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Sample records for alters respiratory phenotype

  1. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

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    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  2. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

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    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  3. Myelin alters the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages by activating PPARs

    OpenAIRE

    Bogie, Jeroen; Jorissen, Winde; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmierlo, Tim; van Horssen, Jack; Hellings, Niels; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, J. J. A.; Nijland, Philip G.; Zelcer, Noam

    2013-01-01

    Background Foamy macrophages, containing myelin degradation products, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Recent studies have described an altered phenotype of macrophages after myelin internalization. However, mechanisms by which myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype influences lesion progression remain unclear. Results We demonstrate that myelin as well as phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid found in myelin, reduce nitri...

  4. New insights on the maternal diet induced-hypertension: potential role of the phenotypic plasticity and sympathetic-respiratory overactivity

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    JOAO HENRIQUE eDA COSTA SILVA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and affects worldwide population. Current environment including life style coupled with genetic programming have been attributed to the rising incidence of hypertension. Besides, environmental conditions during perinatal development such as maternal malnutrition can program changes in the integration among renal, neural and endocrine system leading to hypertension. This phenomenon is termed phenotypic plasticity and refers to the adjustment of a phenotype in response to environmental input without genetic change, following a novel or unusual input during development. Human and animal studies indicate that fetal exposure to an adverse maternal environment may alter the renal morphology and physiology that contribute to the development of hypertension. Recently, it has been shown that the maternal protein restriction alter the central control of SAH by a mechanism that include respiratory dysfunction and enhanced sympathetic-respiratory coupling at early life, which may contribute to adult hypertension. This review will address the new insights on the maternal diet induced-hypertension that include the potential role of the phenotypic plasticity, specifically the perinatal protein malnutrition, and sympathetic-respiratory overactivity.

  5. Alterations of complex I of the respiratory chain in tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many solid tumors exhibit a shift in the energy metabolism from aerobic oxidation in the mitochondria to anaerobic glycolysis, which was first observed by Otto Warburg. In accordance with the Warburg hypothesis, we assume that an irreversible damage to the respiratory chain is a fundamental property of cancer cells and can be a primary event in tumor formation. The aim of this PhD thesis was to elucidate deficiencies of the respiratory chain in mitochondria rich (oncocytic) tumors of the kidney, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the salivary gland, the parotid gland, the pituitary gland, the adrenal gland and the eyelid. Additionally Hashimoto's thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease of the thyroid containing oncocytic cells and non-oncocytic thyroid tumors (follicular adenomas, follicular carcinomas, papillary carcinomas and anaplastic carcinomas) were investigated for alterations in the mitochondrial energy metabolism. In oncocytomas (n =57) a specific loss of respiratory chain complex I was detected in 97% of investigated cases by immunohistochemistry, enzymatic measurements and immunoblot analysis. Other complexes of the respiratory chain were compensatory upregulated. In half of the cases, complex I deficiency was caused by disruptive mutations, either frame shift or nonsense mutations in complex I subunits encoded on the mitochondrial genome. Oncocytic nodules in ten cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis also demonstrated a loss of complex I, whereas complex IV expression was very heterogenous. Thyroid cancers, especially papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas, exhibited in most cases a reduction or complete loss of complex I. In some cases oncocytic cells were found in a low percentage, all lacking complex I. Follicular thyroid adenomas are characterized by a general reduction of respiratory chain enzymes, compared to the mitochondrial marker protein porin. In anaplastic thyroid carcinomas neither a specific defect nor a general down regulation was found in this

  6. Cough and dyspnoea may discriminate allergic and infectious respiratory phenotypes in infancy.

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    Rancière, Fanny; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Nikasinovic, Lydia; Just, Jocelyne; Momas, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Asthma symptoms are non-specific during infancy, making the identification of different subgroups among preschool children with early respiratory manifestations an important challenge. We previously used a clustering approach to identify bronchial obstructive phenotypes in 1-yr-old infants from the Pollution and Asthma Risk: an Infant Study (PARIS) birth cohort. In the present study, we examined whether these phenotypes were stable at 3 yr and studied their comorbidity and risk factors. Partitioning around medoids (PAM) method was applied at 1 and 3 yr of age to cluster children according to wheezing, dry night cough, dyspnoea with sleep disturbance and breathlessness. The resulting groups were used to derive phenotypes in 2084 children during their first 3 yr of life. Analysis of associated comorbidity and risk factors was conducted using multinomial logistic regression. PAM groups were similarly defined at both ages so that two respiratory phenotypes were identified between birth and 3 yr: cough phenotype (CP) and dyspnoea phenotype (DP) including 14.1% and 30.7% of children, respectively. CP infants experienced more often allergic features than DP, dominated by respiratory infections. Parental history of allergy, potential allergen exposure and psychosocial factors were associated with CP. Day care centre attendance was more frequent in DP as well as exposure to domestic chemical pollution, suggesting a greater vulnerability to pathogens. Finally, dry night cough and dyspnoea disturbing the sleep appear to be markers of two respiratory profiles potentially allergic and infectious before 3 yr old. PMID:22300433

  7. Separate Respiratory Phenotypes in Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (Mecp2) Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bissonnette, John M.; Knopp, Sharon J.

    2006-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) that encodes a DNA binding protein involved in gene silencing. Selective deletion of Mecp2 in post-mitotic neurons in mice results in a Rettlike phenotype characterized by disturbances in motor activity and body weight, suggesting that these symptoms are exclusively caused by neuronal deficiency. Included in the RTT phenotype are episodes of respiratory depression...

  8. Epigenetic alterations differ in phenotypically distinct human neuroblastoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic aberrations and a CpG island methylator phenotype have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in children with neuroblastoma (NB). Seven cancer related genes (THBS-1, CASP8, HIN-1, TIG-1, BLU, SPARC, and HIC-1) that have been shown to have epigenetic changes in adult cancers and play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis, tumor growth, and apoptosis were analyzed to investigate the role epigenetic alterations play in determining NB phenotype. Two NB cell lines (tumorigenic LA1-55n and non-tumorigenic LA1-5s) that differ in their ability to form colonies in soft agar and tumors in nude mice were used. Quantitative RNA expression analyses were performed on seven genes in LA1-5s, LA1-55n and 5-Aza-dC treated LA1-55n NB cell lines. The methylation status around THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1 and CASP8 promoters was examined using methylation specific PCR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to examine histone modifications along the THBS-1 promoter. Luciferase assay was used to determine THBS-1 promoter activity. Cell proliferation assay was used to examine the effect of 5-Aza-dC on NB cell growth. The soft agar assay was used to determine the tumorigenicity. Promoter methylation values for THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1, and CASP8 were higher in LA1-55n cells compared to LA1-5s cells. Consistent with the promoter methylation status, lower levels of gene expression were detected in the LA1-55n cells. Histone marks associated with repressive chromatin states (H3K9Me3, H3K27Me3, and H3K4Me3) were identified in the THBS-1 promoter region in the LA1-55n cells, but not the LA1-5s cells. In contrast, the three histone codes associated with an active chromatin state (acetyl H3, acetyl H4, and H3K4Me3) were present in the THBS-1 promoter region in LA1-5s cells, but not the LA1-55n cells, suggesting that an accessible chromatin structure is important for THBS-1 expression. We also show that 5-Aza-dC treatment of LA1-55n cells alters the DNA methylation

  9. Neighbor species differentially alter resistance phenotypes in Plantago.

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    Barton, Kasey E; Bowers, M Deane

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we investigated how neighbors (i.e., competitors) altered resistance phenotypes, namely plant size and levels of secondary compounds (iridoid glycosides), of individual plants and specifically tested whether neighbor identity mattered. We conducted a greenhouse experiment with Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major (Plantaginaceae) in which each species served as focal plants as well as neighbors in a factorial design. In addition, we harvested plants six and nine weeks after transplantation to test whether effects changed as plants grew. In both species, competition reduced plant size, and this effect increased over time. Plantago lanceolata neighbors suppressed growth of both focal plant species more than P. major neighbors. Effects of competition on levels of secondary compounds were more complex. Concentrations of iridoid glycosides were increased by competition in both species at harvest one. By the second harvest, an effect of competition on iridoid glycosides was found only in P. major. Neighbor identity influenced levels of iridoid glycosides in P. lanceolata at harvest one; concentrations were higher in plants grown with P. lanceolata neighbors than in plants grown with P. major neighbors. We also tested whether there was a trade-off between growth (biomass) and defense (levels of iridoid glycosides). Biomass and iridoid glycoside content were significantly correlated only in plants grown with competition and harvested at nine weeks, and this relationship was positive in both species, indicating that there was no trade-off between growth and defense. This study suggests that neighbor identity could play an important role in interspecific interactions, including the interactions of plants with other trophic levels. PMID:16944243

  10. Microglia in close vicinity of glioma cells: correlation between phenotype and metabolic alterations.

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    Pierre Voisin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are immune cells within the central nervous system. In brain-developing tumors, gliomas are able to silence the defense and immune functions of microglia, a phenomenon which strongly contributes to tumor progression and treatment resistance. Being activated and highly motile, microglia infiltrate tumors and secrete macrophagic chemoattractant factors. Thereafter, tumor cells shut down their immune properties and stimulate the microglia to release tumor growth-promoting factors. The result of such modulation is that a kind of symbiosis occurs between microglia and tumor cells, in favor of tumor growth.However, little is known about microglial phenotype and metabolic modifications in a tumoral environment. Co-cultures were performed using CHME5 microglia cells grown on collagen beads or on coverslips and placed on monolayer of C6 cells, limiting cell/cell contacts. Phagocytic behavior and expression of macrophagic and cytoskeleton markers were monitored. Respiratory properties and energetic metabolism were also studied with regard to the activated phenotype of microglia. In co-cultures, transitory modifications of microglial morphology and metabolism were observed linked to a concomitant transitory increase of phagocytic properties. Therefore, after 1h of co-culture, microglia were activated but when longer in contact with tumor cells, phagocytic properties appear silenced. Like the behavior of the phenotype, microglial respiration showed a transitory readjustment although the mitochondria maintained their perinuclear relocation. Nevertheless, the energetic metabolism of the microglia was altered, suggesting a new energetic steady state. The results clearly indicate that like the depressed immune properties, the macrophagic and metabolic status of the microglia is quickly driven by the glioma environment, despite short initial phagocytic activation. Such findings question the possible contribution of diffusible tumor factors to the

  11. Phenotypic plasticity opposes species invasions by altering fitness surface.

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    Scott D Peacor

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding species invasion is a central problem in ecology because invasions of exotic species severely impact ecosystems, and because invasions underlie fundamental ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species increases its ability to oppose invaders, and plasticity of an invader increases its ability to displace residents. Whereas these effects are expected due to increased fitness associated with phenotypic plasticity, the model additionally reveals a new and unforeseen mechanism by which plasticity affects invasions: phenotypic plasticity increases the steepness of the fitness surface, thereby making invasion more difficult, even by phenotypically plastic invaders. Our results should apply to phenotypically plastic responses to any fluctuating environmental factors including predation risk, and to other factors that affect the fitness surface such as the generalism of predators. We extend the results to competition, and argue that phenotypic plasticity's effect on the fitness surface will destabilize coexistence at local scales, but stabilize coexistence at regional scales. Our study emphasizes the need to incorporate variable interaction strengths due to phenotypic plasticity into invasion biology and ecological theory on competition and coexistence in fragmented landscapes.

  12. Phenotypic plasticity opposes species invasions by altering fitness surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Peacor, Scott D.; Stefano Allesina; Riolo, Rick L; Mercedes Pascual

    2006-01-01

    Understanding species invasion is a central problem in ecology because invasions of exotic species severely impact ecosystems, and because invasions underlie fundamental ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species increases its ability to oppose invaders, and plasticity of an invader increases its ability to displace resident...

  13. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Walmrath Dieter; Grimminger Friedrich; Markart Philipp; Schmidt Reinhold; Ruppert Clemens; Günther Andreas; Seeger Werner

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactan...

  14. Depolarization Alters Phenotype, Maintains Plasticity of Predifferentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Sundelacruz, Sarah; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Although adult stem cell transplantation has been implemented as a therapy for tissue repair, it is limited by the availability of functional adult stem cells. A potential approach to generate stem and progenitor cells may be to modulate the differentiated status of somatic cells. Therefore, there is a need for a better understanding of how the differentiated phenotype of mature cells is regulated. We hypothesize that bioelectric signaling plays an important role in the maintenance of the dif...

  15. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Walmrath Dieter

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactant phospholipids and apoproteins into polymerizing fibrin, and damage/inhibition of surfactant compounds by inflammatory mediators. There is now good evidence that these surfactant abnormalities promote alveolar instability and collapse and, consequently, loss of compliance and the profound gas exchange abnormalities seen in ARDS. An acute improvement of gas exchange properties together with a far-reaching restoration of surfactant properties was encountered in recently performed pilot studies. Here we summarize what is known about the kind and severity of surfactant changes occuring in ARDS, the contribution of these changes to lung failure, and the role of surfactant administration for therapy of ARDS.

  16. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of NAD-dependent Pasteurellaceae from the respiratory tract of pigs and their possible pathogenetic importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielstein, P.; Wuthe, H.H.; Angen, Øystein;

    2001-01-01

    . In the present study, 107 of these NAD-dependent isolates from the porcine respiratory tract, primarily from lungs with pathological changes, were investigated. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, such as haemolysis, urease, catalase, and indole formation as well as other fermentative activities, 50...

  17. A genetic code alteration is a phenotype diversity generator in the human pathogen Candida albicans.

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    Isabel Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The discovery of genetic code alterations and expansions in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes abolished the hypothesis of a frozen and universal genetic code and exposed unanticipated flexibility in codon and amino acid assignments. It is now clear that codon identity alterations involve sense and non-sense codons and can occur in organisms with complex genomes and proteomes. However, the biological functions, the molecular mechanisms of evolution and the diversity of genetic code alterations remain largely unknown. In various species of the genus Candida, the leucine CUG codon is decoded as serine by a unique serine tRNA that contains a leucine 5'-CAG-3'anticodon (tRNA(CAG(Ser. We are using this codon identity redefinition as a model system to elucidate the evolution of genetic code alterations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have reconstructed the early stages of the Candida genetic code alteration by engineering tRNAs that partially reverted the identity of serine CUG codons back to their standard leucine meaning. Such genetic code manipulation had profound cellular consequences as it exposed important morphological variation, altered gene expression, re-arranged the karyotype, increased cell-cell adhesion and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides the first experimental evidence for an important role of genetic code alterations as generators of phenotypic diversity of high selective potential and supports the hypothesis that they speed up evolution of new phenotypes.

  18. Altering an extended phenotype reduces intraspecific male aggression and can maintain diversity in cichlid fish

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    Isabel Santos Magalhaes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reduced male aggression towards different phenotypes generating negative frequency-dependent intrasexual selection has been suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the invasion and maintenance of novel phenotypes in a population. To date, the best empirical evidence for the phenomenon has been provided by laboratory studies on cichlid fish with different colour polymorphisms. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis in a natural population of Lake Malawi cichlid fish, in which males build sand-castles (bowers to attract females during seasonal leks. We predicted that if bower shape plays an important role in male aggressive interactions, aggression among conspecific males should decrease when their bower shape is altered. Accordingly, we allocated randomly chosen bowers in a Nyassachromis cf. microcephalus lek into three treatments: control, manipulated to a different shape, and simulated manipulation. We then measured male behaviours and bower shape before and after these treatments. We found that once bower shape was altered, males were involved in significantly fewer aggressive interactions with conspecific males than before manipulation. Mating success was not affected. Our results support the idea that an extended phenotype, such as bower shape, can be important in maintaining polymorphic populations. Specifically, reduced male conspecific aggression towards males with different extended phenotypes (here, bower shapes may cause negative frequency-dependent selection, allowing the invasion and establishment of a new phenotype (bower builder. This could help our understanding of mechanisms of diversification within populations, and in particular, the overall diversification of bower shapes within Lake Malawi cichlids.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of a respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain suggests the expression of its phenotype is glucose insensitive and predominantly controlled by Hap4, Cat8 and Mig1

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    Bonander Nicklas

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the first respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, KOY.TM6*P, by integrating the gene encoding a chimeric hexose transporter, Tm6*, into the genome of an hxt null yeast. Subsequently we transferred this respiratory phenotype in the presence of up to 50 g/L glucose to a yeast strain, V5 hxt1-7Δ, in which only HXT1-7 had been deleted. In this study, we compared the transcriptome of the resultant strain, V5.TM6*P, with that of its wild-type parent, V5, at different glucose concentrations. Results cDNA array analyses revealed that alterations in gene expression that occur when transitioning from a respiro-fermentative (V5 to a respiratory (V5.TM6*P strain, are very similar to those in cells undergoing a diauxic shift. We also undertook an analysis of transcription factor binding sites in our dataset by examining previously-published biological data for Hap4 (in complex with Hap2, 3, 5, Cat8 and Mig1, and used this in combination with verified binding consensus sequences to identify genes likely to be regulated by one or more of these. Of the induced genes in our dataset, 77% had binding sites for the Hap complex, with 72% having at least two. In addition, 13% were found to have a binding site for Cat8 and 21% had a binding site for Mig1. Unexpectedly, both the up- and down-regulation of many of the genes in our dataset had a clear glucose dependence in the parent V5 strain that was not present in V5.TM6*P. This indicates that the relief of glucose repression is already operable at much higher glucose concentrations than is widely accepted and suggests that glucose sensing might occur inside the cell. Conclusion Our dataset gives a remarkably complete view of the involvement of genes in the TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle and respiratory chain in the expression of the phenotype of V5.TM6*P. Furthermore, 88% of the transcriptional response of the induced genes in our dataset can be related to the potential

  20. Bone Marrow Transplantation Alters the Tremor Phenotype in the Murine Model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy

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    Adarsh S. Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tremor is a prominent phenotype of the twitcher mouse, an authentic genetic model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe’s disease. In the current study, the tremor was quantified using a force-plate actometer designed to accommodate low-weight mice. The actometer records the force oscillations caused by a mouse’s movements, and the rhythmic structure of the force variations can be revealed. Results showed that twitcher mice had significantly increased power across a broad band of higher frequencies compared to wildtype mice. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT, the only available therapy for GLD, worsened the tremor in the twitcher mice and induced a measureable alteration of movement phenotype in the wildtype mice. These data highlight the damaging effects of conditioning radiation and BMT in the neonatal period. The behavioral methodology used herein provides a quantitative approach for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions for Krabbe’s disease.

  1. Female mice with loss-of-function ITCH display an altered reproductive phenotype.

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    Stermer, Angela R; Myers, Jessica L; Murphy, Caitlin J; Di Bona, Kristin R; Matesic, Lydia; Richburg, John H

    2016-02-01

    Major progress in deciphering the role of the E3 ligase, ITCH, in animal physiology has come from the generation and identification of Itch loss-of-function mutant mice (itchy). Mutant mice display an autoimmune-like phenotype characterized by chronic dermatitis, which has been attributed to increased levels of ITCH target proteins (e.g. transcription factors JUNB and CJUN) in T cells. Autoimmune disorders also exist in humans with Itch frameshift mutations resulting in loss of functional ITCH protein. Recent phenotypic analysis of male itchy mice revealed reduced sperm production, although cross breeding experiments showed no difference in litter size when male itchy mice were bred to wild type females. However, a reduction in litter sizes did occur when itchy females were bred to wild type males. Based on these results, characterization of female reproductive function in itchy mice was performed. Developmental analysis of fetuses at gestational day 18.5, cytological evaluation of estrous cyclicity, histopathological analysis of ovaries, and protein analysis were used to investigate the itchy reproductive phenotype. Gross skeletal and soft tissue analysis of gestational day 18.5 itchy fetuses indicated no gross developmental deformities. Itchy females had reduced implantation sites, decreased corpora lutea, and increased estrous cycle length due to increased number of days in estrus compared to controls. Alterations in the expression of prototypical ITCH targets in the ovaries were not indicated, suggesting that an alteration in an as yet defined ovary-specific ITCH substrate or interaction with the altered immune system likely accounts for the disruption of female reproduction. This report indicates the importance of the E3 ligase, ITCH, in female reproduction. PMID:26515141

  2. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations of Dendritic Cells Induced by Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kakimoto, Miki; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Fujita, Shigeru; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2002-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) has a tropism for T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages, suggesting that HHV-6 infection affects the immunosurveillance system. In the present study, we investigated the HHV-6-induced phenotypic and functional alterations of dendritic cells (DCs), which are professional antigen-presenting cells. HHV-6 infection of monocyte-derived immature DCs appeared to induce the up-regulation of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA class I and class II molecules, suggesting that HHV-6 i...

  3. Swimming kinematics and respiratory behaviour of Xenopus laevis larvae raised in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejtek, M.; Souza, K.; Neff, A.; Wassersug, R.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the respiratory behaviours and swimming kinematics of Xenopus laevis tadpoles hatched in microgravity (Space Shuttle), simulated microgravity (clinostat) and hypergravity (3 g centrifuge). All observations were made in the normal 1 g environment. Previous research has shown that X. laevis raised in microgravity exhibit abnormalities in their lungs and vestibular system upon return to 1 g. The tadpoles raised in true microgravity exhibited a significantly lower tailbeat frequency than onboard 1 g centrifuge controls on the day of landing (day0), but this behaviour normalized within 9 days. The two groups did not differ significantly in buccal pumping rates. Altered buoyancy in the space-flight microgravity tadpoles was indicated by an increased swimming angle on the day after landing (day1). Tadpoles raised in simulated microgravity differed to a greater extent in swimming behaviours from their 1 g controls. The tadpoles raised in hypergravity showed no substantive effects on the development of swimming or respiratory behaviours, except swimming angle. Together, these results show that microgravity has a transient effect on the development of locomotion in X. laevis tadpoles, most notably on swimming angle, indicative of stunted lung development. On the basis of the behaviours we studied, there is no indication of neuromuscular retardation in amphibians associated with embryogenesis in microgravity.

  4. Dexamethasone treatment alters insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels in male mice as observed in DIO but does not lead to alterations of metabolic phenotypes in the offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Bönisch, Clemens; Irmler, Martin; Brachthäuser, Laura; Neff, Frauke; Bamberger, Mareike T.; Marschall, Susan; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic inheritance (EI) of metabolic phenotypes via the paternal lineage has been shown in rodent models of diet-induced obesity (DIO). However, the factors involved in soma-to-germline information transfer remain elusive. Here, we address the role of alterations in insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels for EI of metabolic phenotypes by treating C57BL/6NTac male mice (F0) with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone and generating offspring (F1) either by in vitro fertilization or by...

  5. The importance of environment on respiratory genotype/phenotype relationships in the Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candelaria, P V; Backer, Vibeke; Khoo, S-K;

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and environmental influences and their interactions are central to asthma pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different macro-environments on asthma genotype-phenotype associations in two geographically separated populations with common ancestry.......Genetic and environmental influences and their interactions are central to asthma pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different macro-environments on asthma genotype-phenotype associations in two geographically separated populations with common ancestry....

  6. Kenny Caffey syndrome with severe respiratory and gastrointestinal involvement: expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Loucas; Krishnaiah, Anil; Spyridou, Christina; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Hannan, Siobhan; Saggar, Anand; Mankad, Kshitij; Deep, Akash; Kinali, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Kenny Caffey syndrome (KCS) is a rare syndrome reported almost exclusively in Middle Eastern populations. It is characterized by severe growth retardation-short stature, dysmorphic features, episodic hypocalcaemia, hypoparathyroidism, seizures, and medullary stenosis of long bones with thickened cortices. We report a 10-year-old boy with KCS with an unusually severe respiratory and gastrointestinal system involvement-features not previously described in the literature. He had severe psychomotor retardation and regressed developmentally from walking unaided to sitting with support. MRI brain showed bilateral hippocampal sclerosis, marked supra-tentorial volume loss and numerous calcifications. A 12 bp deletion of exon 2 of tubulin-specific chaperone E (TBCE) gene was identified and the diagnosis of KCS was confirmed. Hypercarbia following a sleep study warranted nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) when aged 6. When boy aged 8, persistent hypercarbia with increasing oxygen requirement and increased frequency and severity of lower respiratory tract infections led to progressive respiratory failure. He became fully dependent on non-invasive ventilation and by 9 years he had a tracheotomy and was established on long-term ventilation. He developed retching, vomiting and diarrhea. Chest CT showed changes consistent with chronic aspiration, but no interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. He died aged 10 from respiratory complications. PMID:26029652

  7. Short-term fertilizer application alters phenotypic traits of symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Anna K; Han, Shery; Rekret, Phil; Rentschler, Christine S; Heath, Katy D; Stinchcombe, John R

    2015-01-01

    Fertilizer application is a common anthropogenic alteration to terrestrial systems. Increased nutrient input can impact soil microbial diversity or function directly through altered soil environments, or indirectly through plant-microbe feedbacks, with potentially important effects on ecologically-important plant-associated mutualists. We investigated the impacts of plant fertilizer, containing all common macro and micronutrients on symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), a group of bacteria that are important for plant productivity and ecosystem function. We collected rhizobia nodule isolates from natural field soil that was treated with slow-release plant fertilizer over a single growing season and compared phenotypic traits related to free-living growth and host partner quality in these isolates to those of rhizobia from unfertilized soils. Through a series of single inoculation assays in controlled glasshouse conditions, we found that isolates from fertilized field soil provided legume hosts with higher mutualistic benefits. Through growth assays on media containing variable plant fertilizer concentrations, we found that plant fertilizer was generally beneficial for rhizobia growth. Rhizobia isolated from fertilized field soil had higher growth rates in the presence of plant fertilizer compared to isolates from unfertilized field soil, indicating that plant fertilizer application favoured rhizobia isolates with higher abilities to utilize fertilizer for free-living growth. We found a positive correlation between growth responses to fertilizer and mutualism benefits among isolates from fertilized field soil, demonstrating that variable plant fertilizer induces context-dependent genetic correlations, potentially changing the evolutionary trajectory of either trait through increased trait dependencies. Our study shows that short-term application is sufficient to alter the composition of rhizobia isolates in the population or community, either directly

  8. Microsatellite alterations in phenotypically normal esophageal squamous epithelium and metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Chun Cai; Di Liu; Kai-Hua Liu; Hai-Ping Zhang; Shan Zhong; Ning-Sao Xia

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the microsatellite alterations in phenotypically normal esophageal squamous epithelium and metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.METHODS: Forty-one specimens were obtained from esophageal cancer (EC) patients. Histopathological assessment identified 23 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 18 adenocarcinomas (ADC), including only 8 ADC with Barrett esophageal columnar epithelium (metaplasia) and dysplasia adjacent to ADC. Paraffinembedded normal squamous epithelium, Barrett esophageal columnar epithelium (metaplasia), dysplasia and esophageal tumor tissues were dissected from the surrounding tissues under microscopic guidance. DNA was extracted using proteinase K digestion buffer, and DNA was diluted at 1:100, 1:1000, 1:5000, 1:10000 and 1:50000, respectively. Seven microsatellite markers (D2S123, D3S1616, D3S1300, D5S346, D17S787, D18S58 and BATRII loci) were used in this study. Un-dilution and dilution polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed, and microsatellite analysis was carried out.RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of un-diluted DNA between SCC and ADC. The levels of MSI and LOH were high in the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence of diluted DNA. The more the diluted DNA was, the higher the rates of MSI and LOH were at the above 7 loci, especially at D3S1616, D5S346, D2S123, D3S1300 and D18S58 loci.CONCLUSION: The sequence of metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma is associated with microsatellite alterations, including MSI and LOH. The MSI and LOH may be the early genetic events during esophageal carcinogenesis, and genetic alterations at the D3S1616, D5S346 and D3S123 loci may play a role in the progress of microsatellite alterations.

  9. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  10. Alterations in Skin Temperature and Sleep in the Fear of Harm Phenotype of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J. Murphy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In children diagnosed with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD, disturbances in the quality of sleep and wakefulness are prominent. A novel phenotype of PBD called Fear of Harm (FOH associated with separation anxiety and aggressive obsessions is associated with sleep onset insomnia, parasomnias (nightmares, night-terrors, enuresis, REM sleep-related problems, and morning sleep inertia. Children with FOH often experience thermal discomfort (e.g., feeling hot, excessive sweating in neutral ambient temperature conditions, as well as no discomfort during exposure to the extreme cold, and alternate noticeably between being excessively hot in the evening and cold in the morning. We hypothesized that these sleep- and temperature-related symptoms were overt symptoms of an impaired ability to dissipate heat, particularly in the evening hours near the time of sleep onset. We measured sleep/wake variables using actigraphy, and nocturnal skin temperature variables using thermal patches and a wireless device, and compared these data between children with PBD/FOH and a control sample of healthy children. The results are suggestive of a thermoregulatory dysfunction that is associated with sleep onset difficulties. Further, they are consistent with our hypothesis that alterations in neural circuitry common to thermoregulation and emotion regulation underlie affective and behavioral symptoms of the FOH phenotype.

  11. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Martin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability, and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo and central memory (CD62Lhi cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit

  12. Effects of altered soil moisture on respiratory quotient in the Edwards Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, M. A.; Hawkes, C.; Breecker, D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns around the world. The impacts of altered precipitation on ecosystem function will be partly controlled by soil microbes because of their primary role in soil carbon cycling. However, microbial responses to drought remain poorly understood, particularly local responses that might partly reflect specialization based on historical conditions. Here, we investigated the respiratory response of microbial communities originating from historically wetter and drier sites to both low and high soil moistures. We focused on the respiratory quotient (RQ= moles of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed), which varies with the oxidation state of organic carbon being respired and/or the compounds being synthesized by soil microbes. We hypothesized that there would be a shift in RQ across the gradient of soil moisture. Soils were collected from 13 sites across a steep precipitation gradient on the Edwards plateau in central Texas, air-dried, rewet at low or high soil moisture (6% or 24% gravimetric, respectively), and incubated in an atmosphere of 21% O2, 1% Ar, and balance He. After eight weeks, CO2, O2 and Ar in the headspace of incubation vials were measured by gas chromatography after separation of Ar and O2 at subambient temperature. Because of the high calcite content in soils on the Edwards plateau, we corrected the RQ values by assuming pH was buffered at 8 and then adding the calculated amount of CO2 dissolved in water in the incubations vials to the measured CO2 in the headspace. We found that uncorrected RQ values were slightly less than one and increased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation. In contrast, corrected RQ values were greater than one and decreased with increasing mean annual precipitation. In both cases, we see a shift in RQ across the gradient, suggesting that differences in substrate utilization may vary based on origin across the gradient and with current level of soil moisture

  13. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimeno Mariona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9. Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers.

  14. Microgravity alters respiratory sinus arrhythmia and short-term heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migeotte, P-F; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, M.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We studied heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in four male subjects before, during, and after 16 days of spaceflight. The electrocardiogram and respiration were recorded during two periods of 4 min controlled breathing at 7.5 and 15 breaths/min in standing and supine postures on the ground and in microgravity. Low (LF)- and high (HF)-frequency components of the short-term HRV (< or =3 min) were computed through Fourier spectral analysis of the R-R intervals. Early in microgravity, HR was decreased compared with both standing and supine positions and had returned to the supine value by the end of the flight. In microgravity, overall variability, the LF-to-HF ratio, and RSA amplitude and phase were similar to preflight supine values. Immediately postflight, HR increased by approximately 15% and remained elevated 15 days after landing. LF/HF was increased, suggesting an increased sympathetic control of HR standing. The overall variability and RSA amplitude in supine decreased postflight, suggesting that vagal tone decreased, which coupled with the decrease in RSA phase shift suggests that this was the result of an adaptation of autonomic control of HR to microgravity. In addition, these alterations persisted for at least 15 days after return to normal gravity (1G).

  15. Alterations in Mesenteric Lymph Node T Cell Phenotype and Cytokine Secretion are Associated with Changes in Thymocyte Phenotype after LP-BM5 Retrovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Lopez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mouse MLN cells and thymocytes from advanced stages of LP-BM5 retrovirus infection were studied. A decrease in the percentage of IL-7+ cells and an increase in the percentage of IL-16+ cells in the MLN indicated that secretion of these cytokines was also altered after LP-BM5 infection. The percentage of MLN T cells expressing IL-7 receptors was significantly reduced, while the percentage of MLN T cells expressing TNFR-p75 and of B cells expressing TNFR-p55 increased. Simultaneous analysis of surface markers and cytokine secretion was done in an attempt to understand whether the deregulation of IFN-Υ secretion could be ascribed to a defined cell phenotype, concluding that all T cell subsets studied increased IFN-Υ secretion after retrovirus infection. Finally, thymocyte phenotype was further analyzed trying to correlate changes in thymocyte phenotype with MLN cell phenotype. The results indicated that the increase in single positive either CD4+CD8- or CD4- CD8+ cells was due to accumulation of both immature (CD3- and mature (CD3+ single positive thymocytes. Moreover, single positive mature thymocytes presented a phenotype similar to the phenotype previously seen on MLN T cells. In summary, we can conclude that LP-BM5 uses the immune system to reach the thymus where it interferes with the generation of functionally mature T cells, favoring the development of T cells with an abnormal phenotype. These new T cells are activated to secrete several cytokines that in turn will favor retrovirus replication and inhibit any attempt of the immune system to control infection.

  16. The role of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in immune phenotype and Th1/Th2 balance of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinling; Wei, Shu; Liu, Lixia; Shan, Fengping; Zhao, Yujun; Shen, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the immune response of dendritic cells derived from monocytes (Mo-DCs) in the porcine peripheral blood following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Viral load assays indicated that PRRSV efficiently infected Mo-DCs but failed to replicate, whereas PRRSV infection of Mo-DCs decreased the expression of SLA-I, SLA-II, CD80 and CD40 compared with those of mock Mo-DCs. Furthermore, we analyzed the cytokine profiles using quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Results indicated apparent changes in IL-10 and IL-12 p40 expression but not in IFN-γ and TNF-α among Mo-DCs infected with PRRSV and uninfected Mo-DCs. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis of the altered Mo-DCs together with IL-4 and GM-CSF induction for 7days revealed the typical morphology and phenotype with 91.73% purity before infection with PRRSV. Overall, our data demonstrate that PRRSV impaired the normal antigen presentation of Mo-DCs and led to inadequate adaptive immune response by down-regulating the expression of SLA-I,SLA-II, CD80 and CD40. Enhanced Th2 -type cytokine IL-10 secretion and reduced Th1-type cytokines IL-12p40,IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion results in Th1/Th2 imbalance.

  17. Alteration in respiratory physiology in obesity for anesthesia-critical care physician

    OpenAIRE

    Porhomayon, J; Papadakos, P; Singh, A.; Nader, N D

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is known to be a major risk factor of a whole range of cardiovascular, metabolic and respiratory disorders. The pattern of regional fat distribution plays an important role in the pre-disposition of obese subjects to respiratory complications. Obesity is responsible for important changes in respiratory function both during spontaneous breathing as well as during general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation. The most characteristic abnormalities consist of decreased functional residua...

  18. The in vivo respiratory phenotype of the adenosine A1 receptor knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzmann, Dirk; Buehler, Philipp; Schweda, Frank; Georgieff, Michael; Warth, Richard; Thomas, Joerg

    2016-02-01

    The nucleoside adenosine has been implicated in the regulation of respiration, especially during hypoxia in the newborn. In this study the role of adenosine A1 receptors for the control of respiration was investigated in vivo. To this end, respiration of unrestrained adult and neonatal adenosine A1 receptor knockout mice (A1R(-/-)) was measured in a plethysmographic device. Under control conditions (21% O2) and mild hypoxia (12-15% O2) no difference of respiratory parameters was observed between adult wildtype (A1R(+/+)) and A1R(-/-) mice. Under more severe hypoxia (6-10% O2) A1R(+/+) mice showed, after a transient increase of respiration, a decrease of respiration frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) leading to a decrease of minute volume (MV). This depression of respiration during severe hypoxia was absent in A1R(-/-) mice which displayed a stimulated respiration as indicated by the enhancement of MV by some 50-60%. During hypercapnia-hyperoxia (3-10% CO2/97-90 % O2), no obvious differences in respiration of A1R(-/-) and A1R(+/+) was observed. In neonatal mice, the respiratory response to hypoxia was surprisingly similar in both genotypes. However, neonatal A1R(-/-) mice appeared to have more frequently periods of apnea during hypoxia and in the post-hypoxic control period. In conclusion, these data indicate that the adenosine A1 receptor is an important molecular component mediating hypoxic depression in adult mice and it appears to stabilize respiration of neonatal mice. PMID:26593641

  19. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia.

  20. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS.

  1. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  2. Forced oscillation technique in the detection of smoking-induced respiratory alterations: diagnostic accuracy and comparison with spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Camilo Dias Faria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Detection of smoking effects is of utmost importance in the prevention of cigarette-induced chronic airway obstruction. The forced oscillation technique offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. However, there have been no data concerning the use of the forced oscillation technique to evaluate respiratory mechanics in groups with different degrees of tobacco consumption. OBJECTIVES: (1 to evaluate the ability of the forced oscillation technique to detect smoking-induced respiratory alterations, with special emphasis on early alterations; and (2 to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. METHODS: One hundred and seventy subjects were divided into five groups according to the number of pack-years smoked: four groups of smokers classified as 60 pack-years and a control group. The four groups of smokers were compared with the control group using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. RESULTS: The early adverse effects of smoking in the group with 60 pack-years, the diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique was similar to that observed with spirometry. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that forced oscillation technique parameters were able to detect early smoking-induced respiratory involvement when pathologic changes are still potentially reversible. These findings support the use of the forced oscillation technique as a versatile clinical diagnostic tool in helping with chronic obstructive lung disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

  3. Altered molecular specificity of surfactant phosphatidycholine synthesis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dushianthan, Ahilanandan; Goss, Victoria; Cusack, Rebecca; Grocott, Michael P. W.; Postle, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening critical illness, characterised by qualitative and quantitative surfactant compositional changes associated with premature airway collapse, gas-exchange abnormalities and acute hypoxic respiratory failure. The underlying mechanisms for this dysregulation in surfactant metabolisms are not fully explored. Lack of therapeutic benefits from clinical trials, highlight the importance of detailed in-vivo analysis and charact...

  4. IGF-1 Has Plaque-Stabilizing Effects in Atherosclerosis by Altering Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    von der Thüsen, Jan H; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-pol...

  5. Alterations in Muscle Mass and Contractile Phenotype in Response to Unloading Models: Role of Transcriptional/Pretranslational Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth M Baldwin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest organ system in mammalian organisms providing postural control and movement patterns of varying intensity. Through evolution, skeletal muscle fibers have evolved into three phenotype clusters defined as a muscle unit which consists of all muscle fibers innervated by a single motoneuron linking varying numbers of fibers of similar phenotype. This fundamental organization of the motor unit reflects the fact that there is a remarkable interdependence of gene regulation between the motoneurons and the muscle mainly via activity-dependent mechanisms. These fiber types can be classified via the primary type of myosin heavy chain (MHC gene expressed in the motor unit. Four MHC gene encoded proteins have been identified in striated muscle: slow type I MHC and three fast MHC types, IIa, IIx, and IIb. These MHCs dictate the intrinsic contraction speed of the myofiber with the type I generating the slowest and IIb the fastest contractile speed. Over the last ~35 years, a large body of knowledge suggests that altered loading state cause both fiber atrophy/wasting and a slow to fast shift in the contractile phenotype in the target muscle(s. Hence, this review will examine findings from three different animal models of unloading: 1 space flight (SF, i.e., microgravity; 2 hindlimb suspension (HS, a procedure that chronically eliminates weight bearing of the lower limbs; and 3 spinal cord isolation (SI, a surgical procedure that eliminates neural activation of the motoneurons and associated muscles while maintaining neurotrophic motoneuron-muscle connectivity. The collective findings demonstrate: 1 all three models show a similar pattern of fiber atrophy with differences mainly in the magnitude and kinetics of alteration; 2 transcriptional/pretranslational processes play a major role in both the atrophy process and phenotype shifts; and 3 signaling pathways impacting these alterations appear to be similar in each of the models

  6. Weight loss alters severity of individual nocturnal respiratory events depending on sleeping position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight loss is an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The mechanisms of how weight loss affects nocturnal breathing are not fully understood. The severity of OSA is currently estimated by the number of respiratory events per hour of sleep (i.e. apnea-hypopnea-index, AHI). AHI neglects duration and morphology of individual respiratory events, which describe the severity of individual events. In the current paper, we investigate the novel Adjusted-AHI parameter (incorporating individual event severity) and AHI after weight loss in relation to sleeping position. It was hypothesised that there are positional differences in individual event severity changes during weight loss. Altogether, 32 successful (> 5% of weight) and 34 unsuccessful weight loss patients at baseline and after 1 year follow-up were analysed. The results revealed that individual respiratory event severity was reduced differently in supine and non-supine positions during weight loss. During weight loss, AHI was reduced by 54% (p = 0.004) and 74% (p < 0.001), while Adjusted-AHI was reduced by 14% (p = 0.454) and 48% (p = 0.003) in supine and non-supine positions, respectively. In conclusion, the severity of individual respiratory events decreased more in the non-supine position. The novel Adjusted-AHI parameter takes these changes into account and might therefore contribute additional information to the planning of treatment of OSA patients. (paper)

  7. Advancement of Phenotype Transformation of Cancer-associated Fibroblasts: 
from Genetic Alterations to Epigenetic Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dali CHEN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the field of human cancer research, even though the vast majority attentions were paid to tumor cells as “the seeds”, the roles of tumor microenvironments as “the soil” are gradually explored in recent years. As a dominant compartment of tumor microenvironments, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs were discovered to correlated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression and prognosis. And the exploration of the mechanisms of CAF phenotype transformation would conducive to the further understand of the CAFs function in human cancers. As we known that CAFs have four main origins, including epithelial cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and local mesenchymal cells. However, researchers found that all these origins finally conduct similiar phenotypes from intrinsic to extrinsic ones. Thus, what and how a mechanism can conduct the phenotype transformation of CAFs with different origins? Two viewpoints are proposed to try to answer the quetsion, involving genetic alterations and epigenetic modifications. This review will systematically summarize the advancement of mechanisms of CAF phenotype transformations in the aspect of genentic and epigenetic modifications.

  8. Altered cardiac rhythm in infants with bronchiolitis and respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Galeone Carlotta; Barbier Paolo; Gualtieri Laura; Tagliabue Claudia; Tremolati Elena; Ghiglia Silvia; Bosis Samantha; Salice Patrizia; Esposito Susanna; Marchisio Paola; Principi Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although the most frequent extra-pulmonary manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection involve the cardiovascular system, no data regarding heart function in infants with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection have yet been systematically collected. The aim of this study was to verify the real frequency of heart involvement in patients with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection, and whether infants with mild or moderate disease also risk heart ...

  9. Altered Corticostriatal Connectivity and Exploration/Exploitation Imbalance Emerge as Intermediate Phenotypes for a Neonatal Dopamine Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Barbara Y; Galiñanes, Gregorio L; Taravini, Irene R E; Belforte, Juan E; Murer, M Gustavo

    2015-10-01

    Findings showing that neonatal lesions of the forebrain dopaminergic system in rodents lead to juvenile locomotor hyperactivity and learning deficits have been taken as evidence of face validity for the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, the core cognitive and physiological intermediate phenotypes underlying this rodent syndrome remain unknown. Here we show that early postnatal dopaminergic lesions cause long-lasting deficits in exploitation of shelter, social and nutritional resources, and an imbalanced exploratory behavior, where nondirected local exploration is exacerbated, whereas sophisticated search behaviors involving sequences of goal directed actions are degraded. Importantly, some behavioral deficits do not diminish after adolescence but instead worsen or mutate, particularly those related to the exploration of wide and spatially complex environments. The in vivo electrophysiological recordings and morphological reconstructions of striatal medium spiny neurons reveal corticostriatal alterations associated to the behavioral phenotype. More specifically, an attenuation of corticostriatal functional connectivity, affecting medial prefrontal inputs more markedly than cingulate and motor inputs, is accompanied by a contraction of the dendritic arbor of striatal projection neurons in this animal model. Thus, dopaminergic neurons are essential during postnatal development for the functional and structural maturation of corticostriatal connections. From a bottom-up viewpoint, our findings suggest that neuropsychiatric conditions presumably linked to developmental alterations of the dopaminergic system should be evaluated for deficits in foraging decision making, alterations in the recruitment of corticostriatal circuits during foraging tasks, and structural disorganization of the frontostriatal connections. PMID:25872916

  10. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella LoMauro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. METHODS: Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. RESULTS: Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1 compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (p<0.01. In contrast to OI type IV patients, whose chest wall geometry and function was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (p<0.01 angle at the sternum (pectus carinatum, paradoxical inspiratory inward motion of the pulmonary rib cage, significant thoraco-abdominal asynchronies and rib cage distortions in supine position (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the restrictive respiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the

  11. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal β-hexamer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids 28QPVIV32, highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a β-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the β-hexamer structure by mutating 28QPVIV32 to 28AAAAA32 had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNase and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having β-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.

  12. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rincón-Arévalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/− mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD, by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410 [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia.

