expression differences, of potential interest. No significant change in transcription was detected in approximately 70% of analyzed genes. However, 13 demonstrated changes in both tumor types (40% showing more intense deregulation in the metastatic), while 5 genes showed changes only in non-metastatic tumors. Changes were related to 3 core proteins: overexpression of syndecan-1 and underexpression of glypican-3 and perlecan. HS synthesis was affected by lower levels of some 3-O-sulfotransferase transcripts, the expression of NDST4 and, only in non metastatic tumors, higher levels of extracellular sulfatases. Furthermore, the expression of chondroitin sulfate also was considerably affected, involving both the synthesis of the saccharidic chains and sulfations at all locations. However, the pro-metastatic enzyme heparanase did not exhibit significant changes in mRNA expression, although in metastatic tumors it appeared related to increased levels of the most stable form of mRNA. Finally, the expression of heparanase 2, which displays anti-metastatic features

  7. Dynamic gene expression patterns in animal models of early and late heart failure reveal biphasic-bidirectional transcriptional activation of signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Janelle; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Kass, David A; Barth, Andreas S

    2014-10-15

    Altered cardiac gene expression in heart failure (HF) has mostly been identified by single-point analysis of end-stage disease. This may miss earlier changes in gene expression that are transient and/or directionally opposite to those observed later. Myocardial datasets from the largest microarray data repository (Gene Expression Omnibus) yielded six HF studies with time-course data. Differentially expressed transcripts between nonfailing controls, early HF (2 wk) were determined, and analysis of KEGG pathways and predicted regulatory control elements performed. We found that gene expression followed varying patterns: Downregulation of metabolic pathways occurred early and was sustained into late-stage HF. In contrast, most signaling pathways undergo a complex biphasic pattern: Calcium signaling, p53, apoptosis, and MAPK pathways displayed a bidirectional response, declining early but rising late. These profiles were compatible with specific microRNA (miRNA) and transcription regulators: Estrogen-related receptor-α and myocyte-enhancer factor-2 binding sites were overrepresented in the promoter regions of downregulated transcripts. Concurrently, there were overrepresented binding sites for E2f and ETS family members (E-Twenty Six, including Gabp, Elf1, and Ets2), serum response and interferon regulated factor in biphasic-bidirectional and late-upregulated transcripts. Binding sites for miRNAs downregulated by HF were more common in upregulated transcripts (e.g., miRNA-22,-133a/b, and -150 in early HF and miRNA-1,-9,-499 in late HF). During the development of HF, gene expression is characterized by dynamic overlapping sets of transcripts controlled by specific interrelated regulatory mechanisms. While metabolic gene classes show early and sustained downregulation in HF, signaling pathways undergo a complex biphasic pattern with early down- and more pronounced late upregulation. PMID:25159852

  8. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  9. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  10. PU.1 Suppresses Th2 Cytokine Expression via Silencing of GATA3 Transcription in Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yashiro, Takuya; Kubo, Masato; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is predominantly expressed in dendritic cells (DCs) and is essential for DC differentiation. Although there are several reports that PU.1 positively regulates the expression of DC-specific genes, whether PU.1 also has a suppressive effect on DCs is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that PU.1 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines including IL-13 and IL-5 in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), through repression of the expression of GATA3, which is a master re...

  11. Altered glutamyl-aminopeptidase activity and expression in renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the knowledge of renal neoplasms have demonstrated the implication of several proteases in their genesis, growth and dissemination. Glutamyl-aminopeptidase (GAP) (EC. 3.4.11.7) is a zinc metallopeptidase with angiotensinase activity highly expressed in kidney tissues and its expression and activity have been associated wtih tumour development. In this prospective study, GAP spectrofluorometric activity and immunohistochemical expression were analysed in clear-cell (CCRCC), papillary (PRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Data obtained in tumour tissue were compared with those from the surrounding uninvolved kidney tissue. In CCRCC, classic pathological parameters such as grade, stage and tumour size were stratified following GAP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. GAP activity in both the membrane-bound and soluble fractions was sharply decreased and its immunohistochemical expression showed mild staining in the four histological types of renal tumours. Soluble and membrane-bound GAP activities correlated with tumour grade and size in CCRCCs. This study suggests a role for GAP in the neoplastic development of renal tumours and provides additional data for considering the activity and expression of this enzyme of interest in the diagnosis and prognosis of renal neoplasms

  12. PPARγ transcriptionally regulates the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in primary neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that has been demonstrated to play a key role in degrading both Aβ and insulin and deficient in IDE function is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) pathology. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular regulation of IDE expression. Here we show IDE levels are markedly decreased in DM2 patients and positively correlated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) levels. Further studies show that PPARγ plays an important role in regulating IDE expression in rat primary neurons through binding to a functional peroxisome proliferator-response element (PPRE) in IDE promoter and promoting IDE gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that PPARγ participates in the insulin-induced IDE expression in neurons. These results suggest that PPARγ transcriptionally induces IDE expression which provides a novel mechanism for the use of PPARγ agonists in both DM2 and AD therapies.

  13. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  14. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  15. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben

    2008-01-01

    studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. METHODS: We have...... tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. RESULTS: The major findings are upregulation of cell cycle pathways and a...... system, angiogenesis, DNA repair and several signal transduction pathways are associated to metastasis. Finally several transcription factors e.g. E2F, NFY, and YY1 are identified as being involved in metastasis. CONCLUSIONS: By pathway meta-analysis many biological mechanisms beyond major...

  16. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the "status" of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  17. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  18. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tretyakov

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  19. Altered gene expression in asymptomatic SHIV-infected rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips Aaron T; Chakraborty Nabarun; Hammamieh Rasha; Carroll Erica E; Miller Stacy-Ann M; Jett Marti

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Simian-Human immunodeficiency virus is a chimeric virus which, in rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta) closely imitates immunodeficiency virus infection in human (HIV). A relatively new way to study pathogenesis of viral infection is to study alterations in host gene expression induced by the virus. SHIV infection with certain strains does not result in clinical signs. We hypothesized that alterations in gene expression relating to the immune system would be present in SHIV-infected ani...

  20. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation. PMID:25762996

  1. Using Blood Informative Transcripts in Geographical Genomics: Impact of Lifestyle on Gene Expression in Fijians

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Artika Praveeta; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg

    2012-01-01

    In previous geographical genomics studies of the impact of lifestyle on gene expression inferred from microarray analysis of peripheral blood samples, we described the complex influences of culture, ethnicity, and gender in Morocco, and of pregnancy in Brisbane. Here we describe the use of nanofluidic Fluidigm quantitative RT-PCR arrays targeted at a set of 96 transcripts that are broadly informative of the major axes of immune gene expression, to explore the population structure of transcrip...

  2. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription ...

  3. Early Exercise Affects Mitochondrial Transcription Factors Expression after Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yongshan Hu; Jianhong Zhu; Pengyue Zhang; Jie Jia; Hongying Sha; Yi Wu; Qi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that exercise training is neuroprotective after stroke, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To clarify this critical issue, the current study investigated the effects of early treadmill exercise on the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors. Adult rats were subjected to ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Expression of two genes critical for transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome pro...

  4. Transcript-specific effects of adrenalectomy on seizure-induced BDNF expression in rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauterborn, J C; Poulsen, F R; Stinis, C T;

    1998-01-01

    Activity-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is negatively modulated by circulating adrenal steroids. The rat BDNF gene gives rise to four major transcript forms that each contain a unique 5' exon (I-IV) and a common 3' exon (V) that codes for BDNF protein. Exon-specific i...

  5. Transcription regulates HIF-1α expression in CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Thomas; Bollinger, Annalena; Gies, Sydney; Feldhoff, Lea; Solbach, Werner; Rupp, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediates the metabolic adaptation of cells to hypoxia and T-helper cell fate. However, HIF-1α regulation in CD4(+) T cells (T cells) remains elusive. Here we observed that depletion of oxygen (O2⩽2%) alone was not sufficient to induce HIF-1α expression in T cells. However, when hypoxic T cells were stimulated, HIF-1α was expressed and this was dependent on nuclear factor-κB- and nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT)-mediated transcriptional upregulation of Hif-1α mRNA. HIF-1α upregulation could be blocked by drugs inhibiting NF-κB, NFAT or mammalian target of rapamycin precluding CD4(+) T-cell stimulation or translation in T cells, as well as by blocking transcription. CD3, CD28, phorbol-12-myristat-13-acetat (PMA) or ionomycin-stimulated T cells did not express HIF-1α under normoxic conditions. In conclusion, regulation of HIF-1α expression in CD4(+) T cells in hypoxia gravely relies on its transcriptional upregulation and subsequent enhanced protein stabilization. PMID:26150319

  6. DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED MIDGUT TRANSCRIPTS IN CULICOIDES SONORENSIS (DIPTERA: CERATOPOGONIDAE) FOLLOWING ORBIVIRUS (REOVIRIDAE) ORAL FEEDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the vector insect's gene expression response to a virus infection may aid design of control measures for arbovirus diseases. Differential display and a subtractive library were used to identify Culicoides sonorensis midgut transcripts more abundant 1 day following per os introduction ...

  7. BRF1 mutations alter RNA polymerase III-dependent transcription and cause neurodevelopmental anomalies.

    OpenAIRE

    Borck, G; Hög, F.; Dentici, M.; Tan, P; Sowada, N.; Medeira, A.; Gueneau, L.; Thiele, H; Kousi, M.; Lepri, F.; Wenzeck, L.; Blumenthal, I; Radicioni, A.; Schwarzenberg, T.; Mandriani, B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes tRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs to regulate protein synthesis. Dysregulation of Pol III transcription has been linked to cancer, and germline mutations in genes encoding Pol III subunits or tRNA processing factors cause neurogenetic disorders in humans, such as hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Here we describe an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and intellectual disability, as well...

  8. Radiation-induced alteration of gene expression in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of rats to high dose of γ-radiation (200 Gy) significantly enhanced the ability of mitochondria to accumulate and retain exogenously added Ca2+ one hour after irradiation. 48 hours after irradiation no differences in Ca2+ transporting parameters between mitochondria from control and irradiated animals were found. The stability of mitochondrial membrane potential - the driving force for Ca2+ accumulation and retention, depends on the expression of bcl-2 gene, whose product not only participates in the regulation of Ca2+ fluxes in, but also demonstrates antioxidant properties. The overexpression of this gene was shown to protect cell mitochondria against oxidative stress. However, the investigation of bcl-2 expression in rat liver did not show any significant changes neither 1 nor 48 hours after irradiation. Taking into account that the damage of mitochondria induced action of oxygen radicals and Ca2+ can be prevented by antioxidants, the expression of genes encoded superoxiddismutase and catalase was studied. Expression was gradually stimulated. However, under conditions employed in experiments, direct changes. Presumably this can be explained by a post-translational regulation of the activity of these enzymes. (authors)

  9. Coordinated transcription factor and promoter engineering to establish strong expression elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, John M; Tong, Alice; Tong, Joyce; Pattie, Jonathan; Alper, Hal S

    2016-07-01

    Gene expression requires the coordination of trans-acting factors and cis-DNA elements to initiate transcription. Here we present a coordinated approach that combines cis-acting element engineering with mutant trans-acting factors to engineer yeast promoters. Specifically, we first construct a hybrid promoter based on the ARO9 upstream region that exhibits high constitutive and inducible expression with respect to exogenous tryptophan. Next, we perform protein engineering to identify a mutant Aro80p that affords both high constitutive expression while retaining inducible traits. We then use this mutant trans-acting factor to drive expression and generate ultra-strong promoters with transcriptional output roughly 2 fold higher than TDH3 (GPD), one of the strongest promoters to-date. Finally, we used this element to construct a modular expression system capable of staged outputs resulting in a system with nearly 6-fold, 12-fold and 15-fold expression relative to the off-state. This work further highlights the potential of using endogenous transcription factors (including mutant factors) along with hybrid promoters to expand the yeast synthetic biology toolbox. PMID:27152757

  10. Combinatorial activation and repression by seven transcription factors specify Drosophila odorant receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Jafari

    Full Text Available The mechanism that specifies olfactory sensory neurons to express only one odorant receptor (OR from a large repertoire is critical for odor discrimination but poorly understood. Here, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of OR expression regulation in Drosophila. A systematic, RNAi-mediated knock down of most of the predicted transcription factors identified an essential function of acj6, E93, Fer1, onecut, sim, xbp1, and zf30c in the regulation of more than 30 ORs. These regulatory factors are differentially expressed in antennal sensory neuron classes and specifically required for the adult expression of ORs. A systematic analysis reveals not only that combinations of these seven factors are necessary for receptor gene expression but also a prominent role for transcriptional repression in preventing ectopic receptor expression. Such regulation is supported by bioinformatics and OR promoter analyses, which uncovered a common promoter structure with distal repressive and proximal activating regions. Thus, our data provide insight into how combinatorial activation and repression can allow a small number of transcription factors to specify a large repertoire of neuron classes in the olfactory system.

  11. Macrophage polarization alters the expression and sulfation pattern of glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pierre; Denys, Agnès; Delos, Maxime; Sikora, Anne-Sophie; Carpentier, Mathieu; Julien, Sylvain; Pestel, Joël; Allain, Fabrice

    2015-05-01

    Macrophages are major cells of inflammatory process and take part in a large number of physiological and pathological processes. According to tissue environment, they can polarize into pro-inflammatory (M1) or alternative (M2) cells. Although many evidences have hinted to a potential role of cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the functions of macrophages, the effect of M1 or M2 polarization on the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides has not been investigated so far. GAGs are composed of repeat sulfated disaccharide units. Heparan (HS) and chondroitin/dermatan sulfates (CS/DS) are the major GAGs expressed at the cell membrane. They are involved in numerous biological processes, which rely on their ability to selectively interact with a large panel of proteins. More than 20 genes encoding sulfotransferases have been implicated in HS and CS/DS biosynthesis, and the functional repertoire of HS and CS/DS has been related to the expression of these isoenzymes. In this study, we analyzed the expression of sulfotransferases as a response to macrophage polarization. We found that M1 and M2 activation drastically modified the profiles of expression of numerous HS and CS/DS sulfotransferases. This was accompanied by the expression of GAGs with distinct structural features. We then demonstrated that GAGs of M2 macrophages were efficient to present fibroblast growth factor-2 in an assay of tumor cell proliferation, thus indicating that changes in GAG structure may contribute to the functions of polarized macrophages. Altogether, our findings suggest a regulatory mechanism in which fine modifications in GAG biosynthesis may participate to the plasticity of macrophage functions. PMID:25504800

  12. Alteration of floral organ identity by over-expression of IbMADS3-1 in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mi-Rae; Seo, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Ji-Seoung; Joen, Seo-Bum; Kang, Seung-Won; Lee, Gung-Pyo; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Sun-Hyung

    2011-04-01

    The MADS-box genes have been studied mainly in flower development by researching flower homeotic mutants. Most of the MADS-box genes isolated from plants are expressed exclusively in floral tissues, and some of their transcripts have been found in various vegetative tissues. The genes in the STMADS subfamily are important in the development of whole plants including roots, stems, leaves, and the plant vascular system. IbMADS3-1, which is in the STMADS subfamily, and which has been cloned in Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is expressed in all vegetative tissues of the plant, particularly in white fibrous roots. Sequence similarity, besides the spatial and temporal expression patterns, enabled the definition of a novel MADS-box subfamily comprising STMADS16 and the other MADS-box genes in STMADS subfamily expressed specifically in vegetative tissues. Expression of IbMADS3-1 was manifest by the appearance of chlorophyll-containing petals and production of characteristic changes in organ identity carpel structure alterations and sepaloidy of the petals. In reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis with a number of genes known to be key regulators of floral organ development, the flowering promoter NFL1 was clearly reduced at the RNA level compared with wild type in transgenic line backgrounds. Moreover, NtMADS5 showed slight down-regulation compared with wild-type plants in transgenic lines. These results suggest that IbMADS3-1 could be a repressor of NFL1 located upstream of NtMADS5. IbMADS3-1 ectopic expression is suggested as a possible means during vegetative development by which the IbMADS3-1 gene may interfere with the floral developmental pathway. PMID:20567900

  13. Expression, processing and transcriptional regulation of granulysin in short-term activated human lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groscurth Peter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulysin, a cytotoxic protein expressed in human natural killer cells and activated T lymphocytes, exhibits cytolytic activity against a variety of intracellular microbes. Expression and transcription have been partially characterised in vitro and four transcripts (NKG5, 519, 520, and 522 were identified. However, only a single protein product of 15 kDa was found, which is subsequently processed to an active 9 kDa protein. Results In this study we investigated generation of granulysin in lymphokine activated killer (LAK cells and antigen (Listeria specific T-cells. Semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed NKG5 to be the most prominent transcript. It was found to be up-regulated in a time-dependent manner in LAK cells and antigen specific T-cells and their subsets. Two isoforms of 519 mRNA were up-regulated under IL-2 and antigen stimulation. Moreover, two novel transcripts, without any known function, comprising solely parts of the 5 prime region of the primary transcript, were detected. A significant increase of granulysin expressing LAK cells as well as antigen specific T-cells was shown by fluorescence microscopy. On the subset level, increase in CD4+ granulysin expressing cells was found only under antigen stimulation. Immunoblotting showed the 15 kDa form of granulysin to be present in the first week of stimulation either with IL-2 or with bacterial antigen. Substantial processing to the 9 kDa form was detected during the first week in LAK cells and in the second week in antigen specific T-cells. Conclusion This first comprehensive study of granulysin gene regulation in primary cultured human lymphocytes shows that the regulation of granulysin synthesis in response to IL-2 or bacterial antigen stimulation occurs at several levels: RNA expression, extensive alternative splicing and posttranslational processing.

  14. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  15. [Identification and expression analysis of WRKY transcription factors in medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhirong; Wang, Xingchun; Xue, Jin'ai; Meng, Lingzhi; Li, Runzhi

    2013-06-01

    WRKY transcription factors, one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants, involve in multiple life activities including plant growth and development as well as stress responses. However, little is known about the types and functions of WRKY transcription factors in Catharanthus roseus, an important medicinal plant. In this study, we identified 47 CrWRKY transcriptional factors from 26 009 proteins in Catharanthus roseus, and classified them into three distinct groups (G1, G2 and G3) according to the structure of WRKY domain and evolution of the protein family. The expression profiling showed that these CrWRKY genes expressed in a tissue/organ specific manner. The 47 CrWRKY genes were clustered into three types of expression patterns. The first type includes the CrWRKYs highly expressed in flowers and the protoplast treated with methy jasmonate (MeJA) or yeast extraction (YE). The second type contains the CrWRKYs highly expressed in stem and hairy root. The third type represents the CrWRKYs highly expressed in root, stem, leaf, seedling and the hairy root treated by MeJA. Real time quantitative PCR was employed to further identify the expression patterns of the 16 selected CrWRKY genes in various organs, the MeJA-treated protoplasts and hairy roots of Catharanthus roseus, and similar results were obtained. Notably, the expresion of more than 1/3 CrWRKY genes were regulated by MeJA or YE, indicating that these CrWRKYs are likely involed in the signalling webs which modulate the biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloid and plant responses to various stresses. The present results provide a framework for functional identification of the CrWRKYs and understanding of the regulation network of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus. PMID:24063238

  16. Knockdown of Leptin A Expression Dramatically Alters Zebrafish Development

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qin; Dalman, Mark; CHEN, YUN; Akhter, Mashal; Brahmandam, Sravya; Patel, Yesha; Lowe, Josef; Thakkar, Mitesh; Gregory, Akil-Vuai; Phelps, Daryllanae; Riley, Caitlin; Londraville, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Using morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO) technology, we blocked leptin A or leptin receptor expression in embryonic zebrafish, and analyzed consequences of leptin knock-down on fish development. Embryos injected with leptin A or leptin receptor MOs (leptin A or leptin receptor morphants) had smaller bodies and eyes, undeveloped inner ear, enlarged pericardial cavity, curved body and/or tail and larger yolk compared to control embryos of the same stages. The defects persisted in 6-9 day...

  17. Transcription factor Nurr1 maintains fiber integrity and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene expression in dopamine neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kadkhodaei, B.; Alvarsson, A; Schintu, N.; Ramskold, D.; Volakakis, N.; Joodmardi, E.; Yoshitake, T.; Kehr, J; Decressac, M.; Bjorklund, A; Sandberg, R; Svenningsson, P; Perlmann, T

    2013-01-01

    Developmental transcription factors important in early neuron specification and differentiation often remain expressed in the adult brain. However, how these transcription factors function to mantain appropriate neuronal identities in adult neurons and how transcription factor dysregulation may contribute to disease remain largely unknown. The transcription factor Nurr1 has been associated with Parkinson's disease and is essential for the development of ventral midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons....

  18. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  19. Transcript and protein expression profile of PF11_0394, a Plasmodium falciparum protein expressed in salivary gland sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlarman Maggie S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a significant problem around the world today, thus there is still a need for new control methods to be developed. Because the sporozoite displays dual infectivity for both the mosquito salivary glands and vertebrate host tissue, it is a good target for vaccine development. Methods The P. falciparum gene, PF11_0394, was chosen as a candidate for study due to its potential role in the invasion of host tissues. This gene, which was selected using a data mining approach from PlasmoDB, is expressed both at the transcriptional and protein levels in sporozoites and likely encodes a putative surface protein. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and green fluorescent protein (GFP-trafficking studies, a transcript and protein expression profile of PF11_0394 was determined. Results The PF11_0394 protein has orthologs in other Plasmodium species and Apicomplexans, but none outside of the group Apicomplexa. PF11_0394 transcript was found to be present during both the sporozoite and erythrocytic stages of the parasite life cycle, but no transcript was detected during axenic exoerythrocytic stages. Despite the presence of transcript throughout several life cycle stages, the PF11_0394 protein was only detected in salivary gland sporozoites. Conclusions PF11_0394 appears to be a protein uniquely detected in salivary gland sporozoites. Even though a specific function of PF11_0394 has not been determined in P. falciparum biology, it could be another candidate for a new vaccine.

  20. TIGER: Toolbox for integrating genome-scale metabolic models, expression data, and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Paul A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been developed for analyzing genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Many of these methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis, use constrained optimization to predict relationships between metabolic flux and the genes that encode and regulate enzyme activity. Recently, mixed integer programming has been used to encode these gene-protein-reaction (GPR relationships into a single optimization problem, but these techniques are often of limited generality and lack a tool for automating the conversion of rules to a coupled regulatory/metabolic model. Results We present TIGER, a Toolbox for Integrating Genome-scale Metabolism, Expression, and Regulation. TIGER converts a series of generalized, Boolean or multilevel rules into a set of mixed integer inequalities. The package also includes implementations of existing algorithms to integrate high-throughput expression data with genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We demonstrate how TIGER automates the coupling of a genome-scale metabolic model with GPR logic and models of transcriptional regulation, thereby serving as a platform for algorithm development and large-scale metabolic analysis. Additionally, we demonstrate how TIGER's algorithms can be used to identify inconsistencies and improve existing models of transcriptional regulation with examples from the reconstructed transcriptional regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The TIGER package provides a consistent platform for algorithm development and extending existing genome-scale metabolic models with regulatory networks and high-throughput data.

  1. Cloning, Sequencing, and Expression of Selenoprotein Transcripts in the Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo.

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    Roger A Sunde

    Full Text Available The minimum Se requirement for male turkey poults is 0.3 μg Se/g--three times higher than requirements found in rodents--based on liver and gizzard glutathione peroxidase-4 (GPX4 and GPX1 activities. In addition, turkey liver GPX4 activity is 10-fold higher and GPX1 activity is 10-fold lower than in rats, and both GPX1 and GPX4 mRNA levels are dramatically down-regulated by Se deficiency. Currently, the sequences of all annotated turkey selenoprotein transcripts and proteins in the NCBI database are only "predicted." Thus we initiated cloning and sequencing of the full turkey selenoprotein transcriptome to demonstrate expression of selenoprotein transcripts in the turkey, and to develop tools to investigate Se regulation of the full selenoproteome. Total RNA was isolated from six tissues of Se-adequate adult tom turkeys, and used to prepare reverse-transcription cDNA libraries. PCR primers were designed, based initially on chicken, rodent, porcine, bovine and human sequences and later on turkey shotgun cloning sequences. We report here the cloning of full transcript sequences for 9 selenoproteins, and 3'UTR portions for 15 additional selenoproteins, which include SECIS elements in 22 3'UTRs, and in-frame Sec (UGA codons within coding regions of 19 selenoproteins, including 12 Sec codons in SEPP1. In addition, we sequenced the gap between two contigs from the shotgun cloning of the turkey genome, and found the missing sequence for the turkey Sec-tRNA. RTPCR was used to determine the relative transcript expression in 6 tissues. GPX3 expression was high in all tissues except kidney, GPX1 expression was high in kidney, SEPW1 expression was high in heart, gizzard and muscle, and SELU expression was high in liver. SEPP2, a selenoprotein not found in mammals, was highly expressed in liver but not in other tissues. In summary, transcripts for 24 selenoproteins are expressed in the turkey, not just predicted.

  2. Homologs to Cry toxin receptor genes in a de novo transcriptome and their altered expression in resistant Spodoptera litura larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Wang, Huidong; Qi, Jiangwei; Han, Lanzhi; Hu, Meiying; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2015-07-01

    Insect resistance threatens sustainability of insecticides based on Cry proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Since high levels of resistance to Cry proteins involve alterations in Cry-binding midgut receptors, their identification is needed to develop resistance management strategies. Through Illumina sequencing we generated a transcriptome containing 16,161 annotated unigenes for the Oriental leafworm (Spodoptera litura). Transcriptome mining identified 6 contigs with identity to reported lepidopteran Cry toxin receptors. Using PCR we confirmed their expression during the larval stage and compared their quantitative expression in larvae from susceptible and a field-derived Cry1Ca resistant strain of S. litura. Among reduced transcript levels detected for most tested contigs in the Cry1Ca-resistant S. litura larvae, the most dramatic reduction (up to 99%) was detected for alkaline phosphatase contigs. This study significantly expands S. litura transcriptomic resources and provides preliminary identification of putative receptor genes with altered expression in S. litura resistant to Cry1Ca toxin. PMID:25981133

  3. Gene expression, single nucleotide variant and fusion transcript discovery in archival material from breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Norton

    Full Text Available Advantages of RNA-Seq over array based platforms are quantitative gene expression and discovery of expressed single nucleotide variants (eSNVs and fusion transcripts from a single platform, but the sensitivity for each of these characteristics is unknown. We measured gene expression in a set of manually degraded RNAs, nine pairs of matched fresh-frozen, and FFPE RNA isolated from breast tumor with the hybridization based, NanoString nCounter (226 gene panel and with whole transcriptome RNA-Seq using RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq V2 library preparation kits. We performed correlation analyses of gene expression between samples and across platforms. We then specifically assessed whole transcriptome expression of lincRNA and discovery of eSNVs and fusion transcripts in the FFPE RNA-Seq data. For gene expression in the manually degraded samples, we observed Pearson correlations of >0.94 and >0.80 with NanoString and ScriptSeq protocols, respectively. Gene expression data for matched fresh-frozen and FFPE samples yielded mean Pearson correlations of 0.874 and 0.783 for NanoString (226 genes and ScriptSeq whole transcriptome protocols respectively, p<2x10(-16. Specifically for lincRNAs, we observed superb Pearson correlation (0.988 between matched fresh-frozen and FFPE pairs. FFPE samples across NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms gave a mean Pearson correlation of 0.838. In FFPE libraries, we detected 53.4% of high confidence SNVs and 24% of high confidence fusion transcripts. Sensitivity of fusion transcript detection was not overcome by an increase in depth of sequencing up to 3-fold (increase from ~56 to ~159 million reads. Both NanoString and ScriptSeq RNA-Seq technologies yield reliable gene expression data for degraded and FFPE material. The high degree of correlation between NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms suggests discovery based whole transcriptome studies from FFPE material will produce reliable expression data. The RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq protocol

  4. Dual transcriptional-translational cascade permits cellular level tuneable expression control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Rosa; Shankar, Jayendra; Robinson, Christopher J; Halliwell, Samantha; Butler, Lisa; Upton, Mathew; Hay, Sam; Micklefield, Jason; Dixon, Neil

    2016-02-18

    The ability to induce gene expression in a small molecule dependent manner has led to many applications in target discovery, functional elucidation and bio-production. To date these applications have relied on a limited set of protein-based control mechanisms operating at the level of transcription initiation. The discovery, design and reengineering of riboswitches offer an alternative means by which to control gene expression. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel tunable recombinant expression system, termed RiboTite, which operates at both the transcriptional and translational level. Using standard inducible promoters and orthogonal riboswitches, a multi-layered modular genetic control circuit was developed to control the expression of both bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and recombinant gene(s) of interest. The system was benchmarked against a number of commonly used E. coli expression systems, and shows tight basal control, precise analogue tunability of gene expression at the cellular level, dose-dependent regulation of protein production rates over extended growth periods and enhanced cell viability. This novel system expands the number of E. coli expression systems for use in recombinant protein production and represents a major performance enhancement over and above the most widely used expression systems. PMID:26405200

  5. Expression of altered retinoblastoma protein inversely correlates with tumor invasion in gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hua Chou; Hui-Chun Chen; Nan-Song Chou; Ping-I Hsu; Hui-Hwa Tseng

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical and pathological significance of altered retinoblastoma (Rb) encoding protein (pRb) in gastric carcinoma.METHODS: Expression of altered pRb was analyzed in 91 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Sixty-five percent (59/91) of the tumors were positively stained and the staining in tumor nuclei of gastric carcinoma ranged 0%-90%. Moreover, strong expression of altered pRb was found in 35% (6/17),24% (5/21), 17% (8/46) and 0% (0/7) of T1, T2, T3 and T4 gastric carcinomas, respectively. Altered pRb expression was inversely correlated with the depth of tumor invasion (P = 0.047). Degree of immunoreactivity had no significant correlation with tumor grade, node metastasis and distant metastasis. In terms of prognostic significance, univariate analysis showed that poor differentiation [41 (66.1%) vs 34 (42.5%) P = 0.051],advanced tumor stage (P < 0.001) and weakly altered pRb expression [17 (80.5%) vs 58 (49.6%) P = 0.044]were associated with worse prognosis in these patients.However, multivariate analysis revealed that advanced tumor stage was the only independent poor prognostic factor (P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: The mutation of Rb gene is frequent in gastric carcinoma. The expression of altered pRb inversely correlates with tumor invasion and is not an independent prognostic marker in gastric adenocarcinoma

  6. Revertants of a Transcription Termination Mutant of Yeast Contain Diverse Genetic Alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Kotval, Jeroo; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Consaul, Sandra; Sherman, Fred

    1983-01-01

    Revertants of the cyc1-512 transcription termination mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated and subjected to a detailed genetic analysis. The cyc1-512 mutation previously was shown to be a 38-base pair deletion that causes only 10% of the normal steady-state levels of CYC1 mRNA and of the CYC1 gene product, iso-1-cytochrome c. Forty-one cyc1-512 revertants were classified by their content of iso-1-cytochrome c and by their genetic properties in meiotic crosses. Many of the...

