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Sample records for alters spinal levels

  1. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain

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    Elphick Maurice R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA, in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P P P P P

  2. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasti, Leonardo; Richardson, Denise; Jhaveri, Maulik; Eldeeb, Khalil; Barrett, David; Elphick, Maurice R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David; Michael, Gregory J; Chapman, Victoria

    2009-07-01

    Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs) are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days) significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P pain states.

  3. Spinal Fluid Lactate Dehydrogenase Level Differentiates between Structural and Metabolic Etiologies of Altered Mental Status in Children

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    Nahid KHOSROSHAHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Khosroshahi N, Alizadeh P, Khosravi M, Salamati P, Kamrani K. Spinal Fluid Lactate Dehydrogenase Level Differentiates between Structural and Metabolic Etiologies of Altered Mental Status in Children. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:31-36.AbstractObjectiveAltered mental status is a common cause of intensive care unit admission inchildren. Differentiating structural causes of altered mental status from metabolic etiologies is of utmost importance in diagnostic approach and management of the patients. Among many biomarkers proposed to help stratifying patients with altered mental status, spinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase appears to be the most promising biomarker to predict cellular necrosis.Materials & MethodsIn this cross sectional study we measured spinal fluid level of lactatedehydrogenase in children 2 months to 12 years of age admitted to a single center intensive care unit over one year. Spinal fluid level of lactate dehydrogenase in 40 pediatric cases of febrile seizure was also determined as the control group.ResultsThe study group included 35 boys (58.3% and 25 girls (41.7%. Their meanage was 2.7+/-3 years and their mean spinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase levelwas 613.8+/-190.4 units/liter. The control group included 24 boys (55.8% and19 girls (44.2%. Their mean age was 1.3+/-1.2 years and their mean spinalfluid lactate dehydrogenase level was 18.9+/-7.5 units/liter. The mean spinalfluid lactate dehydrogenase level in children with abnormal head CT scan was246.3+/-351.5 units/liter compared to 164.5+/-705.7 in those with normal CTscan of the head (p=0.001.ConclusionSpinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase level is useful in differentiating structural andmetabolic causes of altered mental status in children. ReferencesFesk SK. Coma and confusional states: emergency diagnosis and management. Neurol Clin 1998; 16: 237- 56.Cucchiara BL, Kanser SE, Wolk DA, et al. Early impairment in consciousness Predicts

  4. Altered Levels of MicroRNA-9, -206, and -132 in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Their Response to Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy.

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    Catapano, Francesco; Zaharieva, Irina; Scoto, Mariacristina; Marrosu, Elena; Morgan, Jennifer; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-07-05

    The identification of noninvasive biomarkers to monitor the disease progression in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is becoming increasingly important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and are implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular diseases, including motor neuron degeneration. In this study, we selectively characterized the expression of miR-9, miR-206, and miR-132 in spinal cord, skeletal muscle, and serum from SMA transgenic mice, and in serum from SMA patients. A systematic analysis of miRNA expression was conducted in SMA mice with different disease severities (severe type I-like and mild type III-like) at different disease stages (pre-, mid-, and late-symptomatic stages), and in morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-treated mice. There was differential expression of all three miRNAs in spinal cord, skeletal muscle and serum samples in SMA mice. Serum miRNAs were altered prior to the changes in spinal cord and skeletal muscle at the presymptomatic stage. The altered miR-132 levels in spinal cord, muscle, and serum transiently reversed to normal level after a single-dose morpholino antisense oligomer PMO25 treatment in SMA mice. We also confirmed a significant alteration of miR-9 and miR-132 level in serum samples from SMA patients. Our study indicates the potential of developing miRNAs as noninvasive biomarkers in SMA.

  5. Altered acetylcholinesterase levels in the spinal cord anterior horn and dorsal root ganglion following sciatic nerve ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenjun Yang; Pei Wang; Songhe Yang; Jingfeng Xue

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral nerve ischemia has been shown to result in ischemic fiber degeneration and axoplasmic transport disturbance. However, the effect on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression in relevant cells following sciatic nerve ischemia remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To observe AChE concentration changes following peripheral nerve ischemia. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present comparative observation, neuroanatomical experiment was performed at the Central Laboratory Animal of Chengde Medical College between 2006 and 2007. MATERIALS: A total of 20 healthy, adult, Wistar rats were randomized into two groups (n = 10): 8-day ischemia and 14-day ischemia. METHODS: Ischemia injury was induced in the unilateral sciatic nerve (experimental side) through ligation of the common iliac artery. The contralateral side received no intervention, and served as the control side. Rats in the 8-day ischemia and 14-day ischemia groups were allowed to survive for 8 and 14 days, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The L5 lumbar spinal cord and the L5 dorsal root ganglion were removed from both sides and sectioned utilizing a Leica vibrating slicer. AChE cellular expression was detected using Karnovsky-Root, and the number of AChE-positive cells and average gray value were analyzed using a MiVnt image analysis system. RESULTS: In the 8-day ischemia group, AChE-positive cell numbers were significantly less in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord anterior horn of the experimental side, but the average gray value was significantly greater, compared with the control side (P < 0.05). These changes were more significant in the 14-day ischemia group than in the 8-day ischemia group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Peripheral nerve ischemia leads to decreased AChE expression in the associated cells in a time-dependent manner.

  6. Impaired formalin-evoked changes of spinal amino acid levels in diabetic rats.

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    Malmberg, Annika B; O'Connor, William T; Glennon, Jeffery C; Ceseña, Rose; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2006-10-18

    To investigate mechanisms by which diabetes alters sensory processing, we measured levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in spinal dialysates from awake, unrestrained control and diabetic rats under resting conditions and following hind paw formalin injection. Under resting conditions, glutamate concentrations in spinal dialysates were significantly (Phyperalgesia in diabetic rats does not appear to be secondary to enhanced glutamatergic input to the spinal cord.

  7. Acute estrogen surge enhances inflammatory nociception without altering spinal Fos expression.

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    Ralya, Andrew; McCarson, Kenneth E

    2014-07-11

    Chronic pain is a major neurological disorder that can manifest differently between genders or sexes. The complex actions of sex hormones may underlie these differences; previous studies have suggested that elevated estrogen levels can enhance pain perception. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that acute, activational effects of estradiol (E2) increase persistent inflammatory nociception, and anatomically where this modulation occurs. Spinal expression of Fos is widely used as a marker of nociceptive activation. This study used formalin-evoked nociception in ovariectomized (OVX) adult female rats and measured late-phase hindlimb flinching and Fos expression in the spinal cord, and their modification by acute estrogen supplementation similar to a proestrus surge. Six days after ovariectomy, female rats were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 10μg/kg E2 or vehicle. Twenty-four hours later, 50μL of 1.25% or 100μL of 5% formalin was injected into the right hindpaw; hindlimb flinches were counted, and spinal cords removed 2h after formalin injection. The numbers of Fos-expressing neurons in sections of the lumbar spinal cord were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Formalin-induced inflammation produced a dose-dependent increase in late-phase hindlimb flinching, and E2 pretreatment increased flinching following 5%, but not 1.25% formalin injection. Despite the modification of behavior by E2, the number of spinal Fos-positive neurons was not altered by E2 pretreatment. These findings demonstrate that an acute proestrus-like surge in serum estrogen can produce a stimulus-intensity-dependent increase in inflammation-evoked nociceptive behavior. However, the lack of effect on spinal Fos expression suggests that this enhancement of nociceptive signaling by estrogen is independent of changes in peripheral activation of, expression of the immediate early gene Fos by, or signal throughput of spinal nociceptive neurons.

  8. Manipulative physiotherapists can reliably palpate nominated lumbar spinal levels.

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    Downey, B J; Taylor, N F; Niere, K R

    1999-08-01

    Palpating a nominated spinal level is a prerequisite to more complex tasks such as palpating the level most likely to be the source of the patient's symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of physiotherapists with a post-graduate qualification in manipulation (manipulative physiotherapists) in palpating the lumbar spines of patients in a clinical setting. Three pairs of manipulative physiotherapists palpated the randomly-nominated lumbar spinal levels of 20 patients presenting to their practices for treatment of low-back pain. Each therapist marked the skin overlying the spinous process of the nominated spinal level with an ultraviolet pen and these marks were transcribed onto transparencies for analysis. The therapists obtained an overall weighted kappa of 0.92 indicating almost perfect agreement for locating the nominated spinal level. The results of this study indicate that manipulative physiotherapists can reliably palpate nominated lumbar spinal levels, suggesting further training in spinal therapy enhances the palpatory skills of physiotherapists in palpating nominated lumbar spinal levels.

  9. Altered activation patterns by triceps surae stretch reflex pathways in acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

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    Frigon, Alain; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J

    2011-10-01

    Spinal reflexes are modified by spinal cord injury (SCI) due the loss of excitatory inputs from supraspinal structures and changes within the spinal cord. The stretch reflex is one of the simplest pathways of the central nervous system and was used presently to evaluate how inputs from primary and secondary muscle spindles interact with spinal circuits before and after spinal transection (i.e., spinalization) in 12 adult decerebrate cats. Seven cats were spinalized and allowed to recover for 1 mo (i.e., chronic spinal state), whereas 5 cats were evaluated before (i.e., intact state) and after acute spinalization (i.e., acute spinal state). Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae (TS) muscles. The force evoked by TS muscles was recorded along with the activity of several hindlimb muscles. Stretch reflexes were abolished in the acute spinal state due to an inability to activate TS muscles, such as soleus (Sol) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG). In chronic spinal cats, reflex force had partly recovered but Sol and LG activity remained considerably depressed, despite the fact that injecting clonidine could recruit these muscles during locomotor-like activity. In contrast, other muscles not recruited in the intact state, most notably semitendinosus and sartorius, were strongly activated by stretching TS muscles in chronic spinal cats. Therefore, stretch reflex pathways from TS muscles to multiple hindlimb muscles undergo functional reorganization following spinalization, both acute and chronic. Altered activation patterns by stretch reflex pathways could explain some sensorimotor deficits observed during locomotion and postural corrections after SCI.

  10. Dynamic alterations of the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β in rat primary motor cortex during transhemispheric functional reorganization after contralateral seventh cervical spinal nerve root transfer following brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

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    Yang, Ming-Jie; Li, Shuang; Yang, Chen-Song; Wang, Xu-Jia; Chang, Shi-Min; Sun, Gui-Xin

    2017-03-22

    The transfer of a contralateral healthy seventh cervical spinal nerve root (cC7) to the recipient nerve in the injured side is considered a reliable and effective procedure for restoration of the physiological functions of an injured hand after brachial plexus root avulsion injury (BPAI). Growing evidence shows that the transhemispheric cortical reorganization is induced after cC7 nerve transfer surgery. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism. Proinflammatory cytokines reportedly play an important role in the neural plasticity. We hypothesize that proinflammatory cytokines are involved in the transhemispheric functional reorganization after cC7 transfer. In the present study, we investigated the level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the rat primary motor cortex after cC7 transfer following BPAI by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that, in the sham group, no statistical significance was observed between the level of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β at each time point after the operation compared with that at day 0, respectively. However, in the unrepaired and repaired groups, the level of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β changed dynamically. The study is the first to provide evidence for the involvement of proinflammatory cytokines in transhemispheric functional reorganization after cC7 transfer following BPAI, which are useful for understanding the underlying mechanism.

  11. Loss of Hoxb8 alters spinal dorsal laminae and sensory responses in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Holstege (Jan); W. de Graaff (Wim); S.M. Hossaini (Mehdi); S.C. Cano; D. Jaarsma (Dick); J. Deschamps (Jacqueline); E. van den Akker (Eric)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAlthough Hox gene expression has been linked to motoneuron identity, a role of these genes in development of the spinal sensory system remained undocumented. Hoxb genes are expressed at high levels in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Hoxb8 null mutants manifest a striking phenotype of

  12. Loss of Hoxb8 alters spinal dorsal laminae and sensory responses in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, J.C.; de Graaff, W.G.A.J.; Hossaini, M.; Cano, S.C.; Jaarsma, D.; van den Akker, E.; Deschamps, J.

    2008-01-01

    Although Hox gene expression has been linked to motoneuron identity, a role of these genes in development of the spinal sensory system remained undocumented. Hoxb genes are expressed at high levels in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Hoxb8 null mutants manifest a striking phenotype of excessive g

  13. Putaminal alteration in multiple sclerosis patients with spinal cord lesions.

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    Zimmermann, Hilga; Rolfsnes, Hans O; Montag, Swantje; Wilting, Janine; Droby, Amgad; Reuter, Eva; Gawehn, Joachim; Zipp, Frauke; Gröger, Adriane

    2015-10-01

    Typical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions occur in the brain as well as in the spinal cord. However, two extreme magnetic resonance imaging phenotypes appear occasionally: those with predominantly spinal cord lesions (MS + SL) and those with cerebral lesions and no detectable spinal lesions (MS + CL). We assessed whether morphological differences can be found between these two extreme phenotypes. We examined 19 patients with MS + SL, 18 with MS + CL and 20 controls. All subjects were examined using magnetic resonance imaging, including anatomical and diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Voxel-based morphologic and regions of interest-based analyses and tract-based spatial statistics were performed. Patients also underwent neuropsychological testing. Demographic, clinical and neuropsychological characteristics did not differ between MS + SL and MS + CL patients. Patients with MS + SL showed significantly larger putamen volumes than those with MS + CL which correlated negatively with disability. Compared to controls, only MS + CL revealed clear cortical and deep gray matter atrophy, which correlated with cerebral lesion volume. Additionally, extensive white matter microstructural damage was found only in MS + CL compared to MS + SL and controls in the tract-based spatial statistics. Higher putamen volumes in MS + SL could suggest compensatory mechanisms in this area responsible for motor control. Widely reduced fractional anisotropy values in MS + CL were caused by higher cerebral lesion volume and thus presumably stronger demyelination, which subsequently leads to higher global gray matter atrophy.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Levels of Human Spinal Tissues.

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    Harris, Liam; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2017-09-06

    .: Systematic Review. .: The aim of this study was to investigate, quantify, compare and compile the various mesenchymal stem cell tissue sources within human spinal tissues to act as a compendium for clinical and research application. .: Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in academic and clinical understanding of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Previously limited to cells isolated from bone marrow, the past decade has illicited the characterization and isolation of human MSCs from adipose, bone marrow, synovium, muscle, periosteum, peripheral blood, umbilical cord, placenta and numerous other tissues. As researchers explore practical applications of cells in these tissues, the absolute levels of MSCs in specific spinal tissue will be critical to guide future research. .: The PubMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for articles relating to the harvest, characterization, isolation and quantification of human mesenchymal stem cells from spinal tissues. Selected articles were examined for relevant data, categorized according to type of spinal tissue, and when possible, standardized to facilitate comparisons between sites. .: Human mesenchymal stem cell levels varied widely between spinal tissues. Yields for Intervertebral disc demonstrated roughly 5% of viable cells to be positive for MSC surface markers. Cartilage endplate cells yielded 18,500- 61,875 cells/ 0.8 mm thick sample of cartilage end plate. Ligamentum flavum yielded 250,000- 500,000 cells per gram of tissue. Annulus fibrosus FACS treatment found 29% of cells positive for MSC marker Stro-1. Nucleus pulposus yielded mean tissue samples of 40,584-234,137 MSCs/gram of tissue. .: Numerous tissues within and surrounding the spine represent a consistent and reliable source for the harvest and isolation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Among the tissues of the spine, the annulus fibrosus and ligamentum flavum each offer considerable levels of mesenchymal stem cells, and may

  15. Differential brain and spinal cord cytokine and BDNF levels in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are modulated by prior and regular exercise.

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    Bernardes, Danielle; Oliveira-Lima, Onésia Cristina; Silva, Thiago Vitarelli da; Faraco, Camila Cristina Fraga; Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Santos, Daniel Moreira dos; Bethea, John R; Brambilla, Roberta; Orian, Jacqueline M; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2013-11-15

    The interactions between a prior program of regular exercise and the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-mediated responses were evaluated. In the exercised EAE mice, although there was no effect on infiltrated cells, the cytokine and derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were altered, and the clinical score was attenuated. Although, the cytokine levels were decreased in the brain and increased in the spinal cord, BDNF was elevated in both compartments with a tendency of lesser demyelization volume in the spinal cord of the exercised EAE group compared with the unexercised.

  16. Decreased cerebral spinal fluid neurotransmitter levels in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

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    Sparks, S E; Wassif, C A; Goodwin, H; Conley, S K; Lanham, D C; Kratz, L E; Hyland, K; Gropman, A; Tierney, E; Porter, F D

    2014-05-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with cognitive impairment and a distinct behavioral phenotype that includes autistic features. SLOS is caused by a defect in 3β-hydroxysterol Δ(7)-reductase which leads to decreased cholesterol levels and elevated cholesterol precursors, specifically 7- and 8-dehydrocholesterol. However, the pathological processes contributing to the neurological abnormalities in SLOS have not been defined. In view of prior data suggesting defects in SLOS in vesicular release and given the association of altered serotonin metabolism with autism, we were interested in measuring neurotransmitter metabolite levels in SLOS to assess their potential to be used as biomarkers in therapeutic trials. We measured cerebral spinal fluid levels of serotonin and dopamine metabolites, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) respectively, in 21 SLOS subjects. Results were correlated with the SLOS anatomical severity score, Aberrant Behavior Checklist scores and concurrent sterol biochemistry. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were significantly reduced in SLOS subjects. In individual patients, the levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were reduced to a similar degree. CSF neurotransmitter metabolite levels did not correlate with either CSF sterols or behavioral measures. This is the first study demonstrating decreased levels of CSF neurotransmitter metabolites in SLOS. We propose that decreased levels of neurotransmitters in SLOS are caused by a sterol-related defect in synaptic vesicle formation and that CSF 5HIAA and HVA will be useful biomarkers in development of future therapeutic trials.

  17. A randomized, comparative trial: does pillow type alter cervico-thoracic spinal posture when side lying?

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    Gordon SJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Susan J Gordon1, Karen A Grimmer-Somers2, Patricia H Trott31School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Science, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD; 2Centre for Allied Health Sciences, 3School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaBackground: Many patients ask for advice about choosing a pillow. This research was undertaken to determine if pillow type alters cervico-thoracic spine position when resting in the side-lying position.Aim: To investigate the effect of different pillow shape and content on the slope of cervico-thoracic spine segments when side lying.Materials and methods: The study was a randomized blinded comparative trial set in a laboratory that replicated a bedroom. The subjects were side sleepers aged over 18 years. Exclusion criteria were history of surgery to the cervico-thoracic spine, an injury or accident to the cervico-thoracic spine in the preceding year, or currently receiving treatment for neck symptoms. Each participant rested in a standardized side-lying position for 10 minutes on each of the trial pillows: regular shaped polyester, foam, feather, and latex pillows, and a contour shaped foam pillow. Reflective markers were placed on external occipital protuberance (EOP, C2, C4, C7, and T3, and digital images were recorded of subjects at 0 and 10 minutes on each pillow. Images were digitized using each reflective marker and the slope of each spinal segment calculated. Univariate analysis of variance models were used to investigate slope differences between pillows at 0 and 10 minutes. Significance was established at P < 0.01 to take account of chance effects from repeated measures and multiple comparisons.Results: At 0 and 10 minutes, the EOP-C2, C2-C4, and C4-C7 segmental slopes were significantly different across all pillows. Significant differences were identified when comparing the feather pillow with the latex, regular and contour foam pillows, and when

  18. Altered expression of glial markers, chemokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal cord of type 2 diabetic monkeys.

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    Kiguchi, Norikazu; Ding, Huiping; Peters, Christopher M; Kock, Nancy D; Kishioka, Shiroh; Cline, J Mark; Wagner, Janice D; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a pathological condition that underlies diabetes and affects sensory processing. Given the high prevalence of pain in diabetic patients and crosstalk between chemokines and opioids, it is pivotal to know whether neuroinflammation-associated mediators are dysregulated in the central nervous system of diabetic primates. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether mRNA expression levels of glial markers, chemokines, and opioid receptors are altered in the spinal cord and thalamus of naturally occurring type 2 diabetic monkeys (n=7) compared with age-matched non-diabetic monkeys (n=6). By using RT-qPCR, we found that mRNA expression levels of both GFAP and IBA1 were up-regulated in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) of diabetic monkeys compared with non-diabetic monkeys. Among all chemokines, expression levels of three chemokine ligand-receptor systems, i.e., CCL2-CCR2, CCL3-CCR1/5, and CCL4-CCR5, were up-regulated in the SDH of diabetic monkeys. Moreover, in the SDH, seven additional chemokine receptors, i.e., CCR4, CCR6, CCR8, CCR10, CXCR3, CXCR5, and CXCR6, were also up-regulated in diabetic monkeys. In contrast, expression levels of MOP, KOP, and DOP, but not NOP receptors, were down-regulated in the SDH of diabetic monkeys, and the thalamus had fewer changes in the glial markers, chemokines and opioids. These findings indicate that neuroinflammation, manifested as glial activation and simultaneous up-regulation of multiple chemokine ligands and receptors, seems to be permanent in type 2 diabetic monkeys. As chemokines and opioids are important pain modulators, this first-in-primate study provides a translational bridge for determining the functional efficacy of spinal drugs targeting their signaling cascades.

  19. Altered rate-dependent depression of the spinal H-reflex as an indicator of spinal disinhibition in models of neuropathic pain.

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    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A G; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2014-02-01

    The unpredictable efficacy of current therapies for neuropathic pain may reflect diverse etiological mechanisms operating between, and within, diseases. As descriptions of pain rarely establish specific mechanisms, a tool that can identify underlying causes of neuropathic pain would be useful in developing patient-specific treatments. Rate-dependent depression (RDD), a measure of the change in amplitude of the Hoffman reflex over consecutive stimulations, is attenuated in diabetic rats that also exhibit impaired spinal γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor function, reduced spinal potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2) expression, and indices of painful neuropathy. To investigate whether loss of RDD is a reliable indicator of the contribution of spinal GABAergic dysfunction to neuropathic pain, we assessed RDD, tactile allodynia, and formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in 3 models: rats treated acutely with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), diabetic rats treated with the BDNF-sequestering molecule tyrosine receptor kinase B/Fc (TrkB/Fc), and rats with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Delivery of BDNF to the spinal cord of normal rats produced RDD deficits and features of painful neuropathy associated with disrupted GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory function and reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Treating diabetic rats with TrkB/Fc restored RDD and alleviated indices of painful neuropathy. In paclitaxel-treated rats, RDD was not impaired and behavioral indices of neuropathic pain were not associated with spinal GABAergic dysfunction or reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Our data reveal BDNF as part of the mechanism underlying spinal cord disinhibition caused by altered GABAA receptor function in diabetic rats and suggest that RDD deficits may be a useful indicator of neuropathic pain states associated with spinal disinhibition, thereby revealing specific therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by

  20. Alterations in body composition and spasticity following subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation training in spinal cord injury

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    Louis Crowe, MB, BCh, BAO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this prospective cohort study was to investigate alterations in body composition variables and spasticity following subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES training in an adult population with spinal cord injury (SCI. Fourteen sedentary adults with SCI (thoracic [T]4–T11; American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A/B; time since injury: 10.17 +/– 11.17 yr were recruited from the National SCI database. Four adhesive electrodes (175 cm2 each were placed bilaterally on the proximal and distal quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups and subtetanic contractions were elicited using a handheld NMES device. Lean body mass (LBM and other body composition variables were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Spasticity was measured using the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic Reflexes (SCATs and visual analog scales. Verbal and written feedback was obtained to subjectively evaluate spasticity. LBM and spasticity measurements were taken before and after an 8 wk NMES training program in order to assess change. A statistically significant increase in lower-limb LBM, i.e., muscle tissue (p > 0.001, and a reduction in SCATs (p < 0.001 score, indicating reduced spasticity, was observed. Subjective responses were positive. Improvements in body composition and SCATs scores indicate that subtetanic NMES training elicits favorable responses and may have important clinical implications for an SCI population.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the lumbosacral level in patients with spinal stenosis: A pilot study.

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    Chun, Se-Woong; Lee, Hack-Jin; Nam, Koong-Ho; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Dong; Jeong, Eun-Jin; Chung, Sun G; Kim, Keewon; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is a common degenerative condition. However, how neurogenic claudication develops has not been clearly elucidated. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid physiology at the lumbosacral level has not received adequate attention. This study was conducted to compare cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics at the lumbosacral spinal level between patients with spinal stenosis and healthy controls. Twelve subjects (four patients and eight healthy controls; 25-77 years old; seven males) underwent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to quantify cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. The cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities were measured at the L2 and S1 levels. All subjects were evaluated at rest and after walking (to provoke neurogenic claudication in the patients). The caudal peak flow velocity in the sacral spine (-0.25 ± 0.28 cm/s) was attenuated compared to that in the lumbar spine (-0.93 ± 0.46 cm/s) in both patients and controls. The lumbar caudal peak flow velocity was slower in patients (-0.65 ± 0.22 cm/s) than controls (-1.07 ± 0.49 cm/s) and this difference became more pronounced after walking (-0.66 ± 0.37 cm/s in patients, -1.35 ± 0.52 cm/s in controls; p = 0.028). The sacral cerebrospinal fluid flow after walking was barely detectable in patients (caudal peak flow velocity: -0.09 ± 0.03 cm/s). Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lumbosacral spine were more attenuated in patients with spinal stenosis than healthy controls. After walking, the patients experiencing claudication did not exhibit an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid flow rate as the controls did. Altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics may partially explain the pathophysiology of spinal stenosis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:104-112, 2017.

  2. Spinal cord injury markedly altered protein expression patterns in the affected rat urinary bladder during healing stages.

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    Lee, Ji-Young; Kim, Bong Jo; Sim, Gyujin; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kang, Dawon; Jung, Jae Hun; Hwa, Jeong Seok; Kwak, Yeon Ju; Choi, Yeon Jin; Park, Young Sook; Han, Jaehee; Lee, Cheol Soon; Kang, Kee Ryeon

    2011-06-01

    The influence of spinal cord injury (SCI) on protein expression in the rat urinary bladder was assessed by proteomic analysis at different time intervals post-injury. After contusion SCI between T9 and T10, bladder tissues were processed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/MS at 6 hr to 28 days after SCI to identify proteins involved in the healing process of SCI-induced neurogenic bladder. Approximately 1,000 spots from the bladder of SCI and sham groups were visualized and identified. At one day after SCI, the expression levels of three protein were increased, and seven spots were down-regulated, including heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) and heat shock protein 20 (Hsp20). Fifteen spots such as S100-A11 were differentially expressed seven days post-injury, and seven proteins including transgelin had altered expression patterns 28 days after injury. Of the proteins with altered expression levels, transgelin, S100-A11, Hsp27 and Hsp20 were continuously and variably expressed throughout the entire post-SCI recovery of the bladder. The identified proteins at each time point belong to eight functional categories. The altered expression patterns identified by 2-DE of transgelin and S100-A11 were verified by Western blot. Transgelin and protein S100-A11 may be candidates for protein biomarkers in the bladder healing process after SCI.

  3. Continuous intrathecal fluid infusions elevate nerve growth factor levels and prevent functional deficits after spinal cord ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, M; Tuszynski, M H; Conner, J; Zivin, J A

    2000-11-17

    Continuous intracerebroventricular or intrathecal infusions of neurotrophic factors have been reported to prevent neuronal degeneration, stimulate axonal sprouting and ameliorate behavioral deficits in various models of CNS injury and aging. In the present study, the ability of intrathecal infusions of recombinant human nerve growth factor (NGF) to reduce functional deficits following spinal cord ischemia was investigated. Adult rabbits underwent intrathecal cannulation and continuous infusions of either 300 microg/ml recombinant human NGF or artificial CSF (vehicle) at a rate of 143 microl/day for 7 days prior to induction of spinal cord ischemia. Continuous infusions were maintained after induction of ischemia. Four days later, both NGF-treated and vehicle-infused subjects showed a significant amelioration of functional motor deficits compared to lesioned, non-infused subjects (PNGF-infused subjects (mean+/-S.E.M.). Significantly elevated NGF protein levels were attained within the spinal cords of both NGF-treated subjects and artificial CSF-infused subjects, although levels were substantially higher in NGF-treated subjects (9.8+/-3.8 ng/g in NGF-infused vs. 2.0+/-0.4 ng/g in vehicle-infused and only 0.4+/-0.2 ng/g in lesioned, non-infused animals). These findings indicate that the process of intrathecal cannulation and fluid infusion elicits alterations in the spinal cord environment that are neuroprotective, including spontaneous elevations in NGF levels.

  4. Tapentadol increases levels of noradrenaline in the rat spinal cord as measured by in vivo microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzschentke, Thomas M; Folgering, Joost H A; Flik, Gunnar; De Vry, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Spinal noradrenaline is thought to play an important role in descending pain inhibitory pathways and the modulation of nociceptive information at the spinal level. Tapentadol is a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI). We showed previously that tapentadol, in con

  5. DIFFERENT TYPES OF INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING PROVIDES BETTERMENT IN ALTERED PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN UPPER THORACIC SPINAL CORD INJURIES

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    Muruganandam Periyasamy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory problems are usual in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries when compared to Lower thoracic spinal cord injuries. Generally there are frequent respiratory complications in the individuals with spinal cord injuries. The complications of the respiratory system are severe and more prevalent source of morbidity and mortality after the spinal cord injury due to the inefficient breathing capacity including inspiratory and expiratory abilities. The present study represents the inspiratory muscle training especially in upper thoracic spinal cord injury patients to assess the improvement in the pulmonary functions. Methods: Twenty five patients with the age between 25 -40 years with the upper spinal cord injuries were selected in the present study in order to assess the efficacy of the training. Several types of exercises were practiced including diaphragmatic breathing exercises, incentive spirometry, active cycle of breathing technique and weight training. COPD Conditions, Chest wall deformities, Hypertensive patients, Cardio vascular problems were excluded in the study. Results: The results from the study showed that significant changes were found in the patients treated with all the above mentioned techniques. Axillary level, nipple level, Xiphisternum levels were analysed and the results found to be significant after the treatment. Incentive spirometry and peak flow meter observations were also found to be significant when compare to the pretreatment. Conclusion: The present study conclude that the combined effect of incentive spriometry, diaphragmatic breathing exercises, and active cycle of breathing technique is more effective in improving the pulmonary functions in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries than single method efficiency.

  6. Injury to the Spinal Cord Niche Alters the Engraftment Dynamics of Human Neural Stem Cells

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    Christopher J. Sontag

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment is a critical mediator of stem cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The majority of preclinical studies involving transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs into the CNS have focused on injured or degenerating microenvironments, leaving a dearth of information as to how NSCs differentially respond to intact versus damaged CNS. Furthermore, single, terminal histological endpoints predominate, providing limited insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of NSC engraftment and migration. We investigated the early and long-term engraftment dynamics of human CNS stem cells propagated as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns following transplantation into uninjured versus subacutely injured spinal cords of immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. We stereologically quantified engraftment, survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation at 1, 7, 14, 28, and 98 days posttransplantation, and identified injury-dependent alterations. Notably, the injured microenvironment decreased hCNS-SCns survival, delayed and altered the location of proliferation, influenced both total and fate-specific migration, and promoted oligodendrocyte maturation.

  7. Double-level Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries: A case report

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    Saeed Bin Ayaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Séquard Syndrome is a type of Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury characterized by a relatively greater ipsilateral loss of proprioception and motor function, with contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensations. The residual deficits in balance produced by such injury may render a person liable to fall that may result in vertebral fracture and another injury to the spinal cord. We present here a case who initially had Brown-Séquard Syndrome due to penetrating knife injury to the neck and later on developed Cauda Equina Syndrome (another Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury due to fractured LV1 following a fall. The fracture was fixed through Pedicle Screws and the patient underwent effective rehabilitation to gain maximum achievable independence in functional activities. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 392-398

  8. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Exercise Training after Spinal Cord Injury Selectively Alters Synaptic Properties in Neurons in Adult Mouse Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jamie R.; Dunn, Lynda R.; Galea, Mary P.; Callister, Robin; Rank, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Following spinal cord injury (SCI), anatomical changes such as axonal sprouting occur within weeks in the vicinity of the injury. Exercise training enhances axon sprouting; however, the exact mechanisms that mediate exercised-induced plasticity are unknown. We studied the effects of exercise training after SCI on the intrinsic and synaptic properties of spinal neurons in the immediate vicinity (<2 segments) of the SCI. Male mice (C57BL/6, 9–10 weeks old) received a spinal hemisection (T10) and after 1 week of recovery, they were randomized to trained (treadmill exercise for 3 weeks) and untrained (no exercise) groups. After 3 weeks, mice were killed and horizontal spinal cord slices (T6–L1, 250 μm thick) were prepared for visually guided whole cell patch clamp recording. Intrinsic properties, including resting membrane potential, input resistance, rheobase current, action potential (AP) threshold and after-hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude were similar in neurons from trained and untrained mice (n=67 and 70 neurons, respectively). Neurons could be grouped into four categories based on their AP discharge during depolarizing current injection; the proportions of tonic firing, initial bursting, single spiking, and delayed firing neurons were similar in trained and untrained mice. The properties of spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents (sEPSCs) did not differ in trained and untrained animals. In contrast, evoked excitatory synaptic currents recorded after dorsal column stimulation were markedly increased in trained animals (peak amplitude 78.9±17.5 vs. 42.2±6.8 pA; charge 1054±376 vs. 348±75 pA·ms). These data suggest that 3 weeks of treadmill exercise does not affect the intrinsic properties of spinal neurons after SCI; however, excitatory synaptic drive from dorsal column pathways, such as the corticospinal tract, is enhanced. PMID:23320512

  10. Successful spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic below-level spinal cord injury pain following complete paraplegia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Tim A; Landmann, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and often difficult to treat. We report a case where epidural spinal cord stimulation (SCS) below the level of injury has been successfully applied in a patient with a complete spinal cord lesion. A 53-year-old female presented with neuropathic below-level SCI pain of both lower legs and feet due to complete SCI below T5. Time and pain duration since injury was 2 years. Pain intensity was reported on numeric rating scale with an average of 7/10 (0 meaning no pain, 10 meaning the worst imaginable pain), but also with about 8-10 pain attacks during the day with an intensity of 9/10, which lasted between some minutes and half an hour. SCS was applied below the level of injury at-level T11-L1. After a successful 2 weeks testing period the pulse generator has been implanted permanently with a burst-stimulation pattern. The average pain was reduced to a bearable intensity of 4/10, in addition attacks could be reduced both in frequency and in intensity. This effects lasted for at least three months of follow-up. Even in case of complete SCI, SCS might be effective. Mechanisms of pain relief remain unclear. A modulation of suggested residual spinothalamic tract function may play a role. Further investigation has to be carried out to support this theory.

  11. Determination of the amount of leg length inequality that alters spinal posture in healthy subjects using rasterstereography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Marcel; Rapp, Walter; Przibylla, Anna; Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Leg length inequalities (LLIs) can result in an increased energy consumption, abnormal gait or osteoarthritis of the hip. In a previous study we simulated different LLIs of up to 15 mm and evaluated their effects on the pelvic position and spinal posture. We found a correlation between LLIs and resulting changes of the pelvic position. Despite suggestions in the literature we were not able to detect significant changes of the spinal posture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the amount of LLI that would in fact alter the spinal posture. The subjects were placed on a simulation platform, whose height could be precisely controlled by the measuring device, to simulate different LLIs of up to 20 mm. For LLIs >20 mm, additional precision-cut wooden blocks were used under one foot. After an adaptation period the resulting changes of the pelvis and spine were measured with a rasterstereographic device. We found a significant correlation between platform height changes and changes of the pelvic position. The frontal spinal parameters surface rotation and lateral deviation changed significantly when simulating differences greater than 20 mm. No changes of the sagittal spinal curvature were measured, however, a trend to decreasing kyphotic angles was noted. Our study has shown for the first time that LLIs >20 mm will lead to significant changes in the spinal posture of healthy test subjects. However, these changes were only found in frontal (surface rotation and lateral flexion) spinal parameters, but not in sagittal parameters. Here for the kyphotic angle only a tendency to decreasing angles was noted. We have also found a significant correlation between different leg lengths and changes of the pelvic position. Further, females and males seem to react in the same way to LLIs.

  12. Inflammation-related alterations of lipids after spinal cord injury revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamosaityte, Sandra; Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Koch, Maria; Later, Robert; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers several lipid alterations in nervous tissue. It is characterized by extensive demyelination and the inflammatory response leads to accumulation of activated microglia/macrophages, which often transform into foam cells by accumulation of lipid droplets after engulfment of the damaged myelin sheaths. Using an experimental rat model, Raman microspectroscopy was applied to retrieve the modifications of the lipid distribution following SCI. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and endogenous two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopies were used for the detection of lipid-laden inflammatory cells. The Raman mapping of CH2 deformation mode intensity at 1440 cm-1 retrieved the lipid-depleted injury core. Preserved white matter and inflammatory regions with myelin fragmentation and foam cells were localized by specifically addressing the distribution of esterified lipids, i.e., by mapping the intensity of the carbonyl Raman band at 1743 cm-1, and were in agreement with CARS/TPEF microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the inflammatory regions are notably rich in saturated fatty acids. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy enabled to specifically detect inflammation after SCI and myelin degradation products.

  13. Estrogen alters baseline and inflammatory-induced cytokine levels independent from hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Amador, Nicole; Abrams, Lisa; Hunter, Deirtra; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2015-04-01

    Although estrogen reduces inflammatory-mediated pain responses, the mechanisms behind its effects are unclear. This study investigated if estrogen modulates inflammatory signaling by reducing baseline or inflammation-induced cytokine levels in the injury-site, serum, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and/or spinal cord. We further tested whether estrogen effects on cytokine levels are in part mediated through hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation. Lumbar DRG, spinal cord, serum, and hind paw tissue were analyzed for cytokine levels in 17β-estradiol-(20%) or vehicle-(100% cholesterol) treated female rats following ovariectomy/sham adrenalectomy (OVX), adrenalectomy/sham ovariectomy (ADX) or ADX+OVX operation at baseline and post formalin injection. Formalin significantly increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 levels in the paw, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in the DRG, spinal cord and serum in comparison to naïve conditions. Estrogen replacement significantly increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in the DRG. Centrally, estradiol significantly decreased pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β levels, as well as IL-10 levels, in the spinal cord in comparison to cholesterol treatment. At both sites, most estradiol modulatory effects occurred irrespective of pain or surgical condition. Estradiol alone had no influence on cytokine release in the paw or serum, indicating that estrogen effects were site-specific. Although cytokine levels were altered between surgical conditions at baseline and following formalin administration, ADX operation did not significantly reverse estradiol's modulation of cytokine levels. These results suggest that estrogen directly regulates cytokines independent of HPA axis activity in vivo, in part by reducing cytokine levels in the spinal cord.

  14. Comparison of Spinal Block Levels between Laboring and Nonlaboring Parturients Using Combined Spinal Epidural Technique with Intrathecal Plain Bupivacaine

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    Yu-Ying Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It was suggested that labor may influence the spread of intrathecal bupivacaine using combined spinal epidural (CSE technique. However, no previous studies investigated this proposition. We designed this study to investigate the spinal block characteristics of plain bupivacaine between nonlaboring and laboring parturients using CSE technique. Methods. Twenty-five nonlaboring (Group NL and twenty-five laboring parturients (Group L undergoing cesarean delivery were enrolled. Following identification of the epidural space at the L3-4 interspace, plain bupivacaine 10 mg was administered intrathecally using CSE technique. The level of sensory block, degree of motor block, and hemodynamic changes were assessed. Results. The baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP and the maximal decrease of SBP in Group L were significantly higher than those in Group NL (=0.002 and =0.03, resp.. The median sensory level tested by cold stimulation was T6 for Group NL and T5 for Group L (=0.46. The median sensory level tested by pinprick was T7 for both groups (=0.35. The degree of motor block was comparable between the two groups (=0.85. Conclusion. We did not detect significant differences in the sensory block levels between laboring and nonlaboring parturients using CSE technique with intrathecal plain bupivacaine.

  15. Noninvasive respiratory management of high level spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R

    2012-03-01

    This article describes noninvasive acute and long-term management of the respiratory muscle paralysis of high spinal cord injury (SCI). This includes full-setting, continuous ventilatory support by noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIV) to support inspiratory muscles and mechanically assisted coughing (MAC) to support inspiratory and expiratory muscles. The NIV and MAC can also be used to extubate or decannulate 'unweanable' patients with SCI, to prevent intercurrent respiratory tract infections from developing into pneumonia and acute respiratory failure (ARF), and to eliminate tracheostomy and resort to costly electrophrenic/diaphragm pacing (EPP/DP) for most ventilator users, while permitting glossopharyngeal breathing (GPB) for security in the event of ventilator failure.

  16. Alterations in multidimensional motor unit number index of hand muscles after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply a novel multidimensional motor unit number index (MD-MUNIX) technique to examine hand muscles in patients with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The MD-MUNIX was estimated from the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and different levels of surface interference pattern electromyogram (EMG) at multiple directions of voluntary isometric muscle contraction. The MD-MUNIX was applied in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), thenar and hypothenar muscles of SCI (n = 12) and healthy control (n = 12) subjects. The results showed that the SCI subjects had significantly smaller CMAP and MD-MUNIX in all the three examined muscles, compared to those derived from the healthy control subjects. The multidimensional motor unit size index (MD-MUSIX) demonstrated significantly larger values for the FDI and hypothenar muscles in SCI subjects than those from healthy control subjects, whereas the MD-MUSIX enlargement was marginally significant for the thenar muscles. The findings from the MD-MUNIX analyses provide an evidence of motor unit loss in hand muscles of cervical SCI patients, contributing to hand function deterioration.

  17. Persistent at-level thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia accompany chronic neuronal and astrocyte activation in superficial dorsal horn following mouse cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jaime L; Hala, Tamara J; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  18. GDNF plasma levels in spina bifida: correlation with severity of spinal damage and motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, Antonio; Rendeli, Claudia; Antonelli, Alessia; Barone, Giuseppe; Focarelli, Benedetta; Tabacco, Fabrizia; Massimi, Luca; Ausili, Emanuele

    2008-12-01

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is one of several powerful survival factors for spinal motoneurons that play a key role in sprouting, synaptic plasticity, and reorganization after spinal cord damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of GDNF in plasma of children with spina bifida (SB) and to determine its correlation with both the severity of spinal cord damage and the motor function of these patients. To measure the GDNF expression, we collected plasma samples from 152 children with SB and in 149 matched controls. Endogenous GDNF levels were quantified using a two-site immuno-enzymatic assay. The statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney two-tailed two-sample test. In children with SB the mean levels of GDNF (131.2 +/- 69.6 pg/mL) were significantly higher (p spine injury.

  19. Effects of polarization in low-level laser therapy of spinal cord injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Obara, Minoru

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a promising approach to treat the spinal cord injury (SCI). Since nerve fibers have optical anisotropy, propagation of light in the spinal tissue might be affected by its polarization direction. However, the effect of polarization on the efficacy of LLLT has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of polarization on the efficacy of near-infrared LLLT for SCI. Rat spinal cord was injured with a weight-drop device. The lesion site was irradiated with an 808-nm diode laser beam that was transmitted through a polarizing filter immediately after injury and daily for five consecutive days. The laser power at the injured spinal cord surface was 25 mW, and the dosage per day was 9.6 J/cm2 (spot diameter, 2 cm; irradiation duration, 1200 s). Functional recovery was assessed daily by an open-field test. The results showed that the functional scores of the SCI rats that were treated with 808-nm laser irradiation were significantly higher than those of the SCI alone group (Group 1) from day 5 after injury, regardless of the polarization direction. Importantly, as compared to the locomotive function of the SCI rats that were treated with the perpendicularly-polarized laser parallel to the spinal column (Group 2), that of the SCI rats that were irradiated with the linearly aligned polarization (Group 3) was significantly improved from day 10 after injury. In addition, the ATP contents in the injured spinal tissue of Group 3, which were measured immediately after laser irradiation, were moderately higher than those of Group 2. These observations are attributable to the deeper penetration of the parallelpolarized light in the anisotropic spinal tissue, suggesting that polarization direction significantly affects the efficacy of LLLT for SCI.

  20. Motor alterations induced by chronic 4-aminopyridine infusion in the spinal cord in vivo: role of glutamate and GABA receptors

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    Rafael eLazo-Gómez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron degeneration is the pathological hallmark of motor neuron diseases, a group of neurodegenerative disorders clinically manifested as muscle fasciculations and hyperreflexia, followed by paralysis, respiratory failure and death. Ample evidence supports a role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in motor death. In previous work we showed that stimulation of glutamate release from nerve endings by perfusion of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP in the rat hippocampus induces seizures and neurodegeneration, and that AMPA insusion in the spinal cord produces paralysis and motor neuron death. On these bases, in this work we have tested the effect of the chronic infusion of 4-AP in the spinal cord, using implanted osmotic minipumps, on motor activity and on motor neuron survival, and the mechanisms underlying this effect. 4-AP produced muscle fasciculations and motor deficits assessed in two motor tests, which start 2-3 h after the implant, which ameliorated spontaneously within 6-7 days, but no neurodegeneration. These effects were prevented by both AMPA and NMDA receptors blockers. The role of GABAA receptors was also explored, and we found that chronic infusion of bicuculline induced moderate motor neuron degeneration and enhanced the hyperexcitation produced by 4-AP. Unexpectedly, the GABAAR agonist muscimol also induced motor deficits and failed to prevent the MN death induced by AMPA. We conclude that motor alterations induced by chronic 4-AP infusion in the spinal cord in vivo is due to ionotropic glutamate receptor overactivation and that blockade of GABAergic neurotransmission induces motor neuron death under chronic conditions. These results shed light on the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the regulation of motor neuron excitability in the spinal cord.

  1. Alterations in Cortical Sensorimotor Connectivity following Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective Resting-State fMRI Study.

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    Akinwunmi Oni-Orisan

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have demonstrated alterations during task-induced brain activation in spinal cord injury (SCI patients. The interruption to structural integrity of the spinal cord and the resultant disrupted flow of bidirectional communication between the brain and the spinal cord might contribute to the observed dynamic reorganization (neural plasticity. However, the effect of SCI on brain resting-state connectivity patterns remains unclear. We undertook a prospective resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI study to explore changes to cortical activation patterns following SCI. With institutional review board approval, rs-fMRI data was obtained in eleven patients with complete cervical SCI (>2 years post injury and nine age-matched controls. The data was processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimages software. Region of interest (ROI based analysis was performed to study changes in the sensorimotor network using pre- and post-central gyri as seed regions. Two-sampled t-test was carried out to check for significant differences between the two groups. SCI patients showed decreased functional connectivity in motor and sensory cortical regions when compared to controls. The decrease was noted in ipsilateral, contralateral, and interhemispheric regions for left and right precentral ROIs. Additionally, the left postcentral ROI demonstrated increased connectivity with the thalamus bilaterally in SCI patients. Our results suggest that cortical activation patterns in the sensorimotor network undergo dynamic reorganization following SCI. The presence of these changes in chronic spinal cord injury patients is suggestive of the inherent neural plasticity within the central nervous system.

  2. Creatine uptake in mouse hearts with genetically altered creatine levels

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Creatine plays an important role in energy metabolism in the heart. Cardiomyocytes accumulate creatine via a specific creatine transporter (CrT), the capacity of which is reduced in the failing heart, resulting in lower myocardial creatine concentration. Therefore, to gain insight into how the CrT is regulated, we studied two mouse models of severely altered myocardial creatine levels. Cardiac creatine uptake levels were measured in isolated hearts from creatine-free guanidinoacetate-N-methyl...

  3. Correlation between Serum Level of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 and Postoperative Recurrence of Spinal Tuberculosis in the Chinese Han Population.

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    Dan He

    Full Text Available To correlate serum level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 with postoperative recurrence of spinal tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population.Patients of Han nationality with newly diagnosed spinal tuberculosis were consecutively included in this study. At different time points postoperatively, serum level of MCP-1 was determined using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Recurrence of spinal tuberculosis after surgery and during the follow-up period was recorded. The correlation between serum MCP-1 level and recurrence of spinal tuberculosis was analyzed.A total of 169 patients with spinal tuberculosis were included in the study and followed up for an average of 2.2 ± 1.3 years (range, 1-5 years. Of these patients, 11 had postoperative recurrence of spinal tuberculosis. The patients' serum level of MCP-1 increased significantly after postoperative recurrence of spinal tuberculosis. Once the symptoms of recurrence were cured, the serum level of MCP-1 decreased significantly and it did not differ from patients without disease recurrence.Postoperative recurrence of spinal tuberculosis is likely to increase the serum level of MCP-1.

  4. Spinal canal stenosis at the level of Atlas

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    Suchanda Bhattacharjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a rare case of high cervical stenosis at the level of atlas who presented with progressively deteriorating quadriparesis and respiratory distress. A 10-year-old boy presented with above symptoms of one-year duration with a preceding history of trivial trauma prior to onset of such symptoms. Cervical spine MRI revealed a significant stenosis at the level of atlas from the posterior side with a syrinx extending above and below. High-resolution computed tomography of the above level yielded an ill-defined osseous bar compressing the canal at the level of C 1 posterior arch, which appeared bifid in the midline. The patient was immediately taken up for surgery in view of his respiratory complaints. The child showed an excellent recovery after excision of the posterior arch of atlas and removal of the compressing osseous structure.

  5. Alteration of Excitatory Amino Acid in Experimental Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁; 罗永湘

    2002-01-01

    Objective To detect the effect of excitatory amino acid (EAA) in the sec-ondary damage following spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Glutamate (Glu) and Aspartate(Asp) on the injury site (T8) were studied using a rat SCI model induced by Allen's weight drop method(10g×2.5cm). The result suggested that Asp and Glu were significantly increased in 10 min. Re-sults Glu was significantly decreased from 2 h to 24 h,while Asp was a little reduced in 2 h,andslightly rose in 4 h as compared with Control Group. Though elevated in 8 h, it dropped again in 24 h ascompared with Control Group. Conclusion The result indicates that the rise of EAA following SCIcould be the cause of the secondary spinal cord damage.

  6. Altering spinal cord excitability enables voluntary movements after chronic complete paralysis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Claudia A; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Harkema, Susan J

    2014-05-01

    Previously, we reported that one individual who had a motor complete, but sensory incomplete spinal cord injury regained voluntary movement after 7 months of epidural stimulation and stand training. We presumed that the residual sensory pathways were critical in this recovery. However, we now report in three more individuals voluntary movement occurred with epidural stimulation immediately after implant even in two who were diagnosed with a motor and sensory complete lesion. We demonstrate that neuromodulating the spinal circuitry with epidural stimulation, enables completely paralysed individuals to process conceptual, auditory and visual input to regain relatively fine voluntary control of paralysed muscles. We show that neuromodulation of the sub-threshold motor state of excitability of the lumbosacral spinal networks was the key to recovery of intentional movement in four of four individuals diagnosed as having complete paralysis of the legs. We have uncovered a fundamentally new intervention strategy that can dramatically affect recovery of voluntary movement in individuals with complete paralysis even years after injury.

  7. Low-level laser therapy for spinal cord injury in rats: effects of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Obara, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The effects of laser polarization on the efficacy of near-infrared low-level laser therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) are presented. Rat spinal cords were injured with a weight-drop device, and the lesion sites were directly irradiated with a linearly polarized 808-nm diode laser positioned either perpendicular or parallel to the spine immediately after the injury and daily for five consecutive days. Functional recovery was assessed daily by an open-field test. Regardless of the polarization direction, functional scores of SCI rats that were treated with the 808-nm laser irradiation were significantly higher than those of SCI alone group (Group 1) from day 5 after injury. The locomotive function of SCI rats irradiated parallel to the spinal column (Group 3) was significantly improved from day 10 after injury, compared to SCI rats treated with the linear polarization perpendicular to the spinal column (Group 2). There were no significant differences in ATP contents in the injured tissue among the three groups. We speculate that the higher efficacy with parallel irradiation is attributable to the deeper light penetration into tissue with anisotropic scattering. PMID:24030687

  8. Tributyltin exposure alters cytokine levels in mouse serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Shanieek; Pellom, Samuel T; Shanker, Anil; Whalen, Margaret M

    2016-11-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a toxic environmental contaminant, has been widely utilized for various industrial, agricultural and household purposes. Its usage has led to a global contamination and its bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms and terrestrial mammals. Previous studies suggest that TBT has debilitating effects on the overall immune function of animals, rendering them more vulnerable to diseases. TBT (at concentrations that have been detected in human blood) alters secretion of inflammatory cytokines from human lymphocytes ex vivo. Thus, it is important to determine if specified levels of TBT can alter levels of cytokines in an in vivo system. Mice were exposed to biologically relevant concentrations of TBT (200, 100 or 25 nM final concentrations). The quantitative determination of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL2, IL5, IL7, IL12βp40, IL13, IL15, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP), MIP2 and regulated on activation normal T-cell-expressed and secreted (RANTES) was performed in mouse sera by MAGPIX analysis and Western blot. Results indicated alterations (both decreases and increases) in several cytokines. The pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-2, IL5, IL12βp40 and IL-15 were altered as were the chemokines MIP-1 and RANTES and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-13. Increases in IFNγ and TNFα were seen in the serum of mice exposed to TBT for less than 24 h. Levels of IL1β, IL-12 βp40, IL-5 and IL-15 were also modulated in mouse serum, depending on the specific experiment and exposure level. IL-2 was consistently decreased in mouse serum when animals were exposed to TBT. There were also TBT-induced increases in MIP-1β, RANTES and IL-13. These results from human and murine samples clearly suggest that TBT exposures modulate the secretion inflammatory cytokines.

  9. Spinal cord response to altered fractionation and re-irradiation: Radiobiological considerations and role of bioeffect models

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    Supe Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    decision in treating in such a condition is even more complex than the original condition and requires knowledge of the kinetics of decay of occult injury of the previous treatment. To test the validity of ERD, clinically reported data of altered fractionation to the spinal cord for 7 patients reported by Wong et al , Saunders et al and Bogaert et al , were analysed, ERD values were calculated and compared with compiled clinical literature data of 3233 patients for the incidence of spinal cord myelitis reported by Cohen and Creditor, Wara et al , Abbatucci et al and Jeremic et al for conventional fractionation. ERD values were estimated with α/β of 2.5 Gy for the conventional and altered fractionation data. To test the validity of TE concept for clinical data of re-irradiation tolerance of the spinal cord, the data of the 22 patients compiled by Nieder et al were used. Clinical data compiled from the literature of Cohen and Creditor, Wara et al , Abbatucci et al and Jeremic et al , were used for comparison.

  10. Plasma levels of beta-endorphin and serotonin in response to specific spinal based exercises

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    O. Sokunbi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercises as the primary mode of treatment for low back disorders aim to achieve pain reduction, improvement in functional abilityand quality of life of for low back disorder sufferers. However the bio-chemical events associated with the use of these exercises in terms of theireffects on pain relieving neuropeptides have not been well established. Thisstudy was carried out to investigate the effects of spinal stabilisation, backextension and treadmill walking exercises on plasma levels of serotonin andbeta-endorphin.Twenty volunteers (10 males and 10 females without low back pain participated in the study. They were randomly allocated either to one of theexercise groups, where participants carried out one of the spinal stabilisation, back extension and treadmill walkingexercises or the control (no exercise group. The main outcome measures used in this study were plasma levels of serotonin and beta-endorphin measured with Enzyme linked immuno absorbent assay (ELISA technique.The results of this study showed that spinal stabilisation and treadmill walking exercises produced significantincrease in plasma serotonin levels (P < 0.05 however there were no significant changes in the plasma levels of beta-endorphin in all the exercise groups (P > 0.05.It could be that biochemical effects associated with stabilisation and treadmill walking exercises therefore mayinvolve production of serotonin and its release into the plasma.

  11. Decreased MHC I expression in IFN gamma mutant mice alters synaptic elimination in the spinal cord after peripheral injury

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    Victório Sheila CS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histocompatibility complex (MHC class I expression in the central nervous system (CNS regulates synaptic plasticity events during development and adult life. Its upregulation may be associated with events such as axotomy, cytokine exposition and changes in neuron electrical activity. Since IFNγ is a potent inducer of the MHC I expression, the present work investigated the importance of this pro-inflammatory cytokine in the synaptic elimination process in the spinal cord, as well as the motor recovery of IFN−/−, following peripheral injury. Methods The lumbar spinal cords of C57BL/6J (wild type and IFNγ−/− (mutant mice, subjected to unilateral sciatic nerve transection, were removed and processed for immunohistochemistry and real time RT-PCR, while the sciatic nerves from animals subjected to unilateral crush, were submitted to immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy for counting of the axons. Gait recovery was monitored using the Cat Walk system. Newborn mice astrocyte primary cultures were established in order to study the astrocytic respose in the absence of the IFNγ expression. Results IFNγ−/− mutant mice showed a decreased expression of MHC I and β2-microglobulin mRNA coupled with reduced synaptophysin immunolabelling in the lesioned spinal cord segment. Following unilateral nerve transection, the Iba-1 (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP reactivities increased equally in both strains. In vitro, the astrocytes demonstrated similar GFAP levels, but the proliferation rate was higher in the wild type mice. In the crushed nerves (distal stump, neurofilaments and p75NTR immunolabeling were upregulated in the mutant mice as compared to the wild type and an improvement in locomotor recovery was observed. Conclusion The present results show that a lack of IFNγ affects the MHC I expression and the synaptic elimination process in the spinal cord. Such

  12. 50 years follow-up on plasma creatinine levels after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmelund, Marlene; Oturai, P S; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the role of plasma creatinine (p-creatinine) in monitoring renal deterioration in patients up to 50 years after spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: The Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. METHODS: A total...... of 119 patients with a traumatic SCI during the years 1944-1975 were included in the study. P-creatinine measurements, results from renography and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured with 51Cr-EDTA clearance were obtained from medical records and analyzed using a linear mixed model and linear...... regression analyses. RESULTS: When compared with median p-creatinine level in the first 5-year period after injury, the level of p-creatinine was stable throughout the first 30 years and decreased significantly after the 30th until 45th year post injury. Only patients with a functional distribution outside...