  13. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A.; Ramírez-Pineda, José R.; Yassin, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD), by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410) [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:27081674

  14. Identification of Vaccine-Altered Circulating B Cell Phenotypes Using Mass Cytometry and a Two-Step Clustering Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejoski, David; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Rodriguez Pozo, André; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Yousfi-Bogniaho, Rahima; Rogez-Kreuz, Christine; Clayette, Pascal; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Lévy, Yves; Cosma, Antonio; Le Grand, Roger; Beignon, Anne-Sophie

    2016-06-01

    Broadening our understanding of the abundance and phenotype of B cell subsets that are induced or perturbed by exogenous Ags will improve the vaccine evaluation process. Mass cytometry (CyTOF) is being used to increase the number of markers that can be investigated in single cells, and therefore characterize cell phenotype at an unprecedented level. We designed a panel of CyTOF Abs to compare the B cell response in cynomolgus macaques at baseline, and 8 and 28 d after the second homologous immunization with modified vaccinia virus Ankara. The spanning-tree progression analysis of density-normalized events (SPADE) algorithm was used to identify clusters of CD20(+) B cells. Our data revealed the phenotypic complexity and diversity of circulating B cells at steady-state and significant vaccine-induced changes in the proportions of some B cell clusters. All SPADE clusters, including those altered quantitatively by vaccination, were characterized phenotypically and compared using double hierarchical clustering. Vaccine-altered clusters composed of previously described subsets including CD27(hi)CD21(lo) activated memory and CD27(+)CD21(+) resting memory B cells, and subphenotypes with novel patterns of marker coexpression. The expansion, followed by the contraction, of a single memory B cell SPADE cluster was positively correlated with serum anti-vaccine Ab titers. Similar results were generated by a different algorithm, automatic classification of cellular expression by nonlinear stochastic embedding. In conclusion, we present an in-depth characterization of B cell subphenotypes and proportions, before and after vaccination, using a two-step clustering analysis of CyTOF data, which is suitable for longitudinal studies and B cell subsets and biomarkers discovery. PMID:27183591

  15. Short-term fertilizer application alters phenotypic traits of symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Simonsen, Anna K.; Han, Shery; Rekret, Phil; Rentschler, Christine S.; Heath, Katy D.; Stinchcombe, John R

    2015-01-01

    Fertilizer application is a common anthropogenic alteration to terrestrial systems. Increased nutrient input can impact soil microbial diversity or function directly through altered soil environments, or indirectly through plant-microbe feedbacks, with potentially important effects on ecologically-important plant-associated mutualists. We investigated the impacts of plant fertilizer, containing all common macro and micronutrients on symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), a group of ba...

  16. Methamphetamine Administration Targets Multiple Immune Subsets and Induces Phenotypic Alterations Suggestive of Immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Harms; Brenda Morsey; Craig W Boyer; Fox, Howard S.; Nora Sarvetnick

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a widely abused stimulant and its users are at increased risk for multiple infectious diseases. To determine the impact of meth on the immune system, we utilized a murine model that simulates the process of meth consumption in a typical addict. Our phenotypic analysis of leukocytes from this dose escalation model revealed that meth affected key immune subsets. Meth administration led to a decrease in abundance of natural killer (NK) cells and the remaining NK cells p...

  17. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  18. Deletion of the MED13 and CDK8 subunits of the Mediator improves the phenotype of a long-lived respiratory deficient mutant of Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Adeline; Bovier, Elodie; Sellem, Carole H; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie

    2015-09-01

    In Podospora anserina, the loss of function of the cytochrome segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is viable. This is due to the presence in this organism, as in most filamentous fungi, of an alternative respiratory oxidase (AOX) that provides a bypass to the cytochrome pathway. However mutants lacking a functional cytochrome pathway present multiple phenotypes including poorly colored thin mycelium and slow growth. In a large genetic screen based on the improvement of these phenotypes, we isolated a large number of independent suppressor mutations. Most of them led to the constitutive overexpression of the aox gene. In this study, we characterize a new suppressor mutation that does not affect the production of AOX. It is a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the MED13 subunit of the kinase module of the Mediator complex. Inactivation of the cdk8 gene encoding another subunit of the same module also results in partial suppression of a cytochrome-deficient mutant. Analysis of strains lacking the MED13 or CDK8 subunits points to the importance of these subunits as regulators involved in diverse physiological processes such as growth, longevity and sexual development. Interestingly, transcriptional analyses indicate that in P. anserina, loss of the respiratory cytochrome pathway results in the up-regulation of glycolysis-related genes revealing a new type of retrograde regulation. The loss of MED13 augments the up-regulation of some of these genes. PMID:26231682

  19. Point process time-frequency analysis of respiratory sinus arrhythmia under altered respiration dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heartbeat. We propose an algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat interval and respiratory recordings under dynamic respiration conditions. The blood volume pressure derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PI) are modeled as an inverse gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PI and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated by a frequency domain transfer function approach. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. Experimental results confirm the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states.

  20. The dynamics of carbon dioxide equilibration after alterations in the respiratory rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manual or automated control of mechanical ventilation can be realized as an open or closed-loop system for which the regulation of the ventilation parameters ideally is tuned to the dynamics and equilibration time of the biological system. We investigated the dynamic, transient state and equilibration time (teq) of the CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) after changes in the respiratory rate (ΔRR). In 17 anaesthetized patients without known history of lung disease, respiratory rate was alternately increased and decreased and end-tidal CO2 partial pressures (PetCO2) were measured. Linear relations were found between ΔRR and PetCO2 changes (ΔPetCO2 = 0.3 − 1.1 · ΔRR) and between ΔRR and teq for increasing and decreasing RR (teq(hypervent) = 0.5 · |ΔRR|, teq(hypovent) = 0.7 · |ΔRR|). Extrapolation of the transition between two PCO2 steady-states allowed for the prediction of the new PCO2 steady-state as early as 0.5 · teq with an error <4 mmHg. At bedside or in automated ventilation systems, the linear dependencies between ΔRR and ΔPCO2 and between ΔRR and teq as well as early steady-state prediction of PCO2 could be used as a guidance towards a timing and step size regulation of RR that is well adapted to the biological system. (paper)

  1. Even mild respiratory distress alters tissue oxygenation significantly in preterm infants during neonatal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables continuous non-invasive measurements of regional oxygen saturation (rSO2). The aim was to evaluate the dynamics of rSO2 of the brain, preductal and postductal tissues during postnatal transition in preterm infants with and without respiratory support (RS). This single-centre study was designed as an exploratory prospective observational study. Fifty one preterm infants (≥ 30 + 0 and < 37 + 0 weeks) delivered by caesarean section were included. RS using a T-Piece-Resuscitator and supplemental oxygen were given according to guidelines. NIRS measurements were carried out by using Invos Monitor (Covidien; USA) for the first 15 min of life. Three NIRS transducers were attached on the forehead (rSO2brain), the right forearm (rSO2arm) and the left lower leg (rSO2leg). Two groups were compared based on need for RS: normal transition (NT) and RS group. Results: In NT group rSO2brain increased over time and was significantly higher than rSO2arm, whereas in RS group rSO2brain and rSO2arm increased without significant differences. Courses of rSO2arm and rSO2leg increased over time and showed a converging pattern with initially lower values of rSO2leg in NT group and a diverging pattern with lower levels of rSO2leg in RS group. Overall, rSO2 levels were higher in NT compared to RS group. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the decreased rSO2 levels in RS group compared to NT group are not only caused by lower arterial oxygen saturation levels, but also by a compromised perfusion even in infants with only mild respiratory distress. (paper)

  2. Genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 recapitulates phenotypic alterations underlying cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, T K; Alshammari, M A; Nenov, M N; Hoxha, E; Cambiaghi, M; Marcinno, A; James, T F; Singh, P; Labate, D; Li, J; Meltzer, H Y; Sacchetti, B; Tempia, F; Laezza, F

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive processing is highly dependent on the functional integrity of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) interneurons in the brain. These cells regulate excitability and synaptic plasticity of principal neurons balancing the excitatory/inhibitory tone of cortical networks. Reduced function of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and disruption of GABAergic synapses in the cortical circuitry result in desynchronized network activity associated with cognitive impairment across many psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms underlying these complex phenotypes are still poorly understood. Here we show that in animal models, genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 (Fgf14), a regulator of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission, leads to loss of PV interneurons in the CA1 hippocampal region, a critical area for cognitive function. Strikingly, this cellular phenotype associates with decreased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and also coincides with disrupted CA1 inhibitory circuitry, reduced in vivo gamma frequency oscillations and impaired working memory. Bioinformatics analysis of schizophrenia transcriptomics revealed functional co-clustering of FGF14 and genes enriched within the GABAergic pathway along with correlatively decreased expression of FGF14, PVALB, GAD67 and VGAT in the disease context. These results indicate that Fgf14−/− mice recapitulate salient molecular, cellular, functional and behavioral features associated with human cognitive impairment, and FGF14 loss of function might be associated with the biology of complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27163207

  3. Automated Behavioral Phenotyping Reveals Presymptomatic Alterations in a SCA3 Genetrap Mouse Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeannette Hübener; Nicolas Casadei; Peter Teismann; Mathias W. Seeliger; Maria Bj(o)rkqvist; Stephan von H(o)rsten; Olaf Riess; Huu Phuc Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of disease models of neurodegenerative disorders requires a systematic and comprehensive phenotyping in a highly standardized manner,Therefore,automated high-resolution behavior test systems such as the homecage based LabMaster system are of particular interest.We demonstrate the power of the automated LabMaster system by discovering previously unrecognized features of a recently characterized atxn3 mutant mouse model.This model provided neurological symptoms including gait ataxia,tremor,weight loss and premature death at the age of t2 months usually detectable just 2 weeks before the mice died.Moreover,using the LabMaster system we were able to detect hypoactivity in presymptomatic mutant mice in the dark as well as light phase.Additionally,we analyzed inflammation,immunological and hematological parameters,which indicated a reduced immune defense in phenotypic mice.Here we demonstrate thai a detailed characterization even of organ systems that are usually not affected in SCA3 is important for further studies of pathogenesis and required for the preclinical therapeutic studies.

  4. Hereditary rickets. How genetic alterations explain the biochemical and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Gole, Evaggelia; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni

    2013-12-01

    The reemergence of vitamin D deficiency in the industrialized countries resurrects the "threat" of nutritional rickets, especially among pediatric populations, a fact that may lead to underdiagnosis of hereditary rickets. Today, hereditary rickets may be subdivided into two main groups according to their biochemical profile: the one associated with defects in vitamin D synthesis and action and the second associated with abnormal phosphorus metabolism. The classification of the patients in a particular group of hereditary rickets is determinative of the treatment to follow. This review, through the recent advances on vitamin D and P metabolism, discusses the molecular and biochemical defects associated to each group of inherited rickets, as well as the clinical phenotypes and the recommended therapeutic approaches.

  5. Exploring the phenotypic expression of a regulatory proteome- altering gene by spectroscopy and chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, L.; Nielsen, J.P.; Møller, B.;

    2001-01-01

    electrophoresis, resulting in a radically changed amino acid and chemical composition. A synergy interval partial least squares regression model (si-PLSR) is tested to select combinations of spectral segments which have a high correlation to defined chemical components indicative of the lys3a gene, such as direct...... spectroscopic sensor from the chemical physical fingerprint. The PLS algorithm chooses spectral intervals: which combine both direct and indirect proteome effects. This explains the robustness of NIR spectral predictions by PLSR for a wide range of chemical components. The new option of using spectroscopy......, analytical chemistry and chemometrics in modeling the genetically based covariance of physical/chemical fingerprints of the intact phenotype in plant breeding and biotechnology is discussed....

  6. Burn injury reveals altered phenotype in mannan-binding lectin-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Kristensen, Mette; Hamblin, MR; Thiel, Steffen;

    2007-01-01

    Burn injury destroys skin, the second largest innate immune organ in the body, and triggers chaotic immune and inflammatory responses. The pattern recognition molecule, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), plays an important role in the first-line host defense against infectious agents. MBL initiates...... the lectin complement pathway and acts as an opsonin. Recent studies suggest that MBL also modulates inflammatory responses. We report that local responses after burn in MBL null mice differ from those found in wild-type (WT) mice in the following important biological markers: spontaneous eschar separation......, thinned epidermis and dermis, upregulation of soluble factors including cytokines, chemokines, cell adhesion molecules, a growth factor-binding protein, and matrix metalloproteinases. Mice lacking C1q, C4, or C3 did not show the lack of eschar separation seen in MBL null-burn phenotype. These findings...

  7. Listeria monocytogenes Mutants with Altered Growth Phenotypes at Refrigeration Temperature and High Salt Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Burall, Laurel S.; Laksanalamai, Pongpan; Datta, Atin R.

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can survive and grow in refrigerated temperatures and high-salt environments. In an effort to better understand the associated mechanisms, a library of ∼ 5,200 transposon mutants of LS411, a food isolate from the Jalisco cheese outbreak, were screened for their ability to grow in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at 5°C or in the presence of 7% NaCl and two mutants with altered growth profiles were identified. The LS522 mutant has a transposon insertion between secA2 and...

  8. High glucose alters retinal astrocytes phenotype through increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Seok Shin

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are macroglial cells that have a crucial role in development of the retinal vasculature and maintenance of the blood-retina-barrier (BRB. Diabetes affects the physiology and function of retinal vascular cells including astrocytes (AC leading to breakdown of BRB. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms leading to retinal AC dysfunction under high glucose conditions remain unclear. Here we show that high glucose conditions did not induce the apoptosis of retinal AC, but instead increased their rate of DNA synthesis and adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. These alterations were associated with changes in intracellular signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration and proliferation. High glucose conditions also affected the expression of inflammatory cytokines in retinal AC, activated NF-κB, and prevented their network formation on Matrigel. In addition, we showed that the attenuation of retinal AC migration under high glucose conditions, and capillary morphogenesis of retinal endothelial cells on Matrigel, was mediated through increased oxidative stress. Antioxidant proteins including heme oxygenase-1 and peroxiredoxin-2 levels were also increased in retinal AC under high glucose conditions through nuclear localization of transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2. Together our results demonstrated that high glucose conditions alter the function of retinal AC by increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress with significant impact on their proliferation, adhesion, and migration.

  9. Fibrocytes in the Fibrotic Lung: Altered Phenotype Detected by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eReese

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrocytes are bone marrow hematopoietic-derived cells that also express a mesenchymal cell marker (commonly collagen I and participate in fibrotic diseases of multiple organs. Given their origin, they or their precursors must be circulating cells before recruitment into target tissues. While most previous studies focused on circulating fibrocytes, here we focus on the fibrocyte phenotype in fibrotic tissue. The study’s relevance to human disease is heightened by use of a model in which bleomycin is delivered systemically, recapitulating several features of human scleroderma including multi-organ fibrosis not observed when bleomycin is delivered directly into the lungs. Using flow cytometry, we find in the fibrotic lung a large population of CD45high fibrocytes (called Region I rarely found in vehicle-treated control mice. A second population of CD45+ fibrocytes (called Region II is observed in both control and fibrotic lung. The level of CD45 in circulating fibrocytes is far lower than in either Region I or II lung fibrocytes. The chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are expressed at higher levels in Region I than in Region II and are present at very low levels in all other lung cells including CD45+/collagen I- leucocytes. The collagen chaperone HSP47 is present at similar high levels in both Regions I and II, but at a higher level in fibrotic lung than in control lung. There is also a major population of HSP47high/CD45- cells in fibrotic lung not present in control lung. CD44 is present at higher levels in Region I than in Region II and at much lower levels in all other cells including CD45+/collagen I- leucocytes. When lung fibrosis is inhibited by restoring caveolin-1 activity using a caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide (CSD, a strong correlation is observed between fibrocyte number and fibrosis score. In summary, the distinctive phenotype of fibrotic lung fibrocytes suggests that fibrocyte differentiation occurs primarily within the

  10. A 3-month age difference profoundly alters the primary rat stromal vascular fraction phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaade, Marlene Louise; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2016-06-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) is a heterogeneous population obtained from collagenase digestion of adipose tissue. When cultured the population becomes more homogeneous and the cells are then termed adipose stromal/stem cells (ASCs). Both the freshly isolated primary SVF population and the cultured ASC population possess regenerative abilities suggested to be mediated by paracrine mechanisms mainly. The use of ASCs and SVF cells, both in animal studies and human clinical studies, has dramatically increased during recent years. However, more knowledge regarding optimal donor characteristics such as age is demanded. Here we report that even a short age difference has an impact on the phenotype of primary SVF cells. We observed that a 3-month difference in relatively young adult rats affects the expression pattern of several mesenchymal stem cell markers in their primary SVF. The younger animals had significantly more CD90+/CD44+/CD29+/PDGFRα+primary cells, than the aged rats, suggesting an age dependent shift in the relative cell type distribution within the population. Taken together with recent studies of much more pronounced age differences, our data strongly suggest that donor age is a very critical parameter that should be taken into account in future stem cell studies, especially when using primary cells. PMID:27265810

  11. Alteration of lymphocyte phenotype and function in sickle cell anemia: Implications for vaccine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandya, Emmanuel; Reynolds, Teri; Obaro, Stephen; Makani, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have increased susceptibility to infections, secondary to impairment of immune function. Besides the described dysfunction in innate immunity, including impaired opsonization and phagocytosis of bacteria, evidence of dysfunction of T and B lymphocytes in SCA has also been reported. This includes reduction in the proportion of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, reduction of CD4+ helper: CD8+ suppressor T cell ratio, aberrant activation and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg ), skewing of CD4+ T cells towards Th2 response and loss of IgM-secreting CD27 + IgM(high) IgD(low) memory B cells. These changes occur on the background of immune activation characterized by predominance of memory CD4+ T cell phenotypes, increased Th17 signaling and elevated levels of C-reactive protein and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, which may affect the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines available to prevent infections in SCA. Thus, in order to optimize the use of vaccines in SCA, a thorough understanding of T and B lymphocyte functions and vaccine reactivity among individuals with SCA is needed. Studies should be encouraged of different SCA populations, including sub-Saharan Africa where the burden of SCA is highest. This article summarizes our current understanding of lymphocyte biology in SCA, and highlights areas that warrant future research. Am. J. Hematol. 91:938-946, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27237467

  12. Phenotypic and Genotypic Alterations of Durancin GL-Resistant Enterococcus durans Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lihui; Liu, Lingping; Liu, Fang; Ju, Xingrong; Yuan, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The emergence and spread of bacteriocin-resistant bacteria threaten the efficiency of bacteriocin usage as food preservatives. In this experiment, 19 selected Enterococcus durans strains acquired resistance after exposure to durancin GL, and the mutants had similar intermediate levels of resistance. One wild-type E. durans KLDS 6.0603 and its two resistant mutants, E. durans KLDS 6.0603-2 and E. durans KLDS 6.0603-3, were used to characterize phenotypic and genotypic differences. Approximately 100 μg/mL of durancin GL can penetrate the cytoplasmic membrane of E. durans KLDS 6.0603, causing damage to bacterial cells, but cannot penetrate E. durans KLDS 6.0603-2 and KLDS 6.0603-3 membranes. Unsaturated fatty acid content in resistant strains was significantly increased compared with wild-type strains, indicating that the former has more fluidity of cell membrane than the latter. Decreased mannose phosphotransferase system gene expression (mptD) was observed in the two resistant strains. Results showed that the factors, including the increased unsaturated fatty acid and decreased mptD expression, could contribute to durancin GL resistance. PMID:27096434

  13. Prenatal Rosiglitazone Administration to Neonatal Rat Pups Does Not Alter the Adult Metabolic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Sierra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prenatally administered rosiglitazone (RGZ is effective in enhancing lung maturity; however, its long-term safety remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the effects of prenatally administered RGZ on the metabolic phenotype of adult rats. Methods. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rat dams were administered either placebo or RGZ at embryonic days 18 and 19. Between 12 and 20 weeks of age, the rats underwent glucose and insulin tolerance tests and de novo fatty acid synthesis assays. The lungs, liver, skeletal muscle, and fat tissue were processed by Western hybridization for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP, and surfactant proteins B (SPB and C (SPC. Plasma was assayed for triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, glucagon, and troponin-I levels. Lungs were also morphometrically analyzed. Results. Insulin and glucose challenges, de novo fatty acid synthesis, and all serum assays revealed no differences among all groups. Western hybridization for PPARγ, ADRP, SPB, and SPC in lung, liver, muscle, and fat tissue showed equal levels. Histologic analyses showed a similar number of alveoli and septal thickness in all experimental groups. Conclusions. When administered prenatally, RGZ does not affect long-term fetal programming and may be safe for enhancing fetal lung maturation.

  14. Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome: Altered phenotype of a contiguous gene syndrome by the presence of a chromosomal deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersh, J.H.; Williams, P.G.; Yen, F.F. [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is characterized by craniofacial anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, polydactyly of the hands and feet, and variable syndactyly. Intellectual abilities are usually normal. Inheritance is in an autosomal dominant fashion. The disorder has been mapped to chromosome 7p13, suggesting that the condition represents a contiguous gene syndrome (CGS). A male infant presented with multiple congenital anomalies, including omphalocele, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, esotropia, broad thumbs and halluces, syndactyly, polydactyly of one foot, hypotonia and developmental delay. A de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 7p was detected, 46,XY,del(7)(p13p15). Although clinical findings in this case were reminiscent of GCPS, and the chromosomal abnormality included the region assigned to the candidate gene for this syndrome, additional physical abnormalities were present, as well as cognitive deficits. Some of these features have been previously described in patients with chromosomal deletions of 7p. The chromosomal abnormality in our case provides supportive evidence of the gene locus in GCPS, and that GCPS represents a new CGS. However, a larger deletion, extending beyond the limits of the gene, significantly altered the phenotype. Isolation of the gene responsible for GCPS, and identification of additional patients with chromosomal abnormalities in this region of chromosome 7, should help to provide more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations.

  15. Adverse respiratory health and hematological alterations among agricultural workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides: a cross-sectional study in North India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fareed

    count were significantly altered (p<0.001 in pesticide sprayers than controls. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the unsafe occupational exposure of OP pesticides causes respiratory illness, decreased lung functions and hematological alterations among pesticide sprayers.

  16. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, A; Wickramasinghe, N; Adikari, T N; Gomes, L; Shyamali, N L A; Salio, M; Cerundolo, V; Ogg, G S; Malavige, G Neelika

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 ex-vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha-galactosyl-ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4(+) subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl-6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl-6 and inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4(+) iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  17. Phenotypic diversity and altered environmental plasticity in Arabidopsis thaliana with reduced Hsp90 levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Sangster

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone HSP90 aids the maturation of a diverse but select set of metastable protein clients, many of which are key to a variety of signal transduction pathways. HSP90 function has been best investigated in animal and fungal systems, where inhibition of the chaperone has exceptionally diverse effects, ranging from reversing oncogenic transformation to preventing the acquisition of drug resistance. Inhibition of HSP90 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovers novel morphologies dependent on normally cryptic genetic variation and increases stochastic variation inherent to developmental processes. The biochemical activity of HSP90 is strictly conserved between animals and plants. However, the substrates and pathways dependent on HSP90 in plants are poorly understood. Progress has been impeded by the necessity of reliance on light-sensitive HSP90 inhibitors due to redundancy in the A. thaliana HSP90 gene family. Here we present phenotypic and genome-wide expression analyses of A. thaliana with constitutively reduced HSP90 levels achieved by RNAi targeting. HSP90 reduction affects a variety of quantitative life-history traits, including flowering time and total seed set, increases morphological diversity, and decreases the developmental stability of repeated characters. Several morphologies are synergistically affected by HSP90 and growth temperature. Genome-wide expression analyses also suggest a central role for HSP90 in the genesis and maintenance of plastic responses. The expression results are substantiated by examination of the response of HSP90-reduced plants to attack by caterpillars of the generalist herbivore Trichoplusia ni. HSP90 reduction potentiates a more robust herbivore defense response. In sum, we propose that HSP90 exerts global effects on the environmental responsiveness of plants to many different stimuli. The comprehensive set of HSP90-reduced lines described here is a vital instrument to further examine

  18. Metformin ameliorates hepatic steatosis and inflammation without altering adipose phenotype in diet-induced obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Lung Woo

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is closely associated with obesity and insulin resistance. To better understand the pathophysiology of obesity-associated NAFLD, the present study examined the involvement of liver and adipose tissues in metformin actions on reducing hepatic steatosis and inflammation during obesity. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD for 12 weeks to induce obesity-associated NAFLD and treated with metformin (150 mg/kg/d orally for the last four weeks of HFD feeding. Compared with HFD-fed control mice, metformin-treated mice showed improvement in both glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Also, metformin treatment caused a significant decrease in liver weight, but not adiposity. As indicated by histological changes, metformin treatment decreased hepatic steatosis, but not the size of adipocytes. In addition, metformin treatment caused an increase in the phosphorylation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, which was accompanied by an increase in the phosphorylation of liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase and decreases in the phosphorylation of liver c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1 and in the mRNA levels of lipogenic enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines. However, metformin treatment did not significantly alter adipose tissue AMPK phosphorylation and inflammatory responses. In cultured hepatocytes, metformin treatment increased AMPK phosphorylation and decreased fat deposition and inflammatory responses. Additionally, in bone marrow-derived macrophages, metformin treatment partially blunted the effects of lipopolysaccharide on inducing the phosphorylation of JNK1 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB p65 and on increasing the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that metformin protects against obesity-associated NAFLD largely through direct effects on decreasing hepatocyte fat deposition and on inhibiting inflammatory responses in both hepatocytes and macrophages.

  19. Alterations of renal phenotype and gene expression profiles due to protein overload in NOD-related mouse strains

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    Agarwal Anupam

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite multiple causes, Chronic Kidney Disease is commonly associated with proteinuria. A previous study on Non Obese Diabetic mice (NOD, which spontaneously develop type 1 diabetes, described histological and gene expression changes incurred by diabetes in the kidney. Because proteinuria is coincident to diabetes, the effects of proteinuria are difficult to distinguish from those of other factors such as hyperglycemia. Proteinuria can nevertheless be induced in mice by peritoneal injection of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA. To gain more information on the specific effects of proteinuria, this study addresses renal changes in diabetes resistant NOD-related mouse strains (NON and NOD.B10 that were made to develop proteinuria by BSA overload. Methods Proteinuria was induced by protein overload on NON and NOD.B10 mouse strains and histology and microarray technology were used to follow the kidney response. The effects of proteinuria were assessed and subsequently compared to changes that were observed in a prior study on NOD diabetic nephropathy. Results Overload treatment significantly modified the renal phenotype and out of 5760 clones screened, 21 and 7 kidney transcripts were respectively altered in the NON and NOD.B10. Upregulated transcripts encoded signal transduction genes, as well as markers for inflammation (Calmodulin kinase beta. Down-regulated transcripts included FKBP52 which was also down-regulated in diabetic NOD kidney. Comparison of transcripts altered by proteinuria to those altered by diabetes identified mannosidase 2 alpha 1 as being more specifically induced by proteinuria. Conclusion By simulating a component of diabetes, and looking at the global response on mice resistant to the disease, by virtue of a small genetic difference, we were able to identify key factors in disease progression. This suggests the power of this approach in unraveling multifactorial disease processes.

  20. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  1. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Luz

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1-, fusion (fzo-1-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  2. Whole blood microarray analysis of pigs showing extreme phenotypes after a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Schroyen, Martine; Steibel, Juan P.; Koltes, James E.; Choi, Igseo; Raney, Nancy E.; Eisley, Christopher; Fritz-Waters, Eric; Reecy, James M.; Dekkers, Jack C M; Rowland, Robert R. R.; Lunney, Joan K.; Catherine W Ernst; Christopher K Tuggle

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of variability in the response of pigs to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) infection, and recent demonstration of significant genetic control of such responses, leads us to believe that selection towards more disease resistant pigs could be a valid strategy to reduce its economic impact on the swine industry. To find underlying molecular differences in PRRS susceptible versus more resistant pigs, 100 animals with extremely different growth ra...

  3. New Insights on the Maternal Diet Induced-Hypertension: Potential Role of the Phenotypic Plasticity and Sympathetic-Respiratory Overactivity

    OpenAIRE

    João H. Costa-Silva; de Brito-Alves, José L.; Barros, Monique Assis de V.; Nogueira, Viviane Oliveira; Paulino-Silva, Kássya M.; de Oliveira-Lira, Allan; Nobre, Isabele G.; Fragoso, Jéssica; Leandro, Carol G.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and affects worldwide population. Current environment including life style coupled with genetic programming have been attributed to the rising incidence of hypertension. Besides, environmental conditions during perinatal development such as maternal malnutrition can program changes in the integration among renal, neural, and endocrine system leading to hypertension. This phenomenon is termed phenotypic...

  4. Alterations in cholinergic sensitivity of respiratory neurons induced by pre-natal nicotine: a mechanism for respiratory dysfunction in neonatal mice

    OpenAIRE

    Coddou, Claudio; Bravo, Eduardo; Eugenín, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine may link cigarette smoking during pregnancy with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Pre-natal nicotine leads to diminished ventilatory responses to hypercarbia and reduced central chemoreception in mice at post-natal days 0–3. We studied how pre-natal nicotine exposure changes the cholinergic contribution to central respiratory chemoreception in neonatal isolated brainstem–spinal cord and slice preparations.

  5. Alterations in osteoclast function and phenotype induced by different inhibitors of bone resorption--implications for osteoclast quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita V; Sørensen, Mette Guldmann; Kocijancic, Dino;

    2010-01-01

    Normal osteoclasts resorb bone by secretion of acid and proteases. Recent studies of patients with loss of function mutations affecting either of these processes have indicated a divergence in osteoclastic phenotypes. These difference in osteoclast phenotypes may directly or indirectly have secon...

  6. Leaf micro-environment influence the altered foliar phenotype of columnar apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talwara, Susheela; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo

    2015-01-01

    in the phenotype of the leaves in the leaf clusters that subtend the fruits of CATs, compared to their standard counterparts. This initial investigation considers standard and columnar trees at different levels of genetic relatedness and records significant increases in leaf area, leaf mass per unit area...... cultivars is altered in terms of incident light by their open architecture and this influences the growth and development of the leaves in the fruiting leaf clusters. Interaction with their modified genetic condition produces a foliar phenotype characteristic of CATs.......Columnar apple trees (CATs) have radically-altered architecture (significantly shorter internodes and lateral branches) when compared to standard apple trees, attributed to a mutation of the Co gene involved in apical dominance. These changes in architecture have been associated with changes...

  7. Adaptive Immunity in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Phenotype and Functional Alterations of T-Cells before and during Infliximab Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Szalay

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to determine T-cell subsets in peripheral blood and their intracellular signaling during activation. The prevalence of Th2 and Th17 cells responsible for the regulation of adaptive immunity was higher in AS than in 9 healthy controls. Although IFX therapy improved patients' condition, immune phenotype did not normalize. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial calcium responses of CD4+ and CD8+ cells to a specific activation were delayed, while NO generation was increased in AS. NO generation normalized sooner upon IFX than calcium response. These results suggest an abnormal immune phenotype with functional disturbances of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in AS.

  8. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

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    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  9. Medial prefrontal cortex: genes linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have altered expression in the highly social maternal phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Eisinger, Brian E; Driessen, Terri M.; Changjiu eZhao; Stephen eGammie

    2014-01-01

    The transition to motherhood involves CNS changes that modify sociability and affective state. However, these changes also put females at risk for postpartum depression and psychosis, which impairs parenting abilities and adversely affects children. Thus, changes in expression and interactions in a core subset of genes may be critical for emergence of a healthy maternal phenotype, but inappropriate changes of the same genes could put women at risk for postpartum disorders. This study evalu...

  10. 520-d Isolation and confinement simulating a flight to Mars reveals heightened immune responses and alterations of leukocyte phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, B; Rykova, M; Feuerecker, M; Jäger, B; Ladinig, C; Basner, M; Hörl, M; Matzel, S; Kaufmann, I; Strewe, C; Nichiporuk, I; Vassilieva, G; Rinas, K; Baatout, S; Schelling, G; Thiel, M; Dinges, D F; Morukov, B; Choukèr, A

    2014-08-01

    During interplanetary exploration, chronic stress caused by long term isolation and confinement in the spacecraft is one of the major concerns of physical and psychological health of space travelers. And for human on Earth, more and more people live in an isolated condition, which has become a common social problem in modern western society. Collective evidences have indicated prolonged chronic stress could bring big influence to human immune function, which may lead to a variety of health problems. However, to what extent long-term isolation can affect the immune system still remains largely unknow. A simulated 520-d Mars mission provided an extraordinary chance to study the effect of prolonged isolation. Six healthy males participated in this mission and their active neuroendocrine and immune conditions were studied with saliva and blood samples from all participants on chosen time points during the isolation period. As a typical neuroendocrine parameter, stress hormone cortisol was measured in the morning saliva samples. Immune phenotype changes were monitored through peripheral leukocyte phenotype analysis. Using an ex vivo viral infection simulation assay we assessed the immune response changes characterized by the ability to produce representative endogenous pro-inflammatory cytokines. The results of this study revealed elevated cortisol levels, increased lymphocyte amount and heightened immune responses, suggesting that prolonged isolation acting as chronic stressors are able to trigger leukocyte phenotype changes and poorly controlled immune responses.

  11. Early postnatal respiratory viral infection alters hippocampal neurogenesis, cell fate, and neuron morphology in the neonatal piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Matthew S; Harasim, Samantha; Rhodes, Justin S; Van Alstine, William G; Johnson, Rodney W

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory viral infections are common during the neonatal period in humans, but little is known about how early-life infection impacts brain development. The current study used a neonatal piglet model as piglets have a gyrencephalic brain with growth and development similar to human infants. Piglets were inoculated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) to evaluate how chronic neuroinflammation affects hippocampal neurogenesis and neuron morphology. Piglets in the neurogenesis study received one bromodeoxyuridine injection on postnatal day (PD) 7 and then were inoculated with PRRSV. Piglets were sacrificed at PD 28 and the number of BrdU+ cells and cell fate were quantified in the dentate gyrus. PRRSV piglets showed a 24% reduction in the number of newly divided cells forming neurons. Approximately 15% of newly divided cells formed microglia, but this was not affected by sex or PRRSV. Additionally, there was a sexual dimorphism of new cell survival in the dentate gyrus where males had more cells than females, and PRRSV infection caused a decreased survival in males only. Golgi impregnation was used to characterize dentate granule cell morphology. Sholl analysis revealed that PRRSV caused a change in inner granule cell morphology where the first branch point was extended further from the cell body. Males had more complex dendritic arbors than females in the outer granule cell layer, but this was not affected by PRRSV. There were no changes to dendritic spine density or morphology distribution. These findings suggest that early-life viral infection can impact brain development. PMID:25176574

  12. Early postnatal respiratory viral infection alters hippocampal neurogenesis, cell fate, and neuron morphology in the neonatal piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Matthew S; Harasim, Samantha; Rhodes, Justin S; Van Alstine, William G; Johnson, Rodney W

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory viral infections are common during the neonatal period in humans, but little is known about how early-life infection impacts brain development. The current study used a neonatal piglet model as piglets have a gyrencephalic brain with growth and development similar to human infants. Piglets were inoculated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) to evaluate how chronic neuroinflammation affects hippocampal neurogenesis and neuron morphology. Piglets in the neurogenesis study received one bromodeoxyuridine injection on postnatal day (PD) 7 and then were inoculated with PRRSV. Piglets were sacrificed at PD 28 and the number of BrdU+ cells and cell fate were quantified in the dentate gyrus. PRRSV piglets showed a 24% reduction in the number of newly divided cells forming neurons. Approximately 15% of newly divided cells formed microglia, but this was not affected by sex or PRRSV. Additionally, there was a sexual dimorphism of new cell survival in the dentate gyrus where males had more cells than females, and PRRSV infection caused a decreased survival in males only. Golgi impregnation was used to characterize dentate granule cell morphology. Sholl analysis revealed that PRRSV caused a change in inner granule cell morphology where the first branch point was extended further from the cell body. Males had more complex dendritic arbors than females in the outer granule cell layer, but this was not affected by PRRSV. There were no changes to dendritic spine density or morphology distribution. These findings suggest that early-life viral infection can impact brain development.

  13. The Transcription Cofactor Swi6 of the Fusarium graminearum Is Involved in Fusarium Graminearum Virus 1 Infection-Induced Phenotypic Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Moonil; Lee, Yoonseung; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    The transcription cofactor Swi6 plays important roles in regulating vegetative growth and meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functions of Swi6 ortholog were also characterized in Fusarium graminearum which is one of the devastating plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we report possible role of FgSwi6 in the interaction between F. graminearum and Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1) strain DK21. FgV1 perturbs biological characteristics of host fungi such as vegetative growth, sporulation, pigmentation, and reduction of the virulence (hypovirulence) of its fungal host. To characterize function(s) of FgSWI6 gene during FgV1 infection, targeted deletion, over-expression, and complementation mutants were generated and further infected successfully with FgV1. Deletion of FgSwi6 led to severe reduction of vegetative growth even aerial mycelia while over-expression did not affect any remarkable alteration of phenotype in virus-free isolates. Virus-infected (VI) FgSWI6 deletion isolate exhibited completely delayed vegetative growth. However, VI FgSWI6 over-expression mutant grew faster than any other VI isolates. To verify whether these different growth patterns in VI isolates, viral RNA quantification was carried out using qRT-PCR. Surprisingly, viral RNA accumulations in VI isolates were similar regardless of introduced mutations. These results provide evidence that FgSWI6 might play important role(s) in FgV1 induced phenotype alteration such as delayed vegetative growth. PMID:27493603

  14. Alterations in the Rate of Limb Movement Using a Lower Body Positive Pressure Treadmill Do Not Influence Respiratory Rate or Phase III Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Buono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of alterations in rate of limb movement on Phase III ventilation during exercise, independent of metabolic rate, gait style, and treadmill incline. Subjects completed five submaximal exercise bouts on a lower body positive pressure treadmill (AlterG P 200. The percent body weight for the five exercise bouts was 100, 87, 75, 63, and 50% and each was matched for carbon dioxide production (VCO2. Naturally, to match the VCO2 while reducing the body weight up to 50% of normal required a significant increase in the treadmill speed from 3.0±0.1 to 4.1±0.2 mph, which resulted in a significant (P<0.05 increase in the mean step frequency (steps per minute from 118±10 at 3 mph (i.e., 100% of body weight to 133±6 at 4.1 mph (i.e., 50% of body weight. The most important finding was that significant increases in step frequency did not significantly alter minute ventilation or respiratory rate. Such results do not support an important role for the rate of limb movement in Phase III ventilation during submaximal exercise, when metabolic rate, gait style, and treadmill incline are controlled.

  15. Altered Peripheral Blood Monocyte Phenotype and Function in Chronic Liver Disease: Implications for Hepatic Recruitment and Systemic Inflammation.

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    Victoria L Gadd

    Full Text Available Liver and systemic inflammatory factors influence monocyte phenotype and function, which has implications for hepatic recruitment and subsequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses, as well as host defence.Peripheral blood monocyte surface marker (CD14, CD16, CD163, CSF1R, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, HLA-DR, CD62L, SIGLEC-1 expression and capacity for phagocytosis, oxidative burst and LPS-stimulated TNF production were assessed in patients with hepatitis C (HCV (n = 39 or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD (n = 34 (classified as non-advanced disease, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls (n = 11 by flow cytometry.The selected markers exhibited similar monocyte-subset-specific expression patterns between patients and controls. Monocyte phenotypic signatures differed between NAFLD and HCV patients, with an increased proportion of CD16+ non-classical monocytes in NAFLD, but increased expression of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in HCV. In both cohorts, monocyte CCR2 expression was reduced and CCR4 elevated over controls. CD62L expression was specifically elevated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and positively correlated with the model-for-end-stage-liver-disease score. Functionally, monocytes from patients with decompensated cirrhosis had equal phagocytic capacity, but displayed features of dysfunction, characterised by lower HLA-DR expression and blunted oxidative responses. Lower monocyte TNF production in response to LPS stimulation correlated with time to death in 7 (46% of the decompensated patients who died within 8 months of recruitment.Chronic HCV and NAFLD differentially affect circulating monocyte phenotype, suggesting specific injury-induced signals may contribute to hepatic monocyte recruitment and systemic activation state. Monocyte function, however, was similarly impaired in patients with both HCV and NAFLD, particularly in advanced disease, which likely contributes to the increased

  16. Gene expression profiling identifies microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 as regulators of microenvironment-driven alterations in melanoma phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz L Hartman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diversity of functional phenotypes observed within a tumor does not exclusively result from intratumoral genetic heterogeneity but also from the response of cancer cells to the microenvironment. We have previously demonstrated that the morphological and functional phenotypes of melanoma can be dynamically altered upon external stimuli. FINDINGS: In the present study, transcriptome profiles were generated to explore the molecules governing phenotypes of melanospheres grown in the bFGF(+EGF(+ serum-free cultures and monolayers maintained in the serum-containing medium. Higher expression levels of MITF-dependent genes that are responsible for differentiation, e.g., TYR and MLANA, and stemness-related genes, e.g., ALDH1A1, were detected in melanospheres. These results were supported by the observation that the melanospheres contained more pigmented cells and cells exerting the self-renewal capacity than the monolayers. In addition, the expression of the anti-apoptotic, MITF-dependent genes e.g., BCL2A1 was also higher in the melanospheres. The enhanced activity of MITF in melanospheres, as illustrated by the increased expression of 74 MITF-dependent genes, identified MITF as a central transcriptional regulator in melanospheres. Importantly, several genes including MITF-dependent ones were expressed in melanospheres and original tumors at similar levels. The reduced MITF level in monolayers might be partially explained by suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and DKK1, a secreted inhibitor of this pathway, was highly up-regulated in monolayers in comparison to melanospheres and original tumors. Furthermore, the silencing of DKK1 in monolayers increased the percentage of cells with self-renewing capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that melanospheres can be used to unravel the molecular pathways that sustain intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity. Melanospheres directly derived from tumor specimens more accurately mirrored

  17. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-05-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced their homing patterns following administration to mice with ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury using whole body bioluminescence imaging. The effect of MSCs on macrophage phenotype following direct and indirect coculture was assessed using qPCR. Human cytokine production was measured using multiplex arrays. After IR, MSCs homed to injured kidneys where they afforded protection indicated by decreased proximal tubule kidney injury molecule-1 expression, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels. SDS-PAGE and immunofluorescence labeling revealed MSCs reduced collagen α1(I) and IV by day 7 post-IR. Gelatin zymography confirmed that MSC treatment significantly increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in IR kidneys, which contributed to a reduction in total collagen. Following direct and indirect coculture, macrophages expressed genes indicative of an anti-inflammatory "M2" phenotype. MSC-derived human GM-CSF, EGF, CXCL1, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, PDGF-AA, and CCL5 were identified in culture supernatants. In conclusion, MSCs home to injured kidneys and promote repair, which may be mediated by their ability to promote M2 macrophage polarization.

  18. Medial prefrontal cortex: genes linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have altered expression in the highly social maternal phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E Eisinger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition to motherhood involves CNS changes that modify sociability and affective state. However, these changes also put females at risk for postpartum depression and psychosis, which impairs parenting abilities and adversely affects children. Thus, changes in expression and interactions in a core subset of genes may be critical for emergence of a healthy maternal phenotype, but inappropriate changes of the same genes could put women at risk for postpartum disorders. This study evaluated microarray gene expression changes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, a region implicated in both maternal behavior and psychiatric disorders. Postpartum mice were compared to virgin controls housed with females and isolated for identical durations. Using the Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET, we found that the genetic landscape of maternal mPFC bears statistical similarity to gene databases associated with schizophrenia (5 of 5 sets and bipolar disorder (BPD, 3 of 3 sets. In contrast to previous studies of maternal lateral septum and medial preoptic area, enrichment of autism and depression-linked genes was not significant (2 of 9 sets, 0 of 4 sets. Among genes linked to multiple disorders were fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7, glutamate metabotropic receptor 3 (Grm3, platelet derived growth factor, beta polypeptide (Pdgfrb, and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1. RT-qPCR confirmed these gene changes as well as FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1 and proenkephalin (Penk. Systems-level methods revealed involvement of developmental gene networks in establishing the maternal phenotype and indirectly suggested a role for numerous microRNAs and transcription factors in mediating expression changes. Together, this study suggests that a subset of genes involved in shaping the healthy maternal brain may also be dysregulated in mental health disorders and put females at risk for postpartum psychosis with aspects of schizophrenia and BPD.