  7. Human von Economo neurons express transcription factors associated with Layer V subcerebral projection neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Inma; Seeley, William W

    2015-01-01

    The von Economo neurons (VENs) are large bipolar Layer V projection neurons found chiefly in the anterior cingulate and frontoinsular cortices. Although VENs have been linked to prevalent illnesses such as frontotemporal dementia, autism, and schizophrenia, little is known about VEN identity, including their major projection targets. Here, we undertook a developmental transcription factor expression study, focusing on markers associated with specific classes of Layer V projection neurons. Using mRNA in situ hybridization, we found that VENs prominently express FEZF2 and CTIP2, transcription factors that regulate the fate and differentiation of subcerebral projection neurons, in humans aged 3 months to 65 years. In contrast, few VENs expressed markers associated with callosal or corticothalamic projections. These findings suggest that VENs may represent a specialized Layer V projection neuron for linking cortical autonomic control sites to brainstem or spinal cord regions. PMID:23960210

  8. Expressing functional siRNAs in mammalian cells using convergent transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawes Ian W

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs as genetic inhibitors of gene expression has been shown to be an effective way of studying gene function in mammalian cells. Recently, different DNA vectors for expression of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs or co-expression of sense and antisense RNAs have been developed that direct siRNA-mediated gene silencing. One expression cassette design that has been used to express long sense and antisense RNAs in non-mammalian cell types is symmetric transcription using convergent promoters. However, convergent transcription as a way to generate functional siRNAs in mammalian cells has not been reported. This vector design permits the generation of expression constructs containing no repeat sequences, but capable of inducing RNA interference (RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Results With the aim of simplifying the construction of RNAi expression vectors, we report on the production and application of a novel convergent promoter cassette capable of expressing sense and antisense RNAs, that form double-stranded RNA, and mediate gene silencing in mammalian cells. We use this cassette to inhibit the expression of both the EGFP transgene and the endogenous TP53 gene. The gene silencing effect is Dicer-dependent and the level of gene inactivation achieved is comparable to that produced with synthetic siRNA. Furthermore, this expression system can be used for both short and long-term control of specific gene expression in mammalian cells. Conclusion The experiments performed in this study demonstrate that convergent transcription can be used in mammalian cells to invoke gene-specific silencing via RNAi. This method provides an alternative to expression of shRNAs and co-expression of sense and antisense RNAs from independent cassettes or a divergent promoter. The main advantage of the present vector design is the potential to produce a functional siRNA expression cassette with no repeat sequences

  9. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  10. Ecstasy-Induced Caspase Expression Alters Following Ginger Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Asl, Sara Soleimani; Pourheydar, Bagher; Dabaghian, Fataneh; Nezhadi, Akram; ROOINTAN, AMIR; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to 3-4, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) leads to cell death. Herein, we studied the protective effects of ginger on MDMA- induced apoptosis. Methods 15 Sprague dawley male rats were administrated with 0, 10 mg/kg MDMA, or MDMA along with 100mg/kg ginger, IP for 7 days. Brains were removed to study the caspase 3, 8, and 9 expressions in the hippocampus by RT-PCR. Data was analyzed by SPSS 16 software using the one-way ANOVA test. Results MDMA treatment resulted in a ...

  11. Molecular hydrogen protects chondrocytes from oxidative stress and indirectly alters gene expressions through reducing peroxynitrite derived from nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaoka Teruyasu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular hydrogen (H2 functions as an extensive protector against oxidative stress, inflammation and allergic reaction in various biological models and clinical tests; however, its essential mechanisms remain unknown. H2 directly reacts with the strong reactive nitrogen species peroxynitrite (ONOO- as well as hydroxyl radicals (•OH, but not with nitric oxide radical (NO•. We hypothesized that one of the H2 functions is caused by reducing cellular ONOO-, which is generated by the rapid reaction of NO• with superoxides (•O2-. To verify this hypothesis, we examined whether H2 could restore cytotoxicity and transcriptional alterations induced by ONOO- derived from NO• in chondrocytes. Methods We treated cultured chondrocytes from porcine hindlimb cartilage or from rat meniscus fibrecartilage with a donor of NO•, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP in the presence or absence of H2. Chondrocyte viability was determined using a LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Kit. Gene expressions of the matrix proteins of cartilage and the matrix metalloproteinases were analyzed by reverse transcriptase-coupled real-time PCR method. Results SNAP treatment increased the levels of nitrated proteins. H2 decreased the levels of the nitrated proteins, and suppressed chondrocyte death. It is known that the matrix proteins of cartilage (including aggrecan and type II collagen and matrix metalloproteinases (such as MMP3 and MMP13 are down- and up-regulated by ONOO-, respectively. H2 restoratively increased the gene expressions of aggrecan and type II collagen in the presence of H2. Conversely, the gene expressions of MMP3 and MMP13 were restoratively down-regulated with H2. Thus, H2 acted to restore transcriptional alterations induced by ONOO-. Conclusions These results imply that one of the functions of H2 exhibits cytoprotective effects and transcriptional alterations through reducing ONOO-. Moreover, novel pharmacological strategies

  12. Liver receptor homolog 1 transcriptionally regulates human bile salt export pump expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xiulong; Kaimal, Rajani; Yan, Bingfang; Deng, Ruitang

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic conversion of cholesterol into bile acids in liver is initiated by the rate-limiting cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), whereas the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is responsible for the canalicular secretion of bile acids. Liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) is a key transcriptional factor required for the hepatic expression of CYP7A1. We hypothesized that LRH-1 was also involved in the transcriptional regulation of BSEP. In support of our hypothesis, we found that overexpression o...

  13. Exogenous gibberellin altered morphology, anatomic and transcriptional regulatory networks of hormones in carrot root and shoot

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guang-Long; Que, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Gibberellins stimulate cell elongation and expansion during plant growth and development. Carrot is a root plant with great value and undergoes obvious alteration in organ size over the period of plant growth. However, the roles of gibberellins in carrot remain unclear. Results To investigate the effects of gibberelliins on the growth of carrot, we treated carrot plants with gibberellic acid 3 (GA3) or paclobutrazol (a gibberellin inhibitor). The results found that GA3 dramatically...

  14. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  15. The Role of H3K4me3 in Transcriptional Regulation Is Altered in Huntington’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Xianjun Dong; Junko Tsuji; Adam Labadorf; Panos Roussos; Jiang-Fan Chen; Myers, Richard H; Schahram Akbarian; Zhiping Weng

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder resulting from expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Previous studies have shown mutant HTT can alter expression of genes associated with dysregulated epigenetic modifications. One of the most widely studied chromatin modifications is trimethylated lysine 4 of histone 3 (H3K4me3). Here, we conducted the first comprehensive study of H3K4me3 ChIP-sequencing in neuronal chromatin from the prefrontal co...

  16. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growth and DNA metabolism, respectively. These findings provided the first clues that the E2F transcription factor might be an important regulator of the cell cycle. Since this initial discovery in 1987, several additional E2F family members have been identified, and more than 100 targets genes have been shown to be directly regulated by E2Fs, the majority of these are important for controlling the cell cycle. The progression of a cell through the cell cycle is accompanied with the increased expression of a specific set of genes during one phase of the cell cycle and the decrease of the same set of genes during a later phase of the cell cycle. This roller coaster ride, or oscillation, of gene expression is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle to allow accurate DNA replication and cell division. The E2F transcription factors have been shown to be critical for the temporal expression of the oscillating cell cycle genes. This review will focus on how the oscillation of E2Fs and their targets is regulated by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanism in mammals, yeast, flies, and worms. Furthermore, we will discuss the functional impact of E2Fs on the cell cycle progression and outline the consequences when E2F expression is disturbed. PMID:26254918

  17. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

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    Schaefer Ulf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs. Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF→miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF→miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1 have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92, we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process.

  18. Microarray Analysis Reveals Higher Gestational Folic Acid Alters Expression of Genes in the Cerebellum of Mice Offspring—A Pilot Study

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    Subit Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational folic acid (FA in the diet dysregulates the expression of genes in the cerebellum of offspring in C57BL/6 J mice. One week before gestation and throughout the pregnancy, groups of dams were supplemented with FA either at 2 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of diet. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the genome wide gene expression profile in the cerebellum from day old pups. Our results revealed that exposure to the higher dose FA diet during gestation dysregulated expression of several genes in the cerebellum of both male and female pups. Several transcription factors, imprinted genes, neuro-developmental genes and genes associated with autism spectrum disorder exhibited altered expression levels. These findings suggest that higher gestational FA potentially dysregulates gene expression in the offspring brain and such changes may adversely alter fetal programming and overall brain development.

  19. Parathyroid Hormone Increases Activating Transcription Factor 4 Expression and Activity in Osteoblasts: Requirement for Osteocalcin Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shibing; Franceschi, Renny T; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Di; Lai, Yumei; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Guozhi

    2008-01-01

    PTH is an important peptide hormone regulator of calcium homeostasis and osteoblast function. However, its mechanism of action in osteoblasts is poorly understood. Our previous study demonstrated that PTH activates mouse osteocalcin (Ocn) gene 2 promoter through the osteoblast-specific element 1 site, a recently identified activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) -binding element. In the present study, we examined effects of PTH on ATF4 expression and activity as well as the requirement for A...

  20. The Transcription Cofactor Swi6 of the Fusarium graminearum Is Involved in Fusarium Graminearum Virus 1 Infection-Induced Phenotypic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonil Son

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription cofactor Swi6 plays important roles in regulating vegetative growth and meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functions of Swi6 ortholog were also characterized in Fusarium graminearum which is one of the devastating plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we report possible role of FgSwi6 in the interaction between F. graminearum and Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1 strain DK21. FgV1 perturbs biological characteristics of host fungi such as vegetative growth, sporulation, pigmentation, and reduction of the virulence (hypovirulence of its fungal host. To characterize function(s of FgSWI6 gene during FgV1 infection, targeted deletion, over-expression, and complementation mutants were generated and further infected successfully with FgV1. Deletion of FgSwi6 led to severe reduction of vegetative growth even aerial mycelia while over-expression did not affect any remarkable alteration of phenotype in virus-free isolates. Virus-infected (VI FgSWI6 deletion isolate exhibited completely delayed vegetative growth. However, VI FgSWI6 over-expression mutant grew faster than any other VI isolates. To verify whether these different growth patterns in VI isolates, viral RNA quantification was carried out using qRT-PCR. Surprisingly, viral RNA accumulations in VI isolates were similar regardless of introduced mutations. These results provide evidence that FgSWI6 might play important role(s in FgV1 induced phenotype alteration such as delayed vegetative growth.

  1. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production. PMID:26820137

  2. Genome-wide Screening of Regulators of Catalase Expression: ROLE OF A TRANSCRIPTION COMPLEX AND HISTONE AND tRNA MODIFICATION COMPLEXES ON ADAPTATION TO STRESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia; Encinar Del Dedo, Javier; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental cues, the mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1-driven signaling cascade activates hundreds of genes to induce a robust anti-stress cellular response in fission yeast. Thus, upon stress imposition Sty1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus where it up-regulates transcription through the Atf1 transcription factor. Several regulators of transcription and translation have been identified as important to mount an integral response to oxidative stress, such as the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyl transferase or Elongator complexes, respectively. With the aim of identifying new regulators of this massive gene expression program, we have used a GFP-based protein reporter and screened a fission yeast deletion collection using flow cytometry. We find that the levels of catalase fused to GFP, both before and after a threat of peroxides, are altered in hundreds of strains lacking components of chromatin modifiers, transcription complexes, and modulators of translation. Thus, the transcription elongation complex Paf1, the histone methylase Set1-COMPASS, and the translation-related Trm112 dimers are all involved in full expression of Ctt1-GFP and in wild-type tolerance to peroxides. PMID:26567340

  3. Failure to interact with Brd4 alters the ability of HPV16 E2 to regulate host genome expression and cellular movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauson, Elaine J; Wang, Xu; Dornan, Edward S; Herzyk, Pawel; Bristol, Molly; Morgan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    The E2 protein of the carcinogen human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) regulates replication and transcription of the viral genome in association with viral and cellular proteins. Our previous work demonstrated that E2 can regulate transcription from the host genome. E2 can activate transcription from adjacent promoters when located upstream using E2 DNA binding sequences and this activation is dependent upon the cellular protein Brd4; this report demonstrates that a Brd4 binding E2 mutant alters host genome expression differently from wild type E2. Of particular note is that highly down regulated genes are mostly not affected by failure to interact with Brd4 suggesting that the E2-Brd4 interaction is more responsible for the transcriptional activation of host genes rather than repression. Therefore failure to interact efficiently with Brd4, or altered levels of Brd4, would alter the ability of E2 to regulate the host genome and could contribute to determining the outcome of infection. PMID:26365679

  4. PCBs are associated with altered gene transcript profiles in arctic Beluga Whales (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Marie; Loseto, Lisa L; Helbing, Caren C; Veldhoen, Nik; Dangerfield, Neil J; Ross, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    High trophic level arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) are exposed to persistent organic pollutants (POP) originating primarily from southern latitudes. We collected samples from 43 male beluga harvested by Inuvialuit hunters (2008-2010) in the Beaufort Sea to evaluate the effects of POPs on the levels of 13 health-related gene transcripts using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Consistent with their role in detoxification, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) (r(2) = 0.18, p = 0.045 for 2008 and 2009) and cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1a1) (r(2) = 0.20, p whales during these two years. While this provides insight into the legacy of PCBs in a remote environment, the possible impacts of a changing ice climate on the health of beluga underscores the need for long-term studies. PMID:24490950

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection induced alteration of gene expression in human gastric cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chiou, C.; Chan, C.; Sheu, D; Chen, K; Li, Y; Chan, E

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen responsible for many digestive disorders, induces complex changes in patterns of gene expression in infected tissues. cDNA expression arrays provide a useful tool for studying these complex phenomena.
AIM—To identify genes that showed altered expression after H pylori infection of human gastric cells compared with uninfected controls.
METHODS—The gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS was cocultivated with H pylori. Growth of infected cells was d...

  6. Neuroglobin-overexpression Alters Hypoxic Response Gene Expression in Primary Neuron Culture Following Oxygen Glucose Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Jianxiang; Guo, Shuzhen; Xing, Changhong; Fan, Xiang; Ning, MingMing; Yuan, Juliet C.; Lo, Eng H.; Wang, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a tissue globin specifically expressed in neurons. Our laboratory and others have shown that Ngb overexpression protects neurons against hypoxia/ischemia, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia/ischemia induces a multitude of spatially and temporally regulated responses in gene expression, and initial evidence suggested that Ngb might function in altering biological processes of gene expression. In this study, we as...

  7. Serum Albumin Alters the Expression of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Iron Controlled Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect serum on global transcription within P. aeruginosa at different phases of growth and the role of iron in this regulation. Results presented in this study suggest a novel mechanism through which serum regulates the expression of different P. ae...

  8. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  9. Identification and Expression Profiles of Six Transcripts Encoding Carboxylesterase Protein in Vitis flexuosa Infected with Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Zaherul; Yun, Hae Keun

    2016-01-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogen attacks via several mechanisms, including hypersensitive cell death. Recognition of pathogen attack by the plant resistance gene triggers expression of carboxylesterase genes associated with hypersensitive response. We identified six transcripts of carboxylesterase genes, Vitis flexuosa carboxylesterase 5585 (VfCXE5585), VfCXE12827, VfCXE13132, VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674, which showed different expression patterns upon transcriptome analysis of V. flexuosa inoculated with Elsinoe ampelina. The lengths of genes ranged from 1,098 to 1,629 bp, and their encoded proteins consisted of 309 to 335 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed hydrolase like domains in all six transcripts and contained two conserved motifs, GXSXG of serine hydrolase characteristics and HGGGF related to the carboxylesterase family. The deduced amino acid sequence also contained a potential catalytic triad consisted of serine, aspartic acid and histidine. Of the six transcripts, VfCXE12827 showed upregulated expression against E. ampelina at all time points. Three genes (VfCXE5585, VfCXE12827, and VfCXE13132) showed upregulation, while others (VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674) were down regulated in grapevines infected with Botrytis cinerea. All transcripts showed upregulated expression against Rhizobium vitis at early and later time points except VfCXE12827, and were downregulated for up to 48 hours post inoculation (hpi) after upregulation at 1 hpi in response to R. vitis infection. All tested genes showed high and differential expression in response to pathogens, indicating that they all may play a role in defense pathways during pathogen infection in grapevines. PMID:27493610

  10. Exposure to cypermethrin and mancozeb alters the expression profile of THBS1, SPP1, FEZ1 and GPNMB in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2016-07-01

    The complex immune system displays a coordinated transcriptional response to xenobiotic exposure by altering expression of designated transcription factors that, in turn, trigger immune responses. Despite the identification of several transcription factors that contribute to regulatory response, very little is known about the specific role of factors that are triggered due to exposure to obnoxious pesticides. Here, for the first time, alterations in human peripheral blood lymphocyte expression of transcriptional factors - thrombospondin-1 (THBS-1), secretory phospho-protein-1 (SPP-1), glycoprotein non-metastatic-β (GPNMB) and fasciculation and elongation factor ζ-1 (FEZ-1), due to in vitro exposure to the crop protection chemicals cypermethrin and mancozeb are reported. Results revealed significant changes in expression profiles due to mancozeb exposure, supporting its immune dysfunction potential; in contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant changes. Based on these effects on gene expression across the doses tested, it was likely key components of immune mechanisms such as proliferation, cell adhesion, apoptosis and cell activation in human PBMC were affected. Although these data are from in vitro experiments, the results point out the potential role for changes in these factors in the etiology of defective T-cell immune function seen in humans occupationally exposed to crop protection chemicals like mancozeb. These studies suggest the involvement of transcription factors in regulation of pesticide-induced immune dysfunction; these studies also represent a novel approach for identifying potential immune-related dysfunctions due to exposure to pesticides. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of these in vitro findings. PMID:26796295

  11. Changes in Air CO₂ Concentration Differentially Alter Transcript Levels of NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 Aquaporin Genes in Tobacco Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Francesca; Schubert, Andrea; Lovisolo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin specific control on water versus carbon pathways in leaves is pivotal in controlling gas exchange and leaf hydraulics. We investigated whether Nicotiana tabacum aquaporin 1 (NtAQP1) and Nicotiana tabacum plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2;1 (NtPIP2;1) gene expression varies in tobacco leaves subjected to treatments with different CO₂ concentrations (ranging from 0 to 800 ppm), inducing changes in photosynthesis, stomatal regulation and water evaporation from the leaf. Changes in air CO₂ concentration ([CO₂]) affected net photosynthesis (Pn) and leaf substomatal [CO₂] (Ci). Pn was slightly negative at 0 ppm air CO₂; it was one-third that of ambient controls at 200 ppm, and not different from controls at 800 ppm. Leaves fed with 800 ppm [CO₂] showed one-third reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration (E), and their gs was in turn slightly lower than in 200 ppm- and in 0 ppm-treated leaves. The 800 ppm air [CO₂] strongly impaired both NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 gene expression, whereas 0 ppm air [CO₂], a concentration below any in vivo possible conditions and specifically chosen to maximize the gene expression alteration, increased only the NtAQP1 transcript level. We propose that NtAQP1 expression, an aquaporin devoted to CO₂ transport, positively responds to CO₂ scarcity in the air in the whole range 0-800 ppm. On the contrary, expression of NtPIP2;1, an aquaporin not devoted to CO₂ transport, is related to water balance in the leaf, and changes in parallel with gs. These observations fit in a model where upregulation of leaf aquaporins is activated at low Ci, while downregulation occurs when high Ci saturates photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. PMID:27089333

  12. Changes in Air CO2 Concentration Differentially Alter Transcript Levels of NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 Aquaporin Genes in Tobacco Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Francesca; Schubert, Andrea; Lovisolo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin specific control on water versus carbon pathways in leaves is pivotal in controlling gas exchange and leaf hydraulics. We investigated whether Nicotiana tabacum aquaporin 1 (NtAQP1) and Nicotiana tabacum plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2;1 (NtPIP2;1) gene expression varies in tobacco leaves subjected to treatments with different CO2 concentrations (ranging from 0 to 800 ppm), inducing changes in photosynthesis, stomatal regulation and water evaporation from the leaf. Changes in air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) affected net photosynthesis (Pn) and leaf substomatal [CO2] (Ci). Pn was slightly negative at 0 ppm air CO2; it was one-third that of ambient controls at 200 ppm, and not different from controls at 800 ppm. Leaves fed with 800 ppm [CO2] showed one-third reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration (E), and their gs was in turn slightly lower than in 200 ppm– and in 0 ppm–treated leaves. The 800 ppm air [CO2] strongly impaired both NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 gene expression, whereas 0 ppm air [CO2], a concentration below any in vivo possible conditions and specifically chosen to maximize the gene expression alteration, increased only the NtAQP1 transcript level. We propose that NtAQP1 expression, an aquaporin devoted to CO2 transport, positively responds to CO2 scarcity in the air in the whole range 0–800 ppm. On the contrary, expression of NtPIP2;1, an aquaporin not devoted to CO2 transport, is related to water balance in the leaf, and changes in parallel with gs. These observations fit in a model where upregulation of leaf aquaporins is activated at low Ci, while downregulation occurs when high Ci saturates photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. PMID:27089333

  13. Expression and Functional Analysis of WRKY Transcription Factors in Chinese Wild Hazel, Corylus heterophylla Fisch.

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    Tian-Tian Zhao

    Full Text Available Plant WRKY transcription factors are known to regulate various biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this study we identified a total of 30 putative WRKY unigenes in a transcriptome dataset of the Chinese wild Hazel, Corylus heterophylla, a species that is noted for its cold tolerance. Thirteen full-length of these ChWRKY genes were cloned and found to encode complete protein sequences, and they were divided into three groups, based on the number of WRKY domains and the pattern of zinc finger structures. Representatives of each of the groups, Unigene25835 (group I, Unigene37641 (group II and Unigene20441 (group III, were transiently expressed as fusion proteins with yellow fluorescent fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana, where they were observed to accumulate in the nucleus, in accordance with their predicted roles as transcriptional activators. An analysis of the expression patterns of all 30 WRKY genes revealed differences in transcript abundance profiles following exposure to cold, drought and high salinity conditions. Among the stress-inducible genes, 23 were up-regulated by all three abiotic stresses and the WRKY genes collectively exhibited four different patterns of expression in flower buds during the overwintering period from November to April. The organ/tissue related expression analysis showed that 18 WRKY genes were highly expressed in stem but only 2 (Unigene9262 and Unigene43101 were greatest in male anthotaxies. The expression of Unigene37641, a member of the group II WRKY genes, was substantially up-regulated by cold, drought and salinity treatments, and its overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in better seedling growth, compared with wild type plants, under cold treatment conditions. The transgenic lines also had exhibited higher soluble protein content, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activiety and lower levels of malondialdehyde, which collectively suggets that Unigene37641 expression promotes cold

  14. Expression of hematopoietic transcription factors Runt, CBFβ and GATA during ontogenesis of scallop Chlamys farreri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Feng; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Transcription factors Runx1, CBFβ and GATA1/2/3 play essential roles in regulating hematopoietic development during embryogenesis of vertebrate. In previous study, the orthologous genes of Runt, CBFβ and GATA1/2/3 have been identified from scallop Chlamys farreri and proved to have conserved function in regulating hemocyte production. Here, these three transcription factors were selected as hematopoietic markers to explore potential developmental events of hematopoiesis during ontogenesis of scallop. The transcripts of CfRunt, CfCBFβ and CfGATA were detected abundantly after 32-cell embryo, trochophore and morula stage, and reached to a peak level in 32-cell embryos and D-shaped veligers, pediveligers or gastrula respectively. Further whole-mount immunofluorescence assay showed that the immunoreactivity of CfRunt was firstly observed at 32-cell stage and then its distribution was specialized gradually to the mesoderm during gastrulation. By trochophore, the expression of CfRunt, CfCBFβ and CfGATA proteins occurred coincidently in two specific symmetry cell mass located bilaterally on prototroch, and then disappeared rapidly in D-shaped or umbonal vliger, respectively. However, remarkable expressions of the three transcription factors were observed consistently in a new sinus structure appeared at the dorsal anterior side of D-shaped and umbonal veliger. After bacterial challenge, the mRNA expression levels of the three transcription factors were up-regulated or down-regulated significantly in trochophore, D-shaped veliger and pediveliger, indicating the available hematopoietic regulation in scallop larvae. The results revealed that scallop might experience two waves of hematopoiesis during early development, which occurred in the bilateral symmetry cell mass of trochophore and the sinus structure of veliger. PMID:27012994

  15. Altered regulation of ELAVL1/HuR in HLA-B27-expressing U937 monocytic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S Sahlberg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of HLA-B27 expression in the regulation of RNA binding protein (RBP Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision (ELAV L1/Human antigen R (HuR expression in Salmonella-infected or LPS-stimulated human monocytic cells, since HuR is a critical regulator of the post-transcriptional fate of many genes (e.g. TNFα important in inflammatory response. METHODS: U937 monocytic cells were stably transfected with pSV2neo resistant vector (mock, wild type HLA-B27, or mutated HLA-B27 with amino acid substitutions in the B pocket. Cells were differentiated, infected with Salmonella enteritidis or stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. The expression levels of HuR protein and cleavage products (CP1 and CP2 were detected by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Specific inhibitors were used to study the role of PKR and p38 in HuR expression and generation of CPs. TNFα and IL-10 secretion after p38 and PKR inhibition were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Full length HuR is overexpressed and HuR cleavage is disturbed in U937 monocytic cells expressing HLA-B27 heavy chains (HC. Increased full length HuR expression, disturbed cleavage and reduced dependence on PKR after infection correlate with the expression of glutamic acid 45 in the B pocket that is linked to the misfolding of HLA-B27. CONCLUSION: Results show that the expression of HLA-B27 HCs modulates the intracellular environment of U937 monocyte/macrophages by altering HuR regulation. This phenomenon is at least partly dependent on the misfolding feature of the B27 molecule. Since HuR is an important regulator of multiple genes involved in inflammatory response observations offer an explanation how HLA-B27 may modulate inflammatory response.

  16. INHIBITORY ROLE OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR COUP-TFⅡ IN EXPRESSION OF HTERT IN HELA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wang; Zeng-liang Bai; Li Xuan; Lin Hou; Bo Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Objective To clone and identify the proteins involved in regulating the transcription of hTERT and study the role of genes in both hTERT transcription and telomerase activity.Methods The full cDNA of COUP-TFⅡ was cloned from HeLa cDNA library by hTERT promoter-based yeast one-hybrid assay and then in-frame inserted into His-tag fusion expression vector pEK318. The His-tag COUP-TFⅡ fusion proteins were purified by Ni-NTA chromatography. The interaction of COUP-TFⅡ with hTERT promoter in vitro was identified by lectrophoretic mobility shift assay and Footprint. The role of COUP-TFⅡ in both hTERT transcription and telomerase activity were probed through Luciferase reporter assay, Northern blot, and TRAP-PCR ELISA.Results COUP-TFⅡ could firmly bind to the downstream E-box and the other two binding sites in hTERT promoter.Luciferase reporter assay indicated COUP-TFⅡ could suppress hTERT promoter activity and stable introduction of COUP TFⅡ into HeLa cells also decreased both endogenous hTERT transcription and telomerase activity.Conclusion The human COUP-TFⅡ can firmly bind to hTERT promoter, and inhibit telomerase activity through decreasing hTERT transcription. It will greatly facilitate understanding of telomerase regulation in normal and cancer cells.