  13. Spinal Cord Swelling and Alterations in Hydrostatic Pressure After Acute Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    SCI .!Performing!a!duraplasty!to! expand !the!space!around!the!spinal...8217( SCI )’ in’a’porcine’ model’could’improve’longHterm’functional’outcome’after’injury.’We’finalized’the󈧐Hweek’PTIBS’analysis’as’well’as...8217Our’data’suggest’that’duraplasty’surgery’might’ improve’functional’recovery’early’ after’ SCI ’ compared’ to’SCIHanimals’without’ duraplasty.’

  14. Spaceflight-induced bone loss alters failure mode and reduces bending strength in murine spinal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg-Johansen, Britta; Liebenberg, Ellen C; Li, Alfred; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation rates are quadrupled in astronauts following spaceflight. While bending motions are main contributors to herniation, the effects of microgravity on the bending properties of spinal discs are unknown. Consequently, the goal of this study was to quantify the bending properties of tail discs from mice with or without microgravity exposure. Caudal motion segments from six mice returned from a 30-day Bion M1 mission and eight vivarium controls were loaded to failure in four-point bending. After testing, specimens were processed using histology to determine the location of failure, and adjacent motion segments were scanned with micro-computed tomography (μCT) to quantify bone properties. We observed that spaceflight significantly shortened the nonlinear toe region of the force-displacement curve by 32% and reduced the bending strength by 17%. Flight mouse spinal segments tended to fail within the growth plate and epiphyseal bone, while controls tended to fail at the disc-vertebra junction. Spaceflight significantly reduced vertebral bone volume fraction, bone mineral density, and trabecular thickness, which may explain the tendency of flight specimens to fail within the epiphyseal bone. Together, these results indicate that vertebral bone loss during spaceflight may degrade spine bending properties and contribute to increased disc herniation risk in astronauts.

  15. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with acute spinal cord injury revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

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    Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity.Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores.Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as potential biomarkers for

  16. Effects of L-lysine monohydrochloride on insulin and blood glucose levels in spinal cord injured rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tian-ling; ZHAO Yu-wu; LIU Xue-yuan; DING Su-ju

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia in brain and spinal cord could aggravate neurologic impairment. Recent studies showed that L-lysine monohydrochlonde (LMH) could increase the insulin secretion and regulate the blood glucose level. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of LMH on pancreatic islet B cells, the levels of endogenous insulin and blood glucose in spinal cord injured rats.Methods Forty male Wistar rats were divided into four groups, namely, normal control group, model group, high-dose LMH group (621.5 mg/kg equal to LMH 1/8 LD50), and low-dose LMH group (310.8 mg/kg equal to LMH 1/16 LD50). The model of spinal cord injured rat was established by hemi-transection at the lower right thoracic spinal cord. LMH was administered via intraperitoneal injection once spinal cord injury was produced in rats. All rats were sacrificed 48 hours after spinal cord injured. The effects of LMH on pancreatic islet B cells, the content of endogenous insulin, end the level of blood glucose were observed with immunohistochemical method, radioimmunoassay method, end biochemical analyzer, respectively. Results The insulin immunohistochemical intensities of islet B cells were significantly weaker in model group then those in normal control group (P 0.05). Conclusion LMH, but dose-dependent, might participate in the regulation of pancreatic islet B cells, and then reduce the blood glucose levels in the spinal cord injured rats.

  17. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation.

  18. Alterations in the neural circuits from peripheral afferents to the spinal cord: possible implications for diabetic polyneuropathy in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats

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    Zhen-Zhen eKou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN presents as a wide variety of sensorimotor symptoms and affects approximately 50% of diabetic patients. Changes in the neural circuits may occur in the early stages in diabetes and are implicated in the development of DPN. Therefore, we aimed to detect changes in the expression of isolectin B4 (IB4, the marker for nonpeptidergic unmyelinated fibers and their cell bodies and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, the marker for peptidergic fibers and their cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG and spinal cord of streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic rats showing alterations in sensory and motor function. We also used cholera toxin B subunit (CTB to show the morphological changes of the myelinated fibers and motor neurons. STZ-induced diabetic rats exhibited hyperglycemia, decreased body weight gain, mechanical allodynia and impaired locomotor activity. In the DRG and spinal dorsal horn, IB4-labeled structures decreased, but both CGRP immunostaining and CTB labeling increased from day 14 to day 28 in diabetic rats. In spinal ventral horn, CTB labeling decreased in motor neurons in diabetic rats. Treatment with intrathecal injection of insulin at the early stages of DPN could alleviate mechanical allodynia and impaired locomotor activity in diabetic rats. The results suggest that the alterations of the neural circuits between spinal nerve and spinal cord via the DRG and ventral root might be involved in DPN.

  19. ALTERATIONS INDUCED BY LOW LEVELS OF DEOXYNIVALENOL IN WEANED PIGLETS

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    DANIELA ELIZA MARIN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin produced by different species of Fusarium genus that may contaminate feed and food. In the present study we investigated the effect of low levels of DON on the modulation of performance, hemodynamic parameters, cellular and humoral immune response in weaned pigs. Histological alterations in different organ tissues were also analyzed. Our results showed that a short in vivo exposure (14 days of weanling piglets to 0; 0.5; 1.5 mg/day of DON significantly induced a dose dependent increase of cellular immune response (lymphocytes proliferation and leucocytes numbers. The 0.5 and 1.5 mg/day of DON modulated also the humoral immune response by increasing the immunoglobulin A synthesis with 7.32 % and 37.98 % and by decreasing that of immunoglubulin G with 11.15 % and 36.87 %, respectively when compared with the control. DON produced also alterations in the hemodynamic parameters of intoxicated piglets; the activity of lactate dehydrogenase significantly increased while the activity of L-glutamate, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine significantly decreased. Both doses of the toxin induced microscopic alterations of the internal organ structure. By contrast, ingestion of the contaminated material had no effect on the performance (weight gain, feed consumption, and feed efficiency, organ weights, and total serum concentration of cholesterol, calcium, sodium and potassium. Taken together these results suggest that even when present at low level DON can affect blood parameters, humoral and cellular immune response in weaned piglets with a significant importance for the swine health.

  20. Alterations of thoraco-abdominal volumes and asynchronies in patients with spinal muscle atrophy type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMauro, Antonella; Romei, Marianna; Priori, Rita; Laviola, Marianna; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Aliverti, Andrea

    2014-06-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by degeneration of motor neurons resulting in muscle weakness. For the mild type III form, a sub-classification into type IIIA and IIIB, based on age of motor impairment, was recently proposed. To investigate if SMA IIIA (more severe) and IIIB differ also in terms of respiratory function, thoracoabdominal kinematics was measured during quiet breathing, inspiration preceding cough and inspiratory capacity on 5 type IIIA and 9 type IIIB patients. Four patients with SMA II (more severe than types III) and 19 healthy controls were also studied. Rib cage motion was similar in SMA IIIB and controls. Conversely, in SMA IIIA and SMA II it was significantly reduced and sometime paradoxical during quiet breathing in supine position. Our results suggest that in SMA IIIA intercostal muscles are weakened and the diaphragm is preserved similarly to SMA II, while in SMA IIIB the action of all inspiratory muscles is maintained. Sub-classification of type III seems feasible also for respiratory function.

  1. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anthropogenic noise alters bat activity levels and echolocation calls

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    Jessie P. Bunkley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative impacts from anthropogenic noise are well documented for many wildlife taxa. Investigations of the effects of noise on bats however, have not been conducted outside of the laboratory. Bats that hunt arthropods rely on auditory information to forage. Part of this acoustic information can fall within the spectrum of anthropogenic noise, which can potentially interfere with signal reception and processing. Compressor stations associated with natural gas extraction produce broadband noise 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. With over half a million producing gas wells in the U.S. this infrastructure is a major source of noise pollution across the landscape. We conducted a ‘natural experiment’ in the second largest gas extraction field in the U.S. to investigate the potential effects of gas compressor station noise on the activity levels of the local bat assemblage. We used acoustic monitoring to compare the activity level (number of minutes in a night with a bat call of the bat assemblage at sites with compressor stations to sites lacking this infrastructure. We found that activity levels for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis were 40% lower at loud compressor sites compared to quieter well pads, whereas the activity levels of four other species (Myotis californicus, M. cillolabrum, M. lucifugus, Parastrellus hesperus were not affected by noise. Furthermore, our results reveal that the assemblage of bat species emitting low frequency (35 kHz echolocation did not exhibit altered activity levels in noise. Lower activity levels of Brazilian free-tailed bats at loud sites indicate a potential reduction in habitat for this species. Additionally, a comparison of echolocation search calls produced by free-tailed bats at sites with and without compressor stations reveal that this species modifies its echolocation search calls in noise—producing longer calls with a narrower bandwidth. Call alterations might affect prey

  3. Altered distribution of interstitial cells and innervation in the rat urinary bladder following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Louise; Cunningham, Rebecca M J; Young, John S; Fry, Christopher H; McMurray, Gordon; Eccles, Rachel; McCloskey, Karen D

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the distribution of interstitial cells (IC) are reportedly associated with dysfunctional bladder. This study investigated whether spinal cord injury (SCI) resulted in changes to IC subpopulations (vimentin-positive with the ultrastructural profile of IC), smooth muscle and nerves within the bladder wall and correlated cellular remodelling with functional properties. Bladders from SCI (T8/9 transection) and sham-operated rats 5 weeks post-injury were used for ex vivo pressure-volume experiments or processed for morphological analysis with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and light/confocal microscopy. Pressure-volume relationships revealed low-pressure, hypercompliance in SCI bladders indicative of decompensation. Extensive networks of vimentin-positive IC were typical in sham lamina propria and detrusor but were markedly reduced post-SCI; semi-quantitative analysis showed significant reduction. Nerves labelled with anti-neurofilament and anti-vAChT were notably decreased post-SCI. TEM revealed lamina propria IC and detrusor IC which formed close synaptic-like contacts with vesicle-containing nerve varicosities in shams. Lamina propria and detrusor IC were ultrastructurally damaged post-SCI with retracted/lost cell processes and were adjacent to areas of cellular debris and neuronal degradation. Smooth muscle hypertrophy was common to SCI tissues. In conclusion, IC populations in bladder wall were decreased 5 weeks post-SCI, accompanied with reduced innervation, smooth muscle hypertrophy and increased compliance. These novel findings indicate that bladder wall remodelling post-SCI affects the integrity of interactions between smooth muscle, nerves and IC, with compromised IC populations. Correlation between IC reduction and a hypercompliant phenotype suggests that disruption to bladder IC contribute to pathophysiological processes underpinning the dysfunctional SCI bladder.

  4. Differential protein levels and post-translational modifications in spinal cord injury of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Brejnikow, Mika; Kang, Sung Ung; Vishwanath, Vinay; Walder, Nadja; Herkner, Kurt; Redl, Heinz; Lubec, Gert

    2010-03-05

    Although changes in protein expression in spinal cord injury (SCI) would be of pivotal interest, information so far is limited. It was therefore the aim of the study to determine protein levels and post-translational modifications in the early phase following SCI in the rat. SCI was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats and sham operated rats served as controls. A gel-based proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by quantification with specific software and subsequent identification of differentially expressed proteins by nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS was applied. Proteins of several pathways and cascades were dysregulated in SCI: 14-3-3 epsilon protein, dynein light chain 1, and tubulin beta-5 chain showed higher levels in SCI, whereas adenylyl cyclase associated protein 1, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, F-actin capping protein subunit beta, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and transthyretin showed lower levels in the injured tissue. Post-translational modifications indicated free oxygen radical attack on proteins in SCI. The occurrence of stress is indicated by deranged stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and signaling abnormalities are reflected by adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and 14-3-3 epsilon protein. The findings propose the involvement of the corresponding cascades and challenge further work into aberrant signaling and oxidative stress in SCI, which may form the basis for experimental intervention for spinal cord trauma.

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor components in human and rat spinal trigeminal nucleus and spinal cord at C1-level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    was expressed in fibers of laminae I and II. The CGRP staining was similar in rat, except for CGRP positive neurons that were found close to the central canal. In C1, the receptor components were detected in laminae I and II, however these fibers were distinct from fibers expressing CGRP as verified by confocal...... to regions in the brainstem with Aδ- and C-fibers; this constitutes an essential part of the pain pathways activated in migraine attacks. Therefore it is of importance to identify the regions within the brainstem that processes nociceptive information from the trigeminovascular system, such as the spinal...... trigeminal nucleus (STN) and the C1-level of the spinal cord. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the distribution and relation between CGRP and its receptor components - calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) - in human and rat STN and at the C1-level...

  6. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Alters Corticospinal Output in Patients with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter J. Fassett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS is intended primarily to alter corticospinal excitability, creating an attractive opportunity to alter neural output following incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI. This study is the first to assess the effects of iTBS in SCI. Eight individuals with chronic incomplete SCI were studied. Sham or real iTBS was delivered (to each participant over primary motor and somatosensory cortices in separate sessions. Motor-evoked potential (MEP recruitment curves were obtained from the flexor carpi radialis muscle before and after iTBS. Results indicate similar responses for iTBS to both motor and somatosensory cortex and reduced MEPs in 56.25% and increased MEPs in 25% of instances. Sham stimulation exceeded real iTBS effects in the remaining 18.25%. It is our opinion that observing short-term neuroplasticity in corticospinal output in chronic SCI is an important advance and should be tested in future studies as an opportunity to improve function in this population. We emphasize the need to re-consider the importance of the direction of MEP change following a single session of iTBS since the relationship between MEP direction and motor function is unknown and multiple sessions of iTBS may yield very different directional results. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of including sham control in the experimental design. The fundamental point from this pilot research is that a single session of iTBS is often capable of creating short-term change in SCI. Future sham-controlled randomized trials may consider repeat iTBS sessions to promote long-term changes in corticospinal excitability.

  7. The effect of spinal cord level on sexual function in the spina bifida population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N G; Andrews, E; Rosoklija, I; Logvinenko, T; Johnson, E K; Oates, R D; Estrada, C R

    2015-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction and infertility are prevalent in the spina bifida (SB) population; however, the mechanism of how they affect a person with spina bifida is poorly understood. Additionally, the management of children with spina bifida becomes more difficult as they exit from pediatric institutes. The present study sought to evaluate sexual health (using validated questionnaires) and fertility in adults with spina bifida and to correlate spinal cord level and ambulatory status with degree of sexual function. After institutional board review approval, 199 adult patients with SB, aged 18 and older and who were followed in one pediatric institution, were identified. Patients who were non-English speaking, cognitively and/or developmentally delayed, or unable to be contacted were excluded. Surveys regarding demographics, sexual health and infertility were mailed to the patients and administered in the clinic with the option to opt-out of the survey. Survey questions regarding sexual health were constructed using validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) for females, and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) for males. Sexual dysfunction scores were correlated to the patients' spinal level and ambulatory status. Of the 121 eligible patients, 45 replied, with a response rate of 39%. For females, using a cut-off value of 26.5 for FSFI scoring, 25 out of 28 (89%) had sexual dysfunction. No association was seen between spinal level or ambulatory status and overall FSFI, satisfaction, or desire scores. For males, 10 out of 17 (59%) had severe erectile dysfunction (ED), and one out of 17 (6%) had no ED. No association was seen between ambulatory status and sexual function scores for the males. However, SHIM, satisfaction, and ED scores were higher in males with lower spinal lesions. People with spina bifida of both genders tended to have more severe dysfunction compared to those with sexual dysfunction

  8. The role of spinal pathways in dopamine mediated alteration in the tail-flick reflex in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Troels S; Schrøder, H D; Smith, D F

    1984-01-01

    The latency of the tail-flick, following intrathecal infusion of the dopamine (DA) agonist, R-apomorphine was measured in rats with intact spinal cord or with spinal cord lesions. Apomorphine failed to influence the tail-flick response in intact rats, whereas it elevated the latency of the tail-f...

  9. Wnt Signaling Alteration in the Spinal Cord of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice: Special Focus on Frizzled-5 Cellular Expression Pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos González-Fernández

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive paralysis due to degeneration of motor neurons by unknown causes. Recent evidence shows that Wnt signaling is involved in neurodegenerative processes, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. However, to date, little is known regarding the expression of Wnt signaling components in this fatal condition. In the present study we used transgenic SOD1G93A mice to evaluate the expression of several Wnt signaling components, with special focus on Frizzled-5 cellular expression alteration along disease progression.Based on previous studies demonstrating the expression of Wnts and their transcriptional regulation during Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis development, we have analyzed the mRNA expression of several Wnt signaling components in the spinal cord of SOD1G93A transgenic mice at different stages of the disease by using real time quantitative PCR analysis. Strikingly, one of the molecules that seemed not to be altered at mRNA level, Frizzled-5, showed a clear up-regulation at late stages in neurons, as evidenced by immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, increased Frizzled-5 appears to correlate with a decrease in NeuN signal in these cells, suggesting a correlation between neuronal affectation and the increased expression of this receptor.Our data suggest the involvement of Wnt signaling pathways in the pathophysiology of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and, more specifically, the implication of Frizzled-5 receptor in the response of neuronal cells against neurodegeneration. Nevertheless, further experimental studies are needed to shed light on the specific role of Frizzled-5 and the emerging but increasing Wnt family of proteins research field as a potential target for this neuropathology.

  10. Serum levels of acylcarnitines are altered in prediabetic conditions.

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    Manuel Mai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The role of mitochondrial function in the complex pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes is not yet completely understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate serum concentrations of short-, medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines as markers of mitochondrial function in volunteers with normal, impaired or diabetic glucose control. METHODS: Based on a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test, 1019 studied subjects were divided into a group with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 636, isolated impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG; n = 184, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 87 or type 2 diabetes (T2D; n = 112. Serum concentrations of free carnitine and 24 acylcarnitines were measured by mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Serum levels of acetylcarnitine (C2, propionylcarnitine (C3, octanoylcarnitine (C8, malonylcarnitine/hydroxybutyrylcarnitine (C3DC+C4OH, hexanoylcarnitine (C6, octenoylcarnitine (C8:1, decanoylcarnitine (C10, decenoylcarnitine (C10:1, dodecanoylcarnitine (C12, tetradecenoylcarnitine (C14:1, tetradecadienylcarnitine (C14:2, hydroxytetradecanoylcarnitine (C14OH, hydroxyhexadecanoylcarnitine (C16OH and octadecenoylcarnitine (C18:1 were significantly different among the groups (all p<0.05 adjusted for age, gender and BMI. Between the prediabetic states C14:1, C14:2 and C18:1 showed significantly higher serum concentrations in persons with IGT (p<0.05. Compared to T2D the IFG and the IGT subjects showed lower serum concentrations of malonylcarnitine/hydroxybutyrylcarnitine (C3DC+C4OH (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Alterations in serum concentrations of several acylcarnitines, in particular tetradecenoylcarnitine (C14:1, tetradecadienylcarnitine (C14:2, octadecenoylcarnitine (C18:1 and malonylcarnitine/hydroxybutyrylcarnitine (C3DC+C4OH are associated not only with T2D but also with prediabetic states.

  11. Transient Paraparesis After Laminectomy in a Patient with Multi-Level Ossification of the Spinal Ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae-Jun; Doh, Jae-Won; Yoon, Seok-Mann; Bae, Hack-Gun; Yun, Il-Gyu

    2004-01-01

    Acute neurologic deterioration is not a rare event in the surgical decompression for thoracic spinal stenosis. We report a case of transient paraparesis after decompressive laminectomy in a 50-yr-old male patient with multi-level thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum and cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Decompressive laminectomy from T9 to T11 was performed without gross neurological improvement. Two weeks after the first operation, laminoplasty from C4 to C6 and additional decompressive laminectomies of T3, T4, T6, and T8 were performed. Paraparesis developed 3 hr after the second operation, which recovered spontaneously 5 hr thereafter. CT and MRI were immediately performed, but there were no corresponding lesions. Vascular compromise of the borderlines of the arterial supply by microthrombi might be responsible for the paraparesis. PMID:15308861

  12. The serotonergic agonists quipazine, CGS-12066A, and alpha-methylserotonin alter motor activity and induce hindlimb stepping in the intact and spinal rat fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Michele R; Robinson, Scott R

    2005-06-01

    The effects of serotonergic agonists were examined in intact and spinal fetuses, using an in vivo fetal rat preparation. On Gestational Day 20, fetuses were prepared with a midthoracic or sham spinal transection. Dose-response curves were obtained for quipazine (nonselective 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT] agonist; 1.0-10.0 mg/kg), CGS-12066A (5-HT-sub(1B) agonist; 1.0-30.0 mg/kg), and alpha-methylserotonin (alpha-Me-5-HT; 5-HT-sub-2 agonist; 0.2-15.0 mg/kg). During a 10-min test, each of the agonists (delivered via intraperitoneal injection) influenced fetal behavior: They increased the occurrence of head movements, mouthing, and hindlimb stepping. Quipazine and alpha-Me-5-HT also promoted hindlimb activity in spinal fetuses. Thus, stimulation of the fetal 5-HT system modulates motor activity at multiple levels of the developing central nervous system.

  13. Effect of chronic administration of morphine on the gene expression level of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters in rat hippocampus and lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebkohan, Amir; Javan, Mohammad; Satarian, Leila; Ahmadiani, Abolhasan

    2009-07-01

    Chronic morphine leads to dependence, tolerance, and neural apoptosis. Vitamin C inhibits the withdrawal syndrome in morphine-dependent subjects and prevents apoptosis in experimental models. Sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT) type-2 is the main transporter for carrying vitamin C into the brain and neural cells. The mechanism(s) by which vitamin C inhibits morphine dependence in not understood. SVCT activity determines the vitamin C availably within the nervous system. We have examined the alterations in the expression of SVCT1, SVCT2, and its splice variants in morphine-tolerant rats. Morphine (20 mg/kg) was injected twice/day to male rats for either 7 or 14 days. The development of analgesic tolerance was assessed using tail-flick test. Lumbar spinal cord and the hippocampus were isolated for RNA extraction. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method was used to assess the levels of gene expression. Administration of morphine for 7 or 14 days reduced the expression level of SVCT2 in both hippocampus and dorsal lumbar spinal cord of rats. SVCT2 expression was reduced in vitamin C-, and vitamin C combined with morphine-treated animals. Results did not show SVCT2 splice variation. SVCT1 did not express in control or morphine-treated rats. It seems that reduced expression level of SVCT2 might be involved in the development of morphine side effects such as tolerance and dependency.

  14. Investigation of some factors affecting the sensory level of spinal anesthesia: position, baricity, temperature, needle direction and speed of injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Stienstra

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the studies to be presented was to investigate different factors influencing spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine 0.5 %. More specifically, the first study investigated the differences in intrathecal distribution as measured by the maximum sensory level of blockade between t

  15. Investigation of some factors affecting the sensory level of spinal anesthesia: position, baricity, temperature, needle direction and speed of injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Stienstra

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the studies to be presented was to investigate different factors influencing spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine 0.5 %. More specifically, the first study investigated the differences in intrathecal distribution as measured by the maximum sensory level of blockade

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and its receptor components in human and rat spinal trigeminal nucleus and spinal cord at C1-level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftekhari Sajedeh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP has a key role in migraine pathophysiology and is associated with activation of the trigeminovascular system. The trigeminal ganglion, storing CGRP and its receptor components, projects peripheral to the intracranial vasculature and central to regions in the brainstem with Aδ- and C-fibers; this constitutes an essential part of the pain pathways activated in migraine attacks. Therefore it is of importance to identify the regions within the brainstem that processes nociceptive information from the trigeminovascular system, such as the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN and the C1-level of the spinal cord. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the distribution and relation between CGRP and its receptor components - calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR and receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1 - in human and rat STN and at the C1-level, using a set of newly well characterized antibodies. In addition, double-stainings with CGRP and myelin basic protein (MBP, myelin, synaptophysin (synaptic vesicles or IB4 (C-fibers in general were performed. Results In the STN, the highest density of CGRP immunoreactive fibers were found in a network around fiber bundles in the superficial laminae. CLR and RAMP1 expression were predominately found in fibers in the spinal trigeminal tract region, with some fibers spanning into the superficial laminae. Co-localization between CGRP and its receptor components was not noted. In C1, CGRP was expressed in fibers of laminae I and II. The CGRP staining was similar in rat, except for CGRP positive neurons that were found close to the central canal. In C1, the receptor components were detected in laminae I and II, however these fibers were distinct from fibers expressing CGRP as verified by confocal microscopy. Conclusions This study demonstrates the detailed expression of CGRP and its receptor components within STN in the brainstem and in the spinal cord at C1

  17. Low levels of cobalamin, epidermal growth factor, and normal prions in multiple sclerosis spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalabrino, G; Veber, D; De Giuseppe, R; Roncaroli, F

    2015-07-09

    We have previously demonstrated that multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the key myelin-related molecules cobalamin (Cbl), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and normal cellular prions (PrP(C)s), thus confirming that some CSF abnormalities may be co-responsible for remyelination failure. We determined the levels of these three molecules in post-mortem spinal cord (SC) samples taken from MS patients and control patients. The control SC samples, almost all of which came from non-neurological patients, did not show any microscopic lesions of any type. All of the samples were supplied by the U.K. MS Tissue Bank. The Cbl, EGF, and PrP(C) levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The SC total homocysteine level was determined using a competitive immunoenzymatic assay. CSF samples, taken from a further group of MS patients, were used for the assay of holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC) levels. The Cbl, EGF, and PrP(C) levels were significantly decreased in MS SCs in comparison with controls and, paradoxically, the decreased Cbl levels were associated with decreased SC levels of homocysteine, a biochemical marker of Cbl deficiency. The trends of EGF and PrP(C) levels paralleled those previously found in CSF, whereas that of Cbl was the opposite. There was no significant difference in CSF holo-TC levels between the MS patients and the controls. Given that we have previously demonstrated that Cbl positively regulates central nervous system EGF levels, it is conceivable that the low EGF levels in the MS SC may be causally related to a local decrease in Cbl levels. Only PrP(C) levels were invariably decreased in both the SC and CSF regardless of the clinical course of the disease. These findings suggest that the simultaneous lack of Cbl, EGF, and PrP(C)s may greatly hamper the remyelination process in MS patients, because they are key molecules of the machinery for remyelination.

  18. Effects of music listening on Cortisol levels and Propofol consumption during spinal anaesthesia

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    Stefan eKoelsch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study explores effects of instrumental music on the hormonal system (as indicated by serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone, the immune system (as indicated by immunoglobulin A and sedative drug requirements during surgery (elective total hip joint replacement under spinal anaesthesia with light sedation. This is the first study investigating this issue with a double-blind design using instrumental music. Methodology / Principal Findings: Patients (n = 40 were randomly assigned either to a music-group (listening to instrumental music, or to a control-group (listening to a non-musical placebo stimulus. Both groups listened to the auditory stimulus about 2 hours before, and during the entire intra-operative period (during the intra-operative light sedation, subjects were able to respond lethargically to verbal commands. Results indicate that, during surgery, patients of the music-group had a lower propofol consumption, and lower cortisol levels, compared to the control-group. Conclusions / Significance: Our data show that listening to music during surgery under regional anaesthesia has effects on cortisol levels (reflecting stress-reducing effects and reduces sedative requirements to reach light sedation.

  19. GABAA receptor partially mediated propofol-induced hyperalgesia at superspinal level and analgesia at spinal cord level in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin-yun WANG; Jun-li CAO; Yin-ming ZENG; Ti-jun DAI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe effects of propofol on nociceptive response at superspinal and spinal level in rats. METHODS:Two hundreds and fifty-eight Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomized into thirty-two groups. Propofol and bicuculline were microinjected into lateral ventricle (icv), ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), intrathecal (ith), and intraperitoneal (ip). The noxious responses were evaluated by hot plate and formalin test. RESULTS: In hot-plate test, systemic and superspinal administration of propofol (40 mg·kg-1 ip, 100μg in 10μL, icy, and 4μg in 0.4μL vlPAG microinjection) produced hyperalgesia (P<0.01). Hyperalgesia induced by vlPAG microinjection of propofol was significantly antagonized by 69.8%, 71.2%, 98.8% at 10, 20, and 30 min by microinjection of bicuculline (10 ng in 0.4μL, vlPAG) (P<0.01). Analgesia induced by ith propofol (100μg·10μL-1) was antagonized about 81.3%, 54.8%, 80.8%, and 97.4% at 10, 20, 30 and 40 min by ith bicuculline (P<0.05). In formalin test,systemic and superspinal administration of propofol (40 mg·kg-1 ip, 4μg in 0.4μL, vlPAG) also produced hyperalgesia (P<0.01). The increased formalin pain scores were antagonized about 57.1% by bicuculline (10ng, vlPAG)(P<0.05) at 60 min after formalin injection. The decreased formalin pain scores induced by ith propofol (100μg in 10μL) were antagonized about 66.7% at 30 min by ith bicuculline (P<0.05) after formalin injection. Hyperalgesia produced by ip propofol in both hot plate and formalin test could not be antagonized by vlPAG administration of bicuculline. CONCLUSION: GABAA receptor partly mediated propofol-induced hyperalgesia at superspinal and analgesia at spinal cord in rats.

  20. Passive leg movements and passive cycling do not alter arterial leg blood flow in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerds, W. ter; Groot, P.C.E. de; Kuppevelt, D. van; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subjects with a spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease-related secondary complications, such as pressure ulcers and attenuated wound healing. It has been suggested that passive exercise enhances blood flow via mechanical pump effects or refl

  1. Plasma iron levels appraised 15 days after spinal cord injury in a limb movement animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, F M; Esteves, A M; Tufik, S; de Mello, M T

    2011-03-01

    Experimental, controlled trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate plasma iron and transferrin levels in a limb movement animal model with spinal cord injury (SCI). Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Departamento de Psicobiologia. In all, 72 male Wistar rats aged 90 days were divided into four groups: (1) acute SCI (1 day, SCI1), (2) 3 days post-SCI (SCI3), (3) 7 days post-SCI (SCI7) and (4) 15 days post-SCI (SCI15). Each of these groups had corresponding control (CTRL) and SHAM groups. Plasma iron and transferrin levels of the different groups were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's test. We found a significant reduction in iron plasma levels after SCI compared with the CTRL group: SCI1 (CTRL: 175±10.58 μg dl(-1); SCI: 108.28±11.7 μg dl(-1)), SCI3 (CTRL: 195.5±11.00 μg dl(-1); SCI: 127.88±12.63 μg dl(-1)), SCI7 (CTRL: 186±2.97 μg dl(-1); SCI: 89.2±15.39 μg dl(-1)) and SCI15 (CTRL: 163±5.48 μg dl(-1); SCI: 124.44±10.30 μg dl(-1)) (P<0.05; ANOVA). The SHAM1 group demonstrated a reduction in iron plasma after acute SCI (CTRL: 175±10.58 μg dl(-1); SHAM: 114.60±7.81 μg dl(-1)) (P<0.05; ANOVA). Reduced iron metabolism after SCI may be one of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of sleep-related movement disorders.

  2. Spinal Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who undergo a spinal tap (lumbar puncture) or spinal anesthesia. Both procedures require a puncture of the tough ... fluid is withdrawn from your spinal canal. During spinal anesthesia, medication is injected into your spinal canal to ...

  3. Altered spinal microRNA-146a and the microRNA-183 cluster contribute to osteoarthritic pain in knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery, and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8-week experimental period (F = 341, p MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly regenerating peripheral knee joint cartilage.

  4. The effect of NR2B subunit palmitoylation at the spinal level after chronic dorsal root ganglia compression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tianjiao; Cui, Yin; Shi, Han; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-11-01

    The NR2B subunit (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit) regulates the source of pain, and it participates in the formation of central sensitization. Palmitoylation was shown to be involved in the regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor internalization. In the present study, we investigated the effects of NR2B subunit palmitoylation in a chronic dorsal root ganglia compression (CCD) rat model. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency were used to assess mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after a CCD operation and an intrathecal injection of the inhibitor of palmitoylation (2-bromopalmitate [2-BP]). The acyl-biotinyl exchange method, Western blotting, and coimmunoprecipitation were used to investigate the effects of pain processing and the expression of levels of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation at the spinal level. CCD rats had long-lasting thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, leading to upregulation of the level of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation at the spinal level. An intrathecal treatment with 2-BP on day 14 after CCD surgery markedly improved pain behaviors and downregulated the expression of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation. These data suggest that upregulated NR2B palmitoylation in CCD-induced neuropathic pain and intrathecal injection of 2-BP could reduce pain behaviors and NR2B phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that spinal NR2B palmitoylation is an important component of CCD-induced neuropathic pain, and it might be a potential target for chronic pain therapy.

  5. Circulating Th17 cytokine levels are altered in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konca Degertekin, Ceyla; Aktas Yilmaz, Banu; Balos Toruner, Fusun; Kalkanci, Ayse; Turhan Iyidir, Ozlem; Fidan, Isıl; Yesilyurt, Emine; Cakır, Nuri; Kustimur, Semra; Arslan, Metin

    2016-04-01

    The disrupted autoimmune response in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has long been considered to be dominantly T helper type 1 (Th1) mediated. Recent advances in the field of immunology have introduced a new class of effector T cells, named 'Th17', which plays important roles in autoimmune disorders once thought to be merely Th1 mediated. We aimed to examine the levels of major Th17 cytokines in patients with HT in this study. We studied serum interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interleukin 23 (IL-23) levels in 46 newly diagnosed, untreated patients with HT (40 women and 6 men, aged 40.0 ± 11.8 years) divided into euthyroid (n=22) and hypothyroid (n=24) groups and compared them with age and sex matched 26 healthy euthyroid controls without HT (21 women and 5 men; aged 36.0 ± 12.9 years). Serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels were significantly different among euthyroid and hypothyroid HT patients and controls, with highest levels obtained in the euthyroid HT group (p=0.041 for IL-17 and pdisease affect Th17 system in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis needs to be determined with further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Salt stress alters DNA methylation levels in alfalfa (Medicago spp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lawati, A; Al-Bahry, S; Victor, R; Al-Lawati, A H; Yaish, M W

    2016-02-26

    Modification of DNA methylation status is one of the mechanisms used by plants to adjust gene expression at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels when plants are exposed to suboptimal conditions. Under abiotic stress, different cultivars often show heritable phenotypic variation accompanied by epigenetic polymorphisms at the DNA methylation level. This variation may provide the raw materials for plant breeding programs that aim to enhance abiotic stress tolerance, including salt tolerance. In this study, methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis was used to assess cytosine methylation levels in alfalfa (Medicago spp) roots exposed to increasing NaCl concentrations (0.0, 8.0, 12.0, and 20.0 dS/m). Eleven indigenous landraces were analyzed, in addition to a salt-tolerant cultivar that was used as a control. There was a slight increase in DNA methylation upon exposure to high levels of soil salinity. Phylogenetic analysis using MSAP showed epigenetic variation within and between the alfalfa landraces when exposed to saline conditions. Based on MSAP and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results, we found that salinity increased global DNA methylation status, particularly in plants exposed to the highest level of salinity (20 dS/m). Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that this might be mediated by the overexpression of methyltransferase homolog genes after exposure to saline conditions. DNA demethylation using 5-azacytidine reduced seedling lengths and dry and fresh weights, indicating a possible decrease in salinity tolerance. These results suggest that salinity affects DNA methylation flexibility.

  7. Formalin-induced behavioural hypersensitivity and neuronal hyperexcitability are mediated by rapid protein synthesis at the spinal level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace Victoria C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a key regulator of mRNA translation whose action can be inhibited by the drug rapamycin. Forms of long-term plasticity require protein synthesis and evidence indicates that mRNA in dendrites, axon terminals and cell bodies is essential for long-term synaptic plasticity. Specific to pain, shifts in pain thresholds and responsiveness are an expression of neuronal plasticity and this likely contributes to persistent pain. We investigated this by inhibiting the activity of mTOR with rapamycin at the spinal level, of rats that were subjected to the formalin test, using both behavioural and electrophysiological techniques. Results For in vivo electrophysiology, Sprague Dawley rats were fully anaesthetised and single-unit extracellular recordings were obtained from lamina V wide dynamic range (WDR dorsal horn spinal neurones at the region where input is received from the hind paw. Neuronal responses from naive rats showed that rapamycin-sensitive pathways were important in nociceptive-specific C-fibre mediated transmission onto WDR neurones as well mechanically-evoked responses since rapamycin was effective in attenuating these measures. Formalin solution was injected into the hind paw prior to which, rapamycin or vehicle was applied directly onto the exposed spinal cord. When rapamycin was applied to the spinal cord prior to hind paw formalin injection, there was a significant attenuation of the prolonged second phase of the formalin test, which comprises continuing afferent input to the spinal cord, neuronal hyperexcitability and an activated descending facilitatory drive from the brainstem acting on spinal neurones. In accordance with electrophysiological data, behavioural studies showed that rapamycin attenuated behavioural hypersensitivity elicited by formalin injection into the hind paw. Conclusion We conclude that mTOR has a role in maintaining persistent pain states via m

  8. [Pseudomeningocele with spinal cord compression following removal of meningioma at the Th3-Th4 level: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulev, Yu A; Trashin, A V; Grigor'ev, G B; Pechiborshch, D A

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomeningocele is an abnormal extradural collection of the cerebrospinal fluid in soft tissues, communicating with the arachnoid space through a dural defect. Postoperative pseudomenigocele of the thoracic spine presenting with myelopathy is a rare phenomenon; we found only two such cases in the literature. A clinical case of a female patient operated on for meningioma at the Th3-Th4 level with postoperative pseudomenigocele and spinal cord compression is presented.

  9. The antinociceptive potency of N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) and its interaction with endomorphin-1 at the spinal level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Ibolya; Tuboly, Gabor; Benedek, Gyorgy; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2011-10-01

    The endogenous N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) activates both transient receptor potential vanilloid1 (TRPV1) and cannabinoid-1 (CB(1)) receptors. The goal of this study was to characterize the antinociceptive potential of NADA on inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia in rats at spinal level, and to determine its interaction with endomorphin-1 (EM) at the spinal level. The effects of NADA and EM on thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated in rats with a unilateral hind paw carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal injection of either EM (0.03-10 μg) or NADA (1.5-50 μg) caused dose-dependent antihyperalgesia, but NADA was 5.4 times less potent than EM. The antihyperalgesia caused by 15 μg NADA was inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not by CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist AM 251, whereas the effect of 50 μg NADA was decreased by both drugs. Co-administration of EM with NADA in 1:15 and 1:50 ratios produced a short-lasting potentiation, but isobolographic analysis for the whole investigated period revealed additive interaction between the two endogenous ligands. The results show that both TRPV1 and CB(1) receptor activation play a substantial role in the antinociceptive effects of NADA at spinal level, while co-administration of NADA with EM did not show potentiation.

  10. 810 NM Light Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Alters the Immune Response and Improves Axonal Regeneration and Functional Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Bresnahan-Basso BDNF Brain derived neurotrophic factor cAMP Cyclic adenosine – 3’,5’ monophosphate C-C Cysteine-cysteine cDNA Complementary...layer IX of the ventral horn, as well as on interneurons in the intermediate gray matter (Molander et al., 1984; Kennedy, 1990). Damage to the...spinal cord after injury, such as neurotrophin 3 (NT3) and brain derived neurotrophic factor ( BDNF ; Hayashi et al., 2000). Functional Impact Several

  11. Effects of lateral funiculus sparing, spinal lesion level, and gender on recovery of bladder voiding reflexes and hematuria in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Sunny L; Brady, Tiffany D; Dugan, Victoria P; Armstrong, James E; Hubscher, Charles H; Johnson, Richard D

    2015-02-01

    Deficits in bladder function are complications following spinal cord injury (SCI), severely affecting quality of life. Normal voiding function requires coordinated contraction of bladder and urethral sphincter muscles dependent upon intact lumbosacral reflex arcs and integration of descending and ascending spinal pathways. We previously reported, in electrophysiological recordings, that segmental reflex circuit neurons in anesthetized male rats were modulated by a bilateral spino-bulbo-spinal pathway in the mid-thoracic lateral funiculus. In the present study, behavioral measures of bladder voiding reflexes and hematuria (hemorrhagic cystitis) were obtained to assess the correlation of plasticity-dependent recovery to the degree of lateral funiculus sparing and mid-thoracic lesion level. Adult rats received mid-thoracic-level lesions at one of the following severities: complete spinal transection; bilateral dorsal column lesion; unilateral hemisection; bilateral dorsal hemisection; a bilateral lesion of the lateral funiculi and dorsal columns; or a severe contusion. Voiding function and hematuria were evaluated by determining whether the bladder was areflexic (requiring manual expression, i.e., "crede maneuver"), reflexive (voiding initiated by perineal stroking), or "automatic" (spontaneous voiding without caretaker assistance). Rats with one or both lateral funiculi spared (i.e., bilateral dorsal column lesion or unilateral hemisection) recovered significantly faster than animals with bilateral lateral funiculus lesions, severe contusion, or complete transection. Bladder reflex recovery time was significantly slower the closer a transection lesion was to T10, suggesting that proximity to the segmental sensory and sympathetic innervation of the upper urinary tract (kidney, ureter) should be avoided in the choice of lesion level for SCI studies of micturition pathways. In addition, hematuria duration was significantly longer in males, compared to females, despite

  12. Does Spinal Fusion and Scoliosis Correction Improve Activity and Participation for Children With GMFCS level 4 and 5 Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charlie; Malagelada, Francesc; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Spinal fusion is used to treat scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following intervention, the WHO considers activity and participation should be assessed to guide intervention and assess the effects. This study assesses whether spinal fusion for scoliosis improves activity and participation for children with severe CP.Retrospective cohort study of 70 children (39M:31F) with GMFCS level 4/5 CP and significant scoliosis. Thirty-six underwent observational and/or brace treatment as the sole treatment for their scoliosis, and 34 underwent surgery. Children in the operative group were older and had worse scoliosis than those in the observational group. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2-year period. The ASKp was used to measure activity and participation.In the observational group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity increased from 51 (40-90) and 10 (0-30) to 70 (43-111) and 14 (0-37). Mean ASKp decreased from 16.3 (1-38) to 14.2 (1-36). In the operative group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity decreased from 81 (50-131) and 14 (1-35) to 38 (10-76) and 9 (0-24). Mean ASKp increased from 10.5 (0-29) to 15.9 (3-38). Spinal-related pain correlated most with change in activity and participation in both groups. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before and after treatment.In children with significant scoliosis and CP classified within GMFCS levels 4 and 5, spinal fusion was associated with an improvement in activity and participation, whereas nonoperative treatment was associated with a small reduction. Pain should be carefully assessed to guide intervention.

  13. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in spinal tuberculosis: -362G/C genetic variant and protein levels in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chaofeng; Zhang, Hongqi; Gao, Qile; He, Dan; Tang, Mingxing; Liu, Shaohua; Deng, Ang; Wang, Yuxiang; Lu, Shijin; Li, Jingsong; Yin, Xinhua; Guo, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to explore the possible association of the monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1-362G/C genetic polymorphism and plasma levels of MCP-1 in patients with spinal tuberculosis (TB). The MCP-1-362G/C (rs2857656) polymorphism and blood levels of MCP-1 in patients with spinal TB and healthy subjects were evaluated and compared. Three hundred thirty-two patients and 336 healthy subjects were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction and Sanger DNA sequencing technology. MCP-1 plasma levels were measured by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. When comparisons were made between patients and controls, the frequency of the MCP-1-362*C minor allele (55.4% versus 47.5%, P = 0.004, odds ratio [OR] = 1.376, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.109-1.706) and the carriers of the MCP-1-362*C allele (80.7% versus 71.4%, P = 0.005, OR = 1. 657, 95% CI: 1.167-2.403) were over-represented in patients. The mean MCP-1 plasma level in spinal TB patients was significantly higher than in controls (154.44 ± 68.81 pg/mL versus 36.69 ± 21.71 pg/mL, t = -5.85, P < 0.001). The patients with the CC genotype had the highest MCP-1 level (150.63 ± 73.89 pg/mL), followed by those with the GC genotype (108.63 ± 52.09 pg/mL, t = 2.351, P = 0.022) and GG (91.29 ± 54.31 pg/mL, t = 3.091, P = 0.003) homozygotes. We report the association of the -362G/C genetic polymorphism and increased plasma levels of MCP-1 in patients with spinal TB and nominate the -362*C minor allele as a risk factor for spinal TB in the Chinese population.

  14. Intermittent catheterization in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: obstacles, worries, level of satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, B; Akkoç, Y; Alaca, R; Erhan, B; Gündüz, B; Yıldız, N; Gök, H; Köklü, K; Cınar, E; Alemdaroğlu, E; Ersöz, M; Karapolat, H; Demir, Y; Bardak, A N; Turna, I; Catalbaş, N; Güneş, S; Tunç, H

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the obstacles in people with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) face performing intermittent catheterization (IC), also their worries and level of satisfaction. Two hundred sixty-nine patients performing IC for at least 3 months were asked to fill-out a questionnaire about their opinions on IC. In total, 69.5% of patients performed IC themselves, 10.4% had performed by their mothers, 7.8% by another caregiver and 7.4% by their spouse. For the 72 (26%) patients unable to apply IC, reasons were insufficient hand function (56.1%), being unable to sit appropriately (35.4%) and spasticity (8.5%). In all, 70% of male patients had insufficient hand function, 20% could not sit and 10% had spasticity while 56.3% of female patients could not sit, 37.5% had insufficient hand function and 63% had spasticity. Difference between sexes was found to be statistically significant (Ppatients had when starting IC were fear of being dependent on IC (50.2%), accidentally injuring self (43.8%), embarrassment (43.2%), causing an infection (40.2%), bleeding (32.7%), fear of feeling pain (30.2%) and hygiene (24.7%). More women felt embarrassment; other items were similar in both sexes. In all, 46.9% of patients had urinary incontinence in intervals. In total, 69.5% of patients performed IC themselves. Men's most common obstacle was insufficient hand function while women's was being unable to sit appropriately. Patients' most common worries were being dependent on IC for life. In all, 46.9% had incontinence in intervals; 47.9% said IC improved their life quality; and 97.4% preferred IC over continuous catheterization.

  15. Preoperative measurement of maternal abdominal circumference relates the initial sensory block level of spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuok, Chi-Hang; Huang, Chung-Hsin; Tsai, Pei-Shan; Ko, Yuan-Pi; Lee, Wei-Shih; Hsu, Yung-Wei; Hung, Fang-Yu

    2016-12-01

    Lumbosacral cerebrospinal fluid volume is decreased as the enlarging uterus compresses the inferior vena cava during pregnancy. A subsequent greater cephalad spread of sensory blockade is observed. Gravid uterus plays a crucial role in affecting the spinal anesthesia level. We hypothesized that maternal abdominal circumference can reflect compressive effect of the uterus and investigated the relationship between abdominal circumference and the level of sensory blockade, and incidence of hypotension following spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine in term parturients. Forty-two term parturients scheduled for elective cesarean section were studied. Abdominal circumference was measured before spinal anesthesia; 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (2 mL, 2.2 mL, or 2.4 mL) was injected in to the subarachnoid space at the L3-L4 intervertebral level according to the parturient's height. The level of sensory blockade was assessed using an ice cube 1 minute, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and 15 minutes after the spinal injection. The level of sensory blockade at the 15(th) minute was defined as the level of maximum sensory blockade. Statistical correlation coefficients were evaluated with Spearman's rank correlation. The correlation coefficient between the abdominal circumference and spinal level measured by cold sensation loss at 5 minutes after spinal anesthesia was significantly positive (right side ρ=0.43, p=0.005; left side ρ=0.46, p=0.003). No significant correlation was found between abdominal circumference and the level of maximum sensory blockade, the incidence of hypotension, ephedrine dosage, nausea, and vomiting after spinal anesthesia. Parturients with greater abdominal circumference value have a higher level of sensory blockade at 5 minutes after spinal anesthesia. Abdominal circumference cannot predict the maximum sensory blockade level and the incidence of hypotension. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Metabolic rate and cardiorespiratory response during hybrid cycling versus handcycling at equal subjective exercise intensity levels in people with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakkum, Arjan J. T.; de Groot, Sonja; Onderwater, Mark Q.; de Jong, Jelle; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the metabolic rate and cardiorespiratory response during hybrid cycling versus handcycling at equal subjective exercise intensity levels in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Amsterdam Rehabilitation Research Centre vertical bar Reade,

  17. Glial Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFα) Generates Metaplastic Inhibition of Spinal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huie, J. Russell; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Injury-induced overexpression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in the spinal cord can induce chronic neuroinflammation and excitotoxicity that ultimately undermines functional recovery. Here we investigate how TNFα might also act to upset spinal function by modulating spinal plasticity. Using a model of instrumental learning in the injured spinal cord, we have previously shown that peripheral intermittent stimulation can produce a plastic change in spinal plasticity (metaplasticity), resulting in the prolonged inhibition of spinal learning. We hypothesized that spinal metaplasticity may be mediated by TNFα. We found that intermittent stimulation increased protein levels in the spinal cord. Using intrathecal pharmacological manipulations, we showed TNFα to be both necessary and sufficient for the long-term inhibition of a spinal instrumental learning task. These effects were found to be dependent on glial production of TNFα and involved downstream alterations in calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. These findings suggest a crucial role for glial TNFα in undermining spinal learning, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting TNFα activity to rescue and restore adaptive spinal plasticity to the injured spinal cord. TNFα modulation represents a novel therapeutic target for improving rehabilitation after spinal cord injury. PMID:22745823

  18. Spinal fusion in children with spina bifida : influence on ambulation level and functional abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, MAGC; Gulmans, VAM; Gooskens, RHJM; Pruijs, JEH; Helders, PJM

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of spinal fusion on ambulation and functional abilities in children with spina bifida for whom early mobilization was stimulated. Ten children (three males and seven females) with myelomeningocele were prospectively followed. Their mean age at

  19. Spinal fusion in children with spina bifida : influence on ambulation level and functional abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, MAGC; Gulmans, VAM; Gooskens, RHJM; Pruijs, JEH; Helders, PJM

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of spinal fusion on ambulation and functional abilities in children with spina bifida for whom early mobilization was stimulated. Ten children (three males and seven females) with myelomeningocele were prospectively followed. Their mean age at ope

  20. Prediction of hypotension during spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean section by altered heart rate variability induced by postural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, K; Yoshimura, N; Tanabe, K; Kito, K; Nagase, K; Iida, H

    2017-02-01

    Maternal hypotension is a common complication during cesarean section performed under spinal anesthesia. Changes in maternal heart rate with postural changes or values of heart rate variability have been reported to predict hypotension. Therefore, we hypothesized that changes in heart rate variability due to postural changes can predict hypotension. A total of 45 women scheduled to undergo cesarean section under spinal anesthesia were enrolled. A postural change test was performed the day before cesarean section. The ratio of the power of low and high frequency components contributing to heart rate variability was assessed in the order of supine, left lateral, and supine. Patients who exhibited a ⩾two-fold increase in the low-to-high frequency ratio when moving to supine from the lateral position were assigned to the postural change test-positive group. According to the findings of the postural change test, patients were assigned to the positive (n=22) and negative (n=23) groups, respectively. Hypotension occurred in 35/45 patients, of whom 21 (60%) were in the positive group and 14 (40%) were in the negative group. The incidence of hypotension was greater in the positive group (Pcesarean section. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Altered expression of 14-3-3ζ protein in spinal cords of rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta.

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    Li-na Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large number of studies have confirmed that excessive apoptosis is one of the reasons for deficient neuronal function in neural tube defects (NTDs. A previous study from our laboratory used 2-D gel electrophoresis to demonstrate that 14-3-3ζ expression was low in the spinal cords of rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta at embryonic day (E 17. As a member of the 14-3-3 protein family, 14-3-3ζ plays a crucial role in the determination of cell fate and anti-apoptotic activity. However, neither the expression of 14-3-3ζ in defective spinal cords, nor the correlation between 14-3-3ζ and excessive apoptosis in NTDs has been fully confirmed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used immunoblotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR to quantify the expression of 14-3-3ζ and double immunofluorescence to visualize 14-3-3ζ and apoptosis. We found that, compared with controls, 14-3-3ζ was down-regulated in spina bifida between E12 and E15. Excessive apoptotic cells and low expression of 14-3-3ζ were observed in the dorsal region of spinal cords with spina bifida during the same time period. To initially explore the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in NTDs, we investigated the expression of microRNA-7 (miR-7, microRNA-375 (miR-375 and microRNA-451 (miR-451, which are known to down-regulate 14-3-3ζ in several different cell types. We also investigated the expression of p53, a molecule that is downstream of 14-3-3ζ and can be down-regulated by it. We discovered that, in contrast to the reduction of 14-3-3ζ expression, the expression of miR-451, miR-375 and p53 increased in spina bifida rat fetuses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that the reduced expression of 14-3-3ζ plays a role in the excessive apoptosis that occurs in spina bifida and may be partly regulated by the over-expression of miR-451 and miR-375, and the consequent up-regulation of p53 might further promote apoptosis in spina bifida.

  2. Altered expression of 14-3-3ζ protein in spinal cords of rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-na; Wei, Xiao-wei; Fan, Yang; Miao, Jia-ning; Wang, Li-li; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Di; Yuan, Zheng-wei

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have confirmed that excessive apoptosis is one of the reasons for deficient neuronal function in neural tube defects (NTDs). A previous study from our laboratory used 2-D gel electrophoresis to demonstrate that 14-3-3ζ expression was low in the spinal cords of rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta at embryonic day (E) 17. As a member of the 14-3-3 protein family, 14-3-3ζ plays a crucial role in the determination of cell fate and anti-apoptotic activity. However, neither the expression of 14-3-3ζ in defective spinal cords, nor the correlation between 14-3-3ζ and excessive apoptosis in NTDs has been fully confirmed. We used immunoblotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to quantify the expression of 14-3-3ζ and double immunofluorescence to visualize 14-3-3ζ and apoptosis. We found that, compared with controls, 14-3-3ζ was down-regulated in spina bifida between E12 and E15. Excessive apoptotic cells and low expression of 14-3-3ζ were observed in the dorsal region of spinal cords with spina bifida during the same time period. To initially explore the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in NTDs, we investigated the expression of microRNA-7 (miR-7), microRNA-375 (miR-375) and microRNA-451 (miR-451), which are known to down-regulate 14-3-3ζ in several different cell types. We also investigated the expression of p53, a molecule that is downstream of 14-3-3ζ and can be down-regulated by it. We discovered that, in contrast to the reduction of 14-3-3ζ expression, the expression of miR-451, miR-375 and p53 increased in spina bifida rat fetuses. These data suggest that the reduced expression of 14-3-3ζ plays a role in the excessive apoptosis that occurs in spina bifida and may be partly regulated by the over-expression of miR-451 and miR-375, and the consequent up-regulation of p53 might further promote apoptosis in spina bifida.

  3. The impact of wheelchair basketball on hdl-cholesterol levels in women with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Maria da Rocha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to Assess the impact of wheelchair basketball (WB on the lipid profile of female paraplegic patients. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and total cholesterol (TC serum levels from two groups were assessed. Both groups were enrolled in a rehabilitation program (RP. One group comprised patients who played WB (P group, (n=4 and another group was made up of patients who did not play (NP, (n=8. All patients enrolled had spinal cord injuries (SCI. Two blood samples were performed for each group. The mean interval between these samples was 11 months in the P group and 8 months to the NP group. The mean weekly duration of activity in P group was 130 minutes. Student’s t test and linear regression methods were used for statistical analysis. A p-value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The HDL-C, TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C baseline values exhibited no significant differences between the P and NP groups (p>0.05. In the second sample, after taking part in WB, comparing the two measurements, the mean HDL-C level in group P had increased significantly (p≤0.01, by 27.42%. It was conclude that weekly WB activity was effective for improving the lipid profile test results in paraplegic patients and may reduce cardiovascular disease risk. This improvement could have been mediated by the adoption of a higher level of daily physical activity by those exercising. Resumo O propósito do presente estudo foi objetivo avaliar o impacto da prática de basquetebol em cadeira de rodas sobre o perfil lipídico de pacientes paraplégicos do sexo feminino. Foram avaliados os níveis séricos da HDL-C, da LDL-C e do colesterol total (CT de dois grupos atendidos num programa de reabilitação. Um grupo foi formado por pacientes praticantes de basquetebol em CR (grupo PR, (n=4 e o outro por suas congêneres paraplégicas não praticantes (NPR, (n=8. Todas as pacientes foram

  4. EXOSC8 mutations alter mRNA metabolism and cause hypomyelination with spinal muscular atrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Müller, Juliane S; Pyle, Angela; Munkley, Jennifer; Dor, Talya; Quartararo, Jade; Ferrero, Ileana; Karcagi, Veronika; Giunta, Michele; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Birchall, Daniel; Princzinger, Agota; Cinnamon, Yuval; Lützkendorf, Susanne; Piko, Henriett; Reza, Mojgan; Florez, Laura; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Griffin, Helen; Schuelke, Markus; Elpeleg, Orly; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Lochmüller, Hanns; Elliott, David J; Chinnery, Patrick F; Edvardson, Shimon; Horvath, Rita

    2014-07-03

    The exosome is a multi-protein complex, required for the degradation of AU-rich element (ARE) containing messenger RNAs (mRNAs). EXOSC8 is an essential protein of the exosome core, as its depletion causes a severe growth defect in yeast. Here we show that homozygous missense mutations in EXOSC8 cause progressive and lethal neurological disease in 22 infants from three independent pedigrees. Affected individuals have cerebellar and corpus callosum hypoplasia, abnormal myelination of the central nervous system or spinal motor neuron disease. Experimental downregulation of EXOSC8 in human oligodendroglia cells and in zebrafish induce a specific increase in ARE mRNAs encoding myelin proteins, showing that the imbalanced supply of myelin proteins causes the disruption of myelin, and explaining the clinical presentation. These findings show the central role of the exosomal pathway in neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Elevated levels of phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Kato, So; Hayakawa, Kentaro; Oka, Hiroyuki; Takeshita, Katsushi; Tanaka, Sakae; Ogata, Toru

    2015-07-01

    The phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit (pNfH) is an axon fiber structural protein that is released into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after nerve damage. Although the previous studies have reported elevated CSF levels of pNfH in various neurological diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, these levels have not been examined in patients with spinal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the CSF levels of pNfH in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to examine the relationship between CSF levels of pNfH and the severity of LSS. This is a prospective observational study. We included consecutive patients with LSS who were undergoing myelography for preoperative evaluation. The CSF samples from patients with idiopathic scoliosis were used as the controls. Physiological measures: CSF levels of pNfH were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) and the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) for sciatic pain were used to assess the clinical severity of LSS, and patients were grouped into tertiles according to their symptom severity and pain grading. Axial magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate the morphological severity of LSS, and patients were classified into three groups based on their morphological grading (using the CSF/rootlet ratio). Analysis of variance was used to examine the relationship between the CSF levels of pNfH and the severity of LSS. Thirty-three patients with LSS were included (13 men and 20 women and mean age 73.2 [range 58-88] years). Most patients (n=32) were positive for pNfH in their CSF (mean 1,344 [149-9,250] pg/mL), whereas all control subjects were negative for pNfH in their CSF. Regarding the association with clinical severity, patients in the third tertiles of ZCQ and NRS tended to have higher levels of pNfH compared with the other groups. There was no association between the CSF level of pNfH and the morphological severity of LSS. This study

  6. Pesticide Exposure Alters Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Levels in Mexican Agricultural Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Recio, Rogelio; Ocampo-Gómez, Guadalupe; Morán-Martínez, Javier; Borja-Aburto, Victor; López-Cervantes,Malaquías; Uribe, Marisela; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; Cebrián, Mariano E.