  19. Early life exposure to environmental tobacco smoke alters immune response to asbestos via a shift in inflammatory phenotype resulting in increased disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Traci Ann; Holian, Andrij; Pinkerton, Kent E; Lee, Joong Won; Cho, Yoon Hee

    2016-07-01

    Asbestos in combination with tobacco smoke exposure reportedly leads to more severe physiological consequences than asbestos alone; limited data also show an increased disease risk due to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure. Environmental influences during gestation and early lung development can result in physiological changes that alter risk for disease development throughout an individual's lifetime. Therefore, maternal lifestyle may impact the ability of offspring to subsequently respond to environmental insults and alter overall disease susceptibility. In this study, we examined the effects of exposure to ETS in utero and during early postnatal development on asbestos-related inflammation and disease in adulthood. ETS exposure in utero appeared to shift inflammation towards a Th2 phenotype, via suppression of Th1 inflammatory cytokine production. This effect was further pronounced in mice exposed to ETS in utero and during early postnatal development. In utero ETS exposure led to increased collagen deposition, a marker of fibrotic disease, when the offspring was later exposed to asbestos, which was further increased with additional ETS exposure during early postnatal development. These data suggest that ETS exposure in utero alters the immune responses and leads to greater disease development after asbestos exposure, which is further exacerbated when exposure to ETS continues during early postnatal development. PMID:27138493

  20. Elevated paternal glucocorticoid exposure alters the small noncoding RNA profile in sperm and modifies anxiety and depressive phenotypes in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, A K; Fennell, K A; Perreau, V M; Fox, A; O'Bryan, M K; Kim, J H; Bredy, T W; Pang, T Y; Hannan, A J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that physiological and behavioral traits may be transgenerationally inherited through the paternal lineage, possibly via non-genomic signals derived from the sperm. To investigate how paternal stress might influence offspring behavioral phenotypes, a model of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation was used. Male breeders were administered water supplemented with corticosterone (CORT) for 4 weeks before mating with untreated female mice. Female, but not male, F1 offspring of CORT-treated fathers displayed altered fear extinction at 2 weeks of age. Only male F1 offspring exhibited altered patterns of ultrasonic vocalization at postnatal day 3 and, as adults, showed decreased time in open on the elevated-plus maze and time in light on the light-dark apparatus, suggesting a hyperanxiety-like behavioral phenotype due to paternal CORT treatment. Interestingly, expression of the paternally imprinted gene Igf2 was increased in the hippocampus of F1 male offspring but downregulated in female offspring. Male and female F2 offspring displayed increased time spent in the open arm of the elevated-plus maze, suggesting lower levels of anxiety compared with control animals. Only male F2 offspring showed increased immobility time on the forced-swim test and increased latency to feed on the novelty-supressed feeding test, suggesting a depression-like phenotype in these animals. Collectively, these data provide evidence that paternal CORT treatment alters anxiety and depression-related behaviors across multiple generations. Analysis of the small RNA profile in sperm from CORT-treated males revealed marked effects on the expression of small noncoding RNAs. Sperm from CORT-treated males contained elevated levels of three microRNAs, miR-98, miR-144 and miR-190b, which are predicted to interact with multiple growth factors, including Igf2 and Bdnf. Sustained elevation of glucocorticoids is therefore involved in the transmission of paternal

  1. The Transcription Cofactor Swi6 of the Fusarium graminearum Is Involved in Fusarium Graminearum Virus 1 Infection-Induced Phenotypic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonil Son

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription cofactor Swi6 plays important roles in regulating vegetative growth and meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functions of Swi6 ortholog were also characterized in Fusarium graminearum which is one of the devastating plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we report possible role of FgSwi6 in the interaction between F. graminearum and Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1 strain DK21. FgV1 perturbs biological characteristics of host fungi such as vegetative growth, sporulation, pigmentation, and reduction of the virulence (hypovirulence of its fungal host. To characterize function(s of FgSWI6 gene during FgV1 infection, targeted deletion, over-expression, and complementation mutants were generated and further infected successfully with FgV1. Deletion of FgSwi6 led to severe reduction of vegetative growth even aerial mycelia while over-expression did not affect any remarkable alteration of phenotype in virus-free isolates. Virus-infected (VI FgSWI6 deletion isolate exhibited completely delayed vegetative growth. However, VI FgSWI6 over-expression mutant grew faster than any other VI isolates. To verify whether these different growth patterns in VI isolates, viral RNA quantification was carried out using qRT-PCR. Surprisingly, viral RNA accumulations in VI isolates were similar regardless of introduced mutations. These results provide evidence that FgSWI6 might play important role(s in FgV1 induced phenotype alteration such as delayed vegetative growth.

  2. A biospectroscopic analysis of human prostate tissue obtained from different time periods points to a trans-generational alteration in spectral phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theophilou, Georgios; Lima, Kássio M G; Briggs, Matthew; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Stringfellow, Helen F; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly-diagnosed malignancy in males worldwide; however, there is marked geographic variation in incidence that may be associated with a Westernised lifestyle. We set out to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) or Raman spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis or variable selection techniques employing genetic algorithm or successive projection algorithm could be utilised to explore differences between prostate tissues from differing years. In total, 156 prostate tissues from transurethral resection of the prostate procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia from 1983 to 2013 were collected. These were distributed to form seven categories: 1983-1984 (n = 20), 1988-1989 (n = 25), 1993-1994 (n = 21), 1998-1999 (n = 21), 2003-2004 (n = 21), 2008-2009 (n = 20) and 2012-2013 (n = 21). Ten-μm-thick tissue sections were floated onto Low-E (IR-reflective) slides for ATR-FTIR or Raman spectroscopy. The prostate tissue spectral phenotype altered in a temporal fashion. Examination of the two categories that are at least one generation (30 years) apart indicated highly-significant segregation, especially in spectral regions containing DNA and RNA bands (≈1,000-1,490 cm(-1)). This may point towards alterations that have occurred through genotoxicity or through epigenetic modifications. Immunohistochemical studies for global DNA methylation supported this. This study points to a trans-generational phenotypic change in human prostate. PMID:26310632

  3. Mutation of a family 8 glycosyltransferase gene alters cell wall carbohydrate composition and causes a humidity-sensitive semi-sterile dwarf phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Nga T; Long, Debbie; Kiang, Sophie; Coupland, George; Shoue, Douglas A; Carpita, Nicholas C; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2003-11-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains about 400 genes coding for glycosyltransferases, many of which are predicted to be involved in the synthesis and remodelling of cell wall components. We describe the isolation of a transposon-tagged mutant, parvus, which under low humidity conditions exhibits a severely dwarfed growth phenotype and failure of anther dehiscence resulting in semi-sterility. All aspects of the mutant phenotype were partially rescued by growth under high-humidity conditions, but not by the application of growth hormones or jasmonic acid. The mutation is caused by insertion of a maize Dissociation (Ds) element in a gene coding for a putative Golgi-localized glycosyltransferase belonging to family 8. Members of this family, originally identified on the basis of similarity to bacterial lipooligosaccharide glycosyltransferases, include enzymes known to be involved in the synthesis of bacterial and plant cell walls. Cell-wall carbohydrate analyses of the parvus mutant indicated reduced levels of rhamnogalacturonan I branching and alterations in the abundance of some xyloglucan linkages that may, however, be indirect consequences of the mutation. PMID:15010604

  4. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  5. The presence of nodules on legume root systems can alter phenotypic plasticity in response to internal nitrogen independent of nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Chooi-Hua; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    All higher plants show developmental plasticity in response to the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil. In legumes, N starvation causes the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic rhizobacteria fix atmospheric N2 for the host in exchange for fixed carbon (C) from the shoot. Here, we tested whether plastic responses to internal [N] of legumes are altered by their symbionts. Glasshouse experiments compared root phenotypes of three legumes, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa and Trifolium subterraneum, inoculated with their compatible symbiont partners and grown under four nitrate levels. In addition, six strains of rhizobia, differing in their ability to fix N2 in M. truncatula, were compared to test if plastic responses to internal [N] were dependent on the rhizobia or N2 -fixing capability of the nodules. We found that the presence of rhizobia affected phenotypic plasticity of the legumes to internal [N], particularly in root length and root mass ratio (RMR), in a plant species-dependent way. While root length responses of M. truncatula to internal [N] were dependent on the ability of rhizobial symbionts to fix N2 , RMR response to internal [N] was dependent only on initiation of nodules, irrespective of N2 -fixing ability of the rhizobia strains.

  6. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Christina Draijer; Barbro N. Melgert

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmon...

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection in elderly mice results in altered antiviral gene expression and enhanced pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terianne M Wong

    Full Text Available Elderly persons are more susceptible to RSV-induced pneumonia than young people, but the molecular mechanism underlying this susceptibility is not well understood. In this study, we used an aged mouse model of RSV-induced pneumonia to examine how aging alters the lung pathology, modulates antiviral gene expressions, and the production of inflammatory cytokines in response to RSV infection. Young (2-3 months and aged (19-21 months mice were intranasally infected with mucogenic or non-mucogenic RSV strains, lung histology was examined, and gene expression was analyzed. Upon infection with mucogenic strains of RSV, leukocyte infiltration in the airways was elevated and prolonged in aged mice compared to young mice. Minitab factorial analysis identified several antiviral genes that are influenced by age, infection, and a combination of both factors. The expression of five antiviral genes, including pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and osteopontin (OPN, was altered by both age and infection, while age was associated with the expression of 15 antiviral genes. Both kinetics and magnitude of antiviral gene expression were diminished as a result of older age. In addition to delays in cytokine signaling and pattern recognition receptor induction, we found TLR7/8 signaling to be impaired in alveolar macrophages in aged mice. In vivo, induction of IL-1β and OPN were delayed but prolonged in aged mice upon RSV infection compared to young. In conclusion, this study demonstrates inherent differences in response to RSV infection in young vs. aged mice, accompanied by delayed antiviral gene induction and cytokine signaling.

  8. Curcumin prevents maleate-induced nephrotoxicity: relation to hemodynamic alterations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, E; Sánchez-Lozada, L G; García-Niño, W R; García, E; Cerecedo, A; García-Arroyo, F E; Osorio, H; Arellano, A; Cristóbal-García, M; Loredo, M L; Molina-Jijón, E; Hernández-Damián, J; Negrette-Guzmán, M; Zazueta, C; Huerta-Yepez, S; Reyes, J L; Madero, M; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J

    2014-11-01

    The potential protective effect of the dietary antioxidant curcumin (120 mg/Kg/day for 6 days) against the renal injury induced by maleate was evaluated. Tubular proteinuria and oxidative stress were induced by a single injection of maleate (400 mg/kg) in rats. Maleate-induced renal injury included increase in renal vascular resistance and in the urinary excretion of total protein, glucose, sodium, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and N-acetyl β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), upregulation of kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, decrease in renal blood flow and claudin-2 expression besides of necrosis and apoptosis of tubular cells on 24 h. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring the oxidation of lipids and proteins and diminution in renal Nrf2 levels. Studies were also conducted in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of all the experimental groups. Maleate induced cell damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in LLC-PK1 cells in culture. In addition, maleate treatment reduced oxygen consumption in ADP-stimulated mitochondria and diminished respiratory control index when using malate/glutamate as substrate. The activities of both complex I and aconitase were also diminished. All the above-described alterations were prevented by curcumin. It is concluded that curcumin is able to attenuate in vivo maleate-induced nephropathy and in vitro cell damage. The in vivo protection was associated to the prevention of oxidative stress and preservation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I, and the in vitro protection was associated to the prevention of ROS production.

  9. NADPH Oxidase 1 Is Associated with Altered Host Survival and T Cell Phenotypes after Influenza A Virus Infection in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia R Hofstetter

    Full Text Available The role of the reactive oxygen species-producing NADPH oxidase family of enzymes in the pathology of influenza A virus infection remains enigmatic. Previous reports implicated NADPH oxidase 2 in influenza A virus-induced inflammation. In contrast, NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1 was reported to decrease inflammation in mice within 7 days post-influenza A virus infection. However, the effect of NADPH oxidase 1 on lethality and adaptive immunity after influenza A virus challenge has not been explored. Here we report improved survival and decreased morbidity in mice with catalytically inactive NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1*/Y compared with controls after challenge with A/PR/8/34 influenza A virus. While changes in lung inflammation were not obvious between Nox1*/Y and control mice, we observed alterations in the T cell response to influenza A virus by day 15 post-infection, including increased interleukin-7 receptor-expressing virus-specific CD8+ T cells in lungs and draining lymph nodes of Nox1*/Y, and increased cytokine-producing T cells in lungs and spleen. Furthermore, a greater percentage of conventional and interstitial dendritic cells from Nox1*/Y draining lymph nodes expressed the co-stimulatory ligand CD40 within 6 days post-infection. Results indicate that NADPH oxidase 1 modulates the innate and adaptive cellular immune response to influenza virus infection, while also playing a role in host survival. Results suggest that NADPH oxidase 1 inhibitors may be beneficial as adjunct therapeutics during acute influenza infection.

  10. Effects of Aging on the Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Relates alterations in respiratory system functions occurring with aging to changes in respiratory system structure during the course of life. Main alterations noted include loss of alveolar elastic recoil, alteration in chest wall structure and decreased respiratory muscle strength, and loss of surface area and changes in pulmonary circulation.…

  11. Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. The Respiratory System The respiratory system is made up of organs ... and the muscles that enable breathing. The Respiratory System Figure A shows the location of the respiratory ...

  12. Lithium treatment of APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice leads to reduced hyperphosphorylated tau, increased amyloid deposition and altered inflammatory phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany L Sudduth

    Full Text Available Lithium is an anti-psychotic that has been shown to prevent the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein through the inhibition of glycogen-synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3β. We recently developed a mouse model that progresses from amyloid pathology to tau pathology and neurodegeneration due to the genetic deletion of NOS2 in an APP transgenic mouse; the APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mouse. Because this mouse develops tau pathology, amyloid pathology and neuronal loss we were interested in the effect anti-tau therapy would have on amyloid pathology, learning and memory. We administered lithium in the diets of APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice for a period of eight months, followed by water maze testing at 12 months of age, immediately prior to sacrifice. We found that lithium significantly lowered hyperphosphorylated tau levels as measured by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. However, we found no apparent neuroprotection, no effect on spatial memory deficits and an increase in histological amyloid deposition. Aβ levels measured biochemically were unaltered. We also found that lithium significantly altered the neuroinflammatory phenotype of the brain, resulting in enhanced alternative inflammatory response while concurrently lowering the classical inflammatory response. Our data suggest that lithium may be beneficial for the treatment of tauopathies but may not be beneficial for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Dexamethasone treatment differentially alters viral shedding and the antibody and acute phase protein response after multivalent respiratory vaccination in beef steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to examine immunosuppression induced by dexamethasone (DEX) administration in cattle upon immunological responses to a multivalent respiratory vaccine containing replicating and non-replicating agents. Steers ( n = 32; 209 +/- 8 kg) seronegative to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis...

  14. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carian E. Boorsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases.

  15. The excitability and rhythm of medullary respiratory neurons in the cat are altered by the serotonin receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N, dimethyltryptamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalley, P M

    1994-06-13

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) is an indolealkylamine which has agonist activity at 5HT receptors. In the present investigation, 5-MeODMT had two types of effects on medullary respiratory neurons of the cat. Iontophoretic administration or i.v. doses (43 +/- 8.9 micrograms/kg) of 5-MeODMT hyperpolarized respiratory neurons and severely reduced action potential discharges. Cinanserin, a 5HT-2/1 c receptor antagonist, when injected i.v. reduced the inhibition produced by i.v. injection of 5-MeODMT. Iontophoresis of cinanserin did not antagonize inhibition produced by iontophoresis of 5-MeODMT or 5-HT. The depression of respiratory discharge by i.v. injection of 5-MeODMT is attributed to presynaptic effects (network depression) and post-synaptic activation of 5HT-1A receptors on respiratory neurons. 5-MeODMT (27 +/- 2.78 micrograms/kg i.v.) also increased discharge frequency of inspiratory and expiratory neurons. Inspiratory neuron discharges were briefer and expiratory neuron discharges occurred earlier in relation to phrenic nerve activity. It is suggested that the effects of the smaller doses are due to binding of 5-MeODMT to 5HT-1A receptors on early inspiratory neurons of the medulla. PMID:7922531

  16. The cytochrome b p.278Y>C mutation causative of a multisystem disorder enhances superoxide production and alters supramolecular interactions of respiratory chain complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelli, Anna; Tropeano, Concetta V; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta;

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome b is the only mtDNA-encoded subunit of the mitochondrial complex III (CIII), the functional bottleneck of the respiratory chain. Previously, the human cytochrome b missense mutation m.15579A>G, which substitutes the Tyr 278 with Cys (p.278Y>C), was identified in a patient with severe......, the CI, CI + CIII and CII + CIII activities and the rate of ATP synthesis driven by the CI or CII substrate were only partially reduced or unaffected. Consistent with these findings, mutated cybrids maintained the mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of oligomycin, indicating...... that it originated from the respiratory electron transport chain. The p.278Y>C mutation enhanced superoxide production, as indicated by direct measurements in mitochondria and by the imbalance of glutathione homeostasis in intact cybrids. Remarkably, although the assembly of CI or CIII was not affected...

  17. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  18. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B-mediated disorders and identification of altered cell-cycle dynamics due to ARID1B haploinsufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sim, J. C. H.; White, S. M.; Fitzpatrick, E.;

    2014-01-01

    patient-derived and ARID1B knockdown fibroblasts after serum starvation demonstrated delayed cell cycle re-entry associated with reduced cell number in the S-1 phase. Based on the patient's distinctive phenotype, we ascertained four additional patients and identified heterozygous de novo ARID1B frameshift...

  19. Matrix Metalloproteinase Stromelysin-1 Triggers a Cascade of Molecular Alterations that leads to stable epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Conversion and a Premalignant Phenotype in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Muschler, J.; Freedman, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-08-11

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate ductal morphogenesis, apoptosis, and neoplastic progression in mammary epithelial cells. To elucidate the direct effects of MMPs on mammary epithelium, we generated functionally normal cells expressing an inducible autoactivating stromelysin-1 (SL-1) transgene. Induction of SL-1 expression resulted in cleavage of E-cadherin, and triggered progressive phenotypic conversion characterized by disappearance of E-cadherin and catenins from cell-cell contacts, downregulation of cytokeratins, upregulation of vimentin, induction of keratinocyte growth factor expression and activation, and upregulation of endogenous MMPs. Cells expressing SL-1 were unable to undergo lactogenic differentiation and became invasive. Once initiated, this phenotypic conversion was essentially stable, and progressed even in the absence of continued SL-1 expression. These observations demonstrate that inappropriate expression of SL-1 initiates a cascade of events that may represent a coordinated program leading to loss of the differentiated epithelial phenotype and gain of some characteristics of tumor cells. Our data provide novel insights into how MMPs function in development and neoplastic conversion.

  20. Influence of Altered NADH Metabolic Pathway on the Respiratory-deficient Mutant of Rhizopus oryzae and its L-lactate Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang; Guo, Chenchen; Luo, Shuizhong; Jiang, Shaotong; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory-deficient mutants of Rhizopus oryzae (R. oryzae) AS 3.3461 were acquired by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation to investigate changes in intracellular NADH metabolic pathway and its influence on the fermentation characteristics of the strain. Compared with R. oryzae AS 3.3461, the intracellular ATP level of the respiratory-deficient strain UV-1 decreased by 52.7 % and the glucose utilization rate rose by 8.9 %; When incubated for 36 h, the activities of phosphofructokinase (PFK), hexokinase (HK), and pyruvate kinase (PK) in the mutant rose by 74.2, 7.2, and 12.0 %, respectively; when incubated for 48 h, the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the mutant rose by 14.6 %; when a mixed carbon source with a glucose/gluconic acid ratio of 1:1 was substituted to culture the mutant, the NADH/NAD(+) ratio decreased by 4.6 %; the ATP content dropped by 27.6 %; the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity rose by 22.7 %; and the lactate yield rose by 11.6 %. These results indicated that changes to the NADH metabolic pathway under a low-energy charge level can effectively increase the glycolytic rate and further improve the yield of L-lactate of R. oryzae.

  1. A phenotypic screen in zebrafish identifies a novel small-molecule inducer of ectopic tail formation suggestive of alterations in non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Gebruers

    Full Text Available Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive model for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and characterization of pharmacologically active small molecules of natural origin. We carried out a zebrafish-based phenotypic screen of over 3000 plant-derived secondary metabolite extracts with the goal of identifying novel small-molecule modulators of the BMP and Wnt signaling pathways. One of the bioactive plant extracts identified in this screen - Jasminum gilgianum, an Oleaceae species native to Papua New Guinea - induced ectopic tails during zebrafish embryonic development. As ectopic tail formation occurs when BMP or non-canonical Wnt signaling is inhibited during the tail protrusion process, we suspected a constituent of this extract to act as a modulator of these pathways. A bioassay-guided isolation was carried out on the basis of this zebrafish phenotype, identifying para-coumaric acid methyl ester (pCAME as the active compound. We then performed an in-depth phenotypic analysis of pCAME-treated zebrafish embryos, including a tissue-specific marker analysis of the secondary tails. We found pCAME to synergize with the BMP-inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 in inducing ectopic tails, and causing convergence-extension defects in compound-treated embryos. These results indicate that pCAME may interfere with non-canonical Wnt signaling. Inhibition of Jnk, a downstream target of Wnt/PCP signaling (via morpholino antisense knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with the kinase inhibitor SP600125 phenocopied pCAME-treated embryos. However, immunoblotting experiments revealed pCAME to not directly inhibit Jnk-mediated phosphorylation of c-Jun, suggesting additional targets of SP600125, and/or other pathways, as possibly being involved in the ectopic tail formation activity of pCAME. Further investigation of pCAME's mechanism of action will help determine this compound's pharmacological utility.

  2. Respiratory Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Özyılmaz, Ezgi

    2014-01-01

    The main function of the lungs is to maintain the exchange between the pulmonary capillary and the air in the alveoli. By this way, the arteriel oxygen and carbondioxide tension remains constant. Respiratory failure is a syndrome which is defined as the loss of the ability of respiratory system to exchange oxygen and carbondioxide elimination function. The main pathophysiological causes of respiratory failure include ventilation-perfusion mismatch, alveolar hypoventilation, impaired diffusion...

  3. Central Neurogenic Respiratory Failure: A Challenging Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Flávio A.; Bernardino, Tenille; Maciel, Ricardo O.H.; Felizola, Sérgio F.A.; Costa, Eduardo L.V.; Silva, Gisele S

    2011-01-01

    Background Central nervous system lesions are rare causes of respiratory failure. Simple observation of the breathing pattern can help localize the lesion, but the examiner needs to be aware of potential pitfalls such as metabolic or pulmonary alterations. Methods We describe 3 cases in which central neurogenic respiratory failure occurred simultaneously with other alterations or in an unusual presentation. Results All patients were diagnosed with central neurogenic respiratory failure and tr...

  4. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  5. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  6. Culture of primary ciliary dyskinesia epithelial cells at air-liquid interface can alter ciliary phenotype but remains a robust and informative diagnostic aid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Hirst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD requires the analysis of ciliary function and ultrastructure. Diagnosis can be complicated by secondary effects on cilia such as damage during sampling, local inflammation or recent infection. To differentiate primary from secondary abnormalities, re-analysis of cilia following culture and re-differentiation of epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface (ALI aids the diagnosis of PCD. However changes in ciliary beat pattern of cilia following epithelial cell culture has previously been described, which has brought the robustness of this method into question. This is the first systematic study to evaluate ALI culture as an aid to diagnosis of PCD in the light of these concerns. METHODS: We retrospectively studied changes associated with ALI-culture in 158 subjects referred for diagnostic testing at two PCD centres. Ciliated nasal epithelium (PCD n = 54; non-PCD n  111 was analysed by high-speed digital video microscopy and transmission electron microscopy before and after culture. RESULTS: Ciliary function was abnormal before and after culture in all subjects with PCD; 21 PCD subjects had a combination of static and uncoordinated twitching cilia, which became completely static following culture, a further 9 demonstrated a decreased ciliary beat frequency after culture. In subjects without PCD, secondary ciliary dyskinesia was reduced. CONCLUSIONS: The change to ciliary phenotype in PCD samples following cell culture does not affect the diagnosis, and in certain cases can assist the ability to identify PCD cilia.

  7. Multiple bidirectional alterations of phenotype and changes in proliferative potential during the in vitro and in vivo passage of clonal mast cell populations derived from mouse peritoneal mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanakura, Y.; Thompson, H.; Nakano, T.; Yamamura, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, Y.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Galli, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    Mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMC) express a connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC) phenotype, including reactivity with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and incorporation of (35S) sulfate predominantly into heparin proteoglycans. When PMC purified to greater than 99% purity were cultured in methylcellulose with IL-3 and IL-4, approximately 25% of the PMC formed colonies, all of which contained both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative mast cells. When these mast cells were transferred to suspension culture, they generated populations that were 100% berberine sulfate-negative, a characteristic similar to that of mucosal mast cells (MMC), and that synthesized predominantly chondroitin sulfate (35S) proteoglycans. When ''MMC-like'' cultured mast cells derived from WBB6F1-+/+ PMC were injected into the peritoneal cavities of mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice, the adoptively transferred mast cell population became 100% berberine sulfate-positive. In methylcellulose culture, these ''second generation PMC'' formed clonal colonies containing both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative cells, but exhibited significantly less proliferative ability than did normal +/+ PMC. Thus, clonal mast cell populations initially derived from single PMC exhibited multiple and bidirectional alterations between CTMC-like and MMC-like phenotypes. However, this process was associated with a progressive diminution of the mast cells' proliferative ability.

  8. Alteration of BACE1-dependent NRG1/ErbB4 signaling and schizophrenia-like phenotypes in BACE1-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonenko, A V; Melnikova, T; Laird, F M; Stewart, K-A; Price, D L; Wong, P C

    2008-04-01

    beta-Site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is required for the penultimate cleavage of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) leading to the generation of amyloid-beta peptides that is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In addition to its role in endoproteolysis of APP, BACE1 participates in the proteolytic processing of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and influences the myelination of central and peripheral axons. Although NRG1 has been genetically linked to schizophrenia and NRG1(+/-) mice exhibit a number of schizophrenia-like behavioral traits, it is not known whether altered BACE1-dependent NRG1 signaling can cause similar behavioral abnormalities. To test this hypothesis, we analyze the behaviors considered to be rodent analogs of clinical features of schizophrenia in BACE1(-/-) mice with impaired processing of NRG1. We demonstrate that BACE1(-/-) mice exhibit deficits in prepulse inhibition, novelty-induced hyperactivity, hypersensitivity to a glutamatergic psychostimulant (MK-801), cognitive impairments, and deficits in social recognition. Importantly, some of these manifestations were responsive to treatment with clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug. Moreover, although the total amount of ErbB4, a receptor for NRG1 was not changed, binding of ErbB4 with postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) was significantly reduced in the brains of BACE1(-/-) mice. Consistent with the role of ErbB4 in spine morphology and synaptic function, BACE1(-/-) mice displayed reduced spine density in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, our findings suggest that alterations in BACE1-dependent NRG1/ErbB4 signaling may participate in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related psychiatric disorders. PMID:18385378

  9. The new total Western diet for rodents does not induce an overweight phenotype or alter parameters of metabolic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Stephany P; Hintze, Korry J; Ward, Robert E; Larson, Deanna P; Lefevre, Michael; Benninghoff, Abby D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the impact of the total Western diet (TWD) for rodents and its macro- and micronutrient components on weight gain and biomarkers of metabolic function in mice compared to a 45% fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) diet and the standard AIN93G diet. We hypothesized that mice fed the TWD would have increased body fat with indicators of metabolic syndrome similar to mice consuming the DIO diet. As expected, DIO-fed mice acquired a metabolic syndrome phenotype typified by increased energy intake, increased body weight gain, increased fat mass, higher fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and higher plasma leptin relative to the AIN93G diet. Mice fed a macronutrient-modified (MM) diet (with standard vitamin and mineral composition) had a similar response, albeit to a lesser degree than mice fed the DIO diet. Mice fed a vitamin- and mineral-modified diet (with standard macronutrient composition) were not different from mice fed the AIN93G diet. Surprisingly, the TWD (with modified macronutrients, vitamins and minerals) did not significantly affect any of these parameters, despite the fact that the TWD macronutrient profile was identical to the MM diet. These data suggest that, in the context of the TWD, vitamin and mineral intakes in mice that reflect a Western dietary pattern inhibit the hyperphagia and resulting increased weight gain associated with the higher fat content of the TWD. In conclusion, these observations underscore the need to consider the influence of micronutrient intakes in pre-clinical models of obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27632924

  10. Different stress-related phenotypes of BALB/c mice from in-house or vendor: alterations of the sympathetic and HPA axis responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuett Christine

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laboratory routine procedures such as handling, injection, gavage or transportation are stressful events which may influence physiological parameters of laboratory animals and may interfere with the interpretation of the experimental results. Here, we investigated if female BALB/c mice derived from in-house breeding and BALB/c mice from a vendor which were shipped during their juvenile life differ in their HPA axis activity and stress responsiveness in adulthood. Results We show that already transferring the home cage to another room is a stressful event which causes an increased HPA axis activation for at least 24 hours as well as a loss of circulating lymphocytes which normalizes during a few days after transportation. However and important for the interpretation of experimental data, commercially available strain-, age- and gender-matched animals that were shipped over-night showed elevated glucocorticoid levels for up to three weeks after shipment, indicating a heightened HPA axis activation and they gained less body weight during adolescence. Four weeks after shipment, these vendor-derived mice showed increased corticosterone levels at 45-min after intraperitoneal ACTH challenge but, unexpectedly, no acute stress-induced glucocorticoid release. Surprisingly, activation of monoaminergic pathways were identified to inhibit the central nervous HPA axis activation in the vendor-derived, shipped animals since depletion of monoamines by reserpine treatment could restore the stress-induced HPA axis response during acute stress. Conclusions In-house bred and vendor-derived BALB/c mice show a different stress-induced HPA axis response in adulthood which seems to be associated with different central monoaminergic pathway activity. The stress of shipment itself and/or differences in raising conditions, therefore, can cause the development of different stress response phenotypes which needs to be taken into account when interpreting

  11. The new total Western diet for rodents does not induce an overweight phenotype or alter parameters of metabolic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Stephany P; Hintze, Korry J; Ward, Robert E; Larson, Deanna P; Lefevre, Michael; Benninghoff, Abby D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the impact of the total Western diet (TWD) for rodents and its macro- and micronutrient components on weight gain and biomarkers of metabolic function in mice compared to a 45% fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) diet and the standard AIN93G diet. We hypothesized that mice fed the TWD would have increased body fat with indicators of metabolic syndrome similar to mice consuming the DIO diet. As expected, DIO-fed mice acquired a metabolic syndrome phenotype typified by increased energy intake, increased body weight gain, increased fat mass, higher fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and higher plasma leptin relative to the AIN93G diet. Mice fed a macronutrient-modified (MM) diet (with standard vitamin and mineral composition) had a similar response, albeit to a lesser degree than mice fed the DIO diet. Mice fed a vitamin- and mineral-modified diet (with standard macronutrient composition) were not different from mice fed the AIN93G diet. Surprisingly, the TWD (with modified macronutrients, vitamins and minerals) did not significantly affect any of these parameters, despite the fact that the TWD macronutrient profile was identical to the MM diet. These data suggest that, in the context of the TWD, vitamin and mineral intakes in mice that reflect a Western dietary pattern inhibit the hyperphagia and resulting increased weight gain associated with the higher fat content of the TWD. In conclusion, these observations underscore the need to consider the influence of micronutrient intakes in pre-clinical models of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  12. The effect of anxiety on respiratory sensory gating measured by respiratory-related evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Pei-Ying S.; von Leupoldt, Andreas; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.; Davenport, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory sensory gating is evidenced by decreased amplitudes of the respiratory-related evoked poten-Received 24 September 2011 tials (RREP) N1 peak for the second (S2) compared to the first occlusion (S1) when two paired occlusions Accepted 2 July 2012 are presented with a 500-millisecond (ms) inter-stimulus-interval during one inspiration. Because anxiety is prevalent in respiratory diseases and associated with altered respiratory perception, we tested whether anxiety can modulate indivi...

  13. Neonatal transplantation tolerance is associated with a systemic reduction in memory cells, altered chimeric cell phenotype, and modified eicosanoid and cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, P; Nassiri, M; Gregorian, S; Viciana, A L; Streilein, J W

    1996-04-27

    Certain B10 background mice are resistant to tolerance induction following a neonatal inoculation of semiallogeneic class I/II MHC-disparate cells despite early thymic clonal deletion of alloreactive cells. The emergence of memory T cells and persistence of particular chimeric cells in the thymus has an association with this resistance. In these studies, we utilized a hemisplenectomy technique to examine systemic cell populations of adult Bl0.S (H2s, H2E-) mice that received (Bl0.S x B10.A)F1 cells at birth and before and following application (and rejection or acceptance) of Bl0.A (H2k/d, H2E+) skin grafts. Prior to skin graft challenge, tolerant mice had reduced splenic levels of memory (CD45hi, PgP-1hi, Mel-14neg) T cells as compared with the rejecting recipients and following B10.A graft challenge, the nontolerant mice showed a further increase in these cells. Elevated pretransplant levels of donor H2Kk+ cells coexpressing B220, CD11b, or CD3 were seen in the tolerant mice. Following skin grafting, splenic chimerism was reduced with differing chimeric cell phenotypes between the tolerant and nontolerant mice. In vitro production of PGE2 in a MLC was delayed in the tolerant mice with minimal production of IL-2 and IL-4. Nontolerant mice made high levels of TxB2 and heightened, early production of IL-2 and IL-4 during the MLC. Thus, tolerance induction is associated with increased numbers of particular chimeric cells, fewer peripheral lymphoid immunocompetant memory T cells, impaired eicosanoid secretion, and reduced alloreactivity and alloantigen-driven IL-2/IL-4 production. It appears that alloreactive cells necessary to break tolerance are generated when fewer class II+ (e.g., B220+, CD11b+) chimeric cells are present and that there is a coexistence of effector and regulatory T cell subpopulations in the nontolerant mice. By comparison, tolerance acquisition does not appear associated with the presence or generation of a predominant subtype of T cell but

  14. Mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells differentiate into odontoblast-like cells with induction of altered adhesive and migratory phenotype of integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Ozeki

    Full Text Available Methods for differentiating induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells into odontoblasts generally require epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Here, we sought to characterize the cells produced by a 'hanging drop' technique for differentiating mouse iPS cells into odontoblast-like cells that requires no such interaction. Cells were cultured by the hanging drop method on a collagen type-I (Col-I scaffold (CS combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-4 (CS/BMP-4 without an epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. We evaluated the expression of odontoblast-related mRNA and protein, and the proliferation rate of these cells using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence staining, and BrdU cell proliferation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The differentiated cells strongly expressed the mRNA for dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP and dentin matrix protein-1 (Dmp-1, which are markers of mature odontoblasts. Osteopontin and osteocalcin were not expressed in the differentiated cells, demonstrating that the differentiated iPS cells bore little resemblance to osteoblasts. Instead, they acquired odontoblast-specific properties, including the adoption of an odontoblastic phenotype, typified by high alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and calcification capacity. The cell-surface expression of proteins such as integrins α2, α6, αV and αVβ3 was rapidly up-regulated. Interestingly, antibodies and siRNAs against integrin α2 suppressed the expression of DSPP and Dmp-1, reduced the activity of ALP and blocked calcification, suggesting that integrin α2 in iPS cells mediates their differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. The adhesion of these cells to fibronectin and Col-I, and their migration on these substrata, was significantly increased following differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Thus, we have demonstrated that integrin α2 is involved in the differentiation of mouse iPS cells into odontoblast-like cells

  15. Inhibition of nestin suppresses stem cell phenotype of glioblastomas through the alteration of post-translational modification of heat shock protein HSPA8/HSC71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Yoshimura, Hisashi; Hagio, Masahito; Arai, Tomio

    2015-02-28

    Nestin, a class VI intermediate filament, was first described as a neuronal stem/progenitor cell marker. We previously reported that knockdown of nestin expression in human glioblastoma cells suppresses cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In the present study, we examined the effect of nestin on stemness, and identified molecules involved in modulating nestin function in glioblastoma cells. Nestin expression was shown to be higher in high-grade gliomas than in low-grade gliomas. Furthermore, compared with control cells, nestin short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-transfected glioblastoma cells exhibited reduced sphere formation, decreased expression of NANOG, N-cadherin, CD133, and Oct-4, and decreased tumor size in vivo. To examine the proteins regulated by nestin in glioblastomas, we carried out two-dimensional electrophoresis using nestin shRNA-transfected glioblastoma cells. As a result, nestin shRNA-transfected glioblastoma cells exhibited a decrease in the level of phosphorylation of heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein (HSC71; gene HSPA8). From immunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrated the direct binding of nestin, HSC71, and cyclin D1 in vitro. Overexpression of nestin in glioblastoma cells increased cell growth, sphere formation, and cell invasion. Transfection with HSC71 siRNA restored nestin expression and cell behavior; therefore, HSC71 knockdown will interfere with enhanced tumorigenic properties of glioblastoma cells that ectopically overexpress nestin. We have demonstrated that HSC71 and nestin regulate each other's expression levels or patterns, and that cyclin D1 is located downstream of nestin and HSC71. In conclusion, nestin regulates stemness, cell growth, and invasion in glioblastoma cells through the alteration of HSC71. Inhibition of nestin and HSC71 may thus be a useful molecular target in the treatment of glioblastomas.

  16. Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Ozyilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main function of the lungs is to maintain the exchange between the pulmonary capillary and the air in the alveoli. By this way, the arteriel oxygen and carbondioxide tension remains constant. Respiratory failure is a syndrome which is defined as the loss of the ability of respiratory system to exchange oxygen and carbondioxide elimination function. The main pathophysiological causes of respiratory failure include ventilation-perfusion mismatch, alveolar hypoventilation, impaired diffusion capacity and increased shunt. A number of diseases may result in respiratory failure by different pathophysiological reasons. The most common causes are Type 1 (hypoxemic and Type 2 (hypercapnic respiratory failure. When suspected with clinical signs and symptoms, the diagnosis should be confirmed with arterial blood gases. At this step, other diagnostic interventions, which could be performed, may be used to enlighten the underlying pathophysiological cause. Although the main therapeutic approach is similar, specific treatment are also required based on the underlying cause. The basic pathophysiological points, diagnosis and basic treatment approach have been evaluated in this review article. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 428-442

  17. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future. PMID:27300144

  18. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    9. 1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2004223 Inhibitive effect on airway mucus overproduction of DNA vaccine based on xenogeneic homologous calcium-activated chloride channel in asthmatic mice. SONG Liqiang (宋立强), et al. Dept Respir Med, Xijing Hosp , 4th Milit Med Univ, Xi’an 710032. Natl Med J China 2004;84(4):329-333.

  19. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    6.1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2004073 A study on the heterogenous apoptosis of lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils from peripheral blood of asthmatic patients. LIU Chuntao (刘春涛), et al. West China Hosp, Sichuan Univ, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2003; 26(10):610 - 614.

  20. Overexpression of the Transcription Factors GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 Differentially Regulates Wax and Cutin Biosynthesis, Alters Cuticle Properties, and Changes Leaf Phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangyang; Wu, Hanying; Zhao, Mingming; Wu, Wang; Xu, Yinong; Gu, Dan

    2016-04-21

    SHINE (SHN/WIN) clade proteins, transcription factors of the plant-specific APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element binding factor (AP2/ERF) family, have been proven to be involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Glycine max is an important economic crop, but its molecular mechanism of wax biosynthesis is rarely characterized. In this study, 10 homologs of Arabidopsis SHN genes were identified from soybean. These homologs were different in gene structures and organ expression patterns. Constitutive expression of each of the soybean SHN genes in Arabidopsis led to different leaf phenotypes, as well as different levels of glossiness on leaf surfaces. Overexpression of GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 in Arabidopsis exhibited 7.8-fold and 9.9-fold up-regulation of leaf cuticle wax productions, respectively. C31 and C29 alkanes contributed most to the increased wax contents. Total cutin contents of leaves were increased 11.4-fold in GmSHN1 overexpressors and 5.7-fold in GmSHN9 overexpressors, mainly through increasing C16:0 di-OH and dioic acids. GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 also altered leaf cuticle membrane ultrastructure and increased water loss rate in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Transcript levels of many wax and cutin biosynthesis and leaf development related genes were altered in GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 overexpressors. Overall, these results suggest that GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 may differentially regulate the leaf development process as well as wax and cutin biosynthesis.

  1. Overexpression of the Transcription Factors GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 Differentially Regulates Wax and Cutin Biosynthesis, Alters Cuticle Properties, and Changes Leaf Phenotypes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available SHINE (SHN/WIN clade proteins, transcription factors of the plant-specific APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element binding factor (AP2/ERF family, have been proven to be involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Glycine max is an important economic crop, but its molecular mechanism of wax biosynthesis is rarely characterized. In this study, 10 homologs of Arabidopsis SHN genes were identified from soybean. These homologs were different in gene structures and organ expression patterns. Constitutive expression of each of the soybean SHN genes in Arabidopsis led to different leaf phenotypes, as well as different levels of glossiness on leaf surfaces. Overexpression of GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 in Arabidopsis exhibited 7.8-fold and 9.9-fold up-regulation of leaf cuticle wax productions, respectively. C31 and C29 alkanes contributed most to the increased wax contents. Total cutin contents of leaves were increased 11.4-fold in GmSHN1 overexpressors and 5.7-fold in GmSHN9 overexpressors, mainly through increasing C16:0 di-OH and dioic acids. GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 also altered leaf cuticle membrane ultrastructure and increased water loss rate in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Transcript levels of many wax and cutin biosynthesis and leaf development related genes were altered in GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 overexpressors. Overall, these results suggest that GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 may differentially regulate the leaf development process as well as wax and cutin biosynthesis.

  2. Respiratory Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  3. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  4. Alterações histopatológicas pulmonares em pacientes com insuficiência respiratória aguda: um estudo em autopsias Pulmonary histopathological alterations in patients with acute respiratory failure: an autopsy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Matos Soeiro

    2008-02-01

    patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF and determine whether underlying diseases and certain associated risk factors increase the incidence of these histopathological patterns. METHODS: Final autopsy reports were reviewed, and 3030 autopsies of patients > 1 year of age with an underlying disease and associated risk factors were selected. All had developed diffuse infiltrates and died of ARF-related pulmonary alterations. RESULTS: The principal pulmonary histopathological alterations resulting in immediate death were diffuse alveolar damage (DAD, pulmonary edema, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP and alveolar hemorrhage. The principal underlying diseases were AIDS, bronchopneumonia, sepsis, liver cirrhosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, acute myocardial infarction (AMI, cerebrovascular accident, tuberculosis, cancer, chronic kidney failure and leukemia. The principal associated risk factors were as follows: age > 50 years; arterial hypertension; congestive heart failure; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and diabetes mellitus. These risk factors and AIDS correlated with a high risk of developing LIP; these same risk factors, if concomitant with sepsis or liver cirrhosis, correlated with a risk of developing DAD; thromboembolism and these risk factors correlated with a risk of developing alveolar hemorrhage; these risk factors and AMI correlated with a risk of developing pulmonary edema. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary findings in patients who died of ARF presented four histopathological patterns: DAD, pulmonary edema, LIP and alveolar hemorrhage. Underlying diseases and certain associated risk factors correlated positively with specific histopathological findings on autopsy.

  5. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    7.1 Upper Respiratory Tract Diesase And Bronchial Asthma 2007072 Dysfunction of releasing adrenaline in asthmatic adrenaline medullary chromaffin cells due to functional redundancy primed by nerve growth factor. WANG Jun(汪俊), et al. Dept Resp Dis Xiangya Hosp Central South Univ, Changsha 410008. Chin J Tuberc Dis 2006;29(12):812-815. Objective To investigate the possible causes of the dysfunction of adrenaline release in asthma rats and to identify the role of nerve growth factor(NGF) in this process.

  6. Respiratory System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    8.1 Respiratory failure2007204 Comparison of the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers and low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. WANG Xiaozhi(王晓芝),et al. Dept Respir & Intensive Care Unit, Binzhou Med Coll, Binzhou 256603. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(1):44-47. Objective To compare the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(LRM) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, randomized comparison of BiPAP mechanical ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(test group) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation (control group) was conducted in 28 patients with ARDS. FiO2/PaO2 ratio, respiratory system compliance(Cs), central venous pressure (CVP), duration of ventilation support were recorded at 0 h, 48 h and 72 h separately. The ventilation associated lung injury and mortality at 28 d were also recorded. Results The FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (298±16) and (309±16) cm H2O, Cs were (38.4±2.2) and (42.0±1.3) ml/cm H2O, CVP were (13.8±0.8) and (11.6±0.7) cm H2O in the test group at 48 h and 72 h separately. In the control group, FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (212±12) and (246±17) cm H2O, Cs were (29.5±1.3) and (29.0±1.0) ml/cm H2O, CVP were 18.6±1.1 and (16.8±1.0) cm H2O. The results were better in the test group as compared with the control group (t=10.03-29. 68, all P<0.01). The duration of ventilation support in the test group was shorter than the control group [(14±3) d vs (19±3)d, t=4.80, P<0.01]. The mortality in 28 d and ventilation associated lung injury were similar in the two groups. Conclusion The results show that combination of LRM with BiPAP mode ventilation, as compared with the control group, contributes to the improved FiO2/PaO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, stable homodynamic and shorter duration of ventilation support in patients with ARDs.