  17. Transcriptional expression profile of cultured human embryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Marlen; Siegert, Antje; Eckert, Klaus; Gerlach, Jörg; Haider, Wolfram; Fichtner, Iduna

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo and to investigate the influence of in vitro partial differentiation on in vivo teratoma formation in immunodeficient mice. Standardized methods are needed for long-term cultivation of undifferentiated stem cells and the multilineage cells that spontaneously differentiate from them. Accordingly, SA002 human embryonic stem cells were cultured on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells, on irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts, or were cultured feeder-free using matrigel. Expression of marker protein transcripts was analyzed in undifferentiated and differentiated stem cells using real-time PCR, and both types of stem cells were transplanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice to test for teratoma formation. Teratoma histology and expression profiles were subsequently characterized. Cells cultured using different conditions and morphologically undifferentiated cells had comparable marker expression profiles, showing high expression levels of markers for pluripotency and low-to-moderate expression levels of germ layer markers. Cells showing spontaneous differentiation that were cultured in feeder-free conditions in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor demonstrated slight upregulation of sex determining region Y-box 17, connexin 32, and albumin expression at early time points, as well as expression of octamer-binding transcription factor 4, proteoglycan epitopes on podocalyxin (Trafalgar), and alkaline phosphatase. At later time points, expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-3-beta, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4-alpha and alpha fetoprotein was upregulated, whereas beta-3-tubulin, chemokine receptor, nestin, sex-determining region Y-box 17, and connexin 32 were downregulated. Expression of pluripotency markers remained high, and hematopoetic markers were not expressed. SA002 cells that showed

  18. Transcriptional regulation of neuropeptide and peptide hormone expression by the Drosophila dimmed and cryptocephal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Sebastien A; Hewes, Randall S

    2006-05-01

    The regulation of neuropeptide and peptide hormone gene expression is essential for the development and function of neuroendocrine cells in integrated physiological networks. In insects, a decline in circulating ecdysteroids triggers the activation of a neuroendocrine system to stimulate ecdysis, the behaviors used to shed the old cuticle at the culmination of each molt. Here we show that two evolutionarily conserved transcription factor genes, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene dimmed (dimm) and the basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) gene cryptocephal (crc), control expression of diverse neuropeptides and peptide hormones in Drosophila. Central nervous system expression of three neuropeptide genes, Dromyosuppressin, FMRFamide-related and Leucokinin, is activated by dimm. Expression of Ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) in the endocrine Inka cells requires crc; homozygous crc mutant larvae display markedly reduced ETH levels and corresponding defects in ecdysis. crc activates ETH expression though a 382 bp enhancer, which completely recapitulates the ETH expression pattern. The enhancer contains two evolutionarily conserved regions, and both are imperfect matches to recognition elements for activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4), the vertebrate ortholog of the CRC protein and an important intermediate in cellular responses to endoplasmic reticulum stress. These regions also contain a putative ecdysteroid response element and a predicted binding site for the products of the E74 ecdysone response gene. These results suggest that convergence between ATF-related signaling and an important intracellular steroid response pathway may contribute to the neuroendocrine regulation of insect molting. PMID:16651547

  19. Complementary RNA amplification methods enhance microarray identification of transcripts expressed in the C. elegans nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Shawn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays provide a powerful method for global analysis of gene expression. The application of this technology to specific cell types and tissues, however, is typically limited by small amounts of available mRNA, thereby necessitating amplification. Here we compare microarray results obtained with two different methods of RNA amplification to profile gene expression in the C. elegans larval nervous system. Results We used the mRNA-tagging strategy to isolate transcripts specifically from C. elegans larval neurons. The WT-Ovation Pico System (WT-Pico was used to amplify 2 ng of pan-neural RNA to produce labeled cDNA for microarray analysis. These WT-Pico-derived data were compared to microarray results obtained with a labeled aRNA target generated by two rounds of In Vitro Transcription (IVT of 25 ng of pan-neural RNA. WT-Pico results in a higher fraction of present calls than IVT, a finding consistent with the proposal that DNA-DNA hybridization results in lower mismatch signals than the RNA-DNA heteroduplexes produced by IVT amplification. Microarray data sets from these samples were compared to a reference profile of all larval cells to identify transcripts with elevated expression in neurons. These results were validated by the high proportion of known neuron-expressed genes detected in these profiles and by promoter-GFP constructs for previously uncharacterized genes in these data sets. Together, the IVT and WT-Pico methods identified 2,173 unique neuron-enriched transcripts. Only about half of these transcripts (1,044, however, are detected as enriched by both IVT and WT-Pico amplification. Conclusion We show that two different methods of RNA amplification, IVT and WT-Pico, produce valid microarray profiles of gene expression in the C. elegans larval nervous system with a low rate of false positives. However, our results also show that each method of RNA amplification detects a unique subset of bona fide neural

  20. Transcript Quantification by RNA-Seq Reveals Differentially Expressed Genes in the Red and Yellow Fruits of Fragaria vesca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Li, Weijia; Dou, Yujuan; Zhang, Junxiang; Jiang, Guihua; Miao, Lixiang; Han, Guofen; Liu, Yuexue; Li, He; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Fragaria vesca (2n = 2x = 14), the woodland strawberry, is a perennial herbaceous plant with a small sequenced genome (240 Mb). It is commonly used as a genetic model plant for the Fragaria genus and the Rosaceae family. Fruit skin color is one of the most important traits for both the commercial and esthetic value of strawberry. Anthocyanins are the most prominent pigments in strawberry that bring red, pink, white, and yellow hues to the fruits in which they accumulate. In this study, we conducted a de novo assembly of the fruit transcriptome of woodland strawberry and compared the gene expression profiles with yellow (Yellow Wonder, YW) and red (Ruegen, RG) fruits. De novo assembly yielded 75,426 unigenes, 21.3% of which were longer than 1,000 bp. Among the high-quality unique sequences, 45,387 (60.2%) had at least one significant match to an existing gene model. A total of 595 genes, representing 0.79% of total unigenes, were differentially expressed in YW and RG. Among them, 224 genes were up-regulated and 371 genes were down-regulated in the fruit of YW. Particularly, some flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes, including C4H, CHS, CHI, F3H, DFR and ANS, as well as some transcription factors (TFs), including MYB (putative MYB86 and MYB39), WDR and MADS, were down-regulated in YW fruit, concurrent with a reduction in anthocyanin accumulation in the yellow pigment phenotype, whereas a putative transcription repressor MYB1R was up-regulated in YW fruit. The altered expression levels of the genes encoding flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes and TFs were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Our study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the yellow pigment phenotype in F. vesca. PMID:26636322

  1. The expression level of the transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) determines cellular survival after radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia promotes radioresistance and is associated with poor prognosis. The transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), also designated as Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1β, is part of the HIF pathway which mediates cellular adaptations to oxygen deprivation and facilitates tumour progression. The subunits HIF-1α and ARNT are key players within this pathway. HIF-1α is regulated in an oxygen-dependent manner whereas ARNT is considered to be constitutively expressed. However, there is mounting evidence that certain tumour cells are capable to elevate ARNT in hypoxia which suggests a survival benefit. Therefore the objective of this study was to elucidate effects of an altered ARNT expression level on the cellular response to radiation. Different human cell lines (Hep3B, MCF-7, 786-Owt, 786-Ovhl, RCC4wt and RCC4vhl) originating from various tumour entities (Hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma respectively) were X-irradiated using a conventional linear accelerator. Knockdown of ARNT expression was achieved by transient siRNA transfection. Complementary experiments were performed by forced ARNT overexpression using appropriate plasmids. Presence/absence of ARNT protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Clonogenic survival assays were performed in order to determine cellular survival post irradiation. Statistical comparison of two groups was achieved by the unpaired t-test. The results of this study indicate that ARNT depletion renders tumour cells susceptible to radiation whereas overexpression of this transcription factor confers radioresistance. These findings provide evidence to consider ARNT as a drug target and as a predictive marker in clinical applications concerning the response to radiation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0539-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  2. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Nin, Dawn Sijin; Lee, A-Young; Simanski, Scott; Kodadek, Thomas; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV) to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment. PMID:27477287

  3. A dynamic exchange of TCF3 and TCF4 transcription factors controls MYC expression in colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Meera; Rennoll, Sherri A.; Wesley M. Raup-Konsavage; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes colorectal cancer (CRC) by activating expression of the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). In the nucleus, the β-catenin transcriptional co-activator binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors, and together TCF/β-catenin complexes activate MYC expression through Wnt responsive DNA regulatory elements (WREs). The MYC 3’ WRE maps 1.4-kb downstream from the MYC transcription stop site and binds TCF4/β-catenin transcription complexes to activate MYC. How...

  4. Altered expression of MGMT in high-grade gliomas results from the combined effect of epigenetic and genetic aberrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ramalho-Carvalho

    Full Text Available MGMT downregulation in high-grade gliomas (HGG has been mostly attributed to aberrant promoter methylation and is associated with increased sensitivity to alkylating agent-based chemotherapy. However, HGG harboring 10q deletions also benefit from treatment with alkylating agents. Because the MGMT gene is mapped at 10q26, we hypothesized that both epigenetic and genetic alterations might affect its expression and predict response to chemotherapy. To test this hypothesis, promoter methylation and mRNA levels of MGMT were determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP or methylation-specific multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively, in a retrospective series of 61 HGG. MGMT/chromosome 10 copy number variations were determined by FISH or MS-MLPA analysis. Molecular findings were correlated with clinical parameters to assess their predictive value. Overall, MGMT methylation ratios assessed by qMSP and MS-MLPA were inversely correlated with mRNA expression levels (best coefficient value obtained with MS-MLPA. By FISH analysis in 68.3% of the cases there was loss of 10q26.1 and in 15% of the cases polysomy was demonstrated; the latter displayed the highest levels of transcript. When genetic and epigenetic data were combined, cases with MGMT promoter methylation and MGMT loss depicted the lowest transcript levels, although an impact in response to alkylating agent chemotherapy was not apparent. Cooperation between epigenetic (promoter methylation and genetic (monosomy, locus deletion changes affecting MGMT in HGG is required for effective MGMT silencing. Hence, evaluation of copy number alterations might add relevant prognostic and predictive information concerning response to alkylating agent-based chemotherapy.

  5. Expression-based network biology identifies alteration in key regulatory pathways of type 2 diabetes and associated risk/complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmi Sengupta

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is a multifactorial and genetically heterogeneous disease which leads to impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. The advanced form of disease causes acute cardiovascular, renal, neurological and microvascular complications. Thus there is a constant need to discover new and efficient treatment against the disease by seeking to uncover various novel alternate signalling mechanisms that can lead to diabetes and its associated complications. The present study allows detection of molecular targets by unravelling their role in altered biological pathways during diabetes and its associated risk factors and complications. We have used an integrated functional networks concept by merging co-expression network and interaction network to detect the transcriptionally altered pathways and regulations involved in the disease. Our analysis reports four novel significant networks which could lead to the development of diabetes and other associated dysfunctions. (a The first network illustrates the up regulation of TGFBRII facilitating oxidative stress and causing the expression of early transcription genes via MAPK pathway leading to cardiovascular and kidney related complications. (b The second network demonstrates novel interactions between GAPDH and inflammatory and proliferation candidate genes i.e., SUMO4 and EGFR indicating a new link between obesity and diabetes. (c The third network portrays unique interactions PTPN1 with EGFR and CAV1 which could lead to an impaired vascular function in diabetic nephropathy condition. (d Lastly, from our fourth network we have inferred that the interaction of beta-catenin with CDH5 and TGFBR1 through Smad molecules could contribute to endothelial dysfunction. A probability of emergence of kidney complication might be suggested in T2D condition. An experimental investigation on this aspect may further provide more decisive observation in drug target identification and better

  6. Altered Hippocampal Transcript Profile Accompanies an Age-Related Spatial Memory Deficit in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Yonan, Amanda L.; Malleret, Gael; Kandel, Eric R.; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Pavlidis, Paul

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a global survey of age-related changes in mRNA levels in the 57BL/6NIA mouse hippocampus and found a difference in the hippocampal gene expression profile between 2-month-old young mice and 15-month-old middle-aged mice correlated with an age-related cognitive deficit in hippocampal-based explicit memory formation. Middle-aged…

  7. An evolutionarily conserved intronic region controls the spatiotemporal expression of the transcription factor Sox10

    OpenAIRE

    Pavan William J; Rodrigues Frederico SLM; Carney Thomas J; Antonellis Anthony; Dutton James R; Ward Andrew; Kelsh Robert N

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background A major challenge lies in understanding the complexities of gene regulation. Mutation of the transcription factor SOX10 is associated with several human diseases. The disease phenotypes reflect the function of SOX10 in diverse tissues including the neural crest, central nervous system and otic vesicle. As expected, the SOX10 expression pattern is complex and highly dynamic, but little is known of the underlying mechanisms regulating its spatiotemporal pattern. SOX10 expres...

  8. CHANGES IN ENDOGENOUS GENE TRANSCRIPT AND PROTEIN LEVELS IN MAIZE PLANTS EXPRESSING THE SOYBEAN FERRITIN TRANSGENE

    OpenAIRE

    Kanobe, Milly N.; Rodermel, Steven R.; Theodore eBailey; Paul eScott

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and exp...

  9. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. We have analyzed 8 publicly available gene expression data sets. A global approach, 'gene set enrichment analysis' as well as an approach focusing on a subset of significantly differently regulated genes, GenMAPP, has been applied to rank pathway gene sets according to differential regulation in metastasizing tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. The major findings are up-regulation of cell cycle pathways and a metabolic shift towards glucose metabolism reflected in several pathways in metastasizing tumors. Growth factor pathways seem to play dual roles; EGF and PDGF pathways are decreased, while VEGF and sex-hormone pathways are increased in tumors that metastasize. Furthermore, migration, proteasome, immune system, angiogenesis, DNA repair and several signal transduction pathways are associated to metastasis. Finally several transcription factors e.g. E2F, NFY, and YY1 are identified as being involved in metastasis. By pathway meta-analysis many biological mechanisms beyond major characteristics such as proliferation are identified. Transcription factor analysis identifies a number of key factors that support central pathways. Several previously proposed treatment targets are identified and several new pathways that may

  10. Molecular mechanisms regulating expression and function of transcription regulator "inhibitor of differentiation 3"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Wai-sui LIM; Jin-mei WU

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factor antagonist inhibitor of differentiation 3 (Id3) has been implicated in many diverse developmental, physiological and pathophysiological processes. Its expression and function is subjected to many levels of complex regulation. This review summarizes the current understanding of these mechanisms and describes how they might be related to the diverse functions that have been attributed to the Id3 protein. Detailed understanding of these mechanisms should provide insights towards the development of therapeutic approaches to various diseases, including cancer and atherogenesis.

  11. Interaction of Vav with ENX-1, a putative transcriptional regulator of homeobox gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Hobert, O.; Jallal, B; Ullrich, A

    1996-01-01

    The proto-oncogene product Vav plays a critical role in hematopoietic signal transduction. By using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified a novel human protein, ENX-1, which interacts specifically with Vav both in vitro and in vivo. ENX-1 represents the human homolog of the Drosophila Enhancer of zeste gene, a member of the Polycomb group of genes, which are transcriptional regulators of homeobox gene expression. Interaction with ENX-1 suggests that Vav functions as an upstream element i...

  12. Transcript profiling reveals expression differences in wild-type and glabrous soybean lines

    OpenAIRE

    Stromvik Martina; Kaur Navneet; Hunt Matt; Vodkin Lila

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Trichome hairs affect diverse agronomic characters such as seed weight and yield, prevent insect damage and reduce loss of water but their molecular control has not been extensively studied in soybean. Several detailed models for trichome development have been proposed for Arabidopsis thaliana, but their applicability to important crops such as cotton and soybean is not fully known. Results Two high throughput transcript sequencing methods, Digital Gene Expression (DGE) Ta...

  13. Directional gene expression and antisense transcripts in sexual and asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    López-Barragán María J; Lemieux Jacob; Quiñones Mariam; Williamson Kim C; Molina-Cruz Alvaro; Cui Kairong; Barillas-Mury Carolina; Zhao Keji; Su Xin-zhuan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It has been shown that nearly a quarter of the initial predicted gene models in the Plasmodium falciparum genome contain errors. Although there have been efforts to obtain complete cDNA sequences to correct the errors, the coverage of cDNA sequences on the predicted genes is still incomplete, and many gene models for those expressed in sexual or mosquito stages have not been validated. Antisense transcripts have widely been reported in P. falciparum; however, the extent an...

  14. Effects of sequence variation on differential allelic transcription factor occupancy and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Timothy E; Gertz, Jason; Pauli, Florencia; Kucera, Katerina S; Varley, Katherine E; Newberry, Kimberly M; Marinov, Georgi K; Mortazavi, Ali; Williams, Brian A; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Wold, Barbara; Willard, Huntington F; Myers, Richard M

    2012-05-01

    A complex interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and the genome regulates transcription. However, connecting variation in genome sequence with variation in TF binding and gene expression is challenging due to environmental differences between individuals and cell types. To address this problem, we measured genome-wide differential allelic occupancy of 24 TFs and EP300 in a human lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. Overall, 5% of human TF binding sites have an allelic imbalance in occupancy. At many sites, TFs clustered in TF-binding hubs on the same homolog in especially open chromatin. While genetic variation in core TF binding motifs generally resulted in large allelic differences in TF occupancy, most allelic differences in occupancy were subtle and associated with disruption of weak or noncanonical motifs. We also measured genome-wide differential allelic expression of genes with and without heterozygous exonic variants in the same cells. We found that genes with differential allelic expression were overall less expressed both in GM12878 cells and in unrelated human cell lines. Comparing TF occupancy with expression, we found strong association between allelic occupancy and expression within 100 bp of transcription start sites (TSSs), and weak association up to 100 kb from TSSs. Sites of differential allelic occupancy were significantly enriched for variants associated with disease, particularly autoimmune disease, suggesting that allelic differences in TF occupancy give functional insights into intergenic variants associated with disease. Our results have the potential to increase the power and interpretability of association studies by targeting functional intergenic variants in addition to protein coding sequences. PMID:22300769

  15. Transcript profiling reveals rewiring of iron assimilation gene expression in Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2012-12-01

    Hyphal growth is repressed in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by the transcription factor Nrg1. Transcript profiling of a C. dubliniensis NRG1 mutant identified a common group of 28 NRG1-repressed genes in both species, including the hypha-specific genes HWP1, ECE1 and the regulator of cell elongation UME6. Unexpectedly, C. dubliniensis NRG1 was required for wild-type levels of expression of 10 genes required for iron uptake including seven ferric reductases, SIT1, FTR1 and RBT5. However, at alkaline pH and during filamentous growth in 10% serum, most of these genes were highly induced in C. dubliniensis. Conversely, RBT5, PGA10, FRE10 and FRP1 did not exhibit induction during hyphal growth when NRG1 is downregulated, indicating that in C. dubliniensis NRG1 is also required for optimal expression of these genes in alkaline environments. In iron-depleted medium at pH 4.5, reduced growth of the NRG1 mutant relative to wild type was observed; however, growth was restored to wild-type levels or greater at pH 6.5, indicating that alkaline induction of iron assimilation gene expression could rescue this phenotype. These data indicate that transcriptional control of iron assimilation and pseudohypha formation has been separated in C. albicans, perhaps promoting growth in a wider range of niches.

  16. Expression of The Embryonic Stem Cell Transcription Factor SOX2 in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laga, Alvaro C.; Lai, Chiou-Yan; Zhan, Qian; Huang, Susan J.; Velazquez, Elsa F.; Yang, Qinghong; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Murphy, George F.

    2010-01-01

    SOX2 is a gene located on chromosome 3q26.33 that encodes a transcription factor important to maintenance of embryonic neural crest stem cell pluripotency. We have identified rare SOX2-immunoreactive cells in normal human skin at or near the established stem cell niches. Three subsets of SOX2-positive cells were defined in these regions: those expressing only SOX2 and those that co-expressed SOX2 and either CK20 or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, which are consistent with dichotomous differentiation of SOX2-expressing precursors along neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) or melanocytic lines, respectively. Examination of Merkel cell carcinomas confirmed nuclear SOX2 expression in this tumor type. In human patient melanoma, strong nuclear expression of SOX2 was noted in a subset of tumors, and the ability to detect SOX2 in lesional cells significantly correlated with primary tumor thickness in a survey cohort. To assess the potential role of SOX2 in melanoma growth, an in vivo tumorigenesis assay was used. Whereas SOX2 knockdown failed to influence proliferation of cultured melanoma cells in vitro, tumor xenografts generated with the SOX2-knockdown cell line showed significant decrease in mean tumor volume as compared with controls. In aggregate, these findings suggest that SOX2 is a novel biomarker for subpopulations of normal skin cells that reside in established stem cell niches and that might relate to Merkel cell and melanocyte ontogeny and tumorigenesis. PMID:20042675

  17. Transcriptional profiling of host gene expression in chicken embryo lung cells infected with laryngotracheitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xianyao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1 causes acute respiratory diseases in chickens often with high mortality. To better understand host-ILTV interactions at the host transcriptional level, a microarray analysis was performed using 4 × 44 K Agilent chicken custom oligo microarrays. Results Microarrays were hybridized using the two color hybridization method with total RNA extracted from ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post infection (dpi. Results showed that 789 genes were differentially expressed in response to ILTV infection that include genes involved in the immune system (cytokines, chemokines, MHC, and NF-κB, cell cycle regulation (cyclin B2, CDK1, and CKI3, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and cellular metabolism. Differential expression for 20 out of 789 genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR. A bioinformatics tool (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis used to analyze biological functions and pathways on the group of 789 differentially expressed genes revealed that 21 possible gene networks with intermolecular connections among 275 functionally identified genes. These 275 genes were classified into a number of functional groups that included cancer, genetic disorder, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. Conclusion The results of this study provide comprehensive knowledge on global gene expression, and biological functionalities of differentially expressed genes in chicken embryo lung cells in response to ILTV infections.

  18. Altered Hippocampal Transcript Profile Accompanies an Age-Related Spatial Memory Deficit in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Yonan, Amanda L.; Malleret, Gaël; Kandel, Eric R.; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Pavlidis, Paul

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a global survey of age-related changes in mRNA levels in the C57BL/6NIA mouse hippocampus and found a difference in the hippocampal gene expression profile between 2-month-old young mice and 15-month-old middle-aged mice correlated with an age-related cognitive deficit in hippocampal-based explicit memory formation. Middle-aged mice displayed a mild but specific deficit in spatial memory in the Morris water maze. By using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays, we found a distinc...

  19. Pdx1 inactivation restricted to the intestinal epithelium in mice alters duodenal gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin; Fang, Rixun; Davis, Corrine; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2009-12-01

    Null mutant mice lacking the transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) are apancreatic and survive only a few days after birth. The role of Pdx1 in regulating intestinal gene expression has therefore yet to be determined in viable mice with normal pancreatic development. We hypothesized that conditional inactivation of Pdx1 restricted to the intestinal epithelium would alter intestinal gene expression and cell differentiation. Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice with intestine-specific Pdx1 inactivation were generated by crossing a transgenic mouse strain expressing Cre recombinase, driven by a mouse villin 1 gene promoter fragment, with a mutant mouse strain homozygous for loxP site-flanked Pdx1. Pdx1 protein is undetectable in all epithelial cells in the intestinal epithelium of Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice. Goblet cell number and mRNA abundance for mucin 3 and mucin 13 genes in the proximal small intestine are comparable between Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre and control mice. Similarly, Paneth cell number and expression of Paneth cell-related genes Defa1, Defcr-rs1, and Mmp7 in the proximal small intestine remain statistically unchanged by Pdx1 inactivation. Although the number of enteroendocrine cells expressing chromogranin A/B, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (Gip), or somatostatin (Sst) is unaffected in the Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice, mRNA abundance for Gip and Sst is significantly reduced in the proximal small intestine. Conditional Pdx1 inactivation attenuates intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity in the duodenal epithelium, consistent with an average 91% decrease in expression of the mouse enterocyte IAP gene, alkaline phosphatase 3 (a novel Pdx1 target candidate), in the proximal small intestine following Pdx1 inactivation. We conclude that Pdx1 is necessary for patterning appropriate gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells of the proximal small intestine. PMID:19808654

  20. Regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression by the alteration of redox status in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wu-kui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 has been considered as a critical transcriptional factor in response to hypoxia. It can increase P-glycoprotein (P-Gp thus generating the resistant effect to chemotherapy. At present, the mechanism regulating HIF-1α is still not fully clear in hypoxic tumor cells. Intracellular redox status is closely correlated with hypoxic micro-environment, so we investigate whether alterations in the cellular redox status lead to the changes of HIF-1α expression. HepG2 cells were exposed to Buthionine sulphoximine (BSO for 12 h prior to hypoxia treatment. The level of HIF-1α expression was measured by Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. Reduce glutathione (GSH concentrations in hypoxic cells were determined using glutathione reductase/5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrob-enzoic acid (DTNB recycling assay. To further confirm the effect of intracellular redox status on HIF-1α expression, N-acetylcysteine (NAC was added to culture cells for 8 h before the hypoxia treatment. The levels of multidrug resistance gene-1 (MDR-1 and erythropoietin (EPO mRNA targeted by HIF-1α in hypoxic cells were further determined with RT-PCR, and then the expression of P-Gp protein was observed by Western blotting. The results showed that BSO pretreatment down-regulated HIF-1α and the effect was concentration-dependent, on the other hand, the increases of intracellular GSH contents by NAC could partly elevate the levels of HIF-1α expression. The levels of P-Gp (MDR-1 and EPO were concomitant with the trend of HIF-1α expression. Therefore, our data indicate that the changes of redox status in hypoxic cells may regulate HIF-1α expression and provide valuable information on tumor chemotherapy.

  1. Expression of SNC73, a transcript of the immunoglobulin α-1 gene, in human epithelial carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yi Geng; Shu Zheng; Zheng-Zhen Shi; Qi Dong; Xin-Han Cai; Yan-Ming Zhang; Wei Cao; Jia-Ping Peng; Yong-Ming Fang; Lei Zheng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of SNC73, a transcript of the immunoglobulin α-1 gene (IgA1-H chain), in human epithelia-derived tumor cells.METHODS: Total RNAs and cell lysates were prepared from five different human epithelial cell lines derived from lung, stomach, liver, skin, and breast, respectively. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis of these five cell lines were done. Both RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect the expression of SNC73 in these cell lines. We also examined the expression of SNC73 in normal epithelial cells of colon mucosa by in situ hybridization. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis were used to determine whether the recombination activating gene1/2 (RAG1 and RAG2) is present. The expression of three immunoglobulin transcription factors, EBF, E2A and Pax5, and the heavy chain of IgA1 and two types of light chains of immunoglobulin (κ and λ) in the aforementioned cell lines were analyzed by RT-PCR and immunochemistry, respectively. All the RT-PCR products were analyzed by sequencing.RESULTS: The results of RT-PCR and immunochemistry showed that both mRNA and protein of SNC73 were expressed in five human epithelia-derived cancer cell lines. These data were further confirmed in the normal epithelial cells of colon mucosa by in situ hybridization. Also, the heavy chain of IgA1 and κ light chain were detected in these cells, but no λ light chain was observed. Both RAG1 and RAG2 were expressed in these human epithelia-derived cancer cell lines and the sequence was identical to that expressed in pre-B and pre-T cells. In addition to RAG1 and RAG2, the mRNA in one of the immunoglobulin transcription factors, EBF, was also detected in these cell lines, and Pax5 was only expressed in SW480 cells, but no expression of E2A was observed in all the five cell lines.CONCLUSION: Immunoglobulin A1 is originally expressed and V(D)J recombination machine is also present in non-lymphoid cells, suggesting that V(D)J recombination machine mediates the

  2. Altered gene expression in asymptomatic SHIV-infected rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Aaron T

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Simian-Human immunodeficiency virus is a chimeric virus which, in rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta closely imitates immunodeficiency virus infection in human (HIV. A relatively new way to study pathogenesis of viral infection is to study alterations in host gene expression induced by the virus. SHIV infection with certain strains does not result in clinical signs. We hypothesized that alterations in gene expression relating to the immune system would be present in SHIV-infected animals despite the lack of clinical signs. Splenic tissue from four adult male Indian-origin Rhesus monkeys serologically positive for non-pathogenic SHIV 89.6 was processed by cDNA microarray analysis. Results were compared with the corresponding outcome using splenic tissues from four unexposed adult male Rhesus monkeys. Subsequent gene analysis confirmed statistically significant variations between control and infected samples. Interestingly, SHIV-infected monkeys exhibited altered expression in genes related to apoptosis, signal transduction, T and B lymphocyte activation and importantly, to immune regulation. Although infected animals appeared asymptomatic, our study demonstrated that SHIV-infected monkeys cannot reliably be used in studies of other infectious agents as their baseline gene expression differs from that of normal Rhesus monkeys. The gene expression differences in SHIV-infected animals relative to uninfected animals offer additional clues to the pathogenesis of altered immune function in response to secondary infection.

  3. Expression of forkhead box transcription factor genes Foxp1 and Foxp2 during jaw development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Jeffry M; Almaidhan, Asma A; Jeong, Juhee

    2016-03-01

    Development of the face is regulated by a large number of genes that are expressed in temporally and spatially specific patterns. While significant progress has been made on characterizing the genes that operate in the oral region of the face, those regulating development of the aboral (lateral) region remain largely unknown. Recently, we discovered that transcription factors LIM homeobox (LHX) 6 and LHX8, which are key regulators of oral development, repressed the expression of the genes encoding forkhead box transcription factors, Foxp1 and Foxp2, in the oral region. To gain insights into the potential role of the Foxp genes in region-specific development of the face, we examined their expression patterns in the first pharyngeal arch (primordium for the jaw) of mouse embryos at a high spatial and temporal resolution. Foxp1 and Foxp2 were preferentially expressed in the aboral and posterior parts of the first pharyngeal arch, including the developing temporomandibular joint. Through double immunofluorescence and double fluorescent RNA in situ hybridization, we found that Foxp1 was expressed in the progenitor cells for the muscle, bone, and connective tissue. Foxp2 was expressed in subsets of bone and connective tissue progenitors but not in the myoblasts. Neither gene was expressed in the dental mesenchyme nor in the oral half of the palatal shelf undergoing extensive growth and morphogenesis. Together, we demonstrated for the first time that Foxp1 and Foxp2 are expressed during craniofacial development. Our data suggest that the Foxp genes may regulate development of the aboral and posterior regions of the jaw. PMID:26969076

  4. Expression of Root-Related Transcription Factors Associated with Flooding Tolerance of Soybean (Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Valliyodan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been conducted on the changes in gene expression of the model plant Arabidopsis to low-oxygen stress. Flooding results in a low oxygen environment in the root zone. However, there is ample evidence that tolerance to soil flooding is more than tolerance to low oxygen alone. In this study, we investigated the physiological response and differential expression of root-related transcription factors (TFs associated with the tolerance of soybean plants to soil flooding. Differential responses of PI408105A and S99-2281 plants to ten days of soil flooding were evaluated at physiological, morphological and anatomical levels. Gene expression underlying the tolerance response was investigated using qRT-PCR of root-related TFs, known anaerobic genes, and housekeeping genes. Biomass of flood-sensitive S99-2281 roots remained unchanged during the entire 10 days of flooding. Flood-tolerant PI408105A plants exhibited recovery of root growth after 3 days of flooding. Flooding induced the development of aerenchyma and adventitious roots more rapidly in the flood-tolerant than the flood-sensitive genotype. Roots of tolerant plants also contained more ATP than roots of sensitive plants at the 7th and 10th days of flooding. Quantitative transcript analysis identified 132 genes differentially expressed between the two genotypes at one or more time points of flooding. Expression of genes related to the ethylene biosynthesis pathway and formation of adventitious roots was induced earlier and to higher levels in roots of the flood-tolerant genotype. Three potential flood-tolerance TFs which were differentially expressed between the two genotypes during the entire 10-day flooding duration were identified. This study confirmed the expression of anaerobic genes in response to soil flooding. Additionally, the differential expression of TFs associated with soil flooding tolerance was not qualitative but quantitative and temporal. Functional analyses of

  5. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of KIAA1199 gene expression in human breast cancer.