    2005-01-01

    Organophosphorous pesticides (OPs) are suspected of altering reproductive function by reducing brain acetylcholinesterase activity and monoamine levels, thus impairing hypothalamic and/or pituitary endocrine functions and gonadal processes. Our objective was to evaluate in a longitudinal study the association between OP exposure and serum levels of pituitary and sex hormones. Urinary OP metabolite levels were measured by gas–liquid chromatography, and serum pituitary and sex hormone levels by...

  7. Patient with neuromyelitis optica and inflammatory demyelinating lesions comprising whole spinal cord from C2 level till conus: case report

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    Pavlisa Goran

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an idiopathic, severe, inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, that causes severe optic neuritis and myelitis attacks. Early discrimination between multiple sclerosis (MS and NMO is important, as optimum treatment for both diseases may differ considerably. Case Presentation We report a case of a patient who initially presented as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, having spastic upper extremities diparesis and spastic paraplegia, C2/C3 sensory level and urinary incontinence, as well as extensive inflammatory spinal cord lesions from C2 level to conus. After 5 months the patient had another attack of transverse myelitis, had electrophysiological findings consistent with optic neuritis, was seropositive for NMO-IgG (aquaporin-4 IgG and thus fulfilled NMO diagnostic criteria. Following treatment of disease attacks with pulse corticosteroid therapy and intravenous immunoglobulins, we included oral azathioprine in a combination with oral prednisone in the therapy. Since there was no significant clinical improvement, we decided to use cyclophosphamide therapy, which resulted in good clinical improvement and gradual decrease of cord swelling. Conclusion In this NMO case report we wanted to emphasize the extensiveness of inflammatory spinal cord changes in our patient, from C2 level to conus. In the conclusion it is important to say that accurate, early diagnosis and distinction from MS is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention.

  8. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury

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    Katja M. Piltti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury.

  9. Five-level noncontiguous spinal injuries of cervical region:report of a case and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-gang; MA Xin-long; LI Feng-tan; FENG Shi-qing

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of multiple noncontiguous spinal injuries (MNSI) in the cervical spine is rare but has catastrophic consequences.The patient in this report was a 34-year-old woman with five-level cervical MNSI.CT and MRI showed that injuries included atlantoaxial instability,burst fracture of C6,dislocation of G6/7,rupture of the intervertebal disc or ligamentous complex,and irreversible cord damage.The mechanism for this case was a combined pattern of hyperflexion,compression,and hyperextension injuries.A review of the literature revealed that this case is the first report in the literature of a vehicle related accident causing five-level noncontiguous injuries of the cervical spine.

  10. 3D joystick for robotic arm control by individuals with high level spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hairong; Wachs, Juan P; Pendergast, Martin; Duerstock, Bradley S

    2013-06-01

    An innovative 3D joystick was developed to enable quadriplegics due to spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to more independently and efficiently operate a robotic arm as an assistive device. The 3D joystick was compared to two different manual input modalities, a keyboard control and a traditional joystick, in performing experimental robotic arm tasks by both subjects without disabilities and those with upper extremity mobility impairments. Fitts's Law targeting and practical pouring tests were conducted to compare the performance and accuracy of the proposed 3D joystick. The Fitts's law measurements showed that the 3D joystick had the best index of performance (IP), though it required an equivalent number of operations and errors as the standard robotic arm joystick. The pouring task demonstrated that the 3D joystick took significantly less task completion time and was more accurate than keyboard control. The 3D joystick also showed a decreased learning curve to the other modalities.

  11. Inhibitory interneuron circuits at cortical and spinal levels are associated with individual differences in corticomuscular coherence during isometric voluntary contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuya, Ryosuke; Ushiyama, Junichi; Ushiba, Junichi

    2017-01-01

    Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) is an oscillatory synchronization of 15–35 Hz (β-band) between electroencephalogram (EEG) of the sensorimotor cortex and electromyogram of contracting muscles. Although we reported that the magnitude of CMC varies among individuals, the physiological mechanisms underlying this variation are still unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate the associations between CMC and intracortical inhibition (ICI) in the primary motor cortex (M1)/recurrent inhibition (RI) in the spinal cord, which probably affect oscillatory neural activities. Firstly, we quantified ICI from changes in motor-evoked potentials induced by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation in M1 during tonic isometric voluntary contraction of the first dorsal interosseous. ICI showed a significant, negative correlation with the strength of EEG β-oscillation, but not with the magnitude of CMC across individuals. Next, we quantified RI from changes in H-reflexes induced by paired-pulse electrical nerve stimulation to the posterior tibial nerve during isometric contraction of the soleus muscle. We observed a significant, positive correlation between RI and peak CMC across individuals. These results suggest that the local inhibitory interneuron networks in cortical and spinal levels are associated with the oscillatory activity in corticospinal loop. PMID:28290507

  12. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, C.S. [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Toxicológicas e Bromatológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I. [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-02

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  13. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

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    C.S. Bitencourt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3, propylthiouracil (PTU or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4 levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg. Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01. In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32% were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  14. Influence of intravascular low level He-Ne laser irradiation on iNOS, total-NOS, and ET-1 in acute spinal cord-injured rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhenchun; Dong, Yinghai; Zhu, Jing

    2005-07-01

    Objective To research the influence of intravascular low level Laser irradiation (ILLLI) on total NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 in spinal cord following acute spinal cord injury (ASCI), and discuss the protective effects of ILLLI on neurons .Methods 72 rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups: treatment group, injury group and control group. In treatment group and injury group, after laminectomy at the level of T-13, ASCI was performed by using Allen"s method with slight modification (6g×10cm) on rabbits. After injury, rabbits were treated immediately with He-Ne laser (power 5 mW, 1 hour per day for 10 days). At the day of 10th after treatment, total-NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 in spinal cord tissues were measured. Results The expression level of total-NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 in spinal cord in injury group were significantly higher than those in control group (Pspinal cord. It indicates that ILLLI can relieve the overexpression of total-NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 ,and thus can perform protective effects on neurons in the course of secondary spinal cord injury (SSCI) following ASCI

  15. Estrogens Suppress Spinal Endomorphin 2 Release in Female Rats in Phase with the Estrous Cycle

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    Kumar, Arjun; Storman, Emiliya M.; Liu, Nai-Jiang; Gintzler, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Male and female rats differ in their ability to utilize spinal endomorphin 2 (EM2; the predominant mu-opioid receptor ligand in spinal cord) and in the mechanisms that underlie spinal EM2 analgesic responsiveness. We investigated the relevance of spinal estrogen receptors (ERs) to the in vivo regulation of spinal EM2 release. Methods ER antagonists were administered directly to the lumbosacral spinal cord of male and female rats, intrathecal perfusate was collected, and resulting changes in EM2 release were quantified using a plate-based radioimmunoassay. Results Intrathecal application of an antagonist of either estrogen receptor-α (ERα) or the ER GPR30 failed to alter spinal EM2 release. Strikingly, however, the concomitant blockade of ERα and GPR30 enhanced spinal EM2 release. This effect was sexually dimorphic, being absent in males. Furthermore, the magnitude of the enhancement of spinal EM2 release in females was dependent upon estrous cycle stage, suggesting a relationship with circulating levels of 17β-estradiol. The rapid onset of enhanced EM2 release following intrathecal application of ERα/GPR30 antagonists (within 30–40 min) suggests mediation via ERs in the plasma membrane, not the nucleus. Notably, both ovarian and spinally synthesized estrogens are essential for membrane ER regulation of spinal EM2 release. Conclusion These findings underscore the importance of estrogens for the regulation of spinal EM2 activity and, by extension, endogenous spinal EM2 antinoci-ception in females. Components of the spinal estrogenic mechanism(s) that suppress EM2 release could represent novel drug targets for improving utilization of endogenous spinal EM2, and thereby pain management in women. PMID:25925013

  16. Subtle alterations in NMDA-stimulated cyclic GMP levels following lateral fluid percussion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, M D; Delahunty, T M; Hamm, R J; Phillips, L L; Lyeth, B G; Povlishock, J T

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether NMDA-stimulated cyclic GMP levels were altered at two different time points following lateral fluid percussion injury. At 60 min and 15 days postinjury, the left and right hippocampi were dissected and chopped into mini-prisms. Each hippocampus was divided into five equal parts and incubated with either the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, 500 microM) alone, IBMX and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) OR IBMX, NMDA, and glycine (10 MM). Two concentrations of NMDA were used: 500 or 1,000 microM. Tissues were then assayed for levels of cyclic GMP. Results indicated that there were no changes in basal levels of cyclic GMP at either postinjury time point. At 60 min postinjury, there were no significant main effects for injury or drug concentration. There was a significant injury x side interaction effect with increased levels of NMDA-stimulated cyclic GMP in the hippocampus ipsilateral to the injury impact and decreased cyclic GMP levels in the contralateral hippocampus. There were no significant alterations in NMDA-stimulated cyclic GMP levels at 15 days postinjury. The data from this study indicated that NMDA-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation is differentially altered in the hippocampus ipsilateral and contralateral to the site of the injury at 1 h after injury, but is normalized by 15 days postinjury. These findings implicate NMDA-mediated intracellular signaling processes in the acute excitotoxic response to injury.

  17. NG2 cells response to axonal alteration in the spinal cord white matter in mice with genetic disruption of neurofilament light subunit expression

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    Xiao Zhi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (NG2 expressing cells, morphologically characterized by multi-branched processes and small cell bodies, are the 4th commonest cell population of non-neuronal cell type in the central nervous system (CNS. They can interact with nodes of Ranvier, receive synaptic input, generate action potential and respond to some pathological stimuli, but the function of the cells is still unclear. We assumed the NG2 cells may play an active role in neuropathogenesis and aimed to determine if NG2 cells could sense and response to the alterations in the axonal contents caused by disruption of neurofilament light subunit (NFL expression. Results In the early neuropathological development stage, our study showed that the diameter of axons of upper motor neurons of NFL-/- mice decreased significantly while the thickness of their myelin sheath increased remarkably. Although there was an obvious morphological distortion in axons with occasionally partial demyelination, no obvious changes in expression of myelin proteins was detected. Parallel to these changes in the axons and their myelination, the processes of NG2 cells were disconnected from the nodes of Ranvier and extended further, suggesting that these cells in the spinal cord white matter could sense the alteration in axonal contents caused by disruption of NFL expression before astrocytic and microglial activation. Conclusion The structural configuration determined by the NFL gene may be important for maintenance of normal morphology of myelinated axons. The NG2 cells might serve as an early sensor for the delivery of information from impaired neurons to the local environment.

  18. Inflammation and schizophrenia: alterations in cytokine levels and perturbation in antioxidative defense systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, A K; Khan, Md W

    2014-02-01

    Although several theories have been proposed including developmental/neurodegenerative processes, neurotransmitter abnormalities, viral infection, and immune dysfunction, the exact causative factor of schizophrenia is unclear. A relationship between inflammation and schizophrenia has been supported by abnormal cytokine production and altered antioxidant status. This study was aimed to examine the alterations in serum oxidative-antioxidative status and cytokine levels of schizophrenic patients. A total of 91 schizophrenic patients from Saudi Arabia and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the present study. Fresh blood samples were collected to measure the levels of cytokines and markers of oxidative stress by spectrophotometric assays simultaneously. We observed that there was a significant increase in the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 and a decrease in the levels of interferon-γ. Lipid peroxides are elevated in serum, while total-sulfhydryl levels were decreased. Also, the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased, while the activities of catalase, glutathione reductase, and myeloperoxidase were found to be elevated in serum. We conclude that inflammation resulting from dysregulation of cytokines and altered antioxidant systems may play a critical role in the etiology of schizophrenia.

  19. Alterations in cytochrome P-450 levels in adult rats following neonatal exposure to xenobiotics

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    Zangar, R.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States) Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States)); Springer, D.L. (Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States)); Buhler, D.R. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to certain xenobiotics has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism in adult rats in a manner that indicates long-term changes in enzyme regulation. Previously, the authors have observed changes in adult testosterone metabolism and in cytochrome P-450 (P-450) mRNA levels in animals neonatally exposed to phenobarbital (PB) or diethylstilbestrol (DES). In order to test for other enzyme alterations, they used Western blot procedures for specific P-450s to analyze hepatic microsomes from adult rats (24 wk old) that had been exposed neonatally to DES, PB, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), or pregnenolone 16[alpha]-carbonitrile (PCN). The most striking effects were observed in the DES-treated males: P-4502C6 and an immunologically similar protein were increased 60 and 90%, respectively, relative to control values, but P-4503A2 was decreased by 44%. No changes were observed in the DES-treated males in levels of P-4502E1, P-4502B, or the male-specific P-4502C13. Adult males neonatally treated with PB had 150% increase in levels of anti-P4502B-reactive protein without significant changes in the other enzymes. The DES- and DMBA-treated females had increased levels of the female-specific P-4502C12 of 38 and 48%, respectively, but no other observed alterations. The results confirm that neonatal exposure to DES or PB can cause alterations in adult hepatic cytochrome P-450 levels but show that these chemicals act on different enzymes. Neonatal DMBA resulted in changes in adult females similar to those produced by the synthetic estrogen DES, but did so at about two-thirds lower dose. 37 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Cobalamin deficiency-induced changes of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor expression and EGF levels in rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Elena; Magnaghi, Valerio; Veber, Daniela; Faroni, Alessandro; Pece, Salvatore; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Scalabrino, Giuseppe

    2011-02-28

    We investigated the effect of cobalamin (Cbl) deficiency on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA levels in the spinal cord (SC) and liver of rats made Cbl-deficient (Cbl-D) by means of total gastrectomy or a Cbl-D diet, and simultaneously measured the levels of the epidermal growth factor (EGF). Both methods of inducing Cbl deficiency decreased EGFR expression in the SC and liver. Cbl replacement treatment normalized or nearly so most of the abnormalities in EGFR expression in the totally gastrectomized (TGX) rats at different times. The EGFR-immunostaining intensity decreased in the SC white matter of the Cbl-D rats and significantly increased in that of the TGX, Cbl-treated rats. EGF levels significantly increased in liver of TGX rats and in SC of 4-month TGX rats, and the increases returned to almost normal levels after a postoperative 2-month administration of Cbl to TGX rats. These findings demonstrate that Cbl deficiency dysregulates the EGFR-EGF dyad in these tissues.

  1. Low-intensity wheelchair training in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury : A randomized controlled trial on fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W; de Groot, Sonja; Tepper, Marga; Faber, Willemijn; Group, Allrisc; Veeger, DirkJan H; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of low-intensity wheelchair training on wheelchair-specific fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS: Inactive manual wheelchair use

  2. Low-intensity wheelchair training in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury : A randomized controlled trial on fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W.; de Groot, Sonja; Tepper, Marga; Faber, Willemijn; Veeger, DirkJan H.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    Objective: To investigate the effects of low-intensity wheelchair training on wheelchair-specific fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Participants: Inactive manual wheelchair

  3. Systems biology investigation of cAMP modulation to increase SMN levels for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

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    Sean G Mack

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1, which encodes the protein SMN. The loss of SMN1 causes a deficiency in SMN protein levels leading to motor neuron cell death in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMN2, however, can also produce some functional SMN to partially compensate for loss of SMN1 in SMA suggesting increasing transcription of SMN2 as a potential therapy to treat patients with SMA. A cAMP response element was identified on the SMN2 promoter, implicating cAMP activation as a step in the transcription of SMN2. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modulating the cAMP signaling cascade on SMN production in vitro and in silico. SMA patient fibroblasts were treated with the cAMP signaling modulators rolipram, salbutamol, dbcAMP, epinephrine and forskolin. All of the modulators tested were able to increase gem formation, a marker for SMN protein in the nucleus, in a dose-dependent manner. We then derived two possible mathematical models simulating the regulation of SMN2 expression by cAMP signaling. Both models fit well with our experimental data. In silico treatment of SMA fibroblasts simultaneously with two different cAMP modulators resulted in an additive increase in gem formation. This study shows how a systems biology approach can be used to develop potential therapeutic targets for treating SMA.

  4. Near-future carbon dioxide levels alter fish behaviour by interfering with neurotransmitter function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Göran E.; Dixson, Danielle L.; Domenici, Paolo; McCormick, Mark I.; Sørensen, Christina; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2012-03-01

    Predicted future CO2 levels have been found to alter sensory responses and behaviour of marine fishes. Changes include increased boldness and activity, loss of behavioural lateralization, altered auditory preferences and impaired olfactory function. Impaired olfactory function makes larval fish attracted to odours they normally avoid, including ones from predators and unfavourable habitats. These behavioural alterations have significant effects on mortality that may have far-reaching implications for population replenishment, community structure and ecosystem function. However, the underlying mechanism linking high CO2 to these diverse responses has been unknown. Here we show that abnormal olfactory preferences and loss of behavioural lateralization exhibited by two species of larval coral reef fish exposed to high CO2 can be rapidly and effectively reversed by treatment with an antagonist of the GABA-A receptor. GABA-A is a major neurotransmitter receptor in the vertebrate brain. Thus, our results indicate that high CO2 interferes with neurotransmitter function, a hitherto unrecognized threat to marine populations and ecosystems. Given the ubiquity and conserved function of GABA-A receptors, we predict that rising CO2 levels could cause sensory and behavioural impairment in a wide range of marine species, especially those that tightly control their acid-base balance through regulatory changes in HCO3- and Cl- levels.

  5. Alterations in the levels of plasma amino acids in polycystic ovary syndrome- A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unni, C. Sumithra N.; Lakshman, Lakshmi R.; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Subhakumari, K.N.; Menon, N. Leela

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Plasma amino acid levels are known to be altered in conditions like sepsis and burns which are situations of metabolic stress. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition which affects a woman throughout her life, is said to be associated with metabolic stress. This study was undertaken to assess if there were significant alterations in the levels of plasma amino acids in women with PCOS. Methods: Sixty five women with PCOS along with the similar number of age matched normal controls were included in this study. Levels of 14 amino acids were determined using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Results: The levels of methionine, cystine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, valine, tyrosine, proline, glycine, lysine and histidine were found to be significantly (P<0.001) lower in cases than in controls. Arginine and alanine levels were found to be significantly (P<0.001) higher in cases compared with controls. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed significant derangement in the levels of plasma amino acids in women with PCOS which might be due to the oxidative and metabolic stress associated with it. Further studies need to be done to confirm the findings. PMID:26658589

  6. Alterations in the levels of plasma amino acids in polycystic ovary syndrome- A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumithra N Unni C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Plasma amino acid levels are known to be altered in conditions like sepsis and burns which are situations of metabolic stress. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a condition which affects a woman throughout her life, is said to be associated with metabolic stress. This study was undertaken to assess if there were significant alterations in the levels of plasma amino acids in women with PCOS. Methods: Sixty five women with PCOS along with the similar number of age matched normal controls were included in this study. Levels of 14 amino acids were determined using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Results: The levels of methionine, cystine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, valine, tyrosine, proline, glycine, lysine and histidine were found to be significantly (P<0.001 lower in cases than in controls. Arginine and alanine levels were found to be significantly (P<0.001 higher in cases compared with controls. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed significant derangement in the levels of plasma amino acids in women with PCOS which might be due to the oxidative and metabolic stress associated with it. Further studies need to be done to confirm the findings.

  7. Low-level lasers alter mRNA levels from traditional reference genes used in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, A. F.; Canuto, K. S.; Rodrigues, J. A.; Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is among the leading causes of mortality worldwide, increasing the importance of treatment development. Low-level lasers are used in several diseases, but some concerns remains on cancers. Reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a technique used to understand cellular behavior through quantification of mRNA levels. Output data from target genes are commonly relative to a reference that cannot vary according to treatment. This study evaluated reference genes levels from MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to red or infrared lasers at different fluences. Cultures were exposed to red and infrared lasers, incubated (4 h, 37 °C), total RNA was extracted and cDNA synthesis was performed to evaluate mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB and TRFC genes by RT-qPCR. Specific amplification was verified by melting curves and agarose gel electrophoresis. RefFinder enabled data analysis by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Specific amplifications were obtained and, although mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB or TRFC genes presented no significant variation through traditional statistical analysis, Excel-based tools revealed that the use of these reference genes are dependent of laser characteristics. Our data showed that exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers at different fluences alter the mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB and TRFC in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  8. Altered microRNA expression profile in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a role in the regulation of NFL mRNA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Melo, Danae; Droppelmann, Cristian A; He, Zhongping; Volkening, Kathryn; Strong, Michael J

    2013-05-24

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, adult onset, fatal neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. There is emerging evidence that alterations in RNA metabolism may be critical in the pathogenesis of ALS. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are key determinants of mRNA stability. Considering that miRNAs are increasingly being recognized as having a role in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, we decided to characterize the miRNA expression profile in spinal cord (SC) tissue in sporadic ALS (sALS) and controls. Furthermore, we performed functional analysis to identify a group of dysregulated miRNAs that could be responsible for the selective suppression of low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA observed in ALS. Using TaqMan arrays we analyzed 664 miRNAs and found that a large number of miRNAs are differentially expressed in ventral lumbar SC in sALS compared to controls. We observed that the majority of dysregulated miRNAs are down-regulated in sALS SC tissues. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that dysregulated miRNAs are linked with nervous system function and cell death. We used two prediction algorithms to develop a panel of miRNAs that have recognition elements within the human NFL mRNA 3'UTR, and then we performed functional analysis for these miRNAs. Our results demonstrate that three miRNAs that are dysregulated in sALS (miR-146a*, miR-524-5p and miR-582-3p) are capable of interacting with NFL mRNA 3'UTR in a manner that is consistent with the suppressed steady state mRNA levels observed in spinal motor neurons in ALS. The miRNA expression profile is broadly altered in the SC in sALS. Amongst these is a group of dysregulated miRNAs directly regulate the NFL mRNA 3'UTR, suggesting a role in the selective suppression of NFL mRNA in the ALS spinal motor neuron neurofilamentous aggregate formation.

  9. A new stress model, a scream sound, alters learning and monoamine levels in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Song, Tusheng; Hou, Ni; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Xiaoge; Zhang, Dianzeng; Wang, Lumin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Chen

    2014-01-17

    Most existing animal models for stress involve the simultaneous application of physical and psychological stress factors. In the current study, we described and used a novel psychological stress model (scream sound stress). To study the validity of it, we carried out acute and chronic scream sound stress. First, adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into white noise, stress and background groups. The white noise group and stress group were treated with white noise and scream sound for 4h in the morning respectively. Compared with white noise and background groups, exposure to acute scream sound increased corticosterone (CORT) level and decreased latency in Morris water maze (MWM) test. The levels of noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were altered in the striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of stress rats. Second, adult SD rats were randomly divided into background and stress groups, which were treated with scream sound for three weeks. Exposure to chronic scream sound suppressed body weight gain, increased corticosterone (CORT) level, influenced the morphology of adrenal gland, improved spleen and thymus indices, and decreased latency in MWM test. NE, DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA levels were also altered in the brain of stress rats. Our results suggested that scream sound, as a novel stressor, facilitated learning ability, as well as altered monoamine levels in the rat brain. Moreover, scream sound is easy to apply and can be applied in more animals at the same time.

  10. Endocannabinoid regulation of spinal nociceptive processing in a model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Gray, Roy A; de Lago, Eva; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Barrett, David A; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2010-04-01

    Models of neuropathic pain are associated with elevated spinal levels of endocannabinoids (ECs) and altered expression of cannabinoid receptors on primary sensory afferents and post-synaptic cells in the spinal cord. We investigated the impact of these changes on the spinal processing of sensory inputs in a model of neuropathic pain. Extracellular single-unit recordings of spinal neurones were made in anaesthetized neuropathic and sham-operated rats. The effects of spinal administration of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB(2)) receptor antagonist N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicycloheptan-2-yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528) on mechanically-evoked responses of spinal neurones were determined. The effects of spinal administration of (5Z,8Z11Z,14Z)-N-(3-furanylmethyl)-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenamide (UCM707), which binds to CB(2) receptors and alters transport of ECs, on evoked responses of spinal neurones and spinal levels of ECs were also determined. The cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251, but not the CB(2) receptor antagonist, significantly facilitated 10-g-evoked responses of spinal neurones in neuropathic, but not sham-operated, rats. Spinal administration of UCM707 did not alter spinal levels of ECs but did significantly inhibit mechanically-evoked responses of neurones in neuropathic, but not sham-operated, rats. Pharmacological studies indicated that the selective inhibitory effects of spinal UCM707 in neuropathic rats were mediated by activation of spinal CB(2) receptors, as well as a contribution from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. This work demonstrates that changes in the EC receptor system in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats influence the processing of sensory inputs, in particular low-weight inputs that drive allodynia

  11. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

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    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  12. Modulation of ROS levels in fibroblasts by altering mitochondria regulates the process of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Jaroslav; Nfonsam, Valentine; Calienes, Fernanda; Sligh, James E; Jandova, Jana

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in fibroblasts which are thought to be crucial regulators of wound healing with a potential to affect the expression of nuclear genes involved in this process. ROS generated by mitochondria are involved in all stages of tissue repair process but the regulation of ROS-generating system in fibroblasts still remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to better understand molecular mechanisms of how the regulation of ROS levels generated by mitochondria may influence the process of wound repair. Cybrid model system of mtDNA variations was used to study the functional consequences of altered ROS levels on wound healing responses in a uniform nuclear background of cultured ρ(0) fibroblasts. Mitochondrial ROS in cybrids were modulated by antioxidants that quench ROS to examine their ability to close the wound. Real-time PCR arrays were used to investigate whether ROS generated by specific mtDNA variants have the ability to alter expression of some key nuclear-encoded genes central to the wound healing response and oxidative stress. Our data suggest levels of mitochondrial ROS affect expression of some nuclear encoded genes central to wound healing response and oxidative stress and modulation of mitochondrial ROS by antioxidants positively affects in vitro process of wound closure. Thus, regulation of mitochondrial ROS-generating system in fibroblasts can be used as effective natural redox-based strategy to help treat non-healing wounds.

  13. Methoxychlor reduces estradiol levels by altering steroidogenesis and metabolism in mouse antral follicles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S; Craig, Zelieann R; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Paulose, Tessie; Leslie, Traci C; Flaws, Jodi A

    2011-06-15

    The organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is a known endocrine disruptor that affects adult rodent females by causing reduced fertility, persistent estrus, and ovarian atrophy. Since MXC is also known to target antral follicles, the major producer of sex steroids in the ovary, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that MXC decreases estradiol (E₂) levels by altering steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in the antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mouse ovaries and cultured with either dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or MXC. Follicle growth was measured every 24 h for 96 h. In addition, sex steroid hormone levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes as well as the E₂ metabolic enzyme Cyp1b1 were measured using qPCR. The results indicate that MXC decreased E₂, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone (P₄) levels compared to DMSO. In addition, MXC decreased expression of aromatase (Cyp19a1), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd17b1), 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (Cyp17a1), 3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd3b1), cholesterol side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1), steroid acute regulatory protein (Star), and increased expression of Cyp1b1 enzyme levels. Thus, these data suggest that MXC decreases steroidogenic enzyme levels, increases metabolic enzyme expression and this in turn leads to decreased sex steroid hormone levels.

  14. Kinematic evaluation of one- and two-level Maverick lumbar total disc replacement caudal to a long thoracolumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingan; Itshayek, Eyal; Jones, Claire F; Schwab, Timothy; Larson, Chadwick R; Lenke, Lawrence G; Cripton, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    Adjacent level degeneration that occurs above and/or below long fusion constructs is a documented clinical problem that is widely believed to be associated with the considerable change in stiffness caused by the fusion. Some researchers have suggested that early degeneration at spinal joints adjacent to a fusion could be treated by implanting total disc replacements at these levels. It is thought that further degeneration could be prevented through the disc replacement's design aims to reproduce normal disc heights, kinematics and tissue loading. For this reason, there is a clinical need to evaluate if a total disc replacement can maintain both the quantity of motion (i.e. range) and the quality of motion (i.e. center of rotation and coupling) at segments adjacent to a long spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to experimentally evaluate range of motion (ROM-the intervertebral motion measured) and helical axis of motion (HAM) changes due to one- and two-level Maverick total disc replacement (TDR) adjacent to a long spinal fusion. Seven spine specimens (T8-S1) were used in this study (66 ± 19 years old, 3F/4 M). A continuous pure moment of ±5.0 Nm was applied to the specimen in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB) and axial rotation (AR), with a compressive follower preload of 400 N. The 5.0 Nm data were analyzed to evaluate the operated segment biomechanics at the level of the disc replacements. The data were also analyzed at lower moments using a modified version of Panjabi's proposed "hybrid" method to evaluate adjacent segment kinematics (intervertebral motion at the segments adjacent to the fusion) under identical overall (T8-S1) specimen rotations. The motion of each vertebra was monitored with an optoelectronic camera system. The biomechanical test was completed for (1) the intact condition and repeated after each surgical technique was applied to the specimen, (2) capsulotomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1, (3) T8-L4 fusion and capsulotomy at L4

  15. Steroid levels in crinoid echinoderms are altered by exposure to model endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Ramón; Barbaglio, Alice; Carnevali, M Daniela Candia; Porte, Cinta

    2006-06-01

    Sexual steroids (testosterone and estradiol) were measured in the whole body of wild specimens of the crinoid Antedon mediterranea collected from the Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy). Testosterone levels (274-1,488 pg/g wet weight (w.w.)) were higher than those of estradiol (60-442 pg/g w.w.) and no significant differences between males and females were observed. No clear seasonal trend was either detected - individuals from February, June and October 2004 analyzed - apart from a peak of estradiol in males in autumn. Nonetheless, dramatic changes on tissue steroid levels were observed when individuals were exposed to model androgenic and anti-androgenic compounds for 2 and 4 weeks. The selected compounds were 17 alpha-methyltestosterone (17 alpha-MT), triphenyltin (TPT), fenarimol (FEN), cyproterone acetate (CPA), and p,p'-DDE. Endogenous testosterone levels were significantly increased after exposure to 17 alpha-MT, TPT and FEN, while different responses were observed for estradiol; 17 alpha-MT and FEN increased endogenous estradiol (up to seven-fold), and TPT lead to a significant decrease. Concerning the anti-androgenic compounds, CPA significantly reduced testosterone in a dose-dependent manner without altering estradiol levels, whereas specimens exposed to p,p'-DDE at a low dose (24 ng/L) for 4 weeks showed a four-fold increase in T levels. Overall, the data show the ability of the selected compounds to alter endogenous steroid concentrations in A. mediterranea, and suggest the existence in this echinoderm species of vertebrate-like mechanisms that can be affected by exposure to androgenic and anti-androgenic chemicals.

  16. Autism associated gene, engrailed2, and flanking gene levels are altered in post-mortem cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeon Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous genetic studies demonstrated association between the transcription factor engrailed2 (EN2 and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. Subsequent molecular analysis determined that the EN2 ASD-associated haplotype (rs1861972-rs1861973 A-C functions as a transcriptional activator to increase gene expression. EN2 is flanked by 5 genes, serotonin receptor5a (HTR5A, insulin induced gene1 (INSIG1, canopy1 homolog (CNPY1, RNA binding motif protein33 (RBM33, and sonic hedgehog (SHH. These flanking genes are co-expressed with EN2 during development and coordinate similar developmental processes. To investigate if mRNA levels for these genes are altered in individuals with autism, post-mortem analysis was performed. METHODS: qRT-PCR quantified mRNA levels for EN2 and the 5 flanking genes in 78 post-mortem cerebellar samples. mRNA levels were correlated with both affection status and rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype. Molecular analysis investigated whether EN2 regulates flanking gene expression. RESULTS: EN2 levels are increased in affected A-C/G-T individuals (p = .0077. Affected individuals also display a significant increase in SHH and a decrease in INSIG1 levels. Rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype is correlated with significant increases for SHH (A-C/G-T and CNPY1 (G-T/G-T levels. Human cell line over-expression and knock-down as well as mouse knock-out analysis are consistent with EN2 and SHH being co-regulated, which provides a possible mechanism for increased SHH post-mortem levels. CONCLUSIONS: EN2 levels are increased in affected individuals with an A-C/G-T genotype, supporting EN2 as an ASD susceptibility gene. SHH, CNPY1, and INSIG1 levels are also significantly altered depending upon affection status or rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype. Increased EN2 levels likely contribute to elevated SHH expression observed in the post-mortem samples.

  17. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...

  18. [Spontaneous spinal cord herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J J; de la Lama, A; Gonza Lez, P; Ramos, A; Zurdo, M; Alday, R

    2004-10-01

    Spontaneous spinal cord herniation through a dural defect is an unusual condition. This entity has been probably underestimated before the introduction of MRI. We report a case of a 49-year-old man with a progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. MRI and CT myelogram showed a ventrally displaced spinal cord at level T6-T7 and expansion of the posterior subarachnoid space. Through a laminectomy, a spinal cord herniation was identified and reduced. The anterior dural defect was repaired with a patch of lyophilized dura. The patient recovered muscle power but there was no improvement of the sensory disturbance. The diagnosis of spontaneous spinal cord herniation must be considered when progressive myelopathy occurs in middle-aged patients, without signs of spinal cord compression and typical radiological findings. Surgical treatment may halt the progressive deficits and even yield improvement in many cases.

  19. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    the final version. RESULTS: The data set consists of nine variables: (1) Intervention/Procedure Date and start time (2) Non-surgical bed rest and external immobilization, (3) Spinal intervention-closed manipulation and/or reduction of spinal elements, (4) Surgical procedure-approach, (5) Date and time......STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS...... of the completion of the intervention or surgical closure; (6) Surgical procedure-open reduction, (7) Surgical procedure-direct decompression of neural elements, and (8 and 9) Surgical procedure-stabilization and fusion (spinal segment number and level). All variables are coded using numbers or characters. Each...

  20. Mineral abundances and different levels of alteration around Mawrth Vallis, Mars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Gou; Zongyu Yue; Kaichang Di; Jinnian Wang

    2015-01-01

    Spectral indices from OMEGA hyperspectral data show that there are two main phyllosilicates exposed in and around Mawrth Vallis: Al phyllosilicates and Fe/Mg phyllosilicates. Detailed analysis of CRISM spectra shows that Al phyllosilicates such as montmorillonite, hydrated silica, kaolinite; Fe/Mg phyllo-silicates such as nontronite, saponite, serpentine are widespread on the light-toned outcrops. Though similar stratigraphical sequences, morphologies and textures are observed on both sides of Mawrth Vallis from HiRISE images, suggesting that the geological processes that formed these units must have operated at a regional scale; the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) derived mineral abundance indicates that there is a higher level of alteration in the western side relative to the eastern side. We suggest that the observed phyllosilicates, stratigraphical sequences and different levels of alteration might have been caused by sedimentary deposition processes in which the composition of the external source sediment or the local solution was different, or by a pedogenic process closely related to the leaching of abundant liquid water with different chemical properties.

  1. Marine mollusc predator-escape behaviour altered by near-future carbon dioxide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Lefevre, Sjannie; McCormick, Mark I; Domenici, Paolo; Nilsson, Göran E; Munday, Philip L

    2014-01-07

    Ocean acidification poses a range of threats to marine invertebrates; however, the potential effects of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) on marine invertebrate behaviour are largely unknown. Marine gastropod conch snails have a modified foot and operculum allowing them to leap backwards rapidly when faced with a predator, such as a venomous cone shell. Here, we show that projected near-future seawater CO2 levels (961 µatm) impair this escape behaviour during a predator-prey interaction. Elevated-CO2 halved the number of snails that jumped from the predator, increased their latency to jump and altered their escape trajectory. Physical ability to jump was not affected by elevated-CO2 indicating instead that decision-making was impaired. Antipredator behaviour was fully restored by treatment with gabazine, a GABA antagonist of some invertebrate nervous systems, indicating potential interference of neurotransmitter receptor function by elevated-CO2, as previously observed in marine fishes. Altered behaviour of marine invertebrates at projected future CO2 levels could have potentially far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems.

  2. Impact of Pharmacological Interventions in Expectant Mothers Resulting in Altered Mutans Streptococci Levels in their Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Murugan Satta; Ankita, Saikia; Renugalakshmi, Apathsakayan; Richard, Kirubakaran

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether prenatal use of fluoride, chlorhexidine mouthrinses, and xylitol could alter the mutans streptococci levels in children. A systematic search of clinical trials was implemented for the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, PubMed, PMC, NCBI, ClinicalKey, Google Scholar, LILACS, and Science Direct. A search for ongoing trials was also undertaken in the clinicaltrial.gov database to identify eligible studies. Data regarding methodology, participants, types of interventions, and outcomes were extracted, and the risk of bias was also assessed independently by two review authors. Only two clinical trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Although one study showed significant results, the overall result of this systematic review showed no statistical significance. A risk ratio and 95 percent confidence interval of 0.1 (0.01 to 1.89) were obtained. Statistically significant results were reported in both the included studies; however, systematic analysis revealed a dearth of current evidence to support the general recommendation of pharmacological interventions for expectant mothers resulting in altered mutans streptococci levels in their children.

  3. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000029.htm Spinal injury To use the sharing features on this page, ... move anyone who you think may have a spinal injury, unless it is absolutely necessary. For example, if ...

  4. Spinal tuberculosis: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Somvanshi, Dilip Singh

    2011-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is a destructive form of tuberculosis. It accounts for approximately half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is more common in children and young adults. The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. Genetic susceptibility to spinal tuberculosis has recently been demonstrated. Characteristically, there is destruction of the intervertebral disk space and the adjacent vertebral bodies, collapse of the spinal elements, and anterior wedging leading to kyphosis and gibbus formation. The thoracic region of vertebral column is most frequently affected. Formation of a ‘cold’ abscess around the lesion is another characteristic feature. The incidence of multi-level noncontiguous vertebral tuberculosis occurs more frequently than previously recognized. Common clinical manifestations include constitutional symptoms, back pain, spinal tenderness, paraplegia, and spinal deformities. For the diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray and more specific than computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging frequently demonstrates involvement of the vertebral bodies on either side of the disk, disk destruction, cold abscess, vertebral collapse, and presence of vertebral column deformities. Neuroimaging-guided needle biopsy from the affected site in the center of the vertebral body is the gold standard technique for early histopathological diagnosis. Antituberculous treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment. Surgery may be required in selected cases, e.g. large abscess formation, severe kyphosis, an evolving neurological deficit, or lack of response to medical treatment. With early diagnosis and early treatment, prognosis is generally good. PMID:22118251

  5. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the level of injury. People who survive a spinal cord injury will most likely have medical complications such as chronic pain and bladder and bowel ...

  6. Audiovisual associations alter the perception of low-level visual motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulusi eKafaligonul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Motion perception is a pervasive nature of vision and is affected by both immediate pattern of sensory inputs and prior experiences acquired through associations. Recently, several studies reported that an association can be established quickly between directions of visual motion and static sounds of distinct frequencies. After the association is formed, sounds are able to change the perceived direction of visual motion. To determine whether such rapidly acquired audiovisual associations and their subsequent influences on visual motion perception are dependent on the involvement of higher-order attentive tracking mechanisms, we designed psychophysical experiments using regular and reverse-phi random dot motions isolating low-level pre-attentive motion processing. Our results show that an association between the directions of low-level visual motion and static sounds can be formed and this audiovisual association alters the subsequent perception of low-level visual motion. These findings support the view that audiovisual associations are not restricted to high-level attention based motion system and early-level visual motion processing has some potential role.

  7. Alterations of BDNF and GDNF serum levels in alcohol-addicted patients during alcohol withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bülent Sönmez

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF are neurotrophic neuropeptides that play important roles in the synaptic plasticity, neuronal growth, survival and function. A possible neuroprotective role of neurotrophic factors against alcohol-induced cell damage has been suggested, and dysregulations in neurotrophic factors may be involved in the vulnerability to addiction. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of BDNF and GDNF serum levels in alcohol-addicted patients during alcohol withdrawal compared to healthy controls. Methods: BDNF and GDNF serum levels of 34 male inpatients diagnosed with alcohol addiction according to DSM-IV-TR were investigated during alcohol withdrawal (day 1, 7 and 14 in comparison to 32 healthy controls using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Severity of alcohol withdrawal was measured by Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol (CIWA-Ar, and intensity of alcohol craving was measured by Penn Alcohol Craving Scale (PACS during alcohol withdrawal (day 1, 7 and 14. Results: BDNF serum levels increased significantly during alcohol withdrawal (p = 0.020. They were negatively correlated to the severity of alcohol withdrawal, and the correlation was close to being statistically significant (p = 0.058. BDNF and GDNF serum levels did not differ significantly between the patient and control groups. GDNF serum levels did not change significantly during alcohol withdrawal. Conclusions: Our results may provide support for the previously hypothesized role of BDNF in the neuroadaptation during alcohol withdrawal.

  8. Audiovisual associations alter the perception of low-level visual motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafaligonul, Hulusi; Oluk, Can

    2015-01-01

    Motion perception is a pervasive nature of vision and is affected by both immediate pattern of sensory inputs and prior experiences acquired through associations. Recently, several studies reported that an association can be established quickly between directions of visual motion and static sounds of distinct frequencies. After the association is formed, sounds are able to change the perceived direction of visual motion. To determine whether such rapidly acquired audiovisual associations and their subsequent influences on visual motion perception are dependent on the involvement of higher-order attentive tracking mechanisms, we designed psychophysical experiments using regular and reverse-phi random dot motions isolating low-level pre-attentive motion processing. Our results show that an association between the directions of low-level visual motion and static sounds can be formed and this audiovisual association alters the subsequent perception of low-level visual motion. These findings support the view that audiovisual associations are not restricted to high-level attention based motion system and early-level visual motion processing has some potential role.

  9. Effects of erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz pretreatment on pathology and oxyradical level following spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz (erigeron breviscapus) pretreatment on pathology and oxyradical level in the spinal cord after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rabbits. Methods A total of 40 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation group with 10 rabbits treated with only abdominal aorta exposure without occlusion,control group with 15 rabbits that underwent ischemia for 50 minutes and treated with matched saline,and ...

  10. Mechanisms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in the spinal cord level%阿片类药物引起痛觉过敏的脊髓机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷洪伊; 徐世元

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioid-induced hyperalgesia has received increasing attention,and the mechanisms need further investigation.Objective To expound some possible mechanisms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in the spinal cord level,which may offer some methods for prevention of the hyperalgesia in clinic.Content This review provides some information about opioidinduced hyperalgesia in the spinal cord level,such as the receptors pathway,signal transduction pathway,neuropeptide and so on.Trend The detailed mechanism of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in the spinal cord level needs further study.%背景 阿片类药物引起的痛觉过敏(opioid-induced hyperalgesia,OIH)日益引起关注,其机制有待深入研究.目的 论述脊髓水平OIH的机制,以供临床研究防治此类痛觉过敏参考.内容 就脊髓水平受体通路、信号转导路径及神经肽等方面,论述OIH的机制.趋向 脊髓水平多种途径参与OIH,值得进一步研究.

  11. Altered levels of Reelin and its isoforms in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S H; Kroll, J L; Stary, J M

    2001-10-29

    Reelin is a secreted extracellular matrix protein approximately 410 kDa mol. wt that is reduced in brains of patients with schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder and major depression. Recent reports also indicate its near absence in sera of some patients with an autosomal recessive form of lissencephaly. Moreover, Reelin is involved not only in normal cortical lamination of the brain during mammalian embryogenesis but is also implicated in cell signaling systems subserving cognition in adult brain. Here, we show that blood levels of Reelin and its isoforms are altered in three psychiatric disorders, namely, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The changes include significant increases in 410 kDa Reelin moiety of 49% in schizophrenic patients (p Reelin levels decreased by 33% in bipolar blood, albeit non-signficantly, vs. controls. There was a significant increase of 90% (p Reelin in Caucasian schizophrenics; the depressed value was elevated by 30% vs. control but non-significantly. Again, in contrast, bipolar 330 kDa value decreased by 31% vs control (p Reelin values varied minimally in schizophrenics vs controls. In contrast, the 180 kDa Reelin values dropped significantly by 49% (p Reelin values appear to be specific since levels of two other blood proteins, ceruloplasmin and albumin did not vary significantly between all psychiatric subjects and controls. These findings suggest that blood Reelin levels and its isoforms may be used as potential peripheral markers to diagnose presence of several psychiatric disorders and may also serve as targets for future therapeutic interventions.

  12. Saharan dust inputs and high UVR levels jointly alter the metabolic balance of marine oligotrophic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Marco J.; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; González-Olalla, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Carrillo, Presentación

    2016-10-01

    The metabolic balance of the most extensive bioma on the Earth is a controversial topic of the global-change research. High ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels by the shoaling of upper mixed layers and increasing atmospheric dust deposition from arid regions may unpredictably alter the metabolic state of marine oligotrophic ecosystems. We performed an observational study across the south-western (SW) Mediterranean Sea to assess the planktonic metabolic balance and a microcosm experiment in two contrasting areas, heterotrophic nearshore and autotrophic open sea, to test whether a combined UVR × dust impact could alter their metabolic balance at mid-term scales. We show that the metabolic state of oligotrophic areas geographically varies and that the joint impact of UVR and dust inputs prompted a strong change towards autotrophic metabolism. We propose that this metabolic response could be accentuated with the global change as remote-sensing evidence shows increasing intensities, frequencies and number of dust events together with variations in the surface UVR fluxes on SW Mediterranean Sea. Overall, these findings suggest that the enhancement of the net carbon budget under a combined UVR and dust inputs impact could contribute to boost the biological pump, reinforcing the role of the oligotrophic marine ecosystems as CO2 sinks.

  13. Comparison of functional electrical stimulation to long leg braces for upright mobility for children with complete thoracic level spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaroti, D; Akers, J M; Smith, B T; Mulcahey, M J; Betz, R R

    1999-09-01

    To prospectively compare functional electrical stimulation (FES) to long leg braces (LLB) as a means of upright mobility for children with motor-complete thoracic level spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Intrasubject group comparison of two interventions. Nonprofit pediatric orthopedic rehabilitation facility specializing in SCI. Convenience sample of five children between 9 and 18 years old with motor-complete thoracic level SCI. The hip and knee extensors were excitable by electrical stimulation. The FES system consisted of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes implanted to the hip and knee extensors and a push-button activated stimulator worn about the waist. Standing was accomplished by simultaneous stimulation of all implanted muscles. For foot and ankle stability, either ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) or supramalleolar orthoses were used. The LLB system consisted of a custom knee-ankle foot orthosis (KAFO) for four subjects and a custom reciprocating gait orthosis (RGO) for one subject who required bracing at the hip. For both interventions, either a front-wheeled walker or Lofstrand crutches were used as assistive devices. Each subject was trained in the use of both FES and LLB in seven standardized upright mobility activities: stand and reach, high transfer, toilet transfer, floor to stand, 6-meter walk, stair ascent, and stair descent. For each mobility activity, five repeated measures of level of independence, using the 7-point Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, and time to completion were recorded for each intervention. Subjects were also asked which intervention they preferred. For 94% of comparisons, subjects required equal (70%) or less (24%) assistance using FES as compared with LLB. Six of the seven mobility activities required less time to complete using FES, two activities at significant levels. The FES system was preferred in 62% of the cases, LLB were desired 27% of the time, and there was no preference in 11% of the cases. The FES system

  14. Alteration of Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level After Acute Moderate Exercise in Professional Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Sheikhani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac fatigue or myocardial damage following exercise until complete exhaustion can increase blood levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in athletes. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of resistance and acute moderate aerobic exercise on alterations in BNP levels in professional athletes. Materials and Methods: Forty professional athletes who had at least 3 years of a championship background in track and field (aerobic group or body building (resistance group volunteered to participate in the present study. Track and field athletes (n = 20 were requested to run 8 km at 60% to 70% of maximum heart rate. Body building athletes (n = 20 performed a resistance training session of 5 exercises in 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of 1 RM (bench press, seated row, leg extension, leg curl, and leg press. Before and immediately after the exercise, plasma BNP levels of both groups of athletes were measured by PATHFASTTM NT-proBNP assay, an immunochemiluminescent assay using two polyclonal antibodies in sandwich test format, on a PATHFASTTM automated analyzer. Results: Plasma BNP levels immediately following exercise increased significantly as compared with baseline values. Plasma BNP concentrations in the aerobic group were significantly higher than in the resistance group before and after exercise. Moreover, the increase in mean BNP concentrations in aerobic athletes was 7 times more than in resistance athletes. Conclusions: BNP levels in athlete who performed distance exercises increased significantly compared with resistance training. Possibly exercise program type, intensity of exercise, volume of exercise program, and field sport can be factors of changes in BNP levels

  15. Corticosterone and Exogenous Glucose Alter Blood Glucose levels, Neurotoxicity, and Vascular Toxicity Produced by Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, John F; Tranter, Karen M; Sarkar, Sumit; George, Nysia I; Hanig, Joseph P; Kelly, Kimberly A; Michalovicz, Lindsay T; Miller, Diane B; O'Callaghan, James P

    2017-08-09

    Our previous studies have raised the possibility that altered blood glucose levels may influence and/or be predictive of methamphetamine (METH) neurotoxicity. This study evaluated the effects of exogenous glucose and corticosterone (CORT) pretreatment alone or in combination with METH on blood glucose levels and the neural and vascular toxicity produced. METH exposure consisted of four sequential injections of 5, 7.5, 10, and 10 mg/kg (2h between injections) D-METH. The three groups given METH in combination with saline, glucose (METH+Glucose), or CORT (METH+CORT) had significantly higher glucose levels compared to the corresponding treatment groups without METH except at 3 h after the last injection. At this last time point, the METH and METH+Glucose groups had lower levels than the non-METH groups, while the METH+CORT group did not. CORT alone or glucose alone did not significantly increase blood glucose. Mortality rates for the METH+CORT (40%) and METH+Glucose (44%) groups were substantially higher than the METH (< 10%) group. Additionally, METH+CORT significantly increased neurodegeneration above all other treatments (≈ 2.5-fold in the parietal cortex). Thus, maintaining elevated levels of glucose during METH exposure increases lethality and may exacerbate neurodegeneration. Neuroinflammation, specifically microglial activation, was associated with degenerating neurons in the parietal cortex and thalamus after METH exposure. The activated microglia in the parietal cortex were surrounding vasculature in most cases and the extent of microglial activation was exacerbated by CORT pretreatment. Our findings implicate elevated blood levels of glucose and hyperthermia in METH-induced neurotoxicity, neurovascular damage, and lethality, and that acute elevation of CORT exacerbates both neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Alteration of plasma glutamate and glutamine levels in children with high-functioning autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie Shimmura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has recently been hypothesized that hyperglutamatergia in the brain is involved in the pathophysiology of autism. However, there is no conclusive evidence of the validity of this hypothesis. As peripheral glutamate/glutamine levels have been reported to be correlated with those of the central nervous system, the authors examined whether the levels of 25 amino acids, including glutamate and glutamine, in the platelet-poor plasma of drug-naïve, male children with high-functioning autism (HFA would be altered compared with those of normal controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasma levels of 25 amino acids in male children (N = 23 with HFA and normally developed healthy male controls (N = 22 were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Multiple testing was allowed for in the analyses. Compared with the normal control group, the HFA group had higher levels of plasma glutamate and lower levels of plasma glutamine. No significant group difference was found in the remaining 23 amino acids. The effect size (Cohen's d for glutamate and glutamine was large: 1.13 and 1.36, respectively. Using discriminant analysis with logistic regression, the two values of plasma glutamate and glutamine were shown to well-differentiate the HFA group from the control group; the rate of correct classification was 91%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study suggests that plasma glutamate and glutamine levels can serve as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of autism, especially normal IQ autism. These findings indicate that glutamatergic abnormalities in the brain may be associated with the pathobiology of autism.

  17. A D2-like receptor family agonist produces analgesia in mechanonociception but not in thermonociception at the spinal cord level in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, Angélica; Simón-Arceo, Karina; Coffeen, Ulises; Fuentes-García, Ruth; Contreras, Bernardo; Pellicer, Francisco; Mercado, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The administration of dopaminergic drugs produces analgesia in individuals experiencing different types of pain. Analgesia induced by these drugs at the spinal cord level is mediated by D2-like agonists, which specifically inhibit the detection of nociceptive stimuli by sensory afferents. The extent of the analgesia provided by spinal dopamine agonists remains controversial, and the cellular mechanism of this analgesic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of quinpirole, a D2-like agonist, based on two nociceptive tests and at various doses that were selected to specifically activate dopamine receptors. We found that intrathecal quinpirole administration produces analgesia of mechanical but not thermal nociception and that the analgesic effect of quinpirole is reversed by a mix of D2, D3, and D4 receptor-specific antagonists, suggesting that the activation of all D2-like receptors is involved in the analgesia produced by intrathecal quinpirole. The differential effect on thermal and mechanical nociception was also tested upon the activation of μ-opioid receptors. As reported previously, low doses of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO produced analgesia of only thermonociception. This evidence shows that a D2-like receptor agonist administered at the spinal cord level produces analgesia specific to mechanonociception but not thermonociception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alterations in maternal corticosteroid levels influence fetal urine and lung liquid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ellen; Wood, Charles E; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2003-12-01

    This study was designed to test the hypotheses that disruption of maternal adrenal secretion in late pregnancy requires fetal adaptations in order to maintain fetal blood volume and fetal viability. Pregnant ewes were adrenalectomized at approximately 112 days, and cortisol and aldosterone were replaced to either normal pregnant levels (with 1 mg/kg per day of cortisol and 3 microg/kg per day of aldosterone) or normal nonpregnant levels of aldosterone or cortisol (0.5 mg/kg per day of cortisol or 1.5 microg/kg per day of aldosterone). Fetal blood volume, blood pressure, lung liquid production, urine production, free water clearance, and glomerular filtration rate were measured at 130 days. In a separate group, fetal organ blood flow was measured. Fetal blood volume was not significantly decreased by disruption of maternal corticosteroid secretion. However fetal urine production and free water clearance were reduced in fetuses of low cortisol or low aldosterone ewes. Fetal lung liquid secretion was also significantly reduced in the low aldosterone group. The glomerular filtration rate was reduced in fetuses of all adrenalectomized ewes, regardless of replacement dose. Fetal blood pressure was significantly reduced in the fetuses of low aldosterone ewes; blood flow to several fetal organs was increased in this group, indicating that decreased vascular resistance may contribute to the relative hypotension. Alterations in maternal adrenal corticosteroid levels resulted in fetal adaptation to maintain fetal blood volume despite relative maternal hypovolemia. These adaptations occurred at the expense of fetal urine and lung liquid production.

  19. Peripheral injury of pelvic visceral sensory nerves alters GFRa (GDNF family receptor alpha localization in sensory and autonomic pathways of the sacral spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Lynne Forrest

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, neurturin and artemin use their co-receptors (GFRα1, GFRα2 and GFRα3, respectively and the tyrosine kinase Ret for downstream signalling. In rodent dorsal root ganglia (DRG most of the unmyelinated and some myelinated sensory afferents express at least one GFRα. The adult function of these receptors is not completely elucidated but their activity after peripheral nerve injury can facilitate peripheral and central axonal regeneration, recovery of sensation, and sensory hypersensitivity that contributes to pain. Our previous immunohistochemical studies of spinal cord and sciatic nerve injuries in adult rodents have identified characteristic changes in GFRα1, GFRα2 or GFRα3 in central spinal cord axons of sensory neurons located in dorsal root ganglia. Here we extend and contrast this analysis by studying injuries of the pelvic and hypogastric nerves that contain the majority of sensory axons projecting to the pelvic viscera (e.g., bladder and lower bowel. At 7 d, we detected some effects of pelvic but not hypogastric nerve transection on the ipsilateral spinal cord. In sacral (L6-S1 cord ipsilateral to nerve injury, GFRα1-immunoreactivity (IR was increased in medial dorsal horn and CGRP-IR was decreased in lateral dorsal horn. Pelvic nerve injury also upregulated GFRα1- and GFRα3-IR terminals and GFRα1-IR neuronal cell bodies in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus that provides the spinal parasympathetic preganglionic output to the pelvic nerve. This evidence suggests peripheral axotomy has different effects on somatic and visceral sensory input to the spinal cord, and identifies sensory-autonomic interactions as a possible site of post-injury regulation.