  7. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930118 Facial or nasal mask pressure supportventilation in managing acute exacerbation ofchronic respiratory failure in COPD patients.CHEN Rongchang(陈荣昌),et al.GuangzhouInstit Respir Dis,Guangzhou 510120.Chin Tu-berc & Respir Dis 1992;15(5)285-287.Eleven COPD patients(age:65±9 yrs)withacute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure(PaCO2 11.3±1.1kPa)were treated with maskpressure support ventilation,another 10 similarpatients(age:68±12yrs)served as controls.Bi-PAP ventilator was used with the followingmodifications:(1)Non-rehreathing valve set-in proximal to mask;(2)5 LPM oxygen flow de-livered into mask to reduce the dead space ef-fect.Mask ventilation was given 2-3 hours ev-ery time and 1-2 times daily for 7 days.Syn-

  8. Respiratory system involvement in Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Kuo, Christin; Ananth, Amitha Lakshmi; Myers, Angela; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Stevenson, David A; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Hudgins, Louanne

    2016-07-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the HRAS proto-oncogene. Respiratory system complications have been reported in individuals with CS, but a comprehensive description of the full spectrum and incidence of respiratory symptoms in these patients is not available. Here, we report the clinical course of four CS patients with respiratory complications as a major cause of morbidity. Review of the literature identified 56 CS patients with descriptions of their neonatal course and 17 patients in childhood/adulthood. We found that in the neonatal period, respiratory complications are seen in approximately 78% of patients with transient respiratory distress reported in 45% of neonates. Other more specific respiratory diagnoses were reported in 62% of patients, the majority of which comprised disorders of the upper and lower respiratory tract. Symptoms of upper airway obstruction were reported in CS neonates but were more commonly diagnosed in childhood/adulthood (71%). Analysis of HRAS mutations and their respiratory phenotype revealed that the common p.Gly12Ser mutation is more often associated with transient respiratory distress and other respiratory diagnoses. Respiratory failure and dependence on mechanical ventilation occurs almost exclusively with rare mutations. In cases of prenatally diagnosed CS, the high incidence of respiratory complications in the neonatal period should prompt anticipatory guidance and development of a postnatal management plan. This may be important in cases involving rarer mutations. Furthermore, the high frequency of airway obstruction in CS patients suggests that otorhinolaryngological evaluation and sleep studies should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102959

  9. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  10. Respiratory Issues in OI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivery, and other respiratory disorders may lead to respiratory failure and death particularly in people with OI Type ... have OI. It is a sobering fact that respiratory failure is the leading cause of death for people ...

  11. Genetic disorders of neonatal respiratory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, F S; Hamvas, A; Nogee, L M

    2001-08-01

    Genetic risk for respiratory distress in infancy has been recognized with increasing frequency in neonatal intensive care units. Reports of family clusters of affected infants and of ethnic- and gender-based respiratory phenotypes point to the contribution of inheritance. Similarly, different outcomes among gestationally matched infants with comparable exposures to oxygen, mechanical ventilation, or nutritional deficiency also suggest a genetic risk for respiratory distress. Examples of inherited deficiency of surfactant protein B in both humans and genetically engineered murine lineages illustrate the importance of identifying markers of genetic risk. In contrast to developmental, inflammatory, or nutritional causes of respiratory distress that may resolve as infants mature, genetic causes result in both acute and chronic (and potentially irreversible) respiratory failure. The availability of clinically useful genetic markers of risk for respiratory distress in infancy will permit development of rational strategies for treatment of genetic lung disorders of infancy and more accurate counseling of families whose infants are at genetic risk for development of respiratory distress at birth or during early childhood. We review examples of genetic variations known to be associated with or cause respiratory distress in infancy. PMID:11477198

  12. Effects of Pleural Effusion on Respiratory Function

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrouska, I; M Klimathianaki; NM Siafakas

    2004-01-01

    The accumulation of pleural effusion has important effects on respiratory system function. It changes the elastic equilibrium volumes of the lung and chest wall, resulting in a restrictive ventilatory effect, chest wall expansion and reduced efficiency of the inspiratory muscles. The magnitude of these alterations depends on the pleural fluid volume and the underlying disease of the respiratory system. The decrease in lung volume is associated with hypoxemia mainly due to an increase in right...

  13. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  14. Isolation of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+, or Salmonella Java, from Indonesia and alteration of the d-tartrate fermentation phenotype by disrupting the ORF STM 3356.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Ho; Choi, Seon Young; Lee, Je Hee; Lee, Hyejon; Shin, Eun Hee; Agtini, Magdarina D; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Ochiai, R Leon; Clemens, John D; Wain, John; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Lee, Bok Kwon; Song, Manki; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Wook

    2006-12-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Paratyphi B [O1,4,(5),12 : Hb : 1,2] can cause either an enteric fever (paratyphoid fever) or self-limiting gastroenteritis in humans. The d-tartrate non-fermenting variant S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT- (S. Paratyphi B) is the causative agent of paratyphoid fever, and the d-tartrate fermenting variant S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+ (S. Paratyphi B dT+; formerly called Salmonella Java) causes gastroenteritis. S. Java is currently recognized as an emerging problem worldwide. Twelve dT+ S. Java isolates were collected in Indonesia between 2000 and 2002. One-third of them contained Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1), which gives the multidrug-resistant phenotype to the bacteria. In this study, a PCR-based method to detect a single nucleotide difference responsible for the inability to ferment d-tartrate, reported elsewhere, was validated. The d-tartrate fermenting phenotype of S. Java was converted to the non-fermenting phenotype by the disruption of the ORF STM 3356, and the d-tartrate non-fermenting phenotype of the ORF STM 3356-disrupted strain and the dT- reference strain was changed to the dT+ phenotype by complementing ORF STM 3356 in trans. The results show that the dT+ phenotype requires a functional product encoded by STM 3356, and support the use of the PCR-based discrimination method for S. Paratyphi B and S. Java as the standard differentiation method.

  15. Respiratory and cardiac self-gated radial MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Motion in cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a major challenge, as it results in artifacts like image blurring if not compensated for. Respiratory motion of the heart can be addressed by acquisitions during breath-hold for scan times shorter than 10–15 seconds. When longer scans are required, only data from end-expiration is used. Determination of the respiratory position is typically achieved via interleaved Respiratory Navigator (RNAV) measurements. Self-Gating (SG) is an alter...

  16. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  18. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Respiratory Failure? Diseases and conditions that impair breathing can cause ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, ...

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Respiratory Failure Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  20. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  1. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  2. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Teens > Lungs and ... you didn't breathe, you couldn't live. Lungs & Respiratory System Basics Each day we breathe about ...

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus Print A A A Text Size What's in ... RSV When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH- ...

  4. Altered phosphodiesterase 3-mediated cAMP hydrolysis contributes to a hypermotile phenotype in obese JCR:LA-cp rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for diabetes-associated cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherton, Stuart J; Jimmo, Sandra L; Palmer, Daniel; Tilley, Douglas G; Dunkerley, Heather A; Raymond, Daniel R; Russell, James C; Absher, P Marlene; Sage, E Helene; Vernon, Robert B; Maurice, Donald H

    2002-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Of the many animal models used in the study of non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes, the JCR:LA-cp rat is unique in that it develops insulin resistance in the presence of obesity and manifests both peripheral and coronary vasculopathies. In this animal model, arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from homozygous obese (cp/cp) rats, but not from age-matched healthy (+/+ or + /cp, collectively defined +/?) littermates, display an " activated" phenotype in vitro and in vivo and have an elevated level of cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. In this report, we confirm that cp/cp rat aortic VSMCs have an elevated level of PDE3 activity and show that only particulate PDE3 (PDE3B) activity is elevated. In marked contrast to results obtained in + /? VSMCs, simultaneous activation of adenylyl cyclase and inhibition of PDE3 activity in cp/cp VSMCs synergistically increased cAMP. Although PDE3 inhibition did not potentiate the antimigratory effects of forskolin on +/? VSMCs, PDE3 inhibition did markedly potentiate the forskolin-induced inhibition of migration of cp/cp-derived VSMCs. Although PDE3 activity was elevated in cp/cp rat aortic VSMCs, levels of expression of cytosolic PDE3 (PDE3A) and PDE3B in +/? and cp/cp VSMCs, as well as activation of these enzymes following activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling cascade, were not different. Our data are consistent with an increased role for PDE3 in regulating cAMP-dependent signaling in cp/cp VSMCs and identify PDE3 as a cellular activity potentially responsible for the phenotype of cp/cp VSMCs.

  5. Microglia phenotype diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olah, M.; Biber, K.; Vinet, J.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, have under healthy conditions a resting phenotype that is characterized by a ramified morphology. With their fine processes microglia are continuously scanning their environment. Upon any homeostatic disturbance microglia rapidly change their phenotype

  6. Expression of Mitochondrial Gene Fragments within the Tapetum Induce Male Sterility by Limiting the Biogenesis of the Respiratory Machinery in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Felix Shaya; Svetlana Gaiduk; Ido Keren; Sofia Shevtsov; Hanita Zemah; Eduard Belausov; Dalia Evenor; Moshe Reuveni; Oren Ostersetzer-Biran

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs) are large and undergo frequent recombination events.A common phenotype that emerges as a consequence of altered mtDNA structure is cytoplasmic-male sterility (CMS).The molecular basis for CMS remains unclear,but it seems logical that altered respiration activities would result in reduced pollen production.Analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mtDNAs indicated that CMS-associated loci often contain fragments of known organellar genes.These may assemble with organellar complexes and thereby interfere with normal respiratory functions.Here,we analyzed whether the expression of truncated fragments of mitochondrial genes (i.e.atp4,cox1 and rps3) may induce male sterility by limiting the biogenesis of the respiratory machinery.cDNA fragments corresponding to atp4f,cox1f and rps3f were cloned in-frame to a mitochondrial localization signal and a C-termini HA-tag under a tapetum-speciflc promoter and introduced to tobacco plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.The constructs were then analyzed for their effect on mitochondrial activity and pollen fertility.Atp4f,Cox1f and Rps3f plants demonstrated male sterility phenotypes,which were tightly correlated with the expression of the recombinant fragments in the floral meristem.Fractionation of native organellar extracts showed that the recombinant ATP4f-HA,COX1f-HA and RPS3f-HA proteins are found in large membrane-associated particles.Analysis of the respiratory activities and protein profiles indicated that organellar complex I was altered in Atp4f,Cox1f and Rps3f plants.

  7. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  8. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  9. Nosocomial viral respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graman, P S; Hall, C B

    1989-12-01

    Nosocomial infections with respiratory tract viruses, particularly influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses, account for the majority of serious nosocomial viral disease. Chronically ill, immunocompromised, elderly, and very young hosts are especially vulnerable to potentially life-threatening involvement of the lower respiratory tract. Effective preventive strategies are based upon early accurate viral diagnosis and an appreciation of the epidemiology and mechanisms of transmission for each viral agent. Influenza viruses spread via airborne dispersion of small particle aerosols, resulting in explosive outbreaks; control measures emphasize immunization and chemoprophylaxis of susceptible patients and personnel, and isolation of those already infected. Transmission of respiratory syncytial virus, in contrast, seems to require closer contact, with virus passed on hands, fomites, or in large droplets inoculated into the eyes and nose at close range. Strategies for control of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus are designed to interrupt hand carriage and inoculation of virus onto mucous membranes.

  10. Extended phenotype: nematodes turn ants into bird-dispersed fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, D P; Kronauer, D J C; Boomsma, J J

    2008-01-01

    A recent study has discovered a novel extended phenotype of a nematode which alters its ant host to resemble ripe fruit. The infected ants are in turn eaten by frugivorous birds that disperse the nematode's eggs.......A recent study has discovered a novel extended phenotype of a nematode which alters its ant host to resemble ripe fruit. The infected ants are in turn eaten by frugivorous birds that disperse the nematode's eggs....

  11. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callesen Henrik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5 was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6 by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals.

  12. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  13. Myeshenia Gravis Presented with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Dhangar, Snehal B Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of 41 year old female known case of depression since 10 years, developed dry cough, low grade fever, breathlessness and drowsiness since 4 days was admitted in ICU and initially diagnosed as type 2 respiratory failure due to pneumonia but on further investigating for altered sensorium patient was found to be NCV positive and was diagnosed as seronegative myasthenia gravis.

  14. 癌相关成纤维细胞表型转换的遗传学与表观遗传学机制研究现状%Advancement of Phenotype Transformation of Cancer-associated Fibroblasts:from Genetic Alterations to Epigenetic Modiifcation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大理; 车国卫

    2015-01-01

    In the ifeld of human cancer research, even though the vast majority attentions were paid to tumor cells as“the seeds”, the roles of tumor microenvironments as“the soil”are gradually explored in recent years. As a dominant com-partment of tumor microenvironments, cancer-associated ifbroblasts (CAFs) were discovered to correlated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression and prognosis. And the exploration of the mechanisms of CAF phenotype transformation would conducive to the further understand of the CAFs function in human cancers. As we known that CAFs have four main origins, including epithelial cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and local mesenchymal cells. However, researchers found that all these origins ifnally conduct similiar phenotypes from intrinsic to extrinsic ones. hTus, what and how a mechanism can conduct the phenotype transformation of CAFs with different origins? Two viewpoints are proposed to try to answer the quet-sion, involving genetic alterations and epigenetic modiifcations. hTis review will systematically summarize the advancement of mechanisms of CAF phenotype transformations in the aspect of genentic and epigenetic modiifcations.%在肿瘤基础研究中,近年来对作为“土壤”的肿瘤微环境的探索逐渐增多。作为肿瘤微环境的主要成分,癌相关成纤维细胞(cancer-associated ifbroblasts, CAFs)在肿瘤发生、进展及预后中的作用被逐步阐明。而CAFs表型形成机制的阐明将有助于更深刻的理解其在肿瘤中的作用。CAFs主要有四种起源:上皮细胞、内皮细胞、间质干细胞和局部的间质细胞。研究发现,不同起源的CAFs具有大致相同的表型特征,而CAFs表型转换的机制却不甚清楚。目前的研究主要集中在:①CAFs基因的改变;②CAFs表观遗传学改变。本文将在阐述CAFs起源多样性和表型特征一致性的基础上,系统总结CAFs表型转换的表观遗传学机制的现状和最新进展。

  15. Anatomy and physiology of respiratory system relevant to anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apeksh Patwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical application of anatomical and physiological knowledge of respiratory system improves patient's safety during anaesthesia. It also optimises patient's ventilatory condition and airway patency. Such knowledge has influence on airway management, lung isolation during anaesthesia, management of cases with respiratory disorders, respiratory endoluminal procedures and optimising ventilator strategies in the perioperative period. Understanding of ventilation, perfusion and their relation with each other is important for understanding respiratory physiology. Ventilation to perfusion ratio alters with anaesthesia, body position and with one-lung anaesthesia. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, an important safety mechanism, is inhibited by majority of the anaesthetic drugs. Ventilation perfusion mismatch leads to reduced arterial oxygen concentration mainly because of early closure of airway, thus leading to decreased ventilation and atelectasis during anaesthesia. Various anaesthetic drugs alter neuronal control of the breathing and bronchomotor tone.

  16. Anatomy and physiology of respiratory system relevant to anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwa, Apeksh; Shah, Amit

    2015-09-01

    Clinical application of anatomical and physiological knowledge of respiratory system improves patient's safety during anaesthesia. It also optimises patient's ventilatory condition and airway patency. Such knowledge has influence on airway management, lung isolation during anaesthesia, management of cases with respiratory disorders, respiratory endoluminal procedures and optimising ventilator strategies in the perioperative period. Understanding of ventilation, perfusion and their relation with each other is important for understanding respiratory physiology. Ventilation to perfusion ratio alters with anaesthesia, body position and with one-lung anaesthesia. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, an important safety mechanism, is inhibited by majority of the anaesthetic drugs. Ventilation perfusion mismatch leads to reduced arterial oxygen concentration mainly because of early closure of airway, thus leading to decreased ventilation and atelectasis during anaesthesia. Various anaesthetic drugs alter neuronal control of the breathing and bronchomotor tone. PMID:26556911

  17. An Epithelial Integrin Regulates the Amplitude of Protective Lung Interferon Responses against Multiple Respiratory Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliopoulos, Victoria A; Van de Velde, Lee-Ann; Van de Velde, Nicholas C; Karlsson, Erik A; Neale, Geoff; Vogel, Peter; Guy, Cliff; Sharma, Shalini; Duan, Susu; Surman, Sherri L; Jones, Bart G; Johnson, Michael D L; Bosio, Catharine; Jolly, Lisa; Jenkins, R Gisli; Hurwitz, Julia L; Rosch, Jason W; Sheppard, Dean; Thomas, Paul G; Murray, Peter J; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2016-08-01

    The healthy lung maintains a steady state of immune readiness to rapidly respond to injury from invaders. Integrins are important for setting the parameters of this resting state, particularly the epithelial-restricted αVβ6 integrin, which is upregulated during injury. Once expressed, αVβ6 moderates acute lung injury (ALI) through as yet undefined molecular mechanisms. We show that the upregulation of β6 during influenza infection is involved in disease pathogenesis. β6-deficient mice (β6 KO) have increased survival during influenza infection likely due to the limited viral spread into the alveolar spaces leading to reduced ALI. Although the β6 KO have morphologically normal lungs, they harbor constitutively activated lung CD11b+ alveolar macrophages (AM) and elevated type I IFN signaling activity, which we traced to the loss of β6-activated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Administration of exogenous TGF-β to β6 KO mice leads to reduced numbers of CD11b+ AMs, decreased type I IFN signaling activity and loss of the protective phenotype during influenza infection. Protection extended to other respiratory pathogens such as Sendai virus and bacterial pneumonia. Our studies demonstrate that the loss of one epithelial protein, αVβ6 integrin, can alter the lung microenvironment during both homeostasis and respiratory infection leading to reduced lung injury and improved survival.

  18. Living with Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tips below. Ongoing Care If you have respiratory failure, see your doctor for ongoing medical care. Your doctor may refer you to pulmonary rehabilitation (rehab). Rehab can involve exercise training, education, and counseling. Your rehab team might include doctors, ...

  19. Respiratory Viruses Augment the Adhesion of Bacterial Pathogens to Respiratory Epithelium in a Viral Species- and Cell Type-Dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Rodriguez, Carina A.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Wang, Yan; Webby, Richard J; Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections often complicate respiratory viral infections, but the mechanisms whereby viruses predispose to bacterial disease are not completely understood. We determined the effects of infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV-3), and influenza virus on the abilities of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells and how these viruses alter the expression of known recept...

  20. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Zammit; Helen Liddicoat; Ian Moonsie; et al

    2010-01-01

    Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ produ...

  1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  2. Microspectrophotometry of respiratory pigments

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, Karen Yvonne, (Thesis)

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis describes the design, construction and optical testing of three fibre-optic microspectrophotometer systems to monitor the reduction of mitochondrial respiratory pigments. The optical and biochemical characteristics of mitochondrial respiration are discussed and the current optical techniques employed in the biochemical analysis of respiratory enzymes are presented. The primary focus of this study is the system parameters surrounding the spectrophotometric determination of...

  3. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  4. p.L18P: a novel IDUA mutation that causes a distinct attenuated phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis type I patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualim, G; Ribeiro, M G; da Fonseca, G G G; Szlago, M; Schenone, A; Lemes, A; Rojas, M V M; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2015-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase (IDUA) which leads to a wide spectrum of clinical severity. Here, we describe the case of four male patients who present the previously undescribed p.L18P mutation. Patient 1 (p.L18P/p.L18P) presents, despite multiple joint contractures, an attenuated phenotype. Patient 2 (p.L18P/p.W402X) was diagnosed at 4 years of age with bone dysplasia, coarse facies, limited mobility, claw hands and underwent bilateral carpal tunnel surgery at 6 years of age. Patients 3 and 4 (both p.L18P/p.L18P) are brothers. Patient 3 was diagnosed at 4 years of age, when presented claw hands, lower limb and shoulder pain, restricted articular movement and bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient 4 was diagnosed at 17 months of age when presented lower limb pain at night, respiratory allergy and repeated upper airways infections. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that p.L18P mutation reduces the signal peptide to 25 amino acids and alters its secondary structure. In conclusion, we report a new IDUA variant that alters the structure of the signal peptide, which likely impairs transport to lysosomes. Moreover, it leads to a distinct attenuated phenotype with mainly bone and cartilage symptoms, without visceromegalies, heart disease, or cognitive impairment. PMID:25256405

  5. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  6. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  7. Prions, protein homeostasis, and phenotypic diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Halfmann, Randal; Alberti, Simon; Lindquist, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Prions are fascinating but often misunderstood protein aggregation phenomena. The traditional association of the mammalian prion protein with disease has overshadowed a potentially more interesting attribute of prions: their ability to create protein-based molecular memories. In fungi, prions alter the relationship between genotype and phenotype in a heritable way that diversifies clonal populations. Recent findings in yeast indicate that prions might be much more common than previously real...

  8. Nuclear respiratory factor-1 and bioenergetics in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radde, Brandie N; Ivanova, Margarita M; Mai, Huy Xuan; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Piell, Kellianne; Van Hoose, Patrick; Cole, Marsha P; Muluhngwi, Penn; Kalbfleisch, Ted S; Rouchka, Eric C; Hill, Bradford G; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-09-10

    Acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is a significant clinical problem in treating patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ breast cancer. We reported that ERα increases nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), which regulates nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene transcription, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and NRF-1 knockdown stimulates apoptosis. Whether NRF-1 and target gene expression is altered in endocrine resistant breast cancer cells is unknown. We measured NRF-1and metabolic features in a cell model of progressive TAM-resistance. NRF-1 and its target mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were higher in TAM-resistant LCC2 and LCC9 cells than TAM-sensitive MCF-7 cells. Using extracellular flux assays we observed that LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells showed similar oxygen consumption rate (OCR), but lower mitochondrial reserve capacity which was correlated with lower Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex, Subunit B in LCC1 and LCC2 cells. Complex III activity was lower in LCC9 than MCF-7 cells. LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells had higher basal extracellular acidification (ECAR), indicating higher aerobic glycolysis, relative to MCF-7 cells. Mitochondrial bioenergetic responses to estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were reduced in the endocrine-resistant cells compared to MCF-7 cells. These results suggest the acquisition of altered metabolic phenotypes in response to long term antiestrogen treatment may increase vulnerability to metabolic stress. PMID:27515002

  9. The Microbiome and the Respiratory Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Robert P; Erb-Downward, John R; Martinez, Fernando J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Although the notion that "the normal lung is free from bacteria" remains common in textbooks, it is virtually always stated without citation or argument. The lungs are constantly exposed to diverse communities of microbes from the oropharynx and other sources, and over the past decade, novel culture-independent techniques of microbial identification have revealed that the lungs, previously considered sterile in health, harbor diverse communities of microbes. In this review, we describe the topography and population dynamics of the respiratory tract, both in health and as altered by acute and chronic lung disease. We provide a survey of current techniques of sampling, sequencing, and analysis of respiratory microbiota and review technical challenges and controversies in the field. We review and synthesize what is known about lung microbiota in various diseases and identify key lessons learned across disease states. PMID:26527186

  10. Learning to have psychosomatic complaints: Conditioning of respiratory behavior and somatic complaints in psychosomatic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bergh, Omer; Stegen, K.; VandeWoestijne, KP

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Assuming a subjective similarity between the experience of a hyperventilation episode and inhaling CO2-enriched air, we tested whether a respiratory challenge in association with a particular stimulus could result in altered respiratory behavior and associated somatic complaints upon presenting the stimulus only.

  11. HYPERTRIGLYCERIDEMIC WAIST PHENOTYPE AND CARDIOMETABOLIC ALTERATIONS IN BRAZILIAN ADULTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral Rocha, Anna Ligia; Feliciano Pereira, Patricia; Cristine Pessoa, Milene; Gonçalves Alfenas, Rita de Cassia; Segheto, Wellington; da Silva, Danielle Cristina Guimarães; Pacheco Andrade, Marcio; Zarbato Longo, Giana

    2015-09-01

    Objetivos: evaluar la prevalencia de alteraciones cardiometabolicas segun el fenotipo cintura hipertrigliceridemica (CH) en adultos brasilenos. Métodos: estudio transversal, de base poblacional, con 976 (n = 533 mujeres) individuos de 20 a 59 anos. El CH fue definido por un aumento en las concentraciones de trigliceridos y en la circunferencia de la cintura (CC). Todos los analisis fueron ajustados por el efecto del diseno del estudio y ponderados por genero, edad y escolaridad. Fue realizado un análisis descriptivo de promedio y presentados sus respectivos intervalos de confianza (IC 95%). La prevalencia de las alteraciones cardiometabolicas segun la presencia o no del fenotipo CH y segun el sexo fue calculada y comparada a traves del test chi-cuadrado de Pearson. El nivel de significancia estadistica adoptado fue de 0,05. Se estimo la probabilidad de riesgo de evento coronario en 10 anos, a partir del score de Framinghan a traves del grafico de densidad de Kernel. Resultados: la prevalencia del fenotipo CH en la muestra fue de 17,32% (IC 95% 13,54-21,89), no se observo diferencia entre sexos. Se observaron mayores promedios para todos los factores de riesgo cardiometabolico analizados en aquellos con CH. Solo Se verificaron menores valores medianos para el HDL en este grupo. Los individuos con CH presentaban mayor probabilidad de evolucionar hacia un evento cardiovascular en 10 anos que aquellos sin el fenotipo. Conclusión: el fenotipo CH constituye un importante marcador precoz del riesgo cardiovascular. Su utilizacion en la practica clinica debe ser incentivada, ya que se trata de una herramienta sencilla y de bajo coste.

  12. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  13. American Association for Respiratory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NBRC Credentials Congress News & Highlights Clinician Training on Tobacco Dependence for Respiratory Therapists Increase your skill with ... 12 Dad’s Struggle with ALS Inspires Respiratory Therapy Student Read More Oct 12 RSV Experience Leads Member ...

  14. Analysis of Pena Shokeir phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J G

    1986-09-01

    At this point in time, we recognize that "Pena Shokeir" is not a diagnosis or a specific syndrome but rather a description of a phenotype produced by fetal akinesia or decreased in utero movement. In its "full blown" form, it is characterized by polyhydramnios, intrauterine growth retardation, pulmonary hypoplasia, craniofacial and limb anomalies, congenital contractures, short umbilical cord, and lethality. From the cases thus far reported, we would anticipate that the phenotype is present in a very heterogeneous group of disorders--heterogeneous both with regard to the specific anomalies present and with regard to the causes (which must include many environmental agents and multiple genetic forms). One challenge for the future is to better describe and delineate specific entities. In the meantime, we would do well to use the terms "Pena Shokeir phenotype" or "fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence," which do not imply a single entity. There are many practical aspects of recognizing this phenotype. The presence of any one of the cardinal signs of the fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence should alert the physician to look for the other associated anomalies, since specific treatment may be indicated, and catch-up or compensatory growth may occur, if given a chance. The ability to provide prenatal diagnosis and perhaps prenatal treatment in the future may allow us to alter dramatically the natural history of some cases. In others, we need to establish when treatment is possible and when it gives no benefit. Perhaps the most important insight gained from the study of the fetal akinesia sequence is the reaffirmation of the concept that function is an integral part of normal development. Specific structures do not develop in isolation but are part of a carefully timed and integrated system. The "use" of a structure in utero is necessary for its continuing and normal development. The old adage "use it or lose it" seems to apply just as appropriately to prenatal normal

  15. Respiratory manifestations in amyloidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ling; CAI Bai-qiang; ZHONG Xu; ZHU Yuan-jue

    2005-01-01

    Background Amyloidosis is a collection of diseases in which different proteins are deposited. Amyloid deposits occur in systemic and organ-limited forms. In both systemic and localized forms of the disease, lung can be involved. The aim of this study was to explore the different respiratory manifestations of amyloidosis. Methods Chest radiology, clinical presentations, bronchoscopic/laryngoscopic findings and lung function data of 59 patients with amyloidosis involving respiratory tract collected during January 1986 to March 2005, were analysed.Results Of the 16 cases with localized respiratory tract amyloidosis, 8 had the lesions in the trachea and the bronchi, 2 in the larynx and the trachea, 5 in the larynx and/or the pharynx, and 1 in the lung parenchyma. Of 43 systemic amyloidosis with respiratory tract involvement, 3 had the lesions in bronchi, 13 in lung parenchyma, 33 in pleura, 8 in mediastina, 1 in nose and 1 in pharynx. Chest X-rays were normal in most cases of tracheobronchial amyloidosis. CT, unlike chest X-rays, showed irregular luminal narrowing, airway wall thickening with calcifications and soft tissue shadows in airway lumen. Localized lung parenchymal amyloidosis presented as multiple nodules. Multiple nodular opacities, patch shadows and reticular opacities were the main radiological findings in systemic amyloidosis with lung parenchymal involvement. In pleural amyloidosis, pleural effusions and pleural thickening were detected. Mediastinal and/or hilar adenopathy were also a form of lung involvement in systemic amyloidosis. The major bronchoscopic findings of tracheobronchial amyloidosis were narrowing of airway lumen, while nodular, 'tumour like' or 'bubble like' masses, with missing or vague cartilaginous rings, were detected in about half of the patients.Conclusions Localized respiratory tract amyloidosis mostly affects the trachea and the bronchi. Chest X-rays are not sensitive to detect these lesions. Systemic amyloidosis often involves

  16. Your Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Lungs & Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Lungs & Respiratory System Print A A A Text Size What's in ... your body, and they work with your respiratory system to allow you to take in fresh air, ...

  17. Exhaled breath analysis discriminates phenotypes of acute lung injury (ALI)

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, L.D.J.; Hemmes, S.N.T.; Nijsen, T.M.E.; P. J. Sterk; Schultz, M.J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction It has been postulated that the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of ALI based on pulmonary and non-pulmonary etiology represent different phenotypes1. Until now, little biological evidence on the molecular level has been presented to support this hypothesis. Exhaled air contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs), metabolites of systemic or respiratory origin. Exhaled air metabolites may differ between diseases2. Molecular profiling of exhaled air of intubated and mechani...

  18. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/objective: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. Materials/methods: The study is based on data for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external measurements over 30 fraction treatment courses for 10 patients, and synchronous external/internal measurements in single sessions for seven patients. Variations in respiratory amplitude (simulated coaching) and external/internal phase shifts were simulated by perturbation with realistic values. Variations were described by medians and standard deviations (SDs) of position distributions of the markers. Gating windows (35% duty cycle) were retrospectively applied to the respiratory data for each session, mimicking the use of commercially available gating systems. Medians and SDs of gated data were compared to those of ungated data, to assess potential margin reductions. Results: External respiratory data collected over entire treatment courses showed SDs from 1.6 to 8.1 mm, the major part arising from baseline variations. The gated data had SDs from 1.5 to 7.7 mm, with a mean reduction of 0.3 mm (6%). Gated distributions were more skewed than ungated, and in a few cases a marginal miss of gated respiration would be found even if no margin reduction was applied. Regularization of breathing amplitude to simulate coaching did not alter these results significantly. Simulation of varying phase shifts between internal and external respiratory signals showed that the SDs of gated distributions were the same as for the ungated or smaller, but the median values were markedly shifted

  19. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  20. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  1. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  2. Bile signalling promotes chronic respiratory infections and antibiotic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reen, F Jerry; Flynn, Stephanie; Woods, David F; Dunphy, Niall; Chróinín, Muireann Ní; Mullane, David; Stick, Stephen; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy, many respiratory pathogens persist in the lung, underpinning the chronic inflammation and eventual lung decline that are characteristic of respiratory disease. Recently, bile acid aspiration has emerged as a major comorbidity associated with a range of lung diseases, shaping the lung microbiome and promoting colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. In order to uncover the molecular mechanism through which bile modulates the respiratory microbiome, a combination of global transcriptomic and phenotypic analyses of the P. aeruginosa response to bile was undertaken. Bile responsive pathways responsible for virulence, adaptive metabolism, and redox control were identified, with macrolide and polymyxin antibiotic tolerance increased significantly in the presence of bile. Bile acids, and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in particular, elicited chronic biofilm behaviour in P. aeruginosa, while induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in lung epithelial cells by CDCA was Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) dependent. Microbiome analysis of paediatric CF sputum samples demonstrated increased colonisation by P. aeruginosa and other Proteobacterial pathogens in bile aspirating compared to non-aspirating patients. Together, these data suggest that bile acid signalling is a leading trigger for the development of chronic phenotypes underlying the pathophysiology of chronic respiratory disease. PMID:27432520

  3. Adult respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to improved emergency resuscitation procedures, and with advancing medical technology in the field of critical care, an increasing number of patients survive the acute phase of shock and catastrophic trauma. Patients who previously died of massive sepsis, hypovolemic or hypotensive shock, multiple fractures, aspiration, toxic inhalation, and massive embolism are now surviving long enough to develop previously unsuspected and unrecognized secondary effects. With increasing frequency, clinicians are recognizing the clinical and radiographic manifestations of pathologic changes in the lungs occurring secondary to various types of massive insult. This paper gives a list of diseases that have been shown to precipitate or predispose to diffuse lung damage. Various terms have been used to describe the lung damage and respiratory failure secondary to these conditions. The term adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is applied to several cases of sudden respiratory failure in patients with previously healthy lungs following various types of trauma or shock. Numerous investigations and experiments have studied the pathologic changes in ARDS, and, while there is still no clear indication of why it develops, there is now some correlation of the sequential pathologic developments with the clinical and radiographic changes

  4. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-01-01

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task. PMID:26021823

  5. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  6. The evolution of phenotypic correlations and "developmental memory".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A; Wagner, Günter P; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Weinreich, Daniel M; Mills, Rob

    2014-04-01

    Development introduces structured correlations among traits that may constrain or bias the distribution of phenotypes produced. Moreover, when suitable heritable variation exists, natural selection may alter such constraints and correlations, affecting the phenotypic variation available to subsequent selection. However, exactly how the distribution of phenotypes produced by complex developmental systems can be shaped by past selective environments is poorly understood. Here we investigate the evolution of a network of recurrent nonlinear ontogenetic interactions, such as a gene regulation network, in various selective scenarios. We find that evolved networks of this type can exhibit several phenomena that are familiar in cognitive learning systems. These include formation of a distributed associative memory that can "store" and "recall" multiple phenotypes that have been selected in the past, recreate complete adult phenotypic patterns accurately from partial or corrupted embryonic phenotypes, and "generalize" (by exploiting evolved developmental modules) to produce new combinations of phenotypic features. We show that these surprising behaviors follow from an equivalence between the action of natural selection on phenotypic correlations and associative learning, well-understood in the context of neural networks. This helps to explain how development facilitates the evolution of high-fitness phenotypes and how this ability changes over evolutionary time.

  7. The evolution of phenotypic correlations and ‘developmental memory’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A.; Wagner, Günter P.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Mills, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Development introduces structured correlations among traits that may constrain or bias the distribution of phenotypes produced. Moreover, when suitable heritable variation exists, natural selection may alter such constraints and correlations, affecting the phenotypic variation available to subsequent selection. However, exactly how the distribution of phenotypes produced by complex developmental systems can be shaped by past selective environments is poorly understood. Here we investigate the evolution of a network of recurrent non-linear ontogenetic interactions, such as a gene regulation network, in various selective scenarios. We find that evolved networks of this type can exhibit several phenomena that are familiar in cognitive learning systems. These include formation of a distributed associative memory that can ‘store’ and ‘recall’ multiple phenotypes that have been selected in the past, recreate complete adult phenotypic patterns accurately from partial or corrupted embryonic phenotypes, and ‘generalise’ (by exploiting evolved developmental modules) to produce new combinations of phenotypic features. We show that these surprising behaviours follow from an equivalence between the action of natural selection on phenotypic correlations and associative learning, well-understood in the context of neural networks. This helps to explain how development facilitates the evolution of high-fitness phenotypes and how this ability changes over evolutionary time. PMID:24351058

  8. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association...

  9. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  10. Methylator phenotype in colorectal cancer: A prognostic factor or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallois, C; Laurent-Puig, P; Taieb, J

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is due to different types of genetic alterations that are translated into different phenotypes. Among them, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP+) is the most recently involved in carcinogenesis of some CRC. The malignant transformation in this case is mainly due to the transcriptional inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. CIMP+ are reported to be more frequently found in the elderly and in women. The tumors are more frequently located in the proximal part of the colon, BRAF mutated and are associated with microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. All sporadic MSI CRC belong to the methylator phenotype, however some non MSI CRC may also harbor a methylator phenotype. The prognostic value of CIMP is not well known. Most studies show a worse prognosis in CIMP+ CRC, and adjuvant treatments seem to be more efficient. We review here the current knowledge on prognostic and predictive values in CIMP+ CRC. PMID:26702883

  11. Respiratory control in the glucose perfused heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphate metabolites, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), inorganic phosphate (Pi), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are potentially important regulators of mitochondrial respiration in vivo. However, previous studies on the heart in vivo and in vitro have not consistently demonstrated an appropriate correlation between the concentration of these phosphate metabolites and moderate changes in work and respiration. Recently, mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels have been proposed as a potential regulator of cardiac respiration during alterations in work output. In order to understand better the mechanism of respiratory control under these conditions, we investigated the relationship between the phosphate metabolites, the NAD(P)H levels, and oxygen consumption (QO2) in the isovolumic perfused rat heart during alterations in work output with pacing. ATP, creatine phosphate (CrP), Pi and intracellular pH were measured using 31P NMR. Mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels were monitored using spectrofluorometric techniques. 33 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. [Respiratory preparation before surgery in patients with chronic respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Jean-Marc; Jaber, Samir

    2012-03-01

    Scheduled and/or thoracic, abdominal surgeries increase the risk of respiratory postoperative complications. In patients with chronic respiratory failure, preoperative evaluation should be performed to evaluate respiratory function in aim to optimize perioperative management. Preoperative gas exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia or hypercapnia) are associated with respiratory postoperative complications. Respiratory physiotherapy and prophylactic non-invasive ventilation should be integrated in a global rehabilitation management for cardiothoracic or abdominal surgery procedures, which are at high risk of postoperative respiratory dysfunction. Stopping tobacco consummation should be benefit, but decease risk of postoperative complications is relevant only after a period for 6 to 8 weeks of cessation. Bronchodilatator aerosol therapy (beta-agonists and atropinics) and inhaled corticotherapy allow a rapid preparation for 24 to 48 h. Systematic preoperative antibiotherapy should not be recommended. PMID:22004791

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Chakravarti; Bineeta Kashyap

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Acute lower respiratory infections lead to high morbidity and mortality rates in children from developing countries. The aim of this study was to look into the extent of respiratory syncytial virus infections in children with special reference to the role of specific immunoglobulins in protection against infection as well as the association with bacterial pathogens. Material & Methods: Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for respiratory syncytial virus antigen by enzyme immunoassa...

  14. Influenza A facilitates sensitization to house dust mite in infant mice leading to an asthma phenotype in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Garawi, A; Fattouh, R; Botelho, F; Walker, T D; Goncharova, S; Moore, C-L; Mori, M; Erjefalt, J S; Chu, D K; Humbles, A A; Kolbeck, R; Stampfli, M R; O'Byrne, P M; Coyle, A J; Jordana, M

    2011-11-01

    The origins of allergic asthma, particularly in infancy, remain obscure. Respiratory viral infections and allergen sensitization in early life have been associated with asthma in young children. However, a causal link has not been established. We investigated whether an influenza A infection in early life alters immune responses to house dust mite (HDM) and promotes an asthmatic phenotype later in life. Neonatal (8-day-old) mice were infected with influenza virus and 7 days later, exposed to HDM for 3 weeks. Unlike adults, neonatal mice exposed to HDM exhibited negligible immune responsiveness to HDM, but not to influenza A. HDM responsiveness in adults was associated with distinct Ly6c+ CD11b+ inflammatory dendritic cell and CD8α+ plasmacytoid (pDC) populations that were absent in HDM-exposed infant mice, suggesting an important role in HDM-mediated inflammation. Remarkably, HDM hyporesponsiveness was overcome when exposure occurred concurrently with an acute influenza infection; young mice now displayed robust allergen-specific immunity, allergic inflammation, and lung remodeling. Remodeling persisted into early adulthood, even after prolonged discontinuation of allergen exposure and was associated with marked impairment of lung function. Our data demonstrate that allergen exposure coincident with acute viral infection in early life subverts constitutive allergen hyporesponsiveness and imprints an asthmatic phenotype in adulthood. PMID:21881572

  15. Influenza A facilitates sensitization to house dust mite in infant mice leading to an asthma phenotype in adulthood

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Garawi, A

    2011-08-31

    The origins of allergic asthma, particularly in infancy, remain obscure. Respiratory viral infections and allergen sensitization in early life have been associated with asthma in young children. However, a causal link has not been established. We investigated whether an influenza A infection in early life alters immune responses to house dust mite (HDM) and promotes an asthmatic phenotype later in life. Neonatal (8-day-old) mice were infected with influenza virus and 7 days later, exposed to HDM for 3 weeks. Unlike adults, neonatal mice exposed to HDM exhibited negligible immune responsiveness to HDM, but not to influenza A. HDM responsiveness in adults was associated with distinct Ly6c + CD11b + inflammatory dendritic cell and CD8α + plasmacytoid (pDC) populations that were absent in HDM-exposed infant mice, suggesting an important role in HDM-mediated inflammation. Remarkably, HDM hyporesponsiveness was overcome when exposure occurred concurrently with an acute influenza infection; young mice now displayed robust allergen-specific immunity, allergic inflammation, and lung remodeling. Remodeling persisted into early adulthood, even after prolonged discontinuation of allergen exposure and was associated with marked impairment of lung function. Our data demonstrate that allergen exposure coincident with acute viral infection in early life subverts constitutive allergen hyporesponsiveness and imprints an asthmatic phenotype in adulthood.

  16. Respiratory neuroplasticity following carotid body denervation Central and peripheral adaptations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew R. Hodges; Hubert V. Forster

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the role of the carotid bodies in ventilatory control has been understated, but the current view suggests that the carotid bodies (1) provide a tonic, facilitory input to the respiratory network, (2) serve as the major site of peripheral O2 chemoreception and minor contributor to CO2/H+ chemoreception, and (3) are required for ventilatory adaptation to high altitude. Each of these roles has been demonstrated in studies of ventilation in mammals after carotid body denervation. Following carotid body denervation, many of the compromised ventilatory "functions" show a time-dependent recovery plasticity that varies in the degree of recovery and time required for recovery. Respiratory plasticity following carotid body denervation is also dependent on species, with contributions from peripheral and central sites/mechanisms driving the respiratory plasticity. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the data pointing to peripheral and central mechanisms of plasticity following carotid body denervation. We speculate that after carotid body denervation there are altered excitatory and/or inhibitory neuromodulator mechanisms that contribute to the initial respiratory depression and the subsequent respiratory plasticity, and further suggest that the continued exploration of central effects of carotid body denervation might provide useful information regarding the capacity of the respiratory network for plasticity following neurologic injury in humans.

  17. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabeticketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidityand mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requiresfocused clinical monitoring, careful interpretationof arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditionsthat can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions thatcompromise respiratory function caused by DKA can bedetected at presentation but are usually more prevalentduring treatment. These conditions include deficits ofpotassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic ornon-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not causedby DKA that can worsen respiratory function under theadded stress of DKA include infections of the respiratorysystem, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular diseaseand miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognitionand management of the conditions that can lead torespiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failureand improve mortality from DKA.

  18. Genetic Testing for Respiratory Disease: Are We There Yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Paré

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genome project promised a revolution in health care – the development of ‘personalized medicine’, where knowledge of an individual’s genetic code enables the prediction of risk for specific diseases and the potential to alter that risk based on preventive measures and lifestyle modification. The present brief review provides a report card on the progress toward that goal with respect to respiratory disease. Should generalized population screening for genetic risk factors for respiratory disease be instituted? Or not?

  19. Perinatal respiratory infections and long term consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Indinnimeo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most important pathogen in the etiology of respiratory infections in early life. 50% of children are affected by RSV within the first year of age, and almost all children become infected within two years. Numerous retrospective and prospective studies linking RSV and chronic respiratory morbidity show that RSV bronchiolitis in infancy is followed by recurrent wheezing after the acute episod. According to some authors a greater risk of wheezing in children with a history of RSV bronchiolitis would be limited to childhood, while according to others this risk would be extended into adolescence and adulthood. To explain the relationship between RSV infection and the development of bronchial asthma or the clinical pathogenetic patterns related to a state of bronchial hyperreactivity, it has been suggested that RSV may cause alterations in the response of the immune system (immunogenic hypothesis, activating directly mast cells and basophils and changing the pattern of differentiation of immune cells present in the bronchial tree as receptors and inflammatory cytokines. It was also suggested that RSV infection can cause bronchial hyperreactivity altering nervous airway modulation, acting on nerve fibers present in the airways (neurogenic hypothesis.The benefits of passive immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab, which seems to represent an effective approach in reducing the sequelae of RSV infection in the short- and long-term period, strengthen the implementation of prevention programs with this drug, as recommended by the national guidelines of the Italian Society of Neonatology. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the

  20. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Pine, Harold S; Underbrink, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, benign disease with no known cure. RRP is caused by infection of the upper aerodigestive tract with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Passage through the birth canal is thought to be the initial transmission event, but infection may occur in utero. HPV vaccines have helped to provide protection from cervical cancer; however, their role in the prevention of RRP is undetermined. Clinical presentation of initial symptoms of RRP may be subtle. RRP course varies, and current management focuses on surgical debulking of papillomatous lesions with or without concurrent adjuvant therapy. PMID:22588043

  1. Respiratory tract and mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory tract problems originating in attempts to diagnose and treat illness are commonplace. They range from pharyngeal trauma during intubation to radiation-induced thyroid carcinoma. Occasionally, as with pulmonary hypervolemia accompanying drug-induced renal failure, they originate at a distance. Their actual number far exceeds those brought to clinical attention. Familiarity with the procedures which give rise to these complications is helpful in detecting and remedying them. It is important, therefore, to discuss their pathogenesis as well as their clinical and radiological findings

  2. Respiratory System Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Danielle M; Singh, Shipra

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory system involvement in cystic fibrosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene throughout the sinopulmonary tract result in recurrent infections with a variety of organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Lung disease occurs earlier in life than once thought and ideal methods of monitoring lung function, decline, or improvement with therapy are debated. Treatment of sinopulmonary disease may include physiotherapy, mucus-modifying and antiinflammatory agents, antimicrobials, and surgery. In the new era of personalized medicine, CFTR correctors and potentiators may change the course of disease. PMID:27469180

  3. Paediatric respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Everard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual “home”.