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    Cem Kuscu

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has demonstrated that upregulated expression of KIAA1199 in human cancer bodes for poor survival. The regulatory mechanism controlling KIAA1199 expression in cancer remains to be characterized. In the present study, we have isolated and characterized the human KIAA1199 promoter in terms of regulation of KIAA1199 gene expression. A 3.3 kb fragment of human genomic DNA containing the 5'-flanking sequence of the KIAA1199 gene possesses both suppressive and activating elements. Employing a deletion mutagenesis approach, a 1.4 kb proximal region was defined as the basic KIAA1199 promoter containing a TATA-box close to the transcription start site. A combination of 5'-primer extension study with 5'RACE DNA sequencing analysis revealed one major transcription start site that is utilized in the human KIAA1199 gene. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the 1.4 kb KIAA1199 promoter contains putative activating regulatory elements, including activator protein-1(AP-1, Twist-1, and NF-κB sites. Sequential deletion and site-direct mutagenesis analysis demonstrated that the AP-1 and distal NF-κB sites are required for KIAA1199 gene expression. Further analyses using an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed the requirement of these cis- and trans-acting elements in controlling KIAA1199 gene expression. Finally, we found that upregulated KIAA1199 expression in human breast cancer specimens correlated with hypomethylation of the regulatory region. Involvement of DNA methylation in regulation of KIAA1199 expression was recapitulated in human breast cancer cell lines. Taken together, our study unraveled the regulatory mechanisms controlling KIAA1199 gene expression in human cancer.

  6. Age-Related Alterations in the Expression of Genes and Synaptic Plasticity Associated with Nitric Oxide Signaling in the Mouse Dorsal Striatum

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    Aisa N. Chepkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related alterations in the expression of genes and corticostriatal synaptic plasticity were studied in the dorsal striatum of mice of four age groups from young (2-3 months old to old (18–24 months of age animals. A significant decrease in transcripts encoding neuronal nitric oxide (NO synthase and receptors involved in its activation (NR1 subunit of the glutamate NMDA receptor and D1 dopamine receptor was found in the striatum of old mice using gene array and real-time RT-PCR analysis. The old striatum showed also a significantly higher number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes and an increased expression of astroglial, inflammatory, and oxidative stress markers. Field potential recordings from striatal slices revealed age-related alterations in the magnitude and dynamics of electrically induced long-term depression (LTD and significant enhancement of electrically induced long-term potentiation in the middle-aged striatum (6-7 and 12-13 months of age. Corticostriatal NO-dependent LTD induced by pharmacological activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors underwent significant reduction with aging and could be restored by inhibition of cGMP hydrolysis indicating that its age-related deficit is caused by an altered NO-cGMP signaling cascade. It is suggested that age-related alterations in corticostriatal synaptic plasticity may result from functional alterations in receptor-activated signaling cascades associated with increasing neuroinflammation and a prooxidant state.

  7. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of c-myc expression during the differentiation of murine erythroleukemia Friend cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mechti, N; Piechaczyk, M; Blanchard, J. M.; Marty, L.; Bonnieu, A; Jeanteur, P; Lebleu, B

    1986-01-01

    c-myc RNA rapidly decreases to barely detectable levels in Friend erythroleukemia cells induced to differentiate upon the addition of dimethylsulfoxide. We show here that c-myc gene is down-regulated both at the transcriptional level presumably by a block in the elongation of primary transcripts and at the post-transcriptional level by an increase in the degradation of its mRNA.

  8. PINCH1 is transcriptional regulator in podocytes that interacts with WT1 and represses podocalyxin expression.

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    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PINCH1, an adaptor protein containing five LIM domains, plays an important role in regulating the integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PINCH1 is induced in the fibrotic kidney after injury, and it primarily localizes at the sites of focal adhesion. Whether it can translocate to the nucleus and directly participate in gene regulation is completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using cultured glomerular podocytes as a model system, we show that PINCH1 expression was induced by TGF-β1, a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes podocyte dysfunction. Interestingly, increased PINCH1 not only localized at the sites of focal adhesions, but also underwent nuclear translocation after TGF-β1 stimulation. This nuclear translocation of PINCH1 was apparently dependent on the putative nuclear export/localization signals (NES/NLS at its C-terminus, as deletion or site-directed mutations abolished its nuclear shuttling. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments revealed that PINCH1 interacted with Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor that is essential for regulating podocyte-specific gene expression in adult kidney. Interaction of PINCH1 and WT1 was mediated by the LIM1 domain of PINCH1 and C-terminal zinc-finger domain of WT1, which led to the suppression of the WT1-mediated podocalyxin expression in podocytes. PINCH1 also repressed podocalyxin gene transcription in a promoter-luciferase reporter assay. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PINCH1 can shuttle into the nucleus from cytoplasm in podocytes, wherein it interacts with WT1 and suppresses podocyte-specific gene expression. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized, novel function of PINCH1, in which it acts as a transcriptional regulator through controlling specific gene expression.

  9. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snus and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    increase of 5-HT1B receptor-mediated contraction occurred at the transcriptional level, demonstrated by an increased mRNA expression for the receptor. Thus, snus and nicotine alter the GPCR expression in the cerebral arteries, which may be involved in cerebral vascular disease.

  10. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Esquerré; Marie Bouvier; Catherine Turlan; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Laurence Girbal; Muriel Cocaign-Bousquet

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype...

  11. The JNKs differentially regulate RNA polymerase III transcription by coordinately modulating the expression of all TFIIIB subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong and, Shuping; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III-dependent transcription is subject to stringent regulation by tumor suppressors and oncogenic proteins and enhanced RNA pol III transcription is essential for cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Since the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) display both oncogenic and tumor suppressor properties, the roles of these proteins in regulating RNA pol III transcription were examined. In both mouse and human cells, loss or reduction in JNK1 expression represses RNA pol III...

  12. PU.1 Suppresses Th2 Cytokine Expression via Silencing of GATA3 Transcription in Dendritic Cells.

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    Takuya Yashiro

    Full Text Available The transcription factor PU.1 is predominantly expressed in dendritic cells (DCs and is essential for DC differentiation. Although there are several reports that PU.1 positively regulates the expression of DC-specific genes, whether PU.1 also has a suppressive effect on DCs is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that PU.1 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines including IL-13 and IL-5 in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs, through repression of the expression of GATA3, which is a master regulator of Th2 differentiations. When PU.1 siRNA was introduced into BMDCs, LPS-induced expression of IL-13 and IL-5 was increased along with upregulation of the constitutive expression of GATA2 and GATA3. The additional introduction of GATA3 siRNA but not of GATA2 siRNA abrogated PU.1 siRNA-mediated upregulation of IL-13 and IL-5. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that PU.1 bound to Gata3 proximal promoter region, which is more dominant than the distal promoter in driving GATA3 transcription in DCs. The degree of histone acetylation at the Gata3 promoter was decreased in PU.1 siRNA-introduced DCs, suggesting the involvement of PU.1 in chromatin modification of the Gata3 promoter. Treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, increased the degree of histone H3 acetylation at the Gata3 promoter and induced the subsequent expression of GATA3. Experiments using HDAC inhibitors and siRNAs showed that HDAC3 suppressed GATA3 expression. The recruitment of HDAC3 to the Gata3 promoter was decreased by PU.1 knockdown. LPS-induced IL-13 expression was dramatically reduced in BMDCs generated from mice lacking the conserved GATA3 response element, termed CGRE, which is an essential site for the binding of GATA3 on the Il-13 promoter. The degree of H3K4me3 at CGRE was significantly increased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected stimulated DCs. Our results indicate that PU.1 plays pivotal roles in DC development and function, serving not only as a

  13. Altered vesicular glutamate transporter expression in human temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Van Liefferinge, J.; Jensen, C.J.; Albertini, G.; Bentea, E.; Demuyser, T.; Merckx, E.; Aronica, E.; Smolders, I; Massie, A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are responsible for loading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Altered VGLUT protein expression has been suggested to affect quantal size and glutamate release under both physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated mRNA and protein expression levels of the three VGLUT subtypes in hippocampal tissue of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), International League Against Epilepsy...

  14. Altered Expression of Cellular Bcl-2 in the Progression of Hamster Cholangiocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Byung-suk Jeon; Byung-IL Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Bcl-2 is an intracytoplasmic and membrane-associated apoptosis suppressor, and its overexpression is closely associated with survival of malignant tumors, in particular their aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. The role of Bcl-2 is, however, still controversial in cholangiocarcinogenesis because of the discrepancies in the expression of the protein. In the present study, alteration in the expression of Bcl-2 in cholangiocarcinogenesis was investigated by studying the immunoreactivities of...

  15. Ischemia Alters the Expression of Connexins in the Aged Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Taizen Nakase; Tetsuya Maeda; Yasuji Yoshida; Ken Nagata

    2009-01-01

    Although the function of astrocytic gap junctions under ischemia is still under debate, increased expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) has been observed in ischemic brain lesions, suggesting that astrocytic gap junctions could provide neuronal protection against ischemic insult. Moreover, different connexin subtypes may play different roles in pathological conditions. We used immunohistochemical analysis to investigate alterations in the expression of connexin subtypes in human stroke brains. Sev...

  16. Altered microRNAs expression profiling in cumulus cells from patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Suying; Zhang, Xuan; Shi, Changgen; Lin, Jimin; Chen, Guowu; Wu, Bin; Wu, Ligang; Shi, Huijuan; Yuan, Yao; Zhou, Weijin; Sun, Zhaogui; Dong, Xi; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, and oocyte developmental competence is altered in patients with PCOS. In recent years microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of gene expression, the aim of the study was to study miRNAs expression patterns of cumulus cells from PCOS patients. Methods The study included 20 patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI): 10 diag...

  17. Juvenile stress enhances anxiety and alters corticosteroid receptor expression in adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Brydges, Nichola M.; Jin, Rowen; Seckl, Jonathan,; Holmes, Megan C; Drake, Amanda J.; Hall, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundExposure to stress in early life is correlated with the development of anxiety disorders in adulthood. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, but an imbalance in corticosteroid receptor (CR) expression in the limbic system, particularly the hippocampus, has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. However, little is known about how prepubertal stress in the so called “juvenile” period might alter the expression of these receptors.AimsTherefore, the aim of t...

  18. Prion disease induced alterations in gene expression in spleen and brain prior to clinical symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon O Kim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyeon O Kim1, Greg P Snyder1, Tyler M Blazey1, Richard E Race2, Bruce Chesebro2, Pamela J Skinner11Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, USA; 2NIH Laboratory of Persistent Viral Diseases, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, Montana, USAAbstract: Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that affect animals and humans. There is a need to gain understanding of prion disease pathogenesis and to develop diagnostic assays to detect prion diseases prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. The goal of this study was to identify genes that show altered expression early in the disease process in the spleen and brain of prion disease-infected mice. Using Affymetrix microarrays, we identified 67 genes that showed increased expression in the brains of prion disease-infected mice prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. These genes function in many cellular processes including immunity, the endosome/lysosome system, hormone activity, and the cytoskeleton. We confirmed a subset of these gene expression alterations using other methods and determined the time course in which these changes occur. We also identified 14 genes showing altered expression prior to the onset of clinical symptoms in spleens of prion disease infected mice. Interestingly, four genes, Atp1b1, Gh, Anp32a, and Grn, were altered at the very early time of 46 days post-infection. These gene expression alterations provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying prion disease pathogenesis and may serve as surrogate markers for the early detection and diagnosis of prion disease.Keywords: prion disease, microarrays, gene expression

  19. Characterization and expression analysis of WOX2 homeodomain transcription factor in Aegilops tauschii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The WUSCHEL (WUS-related homeobox (WOX gene family coordinates transcription during the early phases of embryogenesis. In this study, a putative WOX2 homolog was isolated and characterized from Aegilops tauschii, the donor of D genome of Triticum aestivum. The sequence consisted of 2045 bp, and contained an open reading frame (ORF, encoded 322 amino acids. The predicted protein sequence contained a highly conserved homeodomain and the WUS-box domain, which is present in some members of the WOX protein family. The full-length ORF was subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a, and an approximately 34-kDa protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 cells with IPTG induction. The molecular mass of the expressed protein was identical to that predicted by the cDNA sequence. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Ae. tauschii WOX2 is closely related to the rice and maize orthologs. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that WOX2 from Ae. tauschii was primarily expressed in the seeds; transcription increased during seed development and declined after the embryos matured, suggesting that WOX2 is associated with embryo development in Ae. tauschii.

  20. Characterization and expression analysis of WOX2 homeodomain transcription factor in Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Ma, Jian; Wang, Ji-Rui; Liu, Ya-Xi; Chen, Guo-Yue; Qi, Peng-Fei; Pu, Zhi-En; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yu-Ming

    2015-03-01

    The WUSCHEL (WUS)-related homeobox (WOX) gene family coordinates transcription during the early phases of embryogenesis. In this study, a putative WOX2 homolog was isolated and characterized from Aegilops tauschii, the donor of D genome of Triticum aestivum. The sequence consisted of 2045 bp, and contained an open reading frame (ORF), encoded 322 amino acids. The predicted protein sequence contained a highly conserved homeodomain and the WUS-box domain, which is present in some members of the WOX protein family. The full-length ORF was subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a, and an approximately 34-kDa protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells with IPTG induction. The molecular mass of the expressed protein was identical to that predicted by the cDNA sequence. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Ae. tauschii WOX2 is closely related to the rice and maize orthologs. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that WOX2 from Ae. tauschii was primarily expressed in the seeds; transcription increased during seed development and declined after the embryos matured, suggesting that WOX2 is associated with embryo development in Ae. tauschii. PMID:25983628

  1. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016. PMID:27087581

  2. PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally regulates the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in primary neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jing; Zhang, Lang; Liu, Shubo; Zhang, Chi [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Jian [The Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital and Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Ministry of Health, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhao, Nanming [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhao, E-mail: zwang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-06-12

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that has been demonstrated to play a key role in degrading both A{beta} and insulin and deficient in IDE function is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) pathology. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular regulation of IDE expression. Here we show IDE levels are markedly decreased in DM2 patients and positively correlated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) levels. Further studies show that PPAR{gamma} plays an important role in regulating IDE expression in rat primary neurons through binding to a functional peroxisome proliferator-response element (PPRE) in IDE promoter and promoting IDE gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that PPAR{gamma} participates in the insulin-induced IDE expression in neurons. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally induces IDE expression which provides a novel mechanism for the use of PPAR{gamma} agonists in both DM2 and AD therapies.

  3. Evaluating the Effect of Cell Culture on Gene Expression in Primary Tissue Samples Using Microfluidic-Based Single Cell Transcriptional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Januszyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Significant transcriptional heterogeneity is an inherent property of complex tissues such as tumors and healing wounds. Traditional methods of high-throughput analysis rely on pooling gene expression data from hundreds of thousands of cells and reporting a population-wide average that is unable to capture differences within distinct cell subsets. Recent advances in microfluidic technology have permitted the development of large-scale single cell analytic methods that overcome this limitation. The increased granularity afforded by such approaches allows us to answer the critical question of whether expansion in cell culture significantly alters the transcriptional characteristics of cells isolated from primary tissue. Here we examine an established population of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs using a novel, microfluidic-based method for high-throughput transcriptional interrogation, coupled with advanced bioinformatic analysis, to evaluate the dynamics of single cell gene expression among primary, passage 0, and passage 1 stem cells. We find significant differences in the transcriptional profiles of cells from each group, as well as a considerable shift in subpopulation dynamics as those subgroups better able to adhere and proliferate under these culture conditions gradually emerge as dominant. Taken together, these findings reinforce the importance of using primary or very early passage cells in future studies.

  4. Low-power millimeter wave radiations do not alter stress-sensitive gene expression of chaperone proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadobov, M; Sauleau, R; Le Coq, L; Debure, L; Thouroude, D; Michel, D; Le Dréan, Y

    2007-04-01

    This article reports experimental results on the influence of low-power millimeter wave (MMW) radiation at 60 GHz on a set of stress-sensitive gene expression of molecular chaperones, namely clusterin (CLU) and HSP70, in a human brain cell line. Selection of the exposure frequency is determined by its near-future applications for the new broadband civil wireless communication systems including wireless local area networks (WLAN) for domestic and professional uses. Frequencies around 60 GHz are strongly attenuated in the earth's atmosphere and such radiations represent a new environmental factor. An exposure system operating in V-band (50-75 GHz) was developed for cell exposure. U-251 MG glial cell line was sham-exposed or exposed to MMW radiation for different durations (1-33 h) and two different power densities (5.4 microW/cm(2) or 0.54 mW/cm(2)). As gene expression is a multiple-step process, we analyzed chaperone proteins induction at different levels. First, using luciferase reporter gene, we investigated potential effect of MMWs on the activation of transcription factors (TFs) and gene promoter activity. Next, using RT-PCR and Western blot assays, we verified whether MMW exposure could alter RNA accumulation, translation, or protein stability. Experimental data demonstrated the absence of significant modifications in gene transcription, mRNA, and protein amount for the considered stress-sensitive genes for the exposure durations and power densities investigated. The main results of this study suggest that low-power 60 GHz radiation does not modify stress-sensitive gene expression of chaperone proteins. PMID:17080454

  5. Integrative analysis of large scale expression profiles reveals core transcriptional response and coordination between multiple cellular processes in a cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi Maitrayee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. They play significant roles in global biogeochemical cycles and carbon sequestration, and have recently been recognized as potential vehicles for production of renewable biofuels. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been extensively used as a model organism for cyanobacterial studies. DNA microarray studies in Synechocystis have shown varying degrees of transcriptome reprogramming under altered environmental conditions. However, it is not clear from published work how transcriptome reprogramming affects pre-existing networks of fine-tuned cellular processes. Results We have integrated 163 transcriptome data sets generated in response to numerous environmental and genetic perturbations in Synechocystis. Our analyses show that a large number of genes, defined as the core transcriptional response (CTR, are commonly regulated under most perturbations. The CTR contains nearly 12% of Synechocystis genes found on its chromosome. The majority of genes in the CTR are involved in photosynthesis, translation, energy metabolism and stress protection. Our results indicate that a large number of differentially regulated genes identified in most reported studies in Synechocystis under different perturbations are associated with the general stress response. We also find that a majority of genes in the CTR are coregulated with 25 regulatory genes. Some of these regulatory genes have been implicated in cellular responses to oxidative stress, suggesting that reactive oxygen species are involved in the regulation of the CTR. A Bayesian network, based on the regulation of various KEGG pathways determined from the expression patterns of their associated genes, has revealed new insights into the coordination between different cellular processes. Conclusion We provide here the first integrative analysis of transcriptome data sets generated in a cyanobacterium. This

  6. Alterations in the hepatic transcriptional landscape after RNAi mediated ApoB silencing in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, M Sabry; Kumar, Chanchal; Chia, Ser Mien; Anandalakshmi, Vidhya; Boo, Nicole; Strapps, Walter; Robinson, Michael; Caguyong, Michelle; Bartz, Steven; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; van Gool, Alain; Shih, Shian-Jiun

    2015-10-01

    The greater genomic conservation between humans and non-human primates (NHP) enables target validation studies for developing of therapeutic strategies for human diseases. Together with predicting activity and potential adverse clinical signs, the inclusion of NHP testing bequeaths to efficacy models for dose titration and pharmacodynamic effects. We have used lipid nanoparticle encapsulated siRNA to silence ApoB in the liver and assessed the phenotypic effects on serum lipids with various levels of hepatic ApoB mRNA knockdown in healthy lean cynomolgus monkeys. ApoB siRNA dosed animals demonstrated significant reductions of hepatic ApoB mRNA and serum APOB protein, with a substantial lowering of plasma lipid levels without obvious signs of toxicity. Microarray based assessment of ApoB siRNA mediated effects revealed a number of differentially expressed genes which mapped onto biological pathways and processes related to lipid and cholesterol metabolism. Furthermore, we identified potential targets and cellular effects that could be studied for therapeutic benchmarking of APOB mediated effects. The network of ApoB regulated genes should be of significance for the understanding and development of novel hypercholesterolemia therapies. PMID:26275376

  7. Endometrial expression of selected transcripts in postpartum of primiparous Holstein cows with clinical and subclinical endometritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Howard; Torres, Cristian G; Carvallo, Francisco; Duchens, Mario; Peralta, Oscar A

    2015-05-01

    Postpartum endometritis compromises milk production and fertility in high-producing dairy cows. Infection of the endometrium induces an inflammatory response with secretion of cytokines that lead to polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) influx and bacterial clearance. Considering that only a portion of cows with endometritis is eligible for clinical diagnosis, there is an increasing effort for developing reliable tools and protocols for diagnosis of subclinical endometritis. Recent reports have indicated that primiparous cows are at greater risk of uterine infection and primiparous cows with subclinical endometritis produce less milk compared to healthy cows. In the present study, gene expression profiles were compared for selected cytokine and hormone endometrial transcripts in the postpartum of primiparous Holstein cows with clinical and subclinical endometritis. Cows were classified as healthy (no signs of clinical endometritis), cows with subclinical endometritis (PMNcows with clinical endometritis (PMN>5%). Although, cows with clinical endometritis had greater (Pcows; no significant differences were detected between clinical and subclinical endometritis groups. Spearman correlation coefficients were positive between relative amounts of gene expression as indicated by amount of these transcripts and PMN percentages and ranged from 0.74 to 0.93 (Pcows with subclinical and clinical endometritis. Moreover, differential relative amounts of hormone transcripts suggest dysregulation of the luteolytic mechanism and PG synthases but not ERα in cows with endometritis. PMID:25746855

  8. Transcription Factors Expressed in Lateral Organ Boundaries: Identification of Downstream Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Patricia S

    2010-07-12

    The processes of lateral organ initiation and patterning are central to the generation of mature plant form. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is essential to our understanding of plant development. Communication between the shoot apical meristem and initiating organ primordia is important both for functioning of the meristem and for proper organ patterning, and very little is known about this process. In particular, the boundary between meristem and leaf is emerging as a critical region that is important for SAM maintenance and regulation of organogenesis. The goal of this project was to characterize three boundary-expressed genes that encode predicted transcription factors. Specifically, we have studied LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB), LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1), and LATERAL ORGAN FUSION2 (LOF2). LOB encodes the founding member of the LOB-DOMAIN (LBD) plant-specific DNA binding transcription factor family and LOF1 and LOF2 encode paralogous MYB-domain transcription factors. We characterized the genetic relationship between these three genes and other boundary and meristem genes. We also used an ectopic inducible expression system to identify direct targets of LOB.

  9. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2009-12-10

    Background: Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs). Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results: We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF?miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF?miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1) have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92), we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process. 2009 Schmeier et al; licensee Bio

  10. Ligula intestinalis infection is associated with alterations of both brain and gonad aromatase expression in roach (Rutilus rutilus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulange-Lecomte, C; Geraudie, P; Forget-Leray, J; Gerbron, M; Minier, C

    2011-09-01

    The tapeworm Ligula intestinalis commonly infests roach (Rutilus rutilus) and is responsible for the inhibition of gonad development. In order to better understand the effect of the plerocercoid on fish physiology, and to discriminate parasitization effects from those of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC), Cyp19b and Cyp19a aromatase expression was investigated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in brain and gonads of ligulosed roach, caught from a reference site. Data were compared to reproductive and endocrine endpoints previously reported in a larger cohort study (including the sampled population of the present one), such as gonadosomatic index, Fulton index, gonadal histology, plasma sex steroid levels and brain aromatase activity. A decrease in Cyp19b expression in the brain of infected fish was demonstrated, in agreement with the reduction of aromatase activity previously described. In contrast, Cyp19a expression in the gonads appeared to be enhanced in ligulosed fish, in accordance with the presence of immature but differentiated sexual tissues. Together these results show that: (1) L. intestinalis infestation results in an alteration of aromatase expression which, in particular, may have profound effects on the fish brain; and (2) L. intestinalis infection must be considered as a major confounding factor in ecotoxicological studies using aromatase expression as an EDC biomarker. Moreover, the concordance between activity and expression--investigated for the first time in the same population--gives a functional relevance to the transcript aromatase dosage in the brain. Finally, quantitative PCR was confirmed as a sensitive approach, enabling aromatase status to be defined in the poorly developed gonads of ligulosed individuals. PMID:21062527

  11. Expression of transcription factor Pokemon in non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-hong; WANG Sheng-fa; YU Liang; WANG Ju; CHANG Hao; YAN Wei-li; FU Kai; ZHANG Jian

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factor Pokemon,a central regulation gene of the important tumor suppressor ARF gene,exerted its activity by acting upstream of many tumor-suppressing genes and proto-oncogenes.Its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)and its clinical significance remains unclear.The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in NSCLC and to explore its correlation with the clinical pathological characteristics and its influence on patients'prognosis.Methods Fifty-five cases of NSCLC were involved in this study.The expression of Pokemon in the tumor tissue,the corresponding tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue was detected via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and Western blotting,with the aim of investigating the correlation between the expression of Pokemon in tumor tissue of NSCLC and its clinicaI pathological characteristics.Moreover,a prognostic analysis was carried out based upon the immunohistochemical(IHC)detection of the expression of Pokemon gene in archival tumor specimens (5 years ago) of 62 cases of NSCLC.Results Statistical significance of the expression of Pokemon mRNA and protein was determined in the tumor tissue,the tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue (P<0.05).The expression of Pokemon was determined not to be associated with the patients'sex,age,smoking condition,tumor differentiation degree,histology and lymph node metastasis condition.However,its relationship with TNM staging was established(P<0.05).Furthermore,it was shown that the suwival rate of patients with negative Pokemon expression was significantly higher than that of those with positive Pokemon expression(P=0.004),therefore,the expression of Pokemon is believed to be an independent factor affectinq prognosis (P=0.034).Concluaion Pokemon was over-expressed in NSCLC tissue and the expression of Pokemon might be of clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer prognostic evaluation.

  12. Phenotypic alterations of petal and sepal by ectopic expression of a rice MADS box gene in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H G; Noh, Y S; Chung, Y Y; Costa, M A; An, K; An, G

    1995-10-01

    Floral organ development is controlled by a group of regulatory factors containing the MADS domain. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a cDNA clone from rice, OsMADS3, which encodes a MADS-domain containing protein. The OsMADS3 amino acid sequence shows over 60% identity to AG of Arabidopsis, PLE of Antirrhinum majus, and AG/PLE homologues of petunia, tobacco, tomato, Brassica napus, and maize. Homology in the MADS box region is most conserved. RNA blot analysis indicated that the rice MADS gene was preferentially expressed in reproductive organs, especially in stamen and carpel. In situ localization studies showed that the transcript was present primarily in stamen and carpel. The function of the rice OsMADS3 was elucidated by ectopic expression of the gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in a heterologous tobacco plant system. Transgenic plants exhibited an altered morphology and coloration of the perianth organs. Sepals were pale green and elongated. Limbs of the corolla were split into sections which in some plants became antheroid structures attached to tubes that resembled filaments. The phenotypes mimic the results of ectopic expression of dicot AG gene or AG homologues. These results indicate that the OsMADS3 gene is possibly an AG homologue and that the AG genes appear to be structurally and functionally conserved between dicot and monocot. PMID:7579155

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Enriched Chevon (Goat Meat Lowers Plasma Cholesterol Levels and Alters Gene Expressions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, control chevon (goat meat and omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon were obtained from goats fed a 50% oil palm frond diet and commercial goat concentrate for 100 days, respectively. Goats fed the 50% oil palm frond diet contained high amounts of α-linolenic acid (ALA in their meat compared to goats fed the control diet. The chevon was then used to prepare two types of pellets (control or enriched chevon that were then fed to twenty-male-four-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n=10 in each group for 12 weeks to evaluate their effects on plasma cholesterol levels, tissue fatty acids, and gene expression. There was a significant increase in ALA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in the muscle tissues and liver of the rats fed the enriched chevon compared with the control group. Plasma cholesterol also decreased (P<0.05 in rats fed the enriched chevon compared to the control group. The rat pellets containing enriched chevon significantly upregulated the key transcription factor PPAR-γ and downregulated SREBP-1c expression relative to the control group. The results showed that the omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon increased the omega-3 fatty acids in the rat tissues and altered PPAR-γ and SREBP-1c genes expression.

  14. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA

  15. Identification of transcription factors potential related to brown planthopper resistance in rice via microarray expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yubing

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens Stål, is one of the most destructive insect pests of rice. The molecular responses of plants to sucking insects resemble responses to pathogen infection. However, the molecular mechanism of BPH-resistance in rice remains unclear. Transcription factors (TF are up-stream regulators of various genes that bind to specific DNA sequences, thereby controlling the transcription from DNA to mRNA. They are key regulators for transcriptional expression in biological processes, and are probably involved in the BPH-induced pathways in resistant rice varieties. Results We conducted a microarray experiment to analyze TF genes related to BPH resistance in a Sri Lankan rice cultivar, Rathu Heenati (RHT. We compared the expression profiles of TF genes in RHT with those of the susceptible rice cultivar Taichun Native 1 (TN1. We detected 2038 TF genes showing differential expression signals between the two rice varieties. Of these, 442 TF genes were probably related to BPH-induced resistance in RHT and TN1, and 229 may be related to constitutive resistance only in RHT. These genes showed a fold change (FC of more than 2.0 (P10, there were 37 induced TF genes and 26 constitutive resistance TF genes. Of these, 13 were probably involved in BPH-induced resistance, and 8 in constitutive resistance to BPH in RHT. Conclusions We explored the molecular mechanism of resistance to BPH in rice by comparing expressions of TF genes between RHT and TN1. We speculate that the level of gene repression, especially for early TF genes, plays an important role in the defense response. The fundamental point of the resistance strategy is that plants protect themselves by reducing their metabolic level to inhibit feeding by BPH and prevent damage from water and nutrient loss. We have selected 21 TF genes related to BPH resistance for further analyses to understand the molecular responses to BPH feeding in rice.

  16. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Qing

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we investigated the use of unsigned and signed network analysis to identify pluripotency and differentiation related genes. Results We show that signed networks provide a better systems level understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of ES cells than unsigned networks, using two independent murine ES cell expression data sets. Specifically, using signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA, we found a pluripotency module and a differentiation module, which are not identified in unsigned networks. We confirmed the importance of these modules by incorporating genome-wide TF binding data for key ES cell regulators. Interestingly, we find that the pluripotency module is enriched with genes related to DNA damage repair and mitochondrial function in addition to transcriptional regulation. Using a connectivity measure of module membership, we not only identify known regulators of ES cells but also show that Mrpl15, Msh6, Nrf1, Nup133, Ppif, Rbpj, Sh3gl2, and Zfp39, among other genes, have important roles in maintaining ES cell pluripotency and self-renewal. We also report highly significant relationships between module membership and epigenetic modifications (histone modifications and promoter CpG methylation status, which are known to play a role in controlling gene expression during ES cell self-renewal and differentiation. Conclusion Our systems biologic re-analysis of gene expression, transcription factor binding, epigenetic and gene ontology data provides a novel integrative view of ES cell biology.