  20. The Effect of Lumbar Disc Herniation on Musculoskeletal Loadings in the Spinal Region During Level Walking and Stair Climbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Shengzheng; Liao, Zhenhua; Zhou, Wenyu; Guan, Xinyu; Ji, Run; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Daiqi; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background People with low back pain (LBP) alter their motion patterns during level walking and stair climbing due to pain or fear. However, the alternations of load sharing during the two activities are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of LBP caused by lumbar disc herniation (LDH) on the muscle activities of 17 main trunk muscle groups and the intradiscal forces acting on the five lumbar discs. Material/Methods Twenty-six healthy adults and seven LDH patients were recruited to perform level walking and stair climbing in the Gait Analysis Laboratory. Eight optical markers were placed on the bony landmarks of the spinous process and pelvis, and the coordinates of these markers were captured during the two activities using motion capture system. The coordinates of the captured markers were applied to developed musculoskeletal model to calculate the kinetic variables. Results LDH patients demonstrated higher muscle activities in most trunk muscle groups during both level walking and stair climbing. There were decreases in anteroposterior shear forces on the discs in the pathological region and increases in the compressive forces on all the lumbar discs during level walking. The symmetry of mediolateral shear forces was worse in LDH patients than healthy adults during stair climbing. Conclusions LDH patients exhibited different kinetic alternations during level walking and stair climbing. However, both adaptive strategies added extra burdens to the trunk system and further increased the risk for development of LDH. PMID:28796755

  1. Ambient CO2, fish behaviour and altered GABAergic neurotransmission: exploring the mechanism of CO2-altered behaviour by taking a hypercapnia dweller down to low CO2 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Matthew D; Turko, Andy J; Heras, Joseph; Andersen, Mads Kuhlmann; Lefevre, Sjannie; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark; Brauner, Colin J; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Nilsson, Göran E

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that projected rises of aquatic CO2 levels cause acid-base regulatory responses in fishes that lead to altered GABAergic neurotransmission and disrupted behaviour, threatening fitness and population survival. It is thought that changes in Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) gradients across neural membranes interfere with the function of GABA-gated anion channels (GABAA receptors). So far, such alterations have been revealed experimentally by exposing species living in low-CO2 environments, like many oceanic habitats, to high levels of CO2 (hypercapnia). To examine the generality of this phenomenon, we set out to study the opposite situation, hypothesizing that fishes living in typically hypercapnic environments also display behavioural alterations if exposed to low CO2 levels. This would indicate that ion regulation in the fish brain is fine-tuned to the prevailing CO2 conditions. We quantified pH regulatory variables and behavioural responses of Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, a fish native to the hypercapnic Mekong River, acclimated to high-CO2 (3.1 kPa) or low-CO2 (0.04 kPa) water. We found that brain and blood pH was actively regulated and that the low-CO2 fish displayed significantly higher activity levels, which were reduced after treatment with gabazine, a GABAA receptor blocker. This indicates an involvement of the GABAA receptor and altered Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) ion gradients. Indeed, Goldman calculations suggest that low levels of environmental CO2 may cause significant changes in neural ion gradients in P. hypophthalmus. Taken together, the results suggest that brain ion regulation in fishes is fine-tuned to the prevailing ambient CO2 conditions and is prone to disruption if these conditions change.

  2. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  3. Below-ambient levels of UV induce chloroplast structural change and alter starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, W R

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in the 400-700 nm bandwidth of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) has been established as an important source of energy for photosynthesis and environmental signals regulating many aspects of green-plant life. Above-ambient levels of UV-B radiation (290-320 nm) under high-PAR conditions have been shown to elicit responses in chloroplasts of Brassica napus similar to those of chloroplasts at low-PAR exposure (W. Fagerberg and J. Bornman, Physiol. Plant. 101: 833-844, 1997). The question arises as to whether UV at normal levels can also evoke similar responses. Here we provide evidence that even below-ambient levels of UV-B (1/28 ambient; Durham, N.H., U.S.A., 1200 hours, March) were capable of inducing an increase in thylakoid surface area relative to the chloroplast volume typical of a low-PAR response (shade response) in sunflowers. This response occurred even though leaves were concurrently exposed to PAR levels that normally induce a "sun" or high-PAR response in the absence of UV-B. Subambient levels of UV-B were also associated with a decrease in chloroplast and starch volume. Exposure to levels of UV-A 1/10 of ambient appeared to enhance the high-PAR response of the chloroplast, characterized by an increase in the amounts of stored starch, an increase in chloroplast volume density ratio values, and a decrease in thylakoid surface area density ratios relative to the high-light controls. These effects were opposite to those seen in UV-B-exposed tissue. In a general sense, subambient levels of UV-B evoked a response similar to that elicited by low-PAR irradiance, while subambient UV-A elicited responses similar to those typical of high-PAR irradiance. The fact that below-ambient levels of UV altered a normal chloroplast structural response to PAR provides evidence that UV may be an important environmental signal for plants.

  4. Prenatal Hyperandrogenization Induces Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations Which Depend on the Levels of Testosterone Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalfi, Sabrina; Velez, Leandro Martín; Heber, María Florencia; Vighi, Susana; Ferreira, Silvana Rocío; Orozco, Adriana Vega; Pignataro, Omar; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is able to induce polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in rats. The aim of the present study was to establish if the levels of prenatal testosterone may determine the extent of metabolic and endocrine alterations during the adult life. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were prenatally injected with either 2 or 5 mg free testosterone (groups T2 and T5 respectively) from day 16 to day 19 day of gestation. Female offspring from T2 and T5 displayed different phenotype of PCOS during adult life. Offspring from T2 showed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and ovulatory cycles whereas those from T5 displayed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and anovulatory cycles. Both group showed increased circulating glucose levels after the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT; an evaluation of insulin resistance). IPGTT was higher in T5 rats and directly correlated with body weight at prepubertal age. However, the decrease in the body weight at prepubertal age was compensated during adult life. Although both groups showed enhanced ovarian steroidogenesis, it appears that the molecular mechanisms involved were different. The higher dose of testosterone enhanced the expression of both the protein that regulates cholesterol availability (the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)) and the protein expression of the transcriptional factor: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma). Prenatal hyperandrogenization induced an anti-oxidant response that prevented a possible pro-oxidant status. The higher dose of testosterone induced a pro-inflammatory state in ovarian tissue mediated by increased levels of prostaglandin E (PG) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, the limiting enzyme of PGs synthesis). In summary, our data show that the levels of testosterone prenatally injected modulate the uterine environment and that this, in turn, would be responsible for the endocrine and metabolic abnormalities and the phenotype of PCOS

  5. Resveratrol alters the lipid composition, metabolism and peroxide level in senescent rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momchilova, Albena; Petkova, Diana; Staneva, Galya; Markovska, Tania; Pankov, Roumen; Skrobanska, Ralica; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana; Koumanov, Kamen

    2014-01-25

    Investigations were performed on the influence of resveratrol on the lipid composition, metabolism, fatty acid and peroxide level in plasma membranes of hepatocytes, isolated from aged rats. Hepatocytes were chosen due to the central role of the liver in lipid metabolism and homeostasis. The obtained results showed that the level of sphingomyelin (SM) and phosphatidylserine (PS) was augmented in plasma membranes of resveratrol-treated senescent hepatocytes. The saturated/unsaturated fatty acids ratio of the two most abundant membrane phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), was decreased as a result of resveratrol treatment. The neutral sphingomyelinase was found to be responsible for the increase of SM and the decrease of ceramide in plasma membranes of resveratrol-treated senescent hepatocytes. Using labeled acetate as a precursor of lipid synthesis we demonstrated, that resveratrol treatment resulted in inhibition mainly of phospholipid synthesis, followed by fatty acids synthesis. Resveratrol induced reduction of specific membrane-associated markers of apoptosis such as localization of PS in the external plasma membrane monolayer and ceramide level. Finally, the content of lipid peroxides was investigated, because the unsaturated fatty acids, which were augmented as a result of resveratrol treatment, are an excellent target of oxidative attack. The results showed that the lipid peroxide level was significantly lower, ROS were slightly reduced and GSH was almost unchanged in resveratrol-treated hepatocytes. We suggest, that one possible biochemical mechanism, underlying the reported resveratrol-induced changes, is the partial inactivation of neutral sphingomyelinase, leading to increase of SM, the latter acting as a native membrane antioxidant. In conclusion, our studies indicate that resveratrol treatment induces beneficial alterations in the phospholipid and fatty acid composition, as well as in the ceramide and peroxide

  6. Elevated CO{sub 2} levels and herbivore damage alter host plant preferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrell, J. [Lund Univ., Dept. of Animal Ecology, Lund (Sweden); Anderson, Peter, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. of Crop Sciences, Alnarp (SE)); Oleszek, W.; Stochmal, Anna [Inst. of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Dept. of Biochemistry, Pulawy (Poland); Agrell, Cecilia [Lund Univ., Dept. of Chemical Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Lund (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between the moth Spodoptera littoralis and two of its host plants, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) were examined, using plants grown under ambient (350 ppm) and elevated (700 ppm) CO{sub 2} conditions. To determine strength and effects of herbivore-induced responses assays were performed with both undamaged (control) and herbivore damaged plants. CO{sub 2} and damage effects on larval host plant preferences were determined through dual-choice bioassays. In addition, larvae were reared from hatching to pupation on experimental foliage to examine effects on larval growth and development. When undamaged plants were used S. littoralis larvae in consumed more cotton than alfalfa, and CO{sub 2} enrichment caused a reduction in the preference for cotton. With damaged plants larvae consumed equal amounts of the two plant species (ambient CO{sub 2} conditions), but CO{sub 2} enrichment strongly shifted preferences towards cotton, which was then consumed three times more than alfalfa. Complementary assays showed that elevated CO{sub 2} levels had no effect on the herbivore-induced responses of cotton, whereas those of alfalfa were significantly increased. Larval growth was highest for larvae fed undamaged cotton irrespectively of CO{sub 2} level, and lowest for larvae on damaged alfalfa from the high CO{sub 2} treatment. Development time increased on damaged cotton irrespectively of CO{sub 2} treatment, and on damaged alfalfa in the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. (au) These results demonstrate that elevated CO2 levels can cause insect herbivores to alter host plant preferences, and that effects on herbivore-induced responses may be a key mechanism behind these processes. Furthermore, since the insects were shown to avoid foliage that reduced their physiological performance, our data suggest that behavioural host plant shifts result in partial escape from negative consequences of feeding on high CO2 foliage. Thus, CO2 enrichment can alter

  7. Pregnancy amelioration of arthritis in SKG mice corresponds with alterations in serum amyloid A3 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Laura A; Stefanski, Adrianne L; Peterson, Lisa K; Rumer, Kristen K; Vondracek, Andrea; Phang, Tzu L; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Winn, Virginia D; Dragone, Leonard L

    2012-06-30

    OBJECTIVES: Pregnancy leads to rheumatoid arthritis remission in humans. The objective of this study was to determine if the SKG mouse could serve as a model for pregnancy-associated inflammatory arthritis amelioration. In addition, the maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) transcriptome was assessed to define a biomarker associated with remission. METHODS: Cohorts of zymosan-treated pregnant SKG mice and controls were monitored for arthritis progression. Microarray analysis evaluated alterations in gene expression in maternal PBMCs at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) between arthritic and pregnancy-remitted mice. A selected target, serum amyloid A3 (SAA3), was further investigated using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RESULTS: Pregnancy resulted in complete or partial remission in the majority of the zymosan-treated SKG mice. Twenty-seven transcripts were differentially expressed in the PBMCs between arthritic and pregnancy-remitted mice. Expression and plasma SAA3 levels decreased with pregnancy-induced arthritis amelioration and plasma SAA3 levels correlated with arthritis severity. CONCLUSIONS: These results establish the SKG mouse as a model system to study pregnancy-induced amelioration of arthritis. These studies also establish SAA3 as a biomarker of arthritis amelioration in SKG mice. This model can be used to elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the impact of pregnancy on the maternal immune system that results in arthritis amelioration.

  8. Smoking, alcoholism and genetic polymorphisms alter CYP2B6 levels in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, Sharon; Lerman, Caryn; Shields, Peter G; Mash, Deborah C; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2003-07-01

    CYP2B6 metabolizes drugs such as nicotine and bupropion, and many toxins and carcinogens. Nicotine induces CYP2B1 in rat brain and in humans polymorphic variation in CYP2B6 affects smoking cessation rates. The aim of this study was to compare CYP2B6 expression in brains of human smokers and non-smokers and alcoholics and non-alcoholics (n=26). CYP2B6 expression was brain region-specific, and was observed in both neurons and astrocytes. CYP2B6 levels were higher in brains of smokers and alcoholics, particularly in cerebellar Purkinje cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons, cells known to be damaged in alcoholics. Significantly more (penzyme levels, stability and activity. Preliminary genotyping of this small sample (n=24) suggested that individuals with the CC genotype had higher brain CYP2B6 than those with the CT or TT genotype. Higher brain CYP2B6 activity in smokers and alcoholics may cause altered sensitivity to centrally acting drugs, increased susceptibility to neurotoxins and carcinogenic xenobiotics and contribute to central tolerance to nicotine.

  9. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yansong [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Xu, Dan [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin [Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China)

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  10. Metallic artefact reduction with monoenergetic dual-energy CT: systematic ex vivo evaluation of posterior spinal fusion implants from various vendors and different spine levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, R.; Winklhofer, S.; Andreisek, G.; Alkadhi, H.; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Osterhoff, G.; Wanner, G.A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Fortunati, M. [The Spine Center, Thun (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate optimal monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) settings for artefact reduction of posterior spinal fusion implants of various vendors and spine levels. Posterior spinal fusion implants of five vendors for cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine were examined ex vivo with single-energy (SE) CT (120 kVp) and DECT (140/100 kVp). Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimised image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Two independent radiologists assessed quantitative and qualitative image parameters for each device and spine level. Inter-reader agreements of quantitative and qualitative parameters were high (ICC = 0.81-1.00, {kappa} = 0.54-0.77). HU values of spinal fusion implants were significantly different among vendors (P < 0.001), spine levels (P < 0.01) and among SECT, monoenergetic DECT of 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and OPTkeV (P < 0.01). Image quality was significantly (P < 0.001) different between datasets and improved with higher monoenergies of DECT compared with SECT (V = 0.58, P < 0.001). Artefacts decreased significantly (V = 0.51, P < 0.001) at higher monoenergies. OPTkeV values ranged from 123-141 keV. OPTkeV according to vendor and spine level are presented herein. Monoenergetic DECT provides significantly better image quality and less metallic artefacts from implants than SECT. Use of individual keV values for vendor and spine level is recommended. (orig.)

  11. Spinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bobby K-B; Deckey, Jeffrey; Hu, Serena S

    2002-01-01

    Spinal infections can occur in a variety of clinical situations. Their presentation ranges from the infant with diskitis who is unwilling to crawl or walk to the adult who develops an infection after a spinal procedure. The most common types of spinal infections are hematogenous bacterial or fungal infections, pediatric diskitis, epidural abscess, and postoperative infections. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of spinal infections, the cornerstone of treatment, requires a high index of suspicion in at-risk patients and the appropriate evaluation to identify the organism and determine the extent of infection. Neurologic function and spinal stability also should be carefully evaluated. The goals of therapy should include eradicating the infection, relieving pain, preserving or restoring neurologic function, improving nutrition, and maintaining spinal stability.

  12. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yani [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Leu, David [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Palo Alto Institute of Research and Education, Palo Alto, California (United States); Chui, Jennifer [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Fike, John R. [Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Huang, Ting-Ting, E-mail: tthuang@stanford.edu [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted.

  13. Spinal brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  14. Prevention of altered hemodynamics after spinal anesthesia: A comparison of volume preloading with tetrastarch, succinylated gelatin and ringer lactate solution for the patients undergoing lower segment caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapobrata Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal anesthesia has replaced general anesthesia in obstetric practice. Hemodynamic instability is a common, but preventable complication of spinal anesthesia. Preloading the circulation with intravenous fluids is considered a safe and effective method of preventing hypotension following spinal anesthesia. We had conducted a study to compare the hemodynamic stability after volume preloading with either Ringer′s lactate (RL or tetrastarch hydroxyethyl starch (HES or succinylated gelatin (SG in the patients undergoing cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective, double-blinded and randomized controlled study. Ninety six ASA-I healthy, nonlaboring parturients were randomly divided in 3 groups HES, SG, RL (n = 32 each and received 10 ml/kg HES 130/0.4; 10 ml/kg SG (4% modified fluid gelatin and 20 ml/kg RL respectively prior to SA scheduled for cesarean section. Heart rate, blood pressure (BP, oxygen saturation was measured. Results: The fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP (<100 mm Hg noted among 5 (15.63%, 12 (37.5% and 14 (43.75% parturients in groups HES, SG, RL respectively. Vasopressor (phenylephrine was used to treat hypotension when SBP <90 mm Hg. Both the results and APGAR scores were comparable in all the groups. Lower preloading volume and less intra-operative vasopressor requirement was noted in HES group for maintaining BP though it has no clinical significance. Conclusion: RL which is cheap, physiological and widely available crystalloid can preload effectively and maintain hemodynamic stability well in cesarean section and any remnant hypotension can easily be manageable with vasopressor.

  15. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders.

  16. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  17. Cervical spinal meningioma mimicking intramedullary spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Senem; Guzel, Aslan; Guzel, Ebru; Bayrak, Aylin Hasanefendioğlu; Sav, Aydin

    2009-01-01

    Case report. To report a very unusual spinal meningioma, mimicking an intramedullary spinal tumor. Spinal meningiomas, usually associated with signs and symptoms of cord or nerve root compression, are generally encountered in women aged over 40. Radiologic diagnosis is often established by their intradural extramedullary location on magnetic resonance images. A 60-year-old woman had a 6-month history of progressive weakness in her upper extremities, difficulty in walking, and cervical pain radiating through both arms. Neurologic examination revealed motor strength deficiency in all her extremities, with extensor reflexes, clonus, and bilateral hyper-reflexiveness. A sensory deficit was present all over her body. Magnetic resonance images revealed that the spinal cord appeared expanded with an ill-defined, homogeneously contrast-enhanced, lobulated, eccentric mass at the C1-C3 level. The patient was operated with a preliminary diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. At surgery, the mass was found to be extramedullary, and gross total resection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a meningioma characterized by the presence of fibrous and meningothelial components. The patient was able to ambulate with a cane, and extremity strength and sensation improved 2 months after surgery. Spinal meningiomas can mimic intramedullary tumors, and should be considered in differential diagnosis of intradural tumors with atypical appearance.

  18. [Information analysis of spinal ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobko, P I; Kovaleva, D V; Kovalchuk, I E; Pivchenko, P G; Rudenok, V V; Davydova, L A

    2000-01-01

    Information parameters (entropia and redundancy) of cervical and thoracic spinal ganglia of albino rat foetuses, mature animals (cat and dog) and human subjects were analysed. Information characteristics of spinal ganglia were shown to be level-specified and to depend on their functional peculiarities. Information parameters of thoracic spinal ganglia of man and different animals are specie specified and may be used in assessment of morphological structures as information systems.

  19. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  20. Alterations in plant growth and in root hormone levels of lodgepole pines inoculated with rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, E; Tuzun, S; Chanway, C P; Enebak, S

    2001-09-01

    The presence of other soil microorganisms might influence the ability of rhizobacterial inoculants to promote plant growth either by reducing contact between the inoculant and the plant root or by interfering with the mechanism(s) involved in rhizobacterially mediated growth promotion. We conducted the following experiments to determine whether reductions in the extent of growth promotion of lodgepole pine mediated by Paenibacillus polymyxa occur in the presence of a forest soil isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens M20) and whether changes in plant growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa (i) are related to changes in P. polymyxa density in the rhizosphere or (ii) result from alterations in root hormone levels. The extent of plant growth, P. polymyxa rhizosphere density, and root hormone concentrations were determined for lodgepole pine treated with (i) a single growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain (P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2) or (ii) a combination of bacteria: strain L6 + strain M20 or strain Pw-2 + strain M20. There was no difference in the growth of pines inoculated with strain L6 and those inoculated with strain L6 + strain M20. However, seedlings inoculated with strain Pw-2 had more lateral roots and greater root mass at 12 weeks after inoculation than plants inoculated with strain Pw-2 + strain M20. The extent of growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa L6 and Pw-2 in each treatment was not correlated to the average population density of each strain in the rhizosphere. Bacterial species-specific effects were observed in root hormone levels: indole-3-acetic acid concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2, while dihydrozeatin riboside concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. fluorescens M20.

  1. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels.

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    Kate Lykke Lambertsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1(-/- mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1(+/+ and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1(+/+. Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1(-/- mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1(-/- mice were hyperactive (≈+60% in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders.

  2. Altered Carbon Isotope Discrimination of C3 Plants Under Very High pCO2 Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, R. J.; Schubert, B.; Jahren, H.

    2009-12-01

    Various modeling and proxy-based reconstructions of atmospheric pCO2 levels for the last 120 Ma have estimated RCO2 as high as 12x for the Early Cretaceous, generally decreasing into the Cenozoic, and decreasing further into the Quaternary. Multiple ecological studies to assess the effect of elevated CO2 on plant biomass and δ13C value have been spurred on by recent increases in greenhouse gases, however these studies typically grow plants under only slightly elevated CO2 levels (i.e., the twenty foremost studies published since 1990 involved 550 to 750 ppm pCO2, which equals RCO2 = 1.4 to 1.9x). In order to recreate the highest pCO2 environments of the last 120 Ma, we grew radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in growth chambers that maintained controlled environmental conditions and pCO2 levels ranging from ~5 to 11x that of today’s atmosphere (1791 to 4200 ppm); upon harvest we measured total biomass and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13Cplant) in both above and below ground plant tissue. Unlike the 1:1 relationship between stable isotopes of atmospheric CO2 (δ13Catm) and δ13Cplant observed at lower pCO2 levels (i.e., RCO2 = 1x to 3x; Jahren et al., 2008), the δ13Cplant of biomass grown at more elevated RCO2 was dependent upon δ13Catm according to the linear relationship: δ13Cplant = 1.9(δ13Cplant) - 12.2 ‰ (r2 = 0.71). Concomitantly, we see a highly significant (p sativus L. from -27.0 to -28.0 ‰ at RCO2 = 5x to 11x, respectively. We will discuss possible mechanisms for changing isotope discrimination at very high pCO2 levels that may not be operative at lower concentrations. For example, we noted a striking reduction in the variability of biomass between plants grown at the same (very high) level of pCO2. This variability (calculated as the standard deviation of the log-transformed biomass data after Poorter and Garnier, 1996) decreased by 37 % (above-ground) and 48 % (below-ground) for plants grown at RCO2 > 5x compared to plants grown at RCO2 = 1x to 3x

  3. 10 Levels thoracic no-intrumented laminectomy for huge spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma removal. Report of the first case and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visocchi, Massimiliano; La Rocca, Giuseppe; Signorelli, Francesco; Roselli, Romeo; Jun, Zhong; Spallone, A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous idiopathic acute spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare cause of acute back pain followed by signs and symptoms of nerve root and/or spinal cord compression, frequently associated with coagulopathies, blood dyscrasias and arterio-venous malformations. Standard management includes non-operative treatment and timely (within 24 h) surgical decompression. Presentation of case We report on the case of a huge 10 levels SSDH treated with decompressive thoracic no-instrumented laminectomy in a 45-year-old woman with good neurological recovery (from ASIA A to D). Discussion Spontaneous SSDHs without detectable structural lesion or anticoagulant therapy are very rare. Among 26 cases documented the literature harbouring SSDHs, the thoracic spine was found to be the preferred site, and the compression was usually extending over several vertebral levels. Nonoperative treatment for SSDH may be justified in presence of minimal neurologic deficits, otherwise, early decompressive laminectomy along with evacuation of hematoma are considered the treatment of choice in presence of major deficits. Conclusion To our knowledge, the present case is the most extensive laminectomy for a SSDH removal never described before. No postoperative instability occurs in 10 levels thoracic laminectomy in case the articular processes are spared. When major neurological deficits are documented, early decompressive laminectomy with evacuation of hematoma should be considered the best treatment for SSDH. PMID:26318128

  4. SERUM LIPID PROFILE AND TRANSAMINASES LEVELS IN HIV PATIENTS ON HAART WITH ADIPOSE TISSUE ALTERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND HIV patients receiving highly active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART usually suffer from side effects like hepatitis, neurological problems, abnormal fat distribution etc. Among these, the most physical, mental and cosmetically disturbing side effect is adipose tissue alterations (ATA, also called as lipodystrophy, which is abnormal fat deposition (Lipohypertrophy and/or fat atrophy (Lipoatrophy. AIM Several studies have shown dyslipidemia in patients on HAART, but there are very few studies on the lipid profile changes in patients on ART with ATA. Hence a study was conducted to assess the serum lipid profile and transaminases activity in patients on ART with ATA and also to evaluate whether lipid profile parameters can predict ATA changes in HIV patients on HAART. METHOD Randomly selected HIV positive patients, who were attending ART centre, were included in the study. Twenty five of these patients in whom HAART was yet to be started were considered as Control group, 25 patients on HAART for more than 12 months but without ATA as ART group and 23 patients on HAART with ATA as ATA group. Lipid profile and serum transaminases in all the groups were assayed by standard methods. RESULTS Serum cholesterol and LDL were significantly increased in ART group and ATA group when compared to control group, but there was no significant difference in lipid profile parameters between ART group and ATA group. Serum AST and ALT levels were significantly increased (p<0.02 in ATA group when compared to ART group. Buffalo hump was seen only in females in our study. Lipoatrophy (facial and limbs and central obesity was seen in males. CONCLUSION There was no significant change in lipid profile parameters in ATA group when compared with ART group. Hence lipid profile parameters are not good predictors of ATA changes in HIV patients on HAART. Significant increase in transaminase levels suggests increased hepatotoxity in ATA patients due to HAART drugs. There

  5. End tidal CO2 level (PETCO2 during laparoscopic surgery: comparison between spinal anaesthesia and general anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul S. Jadhav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is a procedure which involves insufflations of the abdomen by a gas, so that endoscope can visualise intra abdominal content without being in direct contact with viscera or tissues. Its advantages are small incisions, less pain, less postoperative ileus, short hospital stay compared to traditional open method. Monitoring of end tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2 and hemodynamics is very necessary during Laparoscopy surgery. This study is conducted to find out effects of CO2 insufflation on parameters like PETCO2, Mean arterial pulse pressure, SPO2 under spinal anaesthesia and general anaesthesia in ASA I and ASA II patients. Methods: The present study was conducted in the department of anaesthesiology from December 2014 to September 2015.This study was a prospective, randomized controlled, single blind. Each group consisted of 30 patients having Group A and Group B as patient undergoing laparoscopic surgery under Spinal anaesthesia and General anaesthesia respectively. Preoperatively patients in Group A (Spinal anaesthesia given inj. Midazolam 0.3mg/kg IM 45 before surgery and Group B (General anaesthesia inj. pentazocin 0.3mg/kg, inj. promethazine 0.5mg/kg, inj. Glycopyrrolate 0.004 mg/kg IM 45 before surgery. In operation theatre, intra operative pulseoximetre, ECG, SPO2, Heart rate (HR, Mean arterial pulse pressure and PETCO2 monitoring done. Amount of CO2 insufflated noted. Results: It was found from present study that in both group there was significant progressive rise in PETCO2 after CO2 insufflation, with peak at 30 min and thereafter plateau till the end of procedure (avg. duration 45-60 min. In group A i.e. laparoscopic surgery under spinal anaesthesia with (spontaneous respiration the rise in PETCO2 was significant as compared to the group B i.e. laparoscopic surgery under general anaesthesia with controlled ventilation. The heart rate increased after CO2 insufflation in both the group, but it was significant in

  6. Is Level of Injury a Determinant of Quality of Life Among Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury? A Tertiary Rehabilitation Center Report

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    Seyed Amir Hossein Tavakoli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The role of injury-related variables in determining health-related quality of life (HRQOL among Iranian persons with spinal cord injury (SCI has not yet been fully described. In this study, we compared HRQOL between individuals with injury at cervical level and those with injury at thoracolumbar sections and evaluated the discriminating value of injury level as a determinant of HRQOL among Iranian people with SCI. Methods: Individuals with SCI, who were referred to Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, were invited to participate in this investigation. HRQOL was assessed using the Short Form (SF-36 questionnaire to determine the quality of life (QOL in eight domains: physical functioning (PF, role limitation due to physical problems (RP, bodily pain (BP, general health (GH, vitality (VT, social functioning (SF, role limitation due to emotional problems (RE, and mental health (MH. Results: Ninety patients with paraplegia and 94 quadriplegic patients participated in this investigation. The mean score of PF domain was significantly lower in patients with injury at cervical level (p < 0.0001. There was no significant difference in other domains of SF-36 between subjects with paraplegia and quadriplegia (p = 0.670, 0.700, 0.910, 0.710, 0.730, 0.290 and 0.850 for RP, RE, VT, MH, SF, BP and GH, respectively. Similarly, the mean physical component summary (PCS score was significantly higher among individuals with injury at thoracolumbar sections (p < 0.0001. The mean mental component summary (MCS score did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.720. Conclusions: Patients with SCI at the cervical level have similar mental health compared to those with injury at thoracolumbar sections, which shows proper mental adaptability in quadriplegic individuals. Injury level can be used as a major determinant of the physical component of QOL among people with SCI.

  7. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the body. It resembles a “horse’s tail” ( cauda equina in Latin). What Causes Spinal ... of the spine fails, it usually places increased stress on other parts of the spine. For example, ...

  8. Spinal Hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Norkin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The given article considers the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, classifications, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of spinal hemangiomas. Advantages of vertebroplasty over the other techniques of treatment of studied pathology are presented

  9. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk. Diseases such as arthritis and scoliosis can cause spinal stenosis, too. Symptoms might appear gradually or not at all. They include Pain in your neck or back Numbness, weakness, cramping, or pain in ...

  10. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. Risk factors for spinal infections include poor nutrition, immune suppression, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Surgical risk factors ...

  11. Spinal Hemangiomas

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Norkin; S.V. Likhachev; A.Yu. Chomartov; A.I. Norkin; D.M. Puchinian

    2010-01-01

    The given article considers the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, classifications, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of spinal hemangiomas. Advantages of vertebroplasty over the other techniques of treatment of studied pathology are presented

  12. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vertebrae. These include: treatment of a fractured (broken) vertebra; correction of deformity (spinal curves or slippages); elimination of pain from painful motion; treatment of instability; and treatment of some cervical disc herniations. One of the less controversial reasons ...

  13. Alterations in expression levels of deafness dystonia protein 1 affect mitochondrial morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engl, Gertraud; Florian, Stefan; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    -C66W was overexpressed. Live cell microscopy of primary fibroblasts derived from DDON patients and of DDP1 downregulated HeLa cells displayed alterations of mitochondrial morphology with notable extensions in the length of mitochondrial tubules, whereas overexpression of DDP1 induced the formation...

  14. Totally ossified metaplastic spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Chang Il; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2013-09-01

    A 61-year-old woman with a very rare case of totally ossified large thoracic spinal metaplastic meningioma, showing progressing myelopathy is presented. Computed tomographic images showed a large totally ossfied intradural round mass occupying the spinal canal on T9-10 level. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large T9-10 intradural extramedullary mass that was hypointense to spinal cord on T1- and T2-weighted sequences, partial enhancement was apparent after Gadolinium administration. The spinal cord was severely compressed and displaced toward the right at the level of T9-10. Surgical removal of the tumor was successfully accomplished via the posterior midline approach and the histological diagnosis verified an ossified metaplastic meningioma. The clinical neurological symptoms of patient were improved postoperatively. In this article we discuss the surgical and pathological aspects of rare case of spinal totally ossified metaplastic meningioma.

  15. A Low Protein Diet Alters Bone Material Level Properties and the Response to In Vitro Repeated Mechanical Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Dubois-Ferrière

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low protein intake is associated with an alteration of bone microstructure and material level properties. However, it remains unknown whether these alterations of bone tissue could influence the response to repeated mechanical loading. The authors investigated the in vitro effect of repeated loading on bone strength in humeri collected from 20 6-month-old female rats pair-fed with a control (15% casein or an isocaloric low protein (2.5% casein diet for 10 weeks. Bone specimens were cyclically loaded in three-point bending under load control for 2000 cycles. Humeri were then monotonically loaded to failure. The load-displacement curve of the in vitro cyclically loaded humerus was compared to the contralateral noncyclically loaded humerus and the influence of both protein diets. Material level properties were also evaluated through a nanoindentation test. Cyclic loading decreased postyield load and plastic deflection in rats fed a low protein diet, but not in those on a regular diet. Bone material level properties were altered in rats fed a low protein diet. This suggests that bone biomechanical alterations consequent to cyclic loading are more likely to occur in rats fed a low protein diet than in control animals subjected to the same in vitro cyclic loading regimen.

  16. Outcomes of a skiing program on level and stability of self-esteem and physical self in adults with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbin, Jean-Marc; Ninot, Grégory

    2008-03-01

    This study explored the intraindividual level and variability of global self-esteem and physical self-worth in adults with spinal cord injury over three consecutive periods, 4 weeks at home, 1 week in an adapted skiing program, and 4 weeks at home. Ten participants responded twice a day over a period of 9 weeks with the Physical Self Inventory, a six-item questionnaire with a visual analogue scale. The results showed that the program significantly increased the level of global self-esteem, physical self-worth, and three subdomains. The variability of the physical condition, sport competence, and physical strength subdomains was diminished after the program. The changes are discussed in terms of impact of a specific adapted physical activities program on physical self conceived as a complex system.

  17. Alterations in male sexual behaviour, attractiveness and testosterone levels induced by an adult-onset calorie restriction regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govic, Antonina; Levay, Elizabeth A; Hazi, Agnes; Penman, Jim; Kent, Stephen; Paolini, Antonio G

    2008-06-26

    Despite an abundance of research on calorie restriction (CR) altering gonadal and appetite regulating hormones, the sexual behavioural consequences of CR remain to be examined systematically. This study compared the sexual behaviour, partner preference, serum testosterone and leptin levels of male adult Hooded Wistar rats administered a CR (continuous 25%, 50% CR or a temporary restriction) with ad libitum fed controls. The temporary restriction (Previous CR) failed to alter sexual behaviour, partner preference and levels of testosterone and leptin. The moderately 25% CR males did not demonstrate an impairment in sexual behaviour but did demonstrate a reduced level of attractiveness to females in one measure of partner preference. Sexual performance was affected by a substantial CR, as the CR 50% group exhibited a longer latency to the first intromission, indicating alteration in sexual arousal. Females also consistently demonstrated a clear preference for the control group compared to the CR 50% group. These findings indicate a possible reduction in the overall reproductive potential of the substantially CR animals. Testosterone levels were equally suppressed by both the 25% and 50% CR, while leptin levels were only reduced in the CR 50% group. Leptin, rather than testosterone, may have influenced the impairment in sexual behaviour only demonstrated by the substantially CR animals. Testosterone, may, however, play a role in modulating the preference of control over CR males, as attractiveness was totally reduced by a substantial CR, and partially reduced by a moderate restricted regimen.

  18. Precise control of miR-125b levels is required to create a regeneration-permissive environment after spinal cord injury: a cross-species comparison between salamander and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Quiroz, Juan Felipe; Tsai, Eve; Coyle, Matthew; Sehm, Tina; Echeverri, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Most spinal cord injuries lead to permanent paralysis in mammals. By contrast, the remarkable regenerative abilities of salamanders enable full functional recovery even from complete spinal cord transections. The molecular differences underlying this evolutionary divergence between mammals and amphibians are poorly understood. We focused on upstream regulators of gene expression as primary entry points into this question. We identified a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) that are conserved between the Mexican axolotl salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum) and mammals but show marked cross-species differences in regulation patterns following spinal cord injury. We found that precise post-injury levels of one of these miRNAs (miR-125b) is essential for functional recovery, and guides correct regeneration of axons through the lesion site in a process involving the direct downstream target Sema4D in axolotls. Translating these results to a mammalian model, we increased miR-125b levels in the rat through mimic treatments following spinal cord transection. These treatments downregulated Sema4D and other glial-scar-related genes, and enhanced the animal's functional recovery. Our study identifies a key regulatory molecule conserved between salamander and mammal, and shows that the expression of miR-125b and Sema4D must be carefully controlled in the right cells at the correct level to promote regeneration. We also show that these molecular components of the salamander's regeneration-permissive environment can be experimentally harnessed to improve treatment outcomes for mammalian spinal cord injuries.

  19. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  20. Dezocine exhibits antihypersensitivity activities in neuropathy through spinal μ-opioid receptor activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Mao, Xiao-Fang; Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Zhang, Ma-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Dezocine is the number one opioid painkiller prescribed and sold in China, occupying 44% of the nation’s opioid analgesics market today and far ahead of the gold-standard morphine. We discovered the mechanisms underlying dezocine antihypersensitivity activity and assessed their implications to antihypersensitivity tolerance. Dezocine, given subcutaneously in spinal nerve-ligated neuropathic rats, time- and dose-dependently produced mechanical antiallodynia and thermal antihyperalgesia, significantly increased ipsilateral spinal norepinephrine and serotonin levels, and induced less antiallodynic tolerance than morphine. Its mechanical antiallodynia was partially (40% or 60%) and completely (100%) attenuated by spinal μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonism or norepinephrine depletion/α2-adrenoceptor antagonism and combined antagonism of MORs and α2-adenoceptors, respectively. In contrast, antagonism of spinal κ-opioid receptors (KORs) and δ-opioid receptors (DORs) or depletion of spinal serotonin did not significantly alter dezocine antiallodynia. In addition, dezocine-delayed antiallodynic tolerance was accelerated by spinal norepinephrine depletion/α2-adenoceptor antagonism. Thus dezocine produces antihypersensitivity activity through spinal MOR activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition (NRI), but apparently not through spinal KOR and DOR activation, serotonin reuptake inhibition or other mechanisms. Our findings reclassify dezocine as the first analgesic of the recently proposed MOR-NRI, and reveal its potential as an alternative to as well as concurrent use with morphine in treating pain. PMID:28230181

  1. Alteration in the cytokine levels and histopathological damage in common carp induced by glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junguo; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most frequently used herbicides, and it has been demonstrated to generate a series of toxicological problems in animals and humans. However, relatively little is known about the effects of glyphosate on the immune system of fish. In the present study, the acute toxicity of glyphosate on common carp was first determined; then, the contents of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor -α (TNF-α) and histopathological alterations in the liver, kidneys, and spleen of common carp exposed to 52.08 or 104.15 mg L(-1) of glyphosate for 168 h were also determined and evaluated. The results of the acute toxicity tests showed that the 96 h LC50 of glyphosate for common carp was 520.77 mg L(-1). Moreover, sub-acute exposure of glyphosate altered the contents of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α in fish immune organs. For example, there was a remarkable increase in the IFN-γ content in the kidneys, while there was a decrease in the liver and spleen. The IL-1β content increased in liver and kidneys, but it decreased in the spleen, and TNF-α mainly increased in the fish liver, kidneys, and spleen. In addition, glyphosate-exposure also caused remarkable histopathological damage in the fish liver, kidneys, and spleen. These results suggest that glyphosate-caused cytokine alterations may result in an immune suppression or excessive activation in the treated common carp as well as may cause immune dysfunction or reduced immunity. In conclusion, glyphosate has immunotoxic effects on common carp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. GROWTH OF STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS IN BIOFILMS ALTERS PEPTIDE SIGNALING AT THE SUB-POPULATION LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Colquhoun Shields

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (pppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations.

  3. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  4. Chronic treatment with glucocorticoids alters rat hippocampal and prefrontal cortical morphology in parallel with endogenous agmatine and arginine decarboxylase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Yang; Wang, Wei-Ping; Huang, Jingjing; Regunathan, Soundar

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the possible effect of chronic treatment with glucocorticoids on the morphology of the rat brain and levels of endogenous agmatine and arginine decarboxylase (ADC) protein, the enzyme essential for agmatine synthesis. Seven-day treatment with dexamethasone, at a dose (10 and 50 mug/kg/day) associated to stress effects contributed by glucocorticoids, did not result in obvious morphologic changes in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, as measured by immunocytochemical staining with beta-tubulin III. However, 21-day treatment (50 mug/kg/day) produced noticeable structural changes such as the diminution and disarrangement of dendrites and neurons in these areas. Simultaneous treatment with agmatine (50 mg/kg/day) prevented these morphological changes. Further measurement with HPLC showed that endogenous agmatine levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were significantly increased after 7-day treatments with dexamethasone in a dose-dependent manner. On the contrary, 21-day treatment with glucocorticoids robustly reduced agmatine levels in these regions. The treatment-caused biphasic alterations of endogenous agmatine levels were also seen in the striatum and hypothalamus. Interestingly, treatment with glucocorticoids resulted in a similar change of ADC protein levels in most brain areas to endogenous agmatine levels: an increase after 7-day treatment versus a reduction after 21-day treatment. These results demonstrated that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against structural alterations caused by glucocorticoids in vivo. The parallel alterations in the endogenous agmatine levels and ADC expression in the brain after treatment with glucocorticoids indicate the possible regulatory effect of these stress hormones on the synthesis and metabolism of agmatine in vivo.

  5. VPAC2 receptor agonist BAY 55-9837 increases SMN protein levels and moderates disease phenotype in severe spinal muscular atrophy mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common inherited causes of infant death and is caused by the loss of functional survival motor neuron (SMN) protein due to mutations or deletion in the SMN1 gene. One of the treatment strategies for SMA is to induce the expression of the protein from the homologous SMN2 gene, a rescuing paralog for SMA. Methods and results Here we demonstrate the promise of pharmacological modulation of SMN2 gene by BAY 55-9837, an agonist of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VPAC2), a member of G protein coupled receptor family. Treatment with BAY 55-9837 lead to induction of SMN protein levels via activation of MAPK14 or p38 pathway in vitro. Importantly, BAY 55-9837 also ameliorated disease phenotype in severe SMA mouse models. Conclusion Our findings suggest the VPAC2 pathway is a potential SMA therapeutic target. PMID:24405637

  6. The relationship between vocal accuracy and variability to the level of compensation to altered auditory feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerer, Nichole E; Jones, Jeffery A

    2012-11-07

    Auditory feedback plays an important role in monitoring vocal output and determining when adjustments are necessary. In this study a group of untrained singers participated in a frequency altered feedback experiment to examine if accuracy at matching a note could predict the degree of compensation to auditory feedback that was shifted in frequency. Participants were presented with a target note and instructed to match the note in pitch and duration. Following the onset of the participants' vocalizations their vocal pitch was shifted down one semi-tone at a random time during their utterance. This altered auditory feedback was instantaneously presented back to them through headphones. Results indicated that note matching accuracy did not correlate with compensation magnitude, however, a significant correlation was found between baseline variability and compensation magnitude. These results suggest that individuals with a more stable baseline fundamental frequency rely more on feedforward control mechanisms than individuals with more variable vocal production. This increased weighting of feedforward control means they are less sensitive to mismatches between their intended vocal production and auditory feedback. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  8. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-ß: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-ß (Aß generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-ß (Aß. The purpose was to determine how Aß may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aß in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid ß was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway.

  9. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-β: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, Jose; Melnikov, Valery G.; Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Munoz, Ruben; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-β (Aβ) generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ). The purpose was to determine how Aβ may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aβ in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid β was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:22666620

  10. Effects of Virtual Walking Treatment on Spinal Cord Injury-Related Neuropathic Pain: Pilot Results and Trends Related to Location of Pain and at-level Neuronal Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Melissa; Richardson, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that virtual walking to treat spinal cord injury-related neuropathic pain (SCI-NP) can be beneficial, although the type of SCI-NP that may benefit the most is unclear. This study's aims were to (1) determine the effect of location of SCI-NP on pain outcomes after virtual walking treatment and (2) examine the potential relationship between neuronal hyperexcitability, as measured by quantitative sensory testing, and pain reduction after virtual walking treatment. Participants were recruited from a larger ongoing trial examining the benefits of virtual walking in SCI-NP. Neuropathic pain was classified according to location of pain (at- or below-level). In addition, quantitative sensory testing was performed on a subset of individuals at a nonpainful area corresponding to the level of their injury before virtual walking treatment and was used to characterize treatment response. These pilot results suggest that when considered as a group, SCI-NP was responsive to treatment irrespective of the location of pain (F1, 44 = 4.82, P = 0.03), with a trend for the greatest reduction occurring in at-level SCI-NP (F1, 44 = 3.18, P = 0.08). These pilot results also potentially implicate cold, innocuous cool, and pressure hypersensitivity at the level of injury in attenuating the benefits of virtual walking to below-level pain, suggesting certain SCI-NP sensory profiles may be less responsive to virtual walking.

  11. 6S RNA regulation of relA alters ppGpp levels in early stationary phase

    OpenAIRE

    Cavanagh, Amy T.; Chandrangsu, Pete; Wassarman, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    6S RNA is a small, non-coding RNA that interacts directly with ? 70-RNA polymerase and regulates transcription at many ? 70-dependent promoters. Here, we demonstrate that 6S RNA regulates transcription of relA, which encodes a ppGpp synthase. The 6S RNA-dependent regulation of relA expression results in increased ppGpp levels during early stationary phase in cells lacking 6S RNA. These changes in ppGpp levels, although modest, are sufficient to result in altered regulation of transcription fr...

  12. Long-term variation in above and belowground plant inputs alters soil organic matter biogeochemistry at the molecular-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, M. J.; Pisani, O.; Lin, L.; Lun, O.; Simpson, A.; Lajtha, K.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term fate of soil carbon reserves with global environmental change remains uncertain. Shifts in moisture, altered nutrient cycles, species composition, or rising temperatures may alter the proportions of above and belowground biomass entering soil. However, it is unclear how long-term changes in plant inputs may alter the composition of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil carbon storage. Advanced molecular techniques were used to assess SOM composition in mineral soil horizons (0-10 cm) after 20 years of Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) at the Harvard Forest. SOM biomarkers (solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation) and both solid-state and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to identify changes in SOM composition and stage of degradation. Microbial activity and community composition were assessed using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Doubling aboveground litter inputs decreased soil carbon content, increased the degradation of labile SOM and enhanced the sequestration of aliphatic compounds in soil. The exclusion of belowground inputs (No roots and No inputs) resulted in a decrease in root-derived components and enhanced the degradation of leaf-derived aliphatic structures (cutin). Cutin-derived SOM has been hypothesized to be recalcitrant but our results show that even this complex biopolymer is susceptible to degradation when inputs entering soil are altered. The PLFA data indicate that changes in soil microbial community structure favored the accelerated processing of specific SOM components with littler manipulation. These results collectively reveal that the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs alters the molecular-level composition of SOM and in some cases, enhances the degradation of recalcitrant SOM. Our study also suggests that increased litterfall is unlikely to enhance soil carbon storage over the long-term in temperate forests.

  13. Alterations of serum levels of BDNF-related miRNAs in patients with depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jie Li

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious and potentially life-threatening mental disorder with unknown etiology. Emerging evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and microRNAs (miRNAs play critical roles in the etiology of depression. Here this study was aimed to identify and characterize the roles of BDNF and its putative regulatory miRNAs in depression. First, we identified that miR-182 may be a putative miRNA that regulates BDNF levels by bioinformatic studies, and characterized the effects of miR-182 on the BDNF levels using cell-based studies, side by side with miR-132 (a known miRNA that regulates BDNF expression. We showed that treatment of miR-132 and miR-182 respectively decreased the BDNF protein levels in a human neuronal cell model, supporting the regulatory roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF expression. Furthermore, we explored the roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF levels in depression using human subjects by assessing their serum levels. Compared with the healthy controls, patients with depression showed lower serum BDNF levels (via the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and higher serum miR-132 and miR-182 levels (via the real-time PCR. Finally, the Pearson's (or Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated to study whether there was a relationship among the Self-Rating Depression Scale score, the serum BDNF levels, and serum BDNF-related miRNA levels. Our results revealed that there was a significant negative correlation between the SDS scores and the serum BDNF levels, and a positive correlation between the SDS scores and miR-132 levels. In addition, we found a reverse relationship between the serum BDNF levels and the miR-132/miR-182 levels in depression. Collectively, we provided evidence supporting that miR-182 is a putative BDNF-regulatory miRNA, and suggested that the serum BDNF and its related miRNAs may be utilized as important biomarkers in the diagnosis or as therapeutic targets of depression.

  14. Altered metabolism of copper, zinc, and magnesium is associated with increased levels of glycated hemoglobin in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktorínová, Alena; Toserová, Eva; Krizko, Marián; Duracková, Zdenka

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with the alterations in the metabolism of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and magnesium (Mg). The aim of the present study was to investigate plasma levels of these elements in patients with DM and in healthy subjects. Association between glycated hemoglobin and levels of metals was also evaluated. We studied 36 subjects with DM (type 1, 11; type 2, 25) and 34 healthy subjects matched for age, sex, and duration of diabetes. Plasma concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mg were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. An imbalance in the levels of studied metals was observed in both type 1 and type 2 DM. We found higher levels of Cu (P diabetic complications.

  15. Regeneration of descending projections to the spinal motor neurons after spinal hemisection in the goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akihito; Goris, Richard C; Funakoshi, Kengo

    2007-06-25

    Following spinal transection, descending spinal projections from goldfish brainstem neurons spontaneously regenerate beyond the lesion site. The nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nFLM), which has a critical role in swimming, also sends regenerated axons over a long distance to the ipsilateral spinal cord. To examine whether regenerated axons re-innervate the appropriate targets, we injected rhodamine dextran amine (RDA) into the nFLM of spinally transected goldfish and examined anterogradely labeled axons in the spinal cord. In intact controls, there were many RDA-labeled boutons or varicosities in the spinal cord in close apposition to both neurons positive for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and those negative for CGRP. This suggests that the nFLM neurons project axons directly to the motoneurons and interneurons in the spinal cord. Four days after hemisection 1 mm caudal to the rostral end of the spinal cord, the number of RDA-labeled boutons in close apposition to the spinal neurons was significantly decreased on the side ipsilateral to the injection. Six to twelve weeks after spinal hemisection, regenerated axons ran through the repaired lesion site, and the number of RDA-labeled boutons or varicosities in close apposition to the ipsilateral spinal neurons had returned to the control level. These findings suggest that the midbrain-spinal pathway, critical for locomotion in fish, spontaneously regenerates beyond the lesion site to re-innervate the appropriately innervated targets after spinal lesion.

  16. Increased serum IL-6 level time-dependently regulates hyperalgesia and spinal mu opioid receptor expression during CFA-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekieh, E; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, H; Maghsoudi, N; Alani, B; Zardooz, H

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is known to cause pro- and anti-inflammatory effects during different stages of inflammation. Recent therapeutic investigations have focused on treatment of various inflammatory disorders with anti-cytokine substances. As a result, the aim of this study was to further elucidate the influence of IL-6 in hyperalgesia and edema during different stages of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis (AA) in male Wistar rats. AA was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of CFA into the rats' hindpaw. Anti-IL-6 was administered either daily or weekly during the 21 days of study. Spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR) expression was detected by Western blotting. Daily and weekly treatment with an anti-IL-6 antibody significantly decreased paw edema in the AA group compared to the AA control group. Additionally, daily and weekly anti-IL-6 administration significantly reduced hyperalgesia on day 7 in the AA group compared to the AA control group; however, there were significant increases in hyperalgesia in the antibody-treated group on days 14 and 21 compared to the AA control group. IL-6 antibody-induced increases in hyperalgesia on the 14(th) and 21(st) days after CFA injection correlated with a time-dependent, significant reduction in spinal mOR expression during anti-IL-6 treatment. Our study confirmed the important time-dependent relationship between serum IL-6 levels and hyperalgesia during AA. These results suggest that the stages of inflammation in AA must be considered for anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory interventions via anti-IL-6 antibody treatment.

  17. Outcomes of patients with altered level of consciousness and abnormal electroencephalogram: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Paula Rodrigues; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Naves, Pedro Vicente Ferreira; Ladeia-Frota, Carol; Caboclo, Luís Otávio

    2017-01-01

    Nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) are frequent in hospitalized patients and may further aggravate injury in the already damaged brain, potentially worsening outcomes in encephalopathic patients. Therefore, both early seizure recognition and treatment have been advocated to prevent further neurological damage. Evaluate the main EEG patterns seen in patients with impaired consciousness and address the effect of treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), continuous intravenous anesthetic drugs (IVADs), or the combination of both, on outcomes. This was a single center retrospective cohort study conducted in a private, tertiary care hospital. Consecutive adult patients with altered consciousness submitted to a routine EEG between January 2008 and February 2011 were included in this study. Based on EEG pattern, patients were assigned to one of three groups: Group Interictal Patterns (IP; EEG showing only interictal epileptiform discharges or triphasic waves), Group Rhythmic and Periodic Patterns (RPP; at least one EEG with rhythmic or periodic patterns), and Group Ictal (Ictal; at least one EEG showing ictal pattern). Groups were compared in terms of administered antiepileptic treatment and frequency of unfavorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale ≥3 and in-hospital mortality). Two hundred and six patients (475 EEGs) were included in this analysis. Interictal pattern was observed in 35.4% (73/206) of patients, RPP in 53.4% (110/206) and ictal in 11.2% (23/206) of patients. Treatment with AEDs, IVADs or a combination of both was administered in half of the patients. While all Ictal group patients received treatment (AEDs or IVADs), only 24/73 (32.9%) IP group patients and 55/108 (50.9%) RPP group patients were treated (p<0.001). Hospital length of stay (LOS) and frequency of unfavorable outcomes did not differ among the groups. In-hospital mortality was higher in IVADs treated RPP patients compared to AEDs treated RPP patients [11/19 (57.9%) vs. 11/36 (30.6%) patients

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Rodent Model Alters Osteocyte Protein Levels Controlling Bone Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Corinne E; Narayanan, Anand; Zawieja, David C; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-04-01

    Bone loss is a common comorbidity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), leading to elevated fracture risk in these patients. Inflammatory factors associated with IBD cause increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation with multiple factors implicated as instigators of these alterations. In this project, we examined the influence of IBD on osteocyte proteins in male rats (2 months old) divided into two groups: induced gut inflammation via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) enema, and vehicle control. We examined the prevalence of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), an anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10), the anabolic factor insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), osteoclastogenesis regulators RANKL and OPG, and the bone formation inhibitor sclerostin in osteocytes in three bone compartments 4 weeks after initiation of gut inflammation. Histomorphometry of the proximal tibia and fourth lumbar vertebra revealed lower bone volume, lower bone formation rate (BFR), lower osteoid surface (OS), and higher osteoclast surface (Oc.S) with TNBS. Tibial mid-shaft periosteal BFR was also lower with TNBS. Immunohistochemical staining of the distal femur demonstrated that %TNF-α(+) , %IL-6(+) , %RANKL(+) , and %OPG(+) osteocytes were elevated in cancellous bone in TNBS animals compared to vehicle. These changes were coincident with increased bone resorption. With regression analysis, %RANKL(+) osteocytes statistically predicted the increase in cancellous Oc.S (R(2)  = 0.565). Increased %sclerostin(+) osteocytes observed in the TNBS treatment predicted declines in cancellous OS (R(2)  = 0.581) as well as BFR in cancellous and cortical bone (R(2)  = 0.674, R(2)  = 0.908, respectively). Contrary to our hypothesis, %IGF-I(+) osteocytes increased in TNBS animals. In conclusion, the IBD model produced a systemic inflammation that altered the regulatory protein profile in osteocytes that

  19. Alterations in dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) levels in the coral Montastraea franksi in response to copper exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, Denise M. [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 1 Williams Street, P.O. Box 38, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States); Jones, Ross J. [Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), 17 Biological Lane, St Georges GE01 (Bermuda); Mitchelmore, Carys L., E-mail: mitchelmore@cbl.umces.edu [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 1 Williams Street, P.O. Box 38, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Symbiotic corals routinely experience hyperoxic conditions within their tissues due to the photosynthesis of the endosymbiotic dinoflagellate microalgae (Symbiodinium spp.). Symbiodinium spp. produce high intracellular levels of the osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). It has recently been discovered in marine algae that DMSP and its enzymatic breakdown products also play a significant role in the scavenging of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). To examine this potential for DMSP in corals, we exposed the hard coral Montastraea franksi to 1, 10 and 50 {mu}g L{sup -1} (ppb) concentrations of the oxidative stressor, copper. Levels of total (DMSP{sub t}, all coral tissue) were higher than particulate DMSP{sub p} (algal component only), demonstrating partitioning of DMSP between algal symbionts and coral host. Significant changes in levels of DMSP{sub t} and DMSP{sub p} occurred in M. franksi after 48 h, demonstrating a response to copper and indicating a potential antioxidant role for DMSP. DMSP{sub t} and DMSP{sub p} levels decreased with copper dose, although at the highest copper dose DMSP{sub p} levels increased, whereas DMSP{sub t} levels did not. This observed differential response to copper between DMSP{sub t} and DMSP{sub p} demonstrates that physiological changes may be overlooked if conclusions are based upon DMSP{sub t} levels alone, which is a common measure used in coral studies. Decreases in chlorophyll a and algal cell numbers in response to elevated copper were also observed. These indices are important physiological indicators and are often used as indices to normalize DMSP levels. Our data suggest that the use of these common indices for normalizing DMSP may not always be appropriate.

  20. Marginal bone-level alterations of loaded zirconia and titanium dental implants: an experimental study in the dog mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Daniel S; Benic, Goran I; Muñoz, Fernando; Kohal, Ralf; Sanz Martin, Ignacio; Cantalapiedra, Antonio G; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Jung, Ronald E

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to test whether or not the marginal bone-level alterations of loaded zirconia implants are similar to the bone-level alterations of a grade 4 titanium one-piece dental implant. In six dogs, all premolars and the first molars were extracted in the mandible. Four months later, three zirconia implants (BPI, VC, ZD) and a control titanium one-piece (STM) implant were randomly placed in each hemimandible and left for transmucosal healing (baseline). Six months later, CAD/CAM crowns were cemented. Sacrifice was scheduled at 6-month postloading. Digital X-rays were taken at implant placement, crowns insertion, and sacrifice. Marginal bone-level alterations were calculated, and intra- and intergroup comparisons performed adjusted by confounding factors. Implants were successfully placed. Until crown insertion, two implants were fractured (one VC, one ZD). At sacrifice, 5 more implants were (partly) fractured (one BPI, four ZD), and one lost osseointegration (VC). No decementation of crowns occurred. All implant systems demonstrated a statistically significant (except VC) loss of marginal bone between baseline and crown insertion ranging from 0.29 mm (VC; P = 0.116) to 0.80 mm (ZD; P = 0.013). The estimated marginal bone loss between baseline and 6 months of loading ranged between 0.19 mm (BPI) and 1.11 mm (VC), being statistically significant for STM and VC only (P implants and control implants (STM vs. BPI P = 0.007; vs. VC P = 0.001; vs. ZD P = 0.011). Zirconia implants were more prone to fracture prior to and after loading with implant-supported crowns compared to titanium implants. Individual differences and variability in the extent of the bone-level changes during the 12-month study period were found between the different implant types and materials. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Metabolic alterations derived from absence of Two-Pore Channel 1 at cardiac level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VANESSA GARCÍA-RÚA; SANDRA FEIJÓO-BANDÍN; MARÍA GARCÍA-VENCE; ALANA ARAGÓN-HERRERA; SUSANA B BRAVO; DIEGO RODRÍGUEZ-PENAS; ANA MOSQUERA-LEAL; PAMELA V LEAR; JOHN PARRINGTON; JANA ALONSO; ESTHER ROSELLÓ-LLETÍ; MANUEL PORTOLÉS; MIGUEL RIVERA; JOSÉ RAMÓN GONZÁLEZ-JUANATEY; FRANCISCA LAGO

    2016-12-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs or TPCNs) are novel voltage-gated ion channels that have been postulated to act as Ca2+ and/orNa+ channels expressed exclusively in acidic organelles such as endosomes and lysosomes. TPCNs participate in theregulation of diverse biological processes and recently have been proposed to be involved in the pathophysiology ofmetabolic disorders such as obesity, fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Due to the importance of thesepathologies in the development of cardiovascular diseases, we aimed to study the possible role of two-pore channel 1(TPCN1) in the regulation of cardiac metabolism. To explore the cardiac function of TPCN1, we developed proteomicapproaches as 2-DE-MALDI-MS and LC-MALDI-MS in the cardiac left ventricle of TPCN1 KO and WT mice, and foundalterations in several proteins implicated in glucose and fatty acid metabolism in TPCN1 KO vs. WT mice. The resultsconfirmed the altered expression of HFABP, a key fatty acid transport protein, and of enolase and PGK1, the key enzymes inthe glycolytic process. Finally, in vitro experiments performed in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in which TPCN1 was silencedusing siRNAs, confirmed that the downregulation of TPCN1 gene expression increased 2-deoxy-D-[3H]-glucose uptake andGLUT4 mobilization into cell peripherals in cardiac cells. Our results are the first to suggest a potential role for TPCNs incardiac metabolism regulation.

  2. The TOC159 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates altered levels of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afitlhile, Meshack; Fry, Morgan; Workman, Samantha

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated whether the TOC159 mutant of Arabidopsis called plastid protein import 2-2 (ppi2-2) accumulates normal levels of fatty acids, and transcripts of fatty acid desaturases and galactolipid synthesis enzymes. The ppi2-2 mutant accumulates decreased pigments and total fatty acid content. The MGD1 gene was downregulated and the mutant accumulates decreased levels of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and 16:3, which suggests that the prokaryotic pathway was impaired in the mutant. The HY5 gene, which encodes long hypocotyl5 transcription factor, was upregulated in the mutant. The DGD1 gene, an HY5 target was marginally increased and the mutant accumulates digalactosyldiacylglycerol at the control level. The mutant had increased expression of 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II gene, which encodes a plastid enzyme that elongates 16:0 to 18:0. Interestingly, glycerolipids in the mutant accumulate increased levels of 18:0. A gene that encodes stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD) was expressed at the control level and 18:1 was increased, which suggest that SAD may be strongly regulated at the posttranscriptional level. The molar ratio of MGDG to bilayer forming plastid lipids was decreased in the cold-acclimated wild type but not in the ppi2-2 mutant. This indicates that the mutant was unresponsive to cold-stress, and is consistent with increased levels of 18:0, and decreased 16:3 and 18:3 in the ppi2-2 mutant. Overall, these data indicate that a defective Toc159 receptor impaired the synthesis of MGDG, and affected desaturation of 16 and 18-carbon fatty acids. We conclude that expression of the MGD1 gene and synthesis of MGDG are tightly linked to plastid biogenesis.

  3. Prenatal exposure to zinc oxide particles alters monoaminergic neurotransmitter levels in the brain of mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yuka; Tachibana, Ken; Yanagita, Shinya; Takeda, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-sized particles (NPs) are beneficial materials used for sunscreens and cosmetics. Although ZnO NPs are widely used for cosmetics, the health effects of exposure during pregnancy on offspring are largely unknown. Here we investigated the effects of prenatal exposure to ZnO NPs on the monoaminergic system of the mouse brain. Subcutaneous administration of ZnO NPs to the pregnant ICR mice (total 500 μg/mouse) were carried out and then measured the levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and noradrenalin, and their metabolites in 9 regions of the brain of offspring (6-week-old) using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis demonstrated that DA levels were increased in hippocampus in the ZnO NP exposure group. In the levels of DA metabolites, homovanillic acid was increased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was increased in the prefrontal cortex by prenatal ZnO NP exposure. Furthermore, DA turnover levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex, neostriatum, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala in the ZnO NP exposure group. We also found changes of the levels of serotonin in the hypothalamus, and of the levels of 5-HIAA (5-HT metabolite) in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in the ZnO NP-exposed group. The levels of 5-HT turnover were increased in each of the regions except for the cerebellum by prenatal ZnO NP exposure. The present study indicated that prenatal exposure to ZnO NPs might disrupt the monoaminergic system, and suggested the possibility of detrimental effects on the mental health of offspring.

  4. Association of a Human FABP1 Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism with Altered Serum Triglyceride Levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-E Peng

    Full Text Available Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP, also known as fatty acid-binding protein 1 (FABP1, is a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism. Elevated FABP1 levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and metabolic syndromes. In this study, we examine the association of FABP1 gene promoter variants with serum FABP1 and lipid levels in a Chinese population. Four promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of FABP1 gene were genotyped in a cross-sectional survey of healthy volunteers (n = 1,182 from Fuzhou city of China. Results showed that only the rs2919872 G>A variant was significantly associated with serum TG concentration(P = 0.032.Compared with the rs2919872 G allele, rs2919872 A allele contributed significantly to reduced serum TG concentration, and this allele dramatically decreased the FABP1 promoter activity(P < 0.05. The rs2919872 A allele carriers had considerably lower serum FABP1 levels than G allele carriers (P < 0.01. In the multivariable linear regression analysis, the rs2919872 A allele was negatively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = -0.320, P = 0.003, while serum TG levels were positively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = 0.487, P = 0.014. Our data suggest that compared with the rs2919872 G allele, the rs2919872 A allele reduces the transcriptional activity of FABP1 promoter, and thereby may link FABP1 gene variation to TG level in humans.

  5. [Technical Tips for Spinal Anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Spinal anesthesia is a standard technique for all anesthesiologists and surgeons. This review deals with basic knowledge and tips for spinal anesthesia in an empirical manner. It is important to understand practical knowledge about specific character of each local anesthetic, spread patterns of the anesthetics in the subarachnoid space and relation between anesthesia level and puncture site. This review also introduces tips for subarachnoid puncture and divided administration method of isobaric local anesthetic solution based on the literature. Anesthesiologists and surgeons have to recognize that it is necessary to take enough time to perform precious and optimal spinal anesthesia.

  6. CSF beta-amyloid levels are altered in narcolepsy: a link with the inflammatory hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Claudio; Placidi, Fabio; Albanese, Maria; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Izzi, Francesca; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Bernardini, Sergio; Romigi, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by hypocretin deficiency due to the loss of hypothalamic orexinergic neurons, and is associated with both the human leucocyte antigen DQB1*06:02 and the T cell receptor polymorphism. The above relationship suggests autoimmune/inflammatory processes underlying the loss of orexinergic neurons in narcolepsy. To test the autoimmune/inflammatory hypothesis by means of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of beta-amyloid1-42 and/or total tau proteins in a sample of narcoleptic patients, we analysed 16 narcoleptic patients and 16 healthy controls. Beta-amyloid1-42 CSF levels were significantly lower in narcoleptic patients compared with healthy controls. We also documented pathologically low levels of CSF beta-amyloid1-42 (narcolepsy and the prevalence of an 'amyloidogenic' pathway caused by the deficiency of the alpha-secretases enzymes.

  7. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canuto, K.S.; Guimaraes, O.R.; Geller, M. [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Sergio, L.P.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia coli cells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out. (author)

  8. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Guimarães, O R; Geller, M; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia colicells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficientE. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out.

  9. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Canuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia coli cells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC. Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out.

  10. Cytochrome P450 levels are altered in patients with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergheim, I.; Wolfgarten, E.; Bollschweiler, E.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) in the carcinogenesis of squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) in human esophagus by determining expression patterns and protein levels of representative CYPs in esophageal tissue of patients with SCC and controls. METHODS: mRNA expression of CYP2E1...

  11. Venous plasma levels of endothelin-1 are not altered immediately after nitroglycerin infusion in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Emmeluth, C;

    1995-01-01

    Endothelin-1 and nitric oxide play an important regulatory role in the control of vascular smooth muscle tone. Nitroglycerin (NTG), a nitric oxide donating drug, may inhibit endothelin production. In this double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, plasma levels of endothelin-1 were measured...

  12. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects altered gastric mucosal MMP-9 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, F.J.G.M.; Sier, C.F.M.; Schram, M.; Witte, T.A.M.C.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Duijn, W. van; Verheijen, J.H.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Verspaget, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinogenesis, and is accompanied by strongly enhanced gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels. Aim: This study was performed to investigate whether H.

  13. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects altered gastric mucosal MMP-9 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, F.J.G.M.; Sier, C.F.M.; Schram, M.; Witte, T.A.M.C.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Duijn, W. van; Verheijen, J.H.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Verspaget, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinogenesis, and is accompanied by strongly enhanced gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels. Aim: This study was performed to investigate whether H. p

  14. A maximal incremental effort alters tear osmolarity depending on the fitness level in military helicopter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera Vilchez, Jesús; Jimenez, Raimundo; Madinabeitia, Iker; Masiulis, Nerijus; Cárdenas, David

    2017-08-04

    Fitness level modulates the physiological responses to exercise for a variety of indices. While intense bouts of exercise have been demonstrated to increase tear osmolarity (Tosm), it is not known if fitness level can affect the Tosm response to acute exercise. This study aims to compare the effect of a maximal incremental test on Tosm between trained and untrained military helicopter pilots. Nineteen military helicopter pilots (ten trained and nine untrained) performed a maximal incremental test on a treadmill. A tear sample was collected before and after physical effort to determine the exercise-induced changes on Tosm. The Bayesian statistical analysis demonstrated that Tosm significantly increased from 303.72 ± 6.76 to 310.56 ± 8.80 mmol/L after performance of a maximal incremental test. However, while the untrained group showed an acute Tosm rise (12.33 mmol/L of increment), the trained group experienced a stable Tosm physical effort (1.45 mmol/L). There was a significant positive linear association between fat indices and Tosm changes (correlation coefficients [r] range: 0.77-0.89), whereas the Tosm changes displayed a negative relationship with the cardiorespiratory capacity (VO2 max; r = -0.75) and performance parameters (r = -0.75 for velocity, and r = -0.67 for time to exhaustion). The findings from this study provide evidence that fitness level is a major determinant of Tosm response to maximal incremental physical effort, showing a fairly linear association with several indices related to fitness level. High fitness level seems to be beneficial to avoid Tosm changes as consequence of intense exercise. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. High homocysteine levels prevent via H2 S the CoCl2 -induced alteration of lymphocyte viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Laurie; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Fromonot, Julien; Durand-Gorde, Josée-Martine; Condo, Jocelyne; Kipson, Nathalie; Mottola, Giovanna; Deharo, Pierre; Guieu, Régis; Ruf, Jean

    2016-08-01

    High homocysteine (HCy) levels are associated with lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory responses that are sometimes in turn related to hypoxia. Because adenosine is a potent lymphocyte suppressor produced in hypoxic conditions and shares metabolic pathways with HCy, we addressed the influence of high HCy levels on the hypoxia-induced, adenosine-mediated, alteration of lymphocyte viability. We treated mitogen-stimulated human lymphocytes isolated from healthy individuals and the human lymphoma T-cell line CEM with cobalt chloride (CoCl2 )to reproduce hypoxia. We found that CoCl2 -altered cell viability was dose-dependently reversed using HCy. In turn, the HCy effect was inhibited using DL-propargylglycine, a specific inhibitor of the hydrogen sulphide (H2 S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase involved in HCy catabolism. We then addressed the intracellular metabolic pathway of adenosine and HCy, and the role of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2 A R). We observed that: (i) hypoxic conditions lowered the intracellular concentration of HCy by increasing adenosine production, which resulted in high A2 A R expression and 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate production; (ii) increasing intracellular HCy concentration reversed the hypoxia-induced adenosinergic signalling despite high adenosine concentration by promoting both S-adenosylhomocysteine and H2 S production; (iii) DL-propargylglycine that inhibits H2 S production abolished the HCy effect. Together, these data suggest that high HCy levels prevent, via H2 S production and the resulting down-regulation of A2 A R expression, the hypoxia-induced adenosinergic alteration of lymphocyte viability. We point out the relevance of these mechanisms in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Hybrid brain-computer interfaces and hybrid neuroprostheses for restoration of upper limb functions in individuals with high-level spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohm, Martin; Schneiders, Matthias; Müller, Constantin; Kreilinger, Alex; Kaiser, Vera; Müller-Putz, Gernot R; Rupp, Rüdiger

    2013-10-01

    The bilateral loss of the grasp function associated with a lesion of the cervical spinal cord severely limits the affected individuals' ability to live independently and return to gainful employment after sustaining a spinal cord injury (SCI). Any improvement in lost or limited grasp function is highly desirable. With current neuroprostheses, relevant improvements can be achieved in end users with preserved shoulder and elbow, but missing hand function. The aim of this single case study is to show that (1) with the support of hybrid neuroprostheses combining functional electrical stimulation (FES) with orthoses, restoration of hand, finger and elbow function is possible in users with high-level SCI and (2) shared control principles can be effectively used to allow for a brain-computer interface (BCI) control, even if only moderate BCI performance is achieved after extensive training. The individual in this study is a right-handed 41-year-old man who sustained a traumatic SCI in 2009 and has a complete motor and sensory lesion at the level of C4. He is unable to generate functionally relevant movements of the elbow, hand and fingers on either side. He underwent extensive FES training (30-45min, 2-3 times per week for 6 months) and motor imagery (MI) BCI training (415 runs in 43 sessions over 12 months). To meet individual needs, the system was designed in a modular fashion including an intelligent control approach encompassing two input modalities, namely an MI-BCI and shoulder movements. After one year of training, the end user's MI-BCI performance ranged from 50% to 93% (average: 70.5%). The performance of the hybrid system was evaluated with different functional assessments. The user was able to transfer objects of the grasp-and-release-test and he succeeded in eating a pretzel stick, signing a document and eating an ice cream cone, which he was unable to do without the system. This proof-of-concept study has demonstrated that with the support of hybrid FES

  17. Levels of estradiol and testosterone are altered in Chinese men with sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Chen, T; Mao, S; Jiang, H; Ding, Q; Xu, G

    2016-09-01

    An estimated 20-30% of adult men have at least one manifestation of sexual dysfunction, the most common of which are premature ejaculation (PE) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Emerging evidence has suggested an association between the regulation of hormones with the processes of erection and ejaculation. In this study, we aim to investigate the relationship between sexual dysfunction, namely, PE and ED, and the levels and ratios of estradiol to testosterone in Chinese men. A retrospective case-control study was performed involving 878 male patients aged from 18 to 74 years (mean: 36 years). The ratio of estradiol to testosterone was significantly higher for subjects with ED (7.45 ± 3.09 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001), and combined PE and ED (6.66 ± 3.05 × 10(-3) ; p = 0.032) compared with that of the control group (6.01 ± 2.61 × 10(-3) ). The ratio was also significantly higher for ED patients when compared with PE patients (5.26 ± 2.18 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001). Furthermore, compared with the control group, subjects with PE had similar levels of estradiol (95.47 ± 37.86 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.678) but significantly higher levels of testosterone (18.66 ± 6.03 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p < 0.001). This contrasted with the ED group, which showed similar levels of testosterone (16.96 ± 5.86 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.773) and significantly higher levels of estradiol (116.88 ± 40.81 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p < 0.001) compared with control. Subjects with combined ED and PE also had a significantly higher level of estradiol (104.98 ± 43.99 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.014) and similar levels of testosterone (17.30 ± 7.23 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.503) compared with control. In conclusion, this study involving Chinese males with sexual dysfunction reports, for the first time, that there is an association between sexual dysfunction

  18. High-fat diet transition reduces brain DHA levels associated with altered brain plasticity and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Zhuang, Yumei; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    To assess how the shift from a healthy diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids to a diet rich in saturated fatty acid affects the substrates for brain plasticity and function, we used pregnant rats fed with omega-3 supplemented diet from their 2nd day of gestation period as well as their male pups for 12 weeks. Afterwards, the animals were randomly assigned to either a group fed on the same diet or a group fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fats for 3 weeks. We found that the HFD increased vulnerability for anxiety-like behavior, and that these modifications harmonized with changes in the anxiety-related NPY1 receptor and the reduced levels of BDNF, and its signalling receptor pTrkB, as well as the CREB protein. Brain DHA contents were significantly associated with the levels of anxiety-like behavior in these rats.

  19. Serotonin markers show altered transcription levels in an experimental pig model of mitral regurgitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cremer, Signe Emilie; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Moesgaard, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    surgically induced MR or sham-operation, resulting in three MR groups: control (CON, n = 12), mild MR (mMR, n = 10) and severe MR (sMR, n = 6). The gene expression levels of 5-HT1BR, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT2BR, SERT and TPH-1 were analysed using quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the mitral valve (MV), anterior papillary...

  20. Chronic stress alters the expression levels of longevity-related genes in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Ana C; Muñoz, Mario F; Herrera, Antonio J; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Stowell, Rianne; Ayala, Antonio; Machado, Alberto; Venero, José L; de Pablos, Rocío M

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of psychological stress on cellular stress during aging and neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of chronic psychological stress, and the consequent increase of circulating glucocorticoids, on several hippocampal genes involved in longevity. Sirtuin-1, p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein, and heat shock protein 70 were studied at the mRNA and protein levels in stressed and non-stressed animals. Stress treatment for 10 days decreased sirtuin-1 and heat shock protein 70 levels, but increased levels of p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. Examination of protein expression following two months of stress treatment indicated that sirtuin-1 remained depressed. In contrast, an increase was observed for thioredoxin-interacting protein, heat shock protein 70, p53 and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. The effect of stress was reversed by mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These data suggest that chronic stress could contribute to aging in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Alteration of cyclic nucleotides levels and oxidative stress in saliva of human subjects with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Fereshteh; Aghahoseini, Farzaneh; Rezaie, Ali; Zamani, Mohammad J; Khorasani, Reza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2005-11-15

    Experimental findings suggest a protective role for cyclic nucleotides against induction of oxidative stress in saliva. Oxidative stress is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. This study was conducted to evaluate salivary oxidative stress along with cGMP and cAMP levels in periodontitis subjects. cAMP and cGMP are second messengers that have important roles in salivary gland functions. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were obtained from periodontitis patients and age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. Saliva samples were analyzed for thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) as a marker of lipid peroxidation, ferric reducing ability (total antioxidant power, TAP), and levels of cAMP and cGMP. Concentrations of cAMP and cGMP were reduced in the saliva of patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. Saliva of patients with severe periodontitis had higher TBARS and lower TAP than control subjects. The presence of oxidative stress and lower levels of salivary cGMP and cAMP in periodontitis are in association with disease severity.

  2. Imatinib alters cell viability but not growth factors levels in TM4 Sertoli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Atari-Hajipirloo, Somayeh; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Valizadeh, Nasim; Mahabadi, Sonya; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anticancer agent imatinib (IM) is a small molecular analog of ATP that inhibits tyrosine kinase activity of platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) and stem cell factor (SCF) receptor in cancer cells. However these factors have a key role in regulating growth and development of normal Sertoli, Leydig and germ cells. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine cell viability, PDGF and SCF levels in mouse normal Sertoli cells exposed to IM. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the mouse TM4 Sertoli cells were treated with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM IM for 2, 4 or 6 days. The cell viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, One-Way ANOVA was performed. Results: IM showed significant decrease in Sertoli cell viability compared to control group (p=0.001). However, IM increased PDGF and SCF level insignificantly (p>0.05). Conclusion: Results suggested that IM treatment induced a dose dependent reduction of cell viability in Sertoli cells. It seems that treatment with this anticancer drug is involved in the fertility process. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of PDGF and SCF in this cell. PMID:27738659

  3. Altered α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin isoform levels in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo

    2016-01-01

    Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease-specific transcript......Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease......-specific transcription patterns in frontal cortex in PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and MSA, and thus may mediate the development of α-synucleinopathies. In this study, the differential expression of α-synuclein isoforms on transcriptional and translational levels was ascertained in MSA patients in comparison with PD...... for parkin and synphilin-1 isoforms. In MSA brains, α-synuclein140 and α-synuclein 112 isoform levels were significantly increased, whereas levels of the α-synuclein 126 isoform were decreased in the substantia nigra, striatum, cerebellar cortex, and nucleus dentatus versus controls. Moreover, in MSA cases...

  4. Altered serous levels of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites in patiens with refractory and non-refractory depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqing Zhang; Yanxia Zhang; Jianxia Yang; Min Hu; Yueqi Zhang; Xia Liang

    2012-01-01

    The study examined plasma metabolite changes of monoamine neurotransmitters in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and non-TRD before and after therapy. All 30 TRD and 30 non-TRD patients met the diagnostic criteria for a depressive episode in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Before treatment, and at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment, the plasma metabolite products of monoamine neurotransmitters in TRD group, including 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol and homovanillic acid, were significantly lower than those in the non-TRD group. After two types of anti-depressive therapy with 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, combined with psychotherapy, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly reduced in both groups of patients, and the serous levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol were significantly increased. In contrast, the homovanillic acid level exhibited no significant change. The levels of plasma metabolite products of peripheral monoamine neurotransmitters in depressive patients may predict the degree of depression and the therapeutic effects of treatment.

  5. Three level spinal dysraphism: multiple composite Type 1 and Type 2 split cord malformatıon

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    Alatas I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has reported an uncommon case a 3 year-old girl a composite split cord malformation (SCM with two different levels of SCM type1 and one level SCM type2, tight filum and sacral dermal sinus. The patient was admitted with a hypertrichosis and hyperpigmented patch. MRI of whole spine and brain was done. SCM type1 at T 7 and L2 levels and SCM typ2 at T11 level were removed then tight filum was cut and dermal sinus was excised at different sites during the same surge

  6. Altered seawater salinity levels affected growth and photosynthesis ofUlva fasciata (Ulvales, Chlorophyta) germlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Binbin; ZOU Dinghui

    2015-01-01

    Seawater salinity is greatly influenced by tide, evaporation and rain falls. In this study, we investigated the growth and photosynthetic responses of zygote-derivedUlva fasciata Delile germlings to short-term (minutes) and prolonged (days) exposure to different salinity gradients, to evaluate the effect of salinity variation on the early stage of life history in this seaweed. The results showed that, the maximum net photosynthetic rates (NPRm) ofU. fasciata germlings was observably decreased in desalted (25 and 15) and high (45) salinity seawater in short-term exposure tests (in minutes). However, after 30 min, the photosynthesis activity in medium salinity (25) was maintained at a relative high level (above 70%). After 8 d prolonged culture, the photosynthesis and mean relative growth rate (RGR) of germlings were all markedly lowered, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents increased as the salinity desalted from 34 to 15. The salinity decrease from 34 to 25 had no significant effect on the RGR, but obviously influenced the morphology of the germlings. High salinity level (45) significantly depressed theRGR and photosynthesis ofU. fasciata germlings, while it notably increased the MDA contents. The results showed that the salinity elevation had more detrimental effects onUlva fasciata germlings than salinity decrease did. The germlings grown at the salinity seawater levels from 25 to 34, performed preferable photosynthetic acclimation both in temporary and prolonged culture. Broad salinity tolerance from 25 to 34 inU. fasciata germlings may have partly evolved as a response to regular diurnal tides.

  7. F-cell levels are altered with erythrocyte density in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sumanta; Dash, Bisnu Prasad; Patel, Dilip Kumar; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit; Banerjee, Debashis; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2011-08-15

    Lighter cells from density fractionated erythrocytes of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients carry higher amount of externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) and cell surface glycophorins compared to the denser counterparts. Further analysis also revealed that the denser cells contained higher levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) compared to the lighter cells, supported by the presence of larger number of F-cells in these populations. In this report, we have found direct evidence on the higher survival of the HbF rich erythrocytes in SCD.

  8. Pulsed low-level infrared laser alters mRNA levels from muscle repair genes dependent on power output in Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Thomé, A. M. C.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite cells are present in skeletal muscle functioning in the repair and regeneration of muscle injury. Activation of these cells depends on the expression of myogenic factor 5 (Myf5), myogenic determination factor 1(MyoD), myogenic regulatory factor 4 (MRF4), myogenin (MyoG), paired box transcription factors 3 (Pax3), and 7 (Pax7). Low-level laser irradiation accelerates the repair of muscle injuries. However, data from the expression of myogenic factors have been controversial. Furthermore, the effects of different laser beam powers on the repair of muscle injuries have been not evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level infrared laser at different powers and in pulsed emission mode on the expression of myogenic regulatory factors and on Pax3 and Pax7 in injured skeletal muscle from Wistar rats. Animals that underwent cryoinjury were divided into three groups: injury, injury laser 25 Mw, and injury laser 75 mW. Low-level infrared laser irradiation (904 nm, 3 J cm‑2, 5 kHz) was carried out at 25 and 75 mW. After euthanasia, skeletal muscle samples were withdrawn and the total RNA was extracted for the evaluation of mRNA levels from the MyoD, MyoG, MRF4, Myf5, Pax3, and Pax7 gene. Pax 7 mRNA levels did not alter, but Pax3 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 25 mW. MyoD, MyoG, and MYf5 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated animals at both powers, and MRF4 mRNA levels decreased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 75 mW. In conclusion, exposure to pulsed low-level infrared laser, by power-dependent effect, could accelerate the muscle repair process altering mRNA levels from paired box transcription factors and myogenic regulatory factors.

  9. The relative effectiveness of segment specific level and non-specific level spinal joint mobilization on pain and range of motion: results of a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaven, Emily Joan; Goode, Adam P; Coronado, Rogelio A; Poole, Charles; Hegedus, Eric J

    2013-02-01

    Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. IN SYMPTOMATIC SUBJECTS TO: (1) examine the effects of a single session of joint mobilization on pain at rest and with most painful movement, and (2) compare the effects when joint mobilization is provided to a specific or non-specific spinal level. Joint mobilization is routinely used for treating spinal pain in conjunction with other interventions, but its unique effect is not well understood. Further, there is controversy about the role of 'specific level' techniques in producing benefit. Searches were performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PEDro) from 1966 through November 2010. Methodological quality was assessed using previously detailed criteria. Meta-analysis and meta-regression were conducted on eligible studies. Eight RCTs with a mean methodological score of 10/12 were included. Significant heterogeneity (P = 0.075) was found in the overall meta-analysis estimate. When stratified by body location, no significant individual effect was found for pain at rest. However, there was a statistical mean difference [0.71 (95% confidence interval: 0.13-1.28)] between pain at rest for the cervical and lumbar individual means. We found multiple studies which provided evidence that a single session of joint mobilization can lead to a reduction of pain at rest and with most painful movement. When using joint mobilization, the need for specific versus non-specific level mobilization may be influenced by anatomical region; the direction of effect in the cervical spine was toward specific mobilization and in the lumbar spine towards non-specific mobilization.

  10. Neuropeptide Kyotorphin (Tyrosyl-Arginine) has Decreased Levels in the Cerebro-Spinal Fluid of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients: Potential Diagnostic and Pharmacological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara Matos; Garcia-Nimo, Laura; Sá Santos, Sónia; Tavares, Isaura; Cocho, José A.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2013-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), besides the characteristic deterioration of memory, studies also point to a higher pain tolerance in spite of sensibility preservation. A change in the normal tau protein phosphorylation is also characteristic of AD, which contributes to the pathogenesis of the disease and is useful in early diagnosis. Kyotorphin (KTP) is an endogenous analgesic dipeptide (Tyr-Arg) for which there is evidence of eventual neuroprotective and neuromodulatory properties. The objective of this work was to study the possible correlation between KTP and phosphorylated tau protein (p-tau) levels in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) samples of AD patients. CSF samples were collected from 25 AD patients and 13 age-matched controls (N), where p-tau and KTP levels were measured. We found a statistically significant difference between p-tau/KTP values in AD and N groups with an inverse correlation between p-tau and KTP values in AD samples. These results suggest that in the future KTP may be a candidate biomarker for neurodegeneration and may be a lead compound to be used pharmacologically for neuroprotection. PMID:24198785

  11. Neuropeptide Kyotorphin (Tyrosyl-Arginine) has Decreased Levels in the Cerebro-Spinal Fluid of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: Potential Diagnostic and Pharmacological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara Matos; Garcia-Nimo, Laura; Sá Santos, Sónia; Tavares, Isaura; Cocho, José A; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2013-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), besides the characteristic deterioration of memory, studies also point to a higher pain tolerance in spite of sensibility preservation. A change in the normal tau protein phosphorylation is also characteristic of AD, which contributes to the pathogenesis of the disease and is useful in early diagnosis. Kyotorphin (KTP) is an endogenous analgesic dipeptide (Tyr-Arg) for which there is evidence of eventual neuroprotective and neuromodulatory properties. The objective of this work was to study the possible correlation between KTP and phosphorylated tau protein (p-tau) levels in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) samples of AD patients. CSF samples were collected from 25 AD patients and 13 age-matched controls (N), where p-tau and KTP levels were measured. We found a statistically significant difference between p-tau/KTP values in AD and N groups with an inverse correlation between p-tau and KTP values in AD samples. These results suggest that in the future KTP may be a candidate biomarker for neurodegeneration and may be a lead compound to be used pharmacologically for neuroprotection.

  12. Prediction of isometric motor tasks and effort levels based on high-density EMG in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanić, Mislav; Rojas-Martínez, Mónica; Mañanas, Miguel Angel; Francesc Alonso, Joan

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The development of modern assistive and rehabilitation devices requires reliable and easy-to-use methods to extract neural information for control of devices. Group-specific pattern recognition identifiers are influenced by inter-subject variability. Based on high-density EMG (HD-EMG) maps, our research group has already shown that inter-subject muscle activation patterns exist in a population of healthy subjects. The aim of this paper is to analyze muscle activation patterns associated with four tasks (flexion/extension of the elbow, and supination/pronation of the forearm) at three different effort levels in a group of patients with incomplete Spinal Cord Injury (iSCI). Approach. Muscle activation patterns were evaluated by the automatic identification of these four isometric tasks along with the identification of levels of voluntary contractions. Two types of classifiers were considered in the identification: linear discriminant analysis and support vector machine. Main results. Results show that performance of classification increases when combining features extracted from intensity and spatial information of HD-EMG maps (accuracy = 97.5%). Moreover, when compared to a population with injuries at different levels, a lower variability between activation maps was obtained within a group of patients with similar injury suggesting stronger task-specific and effort-level-specific co-activation patterns, which enable better prediction results. Significance. Despite the challenge of identifying both the four tasks and the three effort levels in patients with iSCI, promising results were obtained which support the use of HD-EMG features for providing useful information regarding motion and force intention.

  13. Imipramine reverses alterations in cytokines and BDNF levels induced by maternal deprivation in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Abelaira, Helena M; Ribeiro, Karine F; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Vuolo, Francieli; Colpo, Gabriela D; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Kapczinski, Flávio; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of evidence is pointing toward an association between immune molecules, as well brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the depression. The present study was aimed to evaluate the behavioral and molecular effects of the antidepressant imipramine in maternally deprived adult rats. To this aim, maternally deprived and non-deprived (control group) male rats were treated with imipramine (30mg/kg) once a day for 14 days during their adult phase. Their behavior was then assessed using the forced swimming test. In addition to this, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines were assessed in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In addition, BDNF protein levels were assessed in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. In deprived rats treated with saline was observed an increase on immobility time, compared with non-deprived rats treated with imipramine (pimipramine treatment reversed the effects of maternal deprivation on BDNF and cytokines levels (pimipramine, it is suggested that classic antidepressants could exert their effects by modulating the immune system.

  14. Alterations in interferon-gamma and nitric oxide levels in human echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Aissa, S; Amri, M; Bouteldja, R; Wietzerbin, J; Touil-Boukoffa, C

    2006-05-15

    Human cystic hydatid disease is characterized by the long-term coexistence of Echinococcus granulosus and its host without effective rejection of the parasite. This parasitic helminth infection currently constitutes a major health problem in Algeria. We investigated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and nitrite (NO2-) production in PBMC culture 2 supernatants from Algerian patients (n = 35), stimulated by a major antigen (antigen 5). Nitrite was also observed in 74 sera and 28 cyst fluids of patients carrying cysts in different locations. In addition, we report the detection of Nitric Oxide Synthase-2 (NOS2) in liver biopsies of patients (n = 8) by an immunochemical method using human NOS2 antibody. In vivo nitrite levels in host sera and cyst biological fluid point to a tight relation between host response and macro-parasite effects. Our in vitro results indicate a correlation between nitrite and IFN-gamma production in PBMC culture supernatants. Furthermore, by immunohistochemistry NOS2 expression was observed in hepatocytes and Küpffer cells from hydatid patients. Collectively, our data imply NO production in host defense against the extracellular parasite, probably in response to an IFN-gamma activating signal. Concomitant enhanced levels of IFN-gamma and nitrite represent useful indicators of the clinical aggressiveness of hydatidosis.

  15. Forest loss increases insect herbivory levels in human-altered landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonov, Pavel; Morante-Filho, José Carlos; Mariano-Neto, Eduardo; Cazetta, Eliana; Andrade, Edyla Ribeiro de; Rocha-Santos, Larissa; Inforzato, Igor; Gomes, Francisco Sanches; Faria, Deborah

    2016-11-01

    Insect herbivory has been observed to be affected by habitat loss and fragmentation, although the mechanisms by which these anthropogenic disturbances affect this process are not well understood. To aid in clarifying this issue, we assessed the relation between forest cover and leaf damage caused by herbivorous insects on a representative tropical forest understory plant family, the Rubiaceae. We measured leaf area loss of Rubiaceae plants in 20 forest sites located in the Brazilian Atlantic forest, and also tested whether variation in forest cover, abundance of insectivorous birds (predators) and of Rubiaceae plants (resources) could explain the observed variation in leaf damage. Herbivory levels varied between 2.6 and 12.5 percent leaf area lost and increased with decreasing forest cover, whereas the other explanatory variables did not provide additional explanatory power. Therefore, forest loss appears to be the main driver of changes in local herbivory, and ecological processes such as top-down and bottom-up control may not account for the deforestation-related increase in herbivory levels. Other mechanisms, for example leaf quality and/or the influence of the adjoining land uses, have to be explored in future studies.

  16. Effect and mechanism of the co-regulation of HCN2-GLT-1 on the spinal cord level of the visceral nociception and hyperalgesia following exposure to posttraumatic stress disorder-like stress in rats

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    Lei JI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the potential role of HCN2-GLT-1 [hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN-2 channel and astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1] in co-mediating visceral hyperalgesia at the spinal cord level following exposure to PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder-like stress in rats. Methods Adult female SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group (n=14, PTSD group (n=15 and PTSD+CTX group [pretreated with ceftriaxone (CTX, n=15]. The animal model of PTSD was reproduced by using single-prolonged stress (SPS combined with electric shock. The alteration of visceral sensitivity was evaluated by measuring the viscero-motor response (VMR to graded colorectal distension (CRD 7 days after PTSD. The transcription of the gene encoding the GLT-1 was selectively induced by CTX to up-regulate the GLT-1 expression. The expression of spinal HCN2 and the effect of CTX on it were evaluated by immunofluorescence. Results HCN2 expression increased significantly in the spinal cord within 7 days after the exposure to PTSD as compared with that of control group (78.05±6.49 vs 121.12±4.85, P<0.001. The expression of HCN2 significantly decreased when being treated with CTX (121.12±4.85 vs 98.24±5.86, P=0.012. HCN2 expression significantly increased in PTSD+CTX group compared with that of the control group (78.05±6.49 vs 98.24±5.86, P=0.024. The value of AUCVMR in PTSD group (0.2913±0.0229 was obviously higher than that in PTSD+CTX group (0.2175±0.0090 when the pressure of CRD was 20 mmHg (P=0.005. When the pressure was changed into 40 mmHg and 60 mmHg, the values of AUCVMR in PTSD group (0.6200±0.0278, 0.7663±0.0262 respectively were significantly higher than those in normal control group (0.3786±0.0155, 0.5271±0.0212, respectively, P<0.001 and PTSD+CTX group (0.5038±0.0336, 0.6400±0.0245, respectively, P=0.006, or P=0.001. Conclusions CTX may exert an effect by directly up-regulating the expression of GLT-1

  17. Involvement of spinal glutamate transporter-1 in the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia associated with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi J

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinshan Shi,1,* Ke Jiang,2,* Zhaoduan Li,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Nankai Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Little is known about the effects of the development of type 2 diabetes on glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord. Therefore, we quantified the extracellular levels of glutamate in the spinal cord of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats using in vivo microdialysis. In addition, protein levels of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were measured using Western blot. Finally, the effects of repeated intrathecal injections of ceftriaxone, which was previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression, on the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia as well as on basal extracellular level of glutamate and the expression of GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were evaluated. It was found that ZDF rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which were associated with increased basal extracellular levels of glutamate and attenuated levels of GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord, particularly in the dorsal horn. Furthermore, repeated intrathecal administrations of ceftriaxone dose-dependently prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in ZDF rats, which were correlated with enhanced GLT-1 expression without altering the basal glutamate levels in the spinal cord of ZDF rats. Overall, the results suggested that impaired glutamate reuptake in the spinal cord may contribute to the development of neuropathic pains in type 2 diabetes. Keywords: diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, glutamate, glutamate transporter-1

  18. Changes in skin levels of two neutotrophins (glial cell line derived neurotrohic factor and neurotrophin-3) cause alterations in cutaneous neuron responses to mechanical stimuli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey Lawson; Sabrina L. Mcllwrath; H. Richard Koerber

    2008-01-01

    Neurotrophins are important for the development and maintenance of both high and low threshold mechanoreceptors (HTMRs and LTMRs). In this series of studies, the effects of constitutive overexpression of two different neurotrophins, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and glial cell line derived neurotrohic factor (GDNF), were examined. Previous studies indicated that both of them may be implicated in the normal development of mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Neurons from mice transgenically altered to overexpress NT-3 or GDNF (NT-3-OE or GDNF-OE mice) in the skin were examined using several physiological, immunohistochemi-cal and molecular techniques. Ex vivo skin/nerve/DRG/spinal cord and skin/nerve preparations were used to determine the response characteristics of the cutaneous neurons; immunohistochemistry was used to examine the biochemical phenotype of DRG cells and the skin; RT-PCR was used to examine the levels of candidate ion channels in skin and DRG that may correlate with changes in physiologi-cal responses. In GDNF-OE mice, I-isolectin B4 (IB4)-immunopositive C-HTMRs (nociceptors), a large percentage of which are sensitive to GDNF, had significantly lower mechanical thresholds than wildtype (WT) neurons. Heat thresholds for the same cells were not different. Mechanical sensitivity changes in GDNF-OE mice were correlated with significant increases in acid sensing ion channels 2a (ASIC2a) and 2b (ASIC2b) and transient receptor potential channel AI (TRPAI), all of which are putative mechanosensitive ion channels. Overexpression of NT-3 affected the responses of A-LTMRs and A-HTMRs, hut had no effect on C-HTMRs. Slowly adapting type 1 (SA1) LTMRs and A-HTMRs had increased mechanical sensitivity compared to WT. Mechanical sensitivity was correlated with significant increases in acid-sensing ion channels ASIC1 and ASIC3. This data indicates that both neurotrophins play roles in determining mechanical thresholds of cutaneous HTMRs and LTMRs and that sensitivity

  19. "INTRAOPERATIVE SPINAL STIFFNESS MEASUREMENT IN MANAGEMENT OF SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karami

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study to determine whether spine stiffness is predictive of clinical results after lumbar spinal fusion for spinal stenosis, a total of 78 patients were measured intraoperatively with Kocher clamp manual distraction technique to determine motion segment stiffness then spinal fusion was performed for any loose segment. ‎Statistical analysis revealed that stiffness measurement correlate with clinical results of surgery. During a minimum of 2 years follow up after surgery, patients who had loose motion segment before or after decompression and were fused had the same level of satisfaction with surgical results as patients without loose segments and fusion. ‎We concluded that intraoperative spinal stiffness measurement provide a good indicator to spine fusion after lumbar canal stenosis ‎surgery.

  20. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaire, R; Notter, M; Riedel, W; Thiel, E

    1997-05-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we determined a significant reduction in testosterone levels (P < 0.008) and neutrophil count (P < 0.004) in miners compared to the unexposed controls. A threefold increase in chromosome aberrations in the miners compared to the nonexposed controls was recorded (P < 0.0001). Most remarkably, cells with multiple aberrations such as "rogue" cells were observed for the first time in miners; these cells had previously been found only after short-term high-dose radiation exposure, e.g. from the Hiroshima atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. We conclude that the miners exposed to uranium are at an increased risk to acquire various degrees of genetic damage, and that the damage may be associated with an

  1. Repeated exposure to neurotoxic levels of chlorpyrifos alters hippocampal expression of neurotrophins and neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young S; Lewis, John A; Ippolito, Danielle L; Hussainzada, Naissan; Lein, Pamela J; Jackson, David A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-18

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organophosphorus pesticide (OP), is one of the most widely used pesticides in the world. Subchronic exposures to CPF that do not cause cholinergic crisis are associated with problems in cognitive function (i.e., learning and memory deficits), but the biological mechanism(s) underlying this association remain speculative. To identify potential mechanisms of subchronic CPF neurotoxicity, adult male Long Evans (LE) rats were administered CPF at 3 or 10mg/kg/d (s.c.) for 21 days. We quantified mRNA and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression profiles by RNA-seq, microarray analysis and small ncRNA sequencing technology in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Hippocampal slice immunohistochemistry was used to determine CPF-induced changes in protein expression and localization patterns. Neither dose of CPF caused overt clinical signs of cholinergic toxicity, although after 21 days of exposure, cholinesterase activity was decreased to 58% or 13% of control levels in the hippocampus of rats in the 3 or 10mg/kg/d groups, respectively. Differential gene expression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was observed only in the 10mg/kg/d dose group relative to controls. Of the 1382 differentially expressed genes identified by RNA-seq and microarray analysis, 67 were common to both approaches. Differential expression of six of these genes (Bdnf, Cort, Crhbp, Nptx2, Npy and Pnoc) was verified in an independent CPF exposure study; immunohistochemistry demonstrated that CRHBP and NPY were elevated in the CA1 region of the hippocampus at 10mg/kg/d CPF. Gene ontology enrichment analysis suggested association of these genes with receptor-mediated cell survival signaling pathways. miR132/212 was also elevated in the CA1 hippocampal region, which may play a role in the disruption of neurotrophin-mediated cognitive processes after CPF administration. These findings identify potential mediators of CPF-induced neurobehavioral deficits following subchronic exposure to CPF at

  2. Advanced age, altered level of consciousness and a new diagnosis of diabetes are independently associated with hypernatreamia in hyperglycaemic crisis

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    Ogbera Anthonia O

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited literature on hypernatreamia in the setting of hyperglycaemic crisis. This is despite the fact that the presence of hypernatreamia may impact on the classification of hyperglycaemic crisis and its management particularly with regards to the nature of fluid therapy. We determined the prevalence of hypernatreamia and its associated factors at presentation for hyperglycaemic crisis. Methods This was a retrospective review of data for hyperglycaemic crisis admissions in Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. The prevalence of hypernatreamia (uncorrected Serum Sodium at presentation >145 mmol/L was determined. Hyperosmolality was defined by calculated effective osmolality >320 mosmols/Kg. Multivariate logistic regression was undertaken using variables that were statistically significant in univariate analysis to ascertain those that were independently associated (Odds Ratio (OR with 95% Confidence Interval (CI with hypernatreamia. Results The prevalence of hypernatreamia in our admissions for hyperglycaemic crisis was 11.7% (n = 32/273 including 171 females and 102 males. All admissions with hypernatreamia met the criteria for hyperosmolality. Age ≥ 60 years (OR = 3.9 95% CI 1.3-12.3; P = 0.018, Altered level of consciousness (OR = 8.8 95% CI 2.3-32.8; P Conclusion The prevalence rate of hypernatreamia in hyperglycaemic admissions was high with all hypernatreamic admissions meeting the criteria for hyperosmolality. Advanced age, altered conscious level and a new diagnosis of diabetes were independently associated with hypernatreamia.

  3. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

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    Nathália Vieira Batista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-activating factor (PAF is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process.

  4. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  5. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaire, R.; Notter, M.; Thiel, E. [Free Univ., Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we determined a significant reduction in testosterone levels (P < 0.008) and neutrophil count (P < 0.0001). Most remarkably, cells with multiple aberrations such as {open_quotes}rogue{close_quotes} cells were observed for the first time in miners; these cells had previously been found only after short-term high-dose radiation exposure, e.g. from the Hiroshima atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Exposure levels of anti-LINGO-1 Li81 antibody in the central nervous system and dose-efficacy relationships in rat spinal cord remyelination models after systemic administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepinsky, R Blake; Shao, Zhaohui; Ji, Benxiu; Wang, Qin; Meng, Gym; Walus, Lee; Lee, Xinhua; Hu, Yinghui; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen; Meier, Werner; Mi, Sha

    2011-11-01

    LINGO-1 (leucine-rich repeat and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein-1) is a negative regulator of myelination and repair of damaged axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Blocking LINGO-1 function leads to robust remyelination. The anti-LINGO-1 Li81 antibody is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis (MS) and is the first MS therapy that directly targets myelin repair. LINGO-1 is selectively expressed in brain and spinal cord but not in peripheral tissues. Perhaps the greatest concern for Li81 therapy is the limited access of the drug to the CNS. Here, we measured Li81 concentrations in brain, spinal cord, and cerebral spinal fluid in rats after systemic administration and correlated them with dose-efficacy responses in rat lysolecithin and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis spinal cord models of remyelination. Remyelination was dose-dependent, and levels of Li81 in spinal cord that promoted myelination correlated well with affinity measurements for the binding of Li81 to LINGO-1. Observed Li81 concentrations in the CNS of 0.1 to 0.4% of blood levels are consistent with values reported for other antibodies. To understand the features of the antibody that affect CNS penetration, we also evaluated the pharmacokinetics of Li81 Fab2, Fab, and poly(ethylene glycol)-modified Fab. The reagents all showed similar CNS exposure despite large differences in their sizes, serum half-lives, and volumes of distribution, and area under the curve (AUC) measurements in the CNS directly correlated with AUC measurements in serum. These studies demonstrate that exposure levels achieved by passive diffusion of the Li81 monoclonal antibody into the CNS are sufficient and lead to robust remyelination.

  7. Precise control of miR-125b levels is required to create a regeneration-permissive environment after spinal cord injury: a cross-species comparison between salamander and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Diaz Quiroz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most spinal cord injuries lead to permanent paralysis in mammals. By contrast, the remarkable regenerative abilities of salamanders enable full functional recovery even from complete spinal cord transections. The molecular differences underlying this evolutionary divergence between mammals and amphibians are poorly understood. We focused on upstream regulators of gene expression as primary entry points into this question. We identified a group of microRNAs (miRNAs that are conserved between the Mexican axolotl salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum and mammals but show marked cross-species differences in regulation patterns following spinal cord injury. We found that precise post-injury levels of one of these miRNAs (miR-125b is essential for functional recovery, and guides correct regeneration of axons through the lesion site in a process involving the direct downstream target Sema4D in axolotls. Translating these results to a mammalian model, we increased miR-125b levels in the rat through mimic treatments following spinal cord transection. These treatments downregulated Sema4D and other glial-scar-related genes, and enhanced the animal’s functional recovery. Our study identifies a key regulatory molecule conserved between salamander and mammal, and shows that the expression of miR-125b and Sema4D must be carefully controlled in the right cells at the correct level to promote regeneration. We also show that these molecular components of the salamander’s regeneration-permissive environment can be experimentally harnessed to improve treatment outcomes for mammalian spinal cord injuries.

  8. Genetic variations altering FSH action affect circulating hormone levels as well as follicle growth in healthy peripubertal girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Alexander S.; Hagen, Casper P; Almstrup, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    or their combination, distinct effects on reproductive hormone levels as well as ovarian follicle maturation in healthy peripubertal girls. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: FSHB and FSHR genetic variants impact reproductive hormone levels as well as associated pathologies in women. While FSHR c. 2039A>G is known to alter...... concerning the influence of FSHB c.-211G>T in adult women. Furthermore, we have no information about the exact day of the menstrual cycle in the subgroup of girls with menarche. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: The sex-specific interaction of FSHB and FSHR genetic variants and physiological as well...... of the Environment, CeHoS (MST-621-00065), Capital Region of Denmark (December 2011), Ministry of Higher Education and Science (DFF-1331-00113) and EDMaRC (Danish Ministry of Health). A.S.B. was funded from December 2015 by ReproUnion (EU Interreg Öresund-Kattegat-Skagerrak). The authors declare no conflict...

  9. Cortical and spinal assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, I W; Gram, Mikkel; Hansen, T M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standardized objective methods to assess the analgesic effects of opioids, enable identification of underlying mechanisms of drug actions in the central nervous system. Opioids may exert their effect on both cortical and spinal levels. In this study actions of morphine at both levels...... subjects was included in the data analysis. There was no change in the activity in resting EEG (P>0.05) after morphine administration as compared to placebo. During cold pressor stimulation, morphine significantly lowered the relative activity in the delta (1-4Hz) band (P=0.03) and increased the activity...... morphine administration (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor EEG and the nociceptive reflex were more sensitive to morphine analgesia than resting EEG and can be used as standardized objective methods to assess opioid effects. However, no correlation between the analgesic effect of morphine on the spinal...

  10. Learning about Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Release Fischbeck Group Learning About Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? What are the ... for Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? Spinal muscular atrophy is a group of inherited ...

  11. Modulation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 expression levels alters mouse mammary tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D Young

    Full Text Available Tumor cells exhibit an altered metabolism characterized by elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate secretion which is supported by an increase in glucose transport and consumption. We hypothesized that reducing or eliminating the expression of the most prominently expressed glucose transporter(s would decrease the amount of glucose available to breast cancer cells thereby decreasing their metabolic capacity and proliferative potential.Of the 12 GLUT family glucose transporters expressed in mice, GLUT1 was the most abundantly expressed at the RNA level in the mouse mammary tumors from MMTV-c-ErbB2 mice and cell lines examined. Reducing GLUT1 expression in mouse mammary tumor cell lines using shRNA or Cre/Lox technology reduced glucose transport, glucose consumption, lactate secretion and lipid synthesis in vitro without altering the concentration of ATP, as well as reduced growth on plastic and in soft agar. The growth of tumor cells with reduced GLUT1 expression was impaired when transplanted into the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice in vivo. Overexpression of GLUT1 in a cell line with low levels of endogenous GLUT1 increased glucose transport in vitro and enhanced growth in nude mice in vivo as compared to the control cells with very low levels of GLUT1.These studies demonstrate that GLUT1 is the major glucose transporter in mouse mammary carcinoma models overexpressing ErbB2 or PyVMT and that modulation of the level of GLUT1 has an effect upon the growth of mouse mammary tumor cell lines in vivo.

  12. Spinal Cord Contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ju; Jian Wang; Yazhou Wang; Xianghui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and lim-ited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  13. Acquired lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, JoAnn

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in patients over age 65 years. In this condition, narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal and nerve root canals leads to painful, debilitating compression of spinal nerves and blood vessels. As the population ages, an increasing number of patients will be diagnosed and treated for lumbar spinal stenosis by primary care providers. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of lumbar spinal stenosis in adults over age 50 years.

  14. Training cessation does not alter GLUT-4 protein levels in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmard, J A; Hortobágyi, T; Neufer, P D; Johns, R A; Fraser, D D; Israel, R G; Dohm, G L

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether short-term training cessation resulted in reduced GLUT-4 protein levels. Endurance- (n = 12, ET) and strength-trained (n = 12) individuals (ST) were examined before and after 14 days of training withdrawal. GLUT-4 content was determined from muscle biopsy samples of the gastrocnemius in ET and the vastus lateralis in ST. Insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test) was significantly (P 0.05) in both groups (92 and 100% of trained values for ET and ST, respectively). In ET, citrate synthase activity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with training withdrawal (41.0 +/- 3.6 vs. 30.6 +/- 2.8 mumol.g-1.min-1); in ST no change was evident. The decrement in insulin sensitivity with the cessation of endurance- or resistance-oriented activity is therefore not associated with a reduction in GLUT-4 protein content. Muscle oxidative capacity and GLUT-4 content do not coincide with the removal of endurance training.

  15. Activation of vagus nerve by semapimod alters substance P levels and decreases breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin, Nuray; Duymuş, Ozlem; Oztürk, Saffet; Demir, Necdet

    2012-11-10

    Chronic inflammation is involved in initiation as well as in progression of cancer. Semapimod, a tetravalent guanylhydrazon and formerly known as CNI-1493, inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines from activated macrophages and this effect is partly mediated by the vagus nerve. Our previous findings demonstrated that inactivation of vagus nerve activity as well sensory neurons enhanced visceral metastasis of 4THM breast carcinoma. Hence semapimod by activating vagus nerve may inhibit breast cancer metastasis. Here, effects of semapimod on breast cancer metastasis, the role of vagal sensory neurons on this effect and changes in mediators of the neuroimmune connection, such as substance P (SP) as well as neprilysin-like activity, were examined. Vagotomy was performed on half of the control animals that were treated with semapimod following orthotopic injection of 4THM breast carcinoma cells. Semapimod decreased lung and liver metastases in control but not in vagotomized animals with an associated increased SP levels in sensory nerve endings. Semapimod also increased neprilysin-like activity in lung tissue of control animals but not in tumor-bearing animals. This is the first report demonstrating that semapimod enhances vagal sensory nerve activity and may have anti-tumoral effects under in-vivo conditions. Further studies, however, are required to elucidate the conditions and the mechanisms involved in anti-tumoral effects of semapimod.

  16. Phenytoin alters transcript levels of hormone-sensitive lipase in muscle from horses with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkowsky, M L; Beech, J; Fletcher, J E

    1998-10-15

    In equine hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP), there is evidence suggesting that the primary defect in the sodium channel is associated with a secondary alteration in triacylglycerol-associated fatty acid metabolism (TAFAM) in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, TAFAM may be involved in the therapeutic action of phenytoin. The effects of phenytoin treatment on the transcript levels of three key proteins in TAFAM, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT), and fatty acid binding protein (FABP), were examined. These transcripts were quantitated by competitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in undifferentiated and differentiated primary cultures of equine skeletal muscle from control, heterozygous HyperPP, and homozygous-affected HyperPP horses. There was a 10-fold lower level of HSL transcript in both undifferentiated and differentiated cultures from homozygous-affected horses than from horses of the other genotypes. Phenytoin selectively increased the HSL transcript in homozygous-affected differentiated cultures to levels similar to those of the other genotypes. The levels of CPT and FABP transcripts were unaffected by genotype, differentiation, and phenytoin treatment. These results suggest that the primary defect in HyperPP may secondarily decrease HSL transcript levels and that the therapeutic action of phenytoin may include regulation of mRNA transcripts in skeletal muscle. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  17. An atypical case of segmental spinal dysgenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zana, Elodie; Chalard, Francois; Sebag, Guy [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France); Mazda, Keyvan [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Paris (France)

    2005-09-01

    Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a complex closed dysraphism. The diagnostic criteria are: lumbar or thoracolumbar vertebral dysgenesis causing kyphosis, focal spinal cord narrowing without exiting roots, deformity of the lower limbs and paraplegia or paraparesis. We present a newborn who showed atypical features of bifocal spinal cord narrowing, without any vertebral abnormality at the proximal level. This seems to be a variant of this rare entity, whose early diagnosis is important, as surgical stabilisation of the spine is required. (orig.)

  18. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test.

  19. Altered Levels of Aroma and Volatiles by Metabolic Engineering of Shikimate Pathway Genes in Tomato Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Tzin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum fruit is an excellent source of antioxidants, dietary fibers, minerals and vitamins and therefore has been referred to as a “functional food”. Ripe tomato fruits produce a large number of specialized metabolites including volatile organic compounds. These volatiles serve as key components of the tomato fruit flavor, participate in plant pathogen and herbivore defense, and are used to attract seed dispersers. A major class of specialized metabolites is derived from the shikimate pathway followed by aromatic amino acid biosynthesis of phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. We attempted to modify tomato fruit flavor by overexpressing key regulatory genes in the shikimate pathway. Bacterial genes encoding feedback-insensitive variants of 3-Deoxy-D-Arabino-Heptulosonate 7-Phosphate Synthase (DAHPS; AroG209-9 and bi-functional Chorismate Mutase/Prephenate Dehydratase (CM/PDT; PheA12 were expressed under the control of a fruit-specific promoter. We crossed these transgenes to generate tomato plants expressing both the AroG209 and PheA12 genes. Overexpression of the AroG209-9 gene had a dramatic effect on the overall metabolic profile of the fruit, including enhanced levels of multiple volatile and non-volatile metabolites. In contrast, the PheA12 overexpression line exhibited minor metabolic effects compared to the wild type fruit. Co-expression of both the AroG209-9 and PheA12 genes in tomato resulted overall in a similar metabolic effect to that of expressing only the AroG209-9 gene. However, the aroma ranking attributes of the tomato fruits from PheA12//AroG209-9 were unique and different from those of the lines expressing a single gene, suggesting a contribution of the PheA12 gene to the overall metabolic profile. We suggest that expression of bacterial genes encoding feedback-insensitive enzymes of the shikimate pathway in tomato fruits provides a useful metabolic engineering tool for the modification of

  20. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenbolone (TREN) was performed to evaluate the response of juvenile coho salmon to EDC exposure. Second, juvenile coho salmon were exposed to 0, 20 or 100% effluent from eight WWTPs from the Puget Sound, WA region for 72h. Juvenile coho salmon exposed to 2 and 10ng EE2L(-1) had 17-fold and 215-fold higher lhb mRNA levels relative to control fish. Hepatic vtg mRNA levels were dramatically increased 6670-fold, but only in response to 10ng EE2L(-1) and Fsh beta-subunit (fshb) mRNA levels were not altered by any of the treatments. In the WWTP effluent exposures, lhb mRNA levels were significantly elevated in fish exposed to five of the WWTP effluents. In contrast, transcript levels of vtg were not affected by any of the WWTP effluent exposures. Mean levels of natural and synthetic estrogens in fish bile were consistent with pituitary lhb expression, suggesting that the observed lhb induction may be due to

  1. Altered Brain Network in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Resting Graph Theory-Based Network Study at Voxel-Wise Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chaoyang; Hu, Xiaofei; Hu, Jun; Liang, Minglong; Yin, Xuntao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare degenerative disorder characterized by loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Neuroimaging has provided noticeable evidence that ALS is a complex disease, and shown that anatomical and functional lesions extend beyond precentral cortices and corticospinal tracts, to include the corpus callosum; frontal, sensory, and premotor cortices; thalamus; and midbrain. The aim of this study is to investigate graph theory-based functional network abnormalities at voxel-wise level in ALS patients on a whole brain scale. Forty-three ALS patients and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. The voxel-wise network degree centrality (DC), a commonly employed graph-based measure of network organization, was used to characterize the alteration of whole brain functional network. Compared with the controls, the ALS patients showed significant increase of DC in the left cerebellum posterior lobes, bilateral cerebellum crus, bilateral occipital poles, right orbital frontal lobe, and bilateral prefrontal lobes; significant decrease of DC in the bilateral primary motor cortex, bilateral sensory motor region, right prefrontal lobe, left bilateral precuneus, bilateral lateral temporal lobes, left cingulate cortex, and bilateral visual processing cortex. The DC's z-scores of right inferior occipital gyrus were significant negative correlated with the ALSFRS-r scores. Our findings confirm that the regions with abnormal network DC in ALS patients were located in multiple brain regions including primary motor, somatosensory and extra-motor areas, supporting the concept that ALS is a multisystem disorder. Specifically, our study found that DC in the visual areas was altered and ALS patients with higher DC in right inferior occipital gyrus have more severity of disease. The result demonstrated that the altered DC value in this region can probably be used to assess severity of ALS.

  2. Pathogenesis of spinally mediated hyperalgesia in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Khara M; Jiang, Yun; Svensson, Camilla I; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2007-06-01

    Hyperalgesia to noxious stimuli is accompanied by increased spinal cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 protein in diabetic rats. The present studies were initiated to establish causality between increased spinal COX-2 activity and hyperalgesia during diabetes and to assess the potential involvement of polyol pathway activity in the pathogenesis of spinally mediated hyperalgesia. Rats with 1, 2, or 4 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes exhibited significantly increased levels of spinal COX-2 protein and activity, along with exaggerated paw flinching in response to 0.5% paw formalin injection. Increased flinching of diabetic rats was attenuated by intrathecal pretreatment with a selective COX-2 inhibitor immediately before formalin injection, confirming the involvement of COX-2 activity in diabetic hyperalgesia. Chronic treatment with insulin or ICI222155, an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) previously shown to prevent spinal polyol accumulation and formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in diabetic rats, prevented elevated spinal COX-2 protein and activity in diabetic rats. In contrast, the ARI IDD676 had no effect on spinal polyol accumulation, elevated spinal COX-2, or hyperalgesia to paw formalin injection. In the spinal cord, aldose reductase immunoreactivity was present solely in oligodendrocytes, which also contained COX-2 immunoreactivity. Polyol pathway flux in spinal oligodendrocytes provides a pathogenic mechanism linking hyperglycemia to hyperalgesia in diabetic rats.

  3. Diagnostic validity of space available for the spinal cord at C1 level for cervical myelopathy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Takenori; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Fujimura, Yoshikazu; Ishii, Yushin; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Matsunaga, Shunji; Shimizu, Takachika; Matsumoto, Morio

    2009-06-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To evaluate diagnostic validity of space available for the spinal cord (SAC) at C1 level for myelopathy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The relationship of SAC at C1 level with myelopathy has been evaluated by relatively small number of the patients, and 2 criteria have been proposed. Two cohorts of the patients with RA were established. Group A consisted of 140 patients with myeopathy due to upper cervical involvement selected from the database. Group B consisted of 99 patients with upper cervical subluxation, but not associated with myelopathy selected from the consecutive series of the hospitalized patients. Distributions of SAC at C1 level in both groups were evaluated. Efficacy indexes for screening (sensitivity, specificity, etc.) were calculated for these patients' population by previously demonstrated 2 criteria. In addition, analysis according to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was performed. The average values of SAC were 11.1 mm in Group A and 16.5 mm in Group B. When cut-off point for myelopathy was defined as 13 mm or less, sensitivity and specificity were 82% and 85%, respectively. When it was defined as 14 mm or less, sensitivity increased (88%) while specificity decreased (74%). Accuracies by these 2 criteria were almost the same (83%, 82%). The left upper corner point of ROC curve was located between these 2 cut-off points. Distributions of SAC showed that SAC was a reliable parameter for relating myelopathy in patients with upper cervical subluxation in RA. The plots according to ROC curve showed adequacy of previously demonstrated 2 cut-off points. For the purpose to screen the patients with high risk for myelopathy, 14 mm or less was recommended as a cut-off point of SAC.

  4. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, S.M.; Wrigley, P.J.; Youssef, A.M.; McIndoe, L.; Wilcox, S.L.; Rae, C.D.; Edden, R; Siddall, P.J.; Henderson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury to 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age and gender matched healthy controls. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  5. EZH2 regulates spinal neuroinflammation in rats with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2017-02-28

    Alteration in gene expression along the pain signaling pathway is a key mechanism contributing to the genesis of neuropathic pain. Accumulating studies have shown that epigenetic regulation plays a crucial role in nociceptive process in the spinal dorsal horn. In this present study, we investigated the role of enhancer of zeste homolog-2 (EZH2), a subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2, in the spinal dorsal horn in the genesis of neuropathic pain in rats induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase, which catalyzes the methylation of histone H3 on K27 (H3K27), resulting in gene silencing. We found that levels of EZH2 and tri-methylated H3K27 (H3K27TM) in the spinal dorsal horn were increased in rats with neuropathic pain on day 3 and day 10 post nerve injuries. EZH2 was predominantly expressed in neurons in the spinal dorsal horn under normal conditions. The number of neurons with EZH2 expression was increased after nerve injury. More strikingly, nerve injury drastically increased the number of microglia with EZH2 expression by more than sevenfold. Intrathecal injection of the EZH2 inhibitor attenuated the development and maintenance of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with nerve injury. Such analgesic effects were concurrently associated with the reduced levels of EZH2, H3K27TM, Iba1, GFAP, TNF-α, IL-1β, and MCP-1 in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with nerve injury. Our results highly suggest that targeting the EZH2 signaling pathway could be an effective approach for the management of neuropathic pain.

  6. Master's level in primary health care education - students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of the alteration in the clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfmark, Anna; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta

    2010-06-16

    Many Western European countries are undergoing reforms with changes in higher education according to the Bologna declaration for Higher European Education Area. In accordance with these changes, the Master's degree was introduced in specialist nurse education in Sweden in 2007, and as a result changed the curriculum and modified theoretical and clinical areas. The aim of this study was to investigate students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of Master's level education in primary health care with a focus on the clinical area. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Interviews with ten students and ten preceptors were performed twice, before and after the clinical practice period. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and themes formulated. Students perceived alteration in the content of the education at the Master's level such as more independence and additional assignments. The preceptors perceived benefits with the Master's level but were unsure of how to transform theoretical and abstract knowledge into practice. Writing the Master's thesis was seen by students to take time away from clinical practice. For some students and preceptors the content of the Master's level clinical practice area was experienced as vague and indistinct. The students had not expected supervision to be different from earlier experiences, while preceptors felt higher demands and requested more knowledge. Both students and preceptors perceived that education at the Master's level might lead to a higher status for the nurses' profession in primary health care. Students and preceptors experienced both advantages and disadvantages concerning the change in specialist nurse education in primary health care at the Master's level. The altered educational content was experienced as a step forward, but they also questioned how the new knowledge could be used in practice. The relevance of the Master's thesis was questioned. Supervision was seen by students

  7. Association of urinary metal profiles with altered glucose levels and diabetes risk: a population-based study in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    Full Text Available Elevated heavy metals and fasting plasma glucose (FPG levels were both associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, studies on the associations of heavy metals and essential elements with altered FPG and diabetes risk were limited or conflicting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential associations of heavy metals and essential trace elements with FPG and diabetes risk among general Chinese population.We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the associations of urinary concentrations of 23 metals with FPG, impaired fasting glucose (IFG and diabetes among 2242 community-based Chinese adults in Wuhan. We used the false discovery rate (FDR method to correct for multiple hypothesis tests.After adjusting for potential confounders, urinary aluminum, titanium, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, antimony, barium, tungsten and lead were associated with altered FPG, IFG or diabetes risk (all P< 0.05; arsenic was only dose-dependently related to diabetes (P< 0.05. After additional adjustment for multiple testing, titanium, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, tungsten and lead were still significantly associated with one or more outcomes (all FDR-adjusted P< 0.05.Our results suggest that multiple metals in urine are associated with FPG, IFG or diabetes risk. Because the cross-sectional design precludes inferences about causality, further prospective studies are warranted to validate our findings.

  8. Drospirenone intake alters plasmatic steroid levels and cyp17a1 expression in gonads of juvenile sea bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Maria; Fernandes, Denise; Medina, Paula; Blázquez, Mercedes; Porte, Cinta

    2016-06-01

    Drospirenone (DRO) is one of the most widely used progestins in contraceptive treatments and hormone replacement therapies. The pharmacokinetics and potential toxicological effects of DRO were investigated in juvenile sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) exposed through the diet (0.01-10 μg DRO/g) for up to 31 days. DRO was detected in the blood (4-27 ng/mL) of fish exposed to the highest concentration, with no significant bioaccumulation over time and no alteration of hepatic metabolizing enzymes, namely, CYP1A and CYP3A-catalysed activities and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT). Pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17P4), 17α-hydroxypregnenolone (17P5), androstenedione (AD) and testosterone (T) were determined in plasma and gene expression of cyp17a1, cyp19a1a and cyp11β analysed by qRT-PCR in gonads. The significant increase in plasmatic levels of 17P5, 17P4 and AD detected after 31 days exposure to 10 ng DRO/g together with the increased expression of cyp17a1 in females evidence the ability of DRO to alter steroid synthesis at low intake concentrations (7 ng DRO/day). However, the potential consequences of this steroid shift for female reproduction remain to be investigated.

  9. Recombinant Human Leptin Does Not Alter Gut Hormone Levels after Gastric Bypass but May Attenuate Sweet Cravings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushika Conroy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery improves glucose homeostasis and alters gut hormones partly independent of weight loss. Leptin plays a role in these processes; levels are decreased following bariatric surgery, creating a relative leptin insufficiency. We previously showed that leptin administration in a weight-reduced state after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB caused no further weight loss. Here, we discuss the impact of leptin administration on gut hormones, glucostasis, and appetite. Weight stable women after RYGB were randomized to receive placebo or recombinant human metreleptin (0.05 mg/kg twice daily. At weeks 0 and 16, a liquid meal challenge was performed. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, PYY, glucagon, and ghrelin (total, acyl, and desacyl were measured fasting and postprandially. Appetite was assessed using a visual analog scale. Mean post-op period was 53±2.3 months; mean BMI was 34.6±0.2 kg/m2. At 16 weeks, there was no significant change in weight within or between groups. Fasting PYY was significantly different between groups and the leptin group had lower sweets craving at week 16 than the placebo group (P<0.05. No other differences were observed. Leptin replacement does not alter gut hormones or glucostasis but may diminish sweet cravings compared to placebo in this population of post-RYGB women.

  10. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Orioli, Andrea; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI) reorganization of spinal cord circuits occur both above and below the spinal lesion. These functional changes can be determined by assessing electrophysiological recording. We aimed at investigating the trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) and trigemino-spinal reflex (TSR) responses after traumatic SCI. TCR and TSR were registered after stimulation of the infraorbital nerve from the sternocleidomastoid, splenius, deltoid, biceps and first dorsal interosseous muscles in 10 healthy subjects and 10 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI. In the control subjects reflex responses were registered from the sternocleidomastoid, and splenium muscles, while no responses were obtained from upper limb muscles. In contrast, smaller but clear short latency EMG potentials were recorded from deltoid and biceps muscles in about half of the SCI patients. Moreover, the amplitudes of the EMG responses in the neck muscles were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. The reflex responses are likely to propagate up the brainstem and down the spinal cord along the reticulospinal tracts and the propriospinal system. Despite the loss of corticospinal axons, synaptic plasticity in pre-existing pathways and/or formation of new circuits through sprouting processes above the injury site may contribute to the findings of this preliminary study and may be involved in the functional recovery. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes can be used to demonstrate and quantify plastic changes at brainstem and cervical level following SCI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Photoperiodic changes in endocannabinoid levels and energetic responses to altered signalling at CB1 receptors in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J M; Smith, N S; Adams, S A; Bradshaw, H B; Demas, G E

    2012-07-01

    Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) adapt to seasonal environmental conditions with marked changes in body mass, primarily in the form of adiposity. Winter-like conditions (e.g. short days) are sufficient to decrease body mass by approximately 30% in part via reductions in food intake. The neuroendocrine mechanisms responsible for these changes are not well understood, and homeostatic orexigenic/anorexigenic systems of the hypothalamus provide little explanation. We investigated the potential role of endocannabinoids, which are known modulators of appetite and metabolism, in mediating seasonal changes in energy balance. Specifically, we housed hamsters in long or short days for 0, 3, or 9 weeks and measured endocannabinoid levels in the hypothalamus, brainstem, liver and retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RWAT). An additional group of males housed in short days for 25 weeks were also compared with long-day controls. Following 9 weeks in short days, levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) were significantly elevated in RWAT and reduced in brainstem, although they returned to long-day levels by week 25 in short-day males that had cycled back to summer-like energy balance. Endocannabinoid levels in these tissues correlated significantly with adiposity and change in body mass. No photoperiodic changes were observed in the hypothalamus or liver; however, sex differences in 2-AG levels were found in the liver (males > females). We further tested the effects of CB(1) receptor signalling on ingestive behaviour. Five daily injections of CB(1) antagonist SR141716 significantly reduced food intake and body mass but not food hoarding. Although the CB(1) agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide did not appreciably affect either ingestive behaviour, body mass was significantly elevated following 2 days of injections. Taken altogether, these findings demonstrate that endocannabinoid levels vary with sex and photoperiod in a site-specific manner, and that

  12. Periodontitis increases rheumatic factor serum levels and citrullinated proteins in gingival tissues and alter cytokine balance in arthritic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Mônica G.; Sacchetti, Silvana B.; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Pimentel, Suzana Peres; Casarin, Renato Corrêa Viana; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Casati, Marcio Z.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated some immunological features by experimental periodontitis (EP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease interact in destructive processes in arthritic rats. Rats were assigned to the following groups: EP +RA; RA; EP; and Negative Control. RA was induced by immunizations with type-II collagen and a local immunization with Complete Freund’s adjuvant in the paw. Periodontitis was induced by ligating the right first molars. The serum level of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACCPA) were measured before the induction of EP (T1) and at 28 days after (T2) by ELISA assay. ACCPA levels were also measured in the gingival tissue at T2. The specimens were processed for morphometric analysis of bone loss, and the gingival tissue surrounding the first molar was collected for the quantification of interleukin IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α using a Luminex/MAGpix assay. Paw edema was analyzed using a plethysmometer. Periodontitis increased the RF and ACCPA levels in the serum and in the gingival tissue, respectively. Besides, the level of paw swelling was increased by EP and remained in progress until the end of the experiment, when EP was associated with RA. Greater values of IL-17 were observed only when RA was present, in spite of PE. It can be concluded that periodontitis increases rheumatic factor serum levels and citrullinated proteins level in gingival tissues and alter cytokine balance in arthritic rats; at the same time, arthritis increases periodontal destruction, confirming the bidirectional interaction between diseases. PMID:28358812

  13. Alterations in intracellular ionic calcium levels in isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes due to the generation of free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, K.P.; Nazeran, H.; Hagler, H.K. (Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Oxygen-derived free radical production has been documented to occur on reperfusion of the ischemic myocardium. Intracellular ionic calcium ((Ca{sup ++}){sub i}) levels in isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes (M) exposed to free radicals were evaluated using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fura-2. The effect of different time periods of free radical exposure and the level of extracellular Ca{sup ++} concentration on altering (Ca{sup ++}){sub i} was examined. The free radical generating system (FRGS) utilized consisted of a HEPES buffered physiological salt solution containing 2.3 mM purine, 2.4. {mu}M iron-loaded transferrin and 0.01 U/ml xanthine oxidase. M maintained in HEPES buffer or the HEPES buffer containing purine and iron-loaded transferrin continued to stimulate, exhibited relatively uniform 340/380 ratios and maintained a rod shape for extended time periods. M continuously exposed to the FRGS showed a significant increase in (Ca{sup ++}){sub i}, became unresponsive to stimulation at 31 {plus minus} 7 (SE) min and eventually exhibited contracture. Exposure to the FRGS for 10 min resulted in a response similar to continuous exposure. M exposed to the FRGS for 5 min exhibited regular Ca{sup ++} transients for 55{plus minus}5 min. M exposed to the FRGS for 10 min and maintained in 2.5 mM Ca{sup ++} versus 1.25 mM Ca{sup ++}, accumulated significantly higher (CA{sup ++}){sub i}. Quiescent myocytes continuously exposed to the FRGS also exhibited a significant increase in (Ca{sup ++}){sub i} over time. Thus, a brief period of free radical exposure may induce subsequent damage. Alterations in Ca{sup ++} flux resulting from the generation of free radicals may possibly contribute to the development of Ca{sup ++} overload and myocardial arrhythmias.

  14. Affective alterations in patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission are associated with decreased BDNF and cortisone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, E; Crespo, I; Keevil, B G; Aulinas, A; Urgell, E; Santos, A; Trainer, P J; Webb, S M

    2017-02-01

    Affective alterations and poorer quality of life often persist in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) in remission. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and is highly expressed in brain areas controlling mood and response to stress. Our aims were to assess affective alterations after long-term remission of CS and evaluate whether they are associated with serum BDNF, salivary cortisol (SalF) and/or cortisone (SalE) concentrations. Thirty-six CS patients in remission (32 females/4 males; mean age (±s.d.), 48.8 ± 11.8 years; median duration of remission, 72 months) and 36 gender-, age- and BMI-matched controls were included. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Positive Affect Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and EuroQoL and CushingQoL questionnaires were completed and measured to evaluate anxiety, depression, stress perception and quality of life (QoL) respectively. Salivary cortisol was measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/TMS). BDNF was measured in serum using an ELISA. Remitted CS patients showed worse scores in all questionnaires than controls: STAI (P cortisone was inversely associated with trait anxiety (r = -0.377, P = 0.040) and depressed affect (r = -0.392, P = 0.032) in CS patients. Delay to diagnosis was associated with depressive symptoms (BDI-II: r = 0.398, P = 0.036 and CES-D: r = 0.449, P = 0.017) and CushingQoL scoring (r = -0.460, P < 0.01). Low BDNF levels are associated with affective alterations in 'cured' CS patients, including depression, anxiety and impaired stress perception. Elevated levels of SalE might also be related to poor affective status in these patients. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  15. 多节段非相邻型脊柱骨折的诊断与治疗%Diagnosis and treatment of multiple level and noncontiguous spinal fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季承; 杨惠林

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the diagnosis and treatment of multiple level and noncontiguous spinal fractures.Method:30 cases suffering from multiple level and noncontiguous spinal fractures were admitted to our institute from January 2007 to December 2010.There were 26 males and 4 females with the age ranging from 16 to 64 years.All the cases had a natural history of trauma.The duration from injury to admission was from 2 hours to 3 days.Total spine X-ray radiographic survey and three-dimensional CT scan were accomplished in the emergency room.One case died of cerebral hernia at the day of admission,and others underwent total spine MRI within 4 days after admission. 14 cases suffered with 2 segments fractures, 11 cases with 3 segments fractures,3 cases with 4 segments fractures and 2 cases with 5 segments fractures.A total of 83 segments were involved.Diagnosis was postponed in 6 cases(7 segments) with delayed time of 2 to 4 days.All delayed-diagnosed cases were determined by total spine MRI.According to ASIA grading system,there were 5 grade A,2 grade B,7 grade C,4 grade D and 11 grade E.8 cases were accompanied by cerebral trauma,4 by rib fracture,3 by hemopneumothorax,4 by pulmonary contusion,2 by rupture of the spleen, 1 by kidney contusion, 10 by limb fracture and 2 by pelvic fracture. 14 cases suffering from burst fractures were complicated with spinal cord injury underwent surgery .The average time from injury to surgery is 6.2 day (4-9 days).10 simple compression fractures with the loss of vertebral height less than 1/3 and no neurologicaldeficit were treated conservatively.5 cases abandoned treatment.Result;23 patients were followed up for 10 months to 44 months with a mean time of 28 months,while 1 case undergoing conservative treatment died of pulmonary embolism 6 days after admission. 14 cases treated surgically had the average Cobb's angle improved from 20.8°(range,16.6o-22.3°) of preoperation to 6.1°(range,4.7°-7.4°) of postoperation,and 6.7

  16. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide levels and oxygen saturation following caesarean section performed under spinal anaesthesia with intrathecal opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalchow, S; Lubeigt, O; Peters, G; Harvey, A; Duggan, T; Binning, A

    2013-07-01

    Intrathecal opioids can be associated with respiratory depression which may have serious consequences. We describe the use of a non-invasive monitor (TOSCA) to measure transcutaneous carbon dioxide levels and percentage of haemoglobin oxygen saturation in post-caesarean section patients in two hospitals which used different intrathecal opioids. Eighty-nine women undergoing caesarean section were monitored postoperatively until 08.00h on the first postoperative day. In addition to hyperbaric bupivacaine, patients from Hospital 1 received intrathecal diamorphine 300μg: those from Hospital 2 received intrathecal fentanyl 15μg and postoperative intramuscular morphine 10mg and were given morphine patient-controlled analgesia. Data from TOSCA were analysed the following day. Respiratory depression was defined as oxygen saturations carbon dioxide levels >7kPa for >2min or the need for medical intervention for clinical respiratory depression. Sustained hypercapnia was recorded in 8/45 (17.8%) patients from Hospital 1 and 3/44 (6.8%) from Hospital 2. Sustained oxygen saturations <90% were recorded in one patient from Hospital 2 and none from Hospital 1. The overall incidence of respiratory depression was 17.8% in Hospital 1 and 9.1% in Hospital 2. The median duration of hypercapnia was 9min [IQR 5.8-12.4] in Hospital 1 and 11.5min [IQR 7-32.8] in Hospital 2. No patient required medical intervention. The incidence of opioid-induced respiratory depression detected by TOSCA is higher than previously reported by other monitoring methods. TOSCA may have a role in detecting subclinical respiratory depression in the obstetric population. Further studies with a control population are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental study on spinal cord injury treated by embryonic spinal cord transplantation and greater omental transposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Dingjun(郝定均); Zheng Yonghong(郑永宏); Yuan Fuyong(袁福镛); He Liming; Wang Rong; Yuan Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of the embryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition for treatment of the spinal cord injury in 24 mongrel dogs. Methods: 24 adult mongrel dogs, weighing 10 ~ 13kg,bryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition group (group D). Each group consisted of 6 dogs. SEP(somatosensory evoked potential) and MEP (motor evoked potential) of the spinal cord were examed prior to the spinal cord injury and 2 months after the treatment to observe the changes of the animals' behavior. All dogs were killed 2 months after surgery and the spinal cord sections were obtained from T12 to L1 level for pathological analysis and observation under the electron microscope.Results: There was an obvious difference in the spinal somatosensory evoked potential and the motor evoked potential between the group D and the other three groups (group A, B, and C). Recovery of the behavior was noted. The spinal cells had survived for two months following the transplantation. Conclusion: Transplantation of the embryonic spinal cell and greater omentum for treatment of the spinal cord injury in dogs can gain a better outcome than the other groups in behavior and spinal somatosensory and motor evoked potential, but the further study is still essential to confirm its clinical efficacy.

  18. 6S RNA regulation of relA alters ppGpp levels in early stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Amy T; Chandrangsu, Pete; Wassarman, Karen M

    2010-12-01

    6S RNA is a small, non-coding RNA that interacts directly with σ(70)-RNA polymerase and regulates transcription at many σ(70)-dependent promoters. Here, we demonstrate that 6S RNA regulates transcription of relA, which encodes a ppGpp synthase. The 6S RNA-dependent regulation of relA expression results in increased ppGpp levels during early stationary phase in cells lacking 6S RNA. These changes in ppGpp levels, although modest, are sufficient to result in altered regulation of transcription from σ(70)-dependent promoters sensitive to ppGpp, including those promoting expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and rRNA. These data place 6S RNA as another player in maintaining appropriate gene expression as cells transition into stationary phase. Independent of this ppGpp-mediated 6S RNA-dependent regulation, we also demonstrate that in later stationary phase, 6S RNA continues to downregulate transcription in general, and specifically at a subset of the amino acid promoters, but through a mechanism that is independent of ppGpp and which we hypothesize is through direct regulation. In addition, 6S RNA-dependent regulation of σ(S) activity is not mediated through observed changes in ppGpp levels. We suggest a role for 6S RNA in modulating transcription of several global regulators directly, including relA, to downregulate expression of key pathways in response to changing environmental conditions.

  19. Age, gender and normalization covariates for spinal cord gray matter and total cross-sectional areas at cervical and thoracic levels: A 2D phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Papinutto

    Full Text Available The source of inter-subject variability and the influence of age and gender on morphometric characteristics of the spinal cord, such as the total cross-sectional area (TCA, the gray matter (GM and white matter (WM areas, currently remain under investigation. Understanding the effect of covariates such as age, gender, brain volumes, and skull- and vertebra-derived metrics on cervical and thoracic spinal cord TCA and GM areas in healthy subjects would be fundamental for exploring compartment specific changes in neurological diseases affecting the spinal cord. Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T we investigated 32 healthy subjects using a 2D phase sensitive inversion recovery sequence and we measured TCA, GM and WM areas at 4 cervical and thoracic levels of the spinal cord. We assessed age and gender relationships of cord measures and explored associations between cord measures and a brain volumes and b skull- and vertebra-derived metrics. Age and gender had a significant effect on TCA, WM and GM areas (with women and elderly having smaller values than men and younger people respectively, but not on the GM area/TCA ratio. The total intracranial volume and C3 vertebra dimensions showed the highest correlations with cord measures. When used in multi-regression models, they reduced cord areas group variability by approximately a third. Age and gender influences on cord measures and normalization strategies here presented might be of use in the study of compartment specific changes in various neurological diseases affecting the spinal cord.

  20. Altered apolipoprotein A-V expression during the acute phase response is independent of plasma triglyceride levels in mice and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, S.; Schomburg, L.; Renko, K.; Tolle, M.; van der Giet, M.; Tietge, U.J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are altered during the acute phase response (APR). Plasma levels of the recently discovered apolipoprotein AN (apoA-V) are inversely associated with plasma TG. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of apoA-V plasma levels and hepatic apoA-V expression

  1. MRI Findings in Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barzin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal canal stenosis results from progressive narrowing of the central spinal canal and the lateral recesses. Primary (congenital lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with achondroplastic dwarfism. The spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposus posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the facet joints, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins and uncovertebral joint hypertrophy in the neck. The central canal and the neurorecess may be compromised by tumor infiltration, such as metastatic disease, or by infectious spondylitis."nAP diameter of the normal adult cervical canal has a mean value of 17-18 mm at vertebral levels C3-5. The lower cervical canal measures 12-14 mm. Cervical stenosis is associated with an AP diameter of less than 10 mm. The thoracic spinal canal varies from 12 to 14 mm in diameter in the adult. The diameter of the normal lumbar spinal canal varies from 15 to 27 mm. Lumbar stenosis results from a spinal canal diameter of less than 12 mm in some patients; a diameter of 10 mm is definitely stenotic."nSpinal MRI is the most suitable technique for the diagnosis of spinal stenosis. The examination should be performed using thin sections (3 mm and high resolution, including the axial and sagittal planes using T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted techniques. The bony and osteophytic components are seen best using a T2-weighted gradient-echo technique."nOn MRI, findings of spinal stenosis have a variable presentation depending on the specific disease. The goal of spinal imaging is to localize the site and level of disease and to help differentiate between conditions in which patients require surgery or conservative treatment."nIn this presentation, different kinds of spinal canal stenosis and their MRI findings would be discussed.

  2. The Relationship between Lifestyle and Pain in Patients with Spinal Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Dadashzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid growth of the industries and constantly involvement of the new technologies into the human lives, the lifestyles of the people are altering. Simultaneously few new disorders in their lifestyles and diseases in their lives are also emerging. The spinal cord abnormalities i.e., the spinal disc herniation and/or low back pain is one of them which have made the life of some people very miserable (Farahani et al., 2012. Indeed the overall lifestyle of a human being regulates the musculoskeletal symptoms. Differences in lifestyle and psychosocial factors associated with individuals' lifestyle are effective in experiencing the level of pressure in musculoskeletal systems. Studies related to the lifestyle and musculoskeletal system, including pain and inflammation, are largely correlate (Mikkonen et al., 2015. Proper knowledge regarding the relationship between lifestyle and spinal disc herniation is very important. Social habits such as diet, exercise, weight gain, anxiety, and depression can cause changes in the spinal cord and spinal disc herniation (Kadow et al., 2014. Further, some of the lifestyle parameters such as smoking, nutrition, BMI, level of activity, sleep status, stress, and anxiety are also seen to reduce the need for medication or avoid and reduce musculoskeletal pain (Dean et al., 2015. As per Bohman et al. (2014 people with a healthy lifestyle suffer 66% less from low back pain than those who have unhealthy lifestyles.

  3. Time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function after acute spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang Jia; Gang Li; Zhen-yu Zhang; Hao-tian Li; Ji-quan Wang; Zhong-kai Fan; Gang Lv

    2016-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial morphology and function play an important role in secondary damage after acute spinal cord injury. We re-corded the time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function in rats with acute spinal cord injury. Results showed that mitochondria had an irregular shape, and increased in size. Mitochondrial cristae were disordered and mitochondrial membrane rupture was visible at 2–24 hours after injury. Fusion protein mitofusin 1 expression gradually increased, peaked at 8 hours after injury, and then decreased to its lowest level at 24 hours. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1, amitochondrial ifssion protein, showed the opposite kinetics. At 2–24 hours after acute spinal cord injury, malondialdehyde content, cytochrome c levels and caspase-3 expression were in-creased, but glutathione content, adenosine triphosphate content, Na+-K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were gradually reduced. Furthermore, mitochondrial morphology altered during the acute stage of spinal cord injury. Fusion was important within the ifrst 8 hours, but ifssion played a key role at 24 hours. Oxidative stress was inhibited, biological productivity was diminished, and mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were reduced in the acute stage of injury. In summary, mitochondrial apoptosis is activated when the time of spinal cord injury is prolonged.

  4. Embryonic-only arsenic exposure in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) reduces growth and alters muscle IGF levels one year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymkowicz, Dana B; Sims, Kaleigh C; Castro, Noemi M; Bridges, William C; Bain, Lisa J

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant of drinking water and crops in many parts of the world. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure is linked to decreased birth weight, weight gain, and proper skeletal muscle function. The goal of this study was to use killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) as a model to determine the long-term effects of embryonic-only arsenic exposure on muscle growth and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway. Killifish embryos were exposed to 0, 50, 200 or 800ppb As(III) from fertilization until hatching. Juvenile fish were reared in clean water and muscle samples were collected at 16, 28, 40 and 52 weeks of age. There were significant reductions in condition factors, ranging from 12 to 17%, in the fish exposed to arsenic at 16, 28 and 40 weeks of age. However, by 52 weeks, no significant changes in condition factors were seen. Alterations in IGF-1R and IGF-1 levels were assessed as a potential mechanism by which growth was reduced. While there no changes in hepatic IGF-1 transcripts, skeletal muscle cells can also produce their own IGF-1 and/or alter IGF-1 receptor levels to help enhance growth. After a 200 and 800ppb embryonic exposure, fish grown in clean water for 16 weeks had IGF-1R transcripts that were 2.8-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than unexposed fish. Through 40 weeks of age, IGF1-R remained elevated in the 200ppb and 800ppb embryonic exposure groups by 1.8-3.9-fold, while at 52 weeks of age, IGF-1R levels were still significantly increased in the 800ppb exposure group. Skeletal muscle IGF-1 transcripts were also significantly increased by 1.9-5.1 fold through the 52 weeks of grow-out in clean by water in the 800ppb embryonic exposure group. Based on these results, embryonic arsenic exposure has long-term effects in that it reduces growth and increases both IGF-1 and IGF-1R levels in skeletal muscle even 1year after the exposure has ended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Exercise alleviates hypoalgesia and increases the level of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Severo do Nascimento

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of treadmill training on nociceptive sensitivity and immunoreactivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, diabetic and trained diabetic. Treadmill training was performed for 8 weeks. The blood glucose concentrations and body weight were evaluated 48 h after diabetes induction and every 30 days thereafter. The nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using the tail-flick apparatus. The animals were then transcardially perfused, and the spinal cords were post-fixed, cryoprotected and sectioned in a cryostat. Immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide analysis was performed on the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. RESULTS: The nociceptive sensitivity analysis revealed that, compared with the control and trained diabetic animals, the latency to tail deflection on the apparatus was longer for the diabetic animals. Optical densitometry demonstrated decreased calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in diabetic animals, which was reversed by treadmill training. CONCLUSION: We concluded that treadmill training can alleviate nociceptive hypoalgesia and reverse decreased calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic animals without pharmacological treatment.

  6. Anti-inflammatory Montelukast prevents toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin: Oxidative stress, histological alterations in liver, and serum cytokine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentli, Recep; Ciftci, Osman; Cetin, Asli; Otlu, Ali

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential beneficial effects of the montelukast (ML) on oxidative stress and histological alterations in liver tissues and cytokine levels in rats intoxicated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Rats were divided randomly into four equal groups (control, TCDD, ML, TCDD + ML). TCDD were administered by gavages dissolved in corn oil at the doses of 2 µg/kg/week, and ML was given intraperitoneally at the dose of 10 mg/kg/day. Oxidative status, histological alterations, and cytokine levels were analyzed on day 60. The results showed that although TCDD induced oxidative stress via significant increase in formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, it caused a significant decline in glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in liver. Besides, TCDD led to significant histopathological damage in liver and serum cytokine levels alterations (increase in tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β levels). In contrast, ML treatment reversed oxidative effects of TCDD by increasing the levels of GSH, CAT, and SOD and decreasing the formation of TBARS. Also, it can normalize the levels of histological and cytokine alterations induced by TCDD. In conclusion, it was determined that TCDD exposure caused adverse effects on cytokine levels, histological alterations, and oxidative stress in rats. However, ML treatment partially eliminated toxic effects of TCDD. Thus, it was judged that coadministration of ML with TCDD may be useful to attenuate the negative effects of TCDD. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Levetiracetam in spinal cord injury pain: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, N B; Grydehøj, J; Bing, J;

    2009-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was primarily to evaluate the efficacy of the anticonvulsant levetiracetam in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) at- and below-level pain and secondarily to evaluate the effect on spasm severity. SETTING: Outpatients at two spinal cord units and a pain center...... severity following spinal cord injury....

  8. ToF-SIMS imaging of molecular-level alteration mechanisms in Le Bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voras, Zachary E.; Wiggins, Marcie B.; Beebe, Thomas P. [University of Delaware, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Newark, DE (United States); University of Delaware, UD Surface Analysis Facility, Newark, DE (United States); DeGhetaldi, Kristin [University of Delaware, Department of Art Conservation, Newark, DE (United States); Winterthur-University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation, Winterthur, DE (United States); Buckley, Barbara [The Barnes Foundation, Department of Conservation, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Baade, Brian [University of Delaware, Department of Art Conservation, Newark, DE (United States); Mass, Jennifer L. [Winterthur Museum, Scientific Research and Analysis Laboratory, Conservation Department, Winterthur, DE (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for cultural heritage studies, especially when used in conjunction with established analytical techniques in the field. The ability of ToF-SIMS to simultaneously image inorganic and organic species within a paint cross section at micrometer-level spatial resolution makes it a uniquely qualified analytical technique to aid in further understanding the processes of pigment and binder alteration, as well as pigment-binder interactions. In this study, ToF-SIMS was used to detect and image both molecular and elemental species related to CdS pigment and binding medium alteration on the painting Le Bonheur de vivre (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) by Henri Matisse. Three categories of inorganic and organic components were found throughout Le Bonheur de vivre and co-localized in cross-sectional samples using high spatial resolution ToF-SIMS analysis: (1) species relating to the preparation and photo-induced oxidation of CdS yellow pigments (2) varying amounts of long-chain fatty acids present in both the paint and primary ground layer and (3) specific amino acid fragments, possibly relating to the painting's complex restoration history. ToF-SIMS's ability to discern both organic and inorganic species via cross-sectional imaging was used to compare samples collected from Le Bonheur de vivre to artificially aged reference paints in an effort to gather mechanistic information relating to alteration processes that have been previously explored using μXANES, SR-μXRF, SEM-EDX, and SR-FTIR. The relatively high sensitivity offered by ToF-SIMS imaging coupled to the high spatial resolution allowed for the positive identification of degradation products (such as cadmium oxalate) in specific paint regions that have before been unobserved. The imaging of organic materials has provided an insight into the extent of destruction of the original binding medium, as well as

  9. Altered topological organization of high-level visual networks in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanjia; Shi, Lin; Lei, Yi; Wang, Defeng

    2016-09-06

    Altered regional activation of high-level visual (HLV) cortices in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been well documented in previous fMRI studies, which led us to investigate the underlying alteration of the HLV networks in the terms of intrinsic interaction and topological organization. First, the activation likelihood estimation, a coordinate-based meta-analysis approach, was used to define the cortical regions/nodes included in HLV networks of "what" and "where" visions. Secondly, the acquired HLV regions were used as seeds to calculate their interregional resting-state functional connectivities (RSFCs) based on the temporal correlation of rs-functional MRI (rs-fMRI) time series. Here, the rs-fMRI data of AD (n=30), late MCI (n=35), early MCI (n=52) and matched healthy controls (n=44) were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset. Finally, based on the calculated pair-wise RSFCs, the "what" and "where" HLV networks were respectively constructed, and their topological properties were calculated and analyzed among groups using the graph theory method. The results demonstrated increased clustering coefficient combined with a prolonged characteristic path length of the "where" visual network in AD patients. No significant alternation of the "what" visual network was found among the groups. These results suggest that the abnormality of the HLV networks could be a late-stage outcome in AD and that the "where" visual network may be more susceptible to the AD-related neuropathological changes than the "what" visual network. In addition, the dysfunction of the "where" network is found to be characterized by a decreased integration combined with an increased local segregation.

  10. Brief anesthesia by isoflurane alters plasma corticosterone levels distinctly in male and female rats: implications for tissue collection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhbat, Mandakh; Merrill, Liana; Kelly, Sean D.; Lee, Vanessa K.; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2016-01-01

    Euthanasia by anesthetic agents is commonly performed prior to tissue collection in order to minimize pain and distress to the animal. However, depending on their mechanism of action as well as administration regimen, different methods of anesthesia may trigger an acute stress response through engaging the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which can impact numerous other physiological processes that the researcher may wish to examine as endpoints. We investigated the effects of the commonly used anesthetic agent isoflurane on two different endpoints related to the stress response: plasma corticosterone levels and gene expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as well as several of its regulators including FK506-binding protein 51 (Fkbp5) in the hippocampus of male and female rats. Our results indicate that brief exposure to anesthesia by isoflurane prior to decapitation can alter plasma corticosterone levels differentially in male and female rats within minutes without impacting gene expression in the hippocampus. We conclude that collection methods can influence stress-related physiological endpoints in female rats and the potential influence of even brief anesthesia as well as sex differences in response to anesthesia should be evaluated during the experimental design process and data interpretation. This finding is particularly important in light of new NIH standards regarding sex and reproducibility, and care should be taken to be certain that sex differences in endpoints of interest are not an artifact of sex differences in response to collection paradigms. PMID:26946276

  11. Projected near-future CO2 levels increase activity and alter defensive behaviours in the tropical squid Idiosepius pygmaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake L. Spady

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 levels projected to occur in the oceans by the end of this century cause a range of behavioural effects in fish, but whether other highly active marine organisms, such as cephalopods, are similarly affected is unknown. We tested the effects of projected future CO2 levels (626 and 956 µatm on the behaviour of male two-toned pygmy squid, Idiosepius pygmaeus. Exposure to elevated CO2 increased the number of active individuals by 19–25% and increased movement (number of line-crosses by nearly 3 times compared to squid at present-day CO2. Squid vigilance and defensive behaviours were also altered by elevated CO2 with >80% of individuals choosing jet escape responses over defensive arm postures in response to a visual startle stimulus, compared with 50% choosing jet escape responses at control CO2. In addition, more escape responses were chosen over threat behaviours in body pattern displays at elevated CO2 and individuals were more than twice as likely to use ink as a defence strategy at 956 µatm CO2, compared with controls. Increased activity could lead to adverse effects on energy budgets as well as increasing visibility to predators. A tendency to respond to a stimulus with escape behaviours could increase survival, but may also be energetically costly and could potentially lead to more chases by predators compared with individuals that use defensive postures. These results demonstrate that projected future ocean acidification affects the behaviours of a tropical squid species.

  12. Effects of altered fundamental frequency on nasalance during vowel production by adult speakers at targeted sound pressure levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandulak, Kerry C; Zajac, David J

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of altered fundamental frequency (F0) on nasalance levels of the vowels /i/ and /a/ produced by adults without cleft palate within a controlled sound pressure level (SPL) range. A prospective group design with convenience sampling from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was used. 20 men and 20 women participated, aged 18 to 55 years. All were native English speakers with normal speech and language skills and adequate velopharyngeal function. The outcome measures were percentage nasalance obtained from the Nasometer 6200 (KayPentax) headset and the Computerized Speech Lab Model 4400 (CSL, KayPentax) during vowel production while speakers (1) targeted an SPL range of 75 to 85 dB and (2) targeted the SPL plus F0 range of 165 to 175 Hz. A significant univariate effect was found for the vowels /i/ and /a/ in the targeted SPL condition such that /i/ was produced with higher nasalance than /a/. A significant univariate effect was also found during production of /a/ in the targeted SPL plus F0 condition such that men produced /a/ with higher nasalance than women did. SPL appears to largely account for percentage nasalance differences between the vowels /i/ and /a/ produced by adult male and female speakers. Increased F0 by male speakers appears to influence percentage nasalance during production of the vowel /a/. Clinical implications in regard to assessment of hypernasality are discussed.

  13. Changes in Dietary Fat Content Rapidly Alters the Mouse Plasma Coagulation Profile without Affecting Relative Transcript Levels of Coagulation Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey C A Cleuren

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a hypercoagulable state and increased risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events.Establish the onset and reversibility of the hypercoagulable state during the development and regression of nutritionally-induced obesity in mice, and its relation to transcriptional changes and clearance rates of coagulation factors as well as its relation to changes in metabolic and inflammatory parameters.Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (10% kcal as fat; LFD or high fat diet (45% kcal as fat; HFD for 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. To study the effects of weight loss, mice were fed the HFD for 16 weeks and switched to the LFD for 1, 2 or 4 weeks. For each time point analyses of plasma and hepatic mRNA levels of coagulation factors were performed after overnight fasting, as well as measurements of circulating metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Furthermore, in vivo clearance rates of human factor (F VII, FVIII and FIX proteins were determined after 2 weeks of HFD-feeding.HFD feeding gradually increased the body and liver weight, which was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose levels from 8 weeks onwards, while insulin levels were affected after 16 weeks. Besides a transient rise in cytokine levels at 2 weeks after starting the HFD, no significant effect on inflammation markers was present. Increased plasma levels of fibrinogen, FII, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FXI and FXII were observed in mice on a HFD for 2 weeks, which in general persisted throughout the 16 weeks of HFD-feeding. Interestingly, with the exception of FXI the effects on plasma coagulation levels were not paralleled by changes in relative transcript levels in the liver, nor by decreased clearance rates. Switching from HFD to LFD reversed the HFD-induced procoagulant shift in plasma, again not coinciding with transcriptional modulation.Changes in dietary fat content rapidly alter the mouse plasma coagulation profile, thereby preceding plasma metabolic changes, which

  14. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  15. An update on spinal cord injury research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-Qi Cao; Er-Dan Dong

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can have a range of debilitating effects and permanently alter the capabilities and quality of life of survivors.The first specialized centers of care for SCI were established in 1944 and since then an increasing amount of research has been carried out in this area.Despite this,the present treatment and care levels for SCI are not comparable to those in other areas of medicine.In the clinic,the aim of SCI treatment is primarily to limit secondary damage by reducing compression in trauma spots and stabilizing the spinal column.Currently,no effective strategy for functional recovery is offered.In this review,we focus on research progress on the molecular mechanisms underlying SCI,and assess the treatment outcomes of SCI in animal models,i.e.,neurotrophins and stem cells are discussed as pre-clinical therapies in animal models.We also assess the resources available and national research projects carried out on SCI in China in recent years,as well as making recommendations for the future allocation of funds in this area.

  16. Remote Dose-Dependent Effects of Dry Needling at Distant Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles on Reduction of Substance P Levels of Proximal Muscle and Spinal Cords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Ling Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Methods. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5–3.0 kg received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemius (distant muscle in one (1D or five sessions (5D. Bilateral biceps femoris (proximal muscles and superficial laminaes of L5-S2, T2-T5, and C2-C5 were sampled immediately and 5 days after dry needling to determine the levels of SP using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Immediately after dry needling for 1D and 5D, the expressions of SP were significantly decreased in ipsilateral biceps femoris and bilateral spinal superficial laminaes (P<.05. Five days after dry needling, these reduced immunoactivities of SP were found only in animals receiving 5D dry needling (P<.05. Conclusions. This remote effect of dry needling involves the reduction of SP levels in proximal muscle and spinal superficial laminaes, which may be closely associated with the control of myofascial pain.

  17. Remote dose-dependent effects of dry needling at distant myofascial trigger spots of rabbit skeletal muscles on reduction of substance P levels of proximal muscle and spinal cords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Yang, Chen-Chia; Liu, Szu-Yu; Chou, Li-Wei; Hong, Chang-Zern

    2014-01-01

    Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP) in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg) received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemius (distant muscle) in one (1D) or five sessions (5D). Bilateral biceps femoris (proximal muscles) and superficial laminaes of L5-S2, T2-T5, and C2-C5 were sampled immediately and 5 days after dry needling to determine the levels of SP using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Immediately after dry needling for 1D and 5D, the expressions of SP were significantly decreased in ipsilateral biceps femoris and bilateral spinal superficial laminaes (P dry needling, these reduced immunoactivities of SP were found only in animals receiving 5D dry needling (P dry needling involves the reduction of SP levels in proximal muscle and spinal superficial laminaes, which may be closely associated with the control of myofascial pain.

  18. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  19. Neonatal pain-related stress and NFKBIA genotype are associated with altered cortisol levels in preterm boys at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Ruth E; Cepeda, Ivan L; Chau, Cecil M Y; Brummelte, Susanne; Weinberg, Joanne; Lavoie, Pascal M; Ladd, Mihoko; Hirschfeld, Aaron F; Russell, Evan; Koren, Gideon; Van Uum, Stan; Brant, Rollin; Turvey, Stuart E

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal pain-related stress is associated with elevated salivary cortisol levels to age 18 months in children born very preterm, compared to full-term, suggesting early programming effects. Importantly, interactions between immune/inflammatory and neuroendocrine systems may underlie programming effects. We examined whether cortisol changes persist to school age, and if common genetic variants in the promoter region of the NFKBIA gene involved in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, modify the association between early experience and later life stress as indexed by hair cortisol levels, which provide an integrated index of endogenous HPA axis activity. Cortisol was assayed in hair samples from 128 children (83 born preterm ≤ 32 weeks gestation and 45 born full-term) without major sensory, motor or cognitive impairments at age 7 years. We found that hair cortisol levels were lower in preterm compared to term-born children. Downregulation of the HPA axis in preterm children without major impairment, seen years after neonatal stress terminated, suggests persistent alteration of stress system programming. Importantly, the etiology was gender-specific such that in preterm boys but not girls, specifically those with the minor allele for NFKBIA rs2233409, lower hair cortisol was associated with greater neonatal pain (number of skin-breaking procedures from birth to term), independent of medical confounders. Moreover, the minor allele (CT or TT) of NFKBIA rs2233409 was associated with higher secretion of inflammatory cytokines, supporting the hypothesis that neonatal pain-related stress may act as a proinflammatory stimulus that induces long-term immune cell activation. These findings are the first evidence that a long-term association between early pain-related stress and cortisol may be mediated by a genetic variants that regulate the activity of NF-κB, suggesting possible involvement of stress/inflammatory mechanisms in HPA programming in boys born very

  20. Rice Stripe Virus Infection Alters mRNA Levels of Sphingolipid-Metabolizing Enzymes and Sphingolipids Content in Laodelphax striatellus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei-Qiang; Bai, Yue-Liang; Shi, Xiao-Xiao; Zhu, Mu-Fei; Zhang, Min-Jing; Mao, Cun-Gui; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids and their metabolites have been implicated in viral infection and replication in mammal cells but how their metabolizing enzymes in the host are regulated by viruses remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of 12 sphingolipid genes and their regulation by Rice stripe virus in the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén), a serious pest of rice throughout eastern Asia. According to protein sequence similarity, we identified 12 sphingolipid enzyme genes in L. striatellus. By comparing their mRNA levels in viruliferous versus nonviruliferous L. striatellus at different life stages by qPCR, we found that RSV infection upregulated six genes (LsCGT1, LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, LsSMPD4, LsSMS, and LsSPT) in most stages of L. striatellus. Especially, four genes (LsCGT1, LsSMPD2, LsNAGA1, and LsSMS) and another three genes (LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, and LsSMS) were significantly upregulated in viruliferous third-instar and fourth-instar nymphs, respectively. HPLC-MS/MS results showed that RSV infection increased the levels of various ceramides, such as Cer18:0, Cer20:0, and Cer22:0 species, in third and fourth instar L. striatellus nymphs. Together, these results demonstrate that RSV infection alters the transcript levels of various sphingolipid enzymes and the contents of sphingolipids in L. striatellus, indicating that sphingolipids may be important for RSV infection or replication in L. striatellus. PMID:28130458

  1. Adrenergic drugs modify the level of noradrenaline in the insular cortex and alter extinction of conditioned taste aversion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresquet, Nadine; Angst, Marie-Josée; Schleef, Carmen; Gobaille, Serge; Sandner, Guy

    2007-03-12

    We compared the effect of conditioned taste aversion in rats by measuring the amount of sucrose that they drunk after conditioning, which differed according to whether rats had drunk the sucrose freely (SD: self drinking) during the conditioning session, or had been forced to drink it (IO: intra-oral administration through a chronically implanted cannula). The SD procedure delayed the extinction of conditioned taste aversion. Enhanced arousal, alertness, awareness or attention in the SD condition may have strengthened the memory of the taste. Brain noradrenergic networks are involved in such processes. We administered two noradrenergic drugs that produce opposite effects on noradrenaline release in the brain, methoxy-idazoxan, RX821002 (1mg/kg, i.p.), and guanfacine (0.12mg/kg, i.p.). We evaluated their effect (i) on the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex using microdialysis, (ii) on glycaemia that is an essential factor of taste learning and (iii) on the comparative SD versus IO conditioned taste aversion protocol mentioned above. Injecting RX821001 increased the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex up to two-fold of the baseline. This effect lasted 1h. The same dose of RX821002 did not elicit any alteration of glycaemia. It enhanced extinction of conditioned taste aversion in the SD group of rats. Injecting 0.12mg/kg of guanfacine produced the opposite effect. The noradrenaline level of the gustatory cortex decreased, but only down to 20% of the baseline. This decrease lasted 2h. Guanfacine increased glycaemia. Extinction of conditioned taste aversion was only marginally decreased by guanfacine in the SD group of rats. These results fit with Aston-Jones' point of view that the role of the noradrenergic coeruleo-cortical system may be to enhance arousal, alertness, awareness or attention to an event by a transient increase of cortical noradrenaline.

  2. Neurological deficit following spinal anaesthesia: MRI and CT evidence of spinal cord gas embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, E. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences]|[Parco Comola-Ricci, Naples (Italy); Marano, I.; Savarese, F.; Brunetti, A.; Sodano, A. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences; Olibet, G. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Intensive Care Unit; Di Salvo, E. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of General and Transplant Surgery

    1999-04-01

    A 62-year-old diabetic woman developed permanent neurological deficits in the legs following spinal anaesthesia. MRI showed oedema in the spinal cord and a small intramedullary focus of signal void at the T10 level, with negative density at CT. Intramedullary gas bubbles have not been reported previously among the possible neurological complications of spinal anaesthesia; a combined ischaemic/embolic mechanism is hypothesised. (orig.) With 2 figs., 10 refs.

  3. Incidence of Primary Spinal Cord, Spinal Meninges, and Cauda Equina Tumors in Korea, 2006-2010

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Primary spinal cord and appendage tumors (PSCAT) originating from the spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina are uncommon. Worldwide, population-based cancer registry data are mostly based on malignant tumors only, which means few data are available on PSCATs, including non-malignant tumors. Therefore, the objective of this study was to provide information regarding the incidence of both non-malignant and malignant PSCATs in Korea on a national level. Materials and Methods Inc...

  4. Social Skills : A Resource for More Social Support, Lower Depression Levels, Higher Quality of Life, and Participation in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Rachel; Peter, Claudio; Cieza, Alarcos; Post, Marcel. W.; Van Leeuwen, Christel M.; Werner, Christina S.; Geyh, Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relevance of social skills and their different dimensions (ie, expressivity, sensitivity, control) in relation to social support, depression, participation, and quality of life (QOL) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Cross-sectional data collection withi

  5. Social Skills : A Resource for More Social Support, Lower Depression Levels, Higher Quality of Life, and Participation in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Rachel; Peter, Claudio; Cieza, Alarcos; Post, Marcel. W.; Van Leeuwen, Christel M.; Werner, Christina S.; Geyh, Szilvia

    Objective: To examine the relevance of social skills and their different dimensions (ie, expressivity, sensitivity, control) in relation to social support, depression, participation, and quality of life (QOL) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Cross-sectional data collection

  6. Current and Future Issues in the Development of Spinal Agents for the Management of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaksh, Tony L; Fisher, Casey J; Hockman, Tyler M; Wiese, Ashley J

    2017-01-01

    Targeting analgesic drugs for spinal delivery reflects the fact that while the conscious experience of pain is mediated supraspinally, input initiated by high intensity stimuli, tissue injury and/or nerve injury is encoded at the level of the spinal dorsal horn and this output informs the brain as to the peripheral environment. This encoding process is subject to strong upregulation resulting in hyperesthetic states and downregulation reducing the ongoing processing of nociceptive stimuli reversing the hyperesthesia and pain processing. The present review addresses the biology of spinal nociceptive processing as relevant to the effects of intrathecally-delivered drugs in altering pain processing following acute stimulation, tissue inflammation/injury and nerve injury. The review covers i) the major classes of spinal agents currently employed as intrathecal analgesics (opioid agonists, alpha 2 agonists; sodium channel blockers; calcium channel blockers; NMDA blockers; GABA A/B agonists; COX inhibitors; ii) ongoing developments in the pharmacology of spinal therapeutics focusing on less studied agents/targets (cholinesterase inhibition; Adenosine agonists; iii) novel intrathecal targeting methodologies including gene-based approaches (viral vectors, plasmids, interfering RNAs); antisense, and toxins (botulinum toxins; resniferatoxin, substance P Saporin); and iv) issues relevant to intrathecal drug delivery (neuraxial drug distribution), infusate delivery profile, drug dosing, formulation and principals involved in the preclinical evaluation of intrathecal drug safety.

  7. Intraspinal penetrating stab injury to the middle thoracic spinal cord with no neurologic deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinning; Curry, Emily J; Blais, Micah; Ma, Richard; Sungarian, Arno S

    2012-05-01

    The annual incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury worldwide is estimated to be 35 patients per million. Nonmissile penetrating spinal injuries most commonly occur in the thoracic region, and the majority has neurologic deficits on admission. The management of patients who lack neurologic deficits is controversial due to the risk of neurologic status alteration intraoperatively. However, failure to intervene increases the risk of infection, delayed onset of neurologic deficits, and worsening functional outcome.A 17-year-old boy presented with an intradural T7-T8 knife penetration injury to the spinal cord with no neurologic deficit. Rapid surgical intervention was critical because the knife was lodged between the 2 hemispheres of the spinal cord. The patient was intubated in the lateral position, transferred to the prone position on a Jackson table, and underwent surgical decompression with laminectomy 1 level above and below the injury site, removal of the knife blade in the original path of trajectory, and repair of the dural tear with a collagen matrix. The patient sustained no neurologic sequelae from the penetrating knife injury. He was able to ambulate at discharge and had no complications. To our knowledge, this is the only report of a patient with intradural spinal cord penetration by a foreign object (knife blade) presenting with a normal neurologic preoperative examination that persisted throughout the course of postoperative care.

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Enriched Chevon (Goat Meat Lowers Plasma Cholesterol Levels and Alters Gene Expressions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, control chevon (goat meat and omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon were obtained from goats fed a 50% oil palm frond diet and commercial goat concentrate for 100 days, respectively. Goats fed the 50% oil palm frond diet contained high amounts of α-linolenic acid (ALA in their meat compared to goats fed the control diet. The chevon was then used to prepare two types of pellets (control or enriched chevon that were then fed to twenty-male-four-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n=10 in each group for 12 weeks to evaluate their effects on plasma cholesterol levels, tissue fatty acids, and gene expression. There was a significant increase in ALA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in the muscle tissues and liver of the rats fed the enriched chevon compared with the control group. Plasma cholesterol also decreased (P<0.05 in rats fed the enriched chevon compared to the control group. The rat pellets containing enriched chevon significantly upregulated the key transcription factor PPAR-γ and downregulated SREBP-1c expression relative to the control group. The results showed that the omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon increased the omega-3 fatty acids in the rat tissues and altered PPAR-γ and SREBP-1c genes expression.

  9. Solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma mimicking a spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heng-Jun; Zhan, Ren-Ya; Chen, Man-Tao; Cao, Fei; Zheng, Xiu-Jue

    2014-01-01

    Dural granuloma is extremely rare. To our knowledge, there has no case reported solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma worldwide so far. Here we report our findings in a 49-year-old woman, who presented with 10-year progressive left lower-limb numbness and two weeks of right lower-limb numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested a homogeneous enhanced spindle-shaped lesion, 2.9 × 1.5 cm in size, occupying the spinal intradural extramedullary space, at the level of Thoracic (T)-2/3, which mimicked the appearance of spinal meningioma. The Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test titer of 1:8, and the venereal diseases research laboratory of cerebral spinal fluid (VDRL-CSF) was reactive, so confirmed neurosyphilis was considered. After formal anti-syphilis treatment, posterior laminectomy surgery was performed, and the lesion was completely separated and extirpated. Final histopathologic diagnosis of the lesion was confirmed as chronic granulomatous inflammation, combined with the neurosyphilis history, spinal dural syphilis granuloma was finally diagnosed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered without any further treatment.

  10. Spinal gout: A review with case illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgafy, Hossein; Liu, Xiaochen; Herron, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize clinical presentations and treatment options of spinal gout in the literature from 2000 to 2014, and present theories for possible mechanism of spinal gout formation. METHODS The authors reviewed 68 published cases of spinal gout, which were collected by searching “spinal gout” on PubMed from 2000 to 2014. The data were analyzed for clinical features, anatomical location of spinal gout, laboratory studies, imaging studies, and treatment choices. RESULTS Of the 68 patients reviewed, the most common clinical presentation was back or neck pain in 69.1% of patients. The most common laboratory study was elevated uric acid levels in 66.2% of patients. The most common diagnostic image finding was hypointense lesion of the gout tophi on the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan. The most common surgical treatment performed was a laminectomy in 51.5% and non-surgical treatment was performed in 29.4% of patients. CONCLUSION Spinal gout most commonly present as back or neck pain with majority of reported patients with elevated uric acid. The diagnosis of spinal gout is confirmed with the presence of negatively birefringent monosodium urate crystals in tissue. Treatment for spinal gout involves medication for the reduction of uric acid level and surgery if patient symptoms failed to respond to medical treatment. PMID:27900275

  11. Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jun Ke,1,* Li Zhang,2,* Rongfeng Qi,1,* Qiang Xu,1 Weihui Li,2 Cailan Hou,3 Yuan Zhong,1 Zhiqiang Zhang,1 Zhong He,4 Lingjiang Li,2,5 Guangming Lu11Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 2Mental Health Institute, the Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, 3Guangdong Academy of Medical Science, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Mental Health Center, Guangzhou, 4Department of Radiology of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 5Shenzhen Kangning Hospital of Guangdong Province, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent research suggests that variability in brain signal provides important information about brain function in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal variability is altered in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We aimed to identify the BOLD signal variability changes of PTSD patients during symptom provocation and compare the brain patterns of BOLD signal variability with those of brain activation.Methods: Twelve PTSD patients and 14 age-matched controls, who all experienced a mining accident, underwent clinical assessment as well as fMRI scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. BOLD signal variability and brain activation were respectively examined with standard deviation (SD and general linear model analysis, and compared between the PTSD and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between PTSD symptom severity and these two brain measures across all subjects as well as in the PTSD group.Results: PTSD patients showed increased activation in the middle occipital gyrus compared with controls, and an inverse correlation was found between PTSD

  12. Phosphoproteomics and bioinformatics analyses of spinal cord proteins in rats with morphine tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jinn Liaw

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Morphine is the most effective pain-relieving drug, but it can cause unwanted side effects. Direct neuraxial administration of morphine to spinal cord not only can provide effective, reliable pain relief but also can prevent the development of supraspinal side effects. However, repeated neuraxial administration of morphine may still lead to morphine tolerance. METHODS: To better understand the mechanism that causes morphine tolerance, we induced tolerance in rats at the spinal cord level by giving them twice-daily injections of morphine (20 µg/10 µL for 4 days. We confirmed tolerance by measuring paw withdrawal latencies and maximal possible analgesic effect of morphine on day 5. We then carried out phosphoproteomic analysis to investigate the global phosphorylation of spinal proteins associated with morphine tolerance. Finally, pull-down assays were used to identify phosphorylated types and sites of 14-3-3 proteins, and bioinformatics was applied to predict biological networks impacted by the morphine-regulated proteins. RESULTS: Our proteomics data showed that repeated morphine treatment altered phosphorylation of 10 proteins in the spinal cord. Pull-down assays identified 2 serine/threonine phosphorylated sites in 14-3-3 proteins. Bioinformatics further revealed that morphine impacted on cytoskeletal reorganization, neuroplasticity, protein folding and modulation, signal transduction and biomolecular metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated morphine administration may affect multiple biological networks by altering protein phosphorylation. These data may provide insight into the mechanism that underlies the development of morphine tolerance.

  13. Prenatal exposure to low-level methylmercury alters the child's fine motor skills at the age of 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prpić, Igor; Milardović, Ana; Vlašić-Cicvarić, Inge; Špiric, Zdravko; Radić Nišević, Jelena; Vukelić, Petar; Snoj Tratnik, Janja; Mazej, Darja; Horvat, Milena

    2017-01-01

    To compare motor, cognitive and language characteristics in children aged 18 months who were prenatally exposed to low-level methyl-mercury (MeHg), and to analyze the eventual differences in these characteristics in relation to cord blood THg concentration. The total number of 205 child-mother pairs was included in the study, and total cord blood mercury was measured in 198 of them. Out of the 198 already measured samples, 47 of them have also been tested for methyl-mercury in cord blood. Data regarding the 47 samples of MeHg levels has been used for calculating the correlation between cord blood THg and cord blood MeHg. MeHg and THg showed a significant correlation (r=0.95, pskills were conducted on 168 children using The Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (BSID-III). Regarding the cord blood THg concentration, 135 children were divided in 4 quartile groups. Their neurodevelopmental characteristics have been compared. The cord blood THg concentration median and inter-quartile range was 2.98ng/g (1.41-5.61ng/g). There was a negative correlation between cord blood THg concentration and fine motor skills (rho=-0.22, p=0.01). It is evident that children grouped in 2nd ,3rd and 4th quartile had statistically significant lower fine motor skills assessment related to those grouped in 1st quartile (2nd quartile -1.24, p=0.03; 3rd quartile -1.28, p=0.03; 4th quartile -1.45, p=0.01). The differences in fine motor skills assessments between children in 2nd and 3rd and 3rd and 4th quartile were not statistically significant. Intrauterine exposure to low-level THg (MeHg) is associated with alterations in fine motor skills at the age of 18 months. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  15. A Mechanistic Assessment of the Discordance between Normal Serum Alanine Aminotransferase Levels and Altered Liver Histology in Chronic Hepatitis B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianqiong Gong

    Full Text Available To understand the mechanisms underlying the discordance between normal serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels and significant alterations in liver histology of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection with persistent normal ALT (PNALT or minimally elevated ALT. A total of 300 treatment-naive chronic HBV-infected patients with PNALT (ALT ≤ upper limit of normal [ULN, 40 U/ml] or minimally elevated ALT (1-2×ULN were retrospectively enrolled. All patients underwent liver biopsy and histological changes were analyzed along with biochemical and HBV markers. Among 300 participants, 177 were HBeAg-positive and 123 HBeAg-negative. Significant histologic abnormalities were found in 42.9% (76/177 and 52.8% (65/123 of HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative patients, respectively. Significant fibrosis, which is a marker of prior injury, was more frequently detected than significant necroinflammation (suggesting active liver injury in both HBeAg-positive and -negative groups, suggesting that liver injury occurred intermittently in our cohort. No significant differences were noticed in the percentage of patients with severe fibrosis between HBeAg-positive and negative phases or between ages 30 and 40 and over 40, suggesting that the fibrosis was possibly carried over from an early phase. Finally, lowering ALT ULN (30 U/L for men, 19 U/L for women alone was not adequate to increase the sensitivity of ALT detection of liver injury. However, the study was limited to a small sample size of 13 HBeAg-positive patients with ALT in the revised normal range. We detected significant liver pathology in almost 50% of chronic HBV infected patients with PNALT (ALT ≤ 40 U/ml or minimally elevated ALT. We postulated that small-scale intermittent liver injury was possibly responsible for the discordance between normal serum ALT and significant liver changes in our cohort.

  16. Spinal cord abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs The infection often begins in the bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess ... Boils Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection Epidural abscess Osteomyelitis Pulmonary tuberculosis Sepsis Spinal cord trauma Swelling Review ...

  17. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you epidural or spinal anesthesia is called an anesthesiologist. First, the area of your back where the ... Chan VWS. Spinal, epidural, and caudal anesthesia. In: Miller RD, ed. Miller's Anesthesia . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  18. Extradural spinal meningioma: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, N. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States); Sze, G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report a case of extradural spinal meningioma with pathologically proven features of malignant transformation. The MRI findings of extradural spinal meningioma and differences in the findings from intradural meningiomas are discussed. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  19. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Print ... treatment for the disease's most troubling symptoms. About SMA Normally, healthy nerve cells in the brain called ...

  20. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... roots may be cut to relieve pain. In adults, surgery to free (detether) the spinal cord can reduce the size ... is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord ...

  1. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  2. Spinal muscular atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amico, Adele; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tiziano, Francesco D; Bertini, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis...

  3. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that attacks nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord. These cells communicate with your voluntary muscles - the ones you can control, like in your ...

  4. Evidence of compromised blood-spinal cord barrier in early and late symptomatic SOD1 mice modeling ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood-brain barrier (BBB, blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB control cerebral/spinal cord homeostasis by selective transport of molecules and cells from the systemic compartment. In the spinal cord and brain of both ALS patients and animal models, infiltration of T-cell lymphocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, and IgG deposits have been observed that may have a critical role in motor neuron damage. Additionally, increased levels of albumin and IgG have been found in the cerebrospinal fluid in ALS patients. These findings suggest altered barrier permeability in ALS. Recently, we showed disruption of the BBB and BSCB in areas of motor neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord in G93A SOD1 mice modeling ALS at both early and late stages of disease using electron microscopy. Examination of capillary ultrastructure revealed endothelial cell degeneration, which, along with astrocyte alteration, compromised the BBB and BSCB. However, the effect of these alterations upon barrier function in ALS is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the functional competence of the BSCB in G93A mice at different stages of disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Evans Blue (EB dye was intravenously injected into ALS mice at early or late stage disease. Vascular leakage and the condition of basement membranes, endothelial cells, and astrocytes were investigated in cervical and lumbar spinal cords using immunohistochemistry. Results showed EB leakage in spinal cord microvessels from all G93A mice, indicating dysfunction in endothelia and basement membranes and confirming our previous ultrastructural findings on BSCB disruption. Additionally, downregulation of Glut-1 and CD146 expressions in the endothelial cells of the BSCB were found which may relate to vascular leakage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest that the BSCB is compromised in areas of motor neuron

  5. The Effect Of Prophylactic Intravenous Ephedrine On Lactic Acid Level Of Neona te During Spinal A nesthesia For Caesarea n Section

    OpenAIRE

    ERSOY, Dr. Ayda TÜRKÖZ Dr. Remzi GÖKDENİZ Dr.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty heaithy women undergoing elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia at term were allocated randomiy to receive ephedrine infusion (grup I, n=15) (approximately 5mg/min) immediately after onset of sensory block or bo/uses of I. V 10 mg ephedrine (grup I, n=15) when maternai blood pressure decreased by more than 20°% from baseline va/ue. Maternai and newborn blood pressures and heart rates were recorded. Incidences of nausea and vomiting were compared between the groups....

  6. Lumbar spinal stenosis CAD from clinical MRM and MRI based on inter- and intra-context features with a two-level classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jaehan; Alomari, Raja S.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-03-01

    An imaging test has an important role in the diagnosis of lumbar abnormalities since it allows to examine the internal structure of soft tissues and bony elements without the need of an unnecessary surgery and recovery time. For the past decade, among various imaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has taken the significant part of the clinical evaluation of the lumbar spine. This is mainly due to technological advancements that lead to the improvement of imaging devices in spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and multi-planar capabilities. In addition, noninvasive nature of MRI makes it easy to diagnose many common causes of low back pain such as disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc diseases. In this paper, we propose a method to diagnose lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), a narrowing of the spinal canal, from magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images. Our method segments the thecal sac in the preprocessing stage, generates the features based on inter- and intra-context information, and diagnoses lumbar disc stenosis. Experiments with 55 subjects show that our method achieves 91.3% diagnostic accuracy. In the future, we plan to test our method on more subjects.

  7. Postoperative Management of the Physiological Effects of Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer; Helwig, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Spinal anesthesia is a common regional anesthesia used in ambulatory and hospital settings. Spinal anesthesia has been shown to reduce postoperative pain and morbidity in certain populations. Understanding the physiological changes during spinal anesthesia can help predict and manage side effects including hypotension, bradycardia, decreased expiration, nausea, vomiting, and urinary retention. This article describes the physiological effects of spinal anesthesia in a body systems approach, describes how to assess the spinal level, and presents common side effects seen postoperatively and how to successfully manage and treat these patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  9. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) A A A What's in this article? ... Outlook en español Atrofia muscular espinal Spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, is an inherited condition that causes ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  11. Acute rehabilitation of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    KIDRIČ-SIVEC, Urška; SEDEJ, Bogdana; MAROLT, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury presents with loss of function of neuromuscular and other systems below the level of injury. Patients may suffer from minor loss of strength to complete quadriplegia with respiratory distress. All the patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who are admitted and treated in University Medical Centre Ljubljana are evaluated after admission and individualized plan of rehabilitation is made. The neurological level of injury is documented with international standa...

  12. Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Zelieann R; Leslie, Traci C; Hatfield, Kimberly P; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2010-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17β-estradiol (E₂) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 μg/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 μg/mL) decreased E(2) (DMSO: 3009.72±744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 μg/mL: 1679.66±461.99 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 1752.72±532.41 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 45.89±33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43±2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1μg/mL: 17.17±4.71 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 13.64±3.53 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 1.29±0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92±0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 μg/mL: 1.49±0.43ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 0.64±0.31 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 0.12±0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11±4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1μg/mL: 26.77±4.41 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 20.90±3.75 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 9.44±2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

  13. Vitamin B₁₂ dependent changes in mouse spinal cord expression of vitamin B₁₂ related proteins and the epidermal growth factor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Elena; Lildballe, Dorte L; Kristensen, Lise; Birn, Henrik; Nexo, Ebba

    2013-03-29

    Chronic vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency in the mammalian central nervous system causes degenerative damage, especially in the spinal cord. Previous studies have shown that cobalamin status alters spinal cord expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor in rats. Employing a mouse model of cobalamin-depletion and loading, we have explored the influence of Cbl status on spinal cord expression of cobalamin related proteins, as well as all four known EGF receptors and their activating ligands. Following four weeks of osmotic minipump infusion (n=7 in each group) with cobinamide (4.25nmol/h), saline or cobalamin (1.75nmol/h) the spinal cords were analyzed for cobalamin and for the mRNA levels of cobalamin related proteins and members of the EGF system using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The median spinal cord cobalamin content was 17, 32, and 52pmol/gr of tissues in cobinamide, saline, and cobalamin treated animals, respectively. Both cobinamide and cobalamin induced a significant decrease in the expression of the lysosomal membrane cobalamin transporter. All four EGF receptors and their activating ligands, except for EGF, were expressed in the spinal cord. Notably, the expression of one of the EGF receptors, HER3, and the ligands heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-α, and neuregulins 1α was increased in cobalamin treated mice. Our studies show that four weeks treatment of mice with cobinamide induces spinal cord cobalamin depletion and that cobalamin loading induces an altered expression pattern of the EGF system thus confirming a spinal cord cross talk between Cbl and the EGF system.

  14. Reflex wind-up in early chronic spinal injury: plasticity of motor outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D; Frigon, Alain; Hurteau, Marie-France; Cain, Charlette; Heckman, C J

    2017-05-01

    In this study we evaluate temporal summation (wind-up) of reflexes in select distal and proximal hindlimb muscles in response to repeated stimuli of the distal tibial or superficial peroneal nerves in cats 1 mo after complete spinal transection. This report is a continuation of our previous paper on reflex wind-up in the intact and acutely spinalized cat. To evaluate reflex wind-up in both studies, we recorded electromyographic signals from the following left hindlimb muscles: lateral gastrocnemius (LG), tibialis anterior (TA), semitendinosus (ST), and sartorius (Srt), in response to 10 electrical pulses to the tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. Two distinct components of the reflex responses were considered, a short-latency compound action potential (CAP) and a longer duration bout of sustained activity (SA). These two response types were shown to be differentially modified by acute spinal injury in our previous work (Frigon A, Johnson MD, Heckman CJ. J Physiol 590: 973-989, 2012). We show that these responses exhibit continued plasticity during the 1-mo recovery period following acute spinalization. During this early chronic phase, wind-up of SA responses returned to preinjury levels in one muscle, the ST, but remained depressed in all other muscles tested. In contrast, CAP response amplitudes, which were initially potentiated following acute transection, returned to preinjury levels in all muscles except for Srt, which continued to show marked increase. These findings illustrate that spinal elements exhibit considerable plasticity during the recovery process following spinal injury and highlight the importance of considering SA and CAP responses as distinct phenomena with unique underlying neural mechanisms.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This research is the first to assess temporal summation, also called wind-up, of muscle reflexes during the 1-mo recovery period following spinal injury. Our results show that two types of muscle reflex activity are differentially

  15. Palmitate alters the rhythmic expression of molecular clock genes and orexigenic neuropeptide Y mRNA levels within immortalized, hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Laura J; Fick, Gordon H; Belsham, Denise D

    2011-09-30

    The control of energy homeostasis within the hypothalamus is under the regulated control of homeostatic hormones, nutrients and the expression of neuropeptides that alter feeding behavior. Elevated levels of palmitate, a predominant saturated fatty acid in diet and fatty acid biosynthesis, alter cellular function. For instance, a key mechanism involved in the development of insulin resistance is lipotoxicity, through increased circulating saturated fatty acids. Although many studies have begun to determine the underlying mechanisms of lipotoxicity in peripheral tissues, little is known about the effects of excess lipids in the brain. To determine these mechanisms we used an immortalized, clonal, hypothalamic cell line, mHypoE-44, to demonstrate that palmitate directly alters the expression of molecular clock components, by increasing Bmal1 and Clock, or by decreasing Per2, and Rev-erbα, their mRNA levels and altering their rhythmic period within individual neurons. We found that these neurons endogenously express the orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AgRP, thus we determined that palmitate administration alters the mRNA expression of these neuropeptides as well. Palmitate treatment causes a significant increase in NPY mRNA levels and significantly alters the phase of rhythmic expression. We explored the link between AMPK and the expression of neuropeptide Y using the AMPK inhibitor compound C and the AMP analog AICAR. AMPK inhibition decreased NPY mRNA. AICAR also elevated basal NPY, but prevented the palmitate-mediated increase in NPY mRNA levels. We postulate that this palmitate-mediated increase in NPY and AgRP synthesis may initiate a detrimental positive feedback loop leading to increased energy consumption.

  16. Spinal epidural hematoma; Spinales epidurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal epidural hematoma is an accumulation of blood in the potential space between the dura and bone. On unenhanced computed tomography epidural hemorrhage appears as a high-density spinal canal mass with variable cord compression. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for evaluating spinal epidural hematoma and can demonstrate the extent of the hematoma and degree of cord compression. When treated surgically the outcome depends on the extent of preoperative neurological deficits and on the operative timing interval. (orig.) [German] Das spinale epidurale Haematom ist eine Blutansammlung zwischen Dura und Knochen. Die klinische Praesentation ist aehnlich dem akuten Bandscheibenvorfall, die Symptomatik ist allerdings in der Regel progredient. In der CT stellt sich ein frisches Haematom hyperdens dar. Die MRT ist die Methode der Wahl zur Diagnose spinaler epiduraler Haematome und kann die Ausdehnung sowie auch das Ausmass der Kompression darstellen. Die wichtigste Differenzialdiagnose vom epiduralen Haematom ist das epidurale Empyem. (orig.)

  17. Concentration of nitric oxide (NO in spinal fluid of chronic spinal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumite Y

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied total nitric oxide (nitrite + nitrate (NO levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of chronic spinal diseases in nonsmokers (133 patients: 76 men and 57 women; mean age, 63 years; range, 15-92 years by the Griess method to clarify the role of NO in different spinal diseases. The extent of compression in terms of numbers of disc level at the compressed spinal nerve and neurological evaluation were also assessed according to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores. The spinal diseases included cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy (cervical disease group, ossification of yellow ligament (thoracic disease group, and lumbar disc herniation, lumbar canal stenosis and lumbar spondylolisthesis (lumbar disease group. NO levels in the spinal disease groups (4.98+/-2.28 micromol/l: mean +/- SD were significantly higher than that in the control group (2.53+/-0.94 micromol/l. An inverse correlation was detected between the elevated levels of NO and the grade of clinical symptoms in the cervical disorders. The number of disc level at the compressed spinal nerve was positively correlated with elevated NO levels in CSF in the cervical and lumbar disorder groups. These results indicate that nerve compression may elevate NO levels in CSF, and that NO concentration in the CSF might be a useful marker of damage to nervous system in spinal disorders.

  18. Higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol associated with moderate alcohol consumption is not related to altered plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; vanTol, A; Hoogenberg, K; vanGent, T; Scheek, LM; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1997-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) are important factors involved in HDL metabolism. Altered plasma activity levels of these factors could play a role in the increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) choles

  19. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome) learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training). Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection). Because formalin-induced central sensitization has been shown to involve NMDA receptor activation, we tested whether pre-treatment with NMDA would also affect spinal learning in manner similar to formalin. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24 h. These

  20. Against the odds: what to expect in rehabilitation of chronic spinal cord injury with a neurologically controlled Hybrid Assistive Limb exoskeleton. A subgroup analysis of 55 patients according to age and lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmücke, Dennis; Zieriacks, Amrei; Jansen, Oliver; Fisahn, Christian; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Wessling, Martin; Meindl, Renate C; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Aach, Mirko

    2017-05-01

    Objective Age and lesion level are believed to represent outcome predictors in rehabilitation of patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). The Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) exoskeleton enables patients to perform a voluntary controlled gait pattern via an electromyography-triggered neuromuscular feedback system, and has been introduced as a temporary gait training tool in patients with SCI. The aim of this prospective pre- and postintervention study was to examine functional outcomes as a function of age and lesion level in patients with chronic incomplete SCI (iSCI) or chronic complete SCI (cSCI) with zones of partial preservation (ZPP) by using the HAL as a temporary training tool. Methods Fifty-five participants with chronic iSCI or cSCI (mean time since injury 6.85 ± 5.12 years) were classified according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) and divided by age (exoskeleton. An improvement of approximately 50% in the 10MWTsss and in gait endurance (6MinWT) can be expected from such training. The influences of SCI lesion level and age on functional outcome were nonsignificant in the present study. Older age (≥ 50 years) may be associated with smaller improvements in the 10MWTsss. An iSCI in paraplegic patients with spastic motor behavior may be a nonsignificant negative predictor in gait endurance improvements. Clinical trial registration no.: DRKS00010250 ( https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/setLocale_DE.do ).

  1. Amitriptyline pharmacokinetics in experimental spinal cord injury in the rabbit

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    Reihanikermani H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that pharmacokinetic behavior of several drugs such as paracetamol, theophylline, and aminoglycosides are significantly altered in spinal cord injured patients. No pharmacokinetic study of amitriptyline has been performed in patients and experimental models of spinal cord injury. Pharmacokinetic parameters of amitriptyline in orally treated rabbits subjected to laminectomy and spinal cord injury compared with those underwent laminectomy alone. Among twenty four male rabbits were included in this study, nine of them subjected to spinal cord injury at the 8 th thoracic level by knife severance method and six rabbits underwent laminectomy alone (sham group and nine rabbits treated as control. All received a single oral dose of amitriptyline (20 mg/kg 24 h after injury. Blood sampling were done at predetermined times to 36 h after drug administration. Amitriptyline concentration in serum samples was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters including maximum concentration (C max , time to reach maximum concentration (T max , half life, and the area under the curve to last detectable concentration time point (AUC 0-t were directly determined from the concentration-time curve. Maximum concentration was observed at 6.5 h after administration in sham group with a concentration of 439.6 ng/ml, whereas in SCI group T max was at 2.7 h with a concentration of 2763.9 ng/ml. In control group it was 3.3 h and 396 ng/ml, respectively. In SCI group, AUC was 9465.6 ng.h/ml and half life was 6 h and for control group it was 2817.4 ng.h/ml and 6.4 h, respectively. Statistical analysis of data showed that SCI didn′t induce significant changes in amitriptyline pharmacokinetic parameters.

  2. Alterations in Circulating miRNA Levels following Early-Stage Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Resection in Post-Menopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kodahl, Annette R; Zeuthen, Pernille; Binder, Harald

    2014-01-01

    design and the same qPCR profiling platform, resulting in limited agreement. CONCLUSIONS: A panel of 4 circulating miRNAs exhibited significantly altered levels following radical resection of primary ER+ breast cancers in post-menopausal women. These specific miRNAs may be involved in tumorigenesis...... these alterations were also observed in an independent data set. METHODS: Global miRNA analysis was performed on prospectively collected serum samples from 24 post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer before surgery and 3 weeks after tumor resection using global LNA...

  3. Immune dysregulation in offspring of a bipolar parent. Altered serum levels of immune growth factors at adolescent age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, J.G.; Mesman, E.; de Wit, H.; Wijkhuijs, AJM; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    Immune dysregulation plays a role in the vulnerability for mood disorders. Immune growth factors, such as Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-2 (IGF-BP2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), IL-7 and sCD25 have repeatedly been reported altered in patients with mood

  4. A rare cause of progressive paraparesis and urinary retention: Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula- Case report

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    Sırma Geyik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal arteriovenous fistulas (AVF, are rarely seen clinical pathology, have serious morbidity in cases without treatment although spinal AVF are the most common types of spinal arteriovenous malformation. Fifty years old male patient suffered from urine retention and paraparesis after lifted a heavy object. Spinal magnetic resonance images (MRI showed diffuse hyper intense lesion from midthoracic spinal cord segment to conus medullaris in T2A sequance. Spinal angiography revealed a long segmental dorsal AVF on the right side of T 7-8 level in spinal cord. Because of the low flow and a small AVF neurosurgical Department decided to perform an operation for spinal AVF. We should keep in mind spinal AVF, in which prognosis is well after prompt and appropriate theraphy, as a differential diagnosis in patients presented with progressive spinal symptoms.

  5. N-acetylcysteine downregulates phosphorylated p-38 expression but does not reverse the increased superoxide anion levels in the spinal cord of rats with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, A; de Souza, J A; Santos, M C Q; Riffel, A P K; Kolberg, C; Ribeiro, M F M; de Fraga, L S; Partata, W A

    2017-02-16

    We determined the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the expression of the phosphorylated p38 (p-p38) protein and superoxide anion generation (SAG), two important players in the processing of neuropathic pain, in the lumbosacral spinal cord of rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain. The sciatic functional index (SFI) was also measured to assess the functional recovery post-nerve lesion. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were divided equally into the following groups: Naive (rats did not undergo surgical manipulation); Sham (rats in which all surgical procedures involved in CCI were used except the ligature), and CCI (rats in which four ligatures were tied loosely around the right common sciatic nerve), which received 2, 4, or 8 intraperitoneal injections of NAC (150 mg·kg-1·day-1) or saline beginning 4 h after CCI. Rats were sacrificed 1, 3, and 7 days after CCI. The SFI was measured on these days and the lumbosacral spinal cord was used for analysis of p-p38 expression and SAG. CCI induced a decrease in SFI as well as an increase in p-p38 expression and SAG in the spinal cord. The SFI showed a partial recovery at day 7 in saline-treated CCI rats, but recovery was improved in NAC-treated CCI rats. NAC induced a downregulation in p-p38 expression at all time-points evaluated, but did not reverse the increased SAG induced by CCI. Since p-p38 is a mediator in neuropathic pain and/or nerve regeneration, modulation of this protein may play a role in NAC-induced effects in CCI rats.

  6. The transformation of spinal curvature into spinal deformity: pathological processes and implications for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawes Martha C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review summarizes what is known about the pathological processes (e.g. structural and functional changes, by which spinal curvatures develop and evolve into spinal deformities. Methods Comprehensive review of articles (English language only published on 'scoliosis,' whose content yielded data on the pathological changes associated with spinal curvatures. Medline, Science Citation Index and other searches yielded > 10,000 titles each of which was surveyed for content related to 'pathology' and related terms such as 'etiology,' 'inheritance,' 'pathomechanism,' 'signs and symptoms.' Additional resources included all books published on 'scoliosis' and available through the Arizona Health Sciences Library, Interlibrary Loan, or through direct contact with the authors or publishers. Results A lateral curvature of the spine–'scoliosis'–can develop in association with postural imbalance due to genetic defects and injury as well as pain and scarring from trauma or surgery. Irrespective of the factor that triggers its appearance, a sustained postural imbalance can result, over time, in establishment of a state of continuous asymmetric loading relative to the spinal axis. Recent studies support the longstanding hypothesis that spinal deformity results directly from such postural imbalance, irrespective of the primary trigger, because the dynamics of growth within vertebrae are altered by continuous asymmetric mechanical loading. These data suggest that, as long as growth potential remains, evolution of a spinal curvature into a spinal deformity can be prevented by reversing the state of continuous asymmetric loading. Conclusion Spinal curvatures can routinely be diagnosed in early stages, before pathological deformity of the vertebral elements is induced in response to asymmetric loading. Current clinical approaches involve 'watching and waiting' while mild reversible spinal curvatures develop into spinal deformities with

  7. A longitudinal study of alterations of hippocampal volumes and serum BDNF levels in association to atypical antipsychotics in a sample of first-episode patients with schizophrenia.

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    Emmanouil Rizos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus, which have been suggested to play an important role in the formation and emergence of schizophrenia syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit significant bilateral hippocampal volume reduction and progressive hippocampal volume decrease in first-episode patients with schizophrenia has been shown in many neuroimaging studies. Dysfunction of the neurotrophic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The initiation of antipsychotic medication alters the levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF levels. However it is unclear whether treatment with antipsychotics is associated with alterations of hippocampal volume and BDNF levels. METHODS: In the present longitudinal study we investigated the association between serum BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes in a sample of fourteen first-episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FEP. MRI scans, BDNF and clinical measurements were performed twice: at baseline before the initiation of antipsychotic treatment and 8 months later, while the patients were receiving monotherapy with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs. RESULTS: We found that left hippocampal volume was decreased (corrected left HV [t = 2.977, df = 13, p = .011] at follow-up; We also found that the higher the BDNF levels change the higher were the differences of corrected left hippocampus after 8 months of treatment with atypical antipsychotics (Pearson r = 0.597, p = 0.024. CONCLUSIONS: The association of BDNF with hippocampal volume alterations in schizophrenia merits further investigation and replication in larger longitudinal studies.

  8. 急诊创伤性脊柱损伤患者致残程度的相关因素%Related factors of levels of disability in patients with traumatic spinal injury in the emergency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏薇萍; 管佳慧; 朱晓燕; 秦海峰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the related factors of levels of disability in patients with traumatic spinal injury in the emergency.Methods Two hundreds and eighty-five patients with traumatic spinal injury were surveyed by the self-designed questionnaire "Survey on Related Factors of Disability Levels of Patients with traumatic injury" and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) from September 2011 to July 2012.Results The cases of coma patients with traumatic spinal injury were 57 cases of Grade A,37 cases of Grade B,44 cases of Grade C,17 cases of Grade D and 18 cases of Grade E.The degree of injury was compared between the coma patients and conscious patients,and the difference was statistically significant (Z =20.055,P <0.01).The patients who were encountered different transportation,trauma causes and surgery time had the different degree of injury,and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05).However,no significant difference was found in protection in the injury site and the time getting hospital (P > 0.05).Among patients with traumatic spinal injury,the main reasons were caused by traffic accidents,falls and crash.Conclusions In addition to direct traumatic factors,the injury degree in patients with traumatic spinal injury is affected by the improper protection for patients in the scene and transportation,the treatment of coma patients based on saving lives,the secondary transport risk increased by transportation and the delayed early surgery time.%目的 探讨急诊创伤性脊柱损伤患者致残程度的相关因素.方法 自行设计《创伤性脊柱损伤致残因素调查表》并结合《脊柱脊髓损伤评分》,对创伤性脊柱损伤患者285例进行调查评估.结果 创伤性脊柱损伤患者中有昏迷情况患者A级57例,B级37例,C级44例,D级17例,E级18例,与无昏迷患者损伤程度比较差异有统计学意义(Z=20.055,P<0.01);不同运送方式、创伤原因、脊柱手术时间患者脊髓损伤程度

  9. Effect of sagittal spinal balance, levels of posterior instrumentation, and length of follow-up on low back pain in patients undergoing posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar spine disease: a multifactorial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Repantis, Thomas; Papazisis, Zisis; Iliopoulos, Panagiotis

    2010-04-15

    Prospective controlled clinical study on low back pain (LBP). To investigate the possible effects of radiographic and other related parameters on LBP in patients underwent decompression and posterolateral instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar spine disease. Sagittal balance of the spine after spine surgery has gained increasing interest regarding its correlation with LBP and fusion rate. To our knowledge, no advanced statistical analysis on the effects of sagittal roentgenographic and other parameters on LBP after lumbar surgery has been published. Forty-five patients with an average age of 63 years, who underwent pedicle-screw fixation in 2, 3, and 4 vertebrae for degenerative lumbar spine disease were selected to be included in this study. Radiographic and self-assessment (bodily pain, short form-36) data were evaluated using advanced statistics (multifactorial analysis) to investigate all possible correlations between a dependent parameter (LBP) and independent parameters (sex, extension of instrumentation, sagittal spinal balance, and angular motion at the adjacent free level above instrumentation). All patients were observed for an average of 5.5 years (range, 5-7 years). Male patients showed significantly more improvement of LBP than female counterparts (P = 0.024). LBP improved after surgery by the first year (P spine disease.This research suggests that the methods directed at the improvement in sagittal spinal balance of the lumbar spine, careful selection of fusion levels, and improvement of fusion rate might be beneficial for decreasing LBP after surgery in degenerative lumbar spine disease.

  10. Lung adenocarcinoma of never smokers and smokers harbor differential regions of genetic alteration and exhibit different levels of genomic instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsie L Thu

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the observed clinical distinctions between lung tumors in smokers and never smokers (NS extend beyond specific gene mutations, such as EGFR, EML4-ALK, and KRAS, some of which have been translated into targeted therapies. However, the molecular alterations identified thus far cannot explain all of the clinical and biological disparities observed in lung tumors of NS and smokers. To this end, we performed an unbiased genome-wide, comparative study to identify novel genomic aberrations that differ between smokers and NS. High resolution whole genome DNA copy number profiling of 69 lung adenocarcinomas from smokers (n = 39 and NS (n = 30 revealed both global and regional disparities in the tumor genomes of these two groups. We found that NS lung tumors had a greater proportion of their genomes altered than those of smokers. Moreover, copy number gains on chromosomes 5q, 7p, and 16p occurred more frequently in NS. We validated our findings in two independently generated public datasets. Our findings provide a novel line of evidence distinguishing genetic differences between smoker and NS lung tumors, namely, that the extent of segmental genomic alterations is greater in NS tumors. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that these lung tumors are globally and genetically different, which implies they are likely driven by distinct molecular mechanisms.

  11. Melanogenesis stimulation in B16-F10 melanoma cells induces cell cycle alterations, increased ROS levels and a differential expression of proteins as revealed by proteomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Elizabeth S.; Kawahara, Rebeca [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Kadowaki, Marina K. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Cascavel, PR (Brazil); Amstalden, Hudson G.; Noleto, Guilhermina R.; Cadena, Silvia Maria S.C.; Winnischofer, Sheila M.B. [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Martinez, Glaucia R., E-mail: grmartinez@ufpr.br [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-09-10

    Considering that stimulation of melanogenesis may lead to alterations of cellular responses, besides melanin production, our main goal was to study the cellular effects of melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results show increased levels of the reactive oxygen species after 15 h of melanogenesis stimulation. Following 48 h of melanogenesis stimulation, proliferation was inhibited (by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase) and the expression levels of p21 mRNA were increased. In addition, melanogenesis stimulation did not induce cellular senescence. Proteomic analysis demonstrated the involvement of proteins from other pathways besides those related to the cell cycle, including protein disulfide isomerase A3, heat-shock protein 70, and fructose biphosphate aldolase A (all up-regulated), and lactate dehydrogenase (down-regulated). In RT-qPCR experiments, the levels of pyruvate kinase M2 mRNA dropped, whereas the levels of ATP synthase (beta-F1) mRNA increased. These data indicate that melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 cells leads to alterations in metabolism and cell cycle progression that may contribute to an induction of cell quiescence, which may provide a mechanism of resistance against cellular injury promoted by melanin synthesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis stimulation by L-tyrosine+NH{sub 4}Cl in B16-F10 melanoma cells increases ROS levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis inhibits cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteomic analysis showed alterations in proteins of the cell cycle and glucose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RT-qPCR analysis confirmed alterations of metabolic targets after melanogenesis stimulation.

  12. Spatial and temporal activation of spinal glial cells: role of gliopathy in central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Young S; Kang, Jonghoon; Unabia, Geda C; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-04-01

    In the spinal cord, neuron and glial cells actively interact and contribute to neurofunction. Surprisingly, both cell types have similar receptors, transporters and ion channels and also produce similar neurotransmitters and cytokines. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical similarities work synergistically to maintain physiological homeostasis in the normal spinal cord. However, in trauma or disease states, spinal glia become activated, dorsal horn neurons become hyperexcitable contributing to sensitized neuronal-glial circuits. The maladaptive spinal circuits directly affect synaptic excitability, including activation of intracellular downstream cascades that result in enhanced evoked and spontaneous activity in dorsal horn neurons with the result that abnormal pain syndromes develop. Recent literature reported that spinal cord injury produces glial activation in the dorsal horn; however, the majority of glial activation studies after SCI have focused on transient and/or acute time points, from a few hours to 1 month, and peri-lesion sites, a few millimeters rostral and caudal to the lesion site. In addition, thoracic spinal cord injury produces activation of astrocytes and microglia that contributes to dorsal horn neuronal hyperexcitability and central neuropathic pain in above-level, at-level and below-level segments remote from the lesion in the spinal cord. The cellular and molecular events of glial activation are not simple events, rather they are the consequence of a combination of several neurochemical and neurophysiological changes following SCI. The ionic imbalances, neuroinflammation and alterations of cell cycle proteins after SCI are predominant components for neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes that result in glial activation. More importantly, SCI induced release of glutamate, proinflammatory cytokines, ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neurotrophic factors trigger activation of postsynaptic neuron and glial cells via their own receptors

  13. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Louisville Swim Scale: A Novel Assessment of Hindlimb Function following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Burke, Darlene A.; Baldini, Angela D.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of animal studies examining the recovery of function following spinal cord injury use the BBB Open-Field Locomotor Scale as a primary outcome measure. However, it is now well known that rehabilitation strategies can bring about significant improvements in hindlimb function in some animal models. Thus, improvements in walking following spinal cord injury in rats may be influenced by differences in activity levels and housing conditions during the first few weeks post-injury. Swimming is a natural form of locomotion that animals are not normally exposed to in the laboratory setting. We hypothesized that deficits in, and functional recovery of, swimming would accurately represent the locomotor capability of the nervous system in the absence of any retraining effects. To test this hypothesis, we have compared the recovery of walking and swimming in rats following a range of standardized spinal cord injuries and two different retraining strategies. In order to assess swimming, we developed a rating system we call the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS) that evaluates three characteristics of swimming that are highly altered by spinal cord injury— namely, hindlimb movement, forelimb dependency, and body position. The data indicate that the LSS is a sensitive and reliable method of determining swimming ability and the improvement in hindlimb function after standardized contusion injury of the thoracic spinal cord. Furthermore, the data suggests that when used in conjunction with the BBB Open-field Locomotor Scale, the LSS assesses locomotor capabilities that are not influenced by a retraining effect. PMID:17115911

  15. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

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    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-04-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT. Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author).

  16. First Case of Autonomic Dysreflexia Following Elective Lower Thoracic Spinal Cord Transection in a Spina Bifida Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Juanita; Mathkour, Mansour; Scullen, Tyler; Kahn, Lora; Biro, Erin; Pham, Alex; Sulaiman, Olawale A R; Smith, Roger; Bui, Cuong J

    2017-08-03

    Spinal cord transection is a radical but effective treatment for highly selective cases of symptomatic spinal retethering in paraplegic spina bifida patients. Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a potentially life-threatening syndrome involving a dysregulated sympathetic discharge reflex commonly seen following cervical and high thoracic spinal cord injury, leading to a disconnect between autonomic pathways above and below the lesion that can lead to severe complications including uncontrolled hypertension, bradycardia, stroke, and potentially death. Herein we present a case in which a paraplegic spina bifida patient presenting with symptomatic spinal retethering experienced autonomic dysreflexia following an elective spinal cord transection. A 51-year-old male with a history of complex spina bifida presented with an active cerebrospinal fluid leak. Physical examination revealed a thin covering of abnormal epidermis over the large placode. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large myelomeningocele defect with posterior element defects spanning from L2 to the sacrum with evidence of tethering. The patient underwent an intradural transection of the spinal cord with a "blind-pouch" closure of the dura at the level of T12/L1. Postoperatively, the patient developed intermittent episodes of hypertension, bradycardia, headaches, altered mental status, severe perspiration, and red flushing of the upper torso, face, and arms. The diagnosis of AD was made clinically and managed with a positive response to a combination of beta- and alpha-blockade along with patient education on avoidance of common AD triggers. At 5-year follow-up the patient has continued to do well on medication. This case highlights a potential major side effect from elective transection of the spinal cord. If unrecognized and untreated, AD can cause significant distress and morbidity. We hope this first case report serves to supplement existing data and aid in future surgical and medical decision

  17. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirshblum, S C; Biering-Sorensen, F; Betz, R

    2014-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine the levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Associat......The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine the levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury...

  18. Spinal fractures resulting from traumatic injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heidari Pedram; Zarei Mohammad Reza; Rasouli Mohammad Reza; Alexander R Vaccaro; Rahimi-Movaghar Vafa

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To illustrate mechanisms of spine fractures and the pattern of spinal injuries characterized by the major mechanisms in urban population of Iran.Methods:Data regarding spinal injuries including demographics,mechanism and level of spinal injury,abbreviated injury score,associated injuries and final fate of the patients were extracted from the Iranian national trauma registry database from 1999 to 2004.Results:A total of 619 patients with traumatic spine fractures were identified,of whom 68.5% were males.The peak frequency of these injuries occurred in the 21-40 year age-group.Accidental falls and road traffic crashes(RTCs)were the most common mechanisms of spinal fractures(47.2% and 44.1%,respectively).RTCs tended to occur in younger patients compared with accidental falls.The most common spinal region for spinal fracture was the lumbar spine(53.63%).Cervical spine fractures were significantly more common in RTCs,while lumbar spine fractures were more common in accidental falls(P<0.001).A total of 171(27.6%)patients had associated non-spinal injuries,of whom 127 had associated extremity injuries,and 55 had head injuries.Thirty-six(5.6%)patients had spinal cord injury(SCI).The injury severity score of the RTC group was significantly higher than that of accidental falls(P=0.002).Fifteen(4%)patients died of traumatic injuries.The rate of death was significantly higher in RTCs compared with accidental falls(5.1% vs 2.1%,P=0.039).Conclusions:The patterns of spinal fractures are similar to those reported from developed countries.RTCs tend to affect the younger age population and are associated with a higher degree of associated injuries and mortality than accidental falls.Therefore preventive strategies should be based on reduction of the number and severity of RTCs.

  19. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. What is different about spinal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Howard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms subserving deep spinal pain have not been studied as well as those related to the skin and to deep pain in peripheral limb structures. The clinical phenomenology of deep spinal pain presents unique features which call for investigations which can explain these at a mechanistic level. Methods Targeted searches of the literature were conducted and the relevant materials reviewed for applicability to the thesis that deep spinal pain is distinctive from deep pain in the peripheral limb structures. Topics related to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of deep spinal pain were organized in a hierarchical format for content review. Results Since the 1980’s the innervation characteristics of the spinal joints and deep muscles have been elucidated. Afferent connections subserving pain have been identified in a distinctive somatotopic organization within the spinal cord whereby afferents from deep spinal tissues terminate primarily in the lateral dorsal horn while those from deep peripheral tissues terminate primarily in the medial dorsal horn. Mechanisms underlying the clinical phenomena of referred pain from the spine, poor localization of spinal pain and chronicity of spine pain have emerged from the literature and are reviewed here, especially emphasizing the somatotopic organization and hyperconvergence of dorsal horn “low back (spinal neurons”. Taken together, these findings provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that deep spine pain is different from deep pain arising from peripheral limb structures. Conclusions This thesis addressed the question “what is different about spine pain?” Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic findings from studies in the last twenty years provide preliminary support for the thesis that deep spine pain is different from deep pain arising from peripheral limb structures.

  1. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-he; Wang, Zi-feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-tian; Zhang, Xiang-heng; Zhao, Yi-ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-gao; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor. Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable. PMID:26986119

  2. Splicing regulation of the Survival Motor Neuron genes and implications for treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bebee, Thomas W.; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2010-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. The reduced SMN levels are due to loss of the survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1) gene. Humans carry a nearly identical SMN2 gene that generates a truncated protein, due to a C to T nucleotide alteration in exon 7 that leads to inefficient RNA splicing of exon 7. This exclusion of SMN exon 7 is central to the onset of the SMA disease, however, this offers a unique ther...

  3. Management of Spinal Meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common spinal tumors encountered in adults, and account for 6.5% of all craniospinal tumors. The treatment for these lesions is primarily surgical, but emerging modalities may include chemotherapy and radiosurgery. In this article, the current management of spinal meningiomas and the body of literature surrounding conventional treatment is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. TDP-43 expression in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansorge Olaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redistribution of nuclear TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43 to the cytoplasm and ubiquitinated inclusions of spinal motor neurons and glial cells is characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS pathology. Recent evidence suggests that TDP-43 pathology is common to sporadic ALS and familial ALS without SOD1 mutation, but not SOD1-related fALS cases. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether TDP-43 abnormalities occur in non-ALS forms of motor neuron disease. Here, we characterise TDP-43 localisation, expression levels and post-translational modifications in mouse models of ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Results TDP-43 mislocalisation to ubiquitinated inclusions or cytoplasm was notably lacking in anterior horn cells from transgenic mutant SOD1G93A mice. In addition, abnormally phosphorylated or truncated TDP-43 species were not detected in fractionated ALS mouse spinal cord or brain. Despite partial colocalisation of TDP-43 with SMN, depletion of SMN- and coilin-positive Cajal bodies in motor neurons of affected SMA mice did not alter nuclear TDP-43 distribution, expression or biochemistry in spinal cords. Conclusion These results emphasise that TDP-43 pathology characteristic of human sporadic ALS is not a core component of the neurodegenerative mechanisms caused by SOD1 mutation or SMN deficiency in mouse models of ALS and SMA, respectively.

  5. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pimentel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco. A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars; bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. Results: A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103. There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Conclusion: There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  6. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Natalia Pimentel; Moreno, Renaldo Duarte; Sousa, Luciene Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco). A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars); bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103). There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  7. Level of local hypothermia and its extent of protection to spinal ischemic injury in rats%局部低温程度与大鼠脊髓缺血损伤保护的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁维; 刘宏志; 路磊; 唐娜

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Local hypothermia of the spinal cord protects against and lessens the secondary injury after the traumatic injury to the spinal cord, but whether the level of local hypothermia correlates with its extent of protection is still unclear.OBJECTIVE:To study the correlation between the extent of protection and the level of hypothermia in spinal ischemic injury in rats. DESIGN:Totally randomized controlled trials.SETTING AND SUBJECTS:This experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of the Third Division of General Surgery of China Medical University(CMU).Male Wistar rats were used in the trials.INTERVENTIONS:The spinal ischemic model of rats was prepared, and hyperthermic saline was perfused to the L5- L10 of subarachnoid cavity.The temperature of the spinal cord was maintained at four levels:38 ℃, 34 ℃, 30 ℃ and 18 ℃ ,and the proximal artery blood pressure was kept between 5.3 kPa to 6.6 kPa.The blockage time was 12 min and 16 min respectively.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The number of rats with paraplegia,the index of paraplegia and histological observations.RESULTS:The number of rats with paraplegia and the index of paraplegia decreased following the decreasing temperature.The number of rats with paraplegia was 6,3,0 and 0 respectively for groups of 38 ℃, 34 ℃, 30 ℃ and 18 ℃ after blockage was applied 12 min,and the number of rats with paraplegia was 8,6,5 and 0 after blockage was applied for 16 min. The index of paraplegia was 2,1,2,3 and 0 after it was blocked for 12 min in 38 ℃ group and 4,1,2,1 and 0 in 34 ℃ group. However, in group of 30 ℃ and 18℃ ,the index of paraplegia was 0;the index of paraplegia was 0, 0,1 and 4 after it was blocked for 16 min in 38 ℃ group,2,1,3 and 0 in 34 ℃ group and 4,2,2,0 and 0 in 30 ℃ group; however, the index of paraplegia was 0 in 18℃ group. The histological examination showed that with the lowering temperature, the spinal ischemic injury was lessened.CONCLUSION:Compared with light and moderate

  8. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, S M; Wrigley, P J; Youssef, A M; McIndoe, L; Wilcox, S L; Rae, C D; Edden, R A E; Siddall, P J; Henderson, L A

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry, and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury with 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content, and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Convulsant and Subconvulsant Doses of Norfloxacin in the Presence and Absence of Biphenylacetic Acid Alter Extracellular Hippocampal Glutamate but Not Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Conscious Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, I.; Gousseau, C.; Marchand, S.; Couet, W.; Ebinger, G.; Michotte, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAA receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  10. Caesarean section in a parturient with a spinal cord stimulator.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sommerfield, D

    2010-01-01

    A 35-year-old G2P1 parturient at 32 weeks of gestation with an implanted spinal cord stimulator was admitted for urgent caesarean section. Spinal anaesthesia was performed below the spinal cord stimulator leads at the L4-5 level, and a healthy female infant was delivered. A basic description of the technology and resulting implications for the parturient are discussed.

  11. Correlation of OPLL with spinal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Chul; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between spinal instability and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament(OPLL). Materials and Methods: In 70 patients(M:F=45:25, mean age=53 years) diagnosed as OPLL on the basis of surgical operation field findings and radiological evaluation [plain film(n=70), CT(n=64),MRI(n=55)], involved levels were the cervical spine(n=32), lumbar spine(n=23), and both the cervical and lumbar spine(n=15). Spinal instability was radiologically diagnosed as horizontal displacement of one vertebra by another of more than 3.5 mm, or a difference in rotation from either adjacent vertebra by more than 11 degree in lateral cervical spine and a difference of more than 1.5 mm from the posterior body margins to the point of intersection of two lines drawn parallel to the opposing segmental endplate in extension lateral lumbar spine. We divided OPLL into group I(continuous, segmental, mixed) and group II(retrodiscal), and compared spinal instability in these two groups. Results: In cervical OPLL, group I comprised 33 cases and group II 14. In group I, spinal instability was noted in 8/33 cases(24%) or 10/123 segments(8.1%). Spinal instability in group II, on the other hand, was found in 13/14 cases(93%) or 17/26 segments(65%). Ossification occurred at the retrodiscal level in 37 cases, byt in case was continuous. In group II, spinal instability was found in 25 of 37 cases(69%), oe in 29 of 55 segments(53%). Conclusion: Compared to other types of OPLL, the frequency of retrodiscal OPLL in association with spinal instability was high. Spinal instability may thus be the most important cause of retrodiscal OPLL.

  12. Thoracic Unilateral Spinal Cord Injury After Spinal Anaesthesia for Total Hip Replacement: Fate or Mistake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, Costa; Romualdo, Del Buono; Eugenio, Agrò Felice; Vittoradolfo, Tambone; Massimiliano, Vitali Andrea; Giovanna, Ricci

    2017-04-01

    Spinal anaesthesia is the most preffered anesthesia technique for total hip replacement, and its complications range from low entity (insignificant) to life threatening. The incidence of neurologic complications after neuraxial anaesthesia is not perfectly clear, although there are several described cases of spinal cord ischaemia. We present a case of unilateral T8-T11 spinal cord ischaemia following L2-L3 spinal anaesthesia for total hip replacement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hyperintense T8-T11 signal alteration on the leftside of paramedian spinal cord. A temporal epidemiologic linkage between the damage and the surgery seems to be present. The injury occurred without anatomical proximity between the injury site and the spinal needle entry site. This may be due to multiple contributing factors, each of them is probably not enough to determine the damage by itself; however, acting simultaneously, they could have been responsible for the complication. The result was unpredictable and unavoidable and was caused by unforeseeable circumstances and not by inadequate medical practice.

  13. Antidepressant Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy Unrelated to the Brain's Functional Network Connectivity alterations at an Individual Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Dong; Ji, Feng; Li, Gong-Ying; Lyu, Bo-Xuan; Hu, Wei; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can alleviate the symptoms of treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Functional network connectivity (FNC) is a newly developed method to investigate the brain's functional connectivity patterns. The first aim of this study was to investigate FNC alterations between TRD patients and healthy controls. The second aim was to explore the relationship between the ECT treatment response and pre-ECT treatment FNC alterations in individual TRD patients. Methods: This study included 82 TRD patients and 41 controls. Patients were screened at baseline and after 2 weeks of treatment with a combination of ECT and antidepressants. Group information guided-independent component analysis (GIG-ICA) was used to compute subject-specific functional networks (FNs). Grassmann manifold and step-wise forward component selection using support vector machines were adopted to perform the FNC measure and extract the functional networks' connectivity patterns (FCP). Pearson's correlation analysis was used to calculate the correlations between the FCP and ECT response. Results: A total of 82 TRD patients in the ECT group were successfully treated. On an average, 8.50 ± 2.00 ECT sessions were conducted. After ECT treatment, only 42 TRD patients had an improved response to ECT (the Hamilton scores reduction rate was more than 50%), response rate 51%. 8 FNs (anterior and posterior default mode network, bilateral frontoparietal network, audio network, visual network, dorsal attention network, and sensorimotor network) were obtained using GIG-ICA. We did not found that FCPs were significantly different between TRD patients and healthy controls. Moreover, the baseline FCP was unrelated to the ECT treatment response. Conclusions: The FNC was not significantly different between the TRD patients and healthy controls, and the baseline FCP was unrelated to the ECT treatment response. These findings will necessitate that we modify the experimental scheme to

  14. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Houlé, John D; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)(+) neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6-S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)(-) and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH(+) neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH(+) cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. 脊柱骨折伴高位截瘫合并气道高反应性患者的气道护理%Nursing of airway hyperreactivity patients with spinal fracture complicated by high- level paraplegia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢娟

    2012-01-01

    目的 探索脊柱骨折伴高位截瘫合并气道高反应性患者气道的有效护理方法.方法 密切观察呼吸的频率、节律、幅度等情况,保持呼吸道通畅,加强气道湿化,保持正态通气方式,维持机体有效循环,保证体内血氧处于正常状态.结果 患者好转出院16例,因家庭因素及经济原因自动出院3例.结论 患有气道高反应性的脊柱骨折伴高位截瘫的患者,应加强气道湿化,保持呼吸道通畅,保持正态通气方式,能保证机体血氧处于正常状态,促进患者早日康复.%Objective To investigate the nursing of airway hyperreactivity patients with spinal fracture complicated by high - level paraplegia. Methods The breath frequency, rhythm and amplitude were closely observed, the respiratory tract was kept open, the tract humidity was increased, the ventilation mode was set postive, the blood circulation was maintained and the oxy-genationwas kept normal. Results Sixteen patients were discharged with recovery, and 3 patients left hospital voluntarily because of their family and financial problems. Conclusion For airway hyperreactivity patients with spinal fracture complicated by high-level paraplegia, we should kept patients' respiratory tract open, increased the tract humidity, set positive ventilation mode, and maintained blood circulation to keep normal oxygenation level.

  16. Neuropathies of spinal cord development in rat pups maternally fed with fried potato chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelalim A. Gad-Allah

    2013-08-01

    Results: Comparing with acrylamide-treatment, protein expression in spinal cord of pups maternally fed with fried potatoes was altered. Necrosis of motor neuronal cells within grey matter, hyperplasia of ependymal lining cells and fragility of white matter was detected. At ultrastructural level, the sensory and motor neuronal cells showed convoluted nuclear envelope and either chromatolysis or compacted chromatin material. Fragmentation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and damage of mitochondria become well evident in pups maternally fed with potato chips. The neuronal axons possessed vacuolation and demyelination associated with apparent damage of mitochondria. Conclusion: Supplementation of fried potato chips exerted neurotoxicity either directly through their content of acrylamide or via its metabolite glycidamide. Both components were reported to find their way across the placenta during gestation and breast milk during the lactation period, interfering with spinal cord differentiation and adversely affected demyelination. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(4.000: 285-292

  17. Norfloxacin-Induced Electroencephalogram Alteration and Seizures in Rats Are Not Triggered by Enhanced Levels of Intracerebral Glutamate†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenel, Marylore; Limosin, Anne; Marchand, Sandrine; Paquereau, Joël; Mimoz, Olivier; Couet, William

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the electroencephalogram (EEG) effect was combined with intracerebral glutamate determinations using microdialysis for rats receiving norfloxacin intravenously (150 mg/kg of body weight). The EEG effect (accompanied by tremors and seizures) was consistently observed without glutamate level modifications. Therefore, norfloxacin-inducted seizures are not triggered by intracerebral glutamate level enhancement. PMID:14576142

  18. [Sexual dysfunction in men with spinal injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stien, Ragnar

    2008-02-14

    Spinal injuries may disturb men's sexual functions in various ways. Review article based on extensive clinical experience, lecturing, research and selected articles. A spinal injury may disrupt or disturb the connection between the brain's main centres for sexual function to the genitals. This often leads to extensive problems with erection, ejaculation, orgasm and fertility. Hormonal affection of sexuality is not much altered. Libido problems are of a more psychological nature, such as a poor self-esteem and lack of understanding from the surroundings. Sedative effects of medicines affect all aspects of sexuality. About 80% of men with spinal injuries have erection problems; mainly erection of short duration that can be treated with medicines administered orally (such as phosphodiesterase inhibitors) or by self injection of alpha-adrenergic inhibitors directly into the sinusoids in the penis. Only 10-15% ejaculate spontaneously. Ejaculation may be assisted in various ways, the vibro-ejaculation method being the most effective. The semen quality is reduced, possibly because of altered neurogen control of sperm maturation. Modern techniques for in vitro fertilisation combined with assisted ejaculation and careful control of the semen quality, has made it possible for most spinal-injured men to have their own children.

  19. Pharmacological profiles of alpha 2 adrenergic receptor agonists identified using genetically altered mice and isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Stone, Laura S; Wilcox, George L

    2009-08-01

    Endogenous, descending noradrenergic fibers impose analgesic control over spinal afferent circuitry mediating the rostrad transmission of pain signals. These fibers target alpha 2 adrenergic receptors (alpha(2)ARs) on both primary afferent terminals and secondary neurons, and their activation mediates substantial inhibitory control over this transmission, rivaling that of opioid receptors which share a similar pattern of distribution. The terminals of primary afferent nociceptive neurons and secondary spinal dorsal horn neurons express alpha(2A)AR and alpha(2C)AR subtypes, respectively. Spinal delivery of these agents serves to reduce their side effects, which are mediated largely at supraspinal sites, by concentrating the drugs at the spinal level. Targeting these spinal alpha(2)ARs with one of five selective therapeutic agonists, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, brimonidine, ST91 and moxonidine, produces significant antinociception that can work in concert with opioid agonists to yield synergistic antinociception. Application of several genetically altered mouse lines had facilitated identification of the primary receptor subtypes that likely mediate the antinociceptive effects of these agents. This review provides first an anatomical description of the localization of the three subtypes in the central nervous system, second a detailed account of the pharmacological history of each of the six primary agonists, and finally a comprehensive report of the specific interactions of other GPCR agonists with each of the six principal alpha(2)AR agonists featured.

  20. Epigallocatechin gallate induces a hepatospecific decrease in the CYP3A expression level by altering intestinal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Ogawa, Sosuke; Hirobe, Ryuta; Kon, Risako; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Yamashita, Marin; Mizukami, Nanaho; Kaneko, Miho; Wakui, Nobuyuki; Machida, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2017-03-30

    In previous studies, we showed that a high-dose intake of green tea polyphenol (GP) induced a hepatospecific decrease in the expression and activity of the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). In this study, we examined whether this decrease in CYP3A expression is induced by epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is the main component of GP. After a diet containing 1.5% EGCG was given to mice, the hepatic CYP3A expression was measured. The level of intestinal bacteria of Clostridium spp., the concentration of lithocholic acid (LCA) in the feces, and the level of the translocation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) to the nucleus in the liver were examined. A decrease in the CYP3A expression level was observed beginning on the second day of the treatment with EGCG. The level of translocation of PXR to the nucleus was significantly lower in the EGCG group. The fecal level of LCA was clearly decreased by the EGCG treatment. The level of intestinal bacteria of Clostridium spp. was also decreased by the EGCG treatment. It is clear that the hepatospecific decrease in the CYP3A expression level observed after a high-dose intake of GP was caused by EGCG. Because EGCG, which is not absorbed from the intestine, causes a decrease in the level of LCA-producing bacteria in the colon, the level of LCA in the liver decreases, resulting in a decrease in the nuclear translocation of PXR, which in turn leads to the observed decrease in the expression level of CYP3A. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chondrolectin affects cell survival and neuronal outgrowth in in vitro and in vivo models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, James N; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Oliver, Peter L; Biba, Angeliki; Becker, Thomas; Davies, Kay E; Becker, Catherina G; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by the selective loss of spinal motor neurons owing to reduced levels of survival motor neuron (Smn) protein. In addition to its well-established role in assembling constituents of the spliceosome, diverse cellular functions have been proposed for Smn, but the reason why low levels of this widely expressed protein result in selective motor neuron pathology is still debated. In longitudinal studies of exon-level changes in SMA mouse model tissues, designed to determine the contribution of splicing dysfunction to the disease, we have previously shown that a generalized defect in splicing is unlikely to play a causative role in SMA. Nevertheless, we identified a small subset of genes that were alternatively spliced in the spinal cord compared with control mice before symptom onset, indicating a possible mechanistic role in disease. Here, we have performed functional studies of one of these genes, chondrolectin (Chodl), known to be highly expressed in motor neurons and important for correct motor axon outgrowth in zebrafish. Using in vitro and in vivo models of SMA, we demonstrate altered expression of Chodl in SMA mouse spinal motor neurons, show that Chodl has distinct effects on cell survival and neurite outgrowth and that increasing the expression of chodl can rescue motor neuron outgrowth defects in Smn-depleted zebrafish. Our findings thus link the dysregulation of Chodl to the pathophysiology of motor neuron degeneration in SMA.

  2. Alterations at the cross-bridge level are associated with a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gineste, Charlotte; Ottenheijm, Coen; Le Fur, Yann; Banzet, Sébastien; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J; Koulmann, Nathalie; Hardeman, Edna C; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding α-tropomyosin slow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8-9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occurring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo.

  3. Alterations at the cross-bridge level are associated with a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Gineste

    Full Text Available Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg was identified in the gene encoding α-tropomyosin slow gene (TPM3. Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8-9 month-old Tg(TPM3Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occurring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo.

  4. Spinal arteriography: a primer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A KUMPE

    2005-01-01

    Spinal arteriography is an esoteric procedure that is seldom performed by peripheral interventionalists. This presentation is intended to outline some of the essential points that the interventionalist performing the procedure should be aware of, especially about spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae (SDAVF).

  5. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  6. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school...

  7. Economic evaluation comparing intraoperative cone beam CT-based navigation and conventional fluoroscopy for the placement of spinal pedicle screws: a patient-level data cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Nicolas; Fisher, Charles G; Batke, Juliet; Strelzow, Jason; Mendelsohn, Daniel; Paquette, Scott J; Kwon, Brian K; Boyd, Michael D; Dvorak, Marcel F S; Street, John T

    2016-01-01

    Pedicle screws are routinely used in contemporary spinal surgery. Screw misplacement may be asymptomatic but is also correlated with potential adverse events. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) has been associated with improved screw placement accuracy rates. However, this technology has substantial acquisition and maintenance costs. Despite its increasing usage, no rigorous full economic evaluation comparing this technology to current standard of care has been reported. Medical costs are exploding in an unsustainable way. Health economic theory requires that medical equipment costs be compared with expected benefits. To answer this question for computer-assisted spinal surgery, we present an economic evaluation looking specifically at symptomatic misplaced screws leading to reoperation secondary to neurologic deficits or biomechanical concerns. The study design was an observational case-control study from prospectively collected data of consecutive patients treated with the aid of CAS (treatment group) compared with a matched historical cohort of patients treated with conventional fluoroscopy (control group). The patient sample consisted of consecutive patients treated surgically at a quaternary academic center. The primary effectiveness measure studied was the number of reoperations for misplaced screws within 1 year of the index surgery. Secondary outcome measures included were total adverse event rate and postoperative computed tomography usage for pedicle screw examination. A patient-level data cost-effectiveness analysis from the hospital perspective was conducted to determine the value of a navigation system coupled with intraoperative 3-D imaging (O-arm Imaging and the StealthStation S7 Navigation Systems, Medtronic, Louisville, CO, USA) in adult spinal surgery. The capital costs for both alternatives were reported as equivalent annual costs based on the annuitization of capital expenditures method using a 3% discount rate and a 7-year amortization period

  8. Association of Parkinson's disease with altered serum levels of lead and transition metals among South Indian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumudini, Nadella; Uma, Addepally; Devi, Yalavarthy Prameela; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Mridula, Rukmini; Borgohain, Rupam; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have suggested an association between the Parkinson's disease (PD) and exposure to heavy metals, such as lead, iron, copper, manganese, etc. A growing body of evidence suggests that heavy metals stimulate free radical formation in the brain and can lead to neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated whether such association exists in PD cases from rural and urban areas in our study population. The plasma levels of copper, iron, manganese and lead in PD cases (n = 150) and controls (n = 170) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and correlated with the oxidative stress markers like malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl and total glutathione. Results indicated significant increase in the levels of copper (17.73 +/- 4.48 vs. 13.0 + 3.22 ng/ml) and iron (554.4 +/- 123.8 vs. 421.7 +/- 126.1 ng/ml) in PD cases compared to controls, whereas no significant differences in the levels of manganese and lead were observed. Further, the data based on urban or rural residence showed that plasma copper, iron, manganese levels were comparatively higher in rural subjects, whereas plasma lead levels were significantly higher in urban subjects. Increased plasma iron showed positive correlation with marker of lipid peroxidation (MDA), suggesting that increased iron levels induced oxidative stress in PD. These results substantiated the earlier observations about the role of environmental exposure and metal-induced oxidative stress in the etiology of PD.

  9. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases; Bildgebende Verfahren bei spinalen Infektionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O. [Staedtisches Krankenhaus Muenchen-Bogenhausen (Germany). Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Nuklearmedizin

    2001-11-01

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.) [German] Die klinische und laborgebundene Diagnostik spinaler Infektionskrankheiten bedarf der Ergaenzung durch die Befunde der bildgebenden Verfahren, um eine gezielte und effiziente Behandlung zu ermoeglichen. Nur die Bildgebung liefert die erforderlichen Zusatzinformationen ueber die exakte Topographie, die Ausdehnung, die Brisanz und die Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Infektionsherde. Insbesondere ist die weichgewebesensitive MRT geeignet, infektioese Veraenderungen im Knochenmark der Wirbelsaeule, in den Bandscheiben, im Bereich der Rueckenmarkshaeute und im Rueckenmark selbst aufzuspueren. Neben relevanten klinischen Aspekten werden die Leitkriterien der Bildgebung typischer spinaler Infektionskrankheiten hervorgehoben und anhand eigener Faelle demonstriert. Hierbei werden die pyogene, die granulomatoese und die postoperative Spondylodiszitis, der epidurale Abszess, die spinale Meningitis und die infektioese Myelitis beruecksichtigt. Die Bedeutung kontrastmittelverstaerkter MR-Aufnahmen wird betont. (orig.)

  10. Microbial communities on seafloor basalts at Dorado Outcrop reflect level of alteration and highlight global lithic clades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Areas of exposed basalt along mid-ocean ridges and at seafloor outcrops serve as conduits of fluid flux into and out of a subsurface ocean, and microbe-mineral interactions can influence alteration reactions at the rock-water interface. Located on the eastern flank of the East Pacific Rise, Dorado Outcrop is a site of low-temperature (<20°C hydrothermal venting and represents a new end-member in the current survey of seafloor basalt biomes. Consistent with prior studies, a survey of 16S rRNA gene sequence diversity using universal primers targeting the V4 hypervariable region revealed much greater richness and diversity on seafloor rocks than in surrounding seawater. Overall, Gamma-, Alpha-, and Deltaproteobacteria, and Thaumarchaeota dominated the sequenced communities, together making up over half of the observed diversity, though bacterial sequences were more abundant than archaeal in all samples. The most abundant bacterial reads were closely related to the obligate chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing Thioprofundum lithotrophicum, suggesting carbon and sulfur cycling as dominant metabolic pathways in this system. Representatives of Thaumarchaeota were detected in relatively high abundance on the basalts in comparison to bottom water, possibly indicating ammonia oxidation. In comparison to other sequence datasets from globally distributed seafloor basalts, this study reveals many overlapping and cosmopolitan phylogenetic groups and also suggests that substrate age correlates with community structure.

  11. Three-year follow-up of an implanted functional electrical stimulation system for upright mobility in a child with a thoracic level spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Randal R; Johnston, Therese E; Smith, Brian T; Mulcahey, M J; McCarthy, James J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system with the use of knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFO) for upright mobility over a 3-year period in a child with a spinal cord injury (SCI). A 13-year-old boy with a T8 complete SCI received a lower extremity implanted FES system. Electrodes were implanted for knee extension and for hip extension, abduction, and adduction. After training and at annual intervals, independence and timeliness in completing 7 upright mobility activities with FES and KAFO, as well as stimulated muscle strength, were assessed. Results have shown that FES provided independence equal to that of KAFO for all activities. Four activities were accomplished more quickly with FES, including donning the system, reaching a high object, transferring to a high surface, and walking 6 m. A floor-to-stand transfer was faster with KAFO. Functional results and stimulated muscle strength have remained stable over the 3-year period. The results indicate that FES can provide function equal to or faster than KAFO in a child with a T8 complete SCI and that performance with the FES system can remain stable for at least 3 years.

  12. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  13. Large spinal intraosseous arteriovenous fistula: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-04-01

    Here the authors report the case of a fresh vertebral body fracture with a large spinal intraosseous arteriovenous fistula (AVF). A 74-year-old woman started to experience low-back pain following a rear-end car collision. Plain radiography showed diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Sagittal CT sections revealed a transverse fracture of the L-4 vertebral body with a bone defect. Sagittal fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI revealed a flow void in the fractured vertebra. Spinal angiography revealed an intraosseous AVF with a feeder from the right L-4 segmental artery. A fresh fracture of the L-4 vertebral body with a spinal intraosseous AVF was diagnosed. Observation of a flow void in the vertebral body on fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI was important for the diagnosis of the spinal intraosseous AVF. Because conservative treatment was ineffective, surgery was undertaken. The day before surgery, embolization through the right L-4 segmental artery was performed using 2 coils to achieve AVF closure. Posterolateral fusion with instrumentation at the T12-S2 vertebral levels was performed without L-4 vertebroplasty. The spinal intraosseous AVF had disappeared after 4 months. At 24 months after surgery, the bone defect was completely replaced by bone and the patient experienced no limitations in daily activities. Given their experience with the present case, the authors believe that performing vertebroplasty or anterior reconstruction may not be necessary in treating spinal intraosseous AVF.

  14. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the behaviour, physiology and stress protein levels of desert locusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Shepherd, Sebastian; Sharkh, Suleiman; Jackson, Christopher W; Newland, Philip L

    2016-11-03

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are present throughout the modern world and are derived from many man-made sources including overhead transmission lines. The risks of extremely-low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are particularly poorly understood especially at high field strengths as they are rarely encountered at ground level. Flying insects, however, can approach close to high field strength transmission lines prompting the question as to how these high levels of exposure affect behaviour and physiology. Here we utilise the accessible nervous system of the locust to ask how exposure to high levels of ELF EMF impact at multiple levels. We show that exposure to ELF EMFs above 4 mT leads to reduced walking. Moreover, intracellular recordings from an identified motor neuron, the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron, show increased spike latency and a broadening of its spike in exposed animals. In addition, hind leg kick force, produced by stimulating the extensor tibiae muscle, was reduced following exposure, while stress-protein levels (Hsp70) increased. Together these results suggest that ELF EMF exposure has the capacity to cause dramatic effects from behaviour to physiology and protein expression, and this study lays the foundation to explore the ecological significance of these effects in other flying insects.

  15. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  16. Ketamine alters behavior and decreases BDNF levels in the rat brain as a function of time after drug administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane B. Fraga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate behavioral changes and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in rats subjected to ketamine administration (25 mg/kg for 7 days. Method: Behavioral evaluation was undertaken at 1 and 6 hours after the last injection. Results: We observed hyperlocomotion 1 hour after the last injection and a decrease in locomotion after 6 hours. Immobility time was decreased and climbing time was increased 6 hours after the last injection. BDNF levels were decreased in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala when rats were killed 6 hours after the last injection, compared to the saline group and to rats killed 1 hour after the last injection. BDNF levels in the striatum were decreased in rats killed 6 hours after the last ketamine injection, and BDNF levels in the hippocampus were decreased in the groups that were killed 1 and 6 hours after the last injection. Conclusion: These results suggest that the effects of ketamine on behavior and BDNF levels are related to the time at which they were evaluated after administration of the drug.

  17. Epidemiologic evidence of spinal cord injury in Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegan Sridharan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal cord injury is a fearsome disability leading to increased rate of morbidity and mortality. Information about the incidence of spinal cord injury may provide support for the healthcare advancements. The aim of the present study is to investigate the epidemiology of spinal cord injury. Methods: The present study was carried out in Rajiv Gandhi government general hospital, Chennai, India. The study design was approved by the institutional human ethical committee. Questionnaire was used to collect the information from the patients in a prospective manner. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scoring systems was used to evaluate the severity of spinal cord injury. Results: A total of 245 cases of spinal injury were studied. Among them, 88 % (n=216 were male and 12% (n=29 were female. Spinal cord injuries of falls from height were prominent over the road traffic accident. Cervical level injuries are widespread in males and dorsal level Injuries are common in females. Conclusion: Hence awareness of the spinal cord injury and availability of healthcare facilities may minimise the consequences of spinal cord injury. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 220-223

  18. MRI study on spinal canal content in Western Maharashtrian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanapurkar SV, Kulkarni DO, Bahetee BH, Vahane MI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the spinal canal content has been studied since the invention of myelography. However, most studies have measured the diameters of the spinal cord only, not the size of the subarachnoid space. The present study complements the current data on the morphology of the spinal contents, and in particular, the spinal subarachnoid space, by analyzing MRI images. Objective: To study morphology of the dural sac, spinal cord & subarachnoid space using MRI. To define the inner geometrical dimensions of spinal canal content that confine the maneuver of an endoscope inserted in cervical spine. 3. To have comprehensive knowledge of the anatomy of cervical spinal canal. Method: Based on MRI images of the spine from 60 normal patients of age between 25-60 years, the dimensions of spinal cord, dural sac & subarachnoid space were measured at mid-vertebral & intervertebral level from C1-C7 vertebrae. The parameters measured were transverse, sagittal diameter of spinal cord & dural sac. The subarachnoid space was measured as anterior, posterior, right, left distance between spinal cord and dura mater. Results: It was found that at each selected transverse level, the subarachnoid space tends to be symmetrical on the right and left sides of the cord, and measures 3.38 mm on an average. However, the anterior and posterior segment, measured on the mid-sagittal plane are generally asymmetric & varies greatly in size ranging 1mm to 6mm with mean 2.57 of anterior & 2.59 of posterior. These measurements match those found in previous studies. The coefficient of variance for the dimensions of the subarachnoid space is as high as 36.16%, while that for the dimensions of the spinal cord (transverse & sagittal are11.08%&13.28%respectively. Conclusion: The findings presented here, expand our knowledge of morphology of spinal canal and show that a thecaloscope must be smaller than 3.38 mm in diameter.

  19. Perioperative prostate specific antigen levels among coronary artery bypass grafting patients: Does extracorporeal circulation and body temperature induce prostate specific antigen levels alterations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patris, Emmanuel; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Patris, Vasileios; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Argiriou, Mihalis; Charitos, Christos; Kalaitzis, Christos; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the perioperative total prostate specific antigen (tPSA) levels among coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC), to investigate the changes overtime of tPSA in each group separately and to determine the effect of body core temperature on tPSA levels. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted. Our sample was allocated to: (a) Seven patients who underwent off pump CABG (Group I) and (b) 16 CABG patients with ECC (Group II). The levels of tPSA were measured preoperatively (baseline), intra-operatively and at the 4th postoperative day. We compared the two groups on their tPSA levels and we investigated the changes of tPSA overtime in each group separately. Results: Intra-operative serum samples were obtained in significantly lower body temperature in patients of Group II than in those of Group I (31°C vs. 36.9°C, P < 0.001). In each group separately, postoperative tPSA levels were increased significantly compared to the baseline values (2.55 ng/ml vs. 0.39 ng/ml for Group I, P = 0.005 and 4.36 ng/ml vs. 0.77 for Group II, P < 0.001). CABG patients with ECC had significantly lower intra-operative tPSA levels than the baseline values (0.67 ng/ml vs. 0.77 ng/ml, P = 0.008). We did not observe significant differences of tPSA levels between the two groups. Conclusions: CABG surgery affects similarly the perioperative tPSA independently the involvement of ECC. Although all patients had significantly higher early postoperative tPSA levels, only those who underwent CABG with ECC had exceeded normal values and significantly decreased intra-operative tPSA. Hypothermia seems to be the causal factor of tPSA reduction. PMID:25657546

  20. Bisphenol A alters transcript levels of biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder in vascular endothelial cells and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H Sofia; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is capable of mimicking endogenous hormones with potential consequences for human health and BPA exposure has been associated with several human diseases including neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) results show that BPA at low concentrations (10 ng/mL and 1 μg/mL) induces differential transcript levels of four biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). These results substantiate increasing concerns of BPA exposure in levels currently detected in humans.

  1. Long-term exposure to xenoestrogens alters some brain monoamines and both serum thyroid hormones and cortisol levels in adult male rats

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    Nashwa M. Saied

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to examine the effect of long-term treatment with the phytoestrogen soy isoflavone [(SIF; 43 mg/kg body weight/day] and/or the plastics component bisphenol-A [(BPA; 3 mg/kg body weight/day] on some monoamines in the forebrain and both serum thyroid hormones and cortisol levels of adult rats. Significant increases in serotonin (5-HT and norepinephrine (NE level, and significant decreases in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA level and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio, were observed after treatment with SIF or BPA. Level of dopamine (DA was increased in SIF-treated group and decreased in BPA-treated group. Activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO was decreased in all treated groups. The level of serum thyroid hormones (fT3 and fT4 was increased after treatment with SIF and decreased after exposure to BPA, while cortisol level was increased in all treated groups. It may be concluded that long-term exposure to SIF or BPA disrupts monoamine levels in the forebrain of adult rats through alteration in the metabolic pathways of amines and disorders of thyroid hormones and cortisol levels.

  2. Microbiology and epidemiology of infectious spinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Se-Jin; Choi, Seung-Won; Youm, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Ha, Ho-Gyun; Yi, Jin-Seok

    2014-07-01

    Infectious spinal disease is regarded as an infection by a specific organism that affects the vertebral body, intervertebral disc and adjacent perivertebral soft tissue. Its incidence seems to be increasing as a result of larger proportion of the older patients with chronic debilitating disease, the rise of intravenous drug abuser, and the increase in spinal procedure and surgery. In Korea, studies assessing infectious spinal disease are rare and have not been addressed in recent times. The objectives of this study are to describe the epidemiology of all kind of spinal infectious disease and their clinical and microbiological characteristics as well as to assess the diagnostic methodology and the parameters related to the outcomes. A retrospective study was performed in all infectious spinal disease cases presenting from January 2005 to April 2010 to three tertiary teaching hospitals within a city of 1.5 million in Korea. Patient demographics, risk factors, clinical features, and outcomes were assessed. Risk factors entailed the presence of diabetes, chronic renal failure, liver cirrhosis, immunosuppressants, remote infection, underlying malignancy and previous spinal surgery or procedure. We comparatively analyzed the results between the groups of pyogenic and tuberculous spinal infection. SPSS version 14 statistical software was used to perform the analyses of the data. The threshold for statistical significance was established at pTSI) and pyogenic spinal infection (PSI) entailed 20 (21.7%) and 72 (78.3%) cases, respectively. A previous spinal surgery or procedure was the most commonly noted risk factor (39.1%), followed by diabetes (15.2%). The occurrence of both pyogenic and tuberculous spondylitis was predominant in the lumbar spine. Discs are more easily invaded in PSI. At initial presentation, white cell blood count and C-reactive protein levels were higher in PSI compared to TSI (p1.5% of pyogenic spondylitis and in 35.0% of tuberculous spondylitis cases

  3. Histopathological alterations of juvenile green (Acipenser medirostris) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) exposed to graded levels of dietary methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Jae-Won; De Riu, Nicola; Moniello, Giuseppe; Hung, Silas S O

    2012-03-01

    Triplicate groups of juvenile green and white sturgeon (average weight of 30 ± 2 g) were exposed to one of four concentrations of dietary methylmercury (MeHg; 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg MeHg/kg diet) for 8 weeks to determine and compare the sensitivity of the two sturgeon species from a histopathological perspective. After 4- and 8-week exposure, histological changes were examined in the kidney, liver, gill, skeletal muscle, and heart muscle of both species using light microscopy. Marked abnormalities were observed in the kidney and liver of both sturgeon species after each exposure period; the abnormalities showed progressive histological alterations in severity with increasing doses and duration of exposure. Renal lesions included tubular epithelium degeneration and necrosis, renal corpuscular disintegration, and interstitial tissue degeneration. The changes observed in the livers of both sturgeon species were glycogen depletion and vacuolar degeneration. In the gill and skeletal and heart muscle of green and white sturgeon fed MeHg-added diets, mild histological changes were observed but did not show pronounced difference between the two species. Although the lowest observed effect concentration in both species was the 25 mg MeHg/kg diet, the histological changes in the kidney and liver were more pronounced at all treatments groups of green sturgeon than those of white sturgeon. The current results on structural changes of kidney and liver (i.e., more severe glycogen depletion and tubular epithelium degeneration in green sturgeon) confirmed our previous results, in that green sturgeon exhibited a higher mortality, lower growth rate, and lower protein, lipid, and energy contents in their whole body than white sturgeon under the same MeHg exposures.

  4. Alteration of TEAD1 expression levels confers apoptotic resistance through the transcriptional up-regulation of Livin.

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    André Landin Malt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TEA domain (TEAD proteins are highly conserved transcription factors involved in embryonic development and differentiation of various tissues. More recently, emerging evidences for a contribution of these proteins towards apoptosis and cell proliferation regulation have also been proposed. These effects appear to be mediated by the interaction between TEAD and its co-activator Yes-Associated Protein (YAP, the downstream effector of the Hippo tumour suppressor pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We further investigated the mechanisms underlying TEAD-mediated apoptosis regulation and showed that overexpression or RNAi-mediated silencing of the TEAD1 protein is sufficient to protect mammalian cell lines from induced apoptosis, suggesting a proapoptotic function for TEAD1 and a non physiological cytoprotective effect for overexpressed TEAD1. Moreover we show that the apoptotic resistance conferred by altered TEAD1 expression is mediated by the transcriptional up-regulation of Livin, a member of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP family. In addition, we show that overexpression of a repressive form of TEAD1 can induce Livin up-regulation, indicating that the effect of TEAD1 on Livin expression is indirect and favoring a model in which TEAD1 activates a repressor of Livin by interacting with a limiting cofactor that gets titrated upon TEAD1 up-regulation. Interestingly, we show that overexpression of a mutated form of TEAD1 (Y421H implicated in Sveinsson's chorioretinal atrophy that strongly reduces its interaction with YAP as well as its activation, can induce Livin expression and protect cells from induced apoptosis, suggesting that YAP is not the cofactor involved in this process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together our data reveal a new, Livin-dependent, apoptotic role for TEAD1 in mammals and provide mechanistic insight downstream of TEAD1 deregulation in cancers.

  5. Primary Dural Spinal Lymphoma Presentation of a Rare Spinal Tumor Case

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    Dilber Ayçiçek Çeçen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary spinal dural lymphomas (PSDL are tumors with characteristic histopathology of a lymphoma, which are completely in the spinal epidural space without any other systemic involvement. Extranodal primary lymphoma involving nervous system prefers thalamus/basal ganglia, periventricular region, cerebellum, eyes, meninges/dura, and cranial nerves or spinal cord. Rare spinal localization with acute spinal cord compression is worth attention. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old male presented with a several-month-long history of upper back pain. Lately, he had numbness and weakness at both lower extremities and was unable to walk for one week. A spinal MRI showed a thoracic lesion with cord compression at T2–T4 levels. The patient underwent surgical decompression, with his final histopathology showing diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Systemic work-up was negative for nodal disease. Following surgery, he received radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. He experienced a good outcome after four years. Conclusion. The upper thoracic cord is a rare location for primary spinal lesions/metastases, both of which prefer the lower thoracic and upper lumbar regions. In cases of progressive paraparesis, there should be immediate surgical intervention in the case of denovo disease, followed by combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy procedures.

  6. Altered Circulating Levels of Serotonin and Immunological Changes in Laying Hens Divergently Selected for Feather Pecking Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Kjaer, Jørgen B.; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in immunological parameters as well as changes with respect to plasma levels of serotonin and tryptophan in lines selected for and against feather pecking (FP) behavior [high FP (HP) line and low FP (LP) line] for 5 generations. The hens from...

  7. Potential Association of Lead Exposure During Early Development of Mice With Alteration of Hippocampus Nitric Oxide Levels and Learning Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI SUN; ZHENG-YAN ZHAO; JIAN HU; XIE-LAI ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Objective Chronic lead (Pb) exposure during development is known to produce learning deficits. Nitric oxide participates in the synaptic mechanisms involved in certain forms of learning and memory. This study was designed to clarify whether Pb-induced impairment in learning and memory was associated with the changes of nitric oxide levels in mice brains.Methods Sixty Balb/c mice aged 10 days were chosen. A model of lead exposure was established by drinking 0.025%, 0.05%,0.075% lead acetate, respectively for 8 weeks. The controls were orally given distilled water. The ability to learn and memorize was examined by open field test, T-water maze test. In parallel with the behavioral data, NO level of hippocampus tissue was detected by biochemical assay. Results Compared with control groups, (1) the weight of 0.075% group was significantly reduced (P<0.05); (2) The number of times in mice attaining the required standards in T-water maze test was lower in 0.075%group (P<0.01). No significant difference was found between experimental and control groups in open field test (P>0.05); (3)NO level of mouse hippocampus tissue was decreased in 0.075% group (P<0.01). Conclusions The findings suggest that decreased hippocampus NO level may contribute to the Pb-induced deficits in learning and memory processes.

  8. Plasma trace elements levels are not altered by submaximal exercise intensities in well-trained endurance euhydrated athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Haro, Carlos; Soria, Marisol; López-Colón, José L; Llorente, María T; Escanero, Jesús F

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of relative exercise intensity on various plasma trace elements in euhydrated endurance athletes. Twenty-seven well-trained endurance athletes performed a cycloergometer test: after a warm-up of 10 min at 2.0 W kg⁻¹, workload increased by 0.5 W kg⁻¹ every 10 min until exhaustion. Oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration ([La⁻](b)), and plasma ions (Zn, Se, Mn and Co) were measured at rest, at the end of each stage, and 3, 5 and 7 min post-exercise. Urine specific gravity (U(SG)) was measured before and after the test, and subjects drank water ad libitum. Fat oxidation (FAT(OXR)), carbohydrate oxidation (CHO(OXR)), energy expenditure from fat (EE(FAT)), from carbohydrates (EE(CHO)) and total EE (EE(T)) were estimated using stoichiometric equations. A repeated measure (ANOVA) was used to compare plasma ion levels at each exercise intensity level. The significance level was set at Pathletes does not provoke a change in plasma trace element levels, suggesting that plasma volume plays an important role in the homeostasis of these elements during exercise.

  9. Altered Circulating Levels of Serotonin and Immunological Changes in Laying Hens Divergently Selected for Feather Pecking Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Kjaer, Jørgen B.; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in immunological parameters as well as changes with respect to plasma levels of serotonin and tryptophan in lines selected for and against feather pecking (FP) behavior [high FP (HP) line and low FP (LP) line] for 5 generations. The hens from...

  10. Sex Hormones in Allergic Conjunctivitis: Altered Levels of Circulating Androgens and Estrogens in Children and Adolescents with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sacchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC is a chronic allergic disease mainly affecting boys in prepubertal age and usually recovering after puberty. To evaluate a possible role of sex hormones in VKC, serum levels of sex hormones in children and adolescents with VKC were assessed. Methods. 12 prepubertal and 7 early pubertal boys with active VKC and 6 male patients with VKC in remission phase at late pubertal age and 48 healthy age and sex-matched subjects were included. Serum concentration of estrone, 17 beta-estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, total testosterone and free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT, cortisol, delta-4-androstenedione, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex-hormones binding globuline (SHBG were evaluated. Results. Serum levels of Estrone were significantly increased in all groups of patients with VKC when compared to healthy controls (P<0.001. Prepubertal and early pubertal VKC showed a significant decrease in DHT (P=0.007 and P=0.028, resp. and SHBG (P=0.01 and P=0.002, resp. when compared to controls and serum levels of SHBG were increased in late pubertal VKC in remission phase (P=0.007. Conclusions and Relevance. VKC patients have different circulating sex hormone levels in different phases of the disease and when compared to nonallergic subjects. These findings suggest a role played by sex hormones in the pathogenesis and/or activity of VKC.

  11. Sex Hormones in Allergic Conjunctivitis: Altered Levels of Circulating Androgens and Estrogens in Children and Adolescents with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Marta; Lambiase, Alessandro; Moretti, Costanzo; Bonini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a chronic allergic disease mainly affecting boys in prepubertal age and usually recovering after puberty. To evaluate a possible role of sex hormones in VKC, serum levels of sex hormones in children and adolescents with VKC were assessed. Methods. 12 prepubertal and 7 early pubertal boys with active VKC and 6 male patients with VKC in remission phase at late pubertal age and 48 healthy age and sex-matched subjects were included. Serum concentration of estrone, 17 beta-estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, total testosterone and free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), cortisol, delta-4-androstenedione, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex-hormones binding globuline (SHBG) were evaluated. Results. Serum levels of Estrone were significantly increased in all groups of patients with VKC when compared to healthy controls (P < 0.001). Prepubertal and early pubertal VKC showed a significant decrease in DHT (P = 0.007 and P = 0.028, resp.) and SHBG (P = 0.01 and P = 0.002, resp.) when compared to controls and serum levels of SHBG were increased in late pubertal VKC in remission phase (P = 0.007). Conclusions and Relevance. VKC patients have different circulating sex hormone levels in different phases of the disease and when compared to nonallergic subjects. These findings suggest a role played by sex hormones in the pathogenesis and/or activity of VKC. PMID:25756057

  12. Chronic stress induces structural alterations in splenic lymphoid tissue that are associated with changes in corticosterone levels in wistar-kyoto rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Martinez-Mota, Lucia; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Hernandez-Chan, Nancy G; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Streber, María L; Granados-Camacho, Ivonne; Becerril, Enrique; Javier, Baquera-Heredia; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily), chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight), mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone), or control treatment (without stress) for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp) in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress.

  13. Gelsolin-Cu/ZnSOD interaction alters intracellular reactive oxygen species levels to promote cancer cell invasion

    KAUST Repository

    Tochhawng, Lalchhandami

    2016-07-07

    The actin-binding protein, gelsolin, is a well known regulator of cancer cell invasion. However, the mechanisms by which gelsolin promotes invasion are not well established. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to promote cancer cell invasion, we investigated on the hypothesis that gelsolin-induced changes in ROS levels may mediate the invasive capacity of colon cancer cells. Herein, we show that increased gelsolin enhances the invasive capacity of colon cancer cells, and this is mediated via gelsolin\\'s effects in elevating intracellular superoxide (O2 .-) levels. We also provide evidence for a novel physical interaction between gelsolin and Cu/ZnSOD, that inhibits the enzymatic activity of Cu/ZnSOD, thereby resulting in a sustained elevation of intracellular O2 .-. Using microarray data of human colorectal cancer tissues from Gene Omnibus, we found that gelsolin gene expression positively correlates with urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), an important matrix-degrading protease invovled in cancer invasion. Consistent with the in vivo evidence, we show that increased levels of O2 .- induced by gelsolin overexpression triggers the secretion of uPA. We further observed reduction in invasion and intracellular O2 .- levels in colon cancer cells, as a consequence of gelsolin knockdown using two different siRNAs. In these cells, concurrent repression of Cu/ ZnSOD restored intracellular O2 .- levels and rescued invasive capacity. Our study therefore identified gelsolin as a novel regulator of intracellular O2 .- in cancer cells via interacting with Cu/ZnSOD and inhibiting its enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings provide insight into a novel function of gelsolin in promoting tumor invasion by directly impacting the cellular redox milieu.

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and inhaled steroids alter surfactant protein D (SP-D levels: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beers Michael F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D, an innate immune molecule, plays an important protective role during airway inflammation. Deficiency of this molecule induces emphysematous changes in murine lungs, but its significance in human COPD remains unclear. Methods We collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 20 subjects with varying degrees of COPD (8 former smokers and 12 current smokers and 15 asymptomatic healthy control subjects (5 never smokers, 3 remote former smokers, and 7 current smokers. All subjects underwent a complete medical history and pulmonary function testing. SP-D was measured by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric methods and multivariable linear regression for control of confounding. The effect of corticosteroid treatment on SP-D synthesis was studied in vitro using an established model of isolated type II alveolar epithelial cell culture. Results Among former smokers, those with COPD had significantly lower SP-D levels than healthy subjects (median 502 and 1067 ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.01. In a multivariable linear regression model controlling for age, sex, race, and pack-years of tobacco, COPD was independently associated with lower SP-D levels (model coefficient -539, p = 0.04 and inhaled corticosteroid use was independently associated with higher SP-D levels (398, p = 0.046. To support the hypothesis that corticosteroids increase SP-D production we used type II alveolar epithelial cells isolated from adult rat lungs. These cells responded to dexamethasone treatment by a significant increase of SP-D mRNA (p = 0.041 and protein (p = 0.037 production after 4 days of culture. Conclusion Among former smokers, COPD is associated with lower levels of SP-D and inhaled corticosteroid use is associated with higher levels of SP-D in the lung. Dexamethasone induced SP-D mRNA and protein expression in isolated epithelial cells in vitro. Given the importance of this

  15. The alteration of plasma TGF-β1 levels in patients with brain tumors after tumor removal

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    Joon-Khim Loh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF β1 may be a candidate for a serologic tumor marker. In this study, the plasma levels of TGF-β1 in patients with brain tumors were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before and after tumor removal. Patients were divided into four groups, the control group and the benign, malignant, and metastatic brain tumor groups. All brain tumor groups showed significant increases in the levels of TGF-β1 before tumor removal (6.36 ± 3.94, 17.0 ± 9.7, and 12.2 ± 10.3 ng/ml for the benign, malignant, and metastatic groups, respectively. When compared with the results obtained in the control group (1.12 ± 0.74 ng/ml, significant decreases in TGF-β1 concentrations after total tumor removal were found in both the benign and malignant brain tumor groups (2.55 ± 2.00 and 8.93 ± 5.73 ng/ml, respectively; p = 0.0001 and p = 0.003, respectively. On the other hand, plasma TGF-β1 levels in the metastatic brain tumor group showed a slight but significant increase (14.7 ± 9.3 ng/ml, p = 0.035 after tumor removal. In a case of low-grade astrocytoma, plasma levels of TGF-β1 were found to be 3.6 and 1.1 ng/ml before and after tumor removal, respectively. However, recurrent tumor was noted in this patient 7 months later, and the levels of TGF-β1 were 26.2 and 8.4 ng/ml before and after the second operation, respectively. The data show that plasma TGF-β1 was elevated in the circulation of patients with brain tumors and that significant decreases in TGF-β1 levels were observed after the removal of benign and malignant tumors. The results also suggest that TGF-β1 may be a useful serologic marker for brain tumors.

  16. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea); Sung, Ki Woong [Department of Paediatrics, Samsung Medical Centre, Seoul 135-710 (Korea)

    2003-11-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  17. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirshblum, S C; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Betz, R

    2014-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association...

  18. Identifying stimuli that alter immediate and subsequent levels of vocal stereotypy: a further analysis of functionally matched stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanovaz, Marc J; Fletcher, Sarah E; Rapp, John T

    2009-09-01

    We used a three-component multiple-schedule with a brief reversal design to evaluate the effects of structurally unmatched and matched stimuli on immediate and subsequent vocal stereotypy that was displayed by three children with autism spectrum disorders. For 2 of the 3 participants, access to matched stimuli, unmatched stimuli, and music decreased immediate levels of vocal stereotypy; however, with the exception of matched stimuli for one participant, none of the stimuli produced a clear abolishing operation for subsequent vocal stereotypy. That is, vocal stereotypy typically increased to baseline levels shortly after alternative stimulation was removed. Detection of motivating operations for each participant's vocal stereotypy was aided by the analysis of component distributions. The results are discussed in terms of immediate and subsequent effects of preferred stimuli on automatically reinforced problem behavior.

  19. Structural alterations of foreskin caused by chronic smoking may explain high levels of urethral reconstruction failure using foreskin flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. Rosado

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to perform a stereological and biochemical analysis of the foreskin of smoker subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Foreskin samples were obtained from 20 young adults (mean = 27.2 years old submitted to circumcision. Of the patients analyzed, one group (n = 10 had previous history of chronic smoking (a half pack to 3 packs per day for 3 to 13 years (mean = 5.8 ± 3.2. The control group included 10 nonsmoking patients. Masson's trichrome stain was used to quantify the foreskin vascular density. Weigert’s resorcin-fucsin stain was used to assess the elastic system fibers and Picrosirius red stain was applied to study the collagen. Stereological analysis was performed using the Image J software to determine the volumetric densities. For biochemical analysis, the total collagen was determined as µg of hydroxyproline per mg of dry tissue. Means were compared using the unpaired t-test (p < 0.05. RESULTS: Elastic system fibers of smokers was 42.5% higher than in the control group (p = 0.002. In contrast, smooth muscle fibers (p = 0.42 and vascular density (p = 0.16 did not show any significant variation. Qualitative analysis using Picrosirius red stain with polarized light evidenced the presence of type I and III collagen in the foreskin tissue, without significant difference between the groups. Total collagen concentration also did not differ significantly between smokers and non-smokers (73.1µg/mg ± 8.0 vs. 69.2µg/mg ± 5.9, respectively, p = 0.23. CONCLUSIONS: The foreskin tissue of smoking patients had a significant increase of elastic system fibers. Elastic fibers play an important role in this tissue’s turnover and this high concentration in smokers possibly causes high extensibility of the foreskin. The structural alterations in smokers’ foreskins could possibly explain the poor results in smoking patients submitted to foreskin fasciocutaneous flaps in urethral reconstruction surgery.

  20. Glutathione peroxidase 1 expression, malondialdehyde levels and histological alterations in the liver of Acrossocheilus fasciatus exposed to cadmium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Di; Sheng, Zhang; Wang, You-Fa; Han, Ying-Li; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jun-Quan

    2016-03-10

    Cadmium (Cd) is known as a widespread pollutant in aquatic environment. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is attributed to Cd exposure, which may affect the growth, development and physiological metabolism of aquatic organisms. In response to these unfavorable damages, antioxidant systems have been developed to protect against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of glutathione peroxidase 1 genes (GPx-1a and GPx-1b) in the liver of Acrossocheilus fasciatus after Cd administration. Total RNA extraction, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) were performed in order to clone the A. fasciatus GPx-1a and GPx-1b full-length cDNA sequences and partial fragment of β-actin cDNA from the liver for the first time. Tissue-specific expression analysis proved that GPx-1 genes were widely expressed in the liver, kidney, gill, testis, muscle, spleen, heart and brain. The changes of GPx-1 mRNA and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the liver treated with Cd were measured. In addition, the acute toxic effects of Cd on the microstructure of the liver were studied using light microscopy. These results suggest that GPx-1, MDA and liver histology which represent molecular, biochemical and histological levels, can be used as potential biomarkers to monitor Cd pollution. The overall findings also highlight the potential use of those three bio-indicators combined together as a multi-level tool (molecular, biochemical and histological levels) when monitoring Cd contamination and other possible exogenetic pollutants in aquatic environment.

  1. Intracellular GSH Alterations and Its Relationship to Level of Resistance following Exposure to Cisplatin in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jamali, Bardia; Nakhjavani, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Amidi, Salimeh; Nikounezhad, Nastaran; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    One of the major complications in cancer chemotherapy with cisplatin as one of the important medicines in treatment regimens of different cancers is the development of resistance. One of the most described cellular defense mechanisms involved in resistance is glutathione (GSH), thus in this study, the effects of cisplatin on the total intracellular GSH level (GSHi) in some sensitive and resistant variants of human cell lines (hepatocarcinoma HepG2, skin A375, cisplatin sensitive glioblastoma ...

  2. Histopathological alterations, biochemical responses and acetylcholinesterase levels in Clarias gariepinus as biomarkers of exposure to organophosphates pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, V F; Ladipo, M K; Aneyo, I A; Adeola, A; Odulele, W Y

    2016-05-01

    Organophosphate pesticides, commonly used in large scale farming, have been found to be major contaminants in aquatic environment. Clarias gariepinus was exposed to acute and sublethal concentrations of phostoxin and DD Force to evaluate single and joint action toxicity of the organophosphates. Effects of phostoxin and DD force on antioxidant enzymes, fish organs and acetylcholinesterase levels in fingerlings and juveniles of C. gariepinus were also investigated. The lethal concentrations (96 h LC50) for phostoxin and DD Force were 0.631 and 1.759 mg/l, respectively. The results obtained from the bioassay showed that phostoxin was 2.8× more toxic than DD Force after exposure of C. gariepinus. Joint action toxicity evaluations of phostoxin and DD Force showed that the interaction between the chemicals was synergistic (RTU >1). The biochemical responses in the exposed fish differed significantly (P < 0.05) from the control fish. The result of acetylcholinesterase study revealed significant difference between acetylcholinesterase levels in the exposed fish and control, with reduction in the acetylcholineterase level in fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of phostoxin and DD Force. Haematological studies revealed an increase in WBC, RBC, PCV and platelets in the exposed fish. Histopathology of the gills showed shortened primary lamellae, loss of secondary lamellae and loss of ceratobrachial bones. In the acute toxicity studies, respiratory stress, erratic swimming and instant death of fish were observed in the exposed fish. This study reveals that changes in histopathology and acetylcholinesterase level are good biomarkers and can be successfully used to detect exposure to organophosphates pesticides in fish.

  3. Alterations in the neuropeptide galanin system in major depressive disorder involve levels of transcripts, methylation, and peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Barde, Swapnali; Rüegg, Joelle; Prud'homme, Josée; EKSTRÖM, TOMAS J.; Palkovits, Miklos; Turecki, Gustavo; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Ihnatko, Robert; Theodorsson, Elvar; Juhasz, Gabriella; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Mechawar, Naguib; Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a substantial burden to patients, families, and society, but many patients cannot be treated adequately. Rodent experiments suggest that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) and its three G protein-coupled receptors, GAL(1-3), are involved in mood regulation. To explore the translational potential of these results, we assessed the transcript levels (by quantitative PCR), DNA methylation status (by bisulfite pyrosequencing), and GAL peptide by RIA of the GAL system...

  4. Alterations in the Anandamide Metabolism in the Development of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids (EC, particularly anandamide (AEA, released constitutively in pain pathways might be accountable for the inhibitory effect on nociceptors. Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain may reflect complex remodeling of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and spinal cord EC system. Multiple pathways involved both in the biosynthesis and degradation of AEA have been suggested. We investigated the local synthesis and degradation features of AEA in DRGs and spinal cord during the development and maintenance of pain in a model of chronic constriction injury (CCI. All AEA synthesis and degradation enzymes are present on the mRNA level in DRGs and lumbar spinal cord of intact as well as CCI-treated animals. Deregulation of EC system components was consistent with development of pain phenotype at days 3, 7, and 14 after CCI. The expression levels of enzymes involved in AEA degradation was significantly upregulated ipsilateral in DRGs and spinal cord at different time points. Expression of enzymes of the alternative, sPLA2-dependent and PLC-dependent, AEA synthesis pathways was elevated in both of the analyzed structures at all time points. Our data have shown an alteration of alternative AEA synthesis and degradation pathways, which might contribute to the variation of AEA levels and neuropathic pain development.

  5. The pch2Delta mutation in baker's yeast alters meiotic crossover levels and confers a defect in crossover interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zanders

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pch2 is a widely conserved protein that is required in baker's yeast for the organization of meiotic chromosome axes into specific domains. We provide four lines of evidence suggesting that it regulates the formation and distribution of crossover events required to promote chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. First, pch2Delta mutants display wild-type crossover levels on a small (III chromosome, but increased levels on larger (VII, VIII, XV chromosomes. Second, pch2Delta mutants show defects in crossover interference. Third, crossovers observed in pch2Delta require both Msh4-Msh5 and Mms4-Mus81 functions. Lastly, the pch2Delta mutation decreases spore viability and disrupts crossover interference in spo11 hypomorph strains that have reduced levels of meiosis-induced double-strand breaks. Based on these and previous observations, we propose a model in which Pch2 functions at an early step in crossover control to ensure that every homolog pair receives an obligate crossover.

  6. Intracellular GSH Alterations and Its Relationship to Level of Resistance following Exposure to Cisplatin in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Bardia; Nakhjavani, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Amidi, Salimeh; Nikounezhad, Nastaran; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    One of the major complications in cancer chemotherapy with cisplatin as one of the important medicines in treatment regimens of different cancers is the development of resistance. One of the most described cellular defense mechanisms involved in resistance is glutathione (GSH), thus in this study, the effects of cisplatin on the total intracellular GSH level (GSHi) in some sensitive and resistant variants of human cell lines (hepatocarcinoma HepG2, skin A375, cisplatin sensitive glioblastoma U373MG and cisplatin resistant glioblastoma U373MGCP, cisplatin sensitive ovary A2780S and cisplatin resistant A2780CP cells) were studied. MTT assay was performed to measure cytotoxicity of cisplatin (33.3 µM for 1 hour). Following cisplatin exposure, GSHi (per million cells) was evaluated using a photometrical assay up to 90 minutes. Our results indicate that there are significant differences between GSHi content of A2780CP and U373MGCP cells compared to other cell lines. Moreover, IC50 of cisplatin in different cells seems to have a relation with mean of GSH level in 90 minutes (GSH (mean)90). As a conclusion, it seems that resistance to cisplatin in different cell lines is more related with the diverse patterns of GSHi variations following cisplatin exposure than its original level, and/or its cellular increase or decrease. It is also suggested that GSH (mean)90 may be used as a factor for the prediction of cellular resistance to cisplatin.

  7. Alterations in nigral NMDA and GABAA receptor control of the striatal dopamine level after repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoute, Cécile; Weiss, Michel; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2008-07-01

    Nitrogen pressure exposure in rats results in decreased dopamine (DA) release at the striatal terminals of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) dopaminergic neurons, demonstrating the narcotic potency of nitrogen. This effect is attributed to decreased excitatory and increased inhibitory inputs to dopaminergic neurons, involving a change in NMDA and GABA(A) receptor function. We investigated whether repetitive exposures to nitrogen modify the excitatory and inhibitory control of the dopaminergic nigro-striatal pathway. We used voltammetry to measure dopamine levels in freely-moving rats, implanted with dopamine-sensitive electrodes in the striatum. NMDA/GABA(A) receptor agonists (NMDA/muscimol) and antagonists (AP7/gabazine) were administered through a guide-cannula into the SNc, and their effects on striatal dopamine levels were measured under normobaric conditions, before and after five repetitive exposures to 1 MPa nitrogen. NMDA-mediated dopamine release was greater following repetitive exposures, AP7-mediated inhibition of glutamatergic input was blocked, suggesting that NMDA receptor sensitivity was increased and glutamate release reduced. Muscimol did not modify dopamine levels following repetitive exposures, whereas the effect of gabazine was greater after exposures than before. This suggested that interneuronal GABA(A) receptors were desensitized, leading to an increased GABAergic input at dopaminergic cells. Thus, repetitive nitrogen exposure induced persistent changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic control of dopaminergic neurons, resulting in decreased activity of the nigrostriatal pathway.

  8. Long-term exposure to paraquat alters behavioral parameters and dopamine levels in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Josiane W; Cognato, Giana P; Christoff, Raissa R; Roesler, Laura N; Leite, Carlos E; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Mauricio R; Vianna, Monica R; Bonan, Carla D

    2014-04-01

    Chronic exposure to paraquat (Pq), a toxic herbicide, can result in Parkinsonian symptoms. This study evaluated the effect of the systemic administration of Pq on locomotion, learning and memory, social interaction, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels, and dopamine transporter (DAT) gene expression in zebrafish. Adult zebrafish received an i.p. injection of either 10 mg/kg (Pq10) or 20 mg/kg (Pq20) of Pq every 3 days for a total of six injections. Locomotion and distance traveled decreased at 24 h after each injection in both treatment doses. In addition, both Pq10- and Pq20-treated animals exhibited differential effects on the absolute turn angle. Nonmotor behaviors were also evaluated, and no changes were observed in anxiety-related behaviors or social interactions in Pq-treated zebrafish. However, Pq-treated animals demonstrated impaired acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory in the Y-maze task. Interestingly, dopamine levels increased while DOPAC levels decreased in the zebrafish brain after both treatments. However, DAT expression decreased in the Pq10-treated group, and there was no change in the Pq20-treated group. The amount of TH protein showed no significant difference in the treated group. Our study establishes a new model to study Parkinson-associated symptoms in zebrafish that have been chronically treated with Pq.

  9. Altered transcription levels of endocrine associated genes in two fisheries species collected from the Great Barrier Reef catchment and lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Frederieke J; Hook, Sharon E; Jones, Dean; Metcalfe, Suzanne; Henderson, Brent; Smith, Rachael; Warne, Michael St J; Turner, Ryan D; McKeown, Adam; Westcott, David A

    2015-03-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is chronically exposed to agricultural run-off containing pesticides, many of which are known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Here, we measure mRNA transcript abundance of two EDC biomarkers in wild populations of barramundi (Lates calcarifer) and coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus and Plectropomus maculatus). Transcription levels of liver vitellogenin (vtg) differed significantly in both species amongst sites with different exposures to agricultural run-off; brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) revealed some differences for barramundi only. Exposure to run-off from sugarcane that contains pesticides is a likely pathway given (i) significant associations between barramundi vtg transcription levels, catchment sugarcane land use, and river pesticide concentrations, and (ii) consistency between patterns of coral trout vtg transcription levels and pesticide distribution in the GBR lagoon. Given the potential consequences of such exposure for reproductive fitness and population dynamics, these results are cause for concern for the sustainability of fisheries resources downstream from agricultural land uses.

  10. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than ty

  11. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than

  12. Sleep patterns over 15-day period in rats with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    A.M. Esteves; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Squarcini, C. F. R.; Lancellotti, Carmen Lucia Penteado; Comparoni, Aniella [UNIFESP; Tufik,Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Study design: Experimental, controlled trial.Objectives: the purpose of this study was to evaluate over a 15-day period alterations in sleep pattern of rats after spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting: Fed