  4. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Brandão, Fabiana AS; Lorena S Derengowski; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work,...

  5. Single Cell Biomechanical Phenotyping using Microfluidics and Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Babahosseini, Hesam

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied with alterations in the cell biomechanical phenotype, including changes in cell structure, morphology, and responses to microenvironmental stress. These alterations result in an increased deformability of transformed cells and reduced resistance to mechanical stimuli, enabling motility and invasion. Therefore, single cell biomechanical properties could be served as a powerful label-free biomarker for effective characterization and early detection of single ca...

  6. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I.; Dorin, Richard I.; Murata, Glen H.; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include de...

  7. Current devices of respiratory physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hristara-Papadopoulou, A; Tsanakas, J; Diomou, G; Papadopoulou, O.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years patients with respiratory diseases use various devices, which help the removal of mucus from the airways and the improvement of pulmonary function. The aim of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of the current devices of respiratory physiotherapy, as it comes from the review of literature. The current devices of physiotherapy for patients with respiratory diseases, are presented as an alternative therapy method or a supplemental therapy and they can motivate pa...

  8. Auscultation of the respiratory system

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Auscultation of the lung is an important part of the respiratory examination and is helpful in diagnosing various respiratory disorders. Auscultation assesses airflow through the trachea-bronchial tree. It is important to distinguish normal respiratory sounds from abnormal ones for example crackles, wheezes, and pleural rub in order to make correct diagnosis. It is necessary to understand the underlying pathophysiology of various lung sounds generation for better understanding of disease proc...

  9. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  10. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Stefano; Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Lo Martire, Viviana; Cohen, Gary; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO). Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM) to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R) during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  11. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bastianini

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO. Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  12. Sox17 promotes cell cycle progression and inhibits TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling to initiate progenitor cell behavior in the respiratory epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Lange

    Full Text Available The Sry-related high mobility group box transcription factor Sox17 is required for diverse developmental processes including endoderm formation, vascular development, and fetal hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Expression of Sox17 in mature respiratory epithelial cells causes proliferation and lineage respecification, suggesting that Sox17 can alter adult lung progenitor cell fate. In this paper, we identify mechanisms by which Sox17 influences lung epithelial progenitor cell behavior and reprograms cell fate in the mature respiratory epithelium. Conditional expression of Sox17 in epithelial cells of the adult mouse lung demonstrated that cell cluster formation and respecification of alveolar progenitor cells toward proximal airway lineages were rapidly reversible processes. Prolonged expression of Sox17 caused the ectopic formation of bronchiolar-like structures with diverse respiratory epithelial cell characteristics in alveolar regions of lung. During initiation of progenitor cell behavior, Sox17 induced proliferation and increased the expression of the progenitor cell marker Sca-1 and genes involved in cell cycle progression. Notably, Sox17 enhanced cyclin D1 expression in vivo and activated cyclin D1 promoter activity in vitro. Sox17 decreased the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta-responsive cell cycle inhibitors in the adult mouse lung, including p15, p21, and p57, and inhibited TGF-beta1-mediated transcriptional responses in vitro. Further, Sox17 interacted with Smad3 and blocked Smad3 DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Together, these data show that a subset of mature respiratory epithelial cells retains remarkable phenotypic plasticity and that Sox17, a gene required for early endoderm formation, activates the cell cycle and reinitiates multipotent progenitor cell behavior in mature lung cells.

  13. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  14. TOXICOPATHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF CADMIUM CHLORIDE ON THE ACCESSORY RESPIRATORY ORGAN OF THE AIR-BREATHING CATFISH HETEROPNEUSTES FOSSILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Susithra, N. Jothivel, P. Jayakumar, V. I. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublethal cadmium chloride (0.3 ppm toxicity induced stress related morphopathological alterations in the accessory respiratory organ of the air-breathing catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Siluriformes; Heteropneustidae have been investigated at various intervals of exposure. The histopathological manifestation of the cadmium toxicity includes bulging of the hyperemic secondary lamellae into the lumen of the accessory respiratory organ, necrosis and sloughing of the respiratory epithelium leading to haemorrhage and fusion of SL at various stages of the exposure. Periodic alterations in the densities of epithelial cells and mucous cells along with the development of non-tissue spaces have also been noticed at different exposure periods leading to alterations in the thickness of the respiratory epithelia. The heavy metal salt exposure has affected the mucogenic activity of the respiratory epithelium not only quantitatively but qualitatively also, indicating the probable ameliorative role fish mucus in cadmium toxicity.

  15. Opposite phenotypes of muscle strength and locomotor function in mouse models of partial trisomy and monosomy 21 for the proximal Hspa13-App region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Brault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21, which causes Down syndrome (DS, is the most common viable human aneuploidy. In contrast to trisomy, the complete monosomy (M21 of Hsa21 is lethal, and only partial monosomy or mosaic monosomy of Hsa21 is seen. Both conditions lead to variable physiological abnormalities with constant intellectual disability, locomotor deficits, and altered muscle tone. To search for dosage-sensitive genes involved in DS and M21 phenotypes, we created two new mouse models: the Ts3Yah carrying a tandem duplication and the Ms3Yah carrying a deletion of the Hspa13-App interval syntenic with 21q11.2-q21.3. Here we report that the trisomy and the monosomy of this region alter locomotion, muscle strength, mass, and energetic balance. The expression profiling of skeletal muscles revealed global changes in the regulation of genes implicated in energetic metabolism, mitochondrial activity, and biogenesis. These genes are downregulated in Ts3Yah mice and upregulated in Ms3Yah mice. The shift in skeletal muscle metabolism correlates with a change in mitochondrial proliferation without an alteration in the respiratory function. However, the reactive oxygen species (ROS production from mitochondrial complex I decreased in Ms3Yah mice, while the membrane permeability of Ts3Yah mitochondria slightly increased. Thus, we demonstrated how the Hspa13-App interval controls metabolic and mitochondrial phenotypes in muscles certainly as a consequence of change in dose of Gabpa, Nrip1, and Atp5j. Our results indicate that the copy number variation in the Hspa13-App region has a peripheral impact on locomotor activity by altering muscle function.

  16. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; Heerde, van, H.J.W; Twisk, J W R; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus convent...

  17. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  18. Breathing and Vocal Control: The Respiratory System as both a Driver and Target of Telencephalic Vocal Motor Circuits in Songbirds

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Marc F.; McLean, Judith; Goller, Franz

    2011-01-01

    The production of vocalizations is intimately linked to the respiratory system. Despite our understanding of neural circuits that generate normal respiratory patterns, very little is understood regarding how these ponto-medullary circuits become engaged during vocal production. Songbirds offer a potentially powerful model system for addressing this relationship. Songs dramatically alter the respiratory pattern in ways that are often highly predictable and songbirds have a specialized telencep...

  19. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally (the other being enteric disease). The economic impact of respiratory disease is both direct, from the production losses caused by primary disease and indirect from preve...

  20. Exhaled volatile organic compounds for phenotyping chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanta Maria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive phenotyping of chronic respiratory diseases would be highly beneficial in the personalised medicine of the future. Volatile organic compounds can be measured in the exhaled breath and may be produced or altered by disease processes. We investigated whether distinct patterns of these compounds were present in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and clinically relevant disease phenotypes. Methods Breath samples from 39 COPD subjects and 32 healthy controls were collected and analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Subjects with COPD also underwent sputum induction. Discriminatory compounds were identified by univariate logistic regression followed by multivariate analysis: 1. principal component analysis; 2. multivariate logistic regression; 3. receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results Comparing COPD versus healthy controls, principal component analysis clustered the 20 best-discriminating compounds into four components explaining 71% of the variance. Multivariate logistic regression constructed an optimised model using two components with an accuracy of 69%. The model had 85% sensitivity, 50% specificity and ROC area under the curve of 0.74. Analysis of COPD subgroups showed the method could classify COPD subjects with far greater accuracy. Models were constructed which classified subjects with ≥2% sputum eosinophilia with ROC area under the curve of 0.94 and those having frequent exacerbations 0.95. Potential biomarkers correlated to clinical variables were identified in each subgroup. Conclusion The exhaled breath volatile organic compound profile discriminated between COPD and healthy controls and identified clinically relevant COPD subgroups. If these findings are validated in prospective cohorts, they may have diagnostic and management value in this disease.

  1. Respiratory protease/antiprotease balance determines susceptibility to viral infection and can be modified by nutritional antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Megan; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-06-15

    The respiratory epithelium functions as a central orchestrator to initiate and organize responses to inhaled stimuli. Proteases and antiproteases are secreted from the respiratory epithelium and are involved in respiratory homeostasis. Modifications to the protease/antiprotease balance can lead to the development of lung diseases such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, altered protease/antiprotease balance, in favor for increased protease activity, is associated with increased susceptibility to respiratory viral infections such as influenza virus. However, nutritional antioxidants induce antiprotease expression/secretion and decrease protease expression/activity, to protect against viral infection. As such, this review will elucidate the impact of this balance in the context of respiratory viral infection and lung disease, to further highlight the role epithelial cell-derived proteases and antiproteases contribute to respiratory immune function. Furthermore, this review will offer the use of nutritional antioxidants as possible therapeutics to boost respiratory mucosal responses and/or protect against infection.

  2. Unsuspected myasthenia gravis presenting as respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mier, A; Laroche, C; Green, M

    1990-01-01

    A patient developed respiratory failure after surgical removal of a recurrent thymoma, which necessitated removal of part of the diaphragm. The respiratory failure was due to previously undiagnosed myasthenia gravis, which had selectively affected the respiratory muscles.

  3. Posturo-respiratory synchronization: effects of aging and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Brad D; Hu, Kun; Peng, Chung-Kang; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Novak, Vera

    2012-06-01

    Spontaneous respiration influences the body's center-of-mass when standing. We contend that the healthy postural control system actively adapts to respiration, thereby minimizing its effect on postural sway. We therefore examined the interaction between respiration and postural sway, as measured by center-of-pressure (COP) oscillations, and quantified the extent to which this interaction resulted in "posturo-respiratory synchronization." We hypothesized that synchronization would be stronger in elderly subjects and those with stroke, and when standing with eyes closed as compared to open, due to alterations in the physiologic mechanisms that normally regulate postural sway. Twenty-five subjects with chronic hemispheric infarction and 38 controls (50-80 years) stood on a force platform for 3 min with eyes-open and 3 min with eyes-closed. Respiratory flow and COP dynamics were simultaneously recorded. The dominant oscillatory mode of respiration and the corresponding oscillatory modes of anterioposterior and mediolateral COP dynamics were extracted using ensemble empirical mode decomposition. The strength of posturo-respiratory synchronization was quantified from the regularity of instantaneous phase shifts between extracted respiratory and COP oscillations. Significant posturo-respiratory synchronization was only present in the anterioposterior direction. The strength of synchronization increased with age (pstroke patients (p=0.01). These observations suggest that a control system actively regulates the effects of respiration on sagittal-plane postural sway, particularly during eyes-open standing. As evidenced by increased posturo-respiratory synchronization with advanced age and central lesion, this novel metric may be used as a clinical marker of altered postural control.

  4. Multivariate genetic analysis of atopy phenotypes in a selected sample of twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Kyvik, KO;

    2006-01-01

    , to a large extent, a common genetic background. In particular, upper and lower respiratory symptoms seem to be different phenotypic expressions of a common set of genes. These results add new insight into the origins of clinical heterogeneity within atopy and should stimulate the search for pleiotropic genes...

  5. GlyT2-Dependent Preservation of MECP2-Expression in Inhibitory Neurons Improves Early Respiratory Symptoms but Does Not Rescue Survival in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsmann, Swen; Mesuret, Guillaume; Dannenberg, Julia; Arnoldt, Mauricio; Niebert, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene have been shown to manifest in a neurodevelopmental disorder that is called Rett syndrome. A typical problem that occurs during development is a disturbance of breathing. To address the role of inhibitory neurons, we generated a mouse line that restores MECP2 in inhibitory neurons in the brainstem by crossbreeding a mouse line that expresses the Cre-recombinase (Cre) in inhibitory neurons under the control of the glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2, slc6a5) promotor (GlyT2-Cre) with a mouse line that has a floxed-stop mutation of the Mecp2 gene (Mecp2stop/y). Unrestrained whole-body-plethysmography at postnatal day P60 revealed a low respiratory rate and prolonged respiratory pauses in Mecp2stop/y mice. In contrast, GlyT2-Cre positive Mecp2stop/y mice (Cre+; Mecp2stop/y) showed greatly improved respiration and were indistinguishable from wild type littermates. These data support the concept that alterations in inhibitory neurons are important for the development of the respiratory phenotype in Rett syndrome. PMID:27672368

  6. Air toxics and epigenetic effects: ozone altered microRNAs in the sputum of human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (03) is a criteria air pollutant that is associated with numerous adverse health effects, including altered respiratory immune responses. Despite its deleterious health effects, possible epigenetic mechanisms underlying 03-induced health effects remain understudied. MicroRN...

  7. Ampakine therapy to counter fentanyl-induced respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, John J; Ren, Jun

    2009-08-31

    Opioid analgesics are the most widely used and effective pharmacological agents for the treatment of acute, postoperative and chronic pain. However, activation of opiate receptors leads to significant depression of respiratory frequency in a subpopulation of patients. Here we test the hypothesis that the AMPAKINE CX717 is effective for alleviating fentanyl-induced respiratory depression without interfering with analgesia. Ampakines are a relatively new class of compounds that are in Phase II clinical trials as potential treatments for cognitive disorders and the enhancement of memory and attentiveness. They function by allosterically binding to amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors and modulating the kinetics of channel closing, transmitter dissociation and desensitization. AMPA receptor mediated conductances play a central role in controlling respiratory rhythmogenesis and drive to motoneurons. Here, we demonstrate that CX717 counters fentanyl-induced respiratory depression without significantly altering analgesia and sedation, or noticeably affecting the animals' behavior. Collectively, the preclinical data demonstrate the significant potential for the use of ampakines in respiratory medicine. PMID:19712906

  8. Stimulation of Respiratory Motor Output and Ventilation in a Murine Model of Pompe Disease by Ampakines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMallah, Mai K; Pagliardini, Silvia; Turner, Sara M; Cerreta, Anthony J; Falk, Darin J; Byrne, Barry J; Greer, John J; Fuller, David D

    2015-09-01

    Pompe disease results from a mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene leading to lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory insufficiency is common, and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment, enzyme replacement, has limited effectiveness. Ampakines are drugs that enhance α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor responses and can increase respiratory motor drive. Recent work indicates that respiratory motor drive can be blunted in Pompe disease, and thus pharmacologic stimulation of breathing may be beneficial. Using a murine Pompe model with the most severe clinical genotype (the Gaa(-/-) mouse), our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that ampakines can stimulate respiratory motor output and increase ventilation. Our second objective was to confirm that neuropathology was present in Pompe mouse medullary respiratory control neurons. The impact of ampakine CX717 on breathing was determined via phrenic and hypoglossal nerve recordings in anesthetized mice and whole-body plethysmography in unanesthetized mice. The medulla was examined using standard histological methods coupled with immunochemical markers of respiratory control neurons. Ampakine CX717 robustly increased phrenic and hypoglossal inspiratory bursting and reduced respiratory cycle variability in anesthetized Pompe mice, and it increased inspiratory tidal volume in unanesthetized Pompe mice. CX717 did not significantly alter these variables in wild-type mice. Medullary respiratory neurons showed extensive histopathology in Pompe mice. Ampakines stimulate respiratory neuromotor output and ventilation in Pompe mice, and therefore they have potential as an adjunctive therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:25569118

  9. Age-related changes in the respiratory system

    OpenAIRE

    Lesauskaite, Vita; Ebejer, Martin J.

    1999-01-01

    This article summarises the main structural and physiological changes which take place in the lung from young adulthood to senescence. An understanding of these changes helps the clinician to correctly interpret some results of radiology and pulmonary function frequently seen in clinical practice. An appreciation of the altered physiology and the consequent reduction in pulmonary reserve should alert the physician to the need for a more critical evaluation of the various respiratory parameter...

  10. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  11. Estudo comparativo de sintomas respiratórios e função pulmonar em pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica relacionada à exposição à fumaça de lenha e de tabaco Comparative study of respiratory symptoms and lung function alterations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease related to the exposure to wood and tobacco smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Carmo Moreira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever e analisar sintomas respiratórios e alterações espirométricas em pacientes portadores de doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica (DPOC, com história de exposição à fumaça de lenha e de tabaco. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados retrospectivamente dados de 170 pacientes distribuídos em 3 grupos: 34 pacientes expostos somente à fumaça de lenha, 59 pacientes, somente à de tabaco e 77 pacientes expostos a ambas. RESULTADOS: Os grupos não diferiram quanto a idade (p = 0,225 e grau de exposição, considerando cada tipo de exposição isoladamente ou em associação (p = 0,164 e p = 0,220, respectivamente. No grupo exposto à fumaça de lenha predominou o sexo feminino.Não houve diferença entre os grupos quanto à freqüência dos sintomas respiratórios (p > 0,05, e houve predominância de grau moderado de dispnéia nos três grupos (p = 0,141. O grupo exposto à fumaça de lenha apresentou melhores percentuais da relação volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo/capacidade vital forçada e de volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo (p OBJECTIVE: To describe and analyze clinical symptoms and spirometric alterations of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and history of exposure to wood and tobacco smoke. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated data related to 170 patients distributed into 3 groups: 34 exposed only to wood smoke, 59 patients exposed only to tobacco smoke and 77 patients exposed to both. RESULTS: The groups did not differ significantly in terms of age (p = 0.225 or degree of exposure, considering each type of exposure in isolation or in combination (p = 0.164 and p = 0.220, respectively. Females predominated in the group exposed to wood smoke. There were no differences among the groups regarding respiratory symptoms (p > 0.05, and moderate dyspnea predominated in the three groups (p = 0.141. The group exposed to wood smoke presented higher percentages of forced expiratory

  12. Minimal impact of age and housing temperature on the metabolic phenotype of Acc2-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Amanda E; Stuart, Ella; Leslie, Simon J; Hoehn, Kyle L; James, David E; Kraegen, Edward W; Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    An important regulator of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is the allosteric inhibition of CPT-1 by malonyl-CoA produced by the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2). Initial studies suggested that deletion of Acc2 (Acacb) increased fat oxidation and reduced adipose tissue mass but in an independently generated strain of Acc2 knockout mice we observed increased whole-body and skeletal muscle FAO and a compensatory increase in muscle glycogen stores without changes in glucose tolerance, energy expenditure or fat mass in young mice (12-16 weeks). The aim of the present study was to determine whether there was any effect of age or housing at thermoneutrality (29 °C; which reduces total energy expenditure) on the phenotype of Acc2 knockout mice. At 42-54 weeks of age, male WT and Acc2(-/-) mice had similar body weight, fat mass, muscle triglyceride content and glucose tolerance. Consistent with younger Acc2(-/-) mice, aged Acc2(-/-) mice showed increased whole-body FAO (24 h average respiratory exchange ratio=0.95±0.02 and 0.92±0.02 for WT and Acc2(-/-) mice respectively, Pmuscle glycogen content (+60%, P<0.05) without any detectable change in whole-body energy expenditure. Hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp studies revealed no difference in insulin action between groups with similar glucose infusion rates and tissue glucose uptake. Housing Acc2(-/-) mice at 29 °C did not alter body composition, glucose tolerance or the effects of fat feeding compared with WT mice. These results confirm that manipulation of Acc2 may alter FAO in mice, but this has little impact on body composition or insulin action.

  13. [Cannabis use and impairment of respiratory function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C

    2013-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in many countries including France. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but in our country it is mainly smoked in the form of cannabis resin mixed with tobacco. The technique of inhaling cannabis differs from that of tobacco, increasing the time that the smoke spends in contact with the bronchial mucosal and its impact on respiratory function. One cigarette composed of cannabis and tobacco is much more harmful than a cigarette containing only tobacco. In cannabis smokers there is an increased incidence of respiratory symptoms and episodes of acute bronchitis. Cannabis produces a rapid bronchodilator effect; chronic use provokes a reduction in specific conductance and increase in airways resistance. Studies on the decline of Forced Expiratory Volume are discordant. Cannabis smoke and tetrahydrocannabinol irritate the bronchial tree. They bring about histological signs of airways inflammation and alter the fungicidal and antibacterial activity of alveolar macrophages. Inhalation of cannabis smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Stopping smoking cannabis will bring about important benefits for lung function. This should encourage clinicians to offer patients support in quitting smoking.

  14. [Vaccinations in respiratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lode, H M; Stahlmann, R

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinations are the most successful and cost-effective measures for prevention of infections. Important pathogens of respiratory tract infections (e.g. influenza viruses and pneumococci) can be effectively treated by vaccinations. The seasonal trivalent and recently now quadrivalent influenza vaccines include antigens from influenza A and B type viruses, which have to be modified annually oriented to the circulating strains. The effective protection by influenza vaccination varies considerably (too short protection time, mismatch); therefore, administration late in the year is the best approach (November/December). Two pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for adults: the over 30-year-old 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 4-year-old 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13). The immunological and clinical efficacy of PPV23 is controversially discussed; however, a moderate reduction of invasive pneumococcal infections is widely accepted. The PCV13 stimulates a T-cell response and has currently demonstrated its clinical efficacy in an impressive study (CAPiTA). The problem of PCV13 is the relatively limited coverage of only 47% of the currently circulating invasive pneumococcal serotypes. PMID:26330051

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  16. Connectomic intermediate phenotypes for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eFornito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are phenotypically heterogeneous entities with a complex genetic basis. To mitigate this complexity, many investigators study so-called intermediate phenotypes that putatively provide a more direct index of the physiological effects of candidate genetic risk variants than overt psychiatric syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a particularly popular technique for measuring such phenotypes because it allows interrogation of diverse aspects of brain structure and function in vivo. Much of this work however, has focused on relatively simple measures that quantify variations in the physiology or tissue integrity of specific brain regions in isolation, contradicting an emerging consensus that most major psychiatric disorders do not arise from isolated dysfunction in one or a few brain regions, but rather from disturbed interactions within and between distributed neural circuits; i.e., they are disorders of brain connectivity. The recent proliferation of new MRI techniques for comprehensively mapping the entire connectivity architecture of the brain, termed the human connectome, has provided a rich repertoire of tools for understanding how genetic variants implicated in mental disorder impact distinct neural circuits. In this article, we review research using these connectomic techniques to understand how genetic variation influences the connectivity and topology of human brain networks. We highlight recent evidence from twin and imaging genetics studies suggesting that the penetrance of candidate risk variants for mental illness, such as those in SLC6A4, MAOA, ZNF804A and APOE, may be higher for intermediate phenotypes characterised at the level of distributed neural systems than at the level of spatially localised brain regions. The findings indicate that imaging connectomics provides a powerful framework for understanding how genetic risk for psychiatric disease is expressed through altered structure and function of

  17. Electrically Insulated Sensing of Respiratory Rate and Heartbeat Using Optical Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Suaste-Gómez; Daniel Hernández-Rivera; Anabel S. Sánchez-Sánchez; Elsy Villarreal-Calva

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and heart rates are among the most important physiological parameters used to monitor patients’ health. It is important to design devices that can measure these parameters without risking or altering the subject’s health. In this context, a novel sensing method to monitor simultaneously the heartbeat and respiratory rate signals of patients within an electrically safety environment was developed and tested. An optical fiber-based sensor was used in order to detect two optical phen...

  18. Chronic heart failure modifies respiratory mechanics in rats: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Deise M. Pacheco; Viviane D. Silveira; Alex Thomaz; Ramiro B Nunes; Viviane R. Elsner; Pedro Dal Lago

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic alterations in an experimental model of chronic heart failure (CHF) following myocardial infarction. Method Twenty-seven male adult Wistar rats were randomized to CHF group (n=12) or Sham group (n=15). Ten weeks after coronary ligation or sham surgery, the animals were anesthetized and submitted to respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic measurements. Pulmonary edema as well as cardiac remodeling were measured. Results The C...

  19. Infantile spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type I presenting without respiratory involvement: Novel mutations and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xinghua; Huang, Xiaojun; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Haiyan; Chen, Shengdi; Cao, Li

    2016-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), also known as distal spinal muscular atrophy 1 (DSMA1) or distal hereditary motor neuropathies type 6 (dHMN6), is a rare autosomal recessive motor neuron disorder that affects infants and is characterized by diaphragmatic palsy, distal muscular weakness and muscle atrophy. The disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding immunoglobulinm-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2). We present a female child with novel compound heterozygous mutations in IGHMBP2 gene c.344C>T (p.115T>M) and c.1737C>A (p.579F>L), displaying distal limbs weakness and atrophy without signs of diaphragmatic palsy or respiratory insufficiency. We review 20 reported SMARD1 cases that have no respiratory involvement or have late onsets. We propose that IGHMBP2 gene mutations are characterized by significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Diaphragmatic palsy and respiratory distress may be absent and SMARD1 should be considered in infantile with the onset of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26922252

  20. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East ... 2, 2015. www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/faq.html . Accessed April ...

  1. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan;

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e......Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence...... not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease...... and therapy of HDM respiratory allergy in practice....

  2. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Once your doctor figures out what's causing your respiratory failure, he or she will plan how to treat that disease or condition. Treatments may include medicines, procedures, and other therapies. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: December 19, 2011 Twitter ...

  3. Mechanistic phenotypes: an aggregative phenotyping strategy to identify disease mechanisms using GWAS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Mosley

    Full Text Available A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs associated with "mechanistic phenotypes", comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1 thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2 four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs, and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p = 0.0001, FDR p = 0.03, driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p = 2×10-5, FDR p = 0.03 (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p = 4×10-6, FDR p = 0.005 (KIF25, PINX1. We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms.

  4. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Modrykamien, Ariel M.; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss t...

  5. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. PMID:26593642

  6. Urgencias respiratorias Respiratory emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Las urgencias respiratorias en un paciente con cáncer pueden tener su origen en patologías de la vía aérea, del parénquima pulmonar o de los grandes vasos. La causa puede ser el propio tumor o complicaciones concomitantes. La obstrucción de la vía aérea debería ser inicialmente evaluada con procedimientos endoscópicos. En situaciones severas, la cirugía raramente es posible. El emplazamiento endobronquial de stents e isótopos radiactivos (braquiterapia, la ablación tumoral por láser o la terapia fotodinámica, pueden aliviar de forma rápida los síntomas y reestablecer el flujo aéreo. El manejo de la hemoptisis depende de la causa que la provoque y de la cuantía de la misma. La broncoscopia sigue siendo el procedimiento de primera línea en la mayor parte de los casos; aporta información diagnóstica y puede interrumpir el sangrado mediante lavados con suero helado, taponamiento endobronquial o inyecciones tópicas de adrenalina o trombina. La radioterapia externa sigue siendo un procedimiento extraordinariamente útil para tratar la hemoptisis de causa tumoral y en situaciones bien seleccionadas la terapia endobronquial con láser o braquiterapia y la embolización arterial bronquial pueden proporcionar un gran rendimiento paliativo. Las urgencias respiratorias por enfermedad del parénquima pulmonar en un paciente oncológico, pueden tener causa tumoral, iatrogénica o infecciosa. El reconocimiento precoz de cada una de ellas determina la administración del tratamiento específico y las posibilidades de éxito.Respiratory emergencies in a patient with cancer can have their origin in pathologies of the airway, of the pulmonary parenchyma or the large vessels. The cause can be the tumour itself or concomitant complications. Obstruction of the airway should be initially evaluated with endoscopic procedures. Surgery is rarely possible in serious situations. The endobronchial placement of stents or radioactive isotopes

  7. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M;

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection...

  8. The Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Robert S. E.; Losh, Molly; Parlier, Morgan; Reznick, J. Steven; Piven, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The broad autism phenotype (BAP) is a set of personality and language characteristics that reflect the phenotypic expression of the genetic liability to autism, in non-autistic relatives of autistic individuals. These characteristics are milder but qualitatively similar to the defining features of autism. A new instrument designed to measure the…

  9. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  10. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  11. Rigid spine syndrome with respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, H.; Kondo, K.; Hoshino, K; Maruyama, K; Yanagisawa, N

    1990-01-01

    The pathogenesis and therapy of respiratory failure in the rigid spine syndrome are discussed in two cases who improved with respiratory assistance. In both cases, the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide were reversed in arterial blood gas analysis and %VC was less than 30%. Remission from respiratory failure has been obtained by the use of a ventilator during the night. The cause of the respiratory failure in both cases was severe restrictive respiratory dysfunction due to extreme...

  12. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  13. Phenotypic variation in Azospirillum brasilense exposed to starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Anat; Valverde, Angel; Castro-Sowinski, Susana; Lerner, Hadas; Okon, Yaacov; Burdman, Saul

    2010-08-01

    Bacteria have developed mechanisms that allow them maintaining cell viability during starvation and resuming growth when nutrients become available. Among these mechanisms are adaptive mutations and phase variation, which are often associated with DNA rearrangements. Azospirillum brasilense is a Gram-negative, nitrogen-fixing, plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. Here we report phenotypic variants of A. brasilense that were collected after exposure to prolonged starvation or after re-isolation from maize roots. The variants differed in several features from the parental strains, including pigmentation, aggregation ability, EPS amount and composition and LPS structure. One of the phenotypic variants, overproducing EPS and showing an altered LPS structure, was further characterized and showed differential response to several stresses and antibiotics relative to its parental strain. Characterization of the variants by repetitive-PCR revealed that phenotypic variation was often associated with DNA rearrangements.

  14. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:To know the relationship between hypothermia, etiology, respiratory failure and prognosis of submersion in environmental emergency medicine.Methods:FromDecember1, 2002 toSeptember30,2007, there were52 hospitalized near- drowning cases in a medical center at northernTaiwan.Retrospective study of52 submersion patients who were hospitalized during the duration was analyzed.Results:The hypothermic groups are more commonly seen in acute respiratory failure after submersion,36%vs.21%,P<0.05.The hypothermic submersion patients who are older in age than normothermic submersion patients(44vs.27 years old,P<0.05).The suicidal submersion patients are older, hypothermic and longer length of stay than accidental submersion patients.Conclusions:Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department(ED) are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  15. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian;

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A...... mutations by investigating patients with the two most common epilepsy syndromes: (i) idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and (ii) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Whole exome sequencing data of 238 patients with IGE as well as Sanger sequencing of 84 patients with TLE were evaluated for GRIN2A sequence...... alterations. Two additional independent cohorts comprising 1469 IGE and 330 TLE patients were screened for structural deletions (>40kb) involving GRIN2A. Apart from a presumably benign, non-segregating variant in a patient with juvenile absence epilepsy, neither mutations nor deletions were detected in either...

  16. Respiratory disease surveillance in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agocs, M.M.; Rudnai, P.; Etzel, R.A. (Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Centers for Disease Control, Budapest (Hungary))

    1992-08-28

    In October 1989, the Hungarian National Institute of Hygiene initiated the Children's Acute Respiratory Morbidity (CHARM) Surveillance System to assess the association between nine reportable respiratory diseases and air pollution. The weekly number of physician-diagnosed, reportable respiratory diseases among four age groups of children (less than 1, 1-2, 3-5, and 6-14 years) was tabulated for Sopron, a city with 60,000 residents. We calculated the proportion of diseases occurring during weeks with low, moderate, and high sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations. The weekly averages of the 24-hour median SO2 concentrations were divided into thirds at less than or equal to 17.6, greater than 17.6 to less than or equal to 26.3, and greater than 26.3 micrograms/m3 (range: 0.9-79.6 micrograms/m3), and the NO2 concentrations at less than or equal to 29.8, greater than 29.8 to less than or equal to 44.1, and greater than 44.1 micrograms/m3 (range: 4.2-90.1 micrograms/m3). During 1990, 11,474 respiratory disease cases occurred among the 4,020 children less than 15 years of age living in Sopron and monitored by the CHARM system. The two most frequently reported disease categories were rhinitis/tonsillitis/pharyngitis (71.5%) and acute bronchitis (8.5%). Sixty-seven percent of pneumonia cases occurred when SO2 concentrations were highest. We found no association between levels of NO2 and respiratory diseases. The CHARM Surveillance System may characterize more fully which groups of children develop particular respiratory diseases following exposure to air pollution.

  17. Next-generation phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Scott J; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Carragher, Neil O

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic drug discovery (PDD) strategies are defined by screening and selection of hit or lead compounds based on quantifiable phenotypic endpoints without prior knowledge of the drug target. We outline the challenges associated with traditional phenotypic screening strategies and propose solutions and new opportunities to be gained by adopting modern PDD technologies. We highlight both historical and recent examples of approved drugs and new drug candidates discovered by modern phenotypic screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of a new era of PDD underpinned by a wealth of technology advances in the areas of in vitro model development, high-content imaging and image informatics, mechanism-of-action profiling and target deconvolution. PMID:27357617

  18. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF. PMID:27335803

  19. Capturing phenotypes for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J; Haendel, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    Deep phenotyping followed by integrated computational analysis of genotype and phenotype is becoming ever more important for many areas of genomic diagnostics and translational research. The overwhelming majority of clinical descriptions in the medical literature are available only as natural language text, meaning that searching, analysis, and integration of medically relevant information in databases such as PubMed is challenging. The new journal Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies will require authors to select Human Phenotype Ontology terms for research papers that will be displayed alongside the manuscript, thereby providing a foundation for ontology-based indexing and searching of articles that contain descriptions of phenotypic abnormalities-an important step toward improving the ability of researchers and clinicians to get biomedical information that is critical for clinical care or translational research. PMID:27148566

  20. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Deans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility.

  1. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  2. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  3. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  4. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome after near-drowning (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, G; Jelen, S; Forster, B; Gullotta, U; Daum, S

    1977-08-01

    After successful rescue from drowning there may develop a situation which is called secondary drowning, resulting in acute respiratory distress characterized by interstitial pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia, hypercapnia and acidosis during drowning, direct alteration of the alveolar membrane by aspirated water and particulate matters and a volume overloading by adsorption and--not seldom--inept therapy. This situation requires mechanical ventilation and forced diuresis, combined with high doses of steroids, antibiotics and digitalis. We present the case of an eleven year old patient whose clinical course demonstrate the necessity of exact clinical observation after rescue from drowning. After development of acute respiratory distress only the immediate utilization of the therapeutic modalities of an intensive care may result in a satisfactory outcome. Four months later our patient had normal pulmonary function except for a moderate reduction of compliance.

  5. Defense mechanisms of the respiratory membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G M; Jakab, G J; Low, R B; Davis, G S

    1977-03-01

    The success or failure of pulmonary defense mechanisms largely determines the appearance of clinical lung disease. The lung is protected by interlucking systems of nonspecific and specific defenses. Inhaled substrances can be isolated by mechanical barriers or can be physically removed from the lung either by transport up the bronchial mucociliary escalator or by transport through interstitial and lymphatic channels leading to lymph nodes. Substances can be locally detoxified within the lung by interaction with secretory proteins, such as antibodies, or by neutralization and dissolution within phagocytic cells. The pulmonary alveolar macrophage is the central figure in the protection of the respiratory membrane, operating in all 3 of the nonspecific modes of defense and augmented by specific immunologic mechanisms as well. Alterations in macrophage function and physiology may be crucial in determining the effectiveness of pulmonary defense. Recent advances in the cell biology of the alveolar macrophage have led to a greater understanding of its complex funcition. The multiple origins of macrophages from local and circulating cell pools and the variability in their fate and lifespan reflect the multi-faceted role of this cell type. The importance of the interactions between macrophages, orther lung cells, and other defense mechanisms has become increasingly clear. As well as functioning as resident defender of the alveolus, the macrophage is an important effector of the pulmonary immune response and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, destructive, and fibrotic lung diseases. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses amplify and direct lung defenses against infection and may also participate in protection against other agents. Immunoglobulin A and G, microbial neutralizing and opsonizing anti-bodies, and macrophage-stimulating T lymphocytes are the major immunospecific forms of lung defense. Infectious agents, cigarette smoke, air

  6. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and identifies…

  7. Nasopharyngeal colonization with respiratory pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory (otitis media, pneumonia) and invasive (sepsis, meningitis) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that every year one million children under the age of five die of pneumonia, mainly in developing countries. Elderly are ano

  8. Guide to industrial respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 has increased the emphasis on proper selection and use of respirators in situations where engineering controls are not feasible or are being implemented. Although a great deal of information on respiratory protection has been published, most of it is more technical than necessary for the average user faced with day-to-day problems of respiratory protection in industrial environments. This Guide is to provide the industrial user a single reference source containing enough information for establishing and maintaining a respirator program that meets the OSHA requirements outlined in 29 CFR Part 1910.134. It includes chapters on respirator selection, use, maintenance, and inspection, a complete description of all types of respirators and their advantages and limitations, and chapters on respirator fitting and wearer training, respiratory physiology, respiratory hazards, and physiological and psychological limitations. Also included are samples of the decision logic used in respirator selection, guidance on setting up an adequate respirator program through formulation of written standard operating procedures, and discussion of the meaning of the approved respirator

  9. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum Print A A A ...

  10. Molecular detection of respiratory viruses: clinical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) cause major morbidity in infants and children. Traditionally, respiratory viruses are detected with conventional tests (viral culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF)), however nowadays viral diagnostics are being revolutionized by the increased implemen

  11. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  12. Hypoventilatory respiratory failure in generalised scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, Gerald D; Pettigrew, Norman M

    1983-01-01

    A patient with generalised cutaneous and gastrointestinal scleroderma subsequently died from respiratory failure secondary to hyperventilation. At necropsy changes consistent with scleroderma of the diaphragm were found; these were thought to have contributed appreciably to the terminal respiratory failure.

  13. Epigenetic reversion of breast carcinoma phenotype is accompaniedby DNA sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandal, Tone; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Spencer, Virginia A.; Folberg,Robert; Bissell, Mina J.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-07-19

    The importance of microenvironment and context in regulation of tissue-specific genes is finally well established. DNA exposure to, or sequestration from, nucleases can be used to detect differences in higher order chromatin structure in intact cells without disturbing cellular or tissue architecture. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and tumor phenotype, we utilized an established 3-D assay where normal and malignant human breast cells can be easily distinguished by the morphology of the structures they make (acinus-like vs tumor-like, respectively). We show that these phenotypes can be distinguished also by sensitivity to AluI digestion where the malignant cells are resistant to digestion relative to non-malignant cells. Reversion of the T4-2 breast cancer cells by either cAMP analogs, or a phospatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K) inhibitor not only reverted the phenotype, but also the chromatin sensitivity to AluI. By using different cAMP-analogs, we show that the cAMP-induced phenotypic reversion, polarization, and shift in DNA organization act through a cAMP-dependent-protein-kinase A-coupled signaling pathway. Importantly, inhibitory antibody to fibronectin also reverted the malignant phenotype, polarized the acini, and changed chromatin sequestration. These experiments show not only that modifying the tumor microenvironment can alter the organization of tumor cells but also that architecture of the tissues and the global chromatin organization are coupled and yet highly plastic.

  14. Nuclear phenotype changes after heat shock in Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Simone L

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule epithelial cells of male nymphs of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus, subjected to short- and long-duration heat shocks at 40ºC were analyzed immediately after the shock and 10 and 30 days later. Normal nuclei with a usual heterochromatic body as well as phenotypes indicative of survival (unravelled heterochromatin, giants and death (apoptosis, necrosis responses were observed in control and treated specimens. However, all nuclear phenotypes, except the normal ones, were more frequent in shocked specimens. Similarly altered phenotypes have also been reported in Triatoma infestans following heat shock, although at different frequencies. The frequency of the various nuclear phenotypes observed in this study suggests that the forms of cell survival observed were not sufficient or efficient enough to protect all of the Malpighian tubule cells from the deleterious effects of stress. In agreement with studies on P. megistus survival following heat shock, only long-duration shock produced strongly deleterious effects.

  15. Phospholipidomic Profile Variation on THP-1 Cells Exposed to Skin or Respiratory Sensitizers and Respiratory Irritant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, João D; Maciel, Elisabete A; Silva, Ana; Ferreira, Isabel; Ricardo, Fernando; Domingues, Pedro; Neves, Bruno M; Domingues, Maria Rosário M; Cruz, Maria Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Occupational exposure to low molecular weight reactive chemicals often leads to development of allergic reactions such as allergic contact dermatitis and respiratory allergies. Further insights into the interaction of these chemicals with physiopathological relevant cellular models might provide the foundations for novel non-animal approaches to safety assessment. In this work we used the human THP-1 cell line to determine phospholipidome changes induced by the skin sensitizer 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB), the respiratory allergen hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and the irritant methyl salicylate (MESA). We detected that these chemicals differently induce lipid peroxidation and modulate THP-1 IL-1β, IL-12B, IL-8, CD86, and HMOX1 transcription. Decreased phosphatidylethanolamine content was detected in cells exposed to MESA, while profound alterations in the relative abundance of cardiolipin species were observed in cells exposed to DNFB. All chemicals tested induced a decrease in the relative abundance of plasmanyl phosphatidylcholine species PC (O-16:0e/18:1) and phosphatidylinositol species PI (34:1), while increasing PI (38:4). An increased abundance of oleic acid was observed in the phospholipids of cells exposed to DNFB while a decreased abundance of palmitic acid was detected in cells treated with MESA or DNFB. We conclude that both specific and common alterations at phospholipidome levels are triggered by the different chemicals, while not allowing a complete distinction between them using a Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP). The common effects observed at phospholipids level with all the chemicals tested might be related to unspecific cell cytotoxic mechanisms that nevertheless may contribute to the elicitation of specific immune responses. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2639-2651, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26946329

  16. Sex-specific Effects of Exercise Ancestry on Metabolic, Morphological, and Gene Expression Phenotypes in Multiple Generations of Mouse Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Guth, Lisa M.; Andrew T. Ludlow; Witkowski, Sarah; Marshall, Mallory R.; Lima, Laila C. J.; Venezia, Andrew C.; Xiao, Tao; Lee, Mei-Ling Ting; Spangenburg, Espen E.; Roth, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Early life and pre-conception environmental stimuli can affect adult health-related phenotypes. Exercise training is an environmental stimulus affecting many systems throughout the body and appears to alter offspring phenotypes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of parental exercise training, or “exercise ancestry,” on morphological and metabolic phenotypes in two generations of mouse offspring. F0 C57BL/6 mice were exposed to voluntary exercise or sedentary lifestyle and bre...

  17. Detection of Respiratory Viruses by Molecular Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Clinical laboratories historically diagnose seven or eight respiratory virus infections using a combination of techniques including enzyme immunoassay, direct fluorescent antibody staining, cell culture, and nucleic acid amplification tests. With the discovery of six new respiratory viruses since 2000, laboratories are faced with the challenge of detecting up to 19 different viruses that cause acute respiratory disease of both the upper and lower respiratory tracts. The application o...