  17. Diverse expression pattern of wheat transcription factors against abiotic stresses in wheat species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloglu, Mehmet Cengiz; Inal, Behcet; Kavas, Musa; Unver, Turgay

    2014-10-15

    Abiotic stress including drought and salinity affects quality and yield of wheat varieties used for the production of both bread and pasta flour. bZIP, MBF1, WRKY, MYB and NAC transcription factor (TF) genes are the largest transcriptional regulators which are involved in growth, development, physiological processes, and biotic/abiotic stress responses in plants. Identification of expression profiling of these TFs plays a crucial role to understand the response of different wheat species against severe environmental changes. In the current study, expression analysis of TaWLIP19 (wheat version of bZIP), TaMBF1, TaWRKY10, TaMYB33 and TaNAC69 genes was examined under drought and salinity stress conditions in Triticum aestivum cv. (Yuregir-89), Triticum turgidum cv. (Kiziltan-91), and Triticum monococcum (Siyez). After drought stress application, all five selected genes in Kiziltan-91 were induced. However, TaMBF1 and TaWLIP19 were the only downregulated genes in Yuregir-89 and Siyez, respectively. Except TaMYB33 in Siyez, expression level of the remaining genes increased under salt stress condition in all Triticum species. For determination of drought response to selected TF members, publicly available RNA-seq data were also analyzed in this study. TaMBF1, TaWLIP19 and TaNAC69 transcripts were detected through in silico analysis. This comprehensive gene expression analysis provides valuable information for understanding the roles of these TFs under abiotic stresses in modern wheat cultivars and ancient einkorn wheat. In addition, selected TFs might be used for determination of drought or salinity-tolerant and susceptible cultivars for molecular breeding studies. PMID:25130909

  18. Gene expression alterations in brains of mice infected with three strains of scrapie

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    Race Richard E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders which occur in humans and various animal species. Examples include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle, chronic wasting disease (CWD in deer and elk, and scrapie in sheep, and experimental mice. To gain insights into TSE pathogenesis, we made and used cDNA microarrays to identify disease-associated alterations in gene expression. Brain gene expression in scrapie-infected mice was compared to mock-infected mice at pre-symptomatic and symptomatic time points. Three strains of mouse scrapie that show striking differences in neuropathology were studied: ME7, 22L, and Chandler/RML. Results In symptomatic mice, over 400 significant gene expression alterations were identified. In contrast, only 22 genes showed significant alteration in the pre-symptomatic animals. We also identified genes that showed significant differences in alterations in gene expression between strains. Genes identified in this study encode proteins that are involved in many cellular processes including protein folding, endosome/lysosome function, immunity, synapse function, metal ion binding, calcium regulation and cytoskeletal function. Conclusion These studies shed light on the complex molecular events that occur during prion disease, and identify genes whose further study may yield new insights into strain specific neuropathogenesis and ante-mortem tests for TSEs.

  19. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91%) and tissues (90%). RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis

  20. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91% and tissues (90%. RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Conclusion RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis.

  1. Multi-transcript expression patterns in the gastrolith disk and the hypodermis of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus at premolt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkovski, Yana; Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Reinhardt, Richard; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Sagi, Amir; Tom, Moshe

    2010-06-01

    In the crustacean Cherax quadricarinatus, alterations of multi-transcript expression patterns between intermolt and late premolt stages were identified in the hypodermis and in the gastrolith disk via a cDNA microarray. The gastrolith disk is a specialized epithelium forming the gastroliths at premolt. The gastroliths are deposits of calcium carbonate derived from the digested cuticle contributing the mineral to the newly formed exoskeleton at postmolt. The late premolt stage was characterized by a dramatic general up-regulation of genes in the gastrolith disk. This phenomenon is explained by the gastrolith disk function rapid formation of the relatively large gastrolith during a short period of time. Besides genes of general importance for this dramatic change, three genes related to the chitin-protein-mineral structure were identified. The cDNA and the deduced protein of the novel one of them, the chitin deacetylase 1 (Cq-CDA1) was fully characterized and its resemblance to already characterized structural proteins of the gastrolith matrix was described. Cq-CDA1 characteristics strongly indicate its participation in the gastrolith construction, although its protein product was not identified yet in the gastrolith. In addition, many differentially expressed genes with unknown function were elucidated. An unexpected milder down-regulation was observed in the hypodermis. PMID:20452841

  2. The Transcriptional Repressor ID2 Can Interact with the Canonical Clock Components CLOCK and BMAL1 and Mediate Inhibitory Effects on mPer1 Expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Sarah M.; Fernando, Shanik J.; Hou, Tim Y.; Duffield, Giles E.

    2010-01-01

    ID2 is a rhythmically expressed HLH transcriptional repressor. Deletion of Id2 in mice results in circadian phenotypes, highlighted by disrupted locomotor activity rhythms and an enhanced photoentrainment response. ID2 can suppress the transactivation potential of the positive elements of the clock, CLOCK-BMAL1, on mPer1 and clock-controlled gene (CCG) activity. Misregulation of CCGs is observed in Id2−/− liver, and mutant mice exhibit associated alterations in lipid homeostasis. These data s...

  3. Identification of genes whose expression is altered by obesity throughout the arterial tree

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Davis, J. Wade; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    We used next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology on the whole transcriptome to identify genes whose expression is consistently affected by obesity across multiple arteries. Specifically, we examined transcriptional profiles of the iliac artery as well as the feed artery, first, second, and third branch order arterioles in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and diaphragm muscles from obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and lean Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats. Within the...

  4. Involvement of transcriptional enhancers in the regulation of developmental expression of yellow gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Upstream regulatory region and flanking DNA of yellow gene wereisolated and cloned from a Drosophila genomic library. A vector containing yellow gene and regulatory elements was constructed using the recombinant DNA technique. Then this vector was integrated into Drosophila genome by genetic transformation. Using both FLP/FRT and Cre/LoxP site-specific recombination systems, two new yellow alleles were created at the same position in the genome of transgenic flies. Results from genetic and molecular analysis indicated that transcriptional enhancers regulate the developmental expression of the transgene. Furthermore, interactions between new-created yellow alleles were observed. Such interactions can influence markedly the expression of yellow gene during development. This effect may also be a form of enhancer-mediated gene expression.

  5. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development. PMID:27178467

  6. Altered hypothalamic protein expression in a rat model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-na Cong

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by progressive motor impairment and cognitive alterations. Changes in energy metabolism, neuroendocrine function, body weight, euglycemia, appetite function, and circadian rhythm can also occur. It is likely that the locus of these alterations is the hypothalamus. We used the HD transgenic (tg rat model bearing 51 CAG repeats, which exhibits similar HD symptomology as HD patients to investigate hypothalamic function. We conducted detailed hypothalamic proteome analyses and also measured circulating levels of various metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic animals. Our results demonstrate that there are significant alterations in HD rat hypothalamic protein expression such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, heat shock protein-70, the oxidative damage protein glutathione peroxidase (Gpx4, glycogen synthase1 (Gys1 and the lipid synthesis enzyme acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1 (Agpat1. In addition, there are significant alterations in various circulating metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic animals including, insulin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL, before any motor or cognitive alterations are apparent. These early metabolic and lipid alterations are likely prodromal signs of hypothalamic dysfunction. Gaining a greater understanding of the hypothalamic and metabolic alterations that occur in HD, could lead to the development of novel therapeutics for early interventional treatment of HD.

  7. Cell signaling and transcription factor genes expressed during whole body regeneration in a colonial chordate

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    Rinkevich Baruch

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The restoration of adults from fragments of blood vessels in botryllid ascidians (termed whole body regeneration [WBR] represents an inimitable event in the chordates, which is poorly understood on the mechanistic level. Results To elucidate mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, a subtracted EST library for early WBR stages was previously assembled, revealing 76 putative genes belonging to major signaling pathways, including Notch/Delta, JAK/STAT, protein kinases, nuclear receptors, Ras oncogene family members, G-Protein coupled receptor (GPCR and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β signaling. RT-PCR on selected transcripts documented specific up-regulation in only regenerating fragments, pointing to a broad activation of these signaling pathways at onset of WBR. The followed-up expression pattern of seven representative transcripts from JAK/STAT signaling (Bl-STAT, the Ras oncogene family (Bl-Rap1A, Bl-Rab-33, the protein kinase family (Bl-Mnk, Bl-Cnot, Bl-Slit and Bl-Bax inhibitor, revealed systemic and site specific activations during WBR in a sub-population of circulatory cells. Conclusion WBR in the non-vertebrate chordate Botrylloides leachi is a multifaceted phenomenon, presided by a complex array of cell signaling and transcription factors. Above results, provide a first insight into the whole genome molecular machinery of this unique regeneration process, and reveal the broad participation of cell signaling and transcription factors in the process. While regeneration involves the participation of specific cell populations, WBR signals are systemically expressed at the organism level.

  8. MicroRNA Expression Is Altered in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Model and Targeting miR-155 with Antagomirs Reveals Cellular Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian W Plank

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are differentially regulated during development and in inflammatory diseases. A role for miRNAs in allergic asthma is emerging and further investigation is required to determine whether they may serve as potential therapeutic targets. We profiled miRNA expression in murine lungs from an ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease model, and compared expression to animals receiving dexamethasone treatment and non-allergic controls. Our analysis identified 29 miRNAs that were significantly altered during allergic inflammation. Target prediction analysis revealed novel genes with altered expression in allergic airways disease and suggests synergistic miRNA regulation of target mRNAs. To assess the impacts of one induced miRNA on pathology, we targeted miR-155-5p using a specific antagomir. Antagomir administration successfully reduced miR-155-5p expression with high specificity, but failed to alter the disease phenotype. Interestingly, further investigation revealed that antagomir delivery has variable efficacy across different immune cell types, effectively targeting myeloid cell populations, but exhibiting poor uptake in lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate that antagomir-based targeting of miRNA function in the lung is highly specific, but highlights cell-specificity as a key limitation to be considered for antagomir-based strategies as therapeutics.

  9. Blueberry polyphenols attenuate kainic acid-induced decrements in cognition and alter inflammatory gene expression in rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Lau, Francis C.; Carey, Amanda N.; Galli, Rachel L.; Spangler, Edward L.; Ingram, Donald K.; Joseph, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to long-term exposure and increased susceptibility to inflammatory insults. In the current study, we investigated whether polyphenols in blueberries can reduce the deleterious effects of inflammation induced by central administration of kainic acid by altering the expression of genes associated with inflammation. To this end, 4-month-old male Fischer-344 (F344) rats were fed a control, 0.015% piroxicam (an NSAID) or 2% blueberry diet for 8 weeks before either Ringer's buffer or kainic acid was bilaterally micro-infused into the hippocampus. Two weeks later, following behavioral evaluation, the rats were killed and total RNA from the hippocampus was extracted and used in real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression of inflammation-related genes. Kainic acid had deleterious effects on cognitive behavior as kainic acid-injected rats on the control diet exhibited increased latencies to find a hidden platform in the Morris water maze compared to Ringer's buffer-injected rats and utilized non-spatial strategies during probe trials. The blueberry diet, and to a lesser degree the piroxicam diet, was able to improve cognitive performance. Immunohistochemical analyses of OX-6 expression revealed that kainic acid produced an inflammatory response by increasing the OX-6 positive areas in the hippocampus of kainic acid-injected rats. Kainic acid up-regulated the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, the neurotrophic factor IGF-1, and the transcription factor NF-κB. Blueberry and piroxicam supplementations were found to attenuate the kainic acid-induced increase in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and NF-κB, while only blueberry was able to augment the increased IGF-1 expression. These results indicate that blueberry polyphenols attenuate learning impairments following neurotoxic insult and exert anti-inflammatory actions

  10. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 Regulates Pokemon Gene Transcription Through p53 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Xu; Yuyang Jiang; Xuyu Zu; Shengnan He; Zhenhua Xie; Feng Liu

    2010-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of...

  11. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcr...

  12. Presence of Transcription Factor OCT4 Limits Interferon-tau Expression during the Pre-attachment Period in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Su; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Bai, Hanako; Bai, Rulan; Sato, Daisuke; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Godkin, James D; Min, Kwan-Sik; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    Interferon-tau (IFNT) is thought to be the conceptus protein that signals maternal recognition of pregnancy in ruminants. We and others have observed that OCT4 expression persists in the trophectoderm of ruminants; thus, both CDX2 and OCT4 coexist during the early stages of conceptus development. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of CDX2 and OCT4 on IFNT gene transcription when evaluated with other transcription factors. Human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells were cotransfected with an ovine IFNT (-654-bp)-luciferase reporter (-654-IFNT-Luc) construct and several transcription factor expression plasmids. Cotransfection of the reporter construct with Cdx2, Ets2 and Jun increased transcription of -654-IFNT-Luc by about 12-fold compared with transfection of the construct alone. When cells were initially transfected with Oct4 (0 h) followed by transfection with Cdx2, Ets2 and/or Jun 24 h later, the expression of -654-IFNT-Luc was reduced to control levels. OCT4 also inhibited the stimulatory activity of CDX2 alone, but not when CDX2 was combined with JUN and/or ETS2. Thus, when combined with the other transcription factors, OCT4 exhibited little inhibitory activity towards CDX2. An inhibitor of the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CREBBP), 12S E1A, reduced CDX2/ETS2/JUN stimulated -654-IFNT-Luc expression by about 40%, indicating that the formation of an appropriate transcription factor complex is required for maximum expression. In conclusion, the presence of OCT4 may initially minimize IFNT expression; however, as elongation proceeds, the increasing expression of CDX2 and formation of the transcription complex leads to greatly increased IFNT expression, resulting in pregnancy establishment in ruminants. PMID:25049833

  13. RNA sequencing analysis of gene expression regulated by the transcription factor SlZFP2 during early fruit development

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Lin; Zhao, Fangfang; Li, Rong; Xiao, Han

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor SlZFP2 (Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger Protein 2) regulates ABA biosynthesis during fruit development. To reveal the regulatory network of this transcription factor, we conducted a high-throughput RNA-seq to identify differentially expressed genes in 2 dpa (days post anthesis) fruits from a representative RNAi line in Solanum pimpinellifolium LA1589 background and the wild type. The transcriptome analysis revealed that expression of 2722 genes was regulated by SlZFP...

  14. AB202. Altered micro RNA expression in patients with non-obstructive azoospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiansheng; Liang, Chaozhao

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNA molecules, are indicated to play essential roles in spermatogenesis. However, little is known about the expression patterns or function of miRNAs in human testes involved in infertility. Methods In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of testes of patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) and normal controls were performed by using microarray technologies. Results Altered microRNA expression in NOA patients was found, w...

  15. Transcriptional regulation of PCFT by KLF4, HNF4α, CDX2 and C/EBPα: Implication in its site-specific expression in the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furumiya, Mai [Department of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Department of Biopharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Kinjo Gakuin University, 2-1723 Omori, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8521 (Japan); Inoue, Katsuhisa; Ohta, Kinya [Department of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Hayashi, Yayoi [Department of Biopharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Kinjo Gakuin University, 2-1723 Omori, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8521 (Japan); Yuasa, Hiroaki, E-mail: yuasa@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined transcription factors that may regulate PCFT expression in the intestine. ► PCFT promoter activity is basically induced by KLF4. ► KLF4-induced PCFT promoter activity is enhanced by HNF4α synergistically. ► CDX2 and C/EBPα suppress PCFT promoter activity induced by KLF4 and HNF4α. -- Abstract: Proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT), which is responsible for the intestinal uptake of folates and analogs, is expressed only in the proximal region in the small intestine. The present study was to examine its transcriptional regulation, which may be involved in such a unique expression profile and potentially in its alteration, using dual-luciferase reporter assays in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. The luciferase activity derived from the reporter construct containing the 5′-flanking sequence of −1695/+96 of the human PCFT gene was enhanced most extensively by the introduction of Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4). The KLF4-induced luciferase activity was further enhanced by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) synergistically. To the contrary, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) extensively suppressed the luciferase activity induced by KLF4 alone and also that induced by KLF4 and HNF4α. Western blot analysis using the rat small intestine indicated uniform expression of KLF4 along the intestinal tract, proximal-oriented expression of HNF4α, distal-oriented expression of CDX2 and C/EBPα. These results suggest that the activity of PCFT promoter is basically induced by KLF4 and the gradiented expression profile of PCFT may be at least in part accounted for by those of HNF4α, CDX2 and C/EBPα.

  16. Differential expression of members of the E2F family of transcription factors in rodent testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toppari Jorma

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The E2F family of transcription factors is required for the activation or repression of differentially expressed gene programs during the cell cycle in normal and abnormal development of tissues. We previously determined that members of the retinoblastoma protein family that interacts with the E2F family are differentially expressed and localized in almost all the different cell types and tissues of the testis and in response to known endocrine disruptors. In this study, the cell-specific and stage-specific expression of members of the E2F proteins has been elucidated. Methods We used immunohistochemical (IHC analysis of tissue sections and Western blot analysis of proteins, from whole testis and microdissected stages of seminiferous tubules to study the differential expression of the E2F proteins. Results For most of the five E2F family members studied, the localizations appear conserved in the two most commonly studied rodent models, mice and rats, with some notable differences. Comparisons between wild type and E2F-1 knockout mice revealed that the level of E2F-1 protein is stage-specific and most abundant in leptotene to early pachytene spermatocytes of stages IX to XI of mouse while strong staining of E2F-1 in some cells close to the basal lamina of rat tubules suggest that it may also be expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia. The age-dependent development of a Sertoli-cell-only phenotype in seminiferous tubules of E2F-1 knockout males corroborates this, and indicates that E2F-1 is required for spermatogonial stem cell renewal. Interestingly, E2F-3 appears in both terminally differentiated Sertoli cells, as well as spermatogonial cells in the differentiative pathway, while the remaining member of the activating E2Fs, E2F-2 is most concentrated in spermatocytes of mid to late prophase of meiosis. Comparisons between wildtype and E2F-4 knockout mice demonstrated that the level of E2F-4 protein displays a distinct

  17. Transcript profiling reveals expression differences in wild-type and glabrous soybean lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromvik Martina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichome hairs affect diverse agronomic characters such as seed weight and yield, prevent insect damage and reduce loss of water but their molecular control has not been extensively studied in soybean. Several detailed models for trichome development have been proposed for Arabidopsis thaliana, but their applicability to important crops such as cotton and soybean is not fully known. Results Two high throughput transcript sequencing methods, Digital Gene Expression (DGE Tag Profiling and RNA-Seq, were used to compare the transcriptional profiles in wild-type (cv. Clark standard, CS and a mutant (cv. Clark glabrous, i.e., trichomeless or hairless, CG soybean isoline that carries the dominant P1 allele. DGE data and RNA-Seq data were mapped to the cDNAs (Glyma models predicted from the reference soybean genome, Williams 82. Extending the model length by 250 bp at both ends resulted in significantly more matches of authentic DGE tags indicating that many of the predicted gene models are prematurely truncated at the 5' and 3' UTRs. The genome-wide comparative study of the transcript profiles of the wild-type versus mutant line revealed a number of differentially expressed genes. One highly-expressed gene, Glyma04g35130, in wild-type soybean was of interest as it has high homology to the cotton gene GhRDL1 gene that has been identified as being involved in cotton fiber initiation and is a member of the BURP protein family. Sequence comparison of Glyma04g35130 among Williams 82 with our sequences derived from CS and CG isolines revealed various SNPs and indels including addition of one nucleotide C in the CG and insertion of ~60 bp in the third exon of CS that causes a frameshift mutation and premature truncation of peptides in both lines as compared to Williams 82. Conclusion Although not a candidate for the P1 locus, a BURP family member (Glyma04g35130 from soybean has been shown to be abundantly expressed in the CS line and very

  18. Spontaneous loss and alteration of antigen receptor expression in mature CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The T-cell receptor CD3 (TCR/CD3) complex plays a central role in antigen recognition and activation of mature T cells, and therefore abnormalities in the expression of the complex should induce unresponsiveness of T cells to antigen stimulus. Using flow cytometry, we detected and enumerated variant cells with loss or alteration of surface TCR/CD3 expression among human mature CD4+ T cells. The presence of variant CD4+ T cells was demonstrated by isolating and cloning them from peripheral blood, and their abnormalities can be accounted for by alterations in TCR expression such as defects of protein expression and partial protein deletion. The variant frequency in peripheral blood increased with aging in normal donors and was highly elevated in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive inherited disease with defective DNA repair and variable T-cell immunodeficiency. These findings suggest that such alterations in TCR expression are induced by somatic mutagenesis of TCR genes and can be important factors related to age-dependent and genetic disease-associated T-cell dysfunction. (author)

  19. Transcriptional profiling of pea ABR17 mediated changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyholos Michael K

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenesis-related proteins belonging to group 10 (PR10 are elevated in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Previously, we have shown a drastic salinity-induced increase in the levels of ABR17, a member of the PR10 family, in pea. Furthermore, we have also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus enhances their germination and early seedling growth under stress. Although it has been reported that several members of the PR10 family including ABR17 possess RNase activity, the exact mechanism by which the aforementioned characteristics are conferred by ABR17 is unknown at this time. We hypothesized that a study of differences in transcriptome between wild type (WT and ABR17 transgenic A. thaliana may shed light on this process. Results The molecular changes brought about by the expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in A. thaliana in the presence or absence of salt stress were investigated using microarrays consisting of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes. Statistical analysis identified number of genes which were over represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts in the transgenic line. Our results highlight the important roles of many abscisic acid (ABA and cytokinin (CK responsive genes in ABR17 transgenic lines. Although the transcriptional changes followed a general salt response theme in both WT and transgenic seedlings under salt stress, many genes exhibited differential expression patterns when the transgenic and WT lines were compared. These genes include plant defensins, heat shock proteins, other defense related genes, and several transcriptional factors. Our microarray results for selected genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion Transcriptional analysis in ABR17 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, both under normal and saline conditions, revealed significant changes in abundance of

  20. p53 inactivation upregulates p73 expression through E2F-1 mediated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali Tophkhane

    Full Text Available While p73 overexpression has been associated with increased apoptosis in cancer tissues, p73 overexpressing tumors appear to be of high grade malignancy. Why this putative tumor suppressor is overexpressed in cancer cells and what the function of overexpressed p73 is in breast cancers are critical questions to be addressed. By investigating the effect of p53 inactivation on p73 expression, we found that both protein and mRNA levels of TAp73 were increased in MCF-7/p53siRNA cells, MCF-7/p53mt135 cells and HCT-116/p53-/- cells, as compared to wild type control, suggesting that p53 inactivation by various forms upregulates p73. We showed that p53 knockdown induced p73 was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. However, although p53 has a putative binding site in the TAp73 promoter, deletion of this binding site did not affect p53 knockdown mediated activation of TAp73 promoter. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP data demonstrated that loss of p53 results in enhanced occupancy of E2F-1 in the TAp73 promoter. The responsive sequence of p53 inactivation mediated p73 upregulation was mapped to the proximal promoter region of the TAp73 gene. To test the role of E2F-1 in p53 inactivation mediated regulation of p73 transcription, we found that p53 knockdown enhanced E2F-1 dependent p73 transcription, and mutations in E2F-1 binding sites in the TAp73 promoter abrogated p53 knockdown mediated activation of TAp73 promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that p21 is a mediator of p53-E2F crosstalk in the regulation of p73 transcription. We concluded that p53 knockdown/inactivation may upregulate TAp73 expression through E2F-1 mediated transcriptional regulation. p53 inactivation mediated upregulation of p73 suggests an intrinsic rescuing mechanism in response to p53 mutation/inactivation. These findings support further analysis of the correlation between p53 status and p73 expression and its prognostic/predictive significance in human cancers.

  1. The over-expression of an Arabidopsis B3 transcription factor, ABS2/NGAL1, leads to the loss of flower petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jingxia; Liu, Xiayan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Gaisheng; Yu, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulations are involved in many aspects of plant development and are mainly achieved through the actions of transcription factors (TF). To investigate the mechanisms of plant development, we carried out genetic screens for mutants with abnormal shoot development. Taking an activation tagging approach, we isolated a gain-of-function mutant abs2-1D (abnormal shoot 2-1D). abs2-1D showed pleiotropic growth defects at both the vegetative and reproductive developmental stages. We cloned ABS2 and it encodes a RAV sub-family of plant B3 type of transcriptional factors. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ABS2 was closely related to NGATHA (NGA) genes that are involved in flower development and was previously named NGATHA-Like 1 (NGAL1). NGAL1 was expressed mainly in the root and the filament of the stamen in flower tissues and sub-cellular localization assay revealed that NGAL1 accumulated in the nucleus. Interestingly, over-expression of NGAL1 driven by the constitutive 35S promoter led to transgenic plants with conspicuous flower defects, particularly a loss-of-petal phenotype. A loss-of-function ngal1-1 mutant did not show obvious phenotype, suggesting the existence of redundant activities and also the utility of gain-of-function genetic screens. Our results show that the over-expression of NGAL1 is capable of altering flower petal development, as well as shoot development. PMID:23185464

  2. Gene Body Methylation can alter Gene Expression and is a Therapeutic Target in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Han, Han; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lay, Fides D.; Jones, Peter A.; Liang, Gangning

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation in promoters is well known to silence genes and is the presumed therapeutic target of methylation inhibitors. Gene body methylation is positively correlated with expression yet its function is unknown. We show that 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment not only reactivates genes but decreases the over-expression of genes, many of which are involved in metabolic processes regulated by c-MYC. Down-regulation is caused by DNA demethylation of the gene bodies and restoration of high levels of expression requires remethylation by DNMT3B. Gene body methylation may therefore be an unexpected therapeutic target for DNA methylation inhibitors, resulting in the normalization of gene over-expression induced during carcinogenesis. Our results provide direct evidence for a causal relationship between gene body methylation and transcription. PMID:25263941

  3. PPP1, a plant-specific regulator of transcription controls Arabidopsis development and PIN expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamins, René; Barbez, Elke; Ortbauer, Martina; Terpstra, Inez; Lucyshyn, Doris; Moulinier-Anzola, Jeanette; Khan, Muhammad Asaf; Leitner, Johannes; Malenica, Nenad; Butt, Haroon; Korbei, Barbara; Scheres, Ben; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Luschnig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Directional transport of auxin is essential for plant development, with PIN auxin transport proteins representing an integral part of the machinery that controls hormone distribution. However, unlike the rapidly emerging framework of molecular determinants regulating PIN protein abundance and subcellular localization, insights into mechanisms controlling PIN transcription are still limited. Here we describe PIN2 PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PPP1), an evolutionary conserved plant-specific DNA binding protein that acts on transcription of PIN genes. Consistent with PPP1 DNA-binding activity, PPP1 reporter proteins are nuclear localized and analysis of PPP1 null alleles and knockdown lines indicated a function as a positive regulator of PIN expression. Furthermore, we show that ppp1 pleiotropic mutant phenotypes are partially reverted by PIN overexpression, and results are presented that underline a role of PPP1-PIN promoter interaction in PIN expression control. Collectively, our findings identify an elementary, thus far unknown, plant-specific DNA-binding protein required for post-embryonic plant development, in general, and correct expression of PIN genes, in particular. PMID:27553690

  4. Co-expression network analysis identifies transcriptional modules in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Ye, Hua

    2014-10-01

    The mouse liver transcriptome has been extensively studied but little is known about the global hepatic gene network of the mouse under normal physiological conditions. Understanding this will help reveal the transcriptional organization of the liver and elucidate its functional complexity. Here, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was carried out to explore gene co-expression networks using large-scale microarray data from normal mouse livers. A total of 7,203 genes were parsed into 16 gene modules associated with protein catabolism, RNA processing, muscle contraction, transcriptional regulation, oxidation reduction, sterol biosynthesis, translation, fatty acid metabolism, immune response and others. The modules were organized into higher order co-expression groups. Hub genes in each module were found to be critical for module function. In sum, the analyses revealed the gene modular map of the mouse liver under normal physiological condition. These results provide a systems-level framework to help understand the complexity of the mouse liver at the molecular level, and should be beneficial in annotating uncharacterized genes. PMID:24816893

  5. Expanded mutational spectrum in Cohen syndrome, tissue expression, and transcript variants of COH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Wenke; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Kühnisch, Jirko; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Garshasbi, Masoud; Najmabadi, Hossein; Walter Kuss, Andreas; Kress, Wolfram; Laureys, Geneviève; Loeys, Bart; Brilstra, Eva; Mancini, Grazia M S; Dollfus, Hélène; Dahan, Karin; Apse, Kira; Hennies, Hans Christian; Horn, Denise

    2009-02-01

    Cohen syndrome is characterised by mental retardation, postnatal microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, pigmentary retinopathy, myopia, and intermittent neutropenia. Mutations in COH1 (VPS13B) have been found in patients with Cohen syndrome from diverse ethnic origins. We have carried out mutation analysis in twelve novel patients with Cohen syndrome from nine families. In this series, we have identified 13 different mutations in COH1, twelve of these are novel including six frameshift mutations, four nonsense mutations, two splice site mutations, and a one-codon deletion. Since different transcripts of COH1 have been reported previously, we have analysed the expression patterns of COH1 splice variants. The transcript variant NM_152564 including exon 28b showed ubiquitous expression in all examined human tissues. In contrast, human brain and retina showed differential splicing of exon 28 (NM_017890). Moreover, analysis of mouse tissues revealed ubiquitous expression of Coh1 homologous to human NM_152564 in all examined tissues but no prevalent alternative splicing. PMID:19006247

  6. Expression quantitative trait analysis reveals fine germline transcript regulation in mouse lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotroneo, Chiara E; Dassano, Alice; Colombo, Francesca; Pettinicchio, Angela; Lecis, Daniele; Dugo, Matteo; De Cecco, Loris; Dragani, Tommaso A; Manenti, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression modulates cellular functions in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. Herein, we carried out a genetic linkage study on the transcriptome of lung tumors induced by urethane in an (A/J x C57BL/6)F4 intercross population, whose individual lung tumor multiplicity (Nlung) is linked to the genotype at the Pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1 (Pas1) locus. We found that expression levels of 1179 and 1579 genes are modulated by an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in cis and in trans, respectively (LOD score > 5). Of note, the genomic area surrounding and including the Pas1 locus regulated 14 genes in cis and 857 genes in trans. In lung tumors of the same (A/J x C57BL/6)F4 mice, we found 1124 genes whose transcript levels associated with Nlung (FDR cancer: they highlight the importance of Pas1 as a tumor-modifier locus, attribute to it a novel role as a major regulator of transcription in lung tumor nodules and strengthen the candidacy of the Kras gene as the effector of this locus. PMID:26966001

  7. Altered expression patterns of syndecan-1 and -2 predict biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rodrigo Ledezma; Federico Cifuentes; Iván Gallegos; Juan Fullá; Enrique Ossandon; Enrique A Castellon; Héctor R Contreras

    2011-01-01

    The clinical features of prostate cancer do not provide an accurate determination of patients undergoing biochemical relapse and are therefore not suitable as indicators of prognosis for recurrence. New molecular markers are needed for proper pre-treatment risk stratification of patients. Our aim was to assess the value of altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 as a marker for predicting biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. The expression of syndecan-1 and -2 was examined by immunohistochemical staining in a series of 60 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients with localized prostate cancer. Ten specimens from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were used as non-malignant controls. Semiquantitative analysis was performed to evaluate the staining patterns. To investigate the prognostic value, Kaplan-Meier survival curves were performed and compared by a log-rank test. In benign samples, syndecan-1 was expressed in basal and secretory epithelial cells with basolateral membrane localisation, whereas syndecan-2 was expressed preferentially in basal cells. In prostate cancer samples, the expression patterns of both syndecans shifted to granular-cytoplasmic localisation. Survival analysis showed a significant difference (P<0.05) between normal and altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 in free prostate-specific antigen recurrence survival curves. These data suggest that the expression of syndecan-1 and -2 can be used as a prognostic marker for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, improving the prostate-specific antigen recurrence risk stratification.

  8. Characterization of expression dynamics of WOX homeodomain transcription factors during somatic embryogenesis in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Giorgio; Minuto, Martina; Boccacci, Paolo; Perrone, Irene; Vallania, Rosalina; Gribaudo, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Different cultivars of Vitis vinifera vary in their potential to form embryogenic tissues. The WUSCHEL (WUS)-related homeobox (WOX) genes have been shown to play an important role in coordinating the gene transcription involved in the early phases of embryogenesis. The expression dynamics of 12 VvWOX genes present in the V. vinifera genome in embryogenic and other tissues of 'Chardonnay' were analysed. In order to understand the influence of WOX genes on the somatic embryogenic process, their expression profiles were compared in two cultivars of V. vinifera ('Chardonnay' and 'Cabernet Sauvignon') that show different aptitudes for embryogenesis. The expression of all VvWOX genes was influenced by culture conditions. VvWOX2 and VvWOX9 were the principal WOX genes expressed during the somatic embryogenesis process, and the low aptitude for embryogenesis of 'Cabernet Sauvignon' was generally correlated with the low expression levels of these VvWOX genes. VvWOX3 and VvWOX11 were strongly activated in correspondence to torpedo and cotyledonary stages of somatic embryos, with low expression in the earlier developmental stages (pre-embryogenic masses and globular embryos) and during embryo germination. VvWOX genes appeared to be key regulators of somatic embryogenesis in grapevine, and the regulation of these genes during early phases of somatic embryogenesis differed between the two cultivars of the same species. PMID:21127025

  9. Transcriptional identification and characterization of differentially expressed genes associated with embryogenesis in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lulu; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Feng, Haiyang; Li, Chao; Luo, Xiaobo; Everlyne, Muleke M; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Embryogenesis is an important component in the life cycle of most plant species. Due to the difficulty in embryo isolation, the global gene expression involved in plant embryogenesis, especially the early events following fertilization are largely unknown in radish. In this study, three cDNA libraries from ovules of radish before and after fertilization were sequenced using the Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling strategy. A total of 5,777 differentially expressed transcripts were detected based on pairwise comparison in the three libraries (0_DAP, 7_DAP and 15_DAP). Results from Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that these differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were implicated in numerous life processes including embryo development and phytohormones biosynthesis. Notably, some genes encoding auxin response factor (ARF ), Leafy cotyledon1 (LEC1) and somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (SERK ) known to be involved in radish embryogenesis were differentially expressed. The expression patterns of 30 genes including LEC1-2, AGL9, LRR, PKL and ARF8-1 were validated by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, the cooperation between miRNA and mRNA may play a pivotal role in the radish embryogenesis process. This is the first report on identification of DEGs profiles related to radish embryogenesis and seed development. These results could facilitate further dissection of the molecular mechanisms underlying embryogenesis and seed development in radish. PMID:26902837

  10. Expression of the Transcription Factor E4BP4 in Human Basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Gohr, Maria; Poulsen, Lars Kærgaard

    2014-01-01

    by Alcian blue. RNA was extracted (0.005-0.02 µg RNA from 0.5 - 1 x 106 cells), and the corresponding cDNA analyzed by real-time PCR where E4BP4 expression was calculated as 2-(CT(E4BP4) - CT(β-actin)). E4BP4 protein expression was visualized in basophil lysates (107 cells/ml) by Western blot......Rationale The cytokine IL-3 plays an important role for human basophil development, function and survival. IL-3 is also reported to induce the expression of the transcription factor E4BP4, but it is not known whether E4BP4 is expressed in basophils and influences basophil responsiveness. The aim of...... this study was to determine whether human basophils express E4BP4 and if so, to compare the expression of E4BP4 with basophil histamine release. Methods Buffy coat blood (<6h) was analyzed for anti-IgE mediated histamine release. Basophils were purified by negative selection and purity was determined...

  11. The tomato mutant ars1 (altered response to salt stress 1) identifies an R1-type MYB transcription factor involved in stomatal closure under salt acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Juan F; Cara, Beatriz; Pérez-Martín, Fernando; Pineda, Benito; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael; Bolarin, Maria C

    2016-06-01

    A screening under salt stress conditions of a T-DNA mutant collection of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) led to the identification of the altered response to salt stress 1 (ars1) mutant, which showed a salt-sensitive phenotype. Genetic analysis of the ars1 mutation revealed that a single T-DNA insertion in the ARS1 gene was responsible of the mutant phenotype. ARS1 coded for an R1-MYB type transcription factor and its expression was induced by salinity in leaves. The mutant reduced fruit yield under salt acclimation while in the absence of stress the disruption of ARS1 did not affect this agronomic trait. The stomatal behaviour of ars1 mutant leaves induced higher Na(+) accumulation via the transpiration stream, as the decreases of stomatal conductance and transpiration rate induced by salt stress were markedly lower in the mutant plants. Moreover, the mutation affected stomatal closure in a response mediated by abscisic acid (ABA). The characterization of tomato transgenic lines silencing and overexpressing ARS1 corroborates the role of the gene in regulating the water loss via transpiration under salinity. Together, our results show that ARS1 tomato gene contributes to reduce transpirational water loss under salt stress. Finally, this gene could be interesting for tomato molecular breeding, because its manipulation could lead to improved stress tolerance without yield penalty under optimal culture conditions. PMID:26578112

  12. The SHINE clade of AP2 domain transcription factors activates wax biosynthesis, alters cuticle properties, and confers drought tolerance when overexpressed in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Asaph; Dixit, Shital; Jetter, Reinhard; Thoenes, Eveline; van Arkel, Gert; Pereira, Andy

    2004-09-01

    The interface between plants and the environment plays a dual role as a protective barrier as well as a medium for the exchange of gases, water, and nutrients. The primary aerial plant surfaces are covered by a cuticle, acting as the essential permeability barrier toward the atmosphere. It is a heterogeneous layer composed mainly of lipids, namely cutin and intracuticular wax with epicuticular waxes deposited on the surface. We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana activation tag gain-of-function mutant shine (shn) that displayed a brilliant, shiny green leaf surface with increased cuticular wax compared with the leaves of wild-type plants. The gene responsible for the phenotype encodes one member of a clade of three proteins of undisclosed function, belonging to the plant-specific family of AP2/EREBP transcription factors. Overexpression of all three SHN clade genes conferred a phenotype similar to that of the original shn mutant. Biochemically, such plants were altered in wax composition (very long fatty acid derivatives). Total cuticular wax levels were increased sixfold in shn compared with the wild type, mainly because of a ninefold increase in alkanes that comprised approximately half of the total waxes in the mutant. Chlorophyll leaching assays and fresh weight loss experiments indicated that overexpression of the SHN genes increased cuticle permeability, probably because of changes in its ultrastructure. Likewise, SHN gene overexpression altered leaf and petal epidermal cell structure, trichome number, and branching as well as the stomatal index. Interestingly, SHN overexpressors displayed significant drought tolerance and recovery, probably related to the reduced stomatal density. Expression analysis using promoter-beta-glucuronidase fusions of the SHN genes provides evidence for the role of the SHN clade in plant protective layers, such as those formed during abscission, dehiscence, wounding, tissue strengthening, and the cuticle. We propose that these

  13. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  14. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  15. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks.

  16. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks. PMID:27161996

  17. Induction of liver alpha-1 acid glycoprotein gene expression involves both positive and negative transcription factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Y. M. Lee; Tsai, W H; Lai, M Y; Chen, D S; Lee, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene is liver specific and acute phase responsive. Within the 180-bp region of the AGP promoter, at least five cis elements have been found to interact with trans-acting factors. Four of these elements (A, C, D, and E) interacted with AGP/EBP, a liver-enriched transcription factor, as shown by footprinting analysis and by an anti-AGP/EBP antibody-induced supershift in a gel retardation assay. Modification of these sites by site-directed mutage...

  18. INK4/ARF Transcript Expression Is Associated with Chromosome 9p21 Variants Linked to Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yan; Sanoff, Hanna K.; Cho, Hyunsoon; Burd, Christin E.; Torrice, Chad; Mohlke, Karen L.; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have linked common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 9p21 near the INK4/ARF (CDKN2A/B) tumor suppressor locus with risk of atherosclerotic diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To explore the mechanism of this association, we investigated whether expression of proximate transcripts (p16INK4a , p15INK4b , ARF, ANRIL and MTAP) correlate with genotype of representative 9p21 SNPs. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed expr...

  19. Role of PU.1 in MHC Class II Expression via CIITA Transcription in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryosuke; Kasakura, Kazumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Yashiro, Takuya; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    The cofactor CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and several transcription factors regulating the cell type-specific expression of CIITA have been identified. Although the MHC class II expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is also mediated by CIITA, the transcription factors involved in the CIITA expression in pDCs are largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of a hematopoietic lineage-specific transcription factor, PU.1, in CIITA transcription in pDCs. The introduction of PU.1 siRNA into mouse pDCs and a human pDC cell line, CAL-1, reduced the mRNA levels of MHC class II and CIITA. When the binding of PU.1 to the 3rd promoter of CIITA (pIII) in CAL-1 and mouse pDCs was analyzed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, a significant amount of PU.1 binding to the pIII was detected, which was definitely decreased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected cells. Reporter assays showed that PU.1 knockdown reduced the pIII promoter activity and that three Ets-motifs in the human pIII promoter were candidates of cis-enhancing elements. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, it was confirmed that two Ets-motifs, GGAA (-181/-178) and AGAA (-114/-111), among three candidates, were directly bound with PU.1. When mouse pDCs and CAL-1 cells were stimulated by GM-CSF, mRNA levels of PU.1, pIII-driven CIITA, total CIITA, MHC class II, and the amount of PU.1 binding to pIII were significantly increased. The GM-CSF-mediated up-regulation of these mRNAs was canceled in PU.1 siRNA-introduced cells. Taking these results together, we conclude that PU.1 transactivates the pIII through direct binding to Ets-motifs in the promoter in pDCs. PMID:27105023

  20. PTRcombiner: mining combinatorial regulation of gene expression from post-transcriptional interaction maps

    OpenAIRE

    Corrado, Gianluca; Tebaldi, Toma; Bertamini, Giulio; Costa, Fabrizio; Quattrone, Alessandro; Viero, Gabriella; Passerini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background The progress in mapping RNA-protein and RNA-RNA interactions at the transcriptome-wide level paves the way to decipher possible combinatorial patterns embedded in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Results Here we propose an innovative computational tool to extract clusters of mRNA trans-acting co-regulators (RNA binding proteins and non-coding RNAs) from pairwise interaction annotations. In addition the tool allows to analyze the binding site similarity of co-regu...

  1. Complex translocation disrupting TCF4 and altering TCF4 isoform expression segregates as mild autosomal dominant intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Maduro, Valerie; Pusey, Barbara N.; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Atkins, Paul; du Souich, Christèle; Rupps, Rosemarie; Limbos, Marjolaine; Adams, David R; Bhatt, Samarth S.; Eydoux, Patrice; Links, Amanda E.; Lehman, Anna; Malicdan, May C.; Mason, Christopher E.; Morimoto, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations of TCF4, which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, cause Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) via multiple genetic mechanisms. TCF4 is a complex locus expressing multiple transcripts by alternative splicing and use of multiple promoters. To address the relationship between mutation of these transcripts and phenotype, we report a three-generation family segregating mild intellectual disability with a chromosomal translocation disrupting TCF4. Results Using whole...

  2. An evolutionarily conserved intronic region controls the spatiotemporal expression of the transcription factor Sox10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan William J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge lies in understanding the complexities of gene regulation. Mutation of the transcription factor SOX10 is associated with several human diseases. The disease phenotypes reflect the function of SOX10 in diverse tissues including the neural crest, central nervous system and otic vesicle. As expected, the SOX10 expression pattern is complex and highly dynamic, but little is known of the underlying mechanisms regulating its spatiotemporal pattern. SOX10 expression is highly conserved between all vertebrates characterised. Results We have combined in vivo testing of DNA fragments in zebrafish and computational comparative genomics to identify the first regulatory regions of the zebrafish sox10 gene. Both approaches converged on the 3' end of the conserved 1st intron as being critical for spatial patterning of sox10 in the embryo. Importantly, we have defined a minimal region crucial for this function. We show that this region contains numerous binding sites for transcription factors known to be essential in early neural crest induction, including Tcf/Lef, Sox and FoxD3. We show that the identity and relative position of these binding sites are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. A further region, partially required for oligodendrocyte expression, lies in the 5' region of the same intron and contains a putative CSL binding site, consistent with a role for Notch signalling in sox10 regulation. Furthermore, we show that β-catenin, Notch signalling and Sox9 can induce ectopic sox10 expression in early embryos, consistent with regulatory roles predicted from our transgenic and computational results. Conclusion We have thus identified two major sites of sox10 regulation in vertebrates and provided evidence supporting a role for at least three factors in driving sox10 expression in neural crest, otic epithelium and oligodendrocyte domains.

  3. Heat shock transcriptional factors in Malus domestica: identification, classification and expression analysis

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    Giorno Filomena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock transcriptional factors (Hsfs play a crucial role in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress conditions and in plant growth and development. Apple (Malus domestica Borkh is an economically important fruit tree whose genome has been fully sequenced. So far, no detailed characterization of the Hsf gene family is available for this crop plant. Results A genome-wide analysis was carried out in Malus domestica to identify heat shock transcriptional factor (Hsf genes, named MdHsfs. Twenty five MdHsfs were identified and classified in three main groups (class A, B and C according to the structural characteristics and to the phylogenetic comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa. Chromosomal duplications were analyzed and segmental duplications were shown to have occurred more frequently in the expansion of Hsf genes in the apple genome. Furthermore, MdHsfs transcripts were detected in several apple organs, and expression changes were observed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis in developing flowers and fruits as well as in leaves, harvested from trees grown in the field and exposed to the naturally increased temperatures. Conclusions The apple genome comprises 25 full length Hsf genes. The data obtained from this investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Hsf gene family in apple, and provide the basis for further studies to dissect Hsf function during development as well as in response to environmental stimuli.

  4. Ethanol induced astaxanthin accumulation and transcriptional expression of carotenogenic genes in Haematococcus pluvialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zewen; Liu, Zhiyong; Hou, Yuyong; Liu, Chenfeng; Gao, Feng; Zheng, Yubin; Chen, Fangjian

    2015-10-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the most promising natural sources of astaxanthin. However, inducing the accumulation process has become one of the primary obstacles in astaxanthin production. In this study, the effect of ethanol on astaxanthin accumulation was investigated. The results demonstrated that astaxanthin accumulation occurred with ethanol addition even under low-light conditions. The astaxanthin productivity could reach 11.26 mg L(-1) d(-1) at 3% (v/v) ethanol, which was 2.03 times of that of the control. The transcriptional expression patterns of eight carotenogenic genes were evaluated using real-time PCR. The results showed that ethanol greatly enhanced transcription of the isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase genes (ipi-1 and ipi-2), which were responsible for isomerization reaction of IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). This finding suggests that ethanol induced astaxanthin biosynthesis was up-regulated mainly by ipi-1 and ipi-2 at transcriptional level, promoting isoprenoid synthesis and substrate supply to carotenoid formation. Thus ethanol has the potential to be used as an effective reagent to induce astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis. PMID:26215339

  5. Identification of bovine leukemia virus tax function associated with host cell transcription, signaling, stress response and immune response pathway by microarray-based gene expression analysis

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    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The Tax protein of BLV is a transcriptional activator of viral replication and a key contributor to oncogenic potential. We previously identified interesting mutant forms of Tax with elevated (TaxD247G or reduced (TaxS240P transactivation effects on BLV replication and propagation. However, the effects of these mutations on functions other than transcriptional activation are unknown. In this study, to identify genes that play a role in the cascade of signal events regulated by wild-type and mutant Tax proteins, we used a large-scale host cell gene-profiling approach. Results Using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts, we found several alterations after the expression of Tax proteins in genes involved in many cellular functions such as transcription, signal transduction, cell growth, apoptosis, stress response, and immune response, indicating that Tax protein has multiple biological effects on various cellular environments. We also found that TaxD247G strongly regulated more genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, and cell growth functions, contrary to TaxS240P, which regulated fewer genes. In addition, the expression of genes related to stress response significantly increased in the presence of TaxS240P as compared to wild-type Tax and TaxD247G. By contrast, the largest group of downregulated genes was related to immune response, and the majority of these genes belonged to the interferon family. However, no significant difference in the expression level of downregulated genes was observed among the Tax proteins. Finally, the expression of important cellular factors obtained from the human microarray results were validated at the RNA and protein levels by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting

  6. Oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 overexpression promotes oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 expression in the brains of neonatal rats exposed to hypoxia****☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Yang; Hong Cui; Aijun Yang; Wenxing Jiang

    2011-01-01

    To examine the expression profiles of oligodendrocyte transcription factors 1 and 2 (Olig1 and Olig2) and the interaction between these two proteins, Olig1 was transfected into the lateral ventricles of neonatal rats subjected to hypoxia. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Olig2 was expressed throughout the nuclei in the brain, and expression increased at 3 days following hypoxia and was higher than levels at 7 days following Ad5-Olig1 transfection. Western blot revealed that Olig1 and Olig2 expression increased in Olig1-transfected brain cells 3 days after hypoxia, but Olig1 and Olig2 expression decreased at 7 days. These results indicate that Olig1 overexpression enhances Olig2 expression in brain tissues of hypoxia rats.

  7. Global Gene Expression Alterations as a Crucial Constituent of Human Cell Response to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

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    Mykyta Sokolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR is inevitable to humans in real-life scenarios; the hazards of IR primarily stem from its mutagenic, carcinogenic, and cell killing ability. For many decades, extensive research has been conducted on the human cell responses to IR delivered at a low dose/low dose (LD rate. These studies have shown that the molecular-, cellular-, and tissue-level responses are different after low doses of IR (LDIR compared to those observed after a short-term high-dose IR exposure (HDIR. With the advent of high-throughput technologies in the late 1990s, such as DNA microarrays, changes in gene expression have also been found to be ubiquitous after LDIR. Very limited subset of genes has been shown to be consistently up-regulated by LDIR, including CDKN1A. Further research on the biological effects and mechanisms induced by IR in human cells demonstrated that the molecular and cellular processes, including transcriptional alterations, activated by LDIR are often related to protective responses and, sometimes, hormesis. Following LDIR, some distinct responses were observed, these included bystander effects, and adaptive responses. Changes in gene expression, not only at the level of mRNA, but also miRNA, have been found to crucially underlie these effects having implications for radiation protection purposes.

  8. Early Exercise Affects Mitochondrial Transcription Factors Expression after Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

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    Yongshan Hu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that exercise training is neuroprotective after stroke, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To clarify this critical issue, the current study investigated the effects of early treadmill exercise on the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors. Adult rats were subjected to ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Expression of two genes critical for transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1 and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1, were examined by RT-PCR after five days of exercise starting at 24 h after ischemia. Mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COX IV was detected by Western blot. Neurological status and cerebral infarct volume were evaluated as indices of brain damage. Treadmill training increased levels of PGC-1 and NRF-1 mRNA, indicating that exercise promotes rehabilitation after ischemia via regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  9. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  10. Expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) during porcine gametogenesis and preimplantation embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelman, J; Manandhar, G; Yi, Y-J; Li, R; Whitworth, K M; Sutovsky, M; Agca, C; Prather, R S; Sutovsky, P

    2008-11-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is responsible for stability, maintenance, and transcriptional control of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have studied the expression and distribution of TFAM in the gametes and preimplantation embryos of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa). We hypothesized that TFAM is not present in the boar sperm mitochondria to reduce the possibility of paternal mtDNA propagation in the progeny. In contrast, we anticipated that Tfam gene is expressed in a developmental stage-dependent manner in porcine oocytes and embryos. The appropriate TFAM band of 25 kDa was detected by Western blotting in ejaculated boar spermatozoa, as well as in porcine oocytes and zygotes. Boar sperm extracts also displayed several bands >25 kDa suggestive of post-translational modification by ubiquitination, confirmed by affinity purification of ubiquitinated proteins. TFAM immunoreactivity was relegated to the sperm tail principal piece and sperm head in fully differentiated spermatozoa. The content of Tfam mRNA increased considerably from the germinal vesicle to blastocyst stage and also between in vitro fertilized and cultured blastocysts compared to in vivo-derived blastocysts. TFAM protein accumulated in the oocytes during maturation and was reduced by proteolysis after fertilization. This pattern was not mirrored in parthenogenetically activated oocytes and zygotes reconstructed by SCNT, suggesting deviant processing of TFAM protein and transcript after oocyte/embryo manipulation. Thus, TFAM may exert a critical role in porcine gametogenesis and preimplantation embryo development. Altogether, our data on the role of TFAM in mitochondrial function and inheritance have broad implications for cell physiology and evolutionary biology. PMID:18636550

  11. Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids upregulate expression of FADS3 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Holly T; Hsieh, Andrea T; Park, Woo Jung; Kothapalli, Kumar S D; Anthony, Joshua C; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Brenna, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene family at 11q12-13.1 includes FADS1 and FADS2, both known to mediate biosynthesis of omega-3 and omega-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA). FADS3 is a putative desaturase due to its sequence similarity with FADS1 and FADS2, but its function is unknown. We have previously described 7 FADS3 alternative transcripts (AT) and 1 FADS2 AT conserved across multiple species. This study examined the effect of dietary LCPUFA levels on liver FADS gene expression in vivo and in vitro, evaluated by qRT-PCR. Fourteen baboon neonates were randomized to three diet groups for their first 12 weeks of life, C: Control, no LCPUFA, L: 0.33% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/0.67% arachidonic acid (ARA) (w/w); and L3: 1.00% DHA/0.67% ARA (w/w). Liver FADS1 and both FADS2 transcripts were downregulated by at least 50% in the L3 group compared to controls. In contrast, FADS3 AT were upregulated (L3 > C), with four transcripts significantly upregulated by 40% or more. However, there was no evidence for a shift in liver fatty acids to coincide with increased FADS3 expression. Significant upregulation of FADS3 AT was also observed in human liver-derived HepG2 cells after DHA or ARA treatment. The PPARγ antagonist GW9662 prevented FADS3 upregulation, while downregulation of FADS1 and FADS2 was unaffected. Thus, FADS3 AT were directly upregulated by LCPUFA by a PPARγ-dependent mechanism unrelated to regulation of other desaturases. This opposing pattern and mechanism of regulation suggests a dissimilar function for FADS3 AT compared to other FADS gene products. PMID:22398025

  12. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  13. Delineation of Multiple Subpallial Progenitor Domains by the Combinatorial Expression of Transcriptional Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flames, Nuria; Pla, Ramón; Gelman, Diego M.; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Puelles, Luis; Marín, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian telencephalon is considered the most complex of all biological structures. It comprises a large number of functionally and morphologically distinct types of neurons that coordinately control most aspects of cognition and behavior. The subpallium, for example, not only gives rise to multiple neuronal types that form the basal ganglia and parts of the amygdala and septum but also is the origin of an astonishing diversity of cortical interneurons. Despite our detailed knowledge on the molecular, morphological, and physiological properties of most of these neuronal populations, the mechanisms underlying their generation are still poorly understood. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the expression patterns of several transcription factors in the ventricular zone of the developing subpallium in the mouse to generate a detailed molecular map of the different progenitor domains present in this region. Our study demonstrates that the ventricular zone of the mouse subpallium contains at least 18 domains that are uniquely defined by the combinatorial expression of several transcription factors. Furthermore, the results of microtransplantation experiments in vivo corroborate that anatomically defined regions of the mouse subpallium, such as the medial ganglionic eminence, can be subdivided into functionally distinct domains. PMID:17804629

  14. Comprehensive reanalysis of transcription factor knockout expression data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals many new targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimand, Jüri; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Todd, Annabel E; Vilo, Jaak; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2010-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) perturbation experiments give valuable insights into gene regulation. Genome-scale evidence from microarray measurements may be used to identify regulatory interactions between TFs and targets. Recently, Hu and colleagues published a comprehensive study covering 269 TF knockout mutants for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the information that can be extracted from this valuable dataset is limited by the method employed to process the microarray data. Here, we present a reanalysis of the original data using improved statistical techniques freely available from the BioConductor project. We identify over 100,000 differentially expressed genes-nine times the total reported by Hu et al. We validate the biological significance of these genes by assessing their functions, the occurrence of upstream TF-binding sites, and the prevalence of protein-protein interactions. The reanalysed dataset outperforms the original across all measures, indicating that we have uncovered a vastly expanded list of relevant targets. In summary, this work presents a high-quality reanalysis that maximizes the information contained in the Hu et al. compendium. The dataset is available from ArrayExpress (accession: E-MTAB-109) and it will be invaluable to any scientist interested in the yeast transcriptional regulatory system. PMID:20385592

  15. Adenovirus-induced alterations in host cell gene expression prior to the onset of viral gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Fredrik; Svensson, Catharina; Pettersson, Ulf; Zhao, Hongxing

    2006-09-15

    In this report, we have studied gene expression profiles in human primary lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) during the very early phase of an adenovirus infection. Eight out of twelve genes with known functions encoded transcription factors linked to two major cellular processes; inhibition of cell growth (ATF3, ATF4, KLF4, KLF6 and ELK3) and immune response (NR4A1 and CEBPB), indicating that the earliest consequences of an adenovirus infection are growth arrest and induction of an immune response. A time course analysis showed that the induction of these immediate-early response genes was transient and suppressed after the onset of the adenovirus early gene expression. PMID:16860366

  16. Retinoic Acid Induces Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation by Altering Both Encoding RNA and microRNA Expression.

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    Jingcheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA is a vitamin A metabolite that is essential for early embryonic development and promotes stem cell neural lineage specification; however, little is known regarding the impact of RA on mRNA transcription and microRNA levels on embryonic stem cell differentiation. Here, we present mRNA microarray and microRNA high-output sequencing to clarify how RA regulates gene expression. Using mRNA microarray analysis, we showed that RA repressed pluripotency-associated genes while activating ectoderm markers in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs. Moreover, RA modulated the DNA methylation of mESCs by altering the expression of epigenetic-associated genes such as Dnmt3b and Dnmt3l. Furthermore, H3K4me2, a pluripotent histone modification, was repressed by RA stimulation. From microRNA sequence data, we identified two downregulated microRNAs, namely, miR-200b and miR-200c, which regulated the pluripotency of stem cells. We found that miR-200b or miR-200c deficiency suppressed the expression of pluripotent genes, including Oct4 and Nanog, and activated the expression of the ectodermal marker gene Nestin. These results demonstrate that retinoid induces mESCs to differentiate by regulating miR-200b/200c. Our findings provide the landscapes of mRNA and microRNA gene networks and indicate the crucial role of miR-200b/200c in the RA-induced differentiation of mESCs.

  17. Retinoic Acid Induces Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation by Altering Both Encoding RNA and microRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengying; Wu, Haibo; Ai, Zhiying; Wu, Yongyan; Liu, Hongliang; Du, Juan; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A metabolite that is essential for early embryonic development and promotes stem cell neural lineage specification; however, little is known regarding the impact of RA on mRNA transcription and microRNA levels on embryonic stem cell differentiation. Here, we present mRNA microarray and microRNA high-output sequencing to clarify how RA regulates gene expression. Using mRNA microarray analysis, we showed that RA repressed pluripotency-associated genes while activating ectoderm markers in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Moreover, RA modulated the DNA methylation of mESCs by altering the expression of epigenetic-associated genes such as Dnmt3b and Dnmt3l. Furthermore, H3K4me2, a pluripotent histone modification, was repressed by RA stimulation. From microRNA sequence data, we identified two downregulated microRNAs, namely, miR-200b and miR-200c, which regulated the pluripotency of stem cells. We found that miR-200b or miR-200c deficiency suppressed the expression of pluripotent genes, including Oct4 and Nanog, and activated the expression of the ectodermal marker gene Nestin. These results demonstrate that retinoid induces mESCs to differentiate by regulating miR-200b/200c. Our findings provide the landscapes of mRNA and microRNA gene networks and indicate the crucial role of miR-200b/200c in the RA-induced differentiation of mESCs. PMID:26162091

  18. Overexpression of the IGF-II/M6P receptor in mouse fibroblast cell lines differentially alters expression profiles of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease-related pathology.