  18. Significance of respirasomes for the assembly/stability of human respiratory chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schägger, Hermann; de Coo, René; Bauer, Matthias F; Hofmann, Sabine; Godinot, Catherine; Brandt, Ulrich

    2004-08-27

    We showed that the human respiratory chain is organized in supramolecular assemblies of respiratory chain complexes, the respirasomes. The mitochondrial complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase) and III (cytochrome c reductase) form a stable core respirasome to which complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) can also bind. An analysis of the state of respirasomes in patients with an isolated deficiency of single complexes provided evidence that the formation of respirasomes is essential for the assembly/stability of complex I, the major entry point of respiratory chain substrates. Genetic alterations leading to a loss of complex III prevented respirasome formation and led to the secondary loss of complex I. Therefore, primary complex III assembly deficiencies presented as combined complex III/I defects. This dependence of complex I assembly/stability on respirasome formation has important implications for the diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

  19. Inflammation in adult women with a history of child maltreatment: The involvement of mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeck, Christina; Koenig, Alexandra Maria; Schury, Katharina; Geiger, Martha Leonie; Karabatsiakis, Alexander; Wilker, Sarah; Waller, Christiane; Gündel, Harald; Fegert, Jörg Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    The experience of maltreatment during childhood is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pro-inflammatory phenotype remain unclear. Mitochondria were recently found to principally coordinate inflammatory processes via both inflammasome activation and inflammasome-independent pathways. To this end, we hypothesized that alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning and oxidative stress might be at the interface between the association of maltreatment experiences during childhood and inflammation. We analyzed pro-inflammatory biomarkers (levels of C-reactive protein, cytokine secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro, PBMC composition, lysophosphatidylcholine levels), serum oxidative stress levels (arginine:citrulline ratio, l-carnitine and acetylcarnitine levels) and mitochondrial functioning (respiratory activity and density of mitochondria in PBMC) in peripheral blood samples collected from 30 women (aged 22-44years) with varying degrees of maltreatment experiences in form of abuse and neglect during childhood. Exposure to maltreatment during childhood was associated with an increased ROS production, higher levels of oxidative stress and an increased mitochondrial activity in a dose-response relationship. Moreover, the increase in mitochondrial activity and ROS production were positively associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by PBMC. Decreased serum levels of lysophosphatidylcholines suggested higher inflammasome activation with increasing severity of child maltreatment experiences. Together these findings offer preliminary evidence for the association of alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory phenotype observed in individuals with a history of maltreatment during childhood. The results emphasize that the early prevention of child abuse and neglect warrants more attention, as the

  20. [Paternal GNAS mutations: Which phenotypes? What genetic counseling?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Marie-Laure

    2015-05-01

    Parental imprinting and the type of the genetic alteration play a determinant role in the phenotype expression of GNAS locus associated to pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). GNAS locus gives rise to several different messenger RNA transcripts that are derived from the paternal allele, the maternal allele, or both and can be either coding or non-coding. As a consequence, GNAS mutations lead to a wide spectrum of phenotypes. An alteration in the coding sequence of the gene leads to a haplo-insufficiency and a dysmorphic phenotype (Albright's syndrome or AHO). AHO is a clinical syndrome defined by specific physical features including short stature, obesity, round-shaped face, subcutaneous ossifications, brachymetarcapy (mainly of the 4th and 5th ray). If the alteration is on the maternal allele, there is a hormonal resistance to the PTH at the kidney level and to the TSH at the thyroid level. The phenotype is known as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a). If the alteration is on the paternal allele, there are few clinical signs with no hormonal resistance and the phenotype is known as pseudopseudo hypoparathyroidism (pseudo-PPHP). Heterozygous GNAS mutations on the paternal GNAS allele were associated with intra uterin growth retardation (IUGR). Moreover, birth weights were lower with paternal GNAS mutations affecting exon 2-13 than with exon 1/intron 1 mutations suggesting a role for loss of function XLαs. Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) is a rare disease of ectopic bone formation, characterized by cutaneous and subcutaneous ossifications progressing towards deep connective and muscular tissues. POH is caused by a heterozygous GNAS inactivating mutation and has been associated with paternal inheritance. However, genotype/phenotype correlations suggest that there is no direct correlation between the ossifying process and parental origin, as there is high variability in heterotopic ossification. Clinical heterogeneity makes genetic counseling a very delicate

  1. Exposure to ozone reduces influenza disease severity and alters distribution of influenza viral antigens in murine lungs.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolcott, J A; Zee, Y. C.; Osebold, J W

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to ambient levels of ozone (0.5 ppm) was shown to alter the pathogenesis of respiratory infection after aerosol infection of mice with influenza A virus. A semiquantitative method for determination of the sites of virus replication by direct immunofluorescence indicated that exposure to ozone reduced the involvement of respiratory epithelium in the infectious process and resulted in a less widespread infection of the alveolar parenchyma. Furthermore, the ozone-mediated alteration in ...

  2. Atypical respiratory complications of dengue fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveen Kumar; AK Gadpayle; Deepshikha Trisal

    2013-01-01

    In last decade, dengue has emerged as one of the most important vector born disease.With increasing cases, uncommon presentations and complications are now commonly recognized. Here, we report two cases of rare pattern of respiratory involvement in dengue: acute respiratory distress syndrome and bronchiolitis with respiratory failure.

  3. Chromosomal phenotypes and submicroscopic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriendt Koen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The finding, during the last decade, that several common, clinically delineated syndromes are caused by submicroscopic deletions or, more rarely, by duplications, has provided a powerful tool in the annotation of the human genome. Since most microdeletion/microduplication syndromes are defined by a common deleted/duplicated region, abnormal dosage of genes located within these regions can explain the phenotypic similarities among individuals with a specific syndrome. As such, they provide a unique resource towards the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes such as congenital heart defects, mental and growth retardation and abnormal behaviour. In addition, the study of phenotypic differences in individuals with the same microdeletion syndrome may also become a treasury for the identification of modifying factors for complex phenotypes. The molecular analysis of these chromosomal anomalies has led to a growing understanding of their mechanisms of origin. Novel tools to uncover additional submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies at a higher resolution and higher speed, as well as the novel tools at hand for deciphering the modifying factors and epistatic interactors, are 'on the doorstep' and will, besides their obvious diagnostic role, play a pivotal role in the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes.

  4. Regulation of the Cyanide-Resistant Alternative Respiratory Pathway in the Fungus Acremonium chrysogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Sándor, Erzsébet; Fekete, Erzsébet; Karaffa, Levente

    2003-01-01

    This review summarises the current knowledge on the biochemical and physiological events that directly or indirectly alter the engagement of the cyanide-resistant alternative respiratory pathway in the cephalosporin C producer filamentous fungus Acremonium chrysogenum. Particular emphasis is placed on the role this activity plays in the overproduction of antibiotic, and also on the critical fermentation technology background that supports its operation.

  5. Exposure of neonates to Respiratory Syncytial Virus is critical in determining subsequent airway response in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Melissa

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of acute bronchiolitis in infants and the elderly. Furthermore, epidemiological data suggest that RSV infection during infancy is a potent trigger of subsequent wheeze and asthma development. However, the mechanism by which RSV contributes to asthma is complex and remains largely unknown. A recent study indicates that the age of initial RSV infection is a key factor in determining airway response to RSV rechallenge. We hypothesized that severe RSV infection during neonatal development significantly alters lung structure and the pulmonary immune micro-environment; and thus, neonatal RSV infection is crucial in the development of or predisposition to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Methods To investigate this hypothesis the present study was conducted in a neonatal mouse model of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway dysfunction. Seven-day-old mice were infected with RSV (2 × 105 TCID50/g body weight and allowed to mature to adulthood. To determine if neonatal RSV infection predisposed adult animals to enhanced pathophysiological responses to allergens, these mice were then sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Various endpoints including lung function, histopathology, cytokine production, and cellularity in bronchoalveolar lavage were examined. Results RSV infection in neonates alone led to inflammatory airway disease characterized by airway hyperreactivity, peribronchial and perivascular inflammation, and subepithelial fibrosis in adults. If early RSV infection was followed by allergen exposure, this pulmonary phenotype was exacerbated. The initial response to neonatal RSV infection resulted in increased TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. Interestingly, increased levels of IL-13 and mucus hyperproduction were observed almost three months after the initial infection with RSV. Conclusion Neonatal RSV exposure results in long term

  6. Postperfusion lung syndrome: Respiratory mechanics, respiratory indices and biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but lethal. Secondary inflammatory response was the popularly accepted theory for the underlying etiology. Respiratory index (RI) and arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen can be reliable indices for the diagnosis of this syndrome as X-ray appearance is always insignificant at the early stage of the onset. Evaluations of extravascular lung water content and pulmonary compliance are also helpful in the definite diagnosis. Multiorgan failure and ...

  7. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  8. The effect of maternal nutrition on the developmental origins of respiratory disease

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Shelley A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental challenges during early life have been shown to result in greater risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and coronary disease in later life. Factors such as unbalanced nutrition before birth result in metabolic and structural adaptations that lead to persistent modifications to offspring phenotype. There is evidence that respiratory disease is influenced by developmental environment. Reduced fetal growth is associated with impaired lung development, increasing risk of develop...

  9. Habituation in neural processing and subjective perception of respiratory sensations

    OpenAIRE

    von Leupoldt, Andreas; Vovk, Andrea; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.; Davenport, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced perception of respiratory sensations is associated with negative treatment outcome in asthma. We examined whether habituation in the neural processing of repeatedly experienced respiratory sensations may underlie subjective reports of reduced respiratory perception. Respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) elicited by inspiratory occlusions and reports of respiratory perception were compared between early and late experimental periods in healthy subjects. Reports of respiratory pe...

  10. Ontogenetic selection on hatchery salmon in the wild: natural selection on artificial phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Michael M; Lachapelle, Kevin A; Kinnison, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Captive rearing often alters the phenotypes of organisms that are destined for release into the wild. Natural selection on these unnatural phenotypes could have important consequences for the utility of captive rearing as a restoration approach. We show that normal hatchery practices significantly advance the development of endangered Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry by 30+ days. As a result, hatchery fry might be expected to face strong natural selection resulting from their developmental a...

  11. Immunoprophylaxis of bovine respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogan Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Respiratory Syndrome (BRS is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of infective agents, the environment and the individual immunological response of animals in the herd. Despite five decades of research on BRS, no clear understanding of how environmental factors influence pathogenic outcomes of the disease has been defined. As such, the development of immunoprophylaxis and vaccine programmes to prevent outbreaks of BRS in cattle has not been successful. The current paper discusses vaccination programmes for all categories of cattle and presents a review of existing vaccines being used for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syndrome in cattle and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the currently used vaccines and vaccination programmes. Lastly, a discussion detailing the design of future perfect vaccines is presented.

  12. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  13. Respiratory influenza virus infection induces intestinal immune injury via microbiota-mediated Th17 cell–dependent inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Wei, Haiming; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Influenza in humans is often accompanied by gastroenteritis-like symptoms such as diarrhea, but the underlying mechanism is not yet understood. We explored the occurrence of gastroenteritis-like symptoms using a mouse model of respiratory influenza infection. We found that respiratory influenza infection caused intestinal injury when lung injury occurred, which was not due to direct intestinal viral infection. Influenza infection altered the intestinal microbiota composition, which was mediat...

  14. Management of hypoxemic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalavanan, N; Aschner, J L

    2016-06-01

    While diagnoses of hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) in preterm infants may be based on criteria similar to those in term infants, management approaches often differ. In preterm infants, HRF can be classified as 'early' or 'late' based on an arbitrary threshold of 28 postnatal days. Among preterm infants with late HRF, the pulmonary vascular abnormalities associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Surfactant, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), sildenafil, prostacyclin and endothelin receptor blockers have been used to manage infants with both early and late HRF. However, evidence is lacking for most therapies currently in use. Chronic oral sildenafil therapy for BPD-associated PH has demonstrated some preliminary efficacy. A favorable response to iNO has been documented in some preterm infants with early PH following premature prolonged rupture of membranes and oligohydramnios. Management is complicated by a lack of clear demarcation between interventions designed to manage respiratory distress syndrome, prevent BPD and treat HRF. Heterogeneity in clinical phenotype, pathobiology and genomic underpinnings of BPD pose challenges for evidence-based management recommendations. Greater insight into the spectrum of disease phenotypes represented by BPD can optimize existing therapies and promote development of new treatments. In addition, better understanding of an individual's phenotype, genotype and biomarkers may suggest targeted personalized interventions. Initiatives such as the Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program provide a framework to address these challenges using genetic, environmental, physiological and clinical data as well as large repositories of patient samples. PMID:27225961

  15. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu; Tatiana Maron-Gutierrez; Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez Garcia; Marcelo Marcos Morales; Patricia Rieken Macedo Rocco

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions ne...

  16. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  17. Tetracycline regulator expression alters the transcriptional program of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Hubert; Rommer, Anna; Konrad, Torsten A; Nassimbeni, Christine; Wieser, Rotraud

    2010-01-01

    Tetracycline regulated ectopic gene expression is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, the tetracycline regulator (tetR) itself has been reported to cause certain phenotypic changes in mammalian cells. We, therefore, asked whether human myeloid U937 cells expressing the tetR in an autoregulated manner would exhibit alterations in gene expression upon removal of tetracycline.

  18. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  19. Deployment-related Respiratory Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael J; Rawlins, Frederic A; Forbes, Damon A; Skabelund, Andrew J; Lucero, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Military deployment to Southwest Asia since 2003 in support of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn has presented unique challenges from a pulmonary perspective. Various airborne hazards in the deployed environment include suspended geologic dusts, burn pit smoke, vehicle exhaust emissions, industrial air pollution, and isolated exposure incidents. These exposures may give rise to both acute respiratory symptoms and in some instances development of chronic lung disease. While increased respiratory symptoms during deployment are well documented, there is limited data on whether inhalation of airborne particulate matter is causally related to an increase in either common or unique pulmonary diseases. While disease processes such as acute eosinophilic pneumonia and exacerbation of preexisting asthma have been adequately documented, there is significant controversy surrounding the potential effects of deployment exposures and development of rare pulmonary disorders such as constrictive bronchiolitis. The role of smoking and related disorders has yet to be defined. This article presents the current evidence for deployment-related respiratory symptoms and ongoing Department of Defense studies. Further, it also provides general recommendations for evaluating pulmonary health in the deployed military population.

  20. Respiratory analysis system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system is described for monitoring the respiratory process in which the gas flow rate and the frequency of respiration and expiration cycles can be determined on a real time basis. A face mask is provided with one-way inlet and outlet valves where the gas flow is through independent flowmeters and through a mass spectrometer. The opening and closing of a valve operates an electrical switch, and the combination of the two switches produces a low frequency electrical signal of the respiratory inhalation and exhalation cycles. During the time a switch is operated, the corresponsing flowmeter produces electric pulses representative of the flow rate; the electrical pulses being at a higher frequency than that of the breathing cycle and combined with the low frequency signal. The high frequency pulses are supplied to conventional analyzer computer which also receives temperature and pressure inputs and computes mass flow rate and totalized mass flow of gas. From the mass spectrometer, components of the gas are separately computed as to flow rate. The electrical switches cause operation of up-down inputs of a reversible counter. The respective up and down cycles can be individually monitored and combined for various respiratory measurements.

  1. Supramolecular Organization of Respiratory Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the existence of superassemblies between mitochondrial respiratory complexes, such superassemblies have been the object of a passionate debate. It is accepted that respiratory supercomplexes are structures that occur in vivo, although which superstructures are naturally occurring and what could be their functional role remain open questions. The main difficulty is to make compatible the existence of superassemblies with the corpus of data that drove the field to abandon the early understanding of the physical arrangement of the mitochondrial respiratory chain as a compact physical entity (the solid model). This review provides a nonexhaustive overview of the evolution of our understanding of the structural organization of the electron transport chain from the original idea of a compact organization to a view of freely moving complexes connected by electron carriers. Today supercomplexes are viewed not as a revival of the old solid model but rather as a refined revision of the fluid model, which incorporates a new layer of structural and functional complexity. PMID:26734886

  2. Incidence of respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in hospital born babies. Subjects and Methods: All live born infants delivered at the hospital and who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were included in the study. Results: Ninety-four neonates developed RDS. Out of these, 88 (93.61%) were preterm and 06 (6.38%) were term infants. There was a male preponderance (65.95%). RDS was documented in 1.72% of total live births. 37.28% of preterm and 0.11% of term neonates born at the hospital. The incidence of RDS was 100% at 26 or less weeks of gestation, 57.14% at 32 weeks, and 3.70% at 36 weeks. The mortality with RDS was 41 (43.61%). Conclusion: RDS is the commonest cause of respiratory distress in the newborn, particularly, in preterm infants. It carries a high mortality rate and the incidence is more than that documented in the Western world. (author)

  3. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaag, A A; Grunnet, L G; Arora, G P;

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago, Hales and Barker along with their co-workers published some of their pioneering papers proposing the 'thrifty phenotype hypothesis' in Diabetologia (4;35:595-601 and 3;36:62-67). Their postulate that fetal programming could represent an important player in the origin of type 2...

  4. Leaf segmentation in plant phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharr, Hanno; Minervini, Massimo; French, Andrew P.; Klukas, Christian; Kramer, David M.; Liu, Xiaoming; Luengo, Imanol; Pape, Jean Michel; Polder, Gerrit; Vukadinovic, Danijela; Yin, Xi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based plant phenotyping is a growing application area of computer vision in agriculture. A key task is the segmentation of all individual leaves in images. Here we focus on the most common rosette model plants, Arabidopsis and young tobacco. Although leaves do share appearance and shape cha

  5. Phenotypic spectrum of GABRA1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Marini, Carla; Pfeffer, Siona;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To delineate phenotypic heterogeneity, we describe the clinical features of a cohort of patients with GABRA1 gene mutations. METHODS: Patients with GABRA1 mutations were ascertained through an international collaboration. Clinical, EEG, and genetic data were collected. Functional analy...

  6. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct 'subpopulations' with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and function......). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially...... and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents...

  7. Sleep Bruxism in Respiratory Medicine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Pierre; Heinzer, Raphael; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB) consists of involuntary episodic and repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by occasional tooth grinding or jaw clenching during sleep. Prevalence decreases from 20% to 14% in childhood to 8% to 3% in adulthood. Although the causes and mechanisms of idiopathic primary SB are unknown, putative candidates include psychologic risk factors (eg, anxiety, stress due to life events, hypervigilance) and sleep physiologic reactivity (eg, sleep arousals with autonomic activity, breathing events). Although certain neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, noradrenalin, histamine) have been proposed to play an indirect role in SB, their exact contribution to rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) (the electromyography marker of SB) genesis remains undetermined. No specific gene is associated with SB; familial environmental influence plays a significant role. To date, no single explanation can account for the SB mechanism. Secondary SB with sleep comorbidities that should be clinically assessed are insomnia, periodic limb movements during sleep, sleep-disordered breathing (eg, apnea-hypopnea), gastroesophageal reflux disease, and neurologic disorders (eg, sleep epilepsy, rapid eye movement behavior disorder). SB is currently quantified by scoring RMMA recordings in parallel with brain, respiratory, and heart activity recordings in a sleep laboratory or home setting. RMMA confirmation with audio-video recordings is recommended for better diagnostic accuracy in the presence of neurologic conditions. Management strategies (diagnostic tests, treatment) should be tailored to the patient's phenotype and comorbidities. In the presence of sleep-disordered breathing, a mandibular advancement appliance or CPAP treatment is preferred over single occlusal splint therapy on the upper jaw. PMID:26225899

  8. 4EBP1 Is Dephosphorylated by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gil, Gustavo; Landa-Cardeña, Adriana; Coutiño, Rocío; García-Román, Rebeca; Sampieri, Clara L; Mora, Silvia I; Montero, Hilda

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) requires protein biosynthesis machinery to generate progeny. There is evidence that RSV might alter some translation components since stress granules are formed in their host cells. Consistent with these observations, we found that RSV induces dephosphorylation of 4EBP1 (eIF4E-binding protein), an important cellular translation factor. Our results show no correlation between the 4EBP1 dephosphorylation time and the decrease in the global rate of protein synthesis. Interestingly, treatment with rapamycin stimulates virus generation. The results suggest that RSV is a virus that still contains unknown mechanisms involved in the translation of their mRNAs through the alteration or modification of some translation factors, such as 4EBP1, possibly to favor its replicative cycle.

  9. HDACs and the senescent phenotype of WI-38 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan Emily J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal cells possess a limited proliferative life span after which they enter a state of irreversible growth arrest. This process, known as replicative senescence, is accompanied by changes in gene expression that give rise to a variety of senescence-associated phenotypes. It has been suggested that these gene expression changes result in part from alterations in the histone acetylation machinery. Here we examine the influence of HDAC inhibitors on the expression of senescent markers in pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells. Results Pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells were treated with the HDAC inhibitors butyrate or trichostatin A (TSA. Following HDAC inhibitor treatment, pre-senescent cells increased p21WAF1 and β-galactosidase expression, assumed a flattened senescence-associated morphology, and maintained a lower level of proteasome activity. These alterations also occurred during normal replicative senescence of WI-38 cells, but were not accentuated further by HDAC inhibitors. We also found that HDAC1 levels decline during normal replicative senescence. Conclusion Our findings indicate that HDACs impact numerous phenotypic changes associated with cellular senescence. Reduced HDAC1 expression levels in senescent cells may be an important event in mediating the transition to a senescent phenotype.

  10. Emergence of respiratory Streptococcus agalactiae isolates in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Eickel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae is a well-known pathogen for neonates and immunocompromized adults. Beyond the neonatal period, S. agalactiae is rarely found in the respiratory tract. During 2002-2008 we noticed S. agalactiae in respiratory secretions of 30/185 (16% of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The median age of these patients was 3-6 years older than the median age CF patients not harboring S. agalactiae. To analyze, if the S. agalactiae isolates from CF patients were clonal, further characterization of the strains was achieved by capsular serotyping, surface protein determination and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. We found a variety of sequence types (ST among the isolates, which did not substantially differ from the MLST patterns of colonizing strains from Germany. However serotype III, which is often seen in colonizing strains and invasive infections was rare among CF patients. The emergence of S. agalactiae in the respiratory tract of CF patients may represent the adaptation to a novel host environment, supported by the altered surfactant composition in older CF patients.

  11. Air pollution and multiple acute respiratory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustini, Annunziata; Stafoggia, Massimo; Colais, Paola; Berti, Giovanna; Bisanti, Luigi; Cadum, Ennio; Cernigliaro, Achille; Mallone, Sandra; Scarnato, Corrado; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory mortality and morbidity have been consistently reported but usually studied separately. To more completely assess air pollution effects, we studied hospitalisations for respiratory diseases together with out-of-hospital respiratory deaths. A time-stratified case-crossover study was carried out in six Italian cities from 2001 to 2005. Daily particulate matter (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) associations with hospitalisations for respiratory diseases (n = 100 690), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 38 577), lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) among COPD patients (n = 9886) and out-of-hospital respiratory deaths (n = 5490) were estimated for residents aged ≥35 years. For an increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, we found an immediate 0.59% (lag 0-1 days) increase in hospitalisations for respiratory diseases and a 0.67% increase for COPD; the 1.91% increase in LRTI hospitalisations lasted longer (lag 0-3 days) and the 3.95% increase in respiratory mortality lasted 6 days. Effects of NO2 were stronger and lasted longer (lag 0-5 days). Age, sex and previous ischaemic heart disease acted as effect modifiers for different outcomes. Analysing multiple rather than single respiratory events shows stronger air pollution effects. The temporal relationship between the pollutant increases and hospitalisations or mortality for respiratory diseases differs.

  12. Superoxide dismutase phenotypes in duodenal ulcers: A genetic marker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulekha S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Cu-Zn superoxide dismutases are antioxidative defensive enzymes that catalyze the reduction of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide. Aim:The study focuses on the association of electromorph of superoxide dismutase with duodenal ulcers, which result due to an imbalance between aggressive and defensive factors. Materials and Methods:Endoscopically confirmed 210 duodenal ulcer patients and 185 healthy individuals for comparative analysis were considered for the present study. Phenotyping of superoxide dismutase was carried out by subjecting the RBC membranes to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, using appropriate staining protocols. Results:Statistical analysis of SOD phenotypes revealed a significant increase of SOD AFNx012 allele and Superoxide dismutases (SOD 2-2 phenotype in duodenal ulcer group. Among these individuals, a predominance of Helicobacter pylori infection was observed. The increased preponderance of homozygotes can be explained on the basis of reduced and altered enzyme activity, which may lead to disturbance in homeostasis of antioxidant/oxidant culminating in high lipid peroxidative gastric mucosal tissue damage and ulceration. No variation in the distribution of SOD phenotypes with respect to Helicobacter pylori indicates the role of Mn-SOD rather than Cu-Zn SOD in the Helicobacter pylori infected cases as reported earlier. Conclusions:Superoxide dismutase as a genetic marker / gene modifier, encoding for an antioxidant enzyme in maintaining tissue homeostasis of the gastric mucosa is discussed.

  13. Bone marrow-derived stem cells and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carla P; Rankin, Sara M

    2011-07-01

    Adult bone marrow contains a number of discrete populations of progenitor cells, including endothelial, mesenchymal, and epithelial progenitor cells and fibrocytes. In the context of a range of diseases, endothelial progenitor cells have been reported to promote angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells are potent immunosuppressors but can also contribute directly to tissue regeneration, and fibrocytes have been shown to induce tissue fibrosis. This article provides an overview of the basic biology of these different subsets of progenitor cells, reporting their distinct phenotypes and functional activities. The differences in their secretomes are highlighted, and the relative role of cellular differentiation vs paracrine effects of progenitor cells is considered. The article reviews the literature examining the contribution of progenitor cells to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease, and discusses recent studies using bone marrow progenitor cells as stem cell therapies in the context of pulmonary hypertension, COPD, and asthma. PMID:21729891

  14. Auditory hedonic phenotypes in dementia: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Phillip D; Downey, Laura E; Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Schott, Jonathan M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Rossor, Martin N; Warren, Jason D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with dementia may exhibit abnormally altered liking for environmental sounds and music but such altered auditory hedonic responses have not been studied systematically. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 73 patients representing major canonical dementia syndromes (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic dementia (SD), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) amnestic Alzheimer's disease (AD)) using a semi-structured caregiver behavioural questionnaire and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of patients' brain MR images. Behavioural responses signalling abnormal aversion to environmental sounds, aversion to music or heightened pleasure in music ('musicophilia') occurred in around half of the cohort but showed clear syndromic and genetic segregation, occurring in most patients with bvFTD but infrequently in PNFA and more commonly in association with MAPT than C9orf72 mutations. Aversion to sounds was the exclusive auditory phenotype in AD whereas more complex phenotypes including musicophilia were common in bvFTD and SD. Auditory hedonic alterations correlated with grey matter loss in a common, distributed, right-lateralised network including antero-mesial temporal lobe, insula, anterior cingulate and nucleus accumbens. Our findings suggest that abnormalities of auditory hedonic processing are a significant issue in common dementias. Sounds may constitute a novel probe of brain mechanisms for emotional salience coding that are targeted by neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25929717

  15. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  16. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display

  17. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaudi, L R [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Rossi, E [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Mantaras, M C [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Perrone, M S [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Siri, L Nicola [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  18. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Kale Cekinmez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing efforts. Respiratory distress syndrome or complications caused by respiratory distress syndrome are the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in premature infants. This article briefly reviews respiratory distress syndrome and its complications. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 615-630

  19. [The curative action of Monticelli Term's water in upper respiratory tract diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, R; Jemmi, G; Barani, B

    1976-01-01

    The Authors study the action of the sodio bromide-iodic water of Monticelli Terme in upper respiratory tract disease and particularly assert that is not to neglect the organic ground on which establishes mucosa's disease. Therman treatment gives the best therapeutic results in every patient presenting chronic inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory trach alternating periods of quiescency and of activity, and poor therapeutic action in patients presenting chronic inveterate diseases with great alterations in vascular and glandular components of the mucosa. PMID:1021139

  20. Deciphering the Galaxy Guppy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Shaddock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal breeding hobbyists have been useful to science because they identify and isolate colorcoat mutations that geneticists can in turn use in their studies of the development and differentiation ofcolor cells. This paper discusses a very interesting color mutant, the Japanese Galaxy, tracing its creationfrom back to a self-educated genetics hobbyist, Hoskiki Tsutsui. The paper discusses a constituent genepreviously studied by Dr. Violet Phang, the snakeskin gene (the linked body and fin genes Ssb and Sst.And it discusses a gene previously unknown to science, the Schimmelpfennig Platinum gene (Sc.Through crossing experiments, the author determines that the combination of these two genes producesan intermediate phenotype, the Medusa. Incorporating the Grass (Gr, another gene unknown to sciencegene into the Medusa through a crossover produces the Galaxy phenotype. Microscope studies of thesnakeskin pattern in Galaxies and snakeskins reveals some parallels with similar studies made of theZebrafish Danio.

  1. Breast tumor copy number aberration phenotypes and genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genomic DNA copy number aberrations are frequent in solid tumors, although the underlying causes of chromosomal instability in tumors remain obscure. Genes likely to have genomic instability phenotypes when mutated (e.g. those involved in mitosis, replication, repair, and telomeres) are rarely mutated in chromosomally unstable sporadic tumors, even though such mutations are associated with some heritable cancer prone syndromes. We applied array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to the analysis of breast tumors. The variation in the levels of genomic instability amongst tumors prompted us to investigate whether alterations in processes/genes involved in maintenance and/or manipulation of the genome were associated with particular types of genomic instability. We discriminated three breast tumor subtypes based on genomic DNA copy number alterations. The subtypes varied with respect to level of genomic instability. We find that shorter telomeres and altered telomere related gene expression are associated with amplification, implicating telomere attrition as a promoter of this type of aberration in breast cancer. On the other hand, the numbers of chromosomal alterations, particularly low level changes, are associated with altered expression of genes in other functional classes (mitosis, cell cycle, DNA replication and repair). Further, although loss of function instability phenotypes have been demonstrated for many of the genes in model systems, we observed enhanced expression of most genes in tumors, indicating that over expression, rather than deficiency underlies instability. Many of the genes associated with higher frequency of copy number aberrations are direct targets of E2F, supporting the hypothesis that deregulation of the Rb pathway is a major contributor to chromosomal instability in breast tumors. These observations are consistent with failure to find mutations in sporadic tumors in genes that have roles in maintenance or manipulation of the genome

  2. Phenotypic expression in mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernsen, P L; Wevers, R. A.; Gabreëls, F J; Lamers, K J; Sonnen, A E; Stekhoven, J H

    1987-01-01

    beta-glucuronidase deficiency is an extremely rare disorder which is known to have a considerable phenotypic variation. A survey of the clinical findings in 19 previously reported patients with mucopolysaccharidosis VII is presented together with the results of clinical and biochemical studies in two further patients. Because a similar clinical picture is present in a heterozygotic sister it is doubted whether all signs and symptoms can be attributed to the beta-glucuronidase deficiency. The ...

  3. Statistical models for trisomic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.; Feingold, E. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population but more common in individuals with specific trisomies, which suggests that the genes involved in the etiology of these disorders may be located on the trisomic chromosome. As with all aneuploid syndromes, however, a considerable degree of variation exists within each phenotype so that any given trait is present only among a subset of the trisomic population. We have previously presented a simple gene-dosage model to explain this phenotypic variation and developed a strategy to map genes for such traits. The mapping strategy does not depend on the simple model but works in theory under any model that predicts that affected individuals have an increased likelihood of disomic homozygosity at the trait locus. This paper explores the robustness of our mapping method by investigating what kinds of models give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity. We describe a number of basic statistical models for trisomic phenotypes. Some of these are logical extensions of standard models for disomic phenotypes, and some are more specific to trisomy. Where possible, we discuss genetic mechanisms applicable to each model. We investigate which models and which parameter values give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity in individuals with the trait. Finally, we determine the sample sizes required to identify the increased disomic homozygosity under each model. Most of the models we explore yield detectable increases in disomic homozygosity for some reasonable range of parameter values, usually corresponding to smaller trait frequencies. It therefore appears that our mapping method should be effective for a wide variety of moderately infrequent traits, even though the exact mode of inheritance is unlikely to be known. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Wine Expertise Predicts Taste Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John E; Pickering, Gary J

    2012-03-01

    Taste phenotypes have long been studied in relation to alcohol intake, dependence, and family history, with contradictory findings. However, on balance - with appropriate caveats about populations tested, outcomes measured and psychophysical methods used - an association between variation in taste responsiveness and some alcohol behaviors is supported. Recent work suggests super-tasting (operationalized via propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness) not only associates with heightened response but also with more acute discrimination between stimuli. Here, we explore relationships between food and beverage adventurousness and taste phenotype. A convenience sample of wine drinkers (n=330) were recruited in Ontario and phenotyped for PROP bitterness via filter paper disk. They also filled out a short questionnaire regarding willingness to try new foods, alcoholic beverages and wines as well as level of wine involvement, which was used to classify them as a wine expert (n=110) or wine consumer (n=220). In univariate logisitic models, food adventurousness predicted trying new wines and beverages but not expertise. Likewise, wine expertise predicted willingness to try new wines and beverages but not foods. In separate multivariate logistic models, willingness to try new wines and beverages was predicted by expertise and food adventurousness but not PROP. However, mean PROP bitterness was higher among wine experts than wine consumers, and the conditional distribution functions differed between experts and consumers. In contrast, PROP means and distributions did not differ with food adventurousness. These data suggest individuals may self-select for specific professions based on sensory ability (i.e., an active gene-environment correlation) but phenotype does not explain willingness to try new stimuli.

  5. [Plasticity of the cellular phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The tragical consequences of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs in 1945 were to lead to the discovery of hematopoietic stem cells and their phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental factors. These concepts were much later extended to the founding cells of other tissues. In the following collection of articles, the mechanisms underlying this plasticity, at the frontiers of developmental biology and oncology, are illustrated in the case of various cell types of neural origin and of some tumours. PMID:21501574

  6. The respiratory neuromuscular system in Pompe disease☆

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, David D.; Mai K. ElMallah; Barbara K Smith; Corti, Manuela; Lawson, Lee Ann; Falk, Darin J.; Byrne, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is due to mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Absence of functional GAA typically results in cardiorespiratory failure in the first year; reduced GAA activity is associated with progressive respiratory failure later in life. While skeletal muscle pathology contributes to respiratory insufficiency in Pompe disease, emerging evidence indicates that respiratory neuron dysfunction is also a significant part of dysfunction in motor units. Ani...

  7. Respiratory Health among Cement Workers in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Zeyede K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known on dust exposure and respiratory health among cement cleaners. There are only a few follow-up studies on respiratory health among cement factory workers and also studies on acute effects of cement dust exposure are limited in numbers. Objective: This study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and adverse respiratory health effects among Ethiopian cement production workers, with particular focus on cement cleaners. Method: The first paper was...

  8. Viral respiratory infections : Diagnosis and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Rotzén Östlund, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Background. Respiratory viral infections are common causes of human morbidity and mortality in children as well as in adults. Adenovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been recognized for many years. During recent years two main events have influenced both the diagnosis and our knowledge of respiratory virus epidemiology: (1) Five new viruses have been described; (2) the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of respirato...

  9. Pathophysiology and Classification of Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Tejpreet Singh; Sharara, Rihab Saeed; Singh, Anil C; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a condition in which the respiratory system fails in one or both of its gas exchange functions. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients admitted to intensive care units. It is a result of either lung failure, resulting in hypoxemia, or pump failure, resulting in alveolar hypoventilation and hypercapnia. This article covers the basic lung anatomy, pathophysiology, and classification of respiratory failure. PMID:26919670

  10. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses ca...

  11. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Eren Kale Cekinmez; Hacer Yapicioglu Yildizdas; Ferda Ozlu

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing effor...

  12. Respiratory Microbiome of New-Born Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Gallacher, David J.; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory tract, once believed to be sterile, harbors diverse bacterial communities. The role of microorganisms within health and disease is slowly being unraveled. Evidence points to the neonatal period as a critical time for establishing stable bacterial communities and influencing immune responses important for long-term respiratory health. This review summarizes the evidence of early airway and lung bacterial colonization and the role the microbiome has on respiratory health in the ...

  13. Small animal disease surveillance: respiratory disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Daly, Janet M.; Philip H Jones; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind; Menacere, Tarek; Heayns, Bethaney; Wardeh, Maya; Newman, Jenny; Everitt, Sally; Day, Michael J.; McConnell, Katie; Noble, Peter J.M.; Radford, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    This second Small Animal Disease Surveillance report focuses on syndromic surveillance of i) respiratory disease in veterinary practice and ii) feline calicivirus (FCV) based on laboratory diagnosis, in a large veterinary-visiting pet population of the UK between January 2014 and December 2015. Presentation for respiratory disease comprised 1.7%, 2.3% and 2.5% of canine, feline and rabbit consultations, respectively. In dogs, the most frequent respiratory sign reported was coughing (71.1% of ...

  14. Respiratory Disease: Diagnostic Approaches in the Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Joanne; Arroyo, Luis G

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of the upper and lower respiratory tract of horses requires strategic selection of possible diagnostic tests based on location of suspected pathologic lesions and purpose of testing and must also include consideration of patient status. This article discusses the various diagnostic modalities that may be applied to the respiratory system of horses under field conditions, indications for use, and aspects of sample collection, handling, and laboratory processing that can impact test results and ultimately a successful diagnosis in cases of respiratory disease.

  15. Genetic background of phenotypic variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A noteworthy feature of the living world is its bewildering variability. A key issue in several biological disciplines is the achievement of an understanding of the hereditary basis of this variability. Two opposing, but not necessarily irreconcilable conceptions attempt to explain the underlying mechanism. The gene function paradigm postulates that phenotypic variance is generated by the polymorphism in the coding sequences of genes. However, comparisons of a great number of homologous gene and protein sequences have revealed that they predominantly remained functionally conserved even across distantly related phylogenic taxa. Alternatively, the gene regulation paradigm assumes that differences in the cis-regulatory region of genes do account for phenotype variation within species. An extension of this latter concept is that phenotypic variability is generated by the polyrnorphism in the overall gene expression profiles of gene networks.In other words, the activity of a particular gene is a system property determined both by the cis-regulatory sequences of the given genes and by the other genes of a gene network, whose expressions vary among individuals, too. Novel proponents of gene function paradigm claim that functional genetic variance within the coding sequences of regulatory genes is critical for the generation of morphological polymorphism. Note, however, that these developmental genes play direct regulatory roles in the control of gene expression.

  16. Adaptive evolution of molecular phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Torsten; Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Molecular phenotypes link genomic information with organismic functions, fitness, and evolution. Quantitative traits are complex phenotypes that depend on multiple genomic loci. In this paper, we study the adaptive evolution of a quantitative trait under time-dependent selection, which arises from environmental changes or through fitness interactions with other co-evolving phenotypes. We analyze a model of trait evolution under mutations and genetic drift in a single-peak fitness seascape. The fitness peak performs a constrained random walk in the trait amplitude, which determines the time-dependent trait optimum in a given population. We derive analytical expressions for the distribution of the time-dependent trait divergence between populations and of the trait diversity within populations. Based on this solution, we develop a method to infer adaptive evolution of quantitative traits. Specifically, we show that the ratio of the average trait divergence and the diversity is a universal function of evolutionary time, which predicts the stabilizing strength and the driving rate of the fitness seascape. From an information-theoretic point of view, this function measures the macro-evolutionary entropy in a population ensemble, which determines the predictability of the evolutionary process. Our solution also quantifies two key characteristics of adapting populations: the cumulative fitness flux, which measures the total amount of adaptation, and the adaptive load, which is the fitness cost due to a population's lag behind the fitness peak.

  17. Alterations in the alveolar epithelium after injury leading to pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kasper, M; Haroske, G.

    1996-01-01

    This review discusses current knowledge of the involvement of the alveolar epithelium in tissue remodelling during fibrogenesis. The purpose of the present paper is to give an overview, including the authors' own results, of knowledge of ultrastructural alterations, proliferation kinetics and phenotypic changes of pneumocytes in experimental and clinical pathology of pulmonary fibrosis. After lung injury, the alveolar epithelial cells show ultrastructural alter...

  18. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan;

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...

  19. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  20. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ray Surveillance Program (CWXSP) Frequently Asked Questions Coal Miner Health Surveillance Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases CWHSP Data Query System CWHSP Public Data Digital Imaging Activity ...

  1. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  2. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  3. Integrating binary traits with quantitative phenotypes for association mapping of multivariate phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Saha, Sujayam; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Clinical binary end-point traits are often governed by quantitative precursors. Hence it may be a prudent strategy to analyze a clinical end-point trait by considering a multivariate phenotype vector, possibly including both quantitative and qualitative phenotypes. A major statistical challenge lies in integrating the constituent phenotypes into a reduced univariate phenotype for association analyses. We assess the performances of certain reduced phenotypes using analysis of variance and a model-free quantile-based approach. We find that analysis of variance is more powerful than the quantile-based approach in detecting association, particularly for rare variants. We also find that using a principal component of the quantitative phenotypes and the residual of a logistic regression of the binary phenotype on the quantitative phenotypes may be an optimal method for integrating a binary phenotype with quantitative phenotypes to define a reduced univariate phenotype. PMID:22373144

  4. Reduction of respiratory effects on lung PET imaging with respiratory-gated acquisition associated with breath-hold CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion causes a spread of lesion uptake over a larger area in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images for moving structures. When CT images are used for attenuation correction of emission data, this motion may alter the quantization of PET images. We present the clinical results of a respiratory-gated PET processing 'CT-based' method, which aims to improve PET-CT co registration by using an additional breath-hold CT (B.H.-CT). The CT-based protocol consisted in a 10-min List Mode respiratory-gated PET acquisition, followed by an end-expiration B.H.-CT acquisition. During these two examinations, the respiratory signal was recorded continuously. Eleven pulmonary lesions were studied. Patients underwent both a standard clinical PET protocol (free breathing) and the CT-based protocol. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions centroids on PET and CT images. SUVmax (Standardized Uptake Value) and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed a significant reduction (p = 0.049) of centroid distances (mean relative change versus standard method: 49%). We also noted a higher SUVmax (mean change: 39%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p = 0.026) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change: 43%) compared with standard ones. The CT-based method improves PET-CT co registration of pulmonary lesions. This protocol should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus improve S.U.V. measurement

  5. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  6. Lung function and respiratory symptoms in a randomized smoking cessation trial of electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibella, Fabio; Campagna, Davide; Caponnetto, Pasquale; Amaradio, Maria Domenica; Caruso, Massimo; Russo, Cristina; Cockcroft, Donald W; Polosa, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    Quitting smoking is the most important step smokers can take to improve their health. Nonetheless, there is little information on long-term improvements in lung function and/or respiratory symptoms after smoking cessation. Here we illustrate long-term changes in spirometric indices as well as in respiratory symptoms in smokers invited to quit or reduce their cigarette consumption by switching to electronic cigarettes (ECs). Prospective evaluation of cigarette consumption, spirometry and symptoms was performed in a 1-year randomized controlled trial of smokers receiving EC containing 2.4%, 1.8% or 0% nicotine. Spirometric data are presented on the basis of participants' pooled continuous smoking phenotype classification (Quitters, Reducers, Failures), whereas respiratory symptoms on the basis of their point prevalence-smoking phenotype. Smoking phenotype classification (Quitters, Reducers, Failures) had no significant effect on spirometric indices (FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC) with the exception of FEF25-75%, which significantly (P  =0.034) increased over the time among Quitters; their FEF25-75% (% predicted) improving from (means±S.D.) 85.7±15.6% at baseline (BL) to 100.8±14.6%. High prevalence of cough/phlegm (43.1%) and shortness of breath (SoB; 34.8%) was reported at BL with substantial reduction in their frequency at subsequent follow-up visits. These symptoms virtually disappeared very quickly in both quitters and reducers. Smokers invited to switch to ECs who completely abstained from smoking showed steady progressive improvements in their FEF25-75% Normalization of peripheral airways function was associated with improvement in respiratory symptoms, adding to the notion that abstaining from smoking can reverse tobacco harm in the lung. PMID:27543458

  7. Acute inhibition of glial cells in the NTS does not affect respiratory and sympathetic activities in rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kauê M; Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-02-16

    Recent studies suggest that neuron-glia interactions are involved in multiple aspects of neuronal activity regulation. In the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neuron-glia interactions are thought to participate in the integration of autonomic responses to physiological challenges. However, it remains to be shown whether NTS glial cells might influence breathing and cardiovascular control, and also if they could be integral to the autonomic and respiratory responses to hypoxic challenges. Here, we investigated whether NTS glia play a tonic role in the modulation of central respiratory and sympathetic activities as well as in the changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling induced by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a model of central autonomic and respiratory plasticity. We show that bilateral microinjections of fluorocitrate (FCt), a glial cell inhibitor, into the caudal and intermediate subnuclei of the NTS did not alter baseline respiratory and sympathetic parameters in in situ preparations of juvenile rats. Similar results were observed in rats previously exposed to CIH. Likewise, CIH-induced changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling were unaffected by FCt-mediated inhibition. However, microinjection of FCt into the ventral medulla produced changes in respiratory frequency. Our results show that acute glial inhibition in the NTS does not affect baseline respiratory and sympathetic control. Additionally, we conclude that NTS glial cells may not be necessary for the continuous manifestation of sympathetic and respiratory adaptations to CIH. Our work provides evidence that neuron-glia interactions in the NTS do not participate in baseline respiratory and sympathetic control.

  8. Dermoid cyst with respiratory manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle-Cabanillas MI, Ibañez-Muñoz C, Pérez-Sáez J, Navazo-Eguía AI, Clemente-García A, Sánchez-Hernández JM.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermoid cysts are congenital tumors caused by entrapment of ectoderm during embryogenesis. The most common localization are the gonads and less than 10% are in the head and neck. They are slow growing and generally observed between the second and third decades of life, being unusual in chilhood. Description: We report a case of a 5 year old male with recurrent respiratory infections, mouth breathing and snoring with apneas and daytime sleepiness. On physical examination tonsillar hypertrophy and a 4 cm sublingual tumor are detected. As complementary tests are performed overnight polysomnography with AHI of 18.3 / h and ultrasonography, reported as cystic mass with multiple rounded echogenic structures inside. Results: The patient was diagnosed with severe OSA and tonsillectomy and intraorally enucleation of tumor (as diagnosis and treatment were performed; with histopathological diagnosis of dermoid cyst. In the postoperative control we check the resolution of respiratory events and snoring. Discussion: Dermoid cysts of the oral cavity (where sublingual localization is the most common represent only 0,01% of all cysts and 1,6% of all dermoid cysts. Usually present as slow-growing asymptomatic mass, even if they reach large size can compromise swallowing, speech or breathing and eventually cause, as in our case, a severe OSA. The surgical treatment allows to confirm the diagnosis an avoid the risk of infectious complications and eventual malignant transformation.

  9. Respiratory innate immune proteins differentially modulate the neutrophil respiratory burst response to influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Mitchell R; Crouch, Erika; Vesona, Jenny;

    2005-01-01

    of IAV with SP-D in vitro strongly increases neutrophil respiratory burst responses to the virus. Several factors are shown to modify this apparent proinflammatory effect of SP-D. Although multimeric forms of SP-D show dose-dependent augmentation of respiratory burst responses, trimeric, single-arm forms...... of IAV while reducing the respiratory burst response to virus....

  10. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...

  11. Truncating mutations in APP cause a distinct neurological phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Steven; Goldman, Alexander; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Bhakta, Viraj; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2016-09-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) gene have been implicated in early onset Alzheimer disease. These mutations alter protein structure to favor the pathologic production of Aβ. We report that homozygous nonsense mutations in APP are associated with decreased somatic growth, microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, thinning of the corpus callosum, and seizures. We compare the phenotype of this case to those reported in mouse models and demonstrate multiple similarities, strengthening the role of amyloid precursor protein in normal brain function and development. Ann Neurol 2016;80:456-460. PMID:27422356

  12. Postperfusion lung syndrome: Respiratory mechanics, respiratory indices and biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but lethal. Secondary inflammatory response was the popularly accepted theory for the underlying etiology. Respiratory index (RI and arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen can be reliable indices for the diagnosis of this syndrome as X-ray appearance is always insignificant at the early stage of the onset. Evaluations of extravascular lung water content and pulmonary compliance are also helpful in the definite diagnosis. Multiorgan failure and triple acid-base disturbances that might develop secondary to postperfusion lung syndrome are responsible for the poor prognosis and increased mortality rather than postperfusion lung syndrome itself. Mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume (TV and proper positive end-expiratory pressure can be an effective treatment strategy. Use of ulinastatin and propofol may benefit the patients through different mechanisms.

  13. Knowledge-based analysis of phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoendorf, Robert

    2016-01-27

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism, and they are widely recorded in biology and medicine. To facilitate data integration, ontologies that formally describe phenotypes are being developed in several domains. I will describe a formal framework to describe phenotypes. A formalized theory of phenotypes is not only useful for domain analysis, but can also be applied to assist in the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases, and I will show how our results on the ontology of phenotypes is now applied in biomedical research.

  14. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns of Strains Isolated from the Cholera Epidemic in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Mahmud, Zahid H.; Ansaruzzaman, Mohammad; Faruque, Shah M.; Talukder, Kaisar A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Alam, Munirul; Islam, Shafiqul; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Mazumder, Ramendra N.; Khan, Azharul I.; Ahmed, Sirajuddin; Iqbal, Anwarul; Chitsatso, Owen; Mudzori, James; Patel, Sheetal; Midzi, Stanley M.; Charimari, Lincoln; Endtz, Hubert P.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    This paper details the phenotypic, genotypic, and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of 88 Vibrio cholerae strains from Zimbabwe. Of the 88 strains, 83 were classified as "altered El Tor" and 5 as "hybrid El Tor" strains. All of the strains were susceptible to tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin,

  15. Quercetin Partially Preserves Development of Osteoblast Phenotype in Fetal Rat Calvaria Cells in an Oxidative Stress Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Jonathan G; La, Stephanie; Hopkins, Robin G; Kipp, Deborah E

    2016-12-01

    Studies are needed to improve understanding of the osteoblast antioxidant response, and the balance between oxidative homeostasis and osteoblast differentiation. The flavonol quercetin aglycone (QRC) up-regulates the osteoblast antioxidant response in vitro without suppressing osteoblast phenotype, suggesting that QRC may preserve osteoblast phenotypic development in cells subsequently exposed to oxidative stress, which suppresses osteoblast differentiation. The aims of this study were to assess the extent that QRC pretreatment preserved development of the osteoblast phenotype in cells subsequently cultured with hydrogen peroxide, an oxidative stressor, and to characterize alterations in the osteoblast antioxidant response and in key antioxidant signaling pathways. We hypothesized that pretreatment with QRC would preserve phenotypic development after hydrogen peroxide treatment, suppress the hydrogen peroxide-induced antioxidant response, and that the antioxidant response would involve alterations in Nrf2 and ERK1/2 signaling. Results showed that treating fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts for 4 days (D5-9) with 300 μM hydrogen peroxide resulted in fewer alkaline phosphatase-positive cells and mineralized nodules, altered cell morphology, and significantly lower osteoblast phenotypic gene expression (P stress response coincided with alterations in phosphorylated ERK1/2, but not Nrf2. These results suggest that QRC suppresses hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of the antioxidant response, and partially preserves osteoblast phenotypic development. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2779-2788, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028516

  16. Hemogoblin phenotypes in Murgese horse

    OpenAIRE

    Carmela Bottiglieri; Rosario Rullo; Aldo Di Luccia; Elisa Pieragostini

    2010-01-01

    In this note we describe two new equine hemoglobin phenotypes found during a survey of the Murgese horse, a rare  Apulian native breed, among whose ancestors the Arabian surely plays an important role. To date we have analysed about  300 individual hemolysates by different chromatographic analyses (PAGIF, IPG, CMC). The results pointed out two unusu-  al patterns where the ratio of the α24Phe60Gln band to the α24Phe60Lys band was 93:7 and 70:30 rather than 60:40&nbs...

  17. Respiratory rate assessment from photoplethysmographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Walter; Garde, Ainara; Myers, Dorothy; Scheffer, Cornie; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A

    2014-01-01

    We present a study investigating the suitability of a respiratory rate estimation algorithm applied to photoplethysmographic imaging on a mobile phone. The algorithm consists of a cascade of previously developed signal processing methods to detect features and extract respiratory induced variations in photoplethysmogram signals to estimate respiratory rate. With custom-built software on an Android phone (Camera Oximeter), contact photoplethysmographic imaging videos were recorded using the integrated camera from 19 healthy adults breathing spontaneously at respiratory rates between 6 and 40 breaths/min. Capnometry was simultaneously recorded to obtain reference respiratory rates. Two hundred and ninety-eight Camera Oximeter recordings were available for analysis. The algorithm detected 22 recordings with poor photoplethysmogram quality and 46 recordings with insufficient respiratory information. Of the 232 remaining recordings, a root mean square error of 5.9 breaths/min and a median absolute error of 2.3 breaths/min was obtained. The study showed that it is feasible to estimate respiratory rates by placing a finger on a mobile phone camera, but that it becomes increasingly challenging at respiratory rates higher than 20 breaths/min. PMID:25571214

  18. Fabry disease, respiratory symptoms, and airway limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Camilla Kara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    . The remaining 27 articles were relevant for this review. RESULTS: The current literature concerning lung manifestations describes various respiratory symptoms such as dyspnoea or shortness of breath, wheezing, and dry cough. These symptoms are often related to cardiac involvement in Fabry disease as respiratory...

  19. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine

    This PhD thesis presents the diversity of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome viruses (PRRSV) circulating in the Danish pig population. PRRS is a disease in pigs caused by the PRRS virus resulting in reproductive failures in sows and gilts and respiratory diseases in pigs . Due to genetic...

  20. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia...... respiratory tract (nasal sampling) should be investigated and both infection sites should be treated....

  1. Abnormal lung lymphatics and respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, S F; Currie, D C; Sheffield, E A; M. Baxter; Corrin, B.; Evans, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    A 65 year old man presented with respiratory failure, pleural effusions, fine reticulonodular shadowing on a chest radiograph, and severe impairment of carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (transfer factor). Open lung biopsy showed only dilated pleural and subpleural lymphatic channels. Hypoplastic deep pulmonary lymphatics may have led to respiratory failure.

  2. Perceived Competence and Comfort in Respiratory Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgel, Barbara J.; Novak, Debra; Burns, Candace M.; Byrd, Annette; Carpenter, Holly; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann; Taormina, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    In response to the Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training, a nationwide survey was conducted in May 2012 to assess occupational health nurses’ educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and training needs in respiratory protection. More than 2,000 occupational health nurses responded; 83% perceived themselves as competent, proficient, or expert in respiratory protection, reporting moderate comfort with 12 respiratory program elements. If occupational health nurses had primary responsibility for the respiratory protection program, they were more likely to perceive higher competence and more comfort in respiratory protection, after controlling for occupational health nursing experience, highest education, occupational health nursing certification, industry sector, Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare membership, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course in the prior 5 years, and perceiving a positive safety culture at work. These survey results document high perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection. These findings support the development of targeted educational programs and interprofessional competencies for respiratory protection. PMID:23429638

  3. Diagnosing and treating respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierkowski, Daria B

    2016-09-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes of respiratory tract illness in children and can lead to significant infection and death. This article discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis, current treatment, and prevention options to successfully diagnose and treat infections caused by RSV. PMID:27552683

  4. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  5. Perioperative modifications of respiratory function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, Michelle

    2012-01-31

    Postoperative pulmonary complications contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality, especially after major thoracic or abdominal surgery. Clinically relevant pulmonary complications include the exacerbation of underlying chronic lung disease, bronchospasm, atelectasis, pneumonia and respiratory failure with prolonged mechanical ventilation. Risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications include patient-related risk factors (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tobacco smoking and increasing age) as well as procedure-related risk factors (e.g., site of surgery, duration of surgery and general vs. regional anaesthesia). Careful history taking and a thorough physical examination may be the most sensitive ways to identify at-risk patients. Pulmonary function tests are not suitable as a general screen to assess risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. Strategies to reduce the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications include smoking cessation, inspiratory muscle training, optimising nutritional status and intra-operative strategies. Postoperative care should include lung expansion manoeuvres and adequate pain control.

  6. The respiratory system in equations

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    The book proposes an introduction to the mathematical modeling of the respiratory system. A detailed introduction on the physiological aspects makes it accessible to a large audience without any prior knowledge on the lung. Different levels of description are proposed, from the lumped models with a small number of parameters (Ordinary Differential Equations), up to infinite dimensional models based on Partial Differential Equations. Besides these two types of differential equations, two chapters are dedicated to resistive networks, and to the way they can be used to investigate the dependence of the resistance of the lung upon geometrical characteristics. The theoretical analysis of the various models is provided, together with state-of-the-art techniques to compute approximate solutions, allowing comparisons with experimental measurements. The book contains several exercises, most of which are accessible to advanced undergraduate students.

  7. Respiratory symptoms and peripheral airways disease in a cross-sectional study on a random population sample

    OpenAIRE

    Olofson, Jan Yngve; Houltz, Birgitta; Nilsson Tengelin, Maria; Bake, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Respiratory symptoms are associated with spirometry results but more strongly with smoking history, suggesting that alterations in the lung other than those revealed by spirometry contribute to cause symptoms. Smoking may cause obstruction of peripheral airways that is poorly detected by spirometry. The slope of phase III of the single-breath nitrogen (N2) test detects smoking-induced alterations in smokers before spirometry is impaired. The aim of the present investigation was to ...

  8. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  9. Immune biomarkers predictive of respiratory viral infection in elderly nursing home residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Johnstone

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine if immune phenotypes associated with immunosenescence predict risk of respiratory viral infection in elderly nursing home residents. METHODS: Residents ≥ 65 years from 32 nursing homes in 4 Canadian cities were enrolled in Fall 2009, 2010 and 2011, and followed for one influenza season. Following influenza vaccination, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained and analysed by flow cytometry for T-regs, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets (CCR7+CD45RA+, CCR7-CD45RA+ and CD28-CD57+ and CMV-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained and tested for viruses in symptomatic residents. A Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex and frailty, determined the relationship between immune phenotypes and time to viral infection. RESULTS: 1072 residents were enrolled; median age 86 years and 72% female. 269 swabs were obtained, 87 were positive for virus: influenza (24%, RSV (14%, coronavirus (32%, rhinovirus (17%, human metapneumovirus (9% and parainfluenza (5%. In multivariable analysis, high T-reg% (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.20-0.81 and high CMV-reactive CD4+ T-cell% (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.03-2.78 were predictive of respiratory viral infection. CONCLUSIONS: In elderly nursing home residents, high CMV-reactive CD4+ T-cells were associated with an increased risk and high T-regs were associated with a reduced risk of respiratory viral infection.

  10. Real-time detection of cofactor availability in genetically modified living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells - Simultaneous probing of different geno- and phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Heiskanen, Arto; Spegel, C.;

    2009-01-01

    This work describes a mediated amperometric method for simultaneous real-time probing of the NAD(P)H availability in two different phenotypes, fermentative and respiratory, of the phosphoglucose isomerase deletion mutant strain of S. cerevisiae. EBY44 [ENY.WA-1A pgi1-1D::URA3], and its parental s...

  11. Modelling neuroinflammatory phenotypes in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyss-Coray Tony

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inflammation of the central nervous system is an important but poorly understood part of neurological disease. After acute brain injury or infection there is a complex inflammatory response that involves activation of microglia and astrocytes and increased production of cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, and complement factors. Antibodies and T lymphocytes may be involved in the response as well. In neurodegenerative disease, where injury is more subtle but consistent, the inflammatory response is continuous. The purpose of this prolonged response is unclear, but it is likely that some of its components are beneficial and others are harmful. Animal models of neurological disease can be used to dissect the specific role of individual mediators of the inflammatory response and assess their potential benefit. To illustrate this approach, we discuss how mutant mice expressing different levels of the cytokine transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1, a major modulator of inflammation, produce important neuroinflammatory phenotypes. We then demonstrate how crosses of TGF-β1 mutant mice with mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD produced important new information on the role of inflammation in AD and on the expression of different neuropathological phenotypes that characterize this disease.

  12. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  13. Influence of uvrD3, uvrE502, and recL152 mutations on the phenotypes of Escherichia coli K-12 dam mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Marinus, M G

    1980-01-01

    The recF143 allele did not alter the phenotypes of dam mutants of Escherichia coli. The uvrD3, uvrE502, and recL152 mutations did alter some of the phenotypes of dam bacteria. It was concluded that the uvrD, uvrE, and recL gene products are involved in the same deoxyribonucleic acid repair pathway as the dam gene product.

  14. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  15. Cortical plasticity within and across lifetimes: How can development inform us about phenotypic transformations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Dooley

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The neocortex is the part of the mammalian brain that is involved in perception, cognition, and volitional motor control. It is a highly dynamic structure that is dramatically altered within the lifetime of an animal and in different lineages throughout the course of evolution. These alterations account for the remarkable variations in behavior that species exhibit. Of particular interest is how these cortical phenotypes change within the lifetime of the individual and eventually evolve in species over time. Because we cannot study the evolution of the neocortex directly we use comparative analysis to appreciate the types of changes that have been made to the neocortex and the similarities that exist across taxa. Developmental studies inform us about how these phenotypic transitions may arise by alterations in developmental cascades or changes in the physical environment in which the brain develops. Both genes and the sensory environment contribute to aspects of the phenotype and similar features, such as the size of a cortical field, can be altered in a variety of ways. Although both genes and the laws of physics place constraints on the evolution of the neocortex, mammals have evolved a number of mechanisms that allow them to loosen these constraints and often alter the course of their own evolution.

  16. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Casella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies.

  17. Profibrotic Phenotype of Conjunctival Fibroblasts from Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Valerie P.J.; Schmidt, Enno; Offiah, Ifeoma; Galatowicz, Grazyna; Zillikens, Detlef; Dart, John K.G.; Calder, Virginia L.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid is an immunobullous disease in which excessive conjunctival fibrosis causes blindness, and the pathogenesis of scarring is incompletely understood. To establish whether profibrotic fibroblasts with an altered phenotype exist in ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid, we compared the functional characteristics of pemphigoid conjunctival fibroblasts to normal conjunctival fibroblasts with respect to cell division; migration; collagen contraction; matrix metalloproteinase, secretion of collagen and chemokines; and myofibroblast differentiation. We found that pemphigoid fibroblasts showed increased cell division (P = 0.01), increased migration in serum-free medium (72 ± 18 migrated cells versus 33 ± 11, P = 0.04), increased collagen contraction in the presence of 10 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor-α, increased collagen type I secretion (P = 0.03), increased secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (P = 0.03), and increased secretion of eotaxin in response to interleukin-13 (P = 0.04). Differences between pemphigoid and normal conjunctival fibroblasts with respect to collagen contraction and MMP secretion in the presence of interleukin-13 were also observed. Together, these findings indicate that pemphigoid conjunctival fibroblasts have a profibrotic phenotype that is maintained in vitro. No differences between pemphigoid fibroblasts obtained from acutely inflamed versus clinically uninflamed conjunctiva were observed. Developing effective antifibrotic therapies will require understanding of the mechanisms that both induce and maintain the profibrotic phenotype. PMID:21224056

  18. Increased entropy of signal transduction in the cancer metastasis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teschendorff Andrew E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical study of biological networks has led to important novel biological insights, such as the presence of hubs and hierarchical modularity. There is also a growing interest in studying the statistical properties of networks in the context of cancer genomics. However, relatively little is known as to what network features differ between the cancer and normal cell physiologies, or between different cancer cell phenotypes. Results Based on the observation that frequent genomic alterations underlie a more aggressive cancer phenotype, we asked if such an effect could be detectable as an increase in the randomness of local gene expression patterns. Using a breast cancer gene expression data set and a model network of protein interactions we derive constrained weighted networks defined by a stochastic information flux matrix reflecting expression correlations between interacting proteins. Based on this stochastic matrix we propose and compute an entropy measure that quantifies the degree of randomness in the local pattern of information flux around single genes. By comparing the local entropies in the non-metastatic versus metastatic breast cancer networks, we here show that breast cancers that metastasize are characterised by a small yet significant increase in the degree of randomness of local expression patterns. We validate this result in three additional breast cancer expression data sets and demonstrate that local entropy better characterises the metastatic phenotype than other non-entropy based measures. We show that increases in entropy can be used to identify genes and signalling pathways implicated in breast cancer metastasis and provide examples of de-novo discoveries of gene modules with known roles in apoptosis, immune-mediated tumour suppression, cell-cycle and tumour invasion. Importantly, we also identify a novel gene module within the insulin growth factor signalling pathway, alteration of which may

  19. Impaired cortical processing of inspiratory loads in children with chronic respiratory defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Annick

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspiratory occlusion evoked cortical potentials (the respiratory related-evoked potentials, RREPs bear witness of the processing of changes in respiratory mechanics by the brain. Their impairment in children having suffered near-fatal asthma supports the hypothesis that relates asthma severity with the ability of the patients to perceive respiratory changes. It is not known whether or not chronic respiratory defects are associated with an alteration in brain processing of inspiratory loads. The aim of the present study was to compare the presence, the latencies and the amplitudes of the P1, N1, P2, and N2 components of the RREPs in children with chronic lung or neuromuscular disease. Methods RREPs were recorded in patients with stable asthma (n = 21, cystic fibrosis (n = 32, and neuromuscular disease (n = 16 and in healthy controls (n = 11. Results The 4 RREP components were significantly less frequently observed in the 3 groups of patients than in the controls. Within the patient groups, the N1 and the P2 components were significantly less frequently observed in the patients with asthma (16/21 for both components and cystic fibrosis (20/32 and 14/32 than in the patients with neuromuscular disease (15/16 and 16/16. When present, the latencies and amplitudes of the 4 components were similar in the patients and controls. Conclusion Chronic ventilatory defects in children are associated with an impaired cortical processing of afferent respiratory signals.

  20. Respiratory Effects of Amifostine and DRDE-07: Probable Prophylactic Agents of Sulphur Mustard in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Singh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Amifostine (S-2[3-aminopropylamino]ethyl phosphorothioate and one of its analogues,DRDE-07 (S-2[2-aminoethylamino]ethyl phenyl sulphide are promising prophylactic agents forsulphur mustard (SM; a blistering agent toxicity. When given orally, DRDE-07 was more effectivethan amifostine as a prophylactic agent against SM administered percutaneously. Variouspharmacological and toxicological studies are required before the introduction of a chemical asa drug. The respiratory effects of amifostine and DRDE-07 were carried out in rats using a bodyplethysmograph fitted with a volumetric pressure transducer for sensing the respiratory flowsignals. The signals were amplified, digitised, and stored on a personal computer for furtheranalysis. After taking control recordings of respiratory signals, different doses (0.5 LD50, 1.0 LD50and 2.0 LD50 of amifostine and DRDE-07 were administered orally (LD50 amifostine = 2262 mg/kg; DRDE-07 = 1599 mg/kg, and the respiratory changes were monitored for 4 h. Amifostine andDRDE-07 showed a uniform breathing pattern even in 2.0 LD50 dose. However, a significant dosedependentdecrease in respiratory frequency was observed following amifostine administration.DRDE-07 did not show any significant change. The tidal volume was not altered significantlyboth in amifostine and DRDE-07 administered animals. The study shows that DRDE-07, even inlethal doses, may not affect the respiration immediately, whereas, amifostine may decrease therespiratory frequency.

  1. Differential gene expression in the respiratory tree of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus during aestivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye; Yang, Hongsheng; Storey, Kenneth B; Chen, Muyan

    2014-12-01

    Sea cucumbers, Apostichopus japonicus, experience seasonally high water temperatures during the summer months and enter aestivation to survive. Aestivation is characterized by strong metabolic rate depression which is supported by a series of strategies including reorganizing metabolic processes, suppressing cell functions, enhancing cytoprotective mechanisms, and altered gene expression. The respiratory tree tissue of the sea cucumber is an excellent material for studying aestivation, undergoing obvious atrophy during aestivation. The present study analyzed the global gene expression profile of respiratory tree tissue of A. japonicus during aestivation by constructing and screening three libraries representing key stages of aestivation: non-aestivation (NA), deep-aestivation (DA), and arousal from aestivation (AA) using RNA-seq. A total of 1240, 1184 and 303 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified following the criteria of |log2 ratio|≥1 and FDR≤0.001 in comparisons of DA vs. NA, AA vs. NA and DA vs. AA. A set of respiratory tree specific DEGs was identified the first time and, in addition, common DEGs that were responsive to aestivation in both respiratory tree and intestine were identified. Functional analysis of DEGs was further performed by GO enrichment analysis and respiratory tree specific GO terms were screened out and provide interesting hints for further studies of the molecular regulation of aestivation in A. japonicus. PMID:25038515

  2. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  3. Management of respiratory symptoms in ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hardiman, Orla

    2012-02-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a frequent feature of ALS and is present in almost all cases at some stage of the illness. It is the commonest cause of death in ALS. FVC is used as important endpoint in many clinical trials, and in decision-making events for patients with ALS, although there are limitations to its predictive utility. There are multiple causes of respiratory muscle failure, all of which act to produce a progressive decline in pulmonary function. Diaphragmatic fatigue and weakness, coupled with respiratory muscle weakness, lead to reduced lung compliance and atelectasis. Increased secretions increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, which further compromises respiratory function. Bulbar dysfunction can lead to nutritional deficiency, which in turn increases the fatigue of respiratory muscles. Early recognition of respiratory decline and symptomatic intervention, including non-invasive ventilation can significantly enhance both quality of life and life expectancy in ALS. Patients with respiratory failure should be advised to consider an advance directive to avoid emergency mechanical ventilation.

  4. Management of respiratory symptoms in ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hardiman, Orla

    2011-03-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a frequent feature of ALS and is present in almost all cases at some stage of the illness. It is the commonest cause of death in ALS. FVC is used as important endpoint in many clinical trials, and in decision-making events for patients with ALS, although there are limitations to its predictive utility. There are multiple causes of respiratory muscle failure, all of which act to produce a progressive decline in pulmonary function. Diaphragmatic fatigue and weakness, coupled with respiratory muscle weakness, lead to reduced lung compliance and atelectasis. Increased secretions increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, which further compromises respiratory function. Bulbar dysfunction can lead to nutritional deficiency, which in turn increases the fatigue of respiratory muscles. Early recognition of respiratory decline and symptomatic intervention, including non-invasive ventilation can significantly enhance both quality of life and life expectancy in ALS. Patients with respiratory failure should be advised to consider an advance directive to avoid emergency mechanical ventilation.

  5. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  6. Endothelin involvement in respiratory centre activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, M; Lafortuna, C L; Ciminaghi, B; Mazzola, S; Clement, M G

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the role of endothelin (ET) in respiratory homeostasis we studied the effects of the ET(A) and ET(B) receptor blocking agent bosentan on respiratory mechanics and control in seven anaesthetised spontaneously breathing pigs, for 180 min after single bolus administration (20 mg/kg i.v.). The results show that the block of ET receptors induced a significant increase in compliance and decrease in resistance of the respiratory system, entailing a significant reduction of diaphragmatic electromyographic activity, without affecting the centroid frequency of the power spectrum. Bosentan administration induced a significant increase in tidal volume (V(T)), accompanied by a significant decrease in respiratory frequency, without any significant change in pulmonary ventilation, CO(2) arterial blood gas pressure or pH. Since the relationship between V(T) and inspiratory time remained substantially constant after bosentan administration, the changes in respiratory pattern appear to be the result of an upward shift in inspiratory off-switch threshold. Both inspiratory and expiratory times during occluded breathing were increased by block of ET receptors, suggesting also a central respiratory neuromodulator effect of ET. In conclusion the present results suggest that the block of ET receptors in spontaneously breathing pigs exerts a role on mechanical properties of the respiratory system as well as on peripheral and central mechanisms of breathing control. PMID:11728166

  7. Surfactant chemical composition and biophysical activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, T J; Longmore, W J; Moxley, M A; Whitsett, J A; Reed, C R; Fowler, A. A.; Hudson, L D; Maunder, R. J.; Crim, C.; Hyers, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung injury and damage to the alveolar type II cells. This study sought to determine if endogenous surfactant is altered in ARDS. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in patients at-risk to develop ARDS (AR, n = 20), with ARDS (A, n = 66) and in normal subjects (N, n = 29). The crude surfactant pellet was analyzed for total phospholipids (PL), individual phospholipids, SP-A, SP-B, and minimum surface tension (STmin). PL was decrea...

  8. Respiratory and hemodynamic effects of diminished expiratory flow during artificial ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Rooyen, Willem

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe supposition, that a diminished expiratory flow (DEF) during artificial ventilation will improve blood-gas exchange. especially in obstructive pulmonary disease and that DEF improves blood-gas exchange better than a comparable positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP. producing the same rise in mean tracheal pressure) was explored in experiments using Yorkshire piglets, without altering respiratory rate, tidal volume, inspiratory time~ inspiratory hold or expiratory time. During ...

  9. Effects of Chest Physiotherapy on the Respiratory Function of Postoperative Gastroplasty Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Eli Forti; Daniela Ike; Marcela Barbalho-Moulim; Irineu Rasera Jr.; Dirceu Costa

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Bariatric surgery has become increasingly more recommended for the treatment of morbidly obese individuals for whom it is possible to identify co-morbidities other than alterations in pulmonary function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of conventional chest physiotherapy (CCP) and of conventional physiotherapy associated with transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (CCP+TEDS) on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in patients wh...

  10. Targeting MicroRNA Function in Respiratory Diseases: Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, Steven; Plank, Maximilian; Tay, Hock L; Collison, Adam; Foster, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that modulate expression of the majority of genes by inhibiting protein translation. Growing literature has identified functional roles for miRNAs across a broad range of biological processes. As such, miRNAs are recognized as potential disease biomarkers and novel targets for therapies. While several miRNA-targeted therapies are currently in clinical trials (e.g., for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and cancer), no therapies have targeted miRNAs in respiratory diseases in the clinic. In this mini-review, we review the current knowledge on miRNA expression and function in respiratory diseases, intervention strategies to target miRNA function, and considerations specific to respiratory diseases. Altered miRNA expression profiles have been reported in a number of respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. These include alterations in isolated lung tissue, as well as sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and peripheral blood or serum. The observed alterations in easily accessible body fluids (e.g., serum) have been proposed as new biomarkers that may inform disease diagnosis and patient management. In a subset of studies, miRNA-targeted interventions also improved disease outcomes, indicating functional roles for altered miRNA expression in disease pathogenesis. In fact, direct administration of miRNA-targeting molecules to the lung has yielded promising results in a number of animal models. The ability to directly administer compounds to the lung holds considerable promise and may limit potential off-target effects and side effects caused by the systemic administration required to treat other diseases.

  11. The effect of respiratory manoeuvres and pharmacological agents on the pharmacokinetics of nedocromil sodium after inhalation.

    OpenAIRE

    Summers, Q. A.; Singh, S; Honeywell, R G; Renwick, A G; Holgate, S T

    1992-01-01

    1. Eight healthy subjects inhaled nedocromil sodium from a metered-dose inhaler using a standardised inspiratory technique. Blood samples were taken for up to 270 min after inhalation for radioimmunoassay of plasma nedocromil sodium concentrations. 2. To investigate the possibility that respiratory manoeuvres can alter the absorption of the drug from the lungs, on the first (control) study day at 70 min after dosing, subjects performed nine forced expiratory manoeuvres over a 3 min period. At...

  12. Respiratory Morbidity and Lung Function in Preterm Infants of 32 to 36 Weeks' Gestational Age

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Andrew A.; McEvoy, Cynthia; Castile, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Normal lung development follows a series of orchestrated events. Premature birth interrupts normal in utero lung development, which results in significant alterations in lung function and physiology. Increasingly, there are reports documenting the broad range of complications experienced by infants aged 34 to 36 weeks' gestational age (GA). Our objective was to summarize the evidence demonstrating respiratory system vulnerability in infants aged 34 to 36 weeks' GA and to review the developmen...

  13. Pesticides and respiratory symptoms among farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Neice Müller Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite the intensive use of pesticides in agriculture there are few studies assessing the risk of respiratory conditions from this exposure. The study aimed at quantifying the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among farmers and evaluating its relationship with occupational use of pesticides and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,379 farmers from two municipalities of Southern Brazil in 1996. Frequency and type of chemical exposure and pesticide poisoning were recorded for both sexes. All subjects aged 15 years or older with at least 15 weekly hours of agricultural activity were interviewed. An adapted questionnaire developed by the American Thoracic Society was used for the assessment of respiratory symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out. RESULTS: More than half (55% of interviewees were male. The prevalence of asthma symptoms was 12% and chronic respiratory disease symptoms was 22%. Higher odds ratios for both asthma (OR=1.51; 95% CI: 1.07-2.14 and chronic respiratory disease (OR=1.34; 95% CI 1.00-1.81 symptoms were found in women. Logistic regression analysis identified associations between many forms of exposure to pesticides and increased respiratory symptoms. Occurrence of pesticide poisoning was associated with higher prevalence of asthma symptoms (OR=1.54; 95% CI: 1.04-2.58 and chronic respiratory disease symptoms (OR=1.57; 95% CI: 1.08-2.28. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of causality limitations, the study results provide evidence that farming exposure to pesticides is associated with higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms, especially when the exposure is above two days per month.

  14. Hemogoblin phenotypes in Murgese horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Bottiglieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note we describe two new equine hemoglobin phenotypes found during a survey of the Murgese horse, a rare  Apulian native breed, among whose ancestors the Arabian surely plays an important role. To date we have analysed about  300 individual hemolysates by different chromatographic analyses (PAGIF, IPG, CMC. The results pointed out two unusu-  al patterns where the ratio of the α24Phe60Gln band to the α24Phe60Lys band was 93:7 and 70:30 rather than 60:40  which would have been expected of BII homozygote. Given that the three horses exhibiting the unusual patterns shared  a common ancestor and that none of the possible combinations of the known haplotypes can account for 7-8%  α24Phe60Lys, reasonably a triplicated arrangement has to be postulated. 

  15. Respiratory Depression Caused by Heroin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Hakan Cansiz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Heroin is a semisynthetic narcotic analgesic and heroin abuse is common due to its pleasure-inducing effect. For the last 30 years heroin abuse has become an important worldwide public health problem. Heroin can be administered in many different ways as preferred. Heroin affects many systems including respiratory system, cardiovascular system and particulary the central nervous system. Overdose use of heroin intravenously can be fatal due to respiratory depression. In this letter, we wanted to engage attention to respiratory depression caused by heroin abuse and potential benefits of using naloxone. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 248-250

  16. Cardiac and Respiratory Disease in Aged Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Celia M

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory and cardiac diseases are common in older horses. Advancing age is a specific risk factor for cardiac murmurs and these are more likely in males and small horses. Airway inflammation is the most common respiratory diagnosis. Recurrent airway obstruction can lead to irreversible structural change and bronchiectasis; with chronic hypoxia, right heart dysfunction and failure can develop. Valvular heart disease most often affects the aortic and/or the mitral valve. Management of comorbidity is an essential element of the therapeutic approach to cardiac and respiratory disease in older equids.

  17. [Ultrastructural changes in the lung in acute adult respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szemenyei, K; Széll, K; Kádas, L

    1980-04-01

    Morphological alterations of the lung in respiratory distress syndrome of adults (ARDS) were analyzed in 10 cases with traumatic-and septic shock, laryngitis subglottica descendens and bronchopneumonia. For the better understanding of the pathomechanism of the disease in addition to the standard methods, first of all ultrastructural alterations were studied. Two phases of the morphologic alterations could be distinguished, the phase of the destruction and the phase of the repair. These two processes are not sharply distinguishable. Genesis of the characteristic histological alterations (damage to the epithelial and endothelial cells, formation of hyaline membranes, microcoagulation, proliferation of the type II pneumocytes and fibroblasts, fibrosis) is discussed, with regard to the data of the literature.

  18. Clinical Asthma Phenotypes and Therapeutic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zedan, M.; Attia, G.; Zedan, M. M.; Osman, A; Abo-Elkheir, N.; Maysara, N.; Barakat, T.; Gamil, N.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that means not all asthmatics respond to the same treatment. We hypothesize an approach to characterize asthma phenotypes based on symptomatology (shortness of breath (SOB), cough, and wheezy phenotypes) in correlation with airway inflammatory biomarkers and FEV1. We aimed to detect whether those clinical phenotypes have an impact on the response to asthma medications. Two hundred three asthmatic children were allocated randomly to receive either montelukast ...

  19. Latent phenotypes pervade gene regulatory circuits.

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Latent phenotypes are non-adaptive byproducts of adaptive phenotypes. They exist in biological systems as different as promiscuous enzymes and genome-scale metabolic reaction networks, and can give rise to evolutionary adaptations and innovations. We know little about their prevalence in the gene expression phenotypes of regulatory circuits, important sources of evolutionary innovations. RESULTS Here, we study a space of more than sixteen million three-gene model regulatory circ...

  20. Latent phenotypes pervade gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Latent phenotypes are non-adaptive byproducts of adaptive phenotypes. They exist in biological systems as different as promiscuous enzymes and genome-scale metabolic reaction networks, and can give rise to evolutionary adaptations and innovations. We know little about their prevalence in the gene expression phenotypes of regulatory circuits, important sources of evolutionary innovations. Results Here, we study a space of more than sixteen million three-gene model regulatory circuit...

  1. Phenotypes and Survival of Hatchling Lizards

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Daniel Augustus

    2001-01-01

    The phenotypes of hatchling reptiles are influenced by the environmental conditions that embryos experience during incubation, by yolk invested into the egg, and by the genetic contributions of the parents. Phenotypic traits are influenced by these factors in ways that potentially affect the fitness of hatchlings. The physical conditions that embryos experience within the nest affects development, hatching success, and hatchling phenotypes. Thus, the nest site that a female selects can inf...

  2. Marital assortment and phenotypic convergence: longitudinal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, A; Herbener, E S

    1993-01-01

    This study provides a direct test of whether the observed similarity of spouses is due to initial assortment rather than to convergence of phenotypes. With data from three well-known longitudinal studies, phenotypic convergence is examined using both variable- and person-centered analyses. The longitudinal evidence does not support the hypothesis that couples increasingly resemble each other with time. Spouse correlations most likely reflect initial assortment at marriage and not the convergence of phenotypes.

  3. Microbial community changes in biological phosphate-removal systems on altering sludge phosphorus content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, WT; Linning, KD; Nakamura, K; Mino, T; Matsuo, T; Forney, LJ

    2000-01-01

    Biomarkers (respiratory quinones and cellular fatty acids) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes were used to characterize the microbial community structure of lab-scale enhanced biological phosphate-removal (EBPR) systems in response to altering sludge p

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns among respiratory isolates of Gram-negative bacilli in a Turkish university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonlugur Ugur

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gram-negative bacteria cause most nosocomial respiratory infections. At the University of Cumhuriyet, we examined 328 respiratory isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumanii organisms in Sivas, Turkey over 3 years. We used disk diffusion or standardized microdilution to test the isolates against 18 antibiotics. Results We cultured organisms from sputum (54%, tracheal aspirate (25%, and bronchial lavage fluid (21%. The most common organisms were Klebsiella spp (35%, A. baumanii (27%, and Escherichia coli (15%. Imipenem was the most active agent, inhibiting 90% of Enterobacteriaceae and A. baumanii organisms. We considered approximately 12% of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 21% of E. coli isolates to be possible producers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. K. pneumoniae isolates of the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype were more resistant to imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline in our study than they are in other regions of the world. Conclusions Our results suggest that imipenem resistance in our region is growing.

  5. Proteomic study of acute respiratory distress syndrome: current knowledge and implications for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Joseph E; Rogers, Angela J

    2016-05-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common cause of acute respiratory failure, and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. Dozens of clinical trials targeting ARDS have failed, with no drug specifically targeting lung injury in widespread clinical use. Thus, the need for drug development in ARDS is great. Targeted proteomic studies in ARDS have identified many key pathways in the disease, including inflammation, epithelial injury, endothelial injury or activation, and disordered coagulation and repair. Recent studies reveal the potential for proteomic changes to identify novel subphenotypes of ARDS patients who may be most likely to respond to therapy and could thus be targeted for enrollment in clinical trials. Nontargeted studies of proteomics in ARDS are just beginning and have the potential to identify novel drug targets and key pathways in the disease. Proteomics will play an important role in phenotyping of patients and developing novel therapies for ARDS in the future. PMID:27031735

  6. Aberrant methylation of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene promoter is associated with the inflammatory breast cancer phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Auwera, I; Laere, S.J.; Van den Bosch, S M; Van den Eynden, G. G.; Trinh, B X; van Dam, P A; Colpaert, C G; van Engeland, M; Van Marck, E A; Vermeulen, P B; Dirix, L Y

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene promoter occurs in about 40% of breast tumours and has been correlated with reduced APC protein levels. To what extent epigenetic alterations of the APC gene may differ according to specific breast cancer phenotypes, remains to be elucidated. Our aim was to explore the role of APC methylation in the inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) phenotype. The status of APC gene promoter hypermethylation was investigated in DNA from normal b...

  7. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy L Etcoff; Shannon Stock; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than g...

  8. Respiratory signal analysis of liver cancer patients with respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong Im; Jung, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chul Jong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Byung Ki [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    External markers respiratory movement measuring device (RPM; Real-time Position Management, Varian Medical System, USA) Liver Cancer Radiation Therapy Respiratory gated with respiratory signal with irradiation time and the actual research by analyzing the respiratory phase with the breathing motion measurement device respiratory tuning evaluate the accuracy of radiation therapy May-September 2014 Novalis Tx. (Varian Medical System, USA) and liver cancer radiotherapy using respiratory gated RPM (Duty Cycle 20%, Gating window 40%-60%) of 16 patients who underwent total when recording the analyzed respiratory movement. After the breathing motion of the external markers recorded on the RPM was reconstructed by breathing through the acts phase analysis, for Beam-on Time and Duty Cycle recorded by using the reconstructed phase breathing breathing with RPM gated the prediction accuracy of the radiation treatment analysis and analyzed the correlation between prediction accuracy and Duty Cycle in accordance with the reproducibility of the respiratory movement. Treatment of 16 patients with respiratory cycle during the actual treatment plan was analyzed with an average difference -0.03 seconds (range -0.50 seconds to 0.09 seconds) could not be confirmed statistically significant difference between the two breathing (p = 0.472). The average respiratory period when treatment is 4.02 sec (0.71 sec), the average value of the respiratory cycle of the treatment was characterized by a standard deviation 7.43% (range 2.57 to 19.20%). Duty Cycle is that the actual average 16.05% (range 13.78 to 17.41%), average 56.05 got through the acts of the show and then analyzed% (range 39.23 to 75.10%) is planned in respiratory research phase (40% to 60%) in was confirmed. The investigation on the correlation between the ratio Duty Cycle and planned respiratory phase and the standard deviation of the respiratory cycle was analyzed in each -0.156 (p = 0.282) and -0.385 (p = 0.070). This study is

  9. Diagnosis, assessment, and phenotyping of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Halpin, David M; O'Donnell, Denis E;

    2016-01-01

    biomarkers to confirm and further assess the diagnosis of COPD. However, it is possible to identify patients who display different phenotypic characteristics of COPD that relate to clinically relevant outcomes. Currently, validated phenotypes of COPD include alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and "frequent...... exacerbators". Recently, a definition and assessment of a new phenotype comprising patients with overlapping features of asthma and COPD has been suggested and is known as "asthma COPD overlap syndrome". Several other phenotypes have been proposed, but require validation against clinical outcomes. Defining...

  10. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  11. Phenotypic plasticity's impacts on diversification and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, David W; Wund, Matthew A; Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Cruickshank, Tami; Schlichting, Carl D; Moczek, Armin P

    2010-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity (the ability of a single genotype to produce multiple phenotypes in response to variation in the environment) is commonplace. Yet its evolutionary significance remains controversial, especially in regard to whether and how it impacts diversification and speciation. Here, we review recent theory on how plasticity promotes: (i) the origin of novel phenotypes, (ii) divergence among populations and species, (iii) the formation of new species and (iv) adaptive radiation. We also discuss the latest empirical support for each of these evolutionary pathways to diversification and identify potentially profitable areas for future research. Generally, phenotypic plasticity can play a largely underappreciated role in driving diversification and speciation.

  12. Chaotic dynamics of respiratory sounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linkoepings Universitet, IMT/LIU, Universitetssjukhuset, S-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden) and Biomedical Engineering, Orebro University Hospital, S-70185 Orebro (Sweden)]. E-mail: christer@imt.liu.se; Johansson, A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linkoepings Universitet, IMT/LIU, Universitetssjukhuset, S-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Hult, P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linkoepings Universitet, IMT/LIU, Universitetssjukhuset, S-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Biomedical Engineering, Orebro University Hospital, S-70185 Orebro (Sweden); Ask, P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linkoepings Universitet, IMT/LIU, Universitetssjukhuset, S-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Biomedical Engineering, Orebro University Hospital, S-70185 Orebro (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    There is a growing interest in nonlinear analysis of respiratory sounds (RS), but little has been done to justify the use of nonlinear tools on such data. The aim of this paper is to investigate the stationarity, linearity and chaotic dynamics of recorded RS. Two independent data sets from 8 + 8 healthy subjects were recorded and investigated. The first set consisted of lung sounds (LS) recorded with an electronic stethoscope and the other of tracheal sounds (TS) recorded with a contact accelerometer. Recurrence plot analysis revealed that both LS and TS are quasistationary, with the parts corresponding to inspiratory and expiratory flow plateaus being stationary. Surrogate data tests could not provide statistically sufficient evidence regarding the nonlinearity of the data. The null hypothesis could not be rejected in 4 out of 32 LS cases and in 15 out of 32 TS cases. However, the Lyapunov spectra, the correlation dimension (D {sub 2}) and the Kaplan-Yorke dimension (D {sub KY}) all indicate chaotic behavior. The Lyapunov analysis showed that the sum of the exponents was negative in all cases and that the largest exponent was found to be positive. The results are partly ambiguous, but provide some evidence of chaotic dynamics of RS, both concerning LS and TS. The results motivate continuous use of nonlinear tools for analysing RS data.

  13. Sexual intercourse and respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverino, Francesca; Santoriello, Carlo; De Sio, Vittorio; Andò, Filippo; de Blasio, Francesco; Polverino, Mario

    2008-06-01

    Sexual activity is an important component of quality of life in patients suffering from chronic illnesses. To our knowledge, the effects of sexual activity on gas exchange in patients with respiratory failure have not been yet studied. To such an extent, we evaluated the oxygen saturation (SaO2), by a pulse oxymeter, during three different sexual performances in a 63-yr-old patient affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT). The sexual performances were divided in four periods: basal, sex, 10 min after sex and relax. In each performance during sex, we observed a significant increase of either heart rate (HR) or SaO2, with the highest value of the latter achieved within the 10 min of the post-sex period. SaO2 returned to basal value (pre-sex) by the end of the relax period. We conclude that the observed improvement of SaO2 during sexual activity might be due to a better ventilation/perfusion ratio (V/Q) obtained for either an increase of ventilation (hyperventilation) and perfusion (tachycardia), without significant muscle expenditure. PMID:18394872

  14. [Respiratory mechanics in professional flautists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, I

    2002-04-01

    Oesophageal, gastric, mouth, transdiaphragmatic, transpulmonary pressures, diaphragmatic EMG, sound and chest wall excursion were measured directly in 3 professional flautists whilst playing their instruments to determine: - what respiratory muscles and percent vital capacity were being used; - how mouth pressure, embouchure resistance, embouchure aperture, airflow and velocity affect sound loudness and frequency. Lung volume was estimated from transpulmonary pressure during playing and the static deflation pressure-volume curve was measured separately; flow was calculated from delta volume/delta time; embouchure resistance was calculated from mouth pressure/flow; velocity was calculated using Bernouilli's equation and mouth pressure. Staccati and sustained tones at different frequency and intensity were performed. Sound loudness was mainly related to airflow whilst sound frequency was determined by velocity. Flow and velocity were independently controlled by mouth pressure and embouchure aperture. Mean mouth pressures varied little from individual to an other (6-11 cm H(2)O) but the flautists used between 72-83% of their vital capacity suggesting inspiratory muscle activity while playing. However, rib cage and abdominal motion were different for each subject. Although different flautists use different strategies to control mouth pressure, their individual mastery of the instrument permits control of airflow and velocity to produce the desired intensity and frequency of sound. PMID:12040320

  15. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea; L; Kroeker; Kevin; M; Coombs

    2014-01-01

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virusinduced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outcome of the host response to viral infection will play an important role in future treatment and vaccine development. In this review we focus primarily on the interferon pathway and its regulation as well as mechanisms by which respiratory RNA viruses interfere with its signalling capacity.

  16. Gastro-esophageal studies in relationship to respiratory problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofetta, G

    2010-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux represents a physiological phenomenon in the first year of life. The reflux associated with clinical complications is defined as "gastroesophageal reflux disease" (GERD), that may be esophageal or extra-esophageal, as is for respiratory problems. Nuclear medicine investigations have given an important contribution to the diagnostic assessment and therapeutical management of GERD in children, by means of the following procedures: scintigraphy of the gastroduodenal transit and reflux detection, scintigraphic quantification of gastric emptying, scintigraphy of the esophageal transit, radioisotopic salivagram, scintigraphy of lung perfusion, ventilation and of mucociliary clearance. All of these investigations are among the less irradiating nuclear medicine procedures, therefore particularly adapted to paediatrics. The main clinical advantages of this body of information include: improvements in the management of many asthmatic children, surgical anti-reflux intervention success-rate increase, prompt regional lung alterations detection for preventing stable tissue damage, and many others. PMID:20823805

  17. Physical therapy in adults with respiratory disorders: where are we? Fisioterapia em adultos com distúrbios respiratórios: onde estamos?

    OpenAIRE

    Gosselink, R

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Physical therapy is involved in the non-medical treatment of patients with acute and chronic respiratory diseases, including obstructive and restrictive pulmonary diseases, patients with neuromuscular disorders, patients admitted for major surgery and patients with critical illness in intensive care. Physical therapy contributes towards assessing and treating various aspects of respiratory disorders such as airflow obstruction, mucus retention, alterations in ventilatory pump fu...

  18. Bronchial obstructive phenotypes in the first year of life among Paris birth cohort infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarisse, Bénédicte; Demattei, Christophe; Nikasinovic, Lydia; Just, Jocelyne; Daures, Jean-Pierre; Momas, Isabelle

    2009-03-01

    As the natural history of respiratory and allergic manifestations is unclear, our ongoing Paris birth cohort study prospectively assesses the onset of these symptoms in early childhood. Data were collected by five questionnaires sent at regular intervals during the first year of life. Partitioning around medoids (PAM) was used to classify infants according to their bronchial obstructive symptoms. A polytomous logistic regression was performed to assess the eventual predictable power of various respiratory events and perinatal factors. Results are given for 2698 infants. Atopic dermatitis occurred in 17.9% of infants. The main respiratory symptoms in infancy were wheeze in the chest (22%), dyspnoea responsible for sleep disturbance (23.7%), nocturnal dry cough (14.5%) and shortness of breath (4.2%). The PAM method identified three groups of infants. Apart from the G0 group of infants mostly asymptomatic, two distinct clinical phenotypes (G1 and G2: 8.7% and 23.5% of total infants respectively) emerged. G2 was defined by severe bronchial obstructive disorders as all cases of dyspnoea with sleep disturbance were included in this group, while all infants assigned in G1 suffered from nocturnal dry cough. G2 group infants had significantly higher rates of respiratory events while a parental history of asthma, symptoms suggestive of rhino-conjunctivitis and birth season clearly differentiated the G1 group. Finally, G1 and G2 group infants should be closely followed up as they are expected to develop allergic and asthmatic phenotypes, possibly in relation to environmental and behavioural risk factors. PMID:18346096

  19. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2. PMID:26647310

  20. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2.

  1. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity controls metabolic and malignant phenotype in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFate, Thomas; Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Lu, Huasheng; Thakar, Jay; Henriques, Jeremy; Halim, Nader D; Wu, Hong; Schell, Michael J; Tsang, Tsz Mon; Teahan, Orla; Zhou, Shaoyu; Califano, Joseph A; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Harris, Robert A; Verma, Ajay

    2008-08-15

    High lactate generation and low glucose oxidation, despite normal oxygen conditions, are commonly seen in cancer cells and tumors. Historically known as the Warburg effect, this altered metabolic phenotype has long been correlated with malignant progression and poor clinical outcome. However, the mechanistic relationship between altered glucose metabolism and malignancy remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity contributes to the Warburg metabolic and malignant phenotype in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. PDC inhibition occurs via enhanced expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK-1), which results in inhibitory phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha (PDHalpha) subunit. We also demonstrate that PDC inhibition in cancer cells is associated with normoxic stabilization of the malignancy-promoting transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) by glycolytic metabolites. Knockdown of PDK-1 via short hairpin RNA lowers PDHalpha phosphorylation, restores PDC activity, reverts the Warburg metabolic phenotype, decreases normoxic HIF-1alpha expression, lowers hypoxic cell survival, decreases invasiveness, and inhibits tumor growth. PDK-1 is an HIF-1-regulated gene, and these data suggest that the buildup of glycolytic metabolites, resulting from high PDK-1 expression, may in turn promote HIF-1 activation, thus sustaining a feed-forward loop for malignant progression. In addition to providing anabolic support for cancer cells, altered fuel metabolism thus supports a malignant phenotype. Correction of metabolic abnormalities offers unique opportunities for cancer treatment and may potentially synergize with other cancer therapies. PMID:18541534

  2. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Milani, M

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinic...

  3. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo, V.; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R.; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D.; Gutiérrez, T.; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatmen...

  4. Respiratory system impedance from 4 to 40 Hz in paralyzed intubated infants with respiratory disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Dorkin, H L; Stark, A. R.; Werthammer, J W; Strieder, D J; Fredberg, J.J.; Frantz, I D

    1983-01-01

    To describe the mechanical characteristics of the respiratory system in intubated neonates with respiratory disease, we measured impedance and resistance in six paralyzed intubated infants with respiratory distress syndrome, three of whom also had pulmonary interstitial emphysema. We subtracted the effects of the endotracheal tube after showing that such subtraction was valid. Oscillatory flow was generated from 4 to 40 Hz by a loudspeaker, airway pressure was measured, and flow was calculate...

  5. Investigations of respiratory control systems simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The Grodins' respiratory control model was investigated and it was determined that the following modifications were necessary before the model would be adaptable for current research efforts: (1) the controller equation must be modified to allow for integration of the respiratory system model with other physiological systems; (2) the system must be more closely correlated to the salient physiological functionings; (3) the respiratory frequency and the heart rate should be expanded to illustrate other physiological relationships and dependencies; and (4) the model should be adapted to particular individuals through a better defined set of initial parameter values in addition to relating these parameter values to the desired environmental conditions. Several of Milhorn's respiratory control models were also investigated in hopes of using some of their features as modifications for Grodins' model.

  6. National prevalence of respiratory allergic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahl, R; Andersen, PS; Chivato, T; Valovirta, E; De Monchy, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Many epidemiological studies have assessed the prevalence of respiratory allergic disorders in confined geographical locations. However, no study has yet established nationally prevalence data in a uniform manner representing whole countries and, thus, enabling cross-national comparisons

  7. Prenatal hyperandrogenism induces alterations that affect liver lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruzzese, Giselle Adriana; Heber, Maria Florencia; Ferreira, Silvana Rocio; Velez, Leandro Martin; Reynoso, Roxana; Pignataro, Omar Pedro; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is hypothesized as one of the main factors contributing to the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS patients have high risk of developing fatty liver and steatosis. This study aimed to evaluate the role of prenatal hyperandrogenism in liver lipid metabolism and fatty liver development. Pregnant rats were hyperandrogenized with testosterone. At pubertal age, the prenatally hyperandrogenized (PH) female offspring displayed both ovulatory (PHov) and anovulatory (PHanov) phenotypes that mimic human PCOS features. We evaluated hepatic transferases, liver lipid content, the balance between lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation pathway, oxidant/antioxidant balance and proinflammatory status. We also evaluated the general metabolic status through growth rate curve, basal glucose and insulin levels, glucose tolerance test, HOMA-IR index and serum lipid profile. Although neither PH group showed signs of liver lipid content, the lipogenesis and fatty oxidation pathways were altered. The PH groups also showed impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance, a decrease in the proinflammatory pathway (measured by prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels), decreased glucose tolerance, imbalance of circulating lipids and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. We conclude that prenatal hyperandrogenism generates both PHov and PHanov phenotypes with signs of liver alterations, imbalance in lipid metabolism and increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The anovulatory phenotype showed more alterations in liver lipogenesis and a more impaired balance of insulin and glucose metabolism, being more susceptible to the development of steatosis. PMID:27179108

  8. Respiratory Review of 2013: Critical Care Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hye Sook

    2013-01-01

    Several papers on respiratory and critical care published from March 2012 to February 2013 were reviewed. From these, this study selected and summarized ten articles, in which the findings were notable, new, and interesting: effects of high-frequency oscillation ventilation on acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); safety and efficacy of hydroxyethyl starch as a resuscitation fluid; long-term psychological impairments after ARDS; safety and efficacy of dexmedetomidine for sedation; B-typ...

  9. Airway Reflux, Cough and Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molyneux, Ian D.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract. The adjacent respiratory structures are also at risk from material ejected from the proximal oesophagus as a result of the failure of anatomical and physiological barriers. There is evidence of the influence of reflux on several respiratory and otorhinological conditions and although in many cases the precise mechanism has yet to be elucidated, the association alone opens p...

  10. Degeneracy as a Substrate for Respiratory Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mellen, Nicholas M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies in vivo and in vitro suggest that both respiratory rhythmogenesis and its central chemosensory modulation arise from multiple, mechanistically and/or anatomically distinct networks whose outputs are similar. These observations are consistent with degeneracy, defined as the ability of structurally distinct elements to generate similar function. This review argues that degeneracy is an essential feature of respiratory networks, ensuring the survival of the individual organism ove...

  11. Amyloid myopathy presenting with respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Ashe, J.; Borel, C O; Hart, G.; Humphrey, R L; Derrick, D A; Kuncl, R W

    1992-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare cause of myopathy. Its prominent or presenting feature may be respiratory failure. Physiological measurement of transdiaphragmatic pressure and biopsy specimens of muscle show the pathological mechanism to be diaphragm weakness due to amyloid infiltration of the diaphragm rather than parenchymal lung involvement. Thus amyloid myopathy even without the typical macroglossia and muscle pseudohypertrophy should be considered as one of the neurological causes of respiratory f...

  12. Respiratory Depression Caused by Heroin Use

    OpenAIRE

    Kadir Hakan Cansiz; Gokhan Inangil; Murat Kuyumcu; Ahmet Erturk Yedekci; Huseyin Sen; Sezai Ozkan; Guner Dagli

    2012-01-01

    Summary Heroin is a semisynthetic narcotic analgesic and heroin abuse is common due to its pleasure-inducing effect. For the last 30 years heroin abuse has become an important worldwide public health problem. Heroin can be administered in many different ways as preferred. Heroin affects many systems including respiratory system, cardiovascular system and particulary the central nervous system. Overdose use of heroin intravenously can be fatal due to respiratory depression. In this letter, we ...

  13. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Budweiser

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Budweiser1, Rudolf A Jörres2, Michael Pfeifer1,31Center for Pneumology, Hospital Donaustauf, Donaustauf, Germany; 2Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Respirology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, GermanyAbstract: Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients with chronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure became a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients’ adherence to therapy.Keywords: respiratory failure, COPD, mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation long-term oxygen therapy, chronic

  14. Emergency thyroidectomy: Due to acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zulfu Bayhan; Sezgin Zeren; Bercis Imge Ucar; Isa Ozbay; Yalcin Sonmez; Metin Mestan; Onur Balaban; Nilufer Araz Bayhan; Mehmet Fatih Ekici

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Giant cervical and mediastinal goiter may lead to acute respiratory failure caused by laryngotracheal compression and airway obstruction. Here, we present a case admitted to the emergency service with a giant goiter along with respiratory failure and poor general health status, which required urgent surgical intervention. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 71-year-old female admitted to the emergency room with shortness of breath and poor general health status resulting from a giant cer...

  15. Respiratory System Model Take into Account Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    He Zhonghai; Ma Zhenhe

    2013-01-01

    In this study, nonlinear phenomenon of respiratory system is analyzed. Airway is partitioned into four parts by different morphology which causes different fluid dynamic character. Reasons that cause nonlinear phenomenon for different parts are given. To simplify the representation, corresponding parameters are selected to compromise the complicity and precision. Then, the suggested representation of respiratory system is summarized so that the model can be used easily in lung simulator.

  16. Preoperative respiratory physical therapy in cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hulzebos, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures and accounts for more resources expended in cardiovascular medicine than any other single procedure. Because cardiac surgery involves sternal incision and cardiopulmonary bypass, patients usually have a restricted respiratory function in the postoperative period. Moreover, anesthesia and analgesia affect respiratory function during and after the surgical intervention, causing changes in lung volume, diaphragmatic dysfunction, respi...

  17. Clowns Benefit Children Hospitalized for Respiratory Pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Bertini; Elena Isola; Giuseppe Paolone; Giuseppe Curcio

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children t...

  18. Occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory health

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Mamane; Isabelle Baldi; Jean-François Tessier; Chantal Raherison; Ghislaine Bouvier

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to review the available literature regarding the link between occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory symptoms or diseases. Identification of epidemiological studies was performed using PubMed. 41 articles were included, 36 regarding agricultural workers and five regarding industry workers. Among the 15 cross-sectional studies focusing on respiratory symptoms and agricultural pesticide exposure, 12 found significant associations with chronic cough, wheeze, dyspno...

  19. Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Samson, L

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in young children, with significant numbers of premature infants and those with other risk factors requiring hospitalization in Canada each year. Palivizumab, an RSV-specific monoclonal antibody, can reduce the hospitalization rate and severity of illness for a small group of high-risk or premature infants during their first RSV season. The present statement reviews the published literature a...

  20. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  1. The panic disorder respiratory ratio: a dimensional approach to the respiratory subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Christophe Freire

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The respiratory ratio is a dimensional construct of the respiratory subtype of panic disorder (PD. The respiratory subtype has been correlated with an increased sensitivity to CO2 inhalation, positive family history of PD and low comorbidity with depression. The objective of our study was to determine whether the respiratory ratio is correlated with CO2-induced panic attacks and other clinical and demographic features. METHODS: We examined 91 patients with PD and submitted them to a double-breath 35% CO2 challenge test. The respiratory ratio was calculated based on the Diagnostic Symptom Questionnaire (DSQ scores recorded in a diary in the days preceding the CO2 challenge. The scores of the respiratory symptoms were summed and divided by the total DSQ score. RESULTS: The respiratory ratio was correlated with CO2 sensitivity, and there was a non-statistically significant trend towards a correlation with a family history of PD. CONCLUSIONS: The positive correlation between the respiratory ratio and the anxiety elicited by the CO2 inhalation indicates that the intensity of respiratory symptoms may be proportional to the sensitivity to carbon dioxide.

  2. Real-Time Surveillance for Respiratory Disease Outbreaks, Ontario, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Adam; Aramini, Jeff; Edge, Graham; Moore, Kieran M.

    2009-01-01

    To validate the utility of a chief complaint–based emergency department surveillance system, we compared it with respiratory diagnostic data and calls to Telehealth Ontario about respiratory disease. This local syndromic surveillance system accurately monitored status of respiratory diseases in the community and contributed to early detection of respiratory disease outbreaks.

  3. Environmental exposure to pesticides and respiratory health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mamane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory effects of environmental exposure to pesticides are debated. Here we aimed to review epidemiological studies published up until 2013, using the PubMed database. 20 studies dealing with respiratory health and non-occupational pesticide exposure were identified, 14 carried out on children and six on adults. In four out of nine studies in children with biological measurements, mothers' dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE blood levels during pregnancy were associated with asthma and wheezing in young children. An association was also found between permethrin in indoor air during pregnancy and wheezing in children. A significant association between asthma and DDE measured in children's blood (aged 7–10 years was observed in one study. However, in three studies, no association was found between asthma or respiratory infections in children and pesticide levels in breast milk and/or infant blood. Lastly, in three out of four studies where post-natal pesticide exposure of children was assessed by parental questionnaire an association with respiratory symptoms was found. Results of the fewer studies on pesticide environmental exposure and respiratory health of adults were much less conclusive: indeed, the associations observed were weak and often not significant. In conclusion, further studies are needed to confirm whether there is a respiratory risk associated with environmental exposure to pesticides.

  4. Structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Maria Luisa; Bianchi, Cristina; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Two models exist of the mitochondrial respiratory chain: the model of a random organization of the individual respiratory enzyme complexes and that of a super-complex assembly formed by stable association between the individual complexes. Recently Schägger, using digitonin solubilization and Blue Native PAGE produced new evidence of preferential associations, in particular a Complex I monomer with a Complex III dimer, and suggested a model of the respiratory chain (the respirasome) based on direct electron channelling between complexes. Discrimination between the two models is amenable to kinetic testing using flux control analysis. Experimental evidence obtained in beef heart SMP, according to the extension of the Metabolic Control Theory for pathways with metabolic channelling, showed that enzyme associations involving Complex I and Complex III take place in the respiratory chain while Complex IV seems to be randomly distributed, with cytochrome c behaving as a mobile component. Flux control analysis at anyone of the respiratory complexes involved in aerobic succinate oxidation indicated that Complex II and III are not functionally associated in a stable supercomplex. A critical appraisal of the solid-state model of the mitochondrial respiratory chain requires its reconciliation with previous biophysical and kinetic evidence that CoQ behaves as a homogeneous diffusible pool between all reducing enzyme and all oxidizing enzymes: the hypothesis can be advanced that both models (CoQ pool and supercomplexes) are true, by postulating that supercomplexes physiologically exist in equilibrium with isolated complexes depending on metabolic conditions of the cell.

  5. Phenotypic robustness can increase phenotypic variability after non-genetic perturbations in gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa-Soto, C.; Martin, O. C.; Wagner, A

    2010-01-01

    Non-genetic perturbations, such as environmental change or developmental noise, can induce novel phenotypes. If an induced phenotype confers a fitness advantage, selection may promote its genetic stabilization. Non-genetic perturbations can thus initiate evolutionary innovation. Genetic variation that is not usually phenotypically visible may play an important role in this process. Populations under stabilizing selection on a phenotype that is robust to mutations can accumulate such variation...

  6. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have d

  7. The Cognitive Phenotype of Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Maureen; Barnes, Marcia A.

    2010-01-01

    A cognitive phenotype is a product of both assets and deficits that specifies what individuals with spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM) can and cannot do and why they can or cannot do it. In this article, we review the cognitive phenotype of SBM and describe the processing assets and deficits that cut within and across content domains, sensory…

  8. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  9. The autonomic phenotype of rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Shapiro, David; Davydov, Dmitry M; Goldstein, Iris B; Mills, Paul J

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that ruminative thoughts may be mediators of the prolonged physiological effects of stress. We hypothesized that autonomic dysregulation plays a role in the relation between rumination and health. Rumination was induced by an anger-recall task in 45 healthy subjects. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI) change scores were evaluated to obtain the autonomic phenotype of rumination. Personality traits and endothelial activation were examined for their relation to autonomic responses during rumination. Degree of endothelial activation was assessed by circulating soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Vagal withdrawal during rumination was greater for women than men. Larger decreases in the high frequency component of HRV were associated with higher levels of anger-in, depression, and sICAM-1 levels. BRS reactivity was negatively related to trait anxiety. BEI reactivity was positively related to anger-in, hostility, anxiety, and depression. Lower BEI and BRS recovery were associated with lower social desirability and higher anger-out, anxiety, and depression. Findings suggest that the autonomic dysregulation that characterizes rumination plays a role in the relationships between personality and cardiovascular health. PMID:19272312

  10. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  11. Components of physical capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with phenotypic expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Márquez-Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Márquez-Martín1, Pilar Cejudo Ramos1, José Luis López-Campos1, María del Pilar Serrano Gotarredona2, Silvia Navarro Herrero2, Rodrigo Tallón Aguilar1, Emilia Barrot Cortes1, Francisco Ortega Ruiz11Medical-Surgical Unit of Respiratory Diseases, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, Spain; 2Radiodiagnostic Unit, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, SpainBackground: More accurate phenotyping of COPD is of great interest since it may have prognostic and therapeutic consequences. We attempted to explore the possible relationship between the extent of emphysema, as assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT, and COPD severity. We also included some study variables involving exercise tolerance evaluation and peripheral muscle strength (PMS measurement.Methods: Sixty-four patients with COPD (mean age 64 ± 7 years were enrolled in a prospective observational cross-sectional study. All patients underwent clinical and functional evaluations: assessment of dyspnea, body mass index (BMI, health status assessment, spirometry testing, and arterial blood gas analysis. The extent of emphysema was graded using HRCT. Functional capacity was evaluated by a cardiopulmonary maximal exercise testing (CPET, the shuttle walking test, and by estimation of PMS.Results: Half of the study patients had an emphysematous phenotype. There was a significant correlation between the score derived from analysis of HRCT images and BMI and respiratory functional parameters, as well as VO2 max (maximal oxygen uptake and chest pull 1RM (1 rep max. Compared with subjects with a nonemphysematous phenotype, those with an emphysematous phenotype showed a lower BMI, a reduced PMS, and displayed a lower power at CPET. Significant differences in lung function tests were found for diffusing capacity and hyperinflation. No significant differences in quality of life were observed between the two study groups.Conclusions: Compared with subjects with

  12. Metabolomic phenotyping of af cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes...... and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal...... outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n...

  13. Constraints on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murren, Courtney J; Auld, Josh R.; Callahan, Hilary S;

    2015-01-01

    costly. In addition, we examine opportunities to offset costs of phenotypes through ontogeny, amelioration of phenotypic costs across environments, and the condition-dependent hypothesis. We propose avenues of further inquiry in the limits of plasticity using new and classic methods of ecological......Phenotypic plasticity is ubiquitous and generally regarded as a key mechanism for enabling organisms to survive in the face of environmental change. Because no organism is infinitely or ideally plastic, theory suggests that there must be limits (for example, the lack of ability to produce...... an optimal trait) to the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, or that plasticity may have inherent significant costs. Yet numerous experimental studies have not detected widespread costs. Explicitly differentiating plasticity costs from phenotype costs, we re-evaluate fundamental questions of the limits...

  14. Phenotypic character gradient variation of Melia azedarach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Shiming; GU Wanchun

    2007-01-01

    Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) was applied on the research data of five geographical-climatic factors and 18 phenotypic characters of 729 trees of 24 populations of Melia azedarach distributed in China.The eigenvalue of the first canonical variable is 0.997 9 (significant at 0.01 level),accounting for 78% of all eigenvalues.A study on the principal component analysis (PCA) was done,taking the first canonical variable coordinate values as the phenotypic character gradient axes (PCGA).The isogram of the PCGA was drawn out with 0.2 contours,which showed a geographical model with a northeast-southwest variation trend of the phenotypic characters of M.azedarach.Meanwhile,the path analysis results show the direct and indirect effects of phenotypic characters with phenotypic character gradient values,which prove that the propagative organs,are steadily changing.

  15. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the Respiratory Guidance System in the Respiratory Gating Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The respiration is one of the most important factors in respiratory gating radiation therapy (RGRT). We have developed an unique respiratory guidance system using an audio-visual system in order to support and stabilize individual patient's respiration and evaluated the usefulness of this system. Seven patients received the RGRT at our clinic from June 2011 to April 2012. After breathing exercise standard deviations by the superficial contents of respiratory cycles and functions, and analyzed them to examine changes in their breathing before and with the audio-visual system, we measured their spontaneous respiration and their respiration with the audio-visual system respectively. With the measured data, we yielded after the therapy. The PTP (peak to peak) of the standard deviations of the free breathing, the audio guidance system, and the respiratory guidance system were 0.343, 0.148, and 0.078 respectively. The respiratory cycles were 0.645, 0.345, and 0.171 respectively and the superficial contents of the respiratory functions were 2.591, 1.008, and 0.877 respectively. The average values of the differences in the standard deviations among the whole patients at the CT room and therapy room were 0.425 for the PTP, 1.566 for the respiratory cycles, and 3.671 for the respiratory superficial contents. As for the standard deviations before and after the application of the PTP respiratory guidance system, that of the PTP was 0.265, that of the respiratory cycles was 0.474, and that of the respiratory superficial contents. The results of t-test of the values before and after free breathing and the audio-visual guidance system showed that the P-value of the PTP was 0.035, that of the cycles 0.009, and that of the respiratory superficial contents 0.010. The respiratory control could be one of the most important factors in the RGRT which determines the success or failure of a treatment. We were able to get more stable breathing with the audio-visual respiratory guidance

  16. The role of image guidance in respiratory gated radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Fredberg Persson, Gitte;

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory gating for radiotherapy beam delivery is a widely available technique, manufactured and sold by most of the major radiotherapy machine vendors. Respiratory gated beam delivery is intended to limit the irradiation of tumours moving with respiration to selected parts of the respiratory...... is therefore of utmost importance for the safe introduction of respiratory gating. In this short overview, suitable image guidance strategies for respiratory gated radiotherapy are reviewed for two cancer sites; breast cancer and lung tumours....

  17. [Research progress of adventitious respiratory sound signal processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaoming

    2013-10-01

    Adventitious respiratory sound signal processing has been an important researching topic in the field of computerized respiratory sound analysis system. In recent years, new progress has been achieved in adventitious respiratory sound signal analysis due to the applications of techniques of non-stationary random signal processing. Algorithm progress of adventitious respiratory sound detections is discussed in detail in this paper. Then the state of art of adventitious respiratory sound analysis is reviewed, and development directions of next phase are pointed out.

  18. Respiratory Management in the Patient with Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Galeiras Vázquez; Pedro Rascado Sedes; Mónica Mourelo Fariña; Antonio Montoto Marqués; M. Elena Ferreiro Velasco

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often lead to impairment of the respiratory system and, consequently, restrictive respiratory changes. Paresis or paralysis of the respiratory muscles can lead to respiratory insufficiency, which is dependent on the level and completeness of the injury. Respiratory complications include hypoventilation, a reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Vital capacity (VC) is an indicator of overall pulmonary function; patients with s...

  19. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Randy J.; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations’ morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response.

  20. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Randy J.; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations’ morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response. PMID:27609668

  1. Respiratory infections precede adult-onset asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory infections in early life are associated with an increased risk of developing asthma but there is little evidence on the role of infections for onset of asthma in adults. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of the occurrence of respiratory infections in the past 12 months to adult-onset asthma in a population-based incident case-control study of adults 21-63 years of age. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited all new clinically diagnosed cases of asthma (n = 521 during a 2.5-year study period and randomly selected controls (n = 932 in a geographically defined area in South Finland. Information on respiratory infections was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. The diagnosis of asthma was based on symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction in lung function measurements. The risk of asthma onset was strongly increased in subjects who had experienced in the preceding 12 months lower respiratory tract infections (including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted odds ratio (OR 7.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.16-9.99, or upper respiratory tract infections (including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.72-2.97. Individuals with personal atopy and/or parental atopy were more susceptible to the effects of respiratory infections on asthma onset than non-atopic persons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new evidence that recently experienced respiratory infections are a strong determinant for adult-onset asthma. Reducing such infections might prevent onset of asthma in adulthood, especially in individuals with atopy or hereditary propensity to it.

  2. PHENOTYPIC TRAITS IN ZAGORJE TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Janječić

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of turkeys in the region of Hrvatsko zagorje began in second half of 16th century, when there was a little influence of other turkey breeds from other region. Recently, interest for protection and preservation of autochthonous poultry breeds in Croatia is growing and in that sense this investigation was set to determine the phenotypic traits of Zagorje turkey. One hundred 10-month old turkeys (5 males and 20 females of four strains (bronze, black, grey and pale were measured, while egg production data were collected by a poll among the breeders. Average body weight of bronze, black, grey and pale strain males were 7.08, 6.88, 6.10 and 6.09 kg, respectively, while in females the average values were 4.02, 4.07, 3.63, and 3.68 kg. Generally, according to body measures of male birds, other than body weight, of all of the strains of Zagorje turkey, the black one is the biggest, as it had the highest values for body length, length of sternum, length of drumstick, length of shank, depth of chest and head measures. At the same time, the bronze strain had the highest value for carcass width. Body measures mentioned previously were not so different in females. Number of reared chicks was lowest in the pale strain. From the body measures assessed it is possible to conclude that Zagorje turkeys are rather uniform within the strain but differences in most of the breed traits are present between the strains, especially in males of bronze and black strain, when compared to gray and pale strain.

  3. Seasonality of long term wheezing following respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, L; Steijn, M; van Aalderen, WMC; Brus, F; Draaisma, JMT; Van Diemen-Steenvoorde, RAAM; Pekelharing-Berghuis, M; Kimpen, JLL

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is well known that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is associated with subsequent wheezing episodes, but the precise natural course of wheezing following RSV LRTI is not known. This study aimed to determine the continuous development of wheezi

  4. Non-invasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loretta YC Yam; Alfred YF Chan; Thomas MT Cheung; Eva LH Tsui; Jane CK Chan; Vivian CW Wong

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome is frequently complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We aimed to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation against invasive mechanical ventilation treating respiratory failure in this disease. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on all respiratory failure patients identified from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Database. Intubation rate, mortality and secondary outcome of a hospital utilizing non-invasive ventilation under standard infection control conditions (NIV Hospital) were compared against 13 hospitals using solely invasive ventilation (IMV Hospitals). Multiple logistic regression analyses with adjustments for confounding variables were performed to test for association between outcomes and hospital groups. Results Both hospital groups had comparable demographics and clinical profiles, but NIV Hospital (42 patients) had higher lactate dehydrogenase ratio and worse radiographic score on admission and ribavirin-corticosteroid commencement. Compared to IMV Hospitals (451 patients), NIV Hospital had lower adjusted odds ratios for intubation (0.36, 95% CI 0.164-0.791, P=0.011) and death (0.235, 95% CI 0.077-0.716, P=0.011), and improved earlier after pulsed steroid rescue. There were no instances of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome among health care workers due to the use of non-invasive ventilation.Conclusion Compared to invasive mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation as initial ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure in the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome appeared to be associated with reduced intubation need and mortality.

  5. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus : current management and new therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Baraldi, Eugenio; Fauroux, Brigitte; Greenough, Anne; Heikkinen, Terho; Manzoni, Paolo; Mejias, Asuncion; Nair, Harish; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Polack, Fernando P.; Ramilo, Octavio; Sharland, Mike; Stein, Renato; Madhi, Shabir A.; Bont, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and

  6. Evaluation of exercise-respiratory system modifications and preliminary respiratory-circulatory system integration scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The respiratory control system, functioning as an independent system, is presented with modifications of the exercise subroutine. These modifications illustrate an improved control of ventilation rates and arterial and compartmental gas tensions. A very elementary approach to describing the interactions of the respiratory and circulatory system is presented.

  7. Respiratory support for severe acute respiratory syndrome: integration of efficacy and safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chen; CAO Zhi-xin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory illness caused by infection with the SARS virus. The most obvious clinical characteristic of SARS is rapidly progressive pneumonia, and about 20% patients need intensive care due to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).1-3 In the absence of effective drugs for SARS, supportive care, especially respiratory support techniques (RSTs), is of primary importance. On the other hand, offering RSTs to SARS patients may carry a high-risk of infection to healthcare workers because of the high infectivity of SARS. Therefore, the strategy of RSTs for SARS should be the integration of efficacy and safety. In this issue of the Chinese Medical Journal, an article from Hong Kong has retrospectively compared both the safety and efficacy of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) with that of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) in the treatment of respiratory failure in SARS.

  8. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Based Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy with Respiratory Guidance System: Analysis of Respiratory Signals and Dosimetric Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effectiveness of respiratory guidance system in 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) based respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) by comparing respiratory signals and dosimetric analysis of treatment plans. Methods. The respiratory amplitude and period of the free, the audio device-guided, and the complex system-guided breathing were evaluated in eleven patients with lung or liver cancers. The dosimetric parameters were assessed by comparing free breathing ...

  9. Acute respiratory failure induced by bleomycin and hyperoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, and oxygen at concentrations greater than 20%, induce acute pulmonary damage separately and when administered together. The interaction of 5 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin and 24 hours of exposure to 80% oxygen in hamsters produces delayed onset acute respiratory distress syndrome three days after treatment. As little as 12 hours of 80% O2 exposure, after intratracheal bleomycin, induces severe pulmonary damage. Lung lesions are characterized as diffuse alveolar damage. Significantly pulmonary edema, measured by iodine-125-bovine serum albumin and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, occurs 72 hours after treatment. Lesions progress from focal mild alveolar interstitial and air-space macrophage and granulocyte infiltrates at 24 hours to marked infiltrates and severe interstitial and air space edema with hemorrhages and hyaline membranes at 96 hours. Significant changes measured by electron microscopy morphometry are increases in volume fractions of neutrophils, alveolar tissue and mononuclear leukocytes. Surfactant assay of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid shows a marked decrease in the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio at 72 hours. Proposed mechanisms of bleomycin and hyperoxia synergism include enhanced production of superoxide radicals either directly or indirectly by increasing neutrophil activity or numbers, or by alteration of cell mediators. The pulmonary edema, without evidence of severe morphological changes, may be secondary to alterations of transalveolar transport mechanisms

  10. Phenotyping: targeting genotype's rich cousin for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynam, Gareth; Walters, Mark; Claes, Peter; Kung, Stefanie; LeSouef, Peter; Dawkins, Hugh; Bellgard, Matthew; Girdea, Marta; Brudno, Michael; Robinson, Peter; Zankl, Andreas; Groza, Tudor; Gillett, David; Goldblatt, Jack

    2015-04-01

    There are many current and evolving tools to assist clinicians in their daily work of phenotyping. In medicine, the term 'phenotype' is usually taken to mean some deviation from normal morphology, physiology and behaviour. It is ascertained via history, examination and investigations, and a primary aim is diagnosis. Therefore, doctors are, by necessity, expert 'phenotypers'. There is an inherent and partially realised power in phenotypic information that when harnessed can improve patient care. Furthermore, phenotyping developments are increasingly important in an era of rapid advances in genomic technology. Fortunately, there is an expanding network of phenotyping tools that are poised for clinical translation. These tools will preferentially be implemented to mirror clinical workflows and to integrate with advances in genomic and information-sharing technologies. This will synergise with and augment the clinical acumen of medical practitioners. We outline key enablers of the ascertainment, integration and interrogation of clinical phenotype by using genetic diseases, particularly rare ones, as a theme. Successes from the test bed or rare diseases will support approaches to common disease.

  11. Evolution of molecular phenotypes under stabilizing selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Schiffels, Stephan; Lässig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Molecular phenotypes are important links between genomic information and organismic functions, fitness, and evolution. Complex phenotypes, which are also called quantitative traits, often depend on multiple genomic loci. Their evolution builds on genome evolution in a complicated way, which involves selection, genetic drift, mutations and recombination. Here we develop a coarse-grained evolutionary statistics for phenotypes, which decouples from details of the underlying genotypes. We derive approximate evolution equations for the distribution of phenotype values within and across populations. This dynamics covers evolutionary processes at high and low recombination rates, that is, it applies to sexual and asexual populations. In a fitness landscape with a single optimal phenotype value, the phenotypic diversity within populations and the divergence between populations reach evolutionary equilibria, which describe stabilizing selection. We compute the equilibrium distributions of both quantities analytically and we show that the ratio of mean divergence and diversity depends on the strength of selection in a universal way: it is largely independent of the phenotype’s genomic encoding and of the recombination rate. This establishes a new method for the inference of selection on molecular phenotypes beyond the genome level. We discuss the implications of our findings for the predictability of evolutionary processes.

  12. Occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mamane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to review the available literature regarding the link between occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory symptoms or diseases. Identification of epidemiological studies was performed using PubMed. 41 articles were included, 36 regarding agricultural workers and five regarding industry workers. Among the 15 cross-sectional studies focusing on respiratory symptoms and agricultural pesticide exposure, 12 found significant associations with chronic cough, wheeze, dyspnoea, breathlessness or chest tightness. All four studies on asthma found a relationship with occupational exposure, as did all three studies on chronic bronchitis. The four studies that performed spirometry reported impaired respiratory function linked to pesticide exposure, suggestive of either obstructive or restrictive syndrome according to the chemical class of pesticide. 12 papers reported results from cohort studies. Three out of nine found a significant relationship with increased risk of wheeze, five out of nine with asthma and three out of three with chronic bronchitis. In workers employed in pesticide production, elevated risks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (two studies out of three and impaired respiratory function suggestive of an obstructive syndrome (two studies out of two were reported. In conclusion, this article suggests that occupational exposure to pesticides is associated with an increased risk of respiratory symptoms, asthma and chronic bronchitis, but the causal relationship is still under debate.

  13. Dynamics of human respiratory system mycoflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Biedunkiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determing the prevalence of individual species of fungi in the respiratory systems of women and men, analysis of the dynamics of the fungi in individual sections of the respiratory system as concerns their quantity and identification of phenology of the isolated fungi coupled with an attempt at identifying their possible preferences for appearing during specific seasons of thc year. During 10 years of studies (1989- 1998. 29 species of fungi belonging: Candida, Geolrichum, Saccharomyces, Saccharomycopsis, Schizosaccharomyces, Torulopsis, Trichosporon and Aspergillus were isolated from the ontocenoses of the respiratory systems of patients at the Independent Public Center for Pulmonology and Oncology in Olsztyn. Candida albicans was a clearly dominating fungus. Individual species appeared individually, in twos or threes in a single patient, they were isolated more frequently in the spring and autumn, less frequently during the winter and summer. The largest number of fungi species were isolated from sputum (29 species, bronchoscopic material (23 species and pharyngeal swabs (15 species. Sacchoromycopsis capsularis and Trichosporon beigelii should be treated as new for the respiratory system. Biodiversity of fungi, their numbers and continous fluctuations in frequency indicate that the respiratory system ontocenose offers the optimum conditions for growth and development of the majority of the majority of yeasts - like fungi.

  14. Microglia modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorea-Hernández, Jonathan-Julio; Morales, Teresa; Rivera-Angulo, Ana-Julia; Alcantara-Gonzalez, David; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation has been linked to the induction of apneas and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, whereas proinflammatory mediators inhibit breathing when applied peripherally or directly into the CNS. Considering that peripheral inflammation can activate microglia in the CNS and that this cell type can directly release all proinflammatory mediators that modulate breathing, it is likely that microglia can modulate breathing generation. It might do so also in hypoxia, since microglia are sensitive to hypoxia, and peripheral proinflammatory conditions affect gasping generation and autoresuscitation. Here, we tested whether microglial activation or inhibition affected respiratory rhythm generation. By measuring breathing as well as the activity of the respiratory rhythm generator (the preBötzinger complex), we found that several microglial activators or inhibitors, applied intracisternally in vivo or in the recording bath in vitro, affect the generation of the respiratory rhythms both in normoxia and hypoxia. Furthermore, microglial activation with lipopolysaccharide affected the ability of the animals to autoresuscitate after hypoxic conditions, an effect that is blocked when lipopolysaccharide is co-applied with the microglial inhibitor minocycline. Moreover, we found that the modulation of respiratory rhythm generation induced in vitro by microglial inhibitors was reproduced by microglial depletion. In conclusion, our data show that microglia can modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation. PMID:26678570

  15. Control Measures for Human Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Lesley; Waterer, Grant

    2016-08-01

    New viral respiratory pathogens are emerging with increasing frequency and have potentially devastating impacts on the population worldwide. Recent examples of newly emerged threats include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Experiences with these pathogens have shown up major deficiencies in how we deal globally with emerging pathogens and taught us salient lessons in what needs to be addressed for future pandemics. This article reviews the lessons learnt from past experience and current knowledge on the range of measures required to limit the impact of emerging respiratory infections from public health responses down to individual patient management. Key areas of interest are surveillance programs, political limitations on our ability to respond quickly enough to emerging threats, media management, public information dissemination, infection control, prophylaxis, and individual patient management. Respiratory physicians have a crucial role to play in many of these areas and need to be aware of how to respond as new viral pathogens emerge. PMID:27486741

  16. Impairment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat hepatomas: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitier, E; Merad-Boudia, M; Guguen-Guillouzo, C; Defer, N; Ceballos-Picot, I; Leroux, J P; Marsac, C

    1995-07-15

    Alterations in the energy metabolism of cancer cells have been reported for many years. However, the deleterious mechanisms involved in these deficiencies have not yet been clearly proved. The main goal of this study was to decipher the harmful mechanisms responsible for the respiratory chain deficiencies in the course of diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis, where mitochondrial DNA abnormalities had been previously reported. The respiratory activity of freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria, assessed by oxygen consumption experiments and enzymatic assays, presented a severe complex I deficiency 19 months after DENA treatment, and later on, in addition, a defective complex III activity. Since respiratory complex subunits are encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, we checked whether the respiratory chain defects were due to impaired synthesis processes. The specific immunodetection of complex I failed to show any alterations in the steady-state levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded subunits in the hepatomas. Moreover, in vitro protein synthesis experiments carried out on freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria did not bring to light any modifications in the synthesis of the mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory complexes, whatever the degree of tumor progression. Finally, Southern blot analysis of mitochondrial DNA did not show any major mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in DENA-induced hepatomas. Because the synthetic processes of respiratory complexes did not seem to be implicated in the respiratory chain impairment, these deficiencies could be partly ascribed to a direct toxic impact of highly reactive molecules on these complexes, thus impairing their function. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important generator of noxious, reactive oxygen free radicals such as superoxide and H2O2, which are normally catabolized by powerful antioxidant scavengers. Nineteen months after DENA treatment, a general collapse of

  17. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  18. A 3-month age difference profoundly alters the primary rat stromal vascular fraction phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Marlene Louise; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline;

    2016-01-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) is a heterogeneous population obtained from collagenase digestion of adipose tissue. When cultured the population becomes more homogeneous and the cells are then termed adipose stromal/stem cells (ASCs). Both the freshly isolated primary SVF population...

  19. Tumour-stromal interactions: Phenotypic and genetic alterations in mammary stroma - implications for tumour progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the well documented role of cytokines in mediating tissue-level interactions, it is now clear that matrix macromolecules fulfil a complementary regulatory function. Data highlighted in the present review extend the repertoire of matrix signalling mechanisms, (1) introducing the concept of 'matrikines', these defined as proteinase-generated fragments of matrix macromolecules that display cryptic bioactivities not manifested by the native, full-length form of the molecule, and (2) indicating that a previously identified motogenic factor (migration stimulating factor [MSF]) produced by foetal and cancer patient fibroblasts is a genetically generated truncated isoform of fibronectin, which displays bioactivities cryptic in all previously identified fibronectin isoforms. These observations are discussed in the context of the contribution of a 'foetal-like' stroma to the progression of breast cancer

  20. Estimating the magnitude and direction of altered arbovirus transmission due to viral phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Christofferson

    Full Text Available Vectorial capacity is a measure of the transmission potential of a vector borne pathogen within a susceptible population. Vector competence, a component of the vectorial capacity equation, is the ability of an arthropod to transmit an infectious agent following exposure to that agent. Comparisons of arbovirus strain-specific vector competence estimates have been used to support observed or hypothesized differences in transmission capability. Typically, such comparisons are made at a single time point during the extrinsic incubation period, the time in days it takes for the virus to replicate and disseminate to the salivary glands. However, vectorial capacity includes crucial parameters needed to effectively evaluate transmission capability, though often this is based on the discrete vector competence values. Utilization of the rate of change of vector competence over a range of days gives a more accurate measurement of the transmission potential. Accordingly, we investigated the rate of change in vector competence of dengue virus in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the resulting vectorial capacity curves. The areas under the curves represent the effective vector competence and the cumulative transmission potentials of arboviruses within a population of mosquitoes. We used the calculated area under the curve for each virus strain and the corresponding variance estimates to test for differences in cumulative transmission potentials between strains of dengue virus based on our dynamic model. To further characterize differences between dengue strains, we devised a displacement index interpreted as the capability of a newly introduced strain to displace the established, dominant circulating strain. The displacement index can be used to better understand the transmission dynamics in systems where multiple strains/serotypes circulate or even multiple arbovirus species. The use of a rate of a rate of change based model of vectorial capacity and the informative calculations of the displacement index will lead to better measurements of the differences in transmission potential of arboviruses.