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    Yanlin Wang

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common type of senile dementia affecting elderly people. The processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP leading to the generation of β-amyloid (Aβ peptide contributes to neurodegeneration and development of AD pathology. The endocytic trafficking pathway, which comprises of the endosomes and lysosomes, acts as an important site for Aβ generation, and endocytic dysfunction has been linked to increased Aβ production and loss of neurons in AD brains. Since insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II receptor plays a critical role in the transport of lysosomal enzymes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomes, it is likely that the receptor may have a role in regulating Aβ metabolism in AD pathology. However, very little is known on how altered levels of the IGF-II receptor can influence the expression/function of various molecules involved in AD pathology. To address this issue, we evaluated the expression profiles of 87 selected genes related to AD pathology in mouse fibroblast MS cells that are deficient in murine IGF-II receptor and corresponding MS9II cells overexpressing ∼ 500 times the human IGF-II receptors. Our results reveal that an elevation in IGF-II receptor levels alters the expression profiles of a number of genes including APP as well as enzymes regulating Aβ production, degradation and clearance mechanisms. Additionally, it influences the expression of various lysosomal enzymes and protein kinases that are involved in Aβ toxicity. IGF-II receptor overexpression also alters expression of several genes involved in intracellular signalling as well as cholesterol metabolism, which play a critical role in AD pathology. The altered gene profiles observed in this study closely match with the corresponding protein levels, with a few exceptions. These results, taken together, suggest that an elevation in IGF-II receptor levels can influence the expression profiles of transcripts as well as proteins

  19. Alteration of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by cigarette smoke condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed, Katia; Vee, Marc Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Smoking is well-known to impair pharmacokinetics, through inducing expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. In the present study, we demonstrated that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) also alters activity and expression of hepatic drug transporters, which are now recognized as major actors of hepatobiliary elimination of drugs. CSC thus directly inhibited activities of sinusoidal transporters such as OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT1 and NTCP as well as those of canalicular transporters like P-glycoprotein, MRP2, BCRP and MATE1, in hepatic transporters-overexpressing cells. CSC similarly counteracted constitutive OATP, NTCP and OCT1 activities in human highly-differentiated hepatic HepaRG cells. In parallel, CSC induced expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in HepaRG cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B1, OATP2B1, OAT2, NTCP, OCT1 and BSEP, and enhanced that of MRP4. Such changes in transporter gene expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, and were counteracted, for some of them, by siRNA-mediated AhR silencing. This suggests that CSC alters hepatic drug transporter levels via activation of the AhR cascade. Importantly, drug transporter expression regulations as well as some transporter activity inhibitions occurred for a range of CSC concentrations similar to those required for inducing drug metabolizing enzymes and may therefore be hypothesized to be relevant for smokers. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of cigarette smoke, which could contribute to known alteration of pharmacokinetics and some liver adverse effects caused by smoking. PMID:27450509

  20. Altered Gene Expression, Mitochondrial Damage and Oxidative Stress: Converging Routes in Motor Neuron Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Rossi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron diseases (MNDs are a rather heterogeneous group of diseases, with either sporadic or genetic origin or both, all characterized by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons. At the cellular level, MNDs share features such as protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial damage and energy deficit, and excitotoxicity and calcium mishandling. This is particularly well demonstrated in ALS, where both sporadic and familial forms share the same symptoms and pathological phenotype, with a prominent role for mitochondrial damage and resulting oxidative stress. Based on recent data, however, altered control of gene expression seems to be a most relevant, and previously overlooked, player in MNDs. Here we discuss which may be the links that make pathways apparently as different as altered gene expression, mitochondrial damage, and oxidative stress converge to generate a similar motoneuron-toxic phenotype.

  1. Genetic alterations and expression of inhibitor of growth 1 in human sporadic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sheng Chen; Jian-Bao Wei; Yong-Chun Zhou; Sen Zhang; Jun-Lin Liang; Yun-Fei Cao; Zong-Jiang Tang; Xiao-Long Zhang; Feng Gao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect and significance of inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1) gene in carcinogenesis and progression of human sporadic colorectal cancer.METHODS: mRNA expression, mutation, and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of ING1 gene in 35 specimens of sporadic colorectal cancer tissues and the matched normal mucous membrane tissues were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),PCR-single strain conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP)and PCR-simple sequence length polymorphism (PCR-SSLP)using microsatellite markers, respectively.RESULTS: The average ratios of light intensities of p33ING1b and p47ING1a mRNA expression in the cancerous tissues were significantly lower than those in normal tissues.The difference between the two mRNA splices was not significant in the matched tissues. In addition, the ratios of light intensities of p33INB1b and p47ING1a mRNA expression in the cancerous tissues of Dukes' stages C and D were significantly lower than those in cancerous tissues of Dukes'stages A and B. However, no mutation of ING1 gene was detected in all 35 cases; only 4 cases of LOH (11.4%)were found.CONCLUSION: p33ING1b and p47ING1a mRNA expressions are closely related with the carcinogenesis and progression of human sporadic colorectal cancer. No mutation of ING1gene is found, and there are only few LOH in sporadic colorectal cancers. These might not be the main reasons for the down regulation of ING1 expression. Its low expression may happen in transcription or post-transcription.

  2. Can alterations in integrin and laminin-5 expression be used as markers of malignancy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, A K; Reibel, J; Schiødt, M;

    1998-01-01

    Development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) involves alterations in the adhesive interactions in the epithelium and invasion through the basement membrane. Therefore, changes in the expression of receptors and ligands involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion may be essential for the...... transformation of a premalignant into a malignant lesion. The aim of this study was to examine if expression of specific cell adhesion molecules can be used as markers of malignant development. By immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression pattern of integrins alpha2beta1, alpha3beta1, alpha6beta4 and...... laminin-5 in biopsies from SCCs (n=18), premalignant lesions (leukoplakias, n=21) and non-premalignant tissue with chronic inflammation (n=11). In poorly differentiated SCCs, patchy loss of alpha3beta1, alpha6beta4 and laminin-5 expression was pronounced at the invasion front, whereas there was a tendency...

  3. Induction of Gene Expression Alterations by Culture Medium from Trypsinized Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmad Chaudhry

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study hypothesized that trypsin treatment itself could be a stress inducer before any other physical or chemical mediated stress is introduced. To further understand the role of trypsin treatment, we incubated adherent cells with conditioned growth medium isolated from trypsinized cells after several hours of trypsin action and examined global gene expression profile with microarray technology. Microarray data identified large-scale gene expression alterations in cells receiving conditioned medium from trypsin treated cells compared to control cells that did not receive such medium. Twenty eight genes were found to be upregulated with at least two-fold change in the expression level, while 70 genes were downregulated. Gene expression signature clearly identified stress response. Taken together this data cautions the contribution of background stress while assessing the effects of radiation, certain drugs or environmental mutagens. Further attention is required while determining the role of conditioned medium in elucidating radiobiological phenomenon such as bystander effect.

  4. Transgenic tobacco expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin exhibits enhanced growth and altered metabolite production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, N; Lilius, G; Bailey, J E; Bülow, L

    1997-03-01

    The gene for Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has been introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabaccum (tobacco). Transgenic tobacco plants expressing VHb exhibited enhanced growth, on average 80-100% more dry weight after 35 days of growth compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, germination time is reduced from 6-8 days for wild-type tobacco to 3-4 days and the growth phase from germination to flowering was 3-5 days shorter for the VHb-expressing transgenes. Transgenic plants contained, on average, 30-40% more chlorophyll and 34% more nicotine than controls. VHb expression also resulted in an altered distribution of secondary metabolites: In the trangenic tobacco plants anabasine content was decreased 80% relative to control plants. PMID:9062923

  5. Alterations in expression, proteolysis and intracellular localizations of clusterin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Zhi He; Xiao-Hang Zhao; Zhen-Mei Song; Kun Wang; Liang-Hong Teng; Fang Liu; You-Sheng Mao; Ning Lu; Shang-Zhong Zhang; Min Wu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate biogenesis and intracellular localizations of clusterin to elucidate the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in tumorigenesis of esophageal mucosa.METHODS: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR for multi-region alteration analysis, Western blot for different transcriptional forms and immunohistochemical staining for intracellular localizations of clusterin were carried out in both tissues and cell lines of ESCC.RESULTS: The N-terminal deletions of the clusterin gene and the appearance of a 50-53 ku nuclear clusterin, an uncleaved, nonglycosylated, and disulfide-linked isoform,were the major alterations in cancer cells of esophagus.Naturally the 40 ku clusterin was located in the connective tissue of the lamina propria of epithelial mucosa and right under the basal membrane of epithelia, but it was disappeared in stromal mucosa of esophagus and the pre-matured clusterin was found positive in cancerous epithelia.CONCLUSION: The N-terminal deletion of clusterin may be essential for its alterations of biogenesis in ESCC.

  6. Altered expression pattern of clock genes in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Wiborg, Ove; Bouzinova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression was used to investigate rhythmic expression of three clock genes; Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. Brain and liver tissue was collected from 96 animals after 3.5 weeks of CMS (48 control and 48 depression-like rats) at 4 h sampling interval within 24 h. We......: The present results suggest that altered expression of investigated clock genes are likely to associate with the induction of a depression-like state in the CMS model....

  7. Altered expression pattern of clock genes in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Bouzinova, Elena; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression was used to investigate rhythmic expression of three clock genes; Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. Brain and liver tissue was collected from 96 animals after 3.5 weeks of CMS (48 control and 48 depression-like rats) at 4 h sampling interval within 24 h. We......: The present results suggest that altered expression of investigated clock genes are likely to associate with the induction of a depression-like state in the CMS model...

  8. Screening and identification of differentially expressed transcripts in circulating cells of prostate cancer patients using suppression subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manatt C Scott

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor metastasis and changes in host immunosurveillance are important components in cancer development. Tumor cell invasion into the bloodstream is an essential step for systemic metastasis. Currently, the detection of tumor cells in the circulation is mainly dependent upon the utilization of known epithelial cell markers. However, expression of these molecules is not limited to cancer patients; healthy people also have a small number of epithelial cells in their circulation. Utilizing these markers to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs cannot adequately explain the mechanisms of tumor cell survival or their development of metastatic potential in peripheral blood. The immune system can also evolve along with the cancer, actually promoting or selecting the outgrowth of tumor variants. Unfortunately, both metastasis and immunosurveillance remain mysterious and are debatable because we have yet to define the molecules that participate in these processes. We are interested in identifying the existence of expressed genes, or mRNA species, that are specifically associated with circulating cells of cancer-bearing patients using prostate cancer (PCa as a model. Results We established two comprehensive subtracted cDNA libraries using a molecular technique called suppression subtractive hybridization. This technique selectively amplifies transcripts that are specifically expressed in circulating cells of either PCa patients or healthy men. Following sequencing reaction, we showed that 17 out of 23 (73.9% sequenced clones did not match any mRNAs in the GenBank database. This result suggests that genes associated with alterations in circulating cells of cancer-bearing patients are largely unknown. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed that two genes are up-regulated in circulating cells of PCa patients, whereas another two genes are down-regulated in the same patients. Conclusion The comprehensive gene expression analysis is capable of

  9. Curcumin alters expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and nestin following chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Tianping Yu; Xiong Zhang; Yu Li

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes can alter their appearance and become reactive following chronic cerebral ischemia. In the present study, a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia was treated with 50 and 100 mg/kg curcumin. Results showed that pathological changes of neuronal injury in hippocampal CA1 area of rats induced by chronic cerebral ischemia were attenuated, as well as upregulated expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and nestin, in a dose-dependent manner.

  10. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney E. Cross

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50 significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development.

  11. Overexpression of GbERF confers alteration of ethylene-responsive gene expression and enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in transgenic tobacco

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jie Qin; Kaijing Zuo; Jingya Zhao; Hua Ling; Youfang Cao; Chengxiang Qiu; Fupeng Li; Xiaofen Sun; Kexuan Tang

    2006-06-01

    GbERF belongs to the ERF (ethylene responsive factor) family of transcription factors and regulates the GCC-box containing pathogen-related (PR) genes in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. To study the function of GbERF in the process of biotic stress, transgenic tobacco plants expressing GbERF were generated. Overexpression of GbERF did not change transgenic plant’s phenotype and endogenous ethylene level. However, the expression profile of some ethylene-inducible GCC-box and non-GCC-box containing genes was altered, such as PR1b, PR2, PR3, PR4, Osmotin, CHN50, ACC oxidase and ACC synthase genes. These data indicate that the cotton GbERF could act as a transcriptional activator or repressor to regulate the differential expression of ethylene-inducible genes via GCC and non-GCC cis-elements. Moreover, the constitutive expression of GbERF in transgenic tobacco enhanced the plant’s resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci infection. In conclusion, GbERF mediates the expression of a wide array of PR and ethylene-responsive genes and plays an important role in the plant’s response to biotic stress.

  12. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  13. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  14. Decreased chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II expression in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Krista A; Wickramasinghe, Nalinie S; Cochrum, Renate K; Watts, Mary Beth; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2006-10-15

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is successfully used for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. However, many patients that are initially TAM responsive develop tumors that are antiestrogen/TAM resistant (TAM-R). The mechanism behind TAM resistance in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive tumors is not understood. The orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF)-I interacts directly with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)- and estradiol (E(2))-occupied ERalpha, corepressors NCoR and SMRT, and inhibit E(2)-induced gene transcription in breast cancer cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that reduced COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII correlate with TAM resistance. We report for the first time that COUP-TFII, but not COUP-TFI, is reduced in three antiestrogen/TAM-R cell lines derived from TAM-sensitive (TAM-S) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in MDA-MB-231 cells compared with MCF-7. ERalpha and ERbeta protein expression was not different between TAM-S and TAM-R cells, but progesterone receptor (PR) was decreased in TAM-R cells. Further, E(2) increased COUP-TFII transcription in MCF-7, but not TAM-R, cells. Importantly, reexpression of COUP-TFII in TAM-S cells to levels comparable to those in MCF-7 was shown to increase 4-OHT-mediated growth inhibition and increased apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of COUP-TFII in TAM-S MCF-7 cells blocked growth inhibitory activity and increased 4-OHT agonist activity. 4-OHT increased COUP-TFII-ERalpha interaction approximately 2-fold in MCF-7 cells. COUP-TFII expression in TAM-R cells also inhibited 4-OHT-induced endogenous PR and pS2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that reduced COUP-TFII expression correlates with acquired TAM resistance in human breast cancer cell lines and that COUP-TFII plays a role in regulating the growth inhibitory activity of TAM in breast cancer cells. PMID:17047084

  15. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming. PMID:27199978

  16. Altered tryptophan hydroxylase 2 expression in enteric serotonergic nerves in Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, David; Murphy, Justin M; Doyle, Brian; O’Donnell, Anne Marie; Gillick, John; Puri, Prem

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine if expression of colonic tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2), a surrogate marker of neuronal 5-hydroxytryptamine, is altered in Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis. METHODS: Entire resected colonic specimens were collected at the time of pull-through operation in children with Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR, n = 12). Five of these patients had a history of pre-operative Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis (HAEC). Controls were collected at colostomy closure in children with anorectal malformation (n = 10). The distribution of expression of TPH2 was evaluated using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein expression of TPH2 was quantified using western blot analysis in the deep smooth muscle layers. RESULTS: TPH2 was co-expressed in nitrergic and cholinergic ganglia in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses in ganglionic colon in HSCR and healthy controls. Co-expression was also seen in submucosal interstitial cells of Cajal and PDGFRα+ cells. The density of TPH2 immuno-positive fibers decreased incrementally from ganglionic bowel to transition zone bowel to aganglionic bowel in the myenteric plexus. Expression of TPH2 was reduced in ganglionic bowel in those affected by pre-operative HAEC compared to those without HAEC and healthy controls. However, expression of TPH2 was similar or high compared to controls in the colons of children who had undergone diverting colostomy for medically refractory HAEC. CONCLUSION: Altered TPH2 expression in colonic serotonergic nerves of patients with HSCR complicated by HAEC may contribute to intestinal secretory and motor disturbances, including recurrent HAEC. PMID:27217698

  17. Transcriptional regulation of the grape cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene CYP736B expression in response to Xylella fastidiosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP mediate synthesis and metabolism of many physiologically important primary and secondary compounds that are related to plant defense against a range of pathogenic microbes and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf infection, we investigated expression and regulatory mechanisms of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene in both disease resistant and susceptible grapevines. Results Cloning of genomic DNA and cDNA revealed that the CYP736B gene was composed of two exons and one intron with GT as a donor site and AG as an acceptor site. CYP736B transcript was up-regulated in PD-resistant plants and down-regulated in PD-susceptible plants 6 weeks after Xf inoculation. However, CYP736B expression was very low in stem tissues at all evaluated time points. 5'RACE and 3'RACE sequence analyses revealed that there were three candidate transcription start sites (TSS in the upstream region and three candidate polyadenylation (PolyA sites in the downstream region of CYP736B. Usage frequencies of each transcription initiation site and each polyadenylation site varied depending on plant genotype, developmental stage, tissue, and treatment. These results demonstrate that expression of CYP736B is regulated developmentally and in response to Xf infection at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Multiple transcription start and polyadenylation sites contribute to regulation of CYP736B expression. Conclusions This report provides evidence that the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene is involved in defense response at a specific stage of Xf infection in grapevines; multiple transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites exist for CYP736B in grapevine; and coordinative and selective use of transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites play an important role in regulation of CYP736B expression

  18. Transcript-level expression analysis of RNA-seq experiments with HISAT, StringTie and Ballgown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertea, Mihaela; Kim, Daehwan; Pertea, Geo M; Leek, Jeffrey T; Salzberg, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing of mRNA (RNA-seq) has become the standard method for measuring and comparing the levels of gene expression in a wide variety of species and conditions. RNA-seq experiments generate very large, complex data sets that demand fast, accurate and flexible software to reduce the raw read data to comprehensible results. HISAT (hierarchical indexing for spliced alignment of transcripts), StringTie and Ballgown are free, open-source software tools for comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq experiments. Together, they allow scientists to align reads to a genome, assemble transcripts including novel splice variants, compute the abundance of these transcripts in each sample and compare experiments to identify differentially expressed genes and transcripts. This protocol describes all the steps necessary to process a large set of raw sequencing reads and create lists of gene transcripts, expression levels, and differentially expressed genes and transcripts. The protocol's execution time depends on the computing resources, but it typically takes under 45 min of computer time. HISAT, StringTie and Ballgown are available from http://ccb.jhu.edu/software.shtml. PMID:27560171

  19. Altered integrity and decreased expression of hepatocyte tight junctions in rifampicin-induced cholestasis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifampicin is a well-known hepatotoxicant, but little is known about the mechanism of rifampicin-induced hepatotoxicity. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression and localization of hepatocyte tight junctions in rifampicin-induced cholestasis in mice. Cholestasis was induced by administration of rifampicin (200 mg/kg) for 7 consecutive days or treatment with a single dose of rifampicin (200 mg/kg) by gastric intubation. The expression of mRNA for hepatic zonula occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2, ZO-3, occludin and claudin-1 was determined using RT-PCR. Localization of ZO-1 and occludin was detected using immunofluorescence. Results showed that there was an 82-fold increase in the conjugated bilirubin in serum in rifampicin-treated mice. In addition, an 8-fold increase in total bile acid in serum was observed after a seven-day administration of rifampicin. The integrity of hepatocyte ZO-1 and occludin was altered by a seven-day administration of rifampicin. Importantly, the integrity and intensity of hepatocyte tight junctions were altered as early as 30 min after a single dose of rifampicin. The expression of hepatic ZO-1 and ZO-2 mRNA was significantly decreased, beginning as early as 30 min and remaining a lower level 12 h after a single dose of rifampicin. Taken together, these results suggest that the altered integrity and internalization of hepatocyte tight junctions are associated with rifampicin-induced cholestasis.

  20. Expression of paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2c (PITX2c) in epidermal keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) has been implicated as one of the genes responsible for Rieger syndrome. It has been also shown to play a central role during development. In this study, we investigated the functional role of PITX2 in keratinocyte differentiation. RT-PCR analysis showed that PITX2c isoform was predominantly expressed in a differentiation-dependent manner. Consistent with, immunohistochemical staining showed that PITX2 expression was increased in the upper layer of epidermis. When PITX2c was overexpressed in cultured keratinocytes by a recombinant adenovirus, the differentiation markers such as involucrin and loricrin were significantly increased at both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, PITX2c overexpression led to the decrease of cell growth, concomitantly with the upregulation of cell cycle-related genes p21. To investigate the effect of PITX2c in vivo, we microinjected PITX2c expression vector into zebrafish embryo. Interestingly, overexpression of PITX2c in zebrafish embryo led to the formation of horn-like structure and thickening of epidermis, together with the increase of keratin 8 (K8) expression. These results suggest that PITX2c has a role in proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes.

  1. Expression of paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2c (PITX2c) in epidermal keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Ge [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangxi Traditional Chinese Medical University, Guangxi, Nanning, 530023 (China); Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Tae-Young; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Sin [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Ou, Bai-sheng [Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangxi Traditional Chinese Medical University, Guangxi, Nanning, 530023 (China); Kim, Sooil; Lee, Young Ho [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Tae-Jin [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Jin [Department of Dermatology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young; Seo, Young-Joon; Lee, Jeung-Hoon [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Deok, E-mail: cdkimd@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) has been implicated as one of the genes responsible for Rieger syndrome. It has been also shown to play a central role during development. In this study, we investigated the functional role of PITX2 in keratinocyte differentiation. RT-PCR analysis showed that PITX2c isoform was predominantly expressed in a differentiation-dependent manner. Consistent with, immunohistochemical staining showed that PITX2 expression was increased in the upper layer of epidermis. When PITX2c was overexpressed in cultured keratinocytes by a recombinant adenovirus, the differentiation markers such as involucrin and loricrin were significantly increased at both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, PITX2c overexpression led to the decrease of cell growth, concomitantly with the upregulation of cell cycle-related genes p21. To investigate the effect of PITX2c in vivo, we microinjected PITX2c expression vector into zebrafish embryo. Interestingly, overexpression of PITX2c in zebrafish embryo led to the formation of horn-like structure and thickening of epidermis, together with the increase of keratin 8 (K8) expression. These results suggest that PITX2c has a role in proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes.

  2. Gene Structures, Classification, and Expression Models of the DREB Transcription Factor Subfamily in Populus trichocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We identified 75 dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB protein genes in Populus trichocarpa. We analyzed gene structures, phylogenies, domain duplications, genome localizations, and expression profiles. The phylogenic construction suggests that the PtrDREB gene subfamily can be classified broadly into six subtypes (DREB A-1 to A-6 in Populus. The chromosomal localizations of the PtrDREB genes indicated 18 segmental duplication events involving 36 genes and six redundant PtrDREB genes were involved in tandem duplication events. There were fewer introns in the PtrDREB subfamily. The motif composition of PtrDREB was highly conserved in the same subtype. We investigated expression profiles of this gene subfamily from different tissues and/or developmental stages. Sixteen genes present in the digital expression analysis had high levels of transcript accumulation. The microarray results suggest that 18 genes were upregulated. We further examined the stress responsiveness of 15 genes by qRT-PCR. A digital northern analysis showed that the PtrDREB17, 18, and 32 genes were highly induced in leaves under cold stress, and the same expression trends were shown by qRT-PCR. Taken together, these observations may lay the foundation for future functional analyses to unravel the biological roles of Populus’ DREB genes.

  3. The Clock Protein CCA1 and the bZIP Transcription Factor HY5 Physically Interact to Regulate Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos Andronis; Simon Barak; Stephen M.Knowles; Shoji Sugano; Elaine M.Tobin

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates the expression of an array of Arabidopsis genes such as those encoding the LIGHT-HARVESTING CHLOROPHYLL A/B (Lhcb) proteins. We have previously studied the promoters of two of these Arabidopsis genes-Lhcb1*1 and Lhcb1*3-and identified a sequence that binds the clock protein CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). This sequence, designated CCAl-binding site (CBS), is necessary for phytochrome and circadian responsiveness of these genes. In close proximity to this sequence, there exists a G-box core element that has been shown to bind the bZIP transcription factor HY5 in other light-regulated plant promoters. In the present study, we examined the importance of the interaction of transcription factors binding the CBS and the G-box core element in the control of normal circadian rhythmic expression of Lhcb genes. Our results show that HY5 is able to specifically bind the G-box element in the Lhcb promoters and that CCA1 can alter the binding activity of HY5. We further show that CCA1 and HY5 can physically interact and that they can act synergistically on transcription in a yeast reporter gene assay. An absence of HY5 leads to a shorter period of Lhcb1*1 circadian expression but does not affect the circadian expression of CATALASE3 (CAT3), whose promoter lacks a G-box element. Our results suggest that interaction of the HY5 and CCA1 proteins on Lhcb promoters is necessary for normal circadian expression of the Lhcb genes.

  4. Zinc supplementation of young men alters metallothionein, zinc transporter, and cytokine gene expression in leukocyte populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Tolunay Beker; Blanchard, Raymond K.; Cousins, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    An effective measure to assess zinc status of humans has remained elusive, in contrast to iron, where a number of indicators of metabolism/function are available. Using monocytes, T lymphocytes, and granulocytes isolated by magnetic sorting and dried blood spots (DBS) derived from 50 μl of peripheral blood, we evaluated the response of metallothionein (MT), zinc transporter, and cytokine genes to a modest (15 mg of Zn per day) dietary zinc supplement in human subjects. Transcript abundance was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR). Zinc supplementation increased MT mRNA abundance by up to 2-fold in RNA from leukocyte subsets, and 4-fold in RNA from DBS. Transcript levels for the zinc transporter genes ZnT1 and Zip3 were increased and decreased, respectively, by zinc supplementation. Expression of the ZnT and Zip genes among leukocyte subsets differ by up to 270-fold. Monocytes and granulocytes from supplemented subjects were activated by LPS, whereas T lymphocytes were activated by mimicking antigen presentation. With zinc consumption, TNF-α and IL-1β expression was greater in activated monocytes and granulocytes, and IFN-γ mRNA levels were higher in activated T lymphocytes. These studies show that QRT-PCR is a tool to reliably measure transcript abundance for nutritionally responsive genes in human subjects, and that a small sample of whole dried blood, when appropriately collected, can be used as the source of total RNA for QRT-PCR analysis. The results obtained also show that zinc supplementation of human subjects programs specific leukocytic subsets to show enhanced cytokine expression upon activation by stimulators of immunity. PMID:16434472

  5. Androgen receptor transcriptionally regulates μ-opioid receptor expression in rat trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Seok; Zhang, Youping; Asgar, Jamila; Auh, Q-Schick; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y

    2016-09-01

    The involvement of testosterone in pain, inflammation, and analgesia has been reported, but the role of androgen receptor (AR), a steroid receptor for testosterone, is not well understood. We have previously shown that peripheral inflammation upregulates μ-opioid receptor (MOR) in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) in a testosterone-dependent manner. In this study, we hypothesized that testosterone regulates MOR expression via transcriptional activities of AR in TG. We first examined whether AR is co-expressed with MOR in TG neurons. Our immunohistochemical experiment revealed that AR staining is detected in neurons of all sizes in TG and that a subset of AR is expressed in MOR as well as in TRPV1-positive neurons. We identified the promoter region of the rat MOR gene contains putative AR binding sites. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that AR directly binds to these sites in TG extracts. We confirmed with luciferase reporter assay that AR activated the MOR promoter in response to androgens in a human neuroblastoma cell line (5H-5YSY). These data demonstrated that AR functions as a transcriptional regulator of the MOR gene activity. Finally, we showed that flutamide, a specific AR antagonist, prevents complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced upregulation of MOR mRNA in TG, and that flutamide dose-dependently blocks the efficacy of DAMGO, a specific MOR agonist, on CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Our results expand the knowledge regarding the role of androgens and their receptor in pain and analgesia and have important clinical implications, particularly for inflammatory pain patients with low or compromised plasma testosterone levels. PMID:27320211

  6. Epigenetic regulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 directs differential elafin expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Elafin expression is epigenetically silenced in human melanoma cells. → Foxa2 expression in melanoma cells is silenced by promoter hypermethylation. → Foxa2 directs activation of the elafin promoter in vivo. → Foxa2 expression induces apoptosis of melanoma cells via elafin re-expression. -- Abstract: Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, induces the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human melanoma cells, where its expression is transcriptionally silenced. However, it remains unknown how the elafin gene is repressed in melanoma cells. We here demonstrate that elafin expression is modulated via epigenetically regulated expression of the transcription factor Foxa2. Treatment of melanoma cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor induced elafin expression, which was specifically responsible for reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. Suppression of Foxa2 transcription, mediated by DNA hypermethylation in its promoter region, was released in melanoma cells upon treatment with the demethylating agent. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the Foxa2 binding site in the elafin promoter was critical for the activation of the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further showed that Foxa2 bound to the elafin promoter in vivo. Analyses of melanoma cells with varied levels of Foxa2 revealed a correlated expression between Foxa2 and elafin and the ability of Foxa2 to induce apoptosis. Our results collectively suggest that, in melanoma cells, Foxa2 expression is silenced and therefore elafin is maintained unexpressed to facilitate cell proliferation in the disease melanoma.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 directs differential elafin expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kyung Sook [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Ji Yoon; Kim, Su Jin [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangsoon [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Hwan [NeoPharm Co. Ltd., Daejeon 305-510 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa [Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, BK21 Nanofusion Technology Team, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok, E-mail: sskoh@kribb.re.kr [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Elafin expression is epigenetically silenced in human melanoma cells. {yields} Foxa2 expression in melanoma cells is silenced by promoter hypermethylation. {yields} Foxa2 directs activation of the elafin promoter in vivo. {yields} Foxa2 expression induces apoptosis of melanoma cells via elafin re-expression. -- Abstract: Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, induces the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human melanoma cells, where its expression is transcriptionally silenced. However, it remains unknown how the elafin gene is repressed in melanoma cells. We here demonstrate that elafin expression is modulated via epigenetically regulated expression of the transcription factor Foxa2. Treatment of melanoma cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor induced elafin expression, which was specifically responsible for reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. Suppression of Foxa2 transcription, mediated by DNA hypermethylation in its promoter region, was released in melanoma cells upon treatment with the demethylating agent. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the Foxa2 binding site in the elafin promoter was critical for the activation of the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further showed that Foxa2 bound to the elafin promoter in vivo. Analyses of melanoma cells with varied levels of Foxa2 revealed a correlated expression between Foxa2 and elafin and the ability of Foxa2 to induce apoptosis. Our results collectively suggest that, in melanoma cells, Foxa2 expression is silenced and therefore elafin is maintained unexpressed to facilitate cell proliferation in the disease melanoma.

  8. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  9. Age-related alterations in innate immune receptor expression and ability of macrophages to respond to pathogen challenge in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Shuang; Domon, Hisanori; Hosur, Kavita B.; WANG Min; Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    The impact of ageing in innate immunity is poorly understood. Studies in the mouse model have described altered innate immune functions in aged macrophages, although these were not generally linked to altered expression of receptors or regulatory molecules. Moreover, the influence of ageing in the expression of these molecules has not been systematically examined. We investigated age-dependent expression differences in selected Toll-like and other pattern-recognition receptors, receptors invo...

  10. Regulatory elements involved in the post-transcriptional control of stage-specific gene expression in Trypanosoma cruzi: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R Araújo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, exhibits unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes, RNA editing and trans-splicing. In the absence of mechanism controlling transcription initiation, organized subsets of T. cruzi genes must be post-transcriptionally co-regulated in response to extracellular signals. The mechanisms that regulate stage-specific gene expression in this parasite have become much clearer through sequencing its whole genome as well as performing various proteomic and microarray analyses, which have demonstrated that at least half of the T. cruzi genes are differentially regulated during its life cycle. In this review, we attempt to highlight the recent advances in characterising cis and trans-acting elements in the T. cruzi genome that are involved in its post-transcriptional regulatory machinery.

  11. Progressive obesity leads to altered ovarian gene expression in the Lethal Yellow mouse: a microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannian John

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal yellow (LY; C57BL/6J Ay/a mice exhibit adult-onset obesity, altered metabolic regulation, and early reproductive senescence. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that obese LY mice possess differences in expression of ovarian genes relative to age-matched lean mice. Methods 90- and 180-day-old LY and lean black (C57BL/6J a/a mice were suppressed with GnRH antagonist (Antide®, then stimulated with 5 IU eCG. cRNA derived from RNA extracts of whole ovarian homogenates collected 36 h post-eCG were run individually on Codelink Mouse Whole Genome Bioarrays (GE Healthcare Life Sciences. Results Fifty-two genes showed ≥ 2-fold differential (p Cyp51, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star. Fewer genes showed lower expression in LY mice, e.g. angiotensinogen. In contrast, none of these genes showed differential expression in 90-day-old LY and black mice, which are of similar body weight. Interestingly, 180-day-old LY mice had a 2-fold greater expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (Hsd11b1 and a 2-fold lesser expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (Hsd11b2, differences not seen in 90-day-old mice. Consistent with altered Hsd11b gene expression, ovarian concentrations of corticosterone (C were elevated in aging LY mice relative to black mice, but C levels were similar in young LY and black mice. Conclusion The data suggest that reproductive dysfunction in aging obese mice is related to modified intraovarian gene expression that is directly related to acquired obesity.

  12. Altered expression of progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in human eutopic endometrium in endometriosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Monika Martina; Küppers, Mareike; Rath, Werner; Buck, Volker Uwe; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2016-07-01

    Recent data implicate an altered expression of progesterone receptor isoform A (PR-A) and B (PR-B) in the endometrium of endometriosis patients. This prospective exploratory study aimed to precisely determine the PR-A and PR-B expression using immunohistochemical techniques in eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis compared with disease-free women throughout the menstrual cycle. All symptomatic patients underwent laparoscopy for the diagnosis of endometriosis and histological confirmation of the disease (EO) whereas controls were proven disease-free (CO). In CO samples (n=10) an increased expression of PR-A and PR-B during the proliferative to early secretory phase and a decreased expression of both receptor isoforms during the mid to late secretory phase was ascertained in accordance with previous studies. In patients with endometriosis (n=16) no cycle dependent pattern of PR-A and PR-B expression was identified in contrast to patients without endometriosis. Moreover, in EO samples a huge variety of inter- and intra-individual differences in PR-A and PR-B expression were detected. These data provide further evidence that dysregulation of the PR-A and PR-B expression might contribute to the pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27050108

  13. Anal cancer in Chinese: human papillomavirus infection and altered expression of p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    AIM To detect the presence of HPV DNA and study the alteration of p53 expression in anal cancers in Chinese.METHODS HPV DNA was amplified by PCR. The amplified HPV DNA was classified by DBH. HPV antigen and p53 expression were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS HPV DNA was amplified only in one case of squamous cell carcinoma of the 72 Chinese anal cancers and further classified as HPV type 16. Others were all HPV negative. HPV antigen and p53 expression were also detected in this case. Positive stainings with anti-p53 antibody were seen in 61.2% anal cancers. There were no statistically significant differences between anal squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas and between anal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenocarcinomas. p53 protein expression was observed in the basal cells of squamous epithelium of condyloma acuminatum and morphologically normal squamous epithelium in 2 cases invaded by anal adenocarcinoma.CONCLUSION HPV infection was not associated with these cases of anal cancer. p53 alteration was a common event. Positive p53 immunostaining can not be regarded as a marker for differentiating benign from malignant lesions.

  14. Loss of the Podocyte-Expressed Transcription Factor Tcf21/Pod1 Results in Podocyte Differentiation Defects and FSGS

    OpenAIRE

    Maezawa, Yoshiro; Onay, Tuncer; Scott, Rizaldy P.; Keir, Lindsay S.; Dimke, Henrik; Li, Chengjin; Eremina, Vera; Maezawa, Yuko; Jeansson, Marie; Shan, Jingdong; Binnie, Matthew; Lewin, Moshe; Ghosh, Asish; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Vainio, Seppo J.

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated cells with an elaborate cytoskeleton and are critical components of the glomerular barrier. We identified a bHLH transcription factor, Tcf21, that is highly expressed in developing and mature podocytes. Because conventional Tcf21 knockout mice die in the perinatal period with major cardiopulmonary defects, we generated a conditional Tcf21 knockout mouse to explore the role of this transcription factor in podocytes in vivo. Tcf21 was deleted from podocyt...

  15. oPOSSUM: identification of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in co-expressed genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Sui, Shannan J; Mortimer, James R.; Arenillas, David J.; Brumm, Jochen; Walsh, Christopher J.; Kennedy, Brian P; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2005-01-01

    Targeted transcript profiling studies can identify sets of co-expressed genes; however, identification of the underlying functional mechanism(s) is a significant challenge. Established methods for the analysis of gene annotations, particularly those based on the Gene Ontology, can identify functional linkages between genes. Similar methods for the identification of over-represented transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been successful in yeast, but extension to human genomics has la...

  16. D-MEF2: a MADS box transcription factor expressed in differentiating mesoderm and muscle cell lineages during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lilly, B; Galewsky, S; Firulli, A B; Schulz, R A; Olson, E N

    1994-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor (MEF) 2 family of transcription factors has been implicated in the regulation of muscle transcription in vertebrates. We have cloned a protein from Drosophila, termed D-MEF2, that shares extensive amino acid homology with the MADS (MCM1, Agamous, Deficiens, and serum-response factor) domains of the vertebrate MEF2 proteins. D-mef2 gene expression is first detected during Drosophila embryogenesis within mesodermal precursor cells prior to specification of the somati...

  17. Differential Expression Pattern of the Human Endoderm-Specific Transcription Factor Sox17 in Various Tissues and Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sox17 is a member of the Sry-related high mobility group (HMG) of transcription factors that is necessary for endodermal formation and liver development in multiple species. Sox17 gene expression is required for formation of definitive endoderm that gives rise to various tissues. Objective: To examine the expression of Sox17 in various human tissues and cells. Methods: Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of Sox17 in adult liver, ...

  18. Heavy Water Reduces GFP Expression in Prokaryotic Cell-Free Assays at the Translation Level While Stimulating Its Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Hohlefelder, Luisa S.; Tobias Stögbauer; Madeleine Opitz; Bayerl, Thomas M.; Joachim O. Rädler

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro proliferation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is remarkably hampered in the presence of heavy water (D2O). Impairment of gene expression at the transcription or translation level can be the base for this effect. However, insights into the underlying mechanisms are lacking. Here, we employ a cell-free expression system for the quantitative analysis of the effect of increasing percentages of D2O on the kinetics of in-vitro GFP expression. Experiments are designed to discriminat...

  19. Phase variation of a Type IIG restriction-modification enzyme alters site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni strain NCTC11168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Awais; Brathwaite, Kelly J; Aidley, Jack; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Parkhill, Julian; Connerton, Ian; Bayliss, Christopher D

    2016-06-01

    Phase-variable restriction-modification systems are a feature of a diverse range of bacterial species. Stochastic, reversible switches in expression of the methyltransferase produces variation in methylation of specific sequences. Phase-variable methylation by both Type I and Type III methyltransferases is associated with altered gene expression and phenotypic variation. One phase-variable gene of Campylobacter jejuni encodes a homologue of an unusual Type IIG restriction-modification system in which the endonuclease and methyltransferase are encoded by a single gene. Using both inhibition of restriction and PacBio-derived methylome analyses of mutants and phase-variants, the cj0031c allele in C. jejuni strain NCTC11168 was demonstrated to specifically methylate adenine in 5'CCCGA and 5'CCTGA sequences. Alterations in the levels of specific transcripts were detected using RNA-Seq in phase-variants and mutants of cj0031c but these changes did not correlate with observed differences in phenotypic behaviour. Alterations in restriction of phage growth were also associated with phase variation (PV) of cj0031c and correlated with presence of sites in the genomes of these phages. We conclude that PV of a Type IIG restriction-modification system causes changes in site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression patterns that may indirectly change adaptive traits. PMID:26786317

  20. Altered brain protein expression profiles are associated with molecular neurological dysfunction in the PKU mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperlini, Esther; Orrù, Stefania; Corbo, Claudia; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), if not detected and treated in newborns, causes severe neurological dysfunction and cognitive and behavioral deficiencies. Despite the biochemical characterization of PKU, the molecular mechanisms underlying PKU-associated brain dysfunction remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the pathogenesis of this neurological damage by analyzing protein expression profiles in brain tissue of Black and Tan BRachyury-PahEnu2 mice (a mouse model of PKU). We compared the cerebral protein expression of homozygous PKU mice with that of their heterozygous counterparts using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analysis, and identified 21 differentially expressed proteins, four of which were over-expressed and 17 under-expressed. An in silico bioinformatic approach indicated that protein under-expression was related to neuronal differentiation and dendritic growth, and to such neurological disorders as progressive motor neuropathy and movement disorders. Moreover, functional annotation analyses showed that some identified proteins were involved in oxidative metabolism. To further investigate the proteins involved in the neurological damage, we validated two of the proteins that were most strikingly under-expressed, namely, Syn2 and Dpysl2, which are involved in synaptic function and neurotransmission. We found that Glu2/3 and NR1 receptor subunits were over-expressed in PKU mouse brain. Our results indicate that differential expression of these proteins may be associated with the processes underlying PKU brain dysfunction, namely, decreased synaptic plasticity and impaired neurotransmission. We identified a set of proteins whose expression is affected by hyperphenylalaninemia. We think that phenylketonuria (PKU) brain dysfunction also depends on reduced Syn2 and Dpysl2 levels, increased Glu2/3 and NR1 levels, and decreased Pkm, Ckb, Pgam1 and Eno1 levels. These findings finally confirm that alteration in synaptic

  1. Transcriptional regulation of two conceptus interferon tau genes expressed in Japanese black cattle during peri-implantation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Nakagawa, So; Kim, Min-Su; Bai, Hanako; Bai, Rulan; Li, Junyou; Min, Kwan-Sik; Ideta, Atsushi; Aoyagi, Yoshito; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT), produced by the mononuclear trophectoderm, signals the process of maternal recognition of pregnancy in ruminants. However, its expression in vivo and its transcriptional regulation are not yet well characterized. Objectives of this study were to determine conceptus IFNT gene isoforms expressed in the bovine uterus and to identify differences in promoter sequences of IFNT genes that differ in their expression. RNA-seq data analysis of bovine conceptuses on days 17, 20, and 22 (day 0  =  day of estrus) detected the expression of two IFNT transcripts, IFNT1 and IFNTc1, which were indeed classified into the IFNT gene clade. RNA-seq and quantitative RT-PCR analyses also revealed that the expression levels of both IFNT mRNAs were highest on day 17, and then decreased on days 20 and 22. Bovine ear-derived fibroblast (EF) cells, a model system commonly used for bovine IFNT gene transcription study in this laboratory, were cotransfected with luciferase reporter constructs carrying upstream (positions -637 to +51) regions of IFNT1 or IFNTc1 gene and various transcription factor expression plasmids including CDX2, AP-1 (Jun) and ETS2. CDX2, either alone or with the other transcription factors, markedly increased luciferase activity. The upstream regions of IFNT1 and IFNTc1 loci were then serially deleted or point-mutated at potential CDX-, AP-1-, and ETS-binding sites. Compared to the wild-type constructs, deletion or mutation at CDX2 or ETS2 binding sites similarly reduced the luciferase activities of IFNT1- or IFNTc1-promoter constructs. However, with the AP-1 site mutated construct, IFNT1- and IFNTc1-reporters behaved differently. These results suggest that two forms of bovine conceptus IFNT genes are expressed in utero and their transcriptional regulations differ. PMID:24348910

  2. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe

  3. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smialowska, Agata, E-mail: smialowskaa@gmail.com [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Kylsten, Per [School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Swoboda, Peter [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: Karl.Ekwall@ki.se [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  4. Ischemia Alters the Expression of Connexins in the Aged Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taizen Nakase

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the function of astrocytic gap junctions under ischemia is still under debate, increased expression of connexin 43 (Cx43 has been observed in ischemic brain lesions, suggesting that astrocytic gap junctions could provide neuronal protection against ischemic insult. Moreover, different connexin subtypes may play different roles in pathological conditions. We used immunohistochemical analysis to investigate alterations in the expression of connexin subtypes in human stroke brains. Seven samples, sectioned after brain embolic stroke, were used for the analysis. Data, evaluated semiquantitatively by computer-assisted densitometry, was compared between the intact hemisphere and ischemic lesions. The results showed that the coexpression of Cx32 and Cx45 with neuronal markers was significantly increased in ischemic lesions. Cx43 expression was significantly increased in the colocalization with astrocytes and relatively increased in the colocalization with neuronal marker in ischemic lesions. Therefore, Cx32, Cx43, and Cx45 may respond differently to ischemic insult in terms of neuroprotection.

  5. The renal metallothionein expression profile is altered in human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, Claus Bøgelund;

    2008-01-01

    -I+II expression profile is altered during lupus nephritis. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was performed on renal biopsies from 37 patients with lupus nephritis. Four specimens of healthy renal tissue served as controls. Clinicopathological correlation studies and renal survival analyses were performed by means of...... standard statistical methods. RESULTS: Proximal tubules displaying epithelial cell MT-I+II depletion in combination with luminal MT-I+II expression were observed in 31 out of 37 of the lupus nephritis specimens, but not in any of the control sections (P = 0.006). The tubular MT score, defined as the median...... number of proximal tubules displaying this MT expression pattern per high-power microscope field (40x magnification), was positively correlated to the creatinine clearance in the lupus nephritis cohort (P = 0.01). Furthermore, a tubular MT score below the median value of the cohort emerged as a...

  6. Transcriptional gene expression profiles of HGF/SF-met signaling pathway in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Nong Li; Yan-Qing Ding; Guo-Bing Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of HGF/SF-met signaling pathway in colorectal carcinoma to understand mechanisms of the signaling pathway at so gene level.METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human colorectal carcinoma cell line LoVo treated with HGF/SF (80 ng/L)for 48 h. Fluorescent probes were prepared from RNA labeled with cy3-dUTP for the control groups and with cy5-dUTP for the HGF/SF-treated groups through reversetranscription. The probes were mixed and hybridized on the microarray at 60 ℃ for 15-20 h, then the microarray was scanned by laser scanner (GenePix 4000B). The intensity of each spot and ratios of Cy5/Cy3 were analyzed and finally the differentially expressed genes were selected by GenePix Pro 3.0 software. 6 differential expression genes (3 up-regulated genes and 3 down-regulated genes) were selected randomly and analyzed by β-actin semiquantitative RT-PCR.RESULTS: The fluorescent intensities of built-in negative control spots were less than 200, and the fluorescent intensities of positive control spots were more than 5000.Of the 4004 human genes analyzed by microarray, 129 genes (holding 3.22 % of the investigated genes) revealed differential expression in HGF/SF-treated groups compared with the control groups, of which 61 genes were up-regulated (holding 1.52 % of the investigated genes) and 68 genes were down-regulated (holding 1.70 % of the investigated genes), which supplied abundant information about target genes of HGF/SF-met signaling.CONCLUSION: HGF/SF-met signaling may up-regulate oncogenes, signal transduction genes, apoptosis-related genes, metastasis related genes, and down-regulate a number of genes. The complexity of HGF/SF-met signaling to control the gene expression is revealed as a whole by the gene chip technology.

  7. Constitutively Expressed αB—Crystallin in Heat Schock Transcription Factor 1 Knockout Mice Myocardium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉; 张洪慧; 丁国宪; 程蕴琳; 晏良军; BENJAMINIvorJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To invesligate the effects of heat shock transcription factor 1(HSF 1) gene on the constitutively expressed aB-Crystallin(αBC)in mice myocardium.Methods:The expression levels of constitutive αBC in HSF1 knockout(hsf1-/-) and HSF1 wild type (hsf1+/+) mice myocardium were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry.Results:The αBC levels in hsf1-/- and hsf1+/_ were 68.42±4.16,100.00±7.58,respectively(P<0.05,cytosolic fraction),and 20.53±1.01,37.55±1.91,respectively(P<0.05,pellet fraction).The αBC signals decreased significantly in hsf1-/- myocardium when compared with those in hsf1+/+ myocardium stained with fluorescence immunohistochemistry.Conclusion.HSF1 is an important,but not the only factor,which mediates the constitutively expressed αBC.

  8. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiao; Guo, Rongrong; Guo, Chunlei; Hou, Hongmin; Wang, Xiping; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu) zipper (bZIP) TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling, and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh) bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes). Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in 10 different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones. PMID:27066030

  9. The evolution of gene expression and binding specificity of the largest transcription factor family in primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapopoulou, Adamandia; Mathew, Lisha; Wong, Alex; Trono, Didier; Jensen, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The KRAB-containing zinc finger (KRAB-ZF) proteins represent the largest family of transcription factors (TFs) in humans, yet for the great majority, their function and specific genomic target remain unknown. However, it has been shown that a large fraction of these genes arose from segmental duplications, and that they have expanded in gene and zinc finger number throughout vertebrate evolution. To determine whether this expansion is linked to selective pressures acting on different domains, we have manually curated all KRAB-ZF genes present in the human genome together with their orthologous genes in three closely related species and assessed the evolutionary forces acting at the sequence level as well as on their expression profiles. We provide evidence that KRAB-ZFs can be separated into two categories according to the polymorphism present in their DNA-contacting residues. Those carrying a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in their DNA-contacting amino acids exhibit significantly reduced expression in all tissues, have emerged in a recent lineage, and seem to be less strongly constrained evolutionarily than those without such a polymorphism. This work provides evidence for a link between age of the TF, as well as polymorphism in their DNA-contacting residues and expression levels—both of which may be jointly affected by selection. PMID:26593440

  10. Expression of the cloned uvrB gene of Escherichia coli: mode of transcription and orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Escherichia coli uvrB gene, located on a 1.5-megadalton EcoRI fragment F, derived from transducing phage lambda b2att2 [lambda b2cI857intam6Δ(bioAB)bioFCD+uvrB+], has been cloned in the unique EcoRI site of several relaxed plasmids, i.e., pMB9, pBR322, and pBH20 (=pBR322, including the lac regulatory elements). Expression of the uvrB gene, both on pMB9 and on pBH20, occurs only when fragment F has one particular orientation. Cloning of this fragment on pBR322 in either orientation does not allow expression of the uvrB gene. Transcription of this gene on pNP5 (=pMB9 uvrB) is shown to be dependent on a pMB9 promotor that is located on a 0.22-megadalton EcoRI-HindIII fragment. Using plasmid pBH20 as a vector, we could demonstrate that expression of the uvrB gene is under control of the lac promotor-operator region. From deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization experiments with lambda pgal8 deoxyribonucleic acid and restriction fragments of pNP5 deoxyribonucleic acid it could be shown that the uvrB gene is transcribed clockwise on the chromosome

  11. Nonspecific transcription factor binding can reduce noise in the expression of downstream proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M.; Bokes, P.; Fox, Z.; Singh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) interact with a multitude of binding sites on DNA and partner proteins inside cells. We investigate how nonspecific binding/unbinding to such decoy binding sites affects the magnitude and time-scale of random fluctuations in TF copy numbers arising from stochastic gene expression. A stochastic model of TF gene expression, together with decoy site interactions is formulated. Distributions for the total (bound and unbound) and free (unbound) TF levels are derived by analytically solving the chemical master equation under physiologically relevant assumptions. Our results show that increasing the number of decoy binding sides considerably reduces stochasticity in free TF copy numbers. The TF autocorrelation function reveals that decoy sites can either enhance or shorten the time-scale of TF fluctuations depending on model parameters. To understand how noise in TF abundances propagates downstream, a TF target gene is included in the model. Intriguingly, we find that noise in the expression of the target gene decreases with increasing decoy sites for linear TF-target protein dose-responses, even in regimes where decoy sites enhance TF autocorrelation times. Moreover, counterintuitive noise transmissions arise for nonlinear dose-responses. In summary, our study highlights the critical role of molecular sequestration by decoy binding sites in regulating the stochastic dynamics of TFs and target proteins at the single-cell level.

  12. Over-expression, purification, and confirmation of Bacillus anthracis transcriptional regulator NprR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Amy J; Woo, Jerry K; Khan, Attiya; Szypulinski, Michael Z; Johnson, Michael E; Lee, Hyunwoo; Lee, Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been recognized as an important biological phenomenon in which bacterial cells communicate and coordinate their gene expression and cellular processes with respect to population density. Bacillus anthracis is the etiological agent of fatal pulmonary anthrax infections, and the NprR/NprX QS system may be involved in its pathogenesis. NprR, renamed as aqsR for anthrax quorum sensing Regulator, is a transcriptional regulator that may control the expression of genes required for proliferation and survival. Currently, there is no protocol reported to over-express and purify B. anthracis AqsR. In this study, we describe cloning, purification, and confirmation of functional full-length B. anthracis AqsR protein. The AqsR gene was cloned into the pQE-30 vector with an HRV 3C protease recognition site between AqsR and the N-terminal His6-tag in order to yield near native AqsR after the His-tag cleavage, leaving only two additional amino acid residues at the N-terminus. PMID:26344899

  13. Transcriptional Bursting in Gene Expression: Analytical Results for General Stochastic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Singh, Abhyudai; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression in individual cells is highly variable and sporadic, often resulting in the synthesis of mRNAs and proteins in bursts. Such bursting has important consequences for cell-fate decisions in diverse processes ranging from HIV-1 viral infections to stem-cell differentiation. It is generally assumed that bursts are geometrically distributed and that they arrive according to a Poisson process. On the other hand, recent single-cell experiments provide evidence for complex burst arrival processes, highlighting the need for analysis of more general stochastic models. To address this issue, we invoke a mapping between general stochastic models of gene expression and systems studied in queueing theory to derive exact analytical expressions for the moments associated with mRNA/protein steady-state distributions. These results are then used to derive noise signatures, i.e. explicit conditions based entirely on experimentally measurable quantities, that determine if the burst distributions deviate from the geometric distribution or if burst arrival deviates from a Poisson process. For non-Poisson arrivals, we develop approaches for accurate estimation of burst parameters. The proposed approaches can lead to new insights into transcriptional bursting based on measurements of steady-state mRNA/protein distributions. PMID:26474290

  14. Altered gene expression profiles in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rahman Omar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an increasing body of epidemiologic and biochemical evidence implying the role of cerebral insulin resistance in Alzheimer-type dementia. For a better understanding of the insulin effect on the central nervous system, we performed microarray-based global gene expression profiling in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of streptozotocin-induced and spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats as model animals for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Results Following pathway analysis and validation of gene lists by real-time polymerase chain reaction, 30 genes from the hippocampus, such as the inhibitory neuropeptide galanin, synuclein gamma and uncoupling protein 2, and 22 genes from the prefrontal cortex, e.g. galanin receptor 2, protein kinase C gamma and epsilon, ABCA1 (ATP-Binding Cassette A1, CD47 (Cluster of Differentiation 47 and the RET (Rearranged During Transfection protooncogene, were found to exhibit altered expression levels in type 2 diabetic model animals in comparison to non-diabetic control animals. These gene lists proved to be partly overlapping and encompassed genes related to neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, neuronal development, insulin secretion, oxidative damage and DNA repair. On the other hand, no significant alterations were found in the transcriptomes of the corpus striatum in the same animals. Changes in the cerebral gene expression profiles seemed to be specific for the type 2 diabetic model, as no such alterations were found in streptozotocin-treated animals. Conclusions According to our knowledge this is the first characterization of the whole-genome expression changes of specific brain regions in a diabetic model. Our findings shed light on the complex role of insulin signaling in fine-tuning brain functions, and provide further experimental evidence in support of the recently elaborated theory of type 3 diabetes.

  15. The candidate tumor suppressor CST6 alters the gene expression profile of human breast carcinoma cells: Down-regulation of the potent mitogenic, motogenic, and angiogenic factor autotaxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently coined CST6 as a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer. CST6 indeed is expressed in the normal human breast epithelium, but little or not at all in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ectopic expression of CST6 in human breast cancer cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumor growth. To obtain insights into the molecular mechanism by which CST6 exhibits its pleiotropic effects on tumor cells, we compared global gene expression profiles in mock- and CST6-transfected human MDA-MB-435S cells. Out of 12,625 transcript species, 61 showed altered expression. These included genes for extracellular matrix components, cytokines, kinases, and phosphatases, as well as several key transcription factors. TaqMan PCR assays were used to confirm the microarray data for 7 out of 11 genes. One down-regulated gene product, secreted autotaxin/lyso-phospholipase D, was of particular interest because its down-regulation by CST6 could explain most of CST6's effect on the breast cancer cells. This study thus provides First evidence that CST6 plays a role in the modulation of genes, particularly, genes that are highly relevant to breast cancer progression

  16. Altered gene expression pattern in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kiliszek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite a substantial progress in diagnosis and therapy, acute myocardial infarction (MI is a major cause of mortality in the general population. A novel insight into the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction obtained by studying gene expression should help to discover novel biomarkers of MI and to suggest novel strategies of therapy. The aim of our study was to establish gene expression patterns in leukocytes from acute myocardial infarction patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI were included. The blood was collected on the 1(st day of myocardial infarction, after 4-6 days, and after 6 months. Control group comprised 14 patients with stable coronary artery disease, without history of myocardial infarction. Gene expression analysis was performed with Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarrays and GCS3000 TG system. Lists of genes showing altered expression levels (fold change >1.5, p<0.05 were submitted to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Gene lists from each group were examined for canonical pathways and molecular and cellular functions. Comparing acute phase of MI with the same patients after 6 months (stable phase and with control group we found 24 genes with changed expression. In canonical analysis three pathways were highlighted: signaling of PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, IL-10 and IL-6 (interleukin 10 and 6. CONCLUSIONS: In the acute phase of STEMI, dozens of genes from several pathways linked with lipid/glucose metabolism, platelet function and atherosclerotic plaque stability show altered expression. Up-regulation of SOCS3 and FAM20 genes in the first days of myocardial infarction is observed in the vast majority of patients.

  17. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of glycerol metabolism in Aspergilli through genome-wide gene expression data anlysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salazar, Margarita Pena; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Panagiotou, Gianni;

    2009-01-01

    Glycerol is catabolized by a wide range of microorganisms including Aspergillus species. To identify the transcriptional regulation of glycerol metabolism in Aspergillus, we analyzed data from triplicate batch fermentations of three different Aspergilli (Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae and...... Aspergillus niger) with glucose and glycerol as carbon sources. Protein comparisons and cross-analysis with gene expression data of all three species resulted in the identification of 88 genes having a conserved response across the three Aspergilli. A promoter analysis of the up-regulated genes led to the...... identification of a conserved binding site for a putative regulator to be 5′-TGCGGGGA-3′, a binding site that is similar to the binding site for Adr1 in yeast and humans. We show that this Adr1 consensus binding sequence was over-represented on promoter regions of several genes in A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A...

  18. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects. PMID:26063602

  19. Impact of altered actin gene expression on vinculin, talin, cell spreading, and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schevzov, G; Lloyd, C; Gunning, P

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a strong correlation between the expression of vinculin and the shape and motility of a cell (Rodriguez Fernandez et al., 1992a, b, 1993). This hypothesis was tested by comparing the expression of vinculin and talin with the motility of morphologically altered myoblasts. These mouse C2 myoblasts were previously generated by directly perturbing the cell cytoskeleton via the stable transfection of a mutant-form of the beta-actin gene (beta sm) and three different forms of the gamma-actin gene; gamma, gamma minus 3'UTR (gamma delta'UTR), and gamma minus intron III (gamma delta IVSIII) (Schevzov et al., 1992; Lloyd and Gunning, 1993). In the case of the beta sm and gamma-actin transfectants, a two-fold decrease in the cell surface area was coupled, as predicted, with a decrease in vinculin and talin expression. In contrast, the gamma delta IVSIII transfectants with a seven-fold decrease in the cell surface area showed an unpredicted slight increase in vinculin and talin expression and the gamma delta 3'-UTR transfectants with a slight increase in the cell surface area showed no changes in talin expression and a decrease in vinculin expression. We conclude that changes in actin gene expression alone can impact on the expression of vinculin and talin. Furthermore, we observed that these actin transfectants failed to show a consistent relationship between cell shape, motility, and the expression of vinculin. However, a relationship between talin and cell motility was found to exist, suggesting a role for talin in the establishment of focal contacts necessary for motility. PMID:7646816

  20. Methamphetamine-induced dopamine-independent alterations in striatal gene expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine hemiparkinsonian rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Lud Cadet

    Full Text Available Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinson's disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA-denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH (2.5 mg/kg known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (±1.7-fold, p<0.025 in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection