WorldWideScience

Sample records for alters mitochondrial distribution

  1. Misfolded SOD1 associated with motor neuron mitochondria alters mitochondrial shape and distribution prior to clinical onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vande Velde

    Full Text Available Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are causative for inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A proportion of SOD1 mutant protein is misfolded onto the cytoplasmic face of mitochondria in one or more spinal cord cell types. By construction of mice in which mitochondrially targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein is selectively expressed in motor neurons, we demonstrate that axonal mitochondria of motor neurons are primary in vivo targets for misfolded SOD1. Mutant SOD1 alters axonal mitochondrial morphology and distribution, with dismutase active SOD1 causing mitochondrial clustering at the proximal side of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures within motor axons and dismutase inactive SOD1 producing aberrantly elongated axonal mitochondria beginning pre-symptomatically and increasing in severity as disease progresses. Somal mitochondria are altered by mutant SOD1, with loss of the characteristic cylindrical, networked morphology and its replacement by a less elongated, more spherical shape. These data indicate that mutant SOD1 binding to mitochondria disrupts normal mitochondrial distribution and size homeostasis as early pathogenic features of SOD1 mutant-mediated ALS.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes transiently alters mitochondrial dynamics during infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stavru, Fabrizia; Bouillaud, Frederic; Sartori, Anna; Ricquier, Daniel; Cossart, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential and highly dynamic organelles, constantly undergoing fusion and fission. We analyzed mitochondrial dynamics during infection with the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and show that this infection profoundly alters mitochondrial dynamics by causing transient mitochondrial network fragmentation. Mitochondrial fragmentation is specific to pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, and it is not observed with the nonpathogenic Listeria innocua species or several ...

  3. Listeria monocytogenes transiently alters mitochondrial dynamics during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavru, Fabrizia; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Sartori, Anna; Ricquier, Daniel; Cossart, Pascale

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondria are essential and highly dynamic organelles, constantly undergoing fusion and fission. We analyzed mitochondrial dynamics during infection with the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and show that this infection profoundly alters mitochondrial dynamics by causing transient mitochondrial network fragmentation. Mitochondrial fragmentation is specific to pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, and it is not observed with the nonpathogenic Listeria innocua species or several other intracellular pathogens. Strikingly, the efficiency of Listeria infection is affected in cells where either mitochondrial fusion or fission has been altered by siRNA treatment, highlighting the relevance of mitochondrial dynamics for Listeria infection. We identified the secreted pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O as the bacterial factor mainly responsible for mitochondrial network disruption and mitochondrial function modulation. Together, our results suggest that the transient shutdown of mitochondrial function and dynamics represents a strategy used by Listeria at the onset of infection to interfere with cellular physiology.

  4. Altered Cytoskeleton as a Mitochondrial Decay Signature in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripathi, Srinivas R; He, Weilue; Sylvester, O'Donnell; Neksumi, Musa; Um, Ji-Yeon; Dluya, Thagriki; Bernstein, Paul S; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria mediate energy metabolism, apoptosis, and aging, while mitochondrial disruption leads to age-related diseases that include age-related macular degeneration. Descriptions of mitochondrial morphology have been non-systematic and qualitative, due to lack of knowledge on the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics. The current study analyzed mitochondrial size, shape, and position quantitatively in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) using a systematic computational model to suggest mitochondrial trafficking under oxidative environment. Our previous proteomic study suggested that prohibitin is a mitochondrial decay biomarker in the RPE. The current study examined the prohibitin interactome map using immunoprecipitation data to determine the indirect signaling on cytoskeletal changes and transcriptional regulation by prohibitin. Immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that there is a positive correlation between mitochondrial changes and altered filaments as well as prohibitin interactions with kinesin and unknown proteins in the RPE. Specific cytoskeletal and nuclear protein-binding mechanisms may exist to regulate prohibitin-mediated reactions as key elements, including vimentin and p53, to control apoptosis in mitochondria and the nucleus. Prohibitin may regulate mitochondrial trafficking through unknown proteins that include 110 kDa protein with myosin head domain and 88 kDa protein with cadherin repeat domain. Altered cytoskeleton may represent a mitochondrial decay signature in the RPE. The current study suggests that mitochondrial dynamics and cytoskeletal changes are critical for controlling mitochondrial distribution and function. Further, imbalance of retrograde versus anterograde mitochondrial trafficking may initiate the pathogenic reaction in adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 alter mitochondrial membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Total phospholipids were extracted and their fatty acyl composition was analysed. Expression of hUCP2 and hUCP3 significantly altered the mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl composition. Palmitoleoyl groups (16:1(n-7)) ...

  6. Desmin Cytoskeleton Linked to Muscle Mitochondrial Distribution and Respiratory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Derek J.; Mavroidis, Manolis; Weisleder, Noah; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies have previously suggested potential association of intermediate filaments (IFs) with mitochondria. Thus, we have investigated mitochondrial distribution and function in muscle lacking the IF protein desmin. Immunostaining of skeletal muscle tissue sections, as well as histochemical staining for the mitochondrial marker enzymes cytochrome C oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase, demonstrate abnormal accumulation of subsarcolemmal clumps of mitochondria in predominantly slow twitch skeletal muscle of desmin-null mice. Ultrastructural observation of desmin-null cardiac muscle demonstrates in addition to clumping, extensive mitochondrial proliferation in a significant fraction of the myocytes, particularly after work overload. These alterations are frequently associated with swelling and degeneration of the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial abnormalities can be detected very early, before other structural defects become obvious. To investigate related changes in mitochondrial function, we have analyzed ADP-stimulated respiration of isolated muscle mitochondria, and ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration in situ using saponin skinned muscle fibers. The in vitro maximal rates of respiration in isolated cardiac mitochondria from desmin-null and wild-type mice were similar. However, mitochondrial respiration in situ is significantly altered in desmin-null muscle. Both the maximal rate of ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption and the dissociation constant (K m) for ADP are significantly reduced in desmin-null cardiac and soleus muscle compared with controls. Respiratory parameters for desmin-null fast twitch gastrocnemius muscle were unaffected. Additionally, respiratory measurements in the presence of creatine indicate that coupling of creatine kinase and the adenine translocator is lost in desmin-null soleus muscle. This coupling is unaffected in cardiac muscle from desmin-null animals. All of these studies indicate that desmin IFs play a significant

  7. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barbi de Moura

    Full Text Available SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  8. Somatic alterations in mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial dysfunction in gastric cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Chen; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Chi, Chin-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Energy metabolism reprogramming was recently identified as one of the cancer hallmarks. One of the underlying mechanisms of energy metabolism reprogramming is mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mutations in nuclear genes or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In the past decades, several types of somatic mtDNA alterations have been identified in gastric cancer. However, the role of these mtDNA alterations in gastric cancer progression remains unclear. In this review, we summarize recently identified somatic mtDNA alterations in gastric cancers as well as the relationship between these alterations and the clinicopathological features of gastric cancer. The causative factors and potential roles of the somatic mtDNA alterations in cancer progression are also discussed. We suggest that point mutations and mtDNA copy number decreases are the two most common mtDNA alterations that result in mitochondrial dysfunction in gastric cancers. The two primary mutation types (transition mutations and mononucleotide or dinucleotide repeat instability) imply potential causative factors. Mitochondrial dysfunction-generated reactive oxygen species may be involved in the malignant changes of gastric cancer. The search for strategies to prevent mtDNA alterations and inhibit the mitochondrial retrograde signaling will benefit the development of novel treatments for gastric cancer and other malignancies. PMID:24744584

  9. Phylogeographic distribution of mitochondrial DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian subcontinent harbours both the human mtDNA macrohaplogroups M and N, of which M is the most prevalent. In this study, we discuss the overall distribution of the various haplogroups and sub-haplogroups of M among the different castes and tribes to understand their diverse pattern with respect to geographical ...

  10. Altered mitochondrial regulation in quadriceps muscles of patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naimi, Ashley I; Bourbeau, Jean; Perrault, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Evidence exists for locomotor muscle impairment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including fiber type alterations and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity. In this study high-resolution respirometry was used to quantify oxygen flux in permeabilized fibres from bi...

  11. Ultrastructural mitochondrial alterations in equine myopathies of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driessche, K; Ducatelle, R; Chiers, K; Van Coster, R; van der Kolk, J H; van der Kolk, H

    2015-03-01

    Very few mitochondrial myopathies have been described in horses. To examine the ultrastructure of muscle mitochondria in equine cases of myopathy of unknown origin. Biopsies of vastus lateralis of the Musculus quadriceps femoris were taken predominantly immediately post mortem and processed for transmission electron microscopy. As a result, electron micrographs of 90 horses in total were available for analysis comprising 4 control horses, 16 horses suffering from myopathy and 70 otherwise diseased horses. Following a thorough clinical and laboratory work-up, four out of five patients that did not fit into the usual algorithm to detect known causes of myopathy showed ultrastructural mitochondrial alterations. Small mitochondria with zones with complete disruption of cristae associated with lactic acidemia were detected in a 17-year-old pony mare, extremely long and slender mitochondria with longitudinal cristae in a 5-year-old Quarter horse stallion, a mixture of irregular extremely large mitochondria (measuring 2500 by 800 nm) next to smaller ones in an 8-year-old Hanoverian mare and round mitochondria with only few cristae in a 11-year-old pony gelding. It remains uncertain whether the subsarcolemmal mitochondrial accumulations observed in the fifth patient have any pathological significance. Ultrastructural alterations in mitochondria were detected in at least four horses. To conclude that these are due to mitochondrial dysfuntions, biochemical tests should be performed. The possibility of a mitochondrial myopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of muscle weakness.

  12. Human Misato regulates mitochondrial distribution and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masashi; Okano, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    Misato of Drosophila melanogaster and Saccharomyces cerevisiae DML1 are conserved proteins having a homologous region with a part of the GTPase family that includes eukaryotic tubulin and prokaryotic FtsZ. We characterized human Misato sharing homology with Misato of D. melanogaster and S. cerevisiae DML1. Tissue distribution of Misato exhibited ubiquitous distribution. Subcellular localization of the protein studied using anti-Misato antibody suggested that it is localized to the mitochondria. Further experiments of fractionating mitochondria revealed that Misato was localized to the outer membrane. The transfection of Misato siRNA led to growth deficiencies compared with control siRNA transfected HeLa cells, and the Misato-depleted HeLa cells showed apoptotic nuclear fragmentation resulting in cell death. After silencing of Misato, the filamentous mitochondrial network disappeared and fragmented mitochondria were observed, indicating human Misato has a role in mitochondrial fusion. To examine the effects of overexpression, COS-7 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding EGFP-Misato. Its overexpression resulted in the formation of perinuclear aggregations of mitochondria in these cells. The Misato-overexpressing cells showed low viability and had no nuclei or a small and structurally unusual ones. These results indicated that human Misato has a role(s) in mitochondrial distribution and morphology and that its unregulated expression leads to cell death

  13. Mitochondrial function is altered in horse atypical myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Hélène; Boemer, François; van Galen, Gaby; Serteyn, Didier; Amory, Hélène; Baise, Etienne; Cassart, Dominique; van Loon, Gunther; Marcillaud-Pitel, Christel; Votion, Dominique-M

    2016-09-01

    Equine atypical myopathy in Europe is a fatal rhabdomyolysis syndrome that results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple). Acylcarnitine concentrations in serum and muscle OXPHOS capacity were determined in 15 atypical myopathy cases. All but one acylcarnitine were out of reference range and mitochondrial respiratory capacity was severely decreased up to 49% as compared to 10 healthy controls. The hallmark of atypical myopathy thus consists of a severe alteration in the energy metabolism including a severe impairment in muscle mitochondrial respiration that could contribute to its high death rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Negrette-Guzmán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that curcumin (CUR, a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM- induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2.

  15. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-ß: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-ß (Aß generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-ß (Aß. The purpose was to determine how Aß may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aß in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid ß was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway.

  16. FRIENDLY regulates mitochondrial distribution, fusion, and quality control in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zawily, Amr M; Schwarzländer, Markus; Finkemeier, Iris; Johnston, Iain G; Benamar, Abdelilah; Cao, Yongguo; Gissot, Clémence; Meyer, Andreas J; Wilson, Ken; Datla, Raju; Macherel, David; Jones, Nick S; Logan, David C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are defining components of most eukaryotes. However, higher plant mitochondria differ biochemically, morphologically, and dynamically from those in other eukaryotes. FRIENDLY, a member of the CLUSTERED MITOCHONDRIA superfamily, is conserved among eukaryotes and is required for correct distribution of mitochondria within the cell. We sought to understand how disruption of FRIENDLY function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to mitochondrial clustering and the effects of this aberrant chondriome on cell and whole-plant physiology. We present evidence for a role of FRIENDLY in mediating intermitochondrial association, which is a necessary prelude to mitochondrial fusion. We demonstrate that disruption of mitochondrial association, motility, and chondriome structure in friendly affects mitochondrial quality control and leads to mitochondrial stress, cell death, and strong growth phenotypes. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Supplementation with Vitamin E and Vitamin C inversely alters mitochondrial copy number and mitochondrial protein in obese, exercising rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E (VE) and vitamin C (VC) blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While obesity alters mitochondrial (MT) function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data...

  18. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction and altered autophagy in cardiovascular aging and disease: from mechanisms to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Csiszar, Anna; Dutta, Debapriya; Balagopal, Gauthami; Calvani, Riccardo; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-08-15

    Advanced age is associated with a disproportionate prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Intrinsic alterations in the heart and the vasculature occurring over the life course render the cardiovascular system more vulnerable to various stressors in late life, ultimately favoring the development of CVD. Several lines of evidence indicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a major contributor to cardiovascular senescence. Besides being less bioenergetically efficient, damaged mitochondria also produce increased amounts of reactive oxygen species, with detrimental structural and functional consequences for the cardiovascular system. The age-related accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondrial likely results from the combination of impaired clearance of damaged organelles by autophagy and inadequate replenishment of the cellular mitochondrial pool by mitochondriogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about relevant mechanisms and consequences of age-related mitochondrial decay and alterations in mitochondrial quality control in the cardiovascular system. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular conditions especially prevalent in late life and the emerging connections with neurodegeneration are also illustrated. Special emphasis is placed on recent discoveries on the role played by alterations in mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission), mitophagy, and their interconnections in the context of age-related CVD and endothelial dysfunction. Finally, we discuss pharmacological interventions targeting mitochondrial dysfunction to delay cardiovascular aging and manage CVD.

  19. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-09-03

    Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntington’s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  20. Alteration in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake disrupts insulin signaling in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Tomás; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Vasquez-Trincado, César; Morales, Pablo E; Lopez-Crisosto, Camila; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Chiong, Mario; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-11-07

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by alterations in both cardiac bioenergetics and insulin sensitivity. Insulin promotes glucose uptake by cardiomyocytes and its use as a substrate for glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidation in order to maintain the high cardiac energy demands. Insulin stimulates Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum, however, how this translates to changes in mitochondrial metabolism in either healthy or hypertrophic cardiomyocytes is not fully understood. In the present study we investigated insulin-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling in normal and norepinephrine or insulin like growth factor-1-induced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Using mitochondrion-selective Ca(2+)-fluorescent probes we showed that insulin increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels. This signal was inhibited by the pharmacological blockade of either the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor or the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, as well as by siRNA-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter knockdown. Norepinephrine-stimulated cardiomyocytes showed a significant decrease in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts compared to either control or insulin like growth factor-1-stimulated cells. This resulted in a reduction in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, Akt activation, glucose uptake and oxygen consumption in response to insulin. Blocking mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake was sufficient to mimic the effect of norepinephrine-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy on insulin signaling. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a key event in insulin signaling and metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

  1. Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Is Altered in Fibroblasts from Patients with Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María J.; Ponce, Daniela P.; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Behrens, Maria I.; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.

    2017-01-01

    The identification of an early biomarker to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains a challenge. Neuropathological studies in animal and AD patients have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of the development of the disease. Current studies suggest the use of peripheral tissues, like skin fibroblasts as a possibility to detect the early pathological alterations present in the AD brain. In this context, we studied mitochondrial function properties (bioenergetics and morphology) in cultured fibroblasts obtained from AD, aged-match and young healthy patients. We observed that AD fibroblasts presented a significant reduction in mitochondrial length with important changes in the expression of proteins that control mitochondrial fusion. Moreover, AD fibroblasts showed a distinct alteration in proteolytic processing of OPA1, a master regulator of mitochondrial fusion, compared to control fibroblasts. Complementary to these changes AD fibroblasts showed a dysfunctional mitochondrial bioenergetics profile that differentiates these cells from aged-matched and young patient fibroblasts. Our findings suggest that the human skin fibroblasts obtained from AD patients could replicate mitochondrial impairment observed in the AD brain. These promising observations suggest that the analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics could represent a promising strategy to develop new diagnostic methods in peripheral tissues of AD patients. PMID:29056898

  2. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  3. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced renal alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Domínguez, Bibiana; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Tapia, Edilia; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2017-09-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of diverse types of cancer, however, acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important side effect of this treatment. Diverse mechanisms have been involved in cisplatin-induced AKI, such as oxidative stress, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. On the other hand, curcumin is a polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L. Previous studies have shown that curcumin protects against the cisplatin-induced AKI; however, it is unknown whether curcumin can reduce alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamic in this model. It was found that curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced: (a) AKI and (b) alterations in the following mitochondrial parameters: bioenergetics, ultrastructure, hydrogen peroxide production and dynamic. In fact, curcumin prevented the increase of mitochondrial fission 1 protein (FIS1), the decrease of optic atrophy 1 protein (OPA1) and the decrease of NAD + -dependent deacetylase sirtuin-3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrial dynamic regulator as well as the increase in the mitophagy associated proteins parkin and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-induced putative kinase protein 1 (PINK1). In conclusion, the protective effect of curcumin in cisplatin-induced AKI was associated with the prevention of the alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics, ultrastructure, redox balance, dynamic, and SIRT3 levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinicopathological Implications of Mitochondrial Genome Alterations in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Gu; Kim, Yu-Na; Lee, Jun Hyung; Szardenings, Michael; Baek, Hee-Jo; Kook, Hoon; Kim, Hye-Ran; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2016-03-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the association between pediatric AML and mitochondrial aberrations has not been studied. We investigated various mitochondrial aberrations in pediatric AML and evaluated their impact on clinical outcomes. Sequencing, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number determination, mtDNA 4,977-bp large deletion assessments, and gene scan analyses were performed on the bone marrow mononuclear cells of 55 pediatric AML patients and on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 55 normal controls. Changes in the mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were also examined. mtDNA copy numbers were about two-fold higher in pediatric AML cells than in controls (Ppediatric AML. Intracellular ROS levels, mitochondrial mass, and mitochondrial membrane potentials were all elevated in pediatric AML. The frequency of the mtDNA 4,977-bp large deletion was significantly higher (Ppediatric AML cells, and pediatric AML patients harboring high amount of mtDNA 4,977-bp deletions showed shorter overall survival and event-free survival rates, albeit without statistical significance. The present findings demonstrate an association between mitochondrial genome alterations and the risk of pediatric AML.

  5. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Cristóbal-García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks and short-term (3 weeks effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW, OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water, OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW, or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident.

  6. IL-15Rα deficiency in skeletal muscle alters respiratory function and the proteome of mitochondrial subpopulations independent of changes to the mitochondrial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Grant C.; Nichols, Cody; Guo, Ge; Croston, Tara L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Hollander, John M.; Pistilli, Emidio E.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-15 receptor alpha knockout (IL15RαKO) mice exhibit a greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial density with an altered mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism and functional impact of these changes have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the functional, proteomic, and genomic alterations in mitochondrial subpopulations isolated from the skeletal muscles of IL15RαKO mice and B6129 background control mice. State 3 respiration was greater in interfibrillar mitochondria and whole muscle ATP levels were greater in IL15RαKO mice supporting the increases in respiration rate. However, the state 3/state 4 ratio was lower, suggesting some degree of respiratory uncoupling. Proteomic analyses identified several markers independently in mitochondrial subpopulations that are associated with these functional alterations. Next Generation Sequencing of mtDNA revealed a high degree of similarity between the mitochondrial genomes of IL15RαKO mice and controls in terms of copy number, consensus coding and the presence of minor alleles, suggesting that the functional and proteomic alterations we observed occur independent of alterations to the mitochondrial genome. These data provide additional evidence to implicate IL-15Rα as a regulator of skeletal muscle phenotypes through effects on the mitochondrion, and suggest these effects are driven by alterations to the mitochondrial proteome. PMID:26458787

  7. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-03-15

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity.

  8. Endotoxemia Engages the RhoA Kinase Pathway to Impair Cardiac Function By Altering Cytoskeleton, Mitochondrial Fission, and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preau, Sebastien; Delguste, Florian; Yu, Yichi; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Richard, Vincent; Saulnier, Fabienne; Boulanger, Eric; Neviere, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The RhoA/ROCK pathway controls crucial biological processes involved in cardiovascular pathophysiology, such as cytoskeleton dynamics, vascular smooth muscle contraction, and inflammation. In this work, we tested whether Rho kinase inhibition would beneficially impact cardiac cytoskeleton organization, bioenergetics, and autophagy in experimental endotoxemia induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in mice. Fasudil, a potent ROCK inhibitor, prevented LPS-induced cardiac inflammation, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton disarray, and mitochondrial injury. ROCK inhibition prevented phosphorylation of cofilin and dynamin-related protein-1, which promotes stabilization-polymerization of F-actin and mediates mitochondrial fission, respectively. Pyr1, which exclusively alters actin dynamics, prevented LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction, suggesting that beneficial impact of ROCK inhibition was not mainly related to pleiotropic effects of fasudil on cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress. Fasudil reduced mitochondrial fragmentation, stimulated initiation of autophagy, and elicited cardioprotection in LPS heart. Mdivi-1, a potent mitochondria fission inhibitor, converted cardioprotective autophagy to an inefficient form due to cargo loading failure in which autophagic vacuoles fail to trap cytosolic cargo, despite their formation at enhanced rates and lysosomal elimination. In experimental endotoxemia, cardioprotection by RhoA/ROCK inhibition may be related to changes in actin cytoskeleton reorganization and mitochondrial homeostasis. Improvement of LPS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction by fasudil was attributed to inhibition of ROCK-dependent Drp1 phosphorylation and activation of autophagic processes that can limit mitochondrial fragmentation and enhance degradation of damaged mitochondria, respectively. Fasudil prevented LPS-induced heart oxidative stress, abnormal F-actin distribution, and oxidative phosphorylation, which concur to improve cardiac contractile and

  9. Maternal high fat diet alters skeletal muscle mitochondrial catalytic activity in adult male rat offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Anne Pileggi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A maternal high-fat (HF diet during pregnancy can lead to metabolic compromise such as insulin resistance in adult offspring. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is one mechanism contributing to metabolic impairments in insulin resistant states. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in metabolically compromised offspring born to HF-fed dams. Sprague-Dawley dams were randomly assigned to receive a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat or a high fat diet (HFD; 45% kcal from fat for 10 days prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and during lactation. From weaning, all male offspring received a standard chow diet and soleus muscle was collected at day 150. Expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA were downregulated in HF offspring. Furthermore, genes encoding the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS respiratory complex subunits were supressed in HF offspring. Moreover, protein expression of the complex I subunit, NDUFB8, was downregulated in HF offspring (36%, which was paralleled by decreased maximal catalytic linked activity of complex I and III (40%. Together, these results indicate that exposure to a maternal HF diet during development may elicit lifelong mitochondrial alterations in offspring skeletal muscle.

  10. The Alterations in Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Genes in Rat Brain Structures after Cocaine Self-Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Kotarska, Agnieszka; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Jastrzębska, Joanna; Wydra, Karolina; Miszkiel, Joanna; Przegaliński, Edmund; Filip, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    The repeated intake of cocaine evokes oxidative stress that is present even during drug withdrawal. Recent studies demonstrate that cocaine-induced oxidative and/or endoplasmic reticulum stress can affect mitochondrial function and dynamics as well as the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes. These alterations in mitochondrial function may determine synaptic and behavioral plasticity. Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) seem to play an important role in the initiation of drug addiction. We used a microarray approach to investigate the expression patterns of nuclear-encoded genes relevant for mitochondrial functions and quantitative real-time PCR assays to determine the numbers of copies of mtDNA and of mRNAs corresponding to two mitochondrial proteins in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats during early cocaine abstinence. We found a significant elevation in the copy number of mtDNA and concomitant increased expression of mitochondrial genes. Moreover, microarray analysis revealed changes in the transcription of nuclear genes engaged in mtDNA replication, nucleoid formation, the oxidative phosphorylation pathway, and mitochondrial fission and fusion. Finally, we observed the upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced genes. Cocaine self-administration influences the expression of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes as well as mtDNA replication. To determine whether these alterations serve as compensatory mechanisms to help maintain normal level of ATP production, further studies are necessary.

  11. Mitochondrial alterations in PINK1 deficient cells are influenced by calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of dynamin-related protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sandebring

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available PTEN-induced novel kinase 1 (PINK1 mutations are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Previous studies have shown that PINK1 influences both mitochondrial function and morphology although it is not clearly established which of these are primary events and which are secondary. Here, we describe a novel mechanism linking mitochondrial dysfunction and alterations in mitochondrial morphology related to PINK1. Cell lines were generated by stably transducing human dopaminergic M17 cells with lentiviral constructs that increased or knocked down PINK1. As in previous studies, PINK1 deficient cells have lower mitochondrial membrane potential and are more sensitive to the toxic effects of mitochondrial complex I inhibitors. We also show that wild-type PINK1, but not recessive mutant or kinase dead versions, protects against rotenone-induced mitochondrial fragmentation whereas PINK1 deficient cells show lower mitochondrial connectivity. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 exaggerates PINK1 deficiency phenotypes and Drp1 RNAi rescues them. We also show that Drp1 is dephosphorylated in PINK1 deficient cells due to activation of the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Accordingly, the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 blocks both Drp1 dephosphorylation and loss of mitochondrial integrity in PINK1 deficient cells but does not fully rescue mitochondrial membrane potential. We propose that alterations in mitochondrial connectivity in this system are secondary to functional effects on mitochondrial membrane potential.

  12. Mitochondrial Alterations and Oxidative Stress in an Acute Transient Mouse Model of Muscle Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases. PMID:24220031

  13. The role of mitochondrial DNA alterations in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Sung; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Wang, Liang-Shun; Chou, Teh-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Wu, Yu-Chung; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2010-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the roles of mitochondrial DNA alterations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, with emphasis on the changes in the copy number and D310 variants of mitochondrial DNA. Paired samples microdissected from esophageal muscles, noncancerous esophageal mucosa, cancerous esophageal squamous cell carcinoma nests, and metastatic lymph nodes of 72 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were subjected to DNA extraction. The copy number and D310 variants of mitochondrial DNA were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing, respectively. Fifty-six patients (77.8%) with somatic D310 mutations had lower survival probability (P = .027). From noncancerous esophageal mucosa to cancerous esophageal squamous cell carcinoma nests and metastatic lymph nodes, the D310 variants were decreased from 2.2 to 1.7 and 1.5, respectively, with a trend to homoplasmy (P = .0009). Concurrently, the mitochondrial DNA copy number was increased from 0.159 to 0.192 and 0.206, respectively, (P = .024), especially in cigarette smokers (P = .014) and heavy wine drinkers (P = .005). Notably, a decrease in D310 variants (1.5, P instability and clonal expansion during the carcinogenesis and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma from the viewpoint of mitochondrial DNA transmission. Copyright 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Maternal diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial activity and redox status in mouse oocytes and zygotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Igosheva

    Full Text Available The negative impact of obesity on reproductive success is well documented but the stages at which development of the conceptus is compromised and the mechanisms responsible for the developmental failure still remain unclear. Recent findings suggest that mitochondria may be a contributing factor. However to date no studies have directly addressed the consequences of maternal obesity on mitochondria in early embryogenesis.Using an established murine model of maternal diet induced obesity and a live cell dynamic fluorescence imaging techniques coupled with molecular biology we have investigated the underlying mechanisms of obesity-induced reduced fertility. Our study is the first to show that maternal obesity prior to conception is associated with altered mitochondria in mouse oocytes and zygotes. Specifically, maternal diet-induced obesity in mice led to an increase in mitochondrial potential, mitochondrial DNA content and biogenesis. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was raised while glutathione was depleted and the redox state became more oxidised, suggestive of oxidative stress. These altered mitochondrial properties were associated with significant developmental impairment as shown by the increased number of obese mothers who failed to support blastocyst formation compared to lean dams. We propose that compromised oocyte and early embryo mitochondrial metabolism, resulting from excessive nutrient exposure prior to and during conception, may underlie poor reproductive outcomes frequently reported in obese women.

  15. ATAD3 gene cluster deletions cause cerebellar dysfunction associated with altered mitochondrial DNA and cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Radha; Frazier, Ann E; Durigon, Romina; Patel, Harshil; Jones, Aleck W; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Lake, Nicole J; Compton, Alison G; Mountford, Hayley S; Tucker, Elena J; Mitchell, Alice L R; Jackson, Deborah; Sesay, Abdul; Di Re, Miriam; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Burke, Derek; Francis, David; Lunke, Sebastian; McGillivray, George; Mandelstam, Simone; Mochel, Fanny; Keren, Boris; Jardel, Claude; Turner, Anne M; Ian Andrews, P; Smeitink, Jan; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Heales, Simon J; Kohda, Masakazu; Ohtake, Akira; Murayama, Kei; Okazaki, Yasushi; Lombès, Anne; Holt, Ian J; Thorburn, David R; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2017-06-01

    Although mitochondrial disorders are clinically heterogeneous, they frequently involve the central nervous system and are among the most common neurogenetic disorders. Identifying the causal genes has benefited enormously from advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies; however, once the defect is known, researchers face the challenge of deciphering the underlying disease mechanism. Here we characterize large biallelic deletions in the region encoding the ATAD3C, ATAD3B and ATAD3A genes. Although high homology complicates genomic analysis of the ATAD3 defects, they can be identified by targeted analysis of standard single nucleotide polymorphism array and whole exome sequencing data. We report deletions that generate chimeric ATAD3B/ATAD3A fusion genes in individuals from four unrelated families with fatal congenital pontocerebellar hypoplasia, whereas a case with genomic rearrangements affecting the ATAD3C/ATAD3B genes on one allele and ATAD3B/ATAD3A genes on the other displays later-onset encephalopathy with cerebellar atrophy, ataxia and dystonia. Fibroblasts from affected individuals display mitochondrial DNA abnormalities, associated with multiple indicators of altered cholesterol metabolism. Moreover, drug-induced perturbations of cholesterol homeostasis cause mitochondrial DNA disorganization in control cells, while mitochondrial DNA aggregation in the genetic cholesterol trafficking disorder Niemann-Pick type C disease further corroborates the interdependence of mitochondrial DNA organization and cholesterol. These data demonstrate the integration of mitochondria in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in which ATAD3 plays a critical role. The dual problem of perturbed cholesterol metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction could be widespread in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  16. Metaxin deficiency alters mitochondrial membrane permeability and leads to resistance to TNF-induced cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Koh; Wang, Xiaofei; Kim, Sung Ouk; Armstrong, Lucas C; Bornstein, Paul; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-02-01

    Metaxin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, is critical for TNF-induced cell death in L929 cells. Its deficiency, caused by retroviral insertion-mediated mutagenesis, renders L929 cells resistance to TNF killing. In this study, we further characterized metaxin deficiency-caused TNF resistance in parallel with Bcl-X(L) overexpression-mediated death resistance. We did not find obvious change in mitochondria membrane potential in metaxin-deficient (Met(mut)) and Bcl-X(L)-overexpressing cells, but we did find an increase in the release rate of the mitochondrial membrane potential probe rhodamine 123 (Rh123) that was preloaded into mitochondria. In addition, overexpression of a function-interfering mutant of metaxin (MetaΔTM/C) or Bcl-X(L) in MCF-7.3.28 cells also resulted in an acquired resistance to TNF killing and a faster rate of Rh123 release, indicating a close correlation between TNF resistance and higher rates of the dye release from the mitochondria. The release of Rh123 can be controlled by the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (PT) pore, as targeting an inner membrane component of the PT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited Rh123 release. However, metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression apparently affect Rh123 release from a site(s) different from that of CsA, as CsA can overcome their effect. Though both metaxin and Bcl-X(L) appear to function on the outer mitochondrial membrane, they do not interact with each other. They may use different mechanisms to increase the permeability of Rh123, since previous studies have suggested that metaxin may influence certain outer membrane porins while Bcl-X(L) may form pores on the outer membrane. The alteration of the mitochondrial outer membrane properties by metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression, as indicated by a quicker Rh123 release, may be helpful in maintaining mitochondrial integrity.

  17. Increased Hemodynamic Load in Early Embryonic Stages Alters Myofibril and Mitochondrial Organization in the Myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Midgett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal blood flow is essential for proper heart formation during embryonic development, as abnormal hemodynamic load (blood pressure and shear stress results in cardiac defects seen in congenital heart disease (CHD. However, the detrimental remodeling processes that relate altered blood flow to cardiac malformation and defects remain unclear. Heart development is a finely orchestrated process with rapid transformations that occur at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. Myocardial cells play an essential role in cardiac tissue maturation by aligning in the direction of stretch and increasing the number of contractile units as hemodynamic load increases throughout development. This study elucidates the early effects of altered blood flow on myofibril and mitochondrial configuration in the outflow tract myocardium in vivo. Outflow tract banding was used to increase hemodynamic load in the chicken embryo heart between Hamburger and Hamilton stages 18 and 24 (~24 h during tubular heart stages. 3D focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy analysis determined that increased hemodynamic load induced changes in the developing myocardium, characterized by thicker myofibril bundles that were more disbursed in circumferential orientation, and mitochondria that organized in large clusters around the nucleus. Proteomic mass-spectrometry analysis quantified altered protein composition after banding that is consistent with altered myofibril thin filament assembly and function, and mitochondrial maintenance and organization. Additionally, pathway analysis of the proteomics data identified possible activation of signaling pathways in response to banding, including the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. Imaging and proteomic data combined indicate that myofibril and mitochondrial arrangement in early embryonic stages is a critical developmental process that when disturbed by altered blood flow may contribute to cardiac malformation and defects.

  18. Mitochondrial Morphofunctional Alterations in Smooth Muscle Cells of Aorta in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarán, Mariana; Llorens, Candelaria; Balceda, Ariel; Scribano, María de La Paz; Pons, Patricia; Moya, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    In an experimental model of atherogenesis induced by hyperfibrinogenemia (HF), the pharmacological response of vitamin E was studied in order to assess its antioxidant effect on the mitochondrial morphofunctional alterations in aortic smooth muscle cells. Three groups of male rats were used: (Ctr) control, (AI) atherogenesis induced for 120 days, and (AIE) atherogenesis induced for 120 days and treated with vitamin E. HF was induced by adrenalin injection (0.1 mg/day/rat) for 120 days. AIE group was treated with the administration of 3.42 mg/day/rat of vitamin E for 105 days after the first induction. Mitochondria morphology was analyzed by electronic microscopy (EM) and mitochondrial complexes (MC) by spectrophotometry. In group AI the total and mean number of mitochondria reduced significantly, the intermembranous matrix increased, and swelling was observed with respect to Ctr and AIE (P < 0.01). These damages were related to a significant decrease in the activity of citrate synthase and complexes I, II, III, and IV in group AI in comparison to Ctr (P < 0.001). Similar behavior was presented by group AI compared to AIE (P < 0.001). These results show that vitamin E produces a significative regression of inflammatory and oxidative stress process and it resolved the morphofunctional mitochondrial alterations in this experimental model of atherogenic disease. PMID:24653842

  19. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, Charles S.; Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator1α (PGC-1α). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1α hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5

  20. Distribution of mitochondrial nucleoids upon mitochondrial network fragmentation and network reintegration in HEPG2 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tauber, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Šantorová, Jitka; Smolková, Katarína; Alán, Lukáš; Špaček, Tomáš; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Ježek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2013), s. 593-603 ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial DNA nucleoids * mitochondrial fission * mitochondrial network fragmentation * mitochondrial network reintegration Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.240, year: 2013

  1. Alterations in Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Mitophagy in Subjects with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhansali, Shipra; Bhansali, Anil; Walia, Rama; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Dhawan, Veena

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress impedes cell-reparative process like autophagy, which has been implicated in impairment of β-cell function in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the role of mitophagy (selective mitochondrial autophagy) in progression of hyperglycemia remains elusive. This study aimed to assess the impact of increasing severity of hyperglycemia on mitochondrial stress and mitophagy. A case-control study included healthy controls, subjects with prediabetes, newly diagnosed T2DM (NDT2DM) and advanced duration of T2DM (ADT2DM) ( n  = 20 each). Mitochondrial stress indices, transcriptional and translational expression of mitophagy markers ( PINK1, PARKIN, MFN2, NIX, LC3-II , and LAMP-2 ) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies were performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With mild hyperglycemia in subjects with prediabetes, to moderate to severe hyperglycemia in NDT2DM and ADT2DM, a progressive rise in mitochondrial oxidative stress was observed. Prediabetic subjects exhibited significantly increased expression of mitophagy-related markers and showed a positive association with HOMA-β, whereas, patients with NDT2DM and ADT2DM demonstrated decreased expression, with a greater decline in ADT2DM subjects. TEM studies revealed significantly reduced number of distorted mitochondria in prediabetics, as compared to the T2DM patients. In addition, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed HbA 1C  > 7% (53 mmol/mol) was associated with attenuated mitophagy. Increasing hyperglycemia is associated with progressive rise in oxidative stress and altered mitochondrial morphology. Sustenance of mitophagy at HbA 1C  < 7% (53 mmol/mol) strengthens the rationale of achieving HbA 1C below this cutoff for good glycemic control. An "adaptive" increase in mitophagy may delay progression to T2DM by preserving the β-cell function in subjects with prediabetes.

  2. Alterations in Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Mitophagy in Subjects with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Bhansali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimHyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress impedes cell-reparative process like autophagy, which has been implicated in impairment of β-cell function in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, the role of mitophagy (selective mitochondrial autophagy in progression of hyperglycemia remains elusive. This study aimed to assess the impact of increasing severity of hyperglycemia on mitochondrial stress and mitophagy.Design and methodsA case–control study included healthy controls, subjects with prediabetes, newly diagnosed T2DM (NDT2DM and advanced duration of T2DM (ADT2DM (n = 20 each. Mitochondrial stress indices, transcriptional and translational expression of mitophagy markers (PINK1, PARKIN, MFN2, NIX, LC3-II, and LAMP-2 and transmission electron microscopic (TEM studies were performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.ResultsWith mild hyperglycemia in subjects with prediabetes, to moderate to severe hyperglycemia in NDT2DM and ADT2DM, a progressive rise in mitochondrial oxidative stress was observed. Prediabetic subjects exhibited significantly increased expression of mitophagy-related markers and showed a positive association with HOMA-β, whereas, patients with NDT2DM and ADT2DM demonstrated decreased expression, with a greater decline in ADT2DM subjects. TEM studies revealed significantly reduced number of distorted mitochondria in prediabetics, as compared to the T2DM patients. In addition, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed HbA1C > 7% (53 mmol/mol was associated with attenuated mitophagy.ConclusionIncreasing hyperglycemia is associated with progressive rise in oxidative stress and altered mitochondrial morphology. Sustenance of mitophagy at HbA1C < 7% (53 mmol/mol strengthens the rationale of achieving HbA1C below this cutoff for good glycemic control. An “adaptive” increase in mitophagy may delay progression to T2DM by preserving the β-cell function in subjects with prediabetes.

  3. Geographical distribution of a specific mitochondrial haplotype of Zymoseptoria tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh BOUKEF

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Severity of disease caused by the fungus Zymoseptoria tritici throughout world cereal growing regions has elicited much debate on the potential evolutionary mechanism conferring high adaptability of the pathogen to diverse climate conditions and different wheat hosts (Triticum durum and T. aestivum. Specific mitochondrial DNA sequence was used to investigate geographic distribution of the type 4 haplotype (mtRFLP4 within 1363 isolates of Z. tritici originating from 21 countries. The mtRFLP4 haplotype was detected from both durum and bread wheat hosts with greater frequency on durum wheat. The distribution of mtRFLP4 was limited to populations sampled from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea region. Greater frequencies of mtRFLP4 were found in Tunisia (87% and Algeria (60%. The haplotype was absent within European, Australian, North and South American populations except Argentina. While alternative hypotheses such as climatic adaptation could not be ruled out, it is postulated that mtRFLP4 originated in North Africa (e.g. Tunisia or Algeria as an adaptation to durum wheat as the prevailing cereal crop. The specialized haplotype has subsequently spread as indicated by lower frequency of occurrence in the surrounding Mediterranean countries and on bread wheat hosts.

  4. Do Alterations in Mitochondrial DNA Play a Role in Breast Carcinogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Rohan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports a role for oxidative stress in breast carcinogenesis. Due to their role in producing energy via oxidative phosphorylation, the mitochondria are a major source of production of reactive oxygen species, which may damage DNA. The mitochondrial genome may be particularly susceptible to oxidative damage leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Genetic variants in mtDNA and nuclear DNA may also contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we address the role of alterations in mtDNA in the etiology of breast cancer. Several studies have shown a relatively high frequency of mtDNA mutations in breast tumor tissue in comparison with mutations in normal breast tissue. To date, several studies have examined the association of genetic variants in mtDNA and breast cancer risk. The G10398A mtDNA polymorphism has received the most attention and has been shown to be associated with increased risk in some studies. Other variants have generally been examined in only one or two studies. Genome-wide association studies may help identify new mtDNA variants which modify breast cancer risk. In addition to assessing the main effects of specific variants, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are likely to explain a greater proportion of the variability in breast cancer risk.

  5. Does high-sucrose diet alter skeletal muscle and liver mitochondrial respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, K; Py, G; Robert, E; Mercier, J

    2003-09-01

    A diet high in sucrose or fructose progressively impairs glucose and lipid metabolism, which leads to insulin resistance. As mitochondria are the sites of the oxidation and utilization of these substrates, we hypothesized that a high sucrose diet would alter mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were fed high-sucrose (SU) or control (CTL) diet for one week; mitochondrial respiration was investigated in mitochondria isolated from liver and both glycolytic and oxidative muscles, with pyruvate and palmitate as substrates. To test for metabolic disturbances, we measured not only glycogen content in muscles and liver, but also lactate, glucose and triglyceride blood concentrations. After one week of high-sucrose intake, we found no change in blood concentration of these variables, but glycogen content was significantly increased in liver (17.28 +/- 2.98 mg/g tissue SU vs 6.47 +/- 1.67 mg/g tissue CTL), oxidative muscle (1.59 +/- 0.21 mg/g tissue SU vs 0.70 +/- 0.24 mg/g tissue CTL) though not in glycolytic muscle (1.72 +/- 0.44 mg/g tissue SU vs 1.52 +/- 0.20 mg/g tissue CTL). State 3 mitochondrial respiration was significantly decreased in SU rats compared with CTL (p respiration could contributed to the development of insulin resistance.

  6. CHOP THERAPY INDUCED MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE ALTERATION IN NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA XENOGRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. N. XU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We are interested in investigating whether cancer therapy may alter the mitochondrial redox state in cancer cells to inhibit their growth and survival. The redox state can be imaged by the redox scanner that collects the fluorescence signals from both the oxidized-flavoproteins (Fp and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH in snap-frozen tissues and has been previously employed to study tumor aggressiveness and treatment responses. Here, with the redox scanner we investigated the effects of chemotherapy on mouse xenografts of a human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line (DLCL2. The mice were treated with CHOP therapy, i.e., cyclophosphamide (C + hydroxydoxorubicin (H + Oncovin (O + prednisone (P with CHO administration on day 1 and prednisone administration on days 1–5. The Fp content of the treated group was significantly decreased (p = 0.033 on day 5, and the mitochondrial redox state of the treated group was slightly more reduced than that of the control group (p = 0.048. The decrease of the Fp heterogeneity (measured by the mean standard deviation had a border-line statistical significance (p = 0.071. The result suggests that the mitochondrial metabolism of lymphoma cells was slightly suppressed and the lymphomas became less aggressive after the CHOP therapy.

  7. Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Alterations in Newborns with Prenatal Exposure to Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pirini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborns exposed to maternal cigarette smoke (CS in utero have an increased risk of developing chronic diseases, cancer, and acquiring decreased cognitive function in adulthood. Although the literature reports many deleterious effects associated with maternal cigarette smoking on the fetus, the molecular alterations and mechanisms of action are not yet clear. Smoking may act directly on nuclear DNA by inducing mutations or epigenetic modifications. Recent studies also indicate that smoking may act on mitochondrial DNA by inducing a change in the number of copies to make up for the damage caused by smoking on the respiratory chain and lack of energy. In addition, individual genetic susceptibility plays a significant role in determining the effects of smoking during development. Furthermore, prior exposure of paternal and maternal gametes to cigarette smoke may affect the health of the developing individual, not only the in utero exposure. This review examines the genetic and epigenetic alterations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA associated with smoke exposure during the most sensitive periods of development (prior to conception, prenatal and early postnatal and assesses how such changes may have consequences for both fetal growth and development.

  8. Gestational protein restriction induces alterations in placental morphology and mitochondrial function in rats during late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelato, Hércules Jonas; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marreto; Moraes, Camila; Amaral, Maria Esmeria Corezola; Catisti, Rosana

    2013-12-01

    The placenta acts a regulator of nutrient composition and supply from mother to fetus and is the source of hormonal signals that affect maternal and fetal metabolism. Thus, appropriate development of the placenta is crucial for normal fetal development. We investigated the effect of gestational protein restriction (GPR) on placental morphology and mitochondrial function on day 19 of gestation. Pregnant dams were divided into two groups: normal (NP 17 % casein) or low-protein diet (LP 6 % casein). The placentas were processed for biochemical, histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis. The integrity of rat placental mitochondria (RPM) isolated by conventional differential centrifugation was measured by oxygen uptake (Clark-type electrode). LP animals presented an increase in adipose tissue and triacylglycerol and a decrease in serum insulin levels. No alterations were observed in body, liver, fetus, or placenta weight. There was also no change in serum glucose, total protein, or lipid content. Gestational protein restriction had tissue-specific respiratory effects, with the observation of a small change in liver respiration (~13 %) and considerable respiratory inhibition in placenta samples (~37 %). The higher oxygen uptake by RPM in the LP groups suggests uncoupling between respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, ultrastructural analysis of junctional zone giant cells from LP placenta showed a disorganized cytoplasm, with loss of integrity of most organelles and intense vacuolization. The present results led us to hypothesize that GPR alters placental structure and morphology, induces sensitivity to insulin, mitochondrial abnormalities and suggests premature aging of the placenta. Further studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  9. Altered mitochondrial function after acute alteration of the endogenous insulin/glucagon ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohweder-Dunn, G.; Aprille, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Mannoheptulose (MH) affects pancreatic Islet cells to cause a drop in serum insulin and a rise in glucagon. This effect peaks 1 hr after injection and results in a 3-fold increase in serum glucose. Here they examined whether metabolic functions of liver mitochondria (mito) are altered by this change in hormone status. Rats fed ad lib on 12 hr light/dark cycles were given MH (2g/kg) or vehicle i.p. during the first 2 hrs of the light cycle. Liver mito were isolated 1 hr later. Acid-extracts were assayed for ATP+ADP+AMP (nmol/mg prot). Citrulline synthesis and pyruvate carboxylation rates (nmol/min/mg prot) were assayed by following H[ 14 C]O 3 - fixation in appropriate media. State 3 and 2,4-DNP-uncoupled respiratory rates (1/2 nmol O 2 /min/mg prot) were assayed polarographically with succinate. The effects of MH on mito are comparable to reported effects of glucagon injection. MH evokes acute reciprocal changes in insulin and glucagon that are highly reproducible. Thus, MH offers an interesting model for studying the effect of endogenous hormones on mito functions

  10. Calcium-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial-endoplasmic reticulum contacts in rat brown adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Golic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are key organelles maintaining cellular bioenergetics and integrity, and their regulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis has been investigated in many cell types. We investigated the short-term Ca-SANDOZ® treatment on brown adipocyte mitochondria, using imaging and molecular biology techniques. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Ca-SANDOZ® drinking or tap water (control drinking for three days. Alizarin Red S staining showed increased Ca2+ level in the brown adipocytes of treated rats, and potassium pyroantimonate staining localized electron-dense regions in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and around lipid droplets. Ca-SANDOZ® decreased mitochondrial number, but increased their size and mitochondrial cristae volume. Transmission electron microscopy revealed numerous enlarged and fusioned-like mitochondria in the Ca-SANDOZ® treated group compared to the control, and megamitochondria in some brown adipocytes. The Ca2+ diet affected mitochondrial fusion as mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and mitofusin 2 (MFN2 were increased, and mitochondrial fission as dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1 was decreased. Confocal microscopy showed a higher colocalization rate between functional mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The level of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1 was elevated, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. These results suggest that Ca-SANDOZ® stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial-ER contacts and the thermogenic capacity of brown adipocytes

  11. Kalpaamruthaa ameliorates mitochondrial and metabolic alterations in diabetes mellitus induced cardiovascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, Raja; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2014-12-01

    Efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa on the activities of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, electron transport chain complexes and mitochondrial ATPases were studied in heart and liver of experimental rats. Cardiovascular damage (CVD) was developed in 8 weeks after type 2 diabetes mellitus induction with high fat diet (2 weeks) and low dose of streptozotocin (2 × 35 mg/kg b.w. i.p. in 24 hr interval). In CVD-induced rats, the activities of total lipase, cholesterol ester hydrolase and cholesterol ester synthetase were increased, while lipoprotein lipase and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activities were decreased. The activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes were altered by Kalpaamruthaa in CVD-induced rats towards normal. Kalpaamruthaa modulated the activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphogluco-isomerase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase) and glycogenolytic enzyme (glycogen phosphorylase) along with increased glycogen content in the liver of CVD-induced rats. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, Complexes and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) were decreased in CVD-induced rats, which were ameliorated by the treatment with Kalpaamruthaa. This study ascertained the efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa for the treatment of CVD in diabetes through the modulation of metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  12. Distributed and Conditional Documents: Conceptualizing Bibliographical Alterities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Drucker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To conceptualize a future history of the book we have to recognize that our understanding of the bibliographical object of the past is challenged by the ontologically unbound, distributed, digital, and networked conditions of the present. As we draw on rich intellectual traditions, we must keep in view the need to let go of the object-centered approach that is at the heart of book history. My argument begins, therefore, with a few assertions. First, that we have much to learn from the scholarship on Old and New World contact that touches on bibliography, document studies, and book history for formulating a non-object centered conception of what a book is. Second, that the insights from these studies can be usefully combined with a theory of the “conditional” document to develop the model of the kinds of distributed artifacts we encounter on a daily basis in the networked conditions of current practices. Finally, I would suggest that this model provides a different conception of artifacts (books, documents, works of textual or graphic art, one in which reception is production and therefore all materiality is subject to performative engagement within varied, and specific, conditions of encounter.

  13. Distribution of mitochondrial clades and morphotypes of baboons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent genetic studies, using maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, indicate a complex evolutionary history for baboons Papio spp. in general, and for eastern African baboons in particular. To further address this topic and to improve our understanding of phylogeographic patterns of baboons in eastern Africa, ...

  14. Chlorella diet alters mitochondrial cardiolipin contents differentially in organs of Danio rerio analyzed by a lipidomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Jen; Wu, Wen-Hsin; Balazova, Maria; Wu, Ting-Yuan; Lin, Jamie; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2018-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important and widely used vertebrate model organism for the study of human diseases which include disorders caused by dysfunctional mitochondria. Mitochondria play an essential role in both energy metabolism and apoptosis, which are mediated through a mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin (CL). In order to examine the cardiolipin profile in the zebrafish model, we developed a CL analysis platform by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Meanwhile, we tested whether chlorella diet would alter the CL profile in the larval fish, and in various organs of the adult fish. The results showed that chlorella diet increased the chain length of CL in larval fish. In the adult zebrafish, the distribution patterns of CL species were similar between the adult brain and eye tissues, and between the heart and muscles. Interestingly, monolyso-cardiolipin (MLCL) was not detected in brain and eyes but found in other examined tissues, indicating a different remodeling mechanism to maintain the CL integrity. While the adult zebrafish were fed with chlorella for four weeks, the CL distribution showed an increase of the species of saturated acyl chains in the brain and eyes, but a decrease in the other organs. Moreover, chlorella diet led to a decrease of MLCL percentage in organs except the non-MLCL-containing brain and eyes. The CL analysis in the zebrafish provides an important tool for studying the mechanism of mitochondria diseases, and may also be useful for testing medical regimens targeting against the Barth Syndrome. PMID:29494608

  15. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Mitochondrial Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Suárez-Rivero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are very versatile organelles in continuous fusion and fission processes in response to various cellular signals. Mitochondrial dynamics, including mitochondrial fission/fusion, movements and turnover, are essential for the mitochondrial network quality control. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can cause neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in which mitochondrial fusion and transport are impaired, or dominant optic atrophy which is caused by a reduced mitochondrial fusion. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction in primary mitochondrial diseases promotes reactive oxygen species production that impairs its own function and dynamics, causing a continuous vicious cycle that aggravates the pathological phenotype. Mitochondrial dynamics provides a new way to understand the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disorders and other diseases related to mitochondria dysfunction such as diabetes, heart failure, or Hungtinton’s disease. The knowledge about mitochondrial dynamics also offers new therapeutics targets in mitochondrial diseases.

  16. Oxygen glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slice cultures results in alterations in carnitine homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Rau

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neuroprotective. Thus, this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which HI alters carnitine metabolism and to begin to elucidate the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine (LCAR supplementation. Utilizing neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures we found that oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD decreased the levels of free carnitines (FC and increased the acylcarnitine (AC: FC ratio. These changes in carnitine homeostasis correlated with decreases in the protein levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT 1 and 2. LCAR supplementation prevented the decrease in CPT1 and CPT2, enhanced both FC and the AC∶FC ratio and increased slice culture metabolic viability, the mitochondrial membrane potential prior to OGD and prevented the subsequent loss of neurons during later stages of reperfusion through a reduction in apoptotic cell death. Finally, we found that LCAR supplementation preserved the structural integrity and synaptic transmission within the hippocampus after OGD. Thus, we conclude that LCAR supplementation preserves the key enzymes responsible for maintaining carnitine homeostasis and preserves both cell viability and synaptic transmission after OGD.

  17. Early Stress History Alters Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and Impairs Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Adult Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Banerjee, K K; Vaidya, V A; Kolthur-Seetharam, U

    2016-09-01

    Early-life adversity is associated with an enhanced risk for adult psychopathology. Psychiatric disorders such as depression exhibit comorbidity for metabolic dysfunction, including obesity and diabetes. However, it is poorly understood whether, besides altering anxiety and depression-like behaviour, early stress also evokes dysregulation of metabolic pathways and enhances vulnerability for metabolic disorders. We used the rodent model of the early stress of maternal separation (ES) to examine the effects of early stress on serum metabolites, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signalling, and muscle mitochondrial content. Adult ES animals exhibited dyslipidaemia, decreased serum IGF1 levels, increased expression of liver IGF binding proteins, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, including Pck1, Lpl, Pdk4 and Hmox1. These changes occurred in the absence of alterations in body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance or insulin levels. ES animals also exhibited a decline in markers of muscle mitochondrial content, such as mitochondrial DNA levels and expression of TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial). Furthermore, the expression of several genes involved in mitochondrial function, such as Ppargc1a, Nrf1, Tfam, Cat, Sesn3 and Ucp3, was reduced in skeletal muscle. Adult-onset chronic unpredictable stress resulted in overlapping and distinct consequences from ES, including increased circulating triglyceride levels, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, with no change in the expression of genes involved in muscle mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results indicate that a history of early adversity can evoke persistent changes in circulating IGF-1 and muscle mitochondrial function and content, which could serve to enhance predisposition for metabolic dysfunction in adulthood. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  18. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked reduction in dendritic complexity. Disrupting postnatal mitochondrial distribution in vivo by deleting Miro1 in mature neurons causes a progressive loss of distal dendrites and compromises neuronal survival. Thus, the local availability of mitochondrial mass is critical for generating and sustaining dendritic arbors, and disruption of mitochondrial distribution in mature neurons is associated with neurodegeneration.

  19. Mdp1, a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene Involved in Mitochondrial/Cytoplasmic Protein Distribution, Is Identical to the Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Gene Rsp5

    OpenAIRE

    Zoladek, T.; Tobiasz, A.; Vaduva, G.; Boguta, M.; Martin, N. C.; Hopper, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    Alteration of the subcellular distribution of Mod5p-I, a tRNA modification enzyme, member of the sorting isozyme family, affects tRNA-mediated nonsense suppression. Altered suppression efficiency was used to identify MDP genes, which, when mutant, change the mitochondrial/cytosolic distribution of Mod5p-I,KR6. MDP2 is the previously identified VRP1, which encodes verprolin, required for proper organization of the actin cytoskeleton. MDP3 is identical to PAN1, which encodes a protein involved ...

  20. Physical activity prevents alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure and glucometabolic parameters in a high-sugar diet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Barbosa de Queiroz

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise is a remarkable intervention for the treatment of many diseases. Mitochondrial changes on skeletal muscle are likely important for many of the benefits provided by exercise. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects that a regular physical activity (swimming without workload has on mitochondrial morphological alterations and glucometabolic parameters induced by a high-sugar diet (HSD. Weaned male Wistar rats fed with a standard diet or a HSD (68% carbohydrate were subjected to 60 minutes of regular physical activity by swimming (without workload for four- (20 sessions or eight-week (40 sessions periods. After training, animals were euthanized and the sera, adipose tissues, and skeletal muscles were collected for further analysis. The HSD increased body weight after an 8-week period; it also increased the fat pads and the adipose index, resulting in glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR. Transmission electron microscopy showed an increase in alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure in the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as a decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and an increase in protein carbonylation. Regular physical activity partially reverted these alterations in rats fed a HSD, preventing mitochondrial morphological alterations and IR. Moreover, we observed a decrease in Pgc1α expression (qPCR analysis in STD-EXE group and a less pronounced reduction in HSD-EXE group after an 8-week period. Thus, regular physical activity (swimming without workload in rats fed a HSD can prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and IR, highlighting the crucial role for physical activity on metabolic homeostasis.

  1. UBIAD1 mutation alters a mitochondrial prenyltransferase to cause Schnyder corneal dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Nickerson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in a novel gene, UBIAD1, were recently found to cause the autosomal dominant eye disease Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD. SCD is characterized by an abnormal deposition of cholesterol and phospholipids in the cornea resulting in progressive corneal opacification and visual loss. We characterized lesions in the UBIAD1 gene in new SCD families and examined protein homology, localization, and structure.We characterized five novel mutations in the UBIAD1 gene in ten SCD families, including a first SCD family of Native American ethnicity. Examination of protein homology revealed that SCD altered amino acids which were highly conserved across species. Cell lines were established from patients including keratocytes obtained after corneal transplant surgery and lymphoblastoid cell lines from Epstein-Barr virus immortalized peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These were used to determine the subcellular localization of mutant and wild type protein, and to examine cholesterol metabolite ratios. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for UBIAD1 protein in keratocytes revealed that both wild type and N102S protein were localized sub-cellularly to mitochondria. Analysis of cholesterol metabolites in patient cell line extracts showed no significant alteration in the presence of mutant protein indicating a potentially novel function of the UBIAD1 protein in cholesterol biochemistry. Molecular modeling was used to develop a model of human UBIAD1 protein in a membrane and revealed potentially critical roles for amino acids mutated in SCD. Potential primary and secondary substrate binding sites were identified and docking simulations indicated likely substrates including prenyl and phenolic molecules.Accumulating evidence from the SCD familial mutation spectrum, protein homology across species, and molecular modeling suggest that protein function is likely down-regulated by SCD mutations. Mitochondrial UBIAD1 protein appears to have a highly

  2. Distribution patterns of postmortem damage in human mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J

    2002-01-01

    1 (HVR1) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III genes. A comparison of damaged sites within and between the regions reveals that damage hotspots exist and that, in the HVR1, these correlate with sites known to have high in vivo mutation rates. Conversely, HVR1 subregions with known structural function......, such as MT5, have lower in vivo mutation rates and lower postmortem-damage rates. The postmortem data also identify a possible functional subregion of the HVR1, termed "low-diversity 1," through the lack of sequence damage. The amount of postmortem damage observed in mitochondrial coding regions...... was significantly lower than in the HVR1, and, although hotspots were noted, these did not correlate with codon position. Finally, a simple method for the identification of incorrect archaeological haplogroup designations is introduced, on the basis of the observed spectrum of postmortem damage....

  3. Unacylated ghrelin does not alter mitochondrial function, redox state and triglyceride content in rat liver in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gortan Cappellari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in liver mitochondrial function with more oxidized redox state and enhanced inflammation may contribute to the onset of obesity- and insulin resistance-associated hepatic complications, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steato-hepatitis. Unacylated ghrelin (UnAG is a gastric hormone reported to be associated with lower oxidative stress in different cell types, but its potential effects on liver mitochondrial function, redox state and inflammation in vivo remains undetermined. We investigated the impact of chronic UnAG overexpression (Tg Myh6/Ghrl leading to systemic upregulation of circulating hormone on mitochondrial ATP production, redox state (oxidized-to-total glutathione and inflammation markers in lean mice. Compared to wild-type animals (wt, Tg Myh6/Ghrl had superimposable liver weight, triglyceride content and plasma lipid profile. Liver mitochondrial enzyme activities and ATP production as well as oxidized-to-total glutathione were also similar in the two groups. In addition, no differences were observed in tissue inflammation marker TNF-alpha between wild-type and Tg Myh6/Ghrl animals. Thus, chronic systemic UnAG upregulation does not alter liver triglyceride content, mitochondrial function, redox state and inflammation markers in lean mice. These findings do not support a major role of UnAG as a physiological modulator of in vivo liver oxidative-lipid metabolism and inflammation.

  4. Altered mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in leukocytes of anorexia nervosa patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M Victor

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Anorexia nervosa is a common illness among adolescents and is characterised by oxidative stress. OBJECTIVE: The effects of anorexia on mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes from anorexic subjects were evaluated. DESIGN AND SETTING: A multi-centre, cross-sectional case-control study was performed. PATIENTS: Our study population consisted of 20 anorexic patients and 20 age-matched controls, all of which were Caucasian women. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anthropometric and metabolic parameters were evaluated in the study population. To assess whether anorexia nervosa affects mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes of anorexic patients, we measured mitochondrial oxygen consumption, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial mass, and complex I and III activity in polymorphonuclear cells. RESULTS: Mitochondrial function was impaired in the leukocytes of the anorexic patients. This was evident in a decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption (P<0.05, mitochondrial membrane potential (P<0.01 and GSH levels (P<0.05, and an increase in ROS production (P<0.05 with respect to control subjects. Furthermore, a reduction of mitochondrial mass was detected in leukocytes of the anorexic patients (P<0.05, while the activity of mitochondrial complex I (P<0.001, but not that of complex III, was found to be inhibited in the same population. CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress is produced in the leukocytes of anorexic patients and is closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results lead us to propose that the oxidative stress that occurs in anorexia takes place at mitochondrial complex I. Future research concerning mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress should aim to determine the physiological mechanism involved in this effect and the physiological impact of anorexia.

  5. Mitochondrial Optic Atrophy (OPA) 1 Processing Is Altered in Response to Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A.; Hurling, Chloe; Stolp, Helen; Sobotka, Kristina; Gressens, Pierre; Hagberg, Henrik; Thornton, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of mitochondrial function and subsequent induction of cell death pathways are key hallmarks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury, both in animal models and in term infants. Mitoprotective therapies therefore offer a new avenue for intervention for the babies who suffer life-long disabilities as a result of birth asphyxia. Here we show that after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons or in a mouse model of HI, mitochondrial protein homeostasis is altered, manifesting as a change in mitochondrial morphology and functional impairment. Furthermore we find that the mitochondrial fusion and cristae regulatory protein, OPA1, is aberrantly cleaved to shorter forms. OPA1 cleavage is normally regulated by a balanced action of the proteases Yme1L and Oma1. However, in primary neurons or after HI in vivo, protein expression of YmelL is also reduced, whereas no change is observed in Oma1 expression. Our data strongly suggest that alterations in mitochondria-shaping proteins are an early event in the pathogenesis of neonatal HI injury. PMID:26393574

  6. Mitochondrial Optic Atrophy (OPA) 1 Processing Is Altered in Response to Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A; Hurling, Chloe; Stolp, Helen; Sobotka, Kristina; Gressens, Pierre; Hagberg, Henrik; Thornton, Claire

    2015-09-17

    Perturbation of mitochondrial function and subsequent induction of cell death pathways are key hallmarks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury, both in animal models and in term infants. Mitoprotective therapies therefore offer a new avenue for intervention for the babies who suffer life-long disabilities as a result of birth asphyxia. Here we show that after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons or in a mouse model of HI, mitochondrial protein homeostasis is altered, manifesting as a change in mitochondrial morphology and functional impairment. Furthermore we find that the mitochondrial fusion and cristae regulatory protein, OPA1, is aberrantly cleaved to shorter forms. OPA1 cleavage is normally regulated by a balanced action of the proteases Yme1L and Oma1. However, in primary neurons or after HI in vivo, protein expression of YmelL is also reduced, whereas no change is observed in Oma1 expression. Our data strongly suggest that alterations in mitochondria-shaping proteins are an early event in the pathogenesis of neonatal HI injury.

  7. Altered mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in leukocytes of anorexia nervosa patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Victor M; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Saiz-Alarcon, Vanessa; Sangüesa, Maria C; Rojo-Bofill, Luis; Bañuls, Celia; Falcón, Rosa; Castelló, Raquel; Rojo, Luis; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a common illness among adolescents and is characterised by oxidative stress. The effects of anorexia on mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes from anorexic subjects were evaluated. A multi-centre, cross-sectional case-control study was performed. Our study population consisted of 20 anorexic patients and 20 age-matched controls, all of which were Caucasian women. Anthropometric and metabolic parameters were evaluated in the study population. To assess whether anorexia nervosa affects mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes of anorexic patients, we measured mitochondrial oxygen consumption, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial mass, and complex I and III activity in polymorphonuclear cells. Mitochondrial function was impaired in the leukocytes of the anorexic patients. This was evident in a decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption (Panorexic patients (Panorexic patients and is closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results lead us to propose that the oxidative stress that occurs in anorexia takes place at mitochondrial complex I. Future research concerning mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress should aim to determine the physiological mechanism involved in this effect and the physiological impact of anorexia.

  8. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Alteration in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Sung Lin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number alteration in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC. The mtDNA copy numbers of paired cancer and non-cancer parts from five resected RCC kidneys after radical nephrectomy were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR. An RCC cell line, 786-O, was infected by lentiviral particles to knock down mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM. Null target (NT and TFAM-knockdown (TFAM-KD represented the control and knockdown 786-O clones, respectively. Protein or mRNA expression levels of TFAM; mtDNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1, ND6 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (COX-2; nuclear DNA (nDNA-encoded succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA; v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 gene (AKT-encoded AKT and v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog gene (c-MYC-encoded MYC; glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase II (HK-II, glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI, phosphofructokinase (PFK, and lactate dehydrogenase subunit A (LDHA; and hypoxia-inducible factors the HIF-1α and HIF-2α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1, and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component α subunit (PDHA1 were analyzed by Western blot or Q-PCR. Bioenergetic parameters of cellular metabolism, basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (mOCRB and basal extracellular acidification rate (ECARB, were measured by a Seahorse XFe-24 analyzer. Cell invasiveness was evaluated by a trans-well migration assay and vimentin expression. Doxorubicin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent. The results showed a decrease of mtDNA copy numbers in resected RCC tissues (p = 0.043. The TFAM-KD clone expressed lower mtDNA copy number (p = 0.034, lower mRNA levels of TFAM (p = 0.008, ND1 (p = 0.007, and ND6 (p = 0.017, and lower protein levels of TFAM and COX-2 than did the NT clone. By contrast, the protein levels of HIF-2α, HK-II, PFK, LDHA, AKT, MYC and vimentin; trans-well migration activity (p = 0

  9. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  10. Lack of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex I and alteration of the respiratory chain in Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial deletion mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierres, Sophie; Sabar, Mohammed; Lelandais, Christine; Chetrit, Philippe; Diolez, Philippe; Degand, Hervé; Boutry, Marc; Vedel, Fernand; de Kouchkovsky, Yaroslav; De Paepe, Rosine

    1997-01-01

    We previously have shown that Nicotiana sylvestris cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) mutants I and II present large mtDNA deletions and that the NAD7 subunit of complex I (the main dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is absent in CMS I. Here, we show that, despite a large difference in size in the mtDNA deletion, CMS I and II display similar alterations. Both have an impaired development from germination to flowering, with partial male sterility that becomes complete under low light. Besides NAD7, two other complex I subunits are missing (NAD9 and the nucleus-encoded, 38-kDa subunit), identified on two-dimensional patterns of mitochondrial proteins. Mitochondria isolated from CMS leaves showed altered respiration. Although their succinate oxidation through complex II was close to that of the wild type, oxidation of glycine, a priority substrate of plant mitochondria, was significantly reduced. The remaining activity was much less sensitive to rotenone, indicating the breakdown of Complex I activity. Oxidation of exogenous NADH (coupled to proton gradient generation and partly sensitive to rotenone) was strongly increased. These results suggest respiratory compensation mechanisms involving additional NADH dehydrogenases to complex I. Finally, the capacity of the cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase pathway was enhanced in CMS, and higher amounts of enzyme were evidenced by immunodetection. PMID:9096412

  11. Inflammation in adult women with a history of child maltreatment: The involvement of mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeck, Christina; Koenig, Alexandra Maria; Schury, Katharina; Geiger, Martha Leonie; Karabatsiakis, Alexander; Wilker, Sarah; Waller, Christiane; Gündel, Harald; Fegert, Jörg Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    The experience of maltreatment during childhood is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pro-inflammatory phenotype remain unclear. Mitochondria were recently found to principally coordinate inflammatory processes via both inflammasome activation and inflammasome-independent pathways. To this end, we hypothesized that alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning and oxidative stress might be at the interface between the association of maltreatment experiences during childhood and inflammation. We analyzed pro-inflammatory biomarkers (levels of C-reactive protein, cytokine secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro, PBMC composition, lysophosphatidylcholine levels), serum oxidative stress levels (arginine:citrulline ratio, l-carnitine and acetylcarnitine levels) and mitochondrial functioning (respiratory activity and density of mitochondria in PBMC) in peripheral blood samples collected from 30 women (aged 22-44years) with varying degrees of maltreatment experiences in form of abuse and neglect during childhood. Exposure to maltreatment during childhood was associated with an increased ROS production, higher levels of oxidative stress and an increased mitochondrial activity in a dose-response relationship. Moreover, the increase in mitochondrial activity and ROS production were positively associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by PBMC. Decreased serum levels of lysophosphatidylcholines suggested higher inflammasome activation with increasing severity of child maltreatment experiences. Together these findings offer preliminary evidence for the association of alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory phenotype observed in individuals with a history of maltreatment during childhood. The results emphasize that the early prevention of child abuse and neglect warrants more attention, as the

  12. Implications of altered glutathione metabolism in aspirin-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, prior to ASA treatment, cytotoxicity of the drug is augmented. On the other hand, when GSH-depleted cells were treated with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, cytotoxicity/apoptosis caused by ASA was attenuated with a significant recovery in oxidative stress, GSH homeostasis, DNA fragmentation and some of the mitochondrial functions. NAC treatment, however, had no significant effects on the drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity and ATP synthesis in GSH-depleted cells. Our results have confirmed that aspirin increases apoptosis by increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory functions. These effects were further amplified when GSH-depleted cells were treated with ASA. We have also shown that some of the effects of aspirin might be associated with reduced GSH homeostasis, as treatment of cells with NAC attenuated the effects of BSO and aspirin. Our results strongly suggest that GSH dependent redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells is critical in preserving mitochondrial functions and preventing oxidative stress associated complications caused by aspirin treatment.

  13. Implications of altered glutathione metabolism in aspirin-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH)-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), prior to ASA treatment, cytotoxicity of the drug is augmented. On the other hand, when GSH-depleted cells were treated with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), cytotoxicity/apoptosis caused by ASA was attenuated with a significant recovery in oxidative stress, GSH homeostasis, DNA fragmentation and some of the mitochondrial functions. NAC treatment, however, had no significant effects on the drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity and ATP synthesis in GSH-depleted cells. Our results have confirmed that aspirin increases apoptosis by increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory functions. These effects were further amplified when GSH-depleted cells were treated with ASA. We have also shown that some of the effects of aspirin might be associated with reduced GSH homeostasis, as treatment of cells with NAC attenuated the effects of BSO and aspirin. Our results strongly suggest that GSH dependent redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells is critical in preserving mitochondrial functions and preventing oxidative stress associated complications caused by aspirin treatment.

  14. DNM1L Variant Alters Baseline Mitochondrial Function and Response to Stress in a Patient with Severe Neurological Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Kaley A; Costford, Sheila R; Yoon, Grace; Sondheimer, Neal; Maynes, Jason T

    2018-04-01

    Mitochondria play vital roles in brain development and neuronal activity, and mitochondrial dynamics (fission and fusion) maintain organelle function through the removal of damaged components. Dynamin-like protein-1 (DRP-1), encoded by DNM1L, is an evolutionarily conserved GTPase that mediates mitochondrial fission by surrounding the scission site in concentric ring-like structures via self-oligomerization, followed by GTPase-dependant constriction. Here, we describe the clinical characteristics and cellular phenotype of a patient with severe neurological dysfunction, possessing a homozygous DNM1L variant c.305C>T (p.T115M) in the GTPase domain. For comparative analysis, we also describe a previously identified heterozygous variant demonstrating a rapidly fatal neurocognitive phenotype (c.261dup/c.385:386del, p.W88M*9/E129K*6). Using patient-generated fibroblasts, we demonstrated both DNM1L variants undergo adverse alterations to mitochondrial structure and function, including impaired mitochondrial fission, reduced membrane potential, and lower oxidative capacity including an increased cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and dsDNA breaks. Mutation of DNM1L was also associated with impaired responses to oxidative stress, as treatment with hydrogen peroxide dramatically increased cellular ROS, with minimal exacerbation of already impaired mitochondrial function. Taken together, our observations indicate that homozygous p.T115M variant of DNM1L produces a neurological and neurodevelopmental phenotype, consistent with impaired mitochondrial architecture and function, through a diminished ability to oligomerize, which was most prevalent under oxidative stress.

  15. Relationships between mitochondrial content and bioenergetics with obesity, body composition and fat distribution in healthy older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Bharadwaj, Manish S.; Tyrrell, Daniel J.; Leng, Iris; Demons, Jamehl L.; Lyles, Mary F.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Molina, Anthony J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial function declines with age; however, the relationship between adiposity and mitochondrial function among older adults is unclear. This study examined relationships between skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and electron transport chain complex 2 driven respiration with whole body and thigh composition, body fat distribution, and insulin sensitivity in older adults. Methods 25 healthy, sedentary, weight-stable men (N = 13) and women (N = 12) >65 years of age, with a...

  16. Alteration of ROS Homeostasis and Decreased Lifespan in S. cerevisiae Elicited by Deletion of the Mitochondrial Translocator FLX1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Anna Giancaspero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the control exerted by the mitochondrial translocator FLX1, which catalyzes the movement of the redox cofactor FAD across the mitochondrial membrane, on the efficiency of ATP production, ROS homeostasis, and lifespan of S. cerevisiae. The deletion of the FLX1 gene resulted in respiration-deficient and small-colony phenotype accompanied by a significant ATP shortage and ROS unbalance in glycerol-grown cells. Moreover, the flx1Δ strain showed H2O2 hypersensitivity and decreased lifespan. The impaired biochemical phenotype found in the flx1Δ strain might be justified by an altered expression of the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in bioenergetics and cell regulation. A search for possible cis-acting consensus motifs in the regulatory region upstream SDH1-ORF revealed a dozen of upstream motifs that might respond to induced metabolic changes by altering the expression of Flx1p. Among these motifs, two are present in the regulatory region of genes encoding proteins involved in flavin homeostasis. This is the first evidence that the mitochondrial flavin cofactor status is involved in controlling the lifespan of yeasts, maybe by changing the cellular succinate level. This is not the only case in which the homeostasis of redox cofactors underlies complex phenotypical behaviours, as lifespan in yeasts.

  17. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghna Pant

    Full Text Available The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1 and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  18. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntingtonâ s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  19. Altered Mitochondrial DNA Methylation Pattern in Alzheimer Disease-Related Pathology and in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Marta; Mosquera, Jose Luis; Ansoleaga, Belén; Ferrer, Isidre; Barrachina, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked with the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles essential for cell viability and are characterized by the presence of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA. DNA methylation is a well-known epigenetic mechanism that regulates nuclear gene transcription. However, mtDNA methylation is not the subject of the same research attention. The present study shows the presence of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in CpG and non-CpG sites in the entorhinal cortex and substantia nigra of control human postmortem brains, using the 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencer. Moreover, increased mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels are found in the D-loop region of mtDNA in the entorhinal cortex in brain samples with Alzheimer disease-related pathology (stages I to II and stages III to IV of Braak and Braak; n = 8) with respect to control cases. Interestingly, this region shows a dynamic pattern in the content of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 mice along with Alzheimer disease pathology progression (3, 6, and 12 months of age). Finally, a loss of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels in the D-loop region is found in the substantia nigra in Parkinson disease (n = 10) with respect to control cases. In summary, the present findings suggest mtDNA epigenetic modulation in human brain is vulnerable to neurodegenerative disease states. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Soluble Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 Alters Cellular Metabolism and Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissette C. Sánchez-Aranguren

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a maternal hypertensive disorder that affects up to 1 out of 12 pregnancies worldwide. It is characterized by proteinuria, endothelial dysfunction, and elevated levels of the soluble form of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1, known as sFlt-1. sFlt-1 effects are mediated in part by decreasing VEGF signaling. The direct effects of sFlt-1 on cellular metabolism and bioenergetics in preeclampsia, have not been established. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether sFlt-1 causes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to disruption of normal functioning in endothelial and placental cells in preeclampsia. Endothelial cells (ECs and first-trimester trophoblast (HTR-8/SVneo were treated with serum from preeclamptic women rich in sFlt-1 or with the recombinant protein. sFlt-1, dose-dependently inhibited ECs respiration and acidification rates indicating a metabolic phenotype switch enhancing glycolytic flux. HTR-8/SVneo displayed a strong basal glycolytic metabolism, remaining less sensitive to sFlt-1-induced mitochondrial impairment. Moreover, results obtained in ECs exposed to serum from preeclamptic subjects demonstrated that increased sFlt-1 leads to metabolic perturbations accountable for mitochondrial dysfunction observed in preeclampsia. sFlt-1 exacerbated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS formation and mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation in ECs and trophoblasts exposed to serum from preeclamptic women. Forcing oxidative metabolism by culturing cells in galactose media, further sensitized cells to sFlt-1. This approach let us establish that sFlt-1 targets mitochondrial function in ECs. Effects of sFlt-1 on HTR-8/SVneo cells metabolism were amplified in galactose, demonstrating that sFlt-1 only target cells that rely mainly on oxidative metabolism. Together, our results establish the early metabolic perturbations induced by sFlt-1 and the resulting endothelial and mitochondrial dysfunction

  1. Mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetic dysfunction is associated with synaptic alterations in mutant SOD1 motor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrané, Jordi; Sahawneh, Mary Anne; Przedborski, Serge; Estévez, Álvaro G.; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), a rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutant SOD1 has pleiotropic toxic effects on motor neurons, among which mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as one of the contributing factors in motor neuron demise. Mitochondria are highly dynamic in neurons; they are constantly reshaped by fusion and move along neurites to localize at sites of high-energy utilization, such as synapses. The finding of abnormal mitochondria accumulation in neuromuscular junctions, where the SOD1-FALS degenerative process is though to initiate, suggests that impaired mitochondrial dynamics in motor neurons may be involved in pathogenesis. We addressed this hypothesis by live imaging microscopy of photo-switchable fluorescent mitoDendra in transgenic rat motor neurons expressing mutant or wild type human SOD1. We demonstrate that mutant SOD1 motor neurons have impaired mitochondrial fusion in axons and cell bodies. Mitochondria also display selective impairment of retrograde axonal transport, with reduced frequency and velocity of movements. Fusion and transport defects are associated with smaller mitochondrial size, decreased mitochondrial density, and defective mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, mislocalization of mitochondria at synapses among motor neurons, in vitro, correlates with abnormal synaptic number, structure, and function. Dynamics abnormalities are specific to mutant SOD1 motor neuron mitochondria, since they are absent in wild type SOD1 motor neurons, they do not involve other organelles, and they are not found in cortical neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that impaired mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to the selective degeneration of motor neurons in SOD1-FALS. PMID:22219285

  2. Altered distribution of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.H.; Park, S.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary`s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.C. [Department of Internal Medicine, Kangnam St. Mary`s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary`s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    The radiographic findings of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) are various. The typical findings are diffuse, bilateral, symmetric, finely granular, or reticular infiltrates. In patients taking aerosol pentamidine, atypical findings may be the first manifestation. One interesting radiologic finding of PCP is that the pneumonia may spare the irradiated lung. We report PCP developed in a patient undergoing irradiation for lung cancer. High-resolution CT revealed diffuse, bilateral, and symmetric ground-glass opacities with septal thickening in both lungs; however, the radiation port was spared and appeared as the ``photographic negative of post-radiation pneumonia.`` The distribution of the pneumonic infiltrates was altered by radiotherapy. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 refs.

  3. Altered distribution of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.H.; Park, S.H.; Kim, S.C.; Kim, Y.S.

    1999-01-01

    The radiographic findings of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) are various. The typical findings are diffuse, bilateral, symmetric, finely granular, or reticular infiltrates. In patients taking aerosol pentamidine, atypical findings may be the first manifestation. One interesting radiologic finding of PCP is that the pneumonia may spare the irradiated lung. We report PCP developed in a patient undergoing irradiation for lung cancer. High-resolution CT revealed diffuse, bilateral, and symmetric ground-glass opacities with septal thickening in both lungs; however, the radiation port was spared and appeared as the ''photographic negative of post-radiation pneumonia.'' The distribution of the pneumonic infiltrates was altered by radiotherapy. (orig.)

  4. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation alters the tertiary interaction and function of tRNALeu(UUR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Wang, Meng; Xue, Ling; Lin, Zhi; He, Qiufen; Shi, Wenwen; Chen, Yaru; Jin, Xiaofen; Li, Haiying; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-08-25

    Several mitochondrial tRNA mutations have been associated with hypertension, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we identified a novel homoplasmic 3253T→C mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) gene in a Han Chinese family with maternally inherited hypertension. The m.3253T→C mutation affected a highly conserved uridine at position 22 at the D-stem of tRNA Leu(UUR) , introducing a G-C base pairing (G13-C22) at the D-stem and a tertiary base pairing (C22-G46) between the D-stem and the variable loop. We therefore hypothesized that the m.3253T→C mutation altered both the structure and function of tRNA Leu(UUR) Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines derived from this Chinese family, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation perturbed the conformation and stability of tRNA Leu(UUR) , as suggested by faster electrophoretic mobility of mutated tRNA relative to the wild-type molecule. Northern blot analysis revealed an ∼45% decrease in the steady-state level of tRNA Leu(UUR) in the mutant cell lines carrying the m.3253T→C mutation, as compared with control cell lines. Moreover, an ∼35% reduction in aminoacylation efficiency of tRNA Leu(UUR) was observed in the m.3253T→C mutant cells. These alterations in tRNA Leu(UUR) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for those polypeptides with a high proportion of Leu(UUR) codons, such as ND6. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation decreased the activities of mitochondrial complexes I and V, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the cells. In conclusion, our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Altering pyrroloquinoline quinone nutritional status modulates mitochondrial, lipid, and energy metabolism in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Bauerly

    Full Text Available We have reported that pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ improves reproduction, neonatal development, and mitochondrial function in animals by mechanisms that involve mitochondrial related cell signaling pathways. To extend these observations, the influence of PQQ on energy and lipid relationships and apparent protection against ischemia reperfusion injury are described herein. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a nutritionally complete diet with PQQ added at either 0 (PQQ- or 2 mg PQQ/Kg diet (PQQ+. Measurements included: 1 serum glucose and insulin, 2 total energy expenditure per metabolic body size (Wt(3/4, 3 respiratory quotients (in the fed and fasted states, 4 changes in plasma lipids, 5 the relative mitochondrial amount in liver and heart, and 6 indices related to cardiac ischemia. For the latter, rats (PQQ- or PQQ+ were subjected to left anterior descending occlusions followed by 2 h of reperfusion to determine PQQ's influence on infarct size and myocardial tissue levels of malondialdehyde, an indicator of lipid peroxidation. Although no striking differences in serum glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid levels were observed, energy expenditure was lower in PQQ- vs. PQQ+ rats and energy expenditure (fed state was correlated with the hepatic mitochondrial content. Elevations in plasma di- and triacylglyceride and β-hydroxybutryic acid concentrations were also observed in PQQ- rats vs. PQQ+ rats. Moreover, PQQ administration (i.p. at 4.5 mg/kg BW for 3 days resulted in a greater than 2-fold decrease in plasma triglycerides during a 6-hour fast than saline administration in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Cardiac injury resulting from ischemia/reperfusion was more pronounced in PQQ- rats than in PQQ+ rats. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PQQ deficiency impacts a number of parameters related to normal mitochondrial function.

  6. Telling apart Felidae and Ursidae from the distribution of nucleotides in mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenchak, Andrij

    2018-02-01

    Rank-frequency distributions of nucleotide sequences in mitochondrial DNA are defined in a way analogous to the linguistic approach, with the highest-frequent nucleobase serving as a whitespace. For such sequences, entropy and mean length are calculated. These parameters are shown to discriminate the species of the Felidae (cats) and Ursidae (bears) families. From purely numerical values we are able to see in particular that giant pandas are bears while koalas are not. The observed linear relation between the parameters is explained using a simple probabilistic model. The approach based on the non-additive generalization of the Bose distribution is used to analyze the frequency spectra of the nucleotide sequences. In this case, the separation of families is not very sharp. Nevertheless, the distributions for Felidae have on average longer tails comparing to Ursidae.

  7. Mitochondrial oxidative stress alters a pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans strongly resembling that of bile acid biosynthesis and secretion in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ling Liu

    Full Text Available Mammalian bile acids (BAs are oxidized metabolites of cholesterol whose amphiphilic properties serve in lipid and cholesterol uptake. BAs also act as hormone-like substances that regulate metabolism. The Caenorhabditis elegans clk-1 mutants sustain elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress and display a slow defecation phenotype that is sensitive to the level of dietary cholesterol. We found that: 1 The defecation phenotype of clk-1 mutants is suppressed by mutations in tat-2 identified in a previous unbiased screen for suppressors of clk-1. TAT-2 is homologous to ATP8B1, a flippase required for normal BA secretion in mammals. 2 The phenotype is suppressed by cholestyramine, a resin that binds BAs. 3 The phenotype is suppressed by the knock-down of C. elegans homologues of BA-biosynthetic enzymes. 4 The phenotype is enhanced by treatment with BAs. 5 Lipid extracts from C. elegans contain an activity that mimics the effect of BAs on clk-1, and the activity is more abundant in clk-1 extracts. 6 clk-1 and clk-1;tat-2 double mutants show altered cholesterol content. 7 The clk-1 phenotype is enhanced by high dietary cholesterol and this requires TAT-2. 8 Suppression of clk-1 by tat-2 is rescued by BAs, and this requires dietary cholesterol. 9 The clk-1 phenotype, including the level of activity in lipid extracts, is suppressed by antioxidants and enhanced by depletion of mitochondrial superoxide dismutases. These observations suggest that C. elegans synthesizes and secretes molecules with properties and functions resembling those of BAs. These molecules act in cholesterol uptake, and their level of synthesis is up-regulated by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Future investigations should reveal whether these molecules are in fact BAs, which would suggest the unexplored possibility that the elevated oxidative stress that characterizes the metabolic syndrome might participate in disease processes by affecting the regulation of metabolism by BAs.

  8. Glutamatergic alterations and mitochondrial impairment in a murine model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Tommaso; Serviddio, Gaetano; Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Dipasquale, Pasqua; Cianci, Silvia; Bellanti, Francesco; Laconca, Leonardo; Romano, Antonino Davide; Padalino, Iolanda; LaFerla, Frank M; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Vendemiale, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    Deficits in glutamate neurotransmission and mitochondrial functions were detected in the frontal cortex (FC) and hippopcampus (HIPP) of aged 3×Tg-Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice, compared with their wild type littermates (non-Tg). In particular, basal levels of glutamate and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) expression were reduced in both areas. Cortical glutamate release responded to K(+) stimulation, whereas no peak release was observed in the HIPP of mutant mice. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) and excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) were reduced in HIPP homogenates, where the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content was lower. In contrast, glutamate transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were found to be higher in the frontal cortex. The respiration rates of complex-I, II, IV, and the membrane potential were reduced in cortical mitochondria, where unaltered proton leak, F(0)F(1)-ATPase activity and ATP content, with increased hydrogen peroxide production (H(2)O(2)), were also observed. In contrast, complex-I respiration rate was significantly increased in hippocampal mitochondria, together with increased proton leak and H(2)O(2) production. Moreover, loss of complex-IV and F(0)F(1)-ATPase activities were observed. These data suggest that impairments of mitochondrial bioenergetics might sustain the failure in the energy-requiring glutamatergic transmission. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamin-related Protein 1 Inhibition Mitigates Bisphenol A-mediated Alterations in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Swati; Yadav, Anuradha; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Khare, Puneet; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory dynamics of mitochondria comprises well orchestrated distribution and mitochondrial turnover to maintain the mitochondrial circuitry and homeostasis inside the cells. Several pieces of evidence suggested impaired mitochondrial dynamics and its association with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. We found that chronic exposure of synthetic xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA), a component of consumer plastic products, impaired autophagy-mediated mitochondrial turnover, leading to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial fragmentation, and apoptosis in hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). It also inhibited hippocampal derived NSC proliferation and differentiation, as evident by the decreased number of BrdU- and β-III tubulin-positive cells. All these effects were reversed by the inhibition of oxidative stress using N-acetyl cysteine. BPA up-regulated the levels of Drp-1 (dynamin-related protein 1) and enhanced its mitochondrial translocation, with no effect on Fis-1, Mfn-1, Mfn-2, and Opa-1 in vitro and in the hippocampus. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy studies suggested increased mitochondrial fission and accumulation of fragmented mitochondria and decreased elongated mitochondria in the hippocampus of the rat brain. Impaired mitochondrial dynamics by BPA resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP decline. Pharmacological (Mdivi-1) and genetic (Drp-1siRNA) inhibition of Drp-1 reversed BPA-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions, fragmentation, and apoptosis. Interestingly, BPA-mediated inhibitory effects on NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiations were also mitigated by Drp-1 inhibition. On the other hand, Drp-1 inhibition blocked BPA-mediated Drp-1 translocation, leading to decreased apoptosis of NSC. Overall, our studies implicate Drp-1 as a potential therapeutic target against BPA-mediated impaired mitochondrial dynamics and

  10. The mitochondrial DNA 4,977-bp deletion and its implication in copy number alteration in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Qualitative and quantitative changes in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been implicated in various cancer types. A 4,977 bp deletion in the major arch of the mitochondrial genome is one of the most common mutations associated with a variety of human diseases and aging. Methods We conducted a comprehensive study on clinical features and mtDNA of 104 colorectal cancer patients in the Wenzhou area of China. In particular, using a quantitative real time PCR method, we analyzed the 4,977 bp deletion and mtDNA content in tumor tissues and paired non-tumor areas from these patients. Results We found that the 4,977 bp deletion was more likely to be present in patients of younger age (≤65 years, p = 0.027). In patients with the 4,977 bp deletion, the deletion level decreased as the cancer stage advanced (p = 0.031). Moreover, mtDNA copy number in tumor tissues of patients with this deletion increased, both compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues and with in tumors of patients without the deletion. Such mtDNA content increase correlated with the levels of the 4,977 bp deletion and with cancer stage (p deletion may play a role in the early stage of colorectal cancer, and it is also implicated in alteration of mtDNA content in cancer cells. PMID:21232124

  11. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  12. Muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity, but not content, is altered with abdominal obesity in sedentary men: synergism with changes in insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanseaume, Emilie; Barquissau, Valentin; Salles, Jérôme; Aucouturier, Julien; Patrac, Véronique; Giraudet, Christophe; Gryson, Céline; Duché, Pascale; Boirie, Yves; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Morio, Béatrice

    2010-06-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for muscle insulin resistance. Mitochondria may play a key role in this etiology. Changes in muscle mitochondrial content and function were examined according to abdominal obesity and insulin sensitivity in men. The descriptive MitHyCal study was conducted on the general population of Clermont-Ferrand, France. Forty-two healthy sedentary men (41.7 +/- 4.3 yr) were divided into four groups according to waist circumference: 87 cm or less (group 1, n = 10); 88-93 cm (group 2, n = 12); 94-101 cm (group 3, n = 10); and 102 cm or greater (group 4, n = 10). Plasma metabolic check-up was performed, and insulin sensitivity index was calculated from glucose and insulin responses to a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test. Muscle biopsies were obtained to assess mitochondrial content, oxidative phosphorylation activity, and superoxide anion (reactive oxygen species) production. Assessment of muscle mitochondrial content and function was planned before data collection began. Abdominal obesity was negatively correlated to insulin sensitivity index (r = -0.39; P muscle mitochondrial content and maximal activity of key oxidative enzymes. In contrast, muscle mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration rate was 24% higher in groups 2 and 3 compared to groups 1 and 4 (P Abdominal obesity is associated with alterations in intrinsic muscle mitochondrial function but not content. These adaptations mainly result in reduced mitochondrial ATP production rate in response to insulin resistance.

  13. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-03

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases.

  14. Errantum: Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai JCK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lai JCK, Ananthakrishnan G, Jandhyam S, et al. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins. Int J Nanomedicine. 2010;5:715–723.The wrong image was used in Figure 5 on page 719.

  15. Monoamine Oxidases, Oxidative Stress, and Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics in Cardiac Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Maggiorani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in healthcare over the past several decades have resulted in populations now living longer. With this increase in longevity, a wider prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is more common and known to be a major factor in rising healthcare costs. A wealth of scientific evidence has implicated cell senescence as an important component in the etiology of these age-dependent pathologies. A number of studies indicate that an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS contributes to trigger and accelerate the cardiac senescence processes, and a new role of monoamine oxidases, MAO-A and MAO-B, is emerging in this context. These mitochondrial enzymes regulate the level of catecholamines and serotonin by catalyzing their oxidative deamination in the heart. MAOs’ expression substantially increases with ageing (6-fold MAO-A in the heart and 4-fold MAO-B in neuronal tissue, and their involvement in cardiac diseases is supposedly related to the formation of ROS, via the hydrogen peroxide produced during the substrate degradation. Here, we will review the most recent advances in this field and describe why MAOs could be effective targets in order to prevent age-associated cardiovascular disease.

  16. In vivo evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and altered redox homeostasis in a genetic mouse model of propionic acidemia: Implications for the pathophysiology of this disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Villar, L; Rivera-Barahona, A; Cuevas-Martín, C; Guenzel, A; Pérez, B; Barry, M A; Murphy, M P; Logan, A; Gonzalez-Quintana, A; Martín, M A; Medina, S; Gil-Izquierdo, A; Cuezva, J M; Richard, E; Desviat, L R

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of toxic metabolites has been described to inhibit mitochondrial enzymes, thereby inducing oxidative stress in propionic acidemia (PA), an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of mitochondrial propionyl-CoA carboxylase. PA patients exhibit neurological deficits and multiorgan complications including cardiomyopathy. To investigate the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of these alterations we have used a hypomorphic mouse model of PA that mimics the biochemical and clinical hallmarks of the disease. We have studied the tissue-specific bioenergetic signature by Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays and analysed OXPHOS complex activities, mtDNA copy number, oxidative damage, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide levels. The results show decreased levels and/or activity of several OXPHOS complexes in different tissues of PA mice. An increase in mitochondrial mass and OXPHOS complexes was observed in brain, possibly reflecting a compensatory mechanism including metabolic reprogramming. mtDNA depletion was present in most tissues analysed. Antioxidant enzymes were also found altered. Lipid peroxidation was present along with an increase in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion production. These data support the hypothesis that oxidative damage may contribute to the pathophysiology of PA, opening new avenues in the identification of therapeutic targets and paving the way for in vivo evaluation of compounds targeting mitochondrial biogenesis or reactive oxygen species production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alteration in expression of the rat mitochondrial ATPase 6 gene during Pneumocystis carinii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlett Marilyn S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumocystis carinii causes pneumonia in immunocompromised patients with a high morbidity and mortality rate, but the interaction between this organism and the host cell is not well understood. The purpose of this research was to study the response of host cells to P. carinii infection on a molecular level. Results The technique of mRNA differential display was used to detect genes whose expression may be affected by P. carinii infection. The nucleotide sequence of one differentially displayed DNA fragment was found to be identical to that of the rat mitochondrial ATPase 6 gene, which is a subunit of the F0F1-ATP synthase complex. A four-fold increase in expression of this gene was verified by Northern blot analysis of total RNA extracted from P. carinii-infected rat lung versus that from mock-infected rat lung. Localization of the cells containing ATPase 6 mRNA was accomplished by in situ hybridization. In sections of non-infected rat lung, these cells were found lining the distal parts of the respiratory tree and in apical areas of the alveoli. Histological location of these cells suggested that they were Clara cells and type II pneumocytes. This hypothesis was confirmed by co-localizing the mRNAs for ATPase 6 and surfactant protein B (SP-B to the same cells by two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization. Conclusions The ATPase 6 gene is over expressed during P. carinii infection, and type II pneumocytes and Clara cells are the cell types responsible for this over-expression.

  18. Altered mitochondrial genome content signals worse pathology and prognosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, Anton M F; Chan, Eva K F; Grogan, Judith; Petersen, Desiree C; Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Gupta, Ruta; Lyons, Ruth J; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Horvath, Lisa G; Kench, James G; Stricker, Phillip D; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) content is depleted in many cancers. In prostate cancer, there is intra-glandular as well as inter-patient mtDNA copy number variation. In this study, we determine if mtDNA content can be used as a predictor for prostate cancer staging and outcomes. Fresh prostate cancer biopsies from 115 patients were obtained at time of surgery. All cores underwent pathological review, followed by isolation of cancer and normal tissue. DNA was extracted and qPCR performed to quantify the total amount of mtDNA as a ratio to genomic DNA. Differences in mtDNA content were compared for prostate cancer pathology features and disease outcomes. We showed a significantly reduced mtDNA content in prostate cancer compared with normal adjacent prostate tissue (mean difference 1.73-fold, P-value Prostate cancer with increased mtDNA content showed unfavorable pathologic characteristics including, higher disease stage (PT2 vs PT3 P-value = 0.018), extracapsular extension (P-value = 0.02) and a trend toward an increased Gleason score (P-value = 0.064). No significant association was observed between changes in mtDNA content and biochemical recurrence (median follow up of 107 months). Contrary to other cancer types, prostate cancer tissue shows no universally depleted mtDNA content. Rather, the change in mtDNA content is highly variable, mirroring known prostate cancer genome heterogeneity. Patients with high mtDNA content have an unfavorable pathology, while a high mtDNA content in normal adjacent prostate tissue is associated with worse prognosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Intracellular expression of Tat alters mitochondrial functions in T cells: a potential mechanism to understand mitochondrial damage during HIV-1 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Mora, Sara; Mateos, Elena; Moran, María; Martín, Miguel Ángel; López, Juan Antonio; Calvo, Enrique; Terrón, María Carmen; Luque, Daniel; Muriaux, Delphine; Alcamí, José; Coiras, Mayte; López-Huertas, María Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-1 replication results in mitochondrial damage that is enhanced during antiretroviral therapy (ART). The onset of HIV-1 replication is regulated by viral protein Tat, a 101-residue protein codified by two exons that elongates viral transcripts. Although the first exon of Tat (aa 1–72) forms itself an active protein, the presence of the second exon (aa 73–101) results in a more competent transcriptional protein with additional functions. Results Mitochondrial overall functions we...

  20. Disjunct distribution of highly diverged mitochondrial lineage clade and population subdivision in a marine bivalve with pelagic larval dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Drent, J; Baker, AJ

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence data for 295 individuals of the marine bivalve Macoma balthica (L.) were collected from 10 sites across the European distribution, and from Alaska. The data were used to infer population subdivision history and estimate current levels of gene flow. Inferred historical

  1. The LRRK2 Variant E193K Prevents Mitochondrial Fission Upon MPP+ Treatment by Altering LRRK2 Binding to DRP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Perez Carrion

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2 are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD. LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including 13 putative armadillo-type repeats at the N-terminus. In this study, we analyzed the functional and molecular consequences of a novel variant, E193K, identified in an Italian family. E193K substitution does not influence LRRK2 kinase activity. Instead it affects LRRK2 biochemical properties, such as phosphorylation at Ser935 and affinity for 14-3-3ε. Primary fibroblasts obtained from an E193K carrier demonstrated increased cellular toxicity and abnormal mitochondrial fission upon 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium treatment. We found that E193K alters LRRK2 binding to DRP1, a crucial mediator of mitochondrial fission. Our data support a role for LRRK2 as a scaffolding protein influencing mitochondrial fission.

  2. The enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) Map effector is imported into the mitochondrial matrix by the TOM/Hsp70 system and alters organelle morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Domańska, Grazyna; Oxle, Marius; Mathieu, Johannes; Selchow, Olaf; Kenny, Brendan; Rassow, Joachim

    2006-04-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a human intestinal pathogen and a major cause of diarrhoea, particularly among infants in developing countries. EPEC target the Map and EspF multifunctional effector proteins to host mitochondria - organelles that play crucial roles in regulating cellular processes such as programmed cell death (apoptosis). While both molecules interfere with the organelles ability to maintain a membrane potential, EspF plays the predominant role and is responsible for triggering cell death. To learn more about the Map-mitochondria interaction, we studied Map localization to mitochondria with purified mitochondria (from mammalian and yeast cells) and within intact yeast. This revealed that (i) Map targeting is dependent on the predicted N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence, (ii) the N-terminal 44 residues are sufficient to target proteins to mitochondria and (iii) Map import involves the mitochondrial outer membrane translocase (Tom22 and Tom40), the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the matrix chaperone, mtHsp70. These results are consistent with Map import into the mitochondria matrix via the classical import mechanism. As all known, Map-associated phenotypes in mammalian cells are independent of mitochondrial targeting, this may indicate that import serves as a mechanism to remove Map from the cytoplasm thereby regulating cytoplasmic function. Intriguingly, Map, but not EspF, alters mitochondrial morphology with deletion analysis revealing important roles for residues 101-152. Changes in mitochondrial morphology have been linked to alterations in the ability of these organelles to regulate cellular processes providing a possible additional role for Map import into mitochondria.

  3. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  4. Ultrastructural and biochemical aspects of liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced alterations. Experimental evidence of mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, O. R.; Roatta de Conti, L. L.; Bolaños, L. P.; Stoppani, A. O.

    1978-01-01

    To study the morphologic and biochemical changes occuring in liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced injury, rats fed a 6-month high-alcohol regimen plus a nutritionally adequate diet which did not induce fatty liver were compared with isocalorically fed controls. After this period the alcohol-fed animals displayed striking ultrastructural changes of liver mitochondria and a decreased respiratory activity with succinate or malate-glutamate as substrate. On the contrary, the respiratory rate with I-glycerophosphate was 50% increased. Regression changes were studied after alcohol was withdrawn from the diet. Enlarged mitochondria rapidly disappeared (in 24 hours), although a few megamitochondria were still present after 8 days of abstinence. A similar recovery was observed for the functional alterations. At the end of the experimental period, only a slight decrease of the maximal respiratory rate using malate-glutamate as a substrate was noted. The ultrastructural findings and the morphometric data suggest that the way in which mitochondrial normalization takes place is based on partition of these organelles. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 13 PMID:623205

  5. Mitochondrial Alterations (Inhibition of Mitochondrial Protein Expression, Oxidative Metabolism, and Ultrastructure) Induced by Linezolid and Tedizolid at Clinically Relevant Concentrations in Cultured Human HL-60 Promyelocytes and THP-1 Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Tamara V; Payen, Valéry L; Sonveaux, Pierre; Muccioli, Giulio G; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2018-03-01

    Linezolid, the first clinically available oxazolidinone antibiotic, causes potentially severe toxicities (myelosuppression, lactic acidosis, and neuropathies) ascribed to impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and consecutive mitochondrial dysfunction. Tedizolid, a newly approved oxazolidinone, shows an enhanced activity compared to linezolid but is also a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. We compared linezolid and tedizolid for (i) inhibition of the expression of subunit I of cytochrome c -oxidase (CYTox I; Western blot analysis), (ii) cytochrome c -oxidase activity (biochemical assay), (iii) mitochondrial oxidative metabolism (Seahorse technology), and (iv) alteration of mitochondrial ultrastructure (electron microscopy) using HL-60 promyelocytes and THP-1 monocytes exposed to microbiologically (multiples of modal MIC against Staphylococcus aureus ) and therapeutically ( C min - C max ) pertinent concentrations. Both drugs caused a rapid and complete (48 to 72 h) inhibition of CYTox I expression, cytochrome c -oxidase activity, and spare respiratory capacity, with conspicuous swelling of the mitochondrial matrix and loss of their cristae. Globally, tedizolid was a more potent inhibitor than linezolid. For both drugs, all effects were quickly (48 to 72 h) and fully reversible upon drug withdrawal. Using an alternation of exposure to and withdrawal from drug mimicking their approved schedule of administration (twice daily and once daily [qD] for linezolid and tedizolid, respectively), only partial inhibition of CYTox I expression was noted for up to 96 h. Thus, rapid reversal of toxic effects upon discontinuous administration may mitigate oxazolidinone toxicity. Since tedizolid is given qD, this may help to explain its reported lower preclinical and clinical toxicity. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. A ketogenic amino acid rich diet benefits mitochondrial homeostasis by altering the AKT/4EBP1 and autophagy signaling pathways in the gastrocnemius and soleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinpeng; Kanasaki, Megumi; Xu, Ling; Kitada, Munehiro; Nagao, Kenji; Adachi, Yusuke; Jinzu, Hiroko; Noguchi, Yasushi; Kohno, Miyuki; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2018-03-14

    Muscle biology is important topic in diabetes research. We have reported that a diet with ketogenic amino acids rich replacement (KAAR) ameliorated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatosteatosis via activation of the autophagy system. Here, we found that a KAAR ameliorated the mitochondrial morphological alterations and associated mitochondrial dysfunction induced by an HFD through induction of the AKT/4EBP1 and autophagy signaling pathways in both fast and slow muscles. The mice were fed with a standard HFD (30% fat in food) or an HFD with KAAR (HFD KAAR ). In both the gastrocnemius and the soleus, HFD KAAR ameliorated HFD-impaired mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial function, characterized by decreased mitofusin 2, optic atrophy 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ coactivator-1α and PPARα levels and increased dynamin-related protein 1 levels. The decreased levels of phosphorylated AKT and 4EBP1 in the gastrocnemius and soleus of HFD-fed mice were remediated by HFD KAAR . Furthermore, the HFD KAAR ameliorated the HFD-induced autophagy defects in the gastrocnemius and soleus. These findings suggest that KAAR may be a novel strategy to combat obesity-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, likely through induction of the AKT/4EBP1 and autophagy pathways in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Stockburger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer’s disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  8. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Carola; Miano, Davide; Pallas, Thea; Friedland, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  9. Copper deficiency alters cell bioenergetics and induces mitochondrial fusion through up-regulation of MFN2 and OPA1 in erythropoietic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustos, Rodrigo I.; Jensen, Erik L.; Ruiz, Lina M.; Rivera, Salvador; Ruiz, Sebastián [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Santiago (Chile); Ferrick, David [Seahorse Bioscience, Billerica, MA (United States); Elorza, Alvaro A., E-mail: aelorza@unab.cl [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •In copper deficiency, cell proliferation is not affected. In turn, cell differentiation is impaired. •Enlarged mitochondria are due to up-regulation of MNF2 and OPA1. •Mitochondria turn off respiratory chain and ROS production. •Energy metabolism switch from mitochondria to glycolysis. -- Abstract: Copper is essential in cell physiology, participating in numerous enzyme reactions. In mitochondria, copper is a cofactor for respiratory complex IV, the cytochrome c oxidase. Low copper content is associated with anemia and the appearance of enlarged mitochondria in erythropoietic cells. These findings suggest a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis, which has not been explored so far. Here, we describe that bathocuproine disulfonate-induced copper deficiency does not alter erythropoietic cell proliferation nor induce apoptosis. However it does impair erythroid differentiation, which is associated with a metabolic switch between the two main energy-generating pathways. That is, from mitochondrial function to glycolysis. Switching off mitochondria implies a reduction in oxygen consumption and ROS generation along with an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial fusion proteins MFN2 and OPA1 were up-regulated along with the ability of mitochondria to fuse. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria did not show changes in total mitochondrial biomass but rather bigger mitochondria because of increased fusion. Similar results were also obtained with human CD34+, which were induced to differentiate into red blood cells. In all, we have shown that adequate copper levels are important for maintaining proper mitochondrial function and for erythroid differentiation where the energy metabolic switch plus the up-regulation of fusion proteins define an adaptive response to copper deprivation to keep cells alive.

  10. Copper deficiency alters cell bioenergetics and induces mitochondrial fusion through up-regulation of MFN2 and OPA1 in erythropoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, Rodrigo I.; Jensen, Erik L.; Ruiz, Lina M.; Rivera, Salvador; Ruiz, Sebastián; Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia; Ferrick, David; Elorza, Alvaro A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •In copper deficiency, cell proliferation is not affected. In turn, cell differentiation is impaired. •Enlarged mitochondria are due to up-regulation of MNF2 and OPA1. •Mitochondria turn off respiratory chain and ROS production. •Energy metabolism switch from mitochondria to glycolysis. -- Abstract: Copper is essential in cell physiology, participating in numerous enzyme reactions. In mitochondria, copper is a cofactor for respiratory complex IV, the cytochrome c oxidase. Low copper content is associated with anemia and the appearance of enlarged mitochondria in erythropoietic cells. These findings suggest a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis, which has not been explored so far. Here, we describe that bathocuproine disulfonate-induced copper deficiency does not alter erythropoietic cell proliferation nor induce apoptosis. However it does impair erythroid differentiation, which is associated with a metabolic switch between the two main energy-generating pathways. That is, from mitochondrial function to glycolysis. Switching off mitochondria implies a reduction in oxygen consumption and ROS generation along with an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial fusion proteins MFN2 and OPA1 were up-regulated along with the ability of mitochondria to fuse. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria did not show changes in total mitochondrial biomass but rather bigger mitochondria because of increased fusion. Similar results were also obtained with human CD34+, which were induced to differentiate into red blood cells. In all, we have shown that adequate copper levels are important for maintaining proper mitochondrial function and for erythroid differentiation where the energy metabolic switch plus the up-regulation of fusion proteins define an adaptive response to copper deprivation to keep cells alive

  11. Growth hormone alters the glutathione S-transferase and mitochondrial thioredoxin systems in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2014-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH's actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Aeromonas distribution and survival in a thermally altered lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Gorden, R.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Esch, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Par Pond is a thermally enriched monomictic southeastern lake which receives heated effluent from a production nuclear reactor. Fish populations in the lake have lesions of epizooty from which Aeromonas spp. are readily isolated. Distribution and population densities of Aeromonas in the water column were measured along an oxygen and temperature gradient as well as seasonally. Greater population densities of Aeromonas occurred below the oxygen chemocline when the lake was stratified. Survival of Aeromonas hydrophila under in situ conditions in both epilimnetic and hypolimnetic waters was determined through the use of polycarbonate membrane diffusion chambers during two separate reactor operating conditions. Survival levels of pure cultures of A. hydrophila corresponded to the distribution patterns of the naturally occurring Aeromonas-like populations. The greater survival of A. hydrophila during full reactor operation suggests that the fish populations may be exposed to Aeromonas for a longer period of time than when the reactor is not operating

  13. Aeromonas distribution and survival in a thermally altered lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Gordon, R.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Esch, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Par Pond is a thermally enriched monomictic southeastern lake which receives heated effluent from a production nuclear reactor. Fish populations in the lake have lesions of epizooty from which Aeromonas spp. are readily isolated. Distribution and population densities of Aeromonas in the water column were measured along an oxygen and temperature gradient. Greater population densities of Aeromonas occurred below the oxygen chemocline when the lake was stratified. Survival of A. hydrophila under in situ conditions in both epilimnetic and hypolimnetic waters was determined using polycarbonate membrane diffusion chambers, during two separate reactor operating conditions. Survival levels of pure cultures of A. hydrophila corresponded to the distribution patterns of the naturally occurring Aeromonas-like populations. The greater survival of A. hydrophila below the chemocline when the reactor was in full operation suggests that the fish populations may be exposed to Aeromonas for a longer period of time than when the reactor is not operating. (auth)

  14. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation introduces an m1G37 modification into tRNAMet, altering its structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Xue, Ling; Chen, Yaru; Li, Haiying; He, Qiufen; Wang, Bibin; Meng, Feilong; Wang, Meng; Guan, Min-Xin

    2018-01-26

    Defective nucleotide modifications of mitochondrial tRNAs have been associated with several human diseases, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we investigated the pathogenic molecular mechanism underlying a hypertension-associated 4435A→G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA Met The m.4435A→G mutation affected a highly conserved adenosine at position 37, 3' adjacent to the tRNA's anticodon, which is important for the fidelity of codon recognition and stabilization. We hypothesized that the m.4435A→G mutation introduced an m 1 G37 modification of tRNA Met , altering its structure and function. Primer extension and methylation activity assays indeed confirmed that the m.4435A→G mutation created a tRNA methyltransferase 5 (TRMT5)-catalyzed m 1 G37 modification of tRNA Met We found that this mutation altered the tRNA Met structure, indicated by an increased melting temperature and electrophoretic mobility of the mutated tRNA compared with the wildtype molecule. We demonstrated that cybrid cell lines carrying the m.4435A→G mutation exhibited significantly decreased efficiency in aminoacylation and steady-state levels of tRNA Met , as compared with those of control cybrids. The aberrant tRNA Met metabolism resulted in variable decreases in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded polypeptides in the mutant cybrids. Furthermore, we found that the m.4435A→G mutation caused respiratory deficiency, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in mutant cybrids. These results demonstrated that an aberrant m 1 G37 modification of mitochondrial tRNA Met affected the structure and function of its tRNA and consequently altered mitochondrial function. Our findings provide critical insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension, which is manifested by the deficient tRNA nucleotide modification. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  15. Mitochondrial content and distribution changes specific to mouse diaphragm after chronic normobaric hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Gamboa, Jorge L.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia reduces aerobic capacity (mitochondrial content) in limb skeletal muscles, and one of the causes seems to be decreased physical activity. Diaphragm and other respiratory muscles, however, may have a different pattern of adaptation as hypoxia increases the work of breathing. Thus, we hypothesized that chronic hypoxia would not reduce mitochondrial content in mouse diaphragm. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were kept in normoxia (FiO2 = 21%, control) or normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 10%, ...

  16. Homeostatic effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by monosodium glutamate administration to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Chagas, Pietro M; da Rocha, Juliana T; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Carvalho, Nélson R; Soares, Félix A; da Luz, Sônia C Almeida; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a group of metabolic alterations considered a worldwide public health problem. Organic selenium compounds have been reported to have many different pharmacological actions, such as anti-hypercholesterolemic and anti-hyperglycemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2, an organic selenium compound, in a model of obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration in rats. The rats were treated during the first ten postnatal days with MSG and received (p-ClPhSe)2 (10 mg/kg, intragastrically) from 45th to 51 th postnatal day. Glucose, lipid and lactate levels were determined in plasma of rats. Glycogen levels and activities of tyrosine aminotransferase, hexokinase, citrate synthase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) were determined in livers of rats. Renal G-6-Pase activity was also determined. The purine content [Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate] and mitochondrial functionality in the liver were also investigated. p-(ClPhSe)2 did not alter the reduction in growth performance and in the body weight caused by MSG but reduced epididymal fat deposition of rats. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored glycemia, triglycerides, cholesterol and lactate levels as well as the glucose metabolism altered in rats treated with MSG. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and the decrease in citrate synthase activity and ATP and ADP levels caused by MSG in rats. In summary, (p-ClPhSe)2 had homeostatic effects on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by MSG administration to rats.

  17. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Tran Thuan Son

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics...... and DNA damage, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of AD and control participants, for biomarker discovery. METHODS: PBMCs were isolated from 53 patients with AD of mild to moderate degree and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Tests were performed on the PBMCs from as many of these participants...... on adjustments for gender and/or age. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD....

  18. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal activity. II. Functional alterations of renal cortical mitochondria isolated after mercuric chloride treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mitochondrial functional defects occurring in the early stages of nephrotoxic renal injury secondary to mercuric chloride have been characterized. No loss of cellular integrity or major mitochondrial structural alterations occurred within the first 3 hr after a subcutaneous injection of 5 mg/kg of HgCl/sub 2/. At 3 h, levels of Hg/sup 2 +/ in renal cortex and isolated renal cortical mitochondria were 1.87 and 0.72 nmol/mg of protein, respectively. Much evidence suggested that this Hg/sup 2 +/ had reached the mitochondria in situ and not during the isolation process. Mitochondria isolated beginning 1 h after treatment with HgCl/sub 2/ showed depressed ADP uptake. At 2 h, inhibitions of State 3 and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration were detected. Inhibition of 2,4-dinitrophenol-activated mitochondrial ATPase activity was present when measured on mitochondria isolated at 3 h. These effects were not reversed by 2 mM dithioerythritol, 50 mg/ml of albumin or 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/. Analysis of the data in the context of information available on the in vitro effects of HgCl/sub 2/ (Weinberg, J.M., Harding, P.G., and Humes, H.D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 60-67) indicated that the mitochondrial functional effects could not be attributed to interaction of the mitochondria with Hg/sup 2 +/ during their isolation. These studies implicate compromised mitochondrial bioenergetic function as one of the earliest intracellular effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ in the production of nephrotoxicity but suggest that the intracellular process involves events in addition to those seen with direct exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ in vitro.

  19. Septic Shock Alters Mitochondrial Respiration of Lymphoid Cell-Lines and Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: The Role of Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clere-Jehl, Raphael; Helms, Julie; Kassem, Mohamad; Le Borgne, Pierrick; Delabranche, Xavier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Geny, Bernard; Meziani, Ferhat; Bilbault, Pascal

    2018-02-14

    In septic shock patients, post-septic immunosuppression state following the systemic inflammatory response syndrome is responsible for nosocomial infections, with subsequent increased mortality. The aim of the present study was to assess the underlying cellular mechanisms of the post-septic immunosuppression state, by investigating mitochondrial functions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from septic shock patients over 7 days. Eighteen patients admitted to a French intensive care unit for septic shock were included. At days 1 and 7, PBMCs were isolated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiration of intact septic PBMCs was assessed versus control group PBMCs, by measuring O2 consumption in plasma, using high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiration was then compared between septic plasmas and control plasmas for control PBMCs, septic PBMCs and lymphoid cell-line (CEM). To investigate the role of plasma, we measured several plasma cytokines, among them HMGB1, by ELISA. Basal O2 consumption of septic shock PBMCs was of 8.27 ± 3.39 and 10.48 ± 3.99 pmol/s/10 cells at days 1 and 7 respectively, significantly higher than in control PBMCs (5.37 ± 1.46 pmol/s/10 cells, p Septic patient PBMCs showed a lower response to oligomycin, suggesting a reduced ATP-synthase activity, as well as an increased response to FCCP suggesting an increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity. At 6 hours, septic plasmas showed a decreased O2 consumption of CEM (4.73 ± 1.46 vs. 6.58 ± 1.53, p Septic plasma impairs mitochondrial respiration in immune cells, with a possible role of the proinflammatory protein HMGB1, leading to a subsequent compensation, probably by enzymatic activation. This compensation result is an improvement of global mitochondrial respiratory capacity, but without restoring ATP-synthase activity.

  20. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) regulates skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling via altered mitochondrial oxidation and reactive oxygen species production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Enxuan; Emanuelli, Brice; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Sirt3 is a member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized in mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial function. Sirt3 expression in skeletal muscle is decreased in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and regulated by feeding, fasting, and caloric restriction. Sirt3 knockout...

  1. Hesperidin potentiates the neuroprotective effects of diazepam and gabapentin against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in mice: Possible behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Lalitha, Sree; Mishra, Jitendriya

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder with complex pathophysiology. Several evidences suggest a role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in pathophysiology of epilepsy. Hesperidin (Hesp) acts as a powerful anti-oxidant agent against superoxide, singlet oxygen, and hydroxyl radicals. Thus, this study was undertaken to evaluate the possible neuroprotective mechanism of Hesp against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions in mice. Materials and Methods: Sixty males Laca mice (20-25 g) were randomly divided into 10 treatment groups (n = 6). Seven days pretreatment of Hesp (100, 200 mg/kg, p.o.) was carried out before PTZ (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) challenge, whereas diazepam (DZP) (0.2, 0.5 mg/kg) and gabapentin (Gbp) (10, 20 mg/kg) were administered i.p. 30 min before PTZ administration, that is, on 7th day. Following PTZ challenge, severity of convulsions (onset of jerks, myoclonic seizures, extensor phase and death), brain anti-oxidant enzyme levels and mitochondrial complex enzymes activities were estimated. Results: Single i.p. PTZ (80 mg/kg) challenge demonstrated severe convulsions, oxidative damage (raised lipid peroxidation [LPO], nitrite concentration as well as depleted reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase levels), and depletion of mitochondrial enzyme Complex (I, II, IV) activities. Hesp (200 mg/kg), DZP (0.5 mg/kg) and Gbp (20 mg/kg) pretreatments attenuated PTZ induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations. However, administration of Hesp (100 mg/kg) in combination with DZP (0.2 mg/kg) or Gbp (10 mg/kg) potentiated their neuroprotective effect, which was significant as compared to their effects in PTZ treated animals. Conclusion: Hesp possesses potent anticonvulsant activity which might be mediated through modulation of gamma-amino butyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor action. PMID:24987179

  2. Experimental Support That Natural Selection Has Shaped the Latitudinal Distribution of Mitochondrial Haplotypes in Australian Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, M Florencia; Wolff, Jonci N; Sgrò, Carla M; Dowling, Damian K

    2017-10-01

    Cellular metabolism is regulated by enzyme complexes within the mitochondrion, the function of which are sensitive to the prevailing temperature. Such thermal sensitivity, coupled with the observation that population frequencies of mitochondrial haplotypes tend to associate with latitude, altitude, or climatic regions across species distributions, led to the hypothesis that thermal selection has played a role in shaping standing variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence. This hypothesis, however, remains controversial, and requires evidence that the distribution of haplotypes observed in nature corresponds with the capacity of these haplotypes to confer differences in thermal tolerance. Specifically, haplotypes predominating in tropical climates are predicted to encode increased tolerance to heat stress, but decreased tolerance to cold stress. We present direct evidence for these predictions, using mtDNA haplotypes sampled from the Australian distribution of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that the ability of flies to tolerate extreme thermal challenges is affected by sequence variation across mtDNA haplotypes, and that the thermal performance associated with each haplotype corresponds with its latitudinal prevalence. The haplotype that predominates at low (subtropical) latitudes confers greater resilience to heat stress, but lower resilience to cold stress, than haplotypes predominating at higher (temperate) latitudes. We explore molecular mechanisms that might underlie these responses, presenting evidence that the effects are in part regulated by SNPs that do not change the protein sequence. Our findings suggest that standing variation in the mitochondrial genome can be shaped by thermal selection, and could therefore contribute to evolutionary adaptation under climatic stress. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  3. Assessment of altered three-dimensional blood characteristics in aortic disease by velocity distribution analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J.; van Ooij, Pim; Schnell, Susanne; Puthumana, Jyothy; Bonow, Robert O.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo test the feasibility of velocity distribution analysis for identifying altered three-dimensional (3D) flow characteristics in patients with aortic disease based on 4D flow MRI volumetric analysis. MethodsForty patients with aortic (Ao) dilation (mid ascending aortic diameter MAA=407 mm,

  4. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  5. Two ovine mitochondrial DNAs harboring a fifth 75/76 bp repeat motif without altered gene expression in Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Oceja, A; Gamarra, D; Cardoso, S; Palencia-Madrid, L; Juste, R A; De Pancorbo, M M

    2017-03-01

    The Basque Country is home to the Latxa sheep breed, which is divided in several varieties such as Latxa Black Face (LBKF) and Latxa Blonde Face (LBLF). Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of 174 male sheep (97 LBKF and 77 LBLF) was performed with the objective of characterizing the maternal lineages of these two varieties that are the basis to produce the cheese with Idiazabal quality label. The percentage of unique haplotypes was 77.32% in LBKF and 67.53% in LBLF. Most of the individuals were classified into B haplogroup (98.85%), while A haplogroup was much less frequent. Two Latxa individuals (one LBKF and one LBLF), both belonging to B haplogroup, displayed an additional 75/76 bp tandem repeat motif. Only 33 other sequences with this repeat motif were found among 11 061 sheep sequences included in the GenBank database. Gene expression was analyzed in peripheral blood leukocytes since the additional 75/76 bp repeat motif falls within ETAS1, a domain with a possible function in regulation of replication and transcription. The mRNA expression from four mitochondrial genes (COI, cyt b, ND1, and ND2) was analyzed in the two individuals of this study with a fifth repeat motif and in four without it. Although lower transcription was observed when the additional 75/76 bp repeat motif was present, no statistically significant differences were observed. Therefore, the variation in the number of the 75/76 repeat motif does not seem to modify the gene expression rate in mitochondrial genes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Developmental exposure to second-hand smoke increases adult atherogenesis and alters mitochondrial DNA copy number and deletions in apoE(-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Fetterman

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. While many studies have focused upon the effects of adult second-hand smoke exposure on cardiovascular disease development, disease development occurs over decades and is likely influenced by childhood exposure. The impacts of in utero versus neonatal second-hand smoke exposure on adult atherosclerotic disease development are not known. The objective of the current study was to determine the effects of in utero versus neonatal exposure to a low dose (1 mg/m(3 total suspended particulate of second-hand smoke on adult atherosclerotic lesion development using the apolipoprotein E null mouse model. Consequently, apolipoprotein E null mice were exposed to either filtered air or second-hand smoke: (i in utero from gestation days 1-19, or (ii from birth until 3 weeks of age (neonatal. Subsequently, all animals were exposed to filtered air and sacrificed at 12-14 weeks of age. Oil red-O staining of whole aortas, measures of mitochondrial damage, and oxidative stress were performed. Results show that both in utero and neonatal second-hand smoke exposure significantly increased adult atherogenesis in mice compared to filtered air controls. These changes were associated with changes in aconitase and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase activities consistent with increased oxidative stress in the aorta, changes in mitochondrial DNA copy number and deletion levels. These studies show that in utero or neonatal exposure to second-hand smoke significantly influences adult atherosclerotic lesion development and results in significant alterations to the mitochondrion and its genome that may contribute to atherogenesis.

  7. Levetiracetam differentially alters CD95 expression of neuronal cells and the mitochondrial membrane potential of immune and neuronal cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah K Rogers

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological seizure disorder that affects over 100 million people worldwide. Levetiracetam, either alone, as monotherapy, or as adjunctive treatment, is widely used to control certain types of seizures. Despite its increasing popularity as a relatively safe and effective anti-convulsive treatment option, its mechanism(s of action are poorly understood. Studies have suggested neuronal, glial, and immune mechanisms of action. Understanding the precise mechanisms of action of Levetiracetam would be extremely beneficial in helping to understand the processes involved in seizure generation and epilepsy. Moreover, a full understanding of these mechanisms would help to create more efficacious treatments while minimizing side effects. The current study examined the effects of Levetiracetam on the mitochondrial membrane potential of neuronal and non-neuronal cells, in vitro, in order to determine if Levetiracetam influences metabolic processes in these cell types. In addition, this study sought to address possible immune-mediated mechanisms by determining if Levetiracetam alters the expression of immune receptor-ligand pairs. The results show that Levetiracetam induces expression of CD95 and CD178 on NGF-treated C17.2 neuronal cells. The results also show that Levetiracetam increases mitochondrial membrane potential on C17.2 neuronal cells in the presence of nerve growth factor. In contrast, Levetiracetam decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential of splenocytes and this effect was dependent on intact invariant chain, thus implicating immune cell interactions. These results suggest that both neuronal and non-neuronal anti-epileptic activities of Levetiracetam involve control over energy metabolism, more specifically, mΔΨ. Future studies are needed to further investigate this potential mechanism of action.

  8. The order of exercise during concurrent training for rehabilitation does not alter acute genetic expression, mitochondrial enzyme activity or improvements in muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Lauren G; Glover, Elisa; Bergstra, T Graham; Safdar, Adeel; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent exercise combines different modes of exercise (e.g., aerobic and resistance) into one training protocol, providing stimuli meant to increase muscle strength, aerobic capacity and mass. As disuse is associated with decrements in strength, aerobic capacity and muscle size concurrent training is an attractive modality for rehabilitation. However, interference between the signaling pathways may result in preferential improvements for one of the exercise modes. We recruited 18 young adults (10 ♂, 8 ♀) to determine if order of exercise mode during concurrent training would differentially affect gene expression, protein content and measures of strength and aerobic capacity after 2 weeks of knee-brace induced disuse. Concurrent exercise sessions were performed 3x/week for 6 weeks at gradually increasing intensities either with endurance exercise preceding (END>RES) or following (RES>END) resistance exercise. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 3 h after the first exercise bout and 48 h after the end of training. Concurrent exercise altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PRC, PPARγ), hypertrophy (PGC-1α4, REDD2, Rheb) and atrophy (MuRF-1, Runx1), increased electron transport chain complex protein content, citrate synthase and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity, muscle mass, maximum isometric strength and VO 2peak. However, the order in which exercise was completed (END>RES or RES>END) only affected the protein content of mitochondrial complex II subunit. In conclusion, concurrent exercise training is an effective modality for the rehabilitation of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, maximum strength, and peak aerobic capacity resulting from disuse, regardless of the order in which the modes of exercise are performed.

  9. The order of exercise during concurrent training for rehabilitation does not alter acute genetic expression, mitochondrial enzyme activity or improvements in muscle function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren G MacNeil

    Full Text Available Concurrent exercise combines different modes of exercise (e.g., aerobic and resistance into one training protocol, providing stimuli meant to increase muscle strength, aerobic capacity and mass. As disuse is associated with decrements in strength, aerobic capacity and muscle size concurrent training is an attractive modality for rehabilitation. However, interference between the signaling pathways may result in preferential improvements for one of the exercise modes. We recruited 18 young adults (10 ♂, 8 ♀ to determine if order of exercise mode during concurrent training would differentially affect gene expression, protein content and measures of strength and aerobic capacity after 2 weeks of knee-brace induced disuse. Concurrent exercise sessions were performed 3x/week for 6 weeks at gradually increasing intensities either with endurance exercise preceding (END>RES or following (RES>END resistance exercise. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 3 h after the first exercise bout and 48 h after the end of training. Concurrent exercise altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PRC, PPARγ, hypertrophy (PGC-1α4, REDD2, Rheb and atrophy (MuRF-1, Runx1, increased electron transport chain complex protein content, citrate synthase and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity, muscle mass, maximum isometric strength and VO 2peak. However, the order in which exercise was completed (END>RES or RES>END only affected the protein content of mitochondrial complex II subunit. In conclusion, concurrent exercise training is an effective modality for the rehabilitation of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, maximum strength, and peak aerobic capacity resulting from disuse, regardless of the order in which the modes of exercise are performed.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Sauvanet

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from

  11. Alterations in mitochondrial function and spermatozoal motility in goat spermatozoa following incubation with a human lysozyme plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huiming; Quan, Fusheng; Chen, Dongmei; Zhang, Bowei; Zhang, Yong

    2010-08-01

    Spermatozoa mediated gene transfer has become a promising technology to generate transgenic animals with disease resistance. However, exogenous DNA invasion may cause changes in spermatozoon natural defense system which result in spermatozoon dysfunction.The objective of this study was to investigate the changes of mitochondrial function and motility in goat spermatozoa after pre-incubation and incubation with and without the human lysozyme plasmid pFLAG-hLY. The results demonstrated that human lysozyme plasmid pFLAG-hLY could bind to the surface of the spermatozoon membrane at 186,000 copies/spermatozoa and incorporate to spermatozoon nucleus at 78 copies/spermatozoa after incubation. However, the treated spermatozoon samples showed a significant lower motility (29.7+/-2.2% vs. pre-incubation control 48.0+/-1.4% and incubation control 54.5+/-1.5%, P spermatozoon dysfunction. In conclusion, this study confirmed that goat spermatozoa could capture human lysozyme plasmid pFLAG-hLY,but the incubation with the plasmids resulted in a decrease of spermatozoa motility and partial rupture of mitochondrial membrane, and further prompted the expression of cytochrome c, and generation of oxidative stress in vitro and finally led to spermatozoon dysfunction.

  12. PPAR-α agonism improves whole body and muscle mitochondrial fat oxidation, but does not alter intracellular fat concentrations in burn trauma children in a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohm G Lynis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance is often associated with increased levels of intracellular triglycerides, diacylglycerol and decreased fat β-oxidation. It was unknown if this relationship was present in patients with acute insulin resistance induced by trauma. Methods A double blind placebo controlled trial was conducted in 18 children with severe burn injury. Metabolic studies to assess whole body palmitate oxidation and insulin sensitivity, muscle biopsies for mitochondrial palmitate oxidation, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl Co-A and fatty acyl carnitine concentrations, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy for muscle and liver triglycerides were compared before and after two weeks of placebo or PPAR-α agonist treatment. Results Insulin sensitivity and basal whole body palmitate oxidation as measured with an isotope tracer increased significantly (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004, respectively after PPAR-α agonist treatment compared to placebo. Mitochondrial palmitate oxidation rates in muscle samples increased significantly after PPAR-α treatment (P = 0.002. However, the concentrations of muscle triglyceride, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl CoA, fatty acyl carnitine, and liver triglycerides did not change with either treatment. PKC-θ activation during hyper-insulinemia decreased significantly following PPAR-α treatment. Conclusion PPAR-α agonist treatment increases palmitate oxidation and decreases PKC activity along with reduced insulin sensitivity in acute trauma, However, a direct link between these responses cannot be attributed to alterations in intracellular lipid concentrations.

  13. PPAR-alpha agonism improves whole body and muscle mitochondrial fat oxidation, but does not alter intracellular fat concentrations in burn trauma children in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Melanie G; Newcomer, Bradley R; Herndon, David N; Qian, Ting; Sun, Dayoung; Morio, Beatrice; Zwetsloot, Jennifer J; Dohm, G Lynis; Fram, Ricki Y; Mlcak, Ronald P; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R

    2007-04-23

    Insulin resistance is often associated with increased levels of intracellular triglycerides, diacylglycerol and decreased fat beta-oxidation. It was unknown if this relationship was present in patients with acute insulin resistance induced by trauma. A double blind placebo controlled trial was conducted in 18 children with severe burn injury. Metabolic studies to assess whole body palmitate oxidation and insulin sensitivity, muscle biopsies for mitochondrial palmitate oxidation, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl Co-A and fatty acyl carnitine concentrations, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy for muscle and liver triglycerides were compared before and after two weeks of placebo or PPAR-alpha agonist treatment. Insulin sensitivity and basal whole body palmitate oxidation as measured with an isotope tracer increased significantly (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004, respectively) after PPAR-alpha agonist treatment compared to placebo. Mitochondrial palmitate oxidation rates in muscle samples increased significantly after PPAR-alpha treatment (P = 0.002). However, the concentrations of muscle triglyceride, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl CoA, fatty acyl carnitine, and liver triglycerides did not change with either treatment. PKC-theta activation during hyper-insulinemia decreased significantly following PPAR-alpha treatment. PPAR-alpha agonist treatment increases palmitate oxidation and decreases PKC activity along with reduced insulin sensitivity in acute trauma, However, a direct link between these responses cannot be attributed to alterations in intracellular lipid concentrations.

  14. Altered 67Ga citrate distribution in patients with multiple red blood cell transfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelstad, B.; Luk, S.S.; Hattner, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Gallium-67 citrate studies from four patients who received multiple red blood cell transfusions were reviewed. Increased kidney, bladder, or bone localization was associated with decreased liver and colon activity. The findings suggest altered distribution due to competition with iron for receptor binding. Identification of inflammatory disease in two patients was possible. However, the effect of transfusions on detection of inflammatory or neoplastic diseases requires further evaluation

  15. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen.

  16. Distribution of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids inside the linear tubules vs. bulk parts of mitochondrial network as visualized by 4Pi microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlasková, Andrea; Engstová, Hana; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Lessard, M.; Alán, Lukáš; Reguera Pajuelo, David; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2015), s. 255-263 ISSN 0145-479X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02033S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial network * mitochondrial DNA * nucleoids * 4Pimicroscopy Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.080, year: 2015

  17. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Ceccatelli Berti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA, namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases.

  18. Alterations in Glutathione Redox Metabolism, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Function in the Left Ventricle of Elderly Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rat Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rat is a genetic model in which the homozygous (FA/FA male animals develop obesity and type 2 diabetes. Morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular complications, due to increased oxidative stress and inflammatory signals, are the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes. The precise molecular mechanism of contractile dysfunction and disease progression remains to be clarified. Therefore, we have investigated molecular and metabolic targets in male ZDF (30–34 weeks old rat heart compared to age matched Zucker lean (ZL controls. Hyperglycemia was confirmed by a 4-fold elevation in non-fasting blood glucose (478.43 ± 29.22 mg/dL in ZDF vs. 108.22 ± 2.52 mg/dL in ZL rats. An increase in reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and oxidative protein carbonylation was observed in ZDF rats. A significant increase in CYP4502E1 activity accompanied by increased protein expression was also observed in diabetic rat heart. Increased expression of other oxidative stress marker proteins, HO-1 and iNOS was also observed. GSH concentration and activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and GSH reductase, were, however, significantly increased in ZDF heart tissue suggesting a compensatory defense mechanism. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, Complex I and Complex IV were significantly reduced in the heart ventricle of ZDF rats in comparison to ZL rats. Western blot analysis has also suggested a decreased expression of IκB-α and phosphorylated-JNK in diabetic heart tissue. Our results have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in ZDF rats might be associated, at least in part, with altered NF-κB/JNK dependent redox cell signaling. These results might have implications in the elucidation of the mechanism of disease progression and designing strategies for diabetes prevention.

  19. Yeast flavohemoglobin, a nitric oxide oxidoreductase, is located in both the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix: effects of respiration, anoxia, and the mitochondrial genome on its intracellular level and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanova, Nina; O'Brien, Kristin M; Stahl, Brett T; McClure, Travis; Poyton, Robert O

    2005-03-04

    Yeast flavohemoglobin, YHb, encoded by the nuclear gene YHB1, has been implicated in both the oxidative and nitrosative stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous studies have shown that the expression of YHB1 is optimal under normoxic or hyperoxic conditions, yet respiring yeast cells have low levels of reduced YHb pigment as detected by carbon monoxide (CO) photolysis difference spectroscopy of glucose-reduced cells. Here, we have addressed this apparent discrepancy by determining the intracellular location of the YHb protein and analyzing the relationships between respiration, YHb level, and intracellular location. We have found that although intact respiration-proficient cells lack a YHb CO spectral signature, cell extracts from these cells have both a YHb CO spectral signature and nitric oxide (NO) consuming activity. This suggests either that YHb cannot be reduced in vivo or that YHb heme is maintained in an oxidized state in respiring cells. By using an anti-YHb antibody and CO difference spectroscopy and by measuring NO consumption, we have found that YHb localizes to two distinct intracellular compartments in respiring cells, the mitochondrial matrix and the cytosol. Moreover, we have found that the distribution of YHb between these two compartments is affected by the presence or absence of oxygen and by the mitochondrial genome. The findings suggest that YHb functions in oxidative stress indirectly by consuming NO, which inhibits mitochondrial respiration and leads to enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, and that cells can regulate intracellular distribution of YHb in accordance with this function.

  20. Earthquake impacts on microcrustacean communities inhabiting groundwater-fed springs alter species-abundance distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, Simone; Di Lorenzo, Tiziana; Galassi, Diana M P

    2018-01-24

    Earthquakes are important natural events, yet their impacts on animal communities are poorly known. Understanding earthquake impacts on groundwater communities is essential to assess their resilience and hence to perform conservation actions. We investigated how a 6.3 M w earthquake that occurred in 2009 altered the community structure (diversity, evenness, dominance, species abundance distributions and beta-diversity) of microcrustaceans (Crustacea Copepoda) inhabiting springs fed by the Gran Sasso Aquifer (Central Italy). Sampling was done in low-discharge (1997), high-discharge (2005), and post-seismic (2012) hydrological years. Stygobites (obligate groundwater species) and non-stygobites (non-obligate groundwater species) showed different patterns. A high-water discharge in 2005 altered abundance patterns of non-stygobites. The earthquake re-established former abundance patterns. Stygobites were less affected by high-water discharge in 2005, and showed strong increases in diversity and evenness after the earthquake. This effect was due to the fact that the earthquake induced a strong population decline of previously dominant stygobites (especially of Nitocrella pescei) in the aquifer, and subsequently at the main spring outlets, thus allowing a more equitable species-abundance distribution. These results highlight the importance of considering species ecology to understand the effects of a significant earthquake event on animal communities.

  1. Alteration of mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity in primary mouse skeletal muscle cells isolated from transgenic and knockout mice: role of ogg1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V; Schuler, A Michele; Chen, Jemimah; Alvarez, Diego F; Eide, Lars; Ledoux, Susan P; Wilson, Glenn L; Rachek, Lyudmila I

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence has linked mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage, increased oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, and insulin resistance (IR). The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the DNA repair enzyme, human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase (hOGG1), on palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and IR in primary cultures of skeletal muscle derived from hind limb of ogg1(-/-) knockout mice and transgenic mice, which overexpress human (hOGG1) in mitochondria (transgenic [Tg]/MTS-hOGG1). Following exposure to palmitate, we evaluated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage, mitochondrial function, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS), mitochondrial mass, JNK activation, insulin signaling pathways, and glucose uptake. Palmitate-induced mtDNA damage, mtROS, mitochondrial dysfunction, and activation of JNK were all diminished, whereas ATP levels, mitochondrial mass, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473), and insulin sensitivity were increased in primary myotubes isolated from Tg/MTS-hOGG1 mice compared to myotubes isolated from either knockout or wild-type mice. In addition, both basal and maximal respiratory rates during mitochondrial oxidation on pyruvate showed a variable response, with some animals displaying an increased respiration in muscle fibers isolated from the transgenic mice. Our results support the model that DNA repair enzyme OGG1 plays a pivotal role in repairing mtDNA damage, and consequently, in mtROS production and regulating downstream events leading to IR in skeletal muscle.

  2. Mitochondrial haplotype distribution and phylogenetic relationship of an endangered species Reeve's turtle (Mauremys reevesii in East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Shik Oh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was examined to reveal haplotype distribution and phylogenetic relationship using mitochondrial DNA CYTB gene sequences of Reeve’s turtle (Mauremys reevesii of East Asia. CYTB sequences of Reeve’s turtles were divided into 6 haplotypes (Hap01–Hap06. Chinese turtles were found in Hap01, Hap02, Hap04, and Hap05, and Hap01 was the highest frequency of 85.0%. Korean Turtles were found in Hap01, Hap03, Hap04, and Hap05, and Hap03 was the highest frequency of 52.1%. Although there was no haplotype which includes only the CYTB sequence exclusive for Reeve’s turtles of Korea, since no CYTB sequence of China was found in Hap03, it would be possible that Hap03 turtles of Korea are separated from those of China. The haplotypes of Reeve’s turtles of East Asia were monophyletic, which indicated that they had been evolved from a single maternal lineage, but went through local evolution after geographical migration and isolation in East Asia.

  3. Mitochondrial genome sequencing in Mesolithic North East Europe Unearths a new sub-clade within the broadly distributed human haplogroup C1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial haplogroup C1 has a broad global distribution but is extremely rare in Europe today. Recent ancient DNA evidence has demonstrated its presence in European Mesolithic individuals. Three individuals from the 7,500 year old Mesolithic site of Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov, Western Russia, could be assigned to haplogroup C1 based on mitochondrial hypervariable region I sequences. However, hypervariable region I data alone could not provide enough resolution to establish the phylogenetic relationship of these Mesolithic haplotypes with haplogroup C1 mitochondrial DNA sequences found today in populations of Europe, Asia and the Americas. In order to obtain high-resolution data and shed light on the origin of this European Mesolithic C1 haplotype, we target-enriched and sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of one Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov C1 individual. The updated phylogeny of C1 haplogroups indicated that the Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov haplotype represents a new distinct clade, provisionally coined "C1f". We show that all three C1 carriers of Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov belong to this clade. No haplotype closely related to the C1f sequence could be found in the large current database of ancient and present-day mitochondrial genomes. Hence, we have discovered past human mitochondrial diversity that has not been observed in modern-day populations so far. The lack of positive matches in modern populations may be explained by under-sampling of rare modern C1 carriers or by demographic processes, population extinction or replacement, that may have impacted on populations of Northeast Europe since prehistoric times.

  4. Muscle glycogen depletion does not alter segmental extracellular and intracellular water distribution measured using bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiose, Keisuke; Yamada, Yosuke; Motonaga, Keiko; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2018-02-08

    Although each gram of glycogen is well known to bind 2.7-4.0 g of water, no studies have been conducted on the effect of muscle glycogen depletion on body water distribution. We investigated changes in extracellular and intracellular water (ECW and ICW) distribution in each body segment in muscle glycogen-depletion and glycogen-recovery condition using segmental bioimpedance spectroscopy technique (BIS). Twelve male subjects consumed 7.0 g.kg body mass -1 of indigestible (glycogen-depleted group) or digestible (glycogen-recovered group) carbohydrate for 24 hours after a glycogen-depletion cycling exercise. Muscle glycogen content using 13 C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, blood hydration status, body composition, and ECW and ICW content of the arm, trunk, and leg using BIS were measured. Muscle glycogen content at the thigh muscles decreased immediately after exercise (glycogen-depleted group, 71.6 {plus minus} 12.1 to 25.5 {plus minus} 10.1 mmol.kg -1 wet wt; glycogen-recovered group, 76.2 {plus minus} 16.4 to 28.1 {plus minus} 16.8 mmol.kg -1 wet wt) and recovered in the glycogen-recovered group (72.7 {plus minus} 21.2 mmol.kg -1 wet wt), but not in the glycogen-depleted group (33.2 {plus minus} 12.6 mmol.kg -1 wet wt) 24 hours post-exercise. Fat-free mass decreased in the glycogen-depleted group ( P glycogen-recovered group 24 hours post-exercise. However, no changes were observed in ECW and ICW content at the leg in both groups. Our results suggested that glycogen depletion per se does not alter body water distribution as estimated via BIS. This information is valuable in assessing body composition using BIS in athletes who show variable glycogen status during training and recovery.

  5. Activation of protein kinase C alters the intracellular distribution and mobility of cardiac Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaq, Haifa; Wang, Dao W; Kunic, Jennifer D; George, Alfred L; Wells, K Sam; Murray, Katherine T

    2012-02-01

    Na(+) current derived from expression of the cardiac isoform SCN5A is reduced by receptor-mediated or direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Previous work has suggested a possible role for loss of Na(+) channels at the plasma membrane in this effect, but the results are controversial. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PKC activation acutely modulates the intracellular distribution of SCN5A channels and that this effect can be visualized in living cells. In human embryonic kidney cells that stably expressed SCN5A with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the channel COOH-terminus (SCN5A-GFP), Na(+) currents were suppressed by an exposure to PKC activation. Using confocal microscopy, colocalization of SCN5A-GFP channels with the plasma membrane under control and stimulated conditions was quantified. A separate population of SCN5A channels containing an extracellular epitope was immunolabeled to permit temporally stable labeling of the plasma membrane. Our results demonstrated that Na(+) channels were preferentially trafficked away from the plasma membrane by PKC activation, with a major contribution by Ca(2+)-sensitive or conventional PKC isoforms, whereas stimulation of protein kinase A (PKA) had the opposite effect. Removal of the conserved PKC site Ser(1503) or exposure to the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin eliminated the PKC-mediated effect to alter channel trafficking, indicating that both channel phosphorylation and ROS were required. Experiments using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching demonstrated that both PKC and PKA also modified channel mobility in a manner consistent with the dynamics of channel distribution. These results demonstrate that the activation of protein kinases can acutely regulate the intracellular distribution and molecular mobility of cardiac Na(+) channels in living cells.

  6. Powering Up Mitochondrial Functions to Treat Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Philadelphia, PA. “Listen to your heart” *05/2017 Keystone Symposia—Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart. Santa Fe, NM. “A heart-derived hormone that...ND6P25L combination was associated with impaired mitochondrial complex I activity, altered mitochondrial morphology, increased reactive oxygen species ...oxygen species production, sensitization of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, increased somatic mtDNA mutation levels, and shortened

  7. Mitochondrial mutations in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail K Mithani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The MitoChip v2.0 resequencing array is an array-based technique allowing for accurate and complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome. No studies have investigated mitochondrial mutation in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas. METHODOLOGY: The entire mitochondrial genome of 22 salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC of salivary glands and matched leukocyte DNA was sequenced to determine the frequency and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in ACC tumors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seventeen of 22 ACCs (77% carried mitochondrial mutations, ranging in number from 1 to 37 mutations. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Twelve of 17 tumors (70.6% carried mutations resulting in amino acid changes of translated proteins. Nine of 17 tumors (52.9% with a mutation carried an amino acid changing mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH complex. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mitochondrial mutation is frequent in salivary ACCs. The high incidence of amino acid changing mutations implicates alterations in aerobic respiration in ACC carcinogenesis. D-loop mutations are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication.

  8. Supplementing non-target taxa: bird feeding alters the local distribution of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J Hunter; Bonter, David N

    2018-03-06

    Although the effects of bird feeding on avian species have been extensively examined, few studies evaluate the indirect effects of bird feeding on non-target taxa. Bird seed could provide direct nourishment to several mammalian species (e.g., Lagomorpha, Rodentia, and Cetartiodactyla), potentially altering their distribution and behavior with possible unintended consequences for some avian populations, particularly those not directly benefiting from the resource. To examine how bird feeders may influence the presence and behavior of mammals, we used camera traps to quantify differences in the distribution and richness of mammal species frequenting sites with bird feeders and control sites (lacking feeders) in Ithaca, New York, USA. We recorded 15,684 images capturing 12 mammal species with gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) and raccoon (Procyon lotor) detected significantly more often at feeder sites than at control sites. Detections of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) marginally increased near feeders whereas detections of several carnivorous species were unrelated to the presence of bird feeders. We recorded larger gray squirrel and raccoon group sizes and greater mammal richness at feeder sites than at nearby control sites. We detected squirrels and raccoons less when snow covered the ground than on snow-free days. Ambient temperature was not a strong predictor of mammal detections. Camera trapping revealed strong, species-specific patterns in the timing of daily visitation to areas with feeders. Because many mammals depredate bird nests, the local increases in mammal richness and activity near bird feeders may create an ecological trap for avian species nesting in close proximity to supplemental feeding stations. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Alterations in Energy/Redox Metabolism Induced by Mitochondrial and Environmental Toxins: A Specific Role for Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase and the Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Paraquat Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifactorial disorder with a complex etiology including genetic risk factors, environmental exposures, and aging. While energy failure and oxidative stress have largely been associated with the loss of dopaminergic cells in PD and the toxicity induced by mitochondrial/environmental toxins, very little is known regarding the alterations in energy metabolism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and their causative role in cell death progression. In this study, we investigated the alterations in the energy/redox-metabolome in dopaminergic cells exposed to environmental/mitochondrial toxins (paraquat, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium [MPP+], and 6-hydroxydopamine [6-OHDA]) in order to identify common and/or different mechanisms of toxicity. A combined metabolomics approach using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and direct-infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS) was used to identify unique metabolic profile changes in response to these neurotoxins. Paraquat exposure induced the most profound alterations in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) metabolome. 13C-glucose flux analysis corroborated that PPP metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucono-1,5-lactone, and erythrose-4-phosphate were increased by paraquat treatment, which was paralleled by inhibition of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Proteomic analysis also found an increase in the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which supplies reducing equivalents by regenerating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels. Overexpression of G6PD selectively increased paraquat toxicity, while its inhibition with 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death. These results suggest that paraquat “hijacks” the PPP to increase NADPH reducing equivalents and stimulate paraquat redox cycling, oxidative stress, and cell death. Our study clearly demonstrates that alterations

  10. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes in women with cervical alterations from north Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G D Deluca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer remains a major public health problem in northern Argentina, showing the highest mortality rate in the country (approximately 22 cases/100000 women. Objective: The aim of this study was to provide epidemiological data on the prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV in women with pre-neoplastic lesions before the massive introduction of HPV vaccination in the country. Materials and Methods: Exfoliated cervical cells were collected to screen for HPV using the widely known MY09/11 PCR, followed by the restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP technique from a total of 714 women with previously diagnosed atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LG-SIL and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HG-SIL. Results: Overall HPV prevalence was 48.2% in ASCUS (24 different HPV types detected, 66.5% in LG-SIL (37 HPV types detected and 82.6% in HG-SIL (16 HPV types detected. HPV-16 was the most prevalent type among all cases. With respect to multiple HPV infections, 9.6% were observed in ASCUS, 14.3% in LG-SIL and 11.4% in HG-SIL. Conclusion: The major strength of our study is the assessment of a large series of women with cytological alterations in this region. The information attained will be useful as a regional baseline for future epidemiological vigilance, in the context of the national HPV vaccination program.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Aline Haas; Costa, Ana Beatriz; Engel, Jéssica Della Giustina; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2018-01-01

    Obesity leads to various changes in the body. Among them, the existing inflammatory process may lead to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, in turn, can trigger mitochondrial changes, which is called mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, excess nutrients supply (as it commonly is the case with obesity) can overwhelm the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, causing a mitochondrial dysfunction, and lead to a higher ROS formation. This increase in ROS production by the respiratory chain may also cause oxidative stress, which may exacerbate the inflammatory process in obesity. All these intracellular changes can lead to cellular apoptosis. These processes have been described in obesity as occurring mainly in peripheral tissues. However, some studies have already shown that obesity is also associated with changes in the central nervous system (CNS), with alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and in cerebral structures such as hypothalamus and hippocampus. In this sense, this review presents a general view about mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity, including related alterations, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, and focusing on the whole organism, covering alterations in peripheral tissues, BBB, and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stomatin-like protein 2 deficiency in T cells is associated with altered mitochondrial respiration and defective CD4+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Darah A; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Blagih, Julianna; Dunn, Stanley D; St-Pierre, Julie; Jones, Russell G; Hatch, Grant M; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2012-11-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mostly mitochondrial protein that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function and modulates T cell activation. To determine the mechanism of action of SLP-2, we generated T cell-specific SLP-2-deficient mice. These mice had normal numbers of thymocytes and T cells in the periphery. However, conventional SLP-2-deficient T cells had a posttranscriptional defect in IL-2 production in response to TCR ligation, and this translated into reduced CD4(+) T cell responses. SLP-2 deficiency was associated with impaired cardiolipin compartmentalization in mitochondrial membranes, decreased levels of the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) iron-sulfur protein 3, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1β subcomplex subunit 8, and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1α subcomplex subunit 9 of respiratory complex I, and decreased activity of this complex as well as of complex II plus III of the respiratory chain. In addition, SLP-2-deficient T cells showed a significant increase in uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and a greater reliance on glycolysis. Based on these results, we propose that SLP-2 organizes the mitochondrial membrane compartmentalization of cardiolipin, which is required for optimal assembly and function of respiratory chain complexes. This function, in T cells, helps to ensure proper metabolic response during activation.

  13. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are ... cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria ...

  14. ABA pretreatment can alter the distribution of polysomes in salt-stressed barley sprouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szypulska Ewa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed caryopses of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Stratus. Caryopses were germinated in darkness at 20°C in three experimental setups: (a in distilled water for 24 hours, followed by 100 mM NaCl for another 24 hours (salinity stress, SS, (b in 100 μM of abscisic acid for the first 24 hours, followed by rinsing with distilled water to remove residual ABA, and in 100 mM NaCl for another 24 hours (ABA pretreatment + salinity stress, ABAS, (c in distilled water only (control, C. Changes in the content of free polysomes (FP, membrane-bound polysomes (MBP, cytoskeleton-bound polysomes (CBP and cytomatrix-bound polysomes (CMBP were examined in barley sprouts germinated in SS and ABAS treatments for 48 hours. In salt-stressed barley sprouts, the concentrations of membrane-bound and cytoskeleton-bound polysomes (MBP, CBP and CMBP decreased significantly, whereas an increase was noted only in the free polysome (FP fraction. ABA pretreatment altered the distribution of polysomes in stressed plants. The content of cytoskeletonbound polysomes (CBP and CMBP increased, FP levels decreased, whereas no changes in MBP content were observed in response to ABA treatment. Our results suggest that plants respond to salt stress by increasing the concentrations of free polysomes that are probably released from damaged cell structures, mainly membranes. Our present and previous findings indicate that ABA could inhibit the release of FP in stressed plants by enhancing polysome binding to the cytoskeleton.

  15. Altered Distribution of Peripheral Blood Maturation-Associated B-Cell Subsets in Chronic Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Julia; Polvorosa, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez-Quintela, Arturo; Madruga, Ignacio; Marcos, Miguel; Pérez-Nieto, Maria Angeles; Hernandez-Cerceño, Maria Luisa; Orfao, Alberto; Laso, Francisco Javier

    2015-08-01

    Although decreased counts of peripheral blood (PB) B cells-associated with an apparently contradictory polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia-have been reported in chronic alcoholism, no information exists about the specific subsets of circulating B cells altered and their relationship with antibody production. Here, we analyzed for the first time the distribution of multiple maturation-associated subpopulations of PB B cells in alcoholism and its potential relationship with the onset of liver disease. PB samples from 35 male patients-20 had alcoholic hepatitis (AH) and 15 chronic alcoholism without liver disease (AWLD)-were studied, in parallel to 19 male healthy donors (controls). The distribution of PB B-cell subsets (immature/regulatory, naïve, CD27(-) and CD27(+) memory B lymphocytes, and circulating plasmablasts of distinct immunoglobulin-Ig-isotypes) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Patients with AH showed significantly decreased numbers of total PB B lymphocytes (vs. controls and AWLD), at the expense of immature, memory, and, to a lesser extent, also naïve B cells. AWLD showed reduced numbers of immature and naïve B cells (vs. controls), but higher PB counts of plasmablasts (vs. the other 2 groups). Although PB memory B cells were reduced among the patients, the percentage of surface (s)IgA(+) cells (particularly CD27(-) /sIgA(+) cells) was increased in AH, whereas both sIgG(+) and sIgA(+) memory B cells were significantly overrepresented in AWLD versus healthy donors. Regarding circulating plasmablasts, patients with AH only showed significantly reduced counts of sIgG(+) cells versus controls. In contrast, the proportion of both sIgA(+) and sIgG(+) plasmablasts-from all plasmablasts-was reduced in AH and increased in AWLD (vs. the other 2 groups). AH and AWLD patients display a significantly reduced PB B-cell count, at the expense of decreased numbers of recently produced immature/regulatory B cells and naïve B cells, together with an increase in Ig

  16. Low testosterone levels are related to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and altered subclinical atherosclerotic markers in type 2 diabetic male patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; de Marañon, Aranzazu M; Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Jover, Ana; Garzon, Sandra; Rocha, Milagros; Victor, Victor M; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    Low testosterone levels in men are associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk. However, the role of testosterone in mitochondrial function and leukocyte-endothelium interactions is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between testosterone levels, metabolic parameters, oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, inflammation and leukocyte-endothelium interactions in type 2 diabetic patients. The study was performed in 280 male type 2 diabetic patients and 50 control subjects. Anthropometric and metabolic parameters, testosterone levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, TNFα, adhesion molecules and leukocyte-endothelium cell interactions were evaluated. Testosterone levels were lower in diabetic patients. Total and mitochondrial ROS were increased and mitochondrial membrane potential, SOD and GSR expression levels were reduced in diabetic patients. TNFα, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels, leukocyte rolling flux and adhesion were all enhanced in diabetic patients, while rolling velocity was reduced. Testosterone levels correlated negatively with glucose, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, triglycerides, nonHDL-c, ApoB, hs-CRP and AIP, and positively with HDL-c and ApoA1. The multivariable regression model showed that HDL-c, HOMA-IR and age were independently associated with testosterone. Furthermore, testosterone levels correlated positively with membrane potential and rolling velocity and negatively with ROS production, VCAM-1, rolling flux and adhesion. Our data highlight that low testosterone levels in diabetic men are related to impaired metabolic profile and mitochondrial function and enhanced inflammation and leukocyte-endothelium cell interaction, which leaves said patients at risk of cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The mitochondrial fusion-promoting factor mitofusin is a substrate of the PINK1/parkin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C Poole

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the PINK1 or parkin genes result in recessive heritable forms of parkinsonism. Genetic studies of Drosophila orthologs of PINK1 and parkin indicate that PINK1, a mitochondrially targeted serine/threonine kinase, acts upstream of Parkin, a cytosolic ubiquitin-protein ligase, to promote mitochondrial fragmentation, although the molecular mechanisms by which the PINK1/Parkin pathway promotes mitochondrial fragmentation are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that PINK1 and Parkin promote mitochondrial fragmentation by targeting core components of the mitochondrial morphogenesis machinery for ubiquitination. We report that the steady-state abundance of the mitochondrial fusion-promoting factor Mitofusin (dMfn is inversely correlated with the activity of PINK1 and Parkin in Drosophila. We further report that dMfn is ubiquitinated in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent fashion and that dMfn co-immunoprecipitates with Parkin. By contrast, perturbations of PINK1 or Parkin did not influence the steady-state abundance of the mitochondrial fission-promoting factor Drp1 or the mitochondrial fusion-promoting factor Opa1, or the subcellular distribution of Drp1. Our findings suggest that dMfn is a direct substrate of the PINK1/Parkin pathway and that the mitochondrial morphological alterations and tissue degeneration phenotypes that derive from mutations in PINK1 and parkin result at least in part from reduced ubiquitin-mediated turnover of dMfn.

  18. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Cooper, H M; Reyes, A; Di Re, M; Sembongi, H; Litwin, T R; Gao, J; Neuman, K C; Fearnley, I M; Spinazzola, A; Walker, J E; Holt, I J

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion.

  19. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V, Oliver C

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities.

  20. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V., Oliver C.

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities. PMID:26207997

  1. Distribution of trace elements in altered pyroclastites from Monte Vulture volcano (southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccarreta, G.

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Three pyroclastic deposits from Monte Yulture volcanic area (Potenza, southern Italy looking like paleosols in the field were investigated in a previous study for mineralogy and major elements to estimate the stage of the weathering. Here is dealt with the behaviour of sorne trace elements (Ce, La, Ba, Ni, Cr, Y, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Nb in the same deposits to give a comprehensive geochemical picture. The distribution of the chemical elements within the whole rock and after its attack with Na-pyrosulfate (residue + solute has been considered. Ba and Sr, as well as their distribution, appear to be controlled by the residual crystals in each of the deposits; La, Ce, Y and Nb are more concentrated in the solute that once was represented by vitric component, allophane, and Fe-Si-Al gels, biotite, carbonates and analcite; Y, Cr, and Ni show similar trends in whole rock and in solute. In particular La, Ce, Y, Y, Cr and Ni in the lowermost unit increase with the depth, as well as the contents of gels and allophane. Probably this behaviour was superimposed by the fluctuation of the water tables, as documented by the occurrence of a carbonate level upon the unit lies. It is concluded that the earliest stage of weathering did not affect the trace element distribution and that interpretations about chemical changes in deeply altered pyroclastic rocks should be always the outcome of careful accurate analyses.En un trabajo previo se estudiaron tres depósitos piroclásticos, considerados como paleosuelos, del área volcánica del Monte Yulture (Potenza, Italia para deducir su grado de meteorización. En el presente trabajo se estudia el comportamiento de algunos elementos traza (Ce, La, Ba, Ni, Cr, Y, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb en esos depósitos para intentar obtener una imagen geoquímica más completa. Se ha estudiado la distribución de elementos traza en la roca total y después de un ataque con pirosulfato-Na (residuo + solución. Ba y Sr parecen estar controlados

  2. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Thuan-Son T

    2015-01-01

    , and APE1 incision activity (in cell lysates) on a DNA substrate containing an AP site (to estimate DNA repair efficiency). RESULTS: In the PBMCs of AD patients, we found reduced basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption, reduced proton leak, higher dATP level, and lower AP endonuclease 1 activity, depending...

  3. The spatial distribution and chemical heterogeneity of clinoptilolite at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada: Evidence for polygenetic hypogene alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, D.E.; Szymanski, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    This part of TRAC's Annual Report for 1993 summarizes the finding of previous reports on the major element geochemistry of zeolitic alteration of the tuffs at Yucca Mountain and updates the status of work. In this report we examine the spatial distribution of zeolites by stratigraphic units and boreholes and the various types of chemical alteration of clinoptilolite indicated by the data reported in Broxton et al. and Bish and Chipera. The purpose is to evaluate the extent of the metasomatic alteration and to test the hypogene hypothesis of Szymanski. In this regard, it is of prime importance to evaluate whether the metasomatic alteration at Yucca Mountain is due to supergene or hypogene processes. In this report, the term open-quotes supergeneclose quotes denotes alteration and mineralization produced by fluids derived directly from atmospheric precipitation and infiltration through the vadose zone, and the term open-quotes hypogeneclose quotes denotes alteration and mineralization produced by fluids from the phreatic zone regardless of their former location or residence time in the Earth's crust. This report begins with a review of previous work on the genesis of zeolites of the Nevada Test Site

  4. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappal, Ravinder; MacDougald, Michelle; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  5. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  6. Post-exercise cold water immersion does not alter high intensity interval training-induced exercise performance and Hsp72 responses, but enhances mitochondrial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Paula Fernandes; Magalhães, Sílvia Mourão; Fonseca, Ivana Alice Teixeira; da Costa Santos, Vanessa Batista; de Matos, Mariana Aguiar; Peixoto, Marco Fabrício Dias; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; Crandall, Craig; Araújo, Hygor Nunes; Silveira, Leonardo Reis; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; de Castro Magalhães, Flávio; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of regular post-exercise cold water immersion (CWI) on intramuscular markers of cellular stress response and signaling molecules related to mitochondria biogenesis and exercise performance after 4 weeks of high intensity interval training (HIIT). Seventeen healthy subjects were allocated into two groups: control (CON, n = 9) or CWI (n = 8). Each HIIT session consisted of 8-12 cycling exercise stimuli (90-110 % of peak power) for 60 s followed by 75 s of active recovery three times per week, for 4 weeks (12 HIIT sessions). After each HIIT session, the CWI had their lower limbs immersed in cold water (10 °C) for 15 min and the CON recovered at room temperature. Exercise performance was evaluated before and after HIIT by a 15-km cycling time trial. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained pre and 72 h post training. Samples were analyzed for heat shock protein 72 kDa (Hsp72), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) assessed by western blot. In addition, the mRNA expression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 and 2 (NRF1 and 2), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CaMK2) and enzymes citrate synthase (CS), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK4) were assessed by real-time PCR. Time to complete the 15-km cycling time trial was reduced with training (p training, but were not different between groups (p > 0.05). No differences were observed with training or condition for mRNA expression of PGC-1α (p = 0.31), CPT1 (p = 0.14), CS (p = 0.44), and NRF-2 (p = 0.82). However, HFS-1 (p = 0.007), PDK4 (p = 0.03), and Tfam (p = 0.03) mRNA were higher in CWI. NRF-1 decrease in both groups after training (p = 0

  7. Altered Frequency Distribution in the Electroencephalogram is Correlated to the Analgesic Effect of Remifentanil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Carina; Malver, Lasse P; Kurita, Geana P

    2015-01-01

    Opioids alter resting state brain oscillations by multiple and complex factors, which are still to be elucidated. To increase our knowledge, multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was subjected to multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), to identify the most descriptive frequency bands and scalp...... remifentanil treatment. As the EEG alterations were correlated to the analgesic effect, the approach may prove to be a novel methodology for monitoring individual efficacy to opioids....

  8. Mitochondrial physiology in the skeletal and cardiac muscles is altered in torrent ducks, Merganetta armata, from high altitudes in the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Neal J; Ivy, Catherine M; Alza, Luis; Cheek, Rebecca; York, Julia M; Chua, Beverly; Milsom, William K; McCracken, Kevin G; Scott, Graham R

    2016-12-01

    Torrent ducks inhabit fast-flowing rivers in the Andes from sea level to altitudes up to 4500 m. We examined the mitochondrial physiology that facilitates performance over this altitudinal cline by comparing the respiratory capacities of permeabilized fibers, the activities of 16 key metabolic enzymes and the myoglobin content in muscles between high- and low-altitude populations of this species. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (assessed using substrates of mitochondrial complexes I, II and/or IV) were higher in highland ducks in the gastrocnemius muscle - the primary muscle used to support swimming and diving - but were similar between populations in the pectoralis muscle and the left ventricle. The heightened respiratory capacity in the gastrocnemius of highland ducks was associated with elevated activities of cytochrome oxidase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). Although respiratory capacities were similar between populations in the other muscles, highland ducks had elevated activities of ATP synthase, lactate dehydrogenase, MDH, hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in the left ventricle, and elevated MDH activity and myoglobin content in the pectoralis. Thus, although there was a significant increase in the oxidative capacity of the gastrocnemius in highland ducks, which correlates with improved performance at high altitudes, the variation in metabolic enzyme activities in other muscles not correlated to respiratory capacity, such as the consistent upregulation of MDH activity, may serve other functions that contribute to success at high altitudes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    of human diseases arising from defects in mitochondrial ion and ROS homeostasis, energy production and morphology [1]. Parkinson´s Disease (PD) is a very good example of this important mitochondrial component on neurodegenerative diseases. Anuradha Yadav, Swati Agrawal, Shashi Kant Tiwari, and Rajnish K. Chaturvedi (CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research / Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, India) [6] remark in their review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD with special focus on the role of oxidative stress and bioenergetic deficits. These alterations may have their origin on pathogenic gene mutations in important genes such as DJ-1, -syn, parkin, PINK1 or LRRK2. These mutations, in turn, may cause defects in mitochondrial dynamics (key events like fission/fusion, biogenesis, trafficking in retrograde and anterograde directions, and mitophagy). This work reviews different strategies to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics in order to ameliorate the neurodegenerative process, with an emphasis on clinical trials reports that indicate their potential. Among them creatine, Coenzyme Q10 and mitochondrial targeted antioxidants/peptides are reported to have the most remarkable effects in clinical trials. They highlight a dual effect of PGC-1α expression on PD prognosis. Whereas a modest expression of this transcriptional co-activator results in positive effects, a moderate to substantial overexpession may have deleterious consequences. As strategies to induce PGC-1α activation, these authors remark the possibility to activate Sirt1 with resveratrol, to use PPAR agonists such as pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, fenofibrate and bezafibrate. Other strategies include the triggering of Nrf2/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway by triterpenoids (derivatives of oleanolic acid) or by Bacopa monniera, the enhancement of ATP production by carnitine and -lipoic acid. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are the prime source of neurodegenerative diseases and

  10. Warming Alters the Size Spectrum and Shifts the Distribution of Biomass in Aquatic Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Body size is one of the key determinants of community structure. The relationship between abundance and body size can explain how community biomass is partitioned among the biota of an ecosystem. We used an aquatic mesocosm experiment to determine how warming of ~4?C would affect the body size, biomass and taxonomic structure of planktonic communities. We found that warming increased the steepness of the slope of the community size spectrum, primarily by altering the phyto...

  11. Cambogin exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on breast adenocarcinoma through the induction of NADPH oxidase 1 and the alteration of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kaikai; Lu, Fangfang; Xie, Jianling; Wu, Minfeng; Cai, Bo; Liu, Yurong; Zhang, Hong; Tan, Hongsheng; Pan, Yingyi; Xu, Hongxi

    2016-08-02

    Cambogin, a bioactive polycyclic polyprenylated acylphoroglucinol (PPAP) derived from the Garcinia genus, possesses proapoptotic effect in medulloblastoma and breast cancer cells. We have previously demonstrated that the proapoptotic effect of cambogin is driven by the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we have shown that the inhibitory effect of cambogin on cell proliferation is associated with the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and mitochondrial fragmentation. Cambogin also promotes the mutual complex formation of the membrane-bound subunit p22phox of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), as well as the phosphorylation of the cytosolic subunit p47phox, subsequently enhancing membrane-bound NOX1 activity, which leads to increases in intracellular and mitochondrial levels of O2.- and H2O2. Pharmacological inhibition of NOX1 using apocynin (pan-NOX inhibitor), ML171 (NOX1 inhibitor) or siRNA against NOX1 prevents the increases in O2.- and H2O2 levels and the anti-proliferative effect of cambogin. Antioxidants, including SOD (superoxide dismutase), CAT (catalase) and EUK-8, are also able to restore cell viability in the presence of cambogin. Besides, cambogin increases the dissociation of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) from ASK1, switching the inactive form of ASK1 to the active kinase, subsequently leads to the phosphorylation of JNK/SAPK, which is abolished upon ML171 treatment. The proapoptotic effect of cambogin in breast cancer cells is also aggravated upon knocking down Trx1 in MCF-7 cells. Taken in conjunction, these data indicate that the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect of cambogin is mediated via inducing NOX1-dependent ROS production and the dissociation of ASK1 and Trx1.

  12. BINDING OF THE RESPIRATORY CHAIN INHIBITOR ANTIMYCIN TO THE MITOCHONDRIAL bc1 COMPLEX: A NEW CRYSTAL STRUCTURE REVEALS AN ALTERED INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN-BONDING PATTERN.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-01-01

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Tw...

  13. Climate change may alter breeding ground distributions of eastern migratory monarchs (Danaus plexippus) via range expansion of Asclepias host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Nathan P

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can profoundly alter species' distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp.) host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in summer months

  14. Climate change may alter breeding ground distributions of eastern migratory monarchs (Danaus plexippus via range expansion of Asclepias host plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Lemoine

    Full Text Available Climate change can profoundly alter species' distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp. host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in

  15. Climate Change May Alter Breeding Ground Distributions of Eastern Migratory Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) via Range Expansion of Asclepias Host Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can profoundly alter species’ distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp.) host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in summer months

  16. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman W. El-Hattab

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA while more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA. Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular noncompaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain (ETC complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial tRNAs, rRNAs, ribosomal proteins, and translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  17. Treatment with tianeptine induces antidepressive-like effects and alters the neurotrophin levels, mitochondrial respiratory chain and cycle Krebs enzymes in the brain of maternally deprived adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della, Franciela P; Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Santos, Maria Augusta B dos; Tomaz, Débora B; Antunes, Altamir R; Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Maternally deprived rats were treated with tianeptine (15 mg/kg) once a day for 14 days during their adult phase. Their behavior was then assessed using the forced swimming and open field tests. The BDNF, NGF and energy metabolism were assessed in the rat brain. Deprived rats increased the immobility time, but tianeptine reversed this effect and increased the swimming time; the BDNF levels were decreased in the amygdala of the deprived rats treated with saline and the BDNF levels were decreased in the nucleus accumbens within all groups; the NGF was found to have decreased in the hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens of the deprived rats; citrate synthase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine and the creatine kinase was decreased in the hippocampus and amygdala of the deprived rats; the mitochondrial complex I and II-III were inhibited, and tianeptine increased the mitochondrial complex II and IV in the hippocampus of the non-deprived rats; the succinate dehydrogenase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine. So, tianeptine showed antidepressant effects conducted on maternally deprived rats, and this can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression.

  18. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  19. Binding of the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin to the mitochondrial bc1 complex: a new crystal structure reveals an altered intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y; Berry, Edward A

    2005-08-19

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28 A resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cytochrome b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density, the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alphaA helix.

  20. Altered chromatographic behaviour of mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase induced by stabilization of the protein by binding of 6'-O-fluorescein-atractyloside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vernon R; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2003-01-01

    Atractyloside (ATR) is a high-affinity specific inhibitor of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase (AAT). The binding of a fluorescent derivative, 6'- O -fluorescein-ATR (FATR), to mitochondria has been characterized. The binding constants obtained are in agreement with previously published values for ATR, demonstrating that FATR is a suitable probe of the AAT. AAT inhibited by FATR (FATR-AAT) was solubilized in dodecyl maltoside and purified by two separate ion-exchange chromatography steps at different pHs, which allowed FATR-AAT to be purified to homogeneity. The presence of the bound fluorescent probe enabled the inhibited AAT to be distinguished from the unliganded protein during chromatography, as they were markedly different in their chromatographic behaviour. The purified FATR-AAT was dimeric and in a single major conformation containing 1 mole FATR per mole of AAT dimer. In contrast, uninhibited AAT was monomeric and conformationally unstable. Use of the fluorescent ATR derivative in the development of the protocol enabled the stable dimeric AAT to be monitored directly and purified more effectively. The purification protocol was repeated using non-derivatized ATR, and highly pure AAT was obtained that was devoid of other members of the mitochondrial carrier family. PMID:14498831

  1. Evidence of remediation-induced alteration of subsurface poly- and perfluoroalkyl substance distribution at a former firefighter training area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Meghan E; Schaefer, Charles; Richards, Trenton; Backe, Will J; Field, Jennifer A; Houtz, Erika; Sedlak, David L; Guelfo, Jennifer L; Wunsch, Assaf; Higgins, Christopher P

    2014-06-17

    Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a class of fluorinated chemicals that are utilized in firefighting and have been reported in groundwater and soil at several firefighter training areas. In this study, soil and groundwater samples were collected from across a former firefighter training area to examine the extent to which remedial activities have altered the composition and spatial distribution of PFASs in the subsurface. Log Koc values for perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), estimated from analysis of paired samples of groundwater and aquifer solids, indicated that solid/water partitioning was not entirely consistent with predictions based on laboratory studies. Differential PFAA transport was not strongly evident in the subsurface, likely due to remediation-induced conditions. When compared to the surface soil spatial distributions, the relative concentrations of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and PFAA precursors in groundwater strongly suggest that remedial activities altered the subsurface PFAS distribution, presumably through significant pumping of groundwater and transformation of precursors to PFAAs. Additional evidence for transformation of PFAA precursors during remediation included elevated ratios of perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) to PFOS in groundwater near oxygen sparging wells.

  2. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III a...

  3. Profiling of Plasma Metabolites Suggests Altered Mitochondrial Fuel Usage and Remodeling of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Liu

    2017-05-01

    Discussion: DKD is associated with altered fuel substrate use and remodeling of sphingolipid metabolism in T2DM with DKD. Associations of albuminuria and impaired filtration function with distinct metabolomic signatures suggest different pathophysiology underlying these 2 manifestations of DKD.

  4. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy.

  5. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS-induced anxiety and related mood disorders in a zebrafish model: altered brain proteome profile implicates mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Chakravarty

    Full Text Available Anxiety and depression are major chronic mood disorders, and the etiopathology for each appears to be repeated exposure to diverse unpredictable stress factors. Most of the studies on anxiety and related mood disorders are performed in rodents, and a good model is chronic unpredictable stress (CUS. In this study, we have attempted to understand the molecular basis of the neuroglial and behavioral changes underlying CUS-induced mood disorders in the simplest vertebrate model, the zebrafish, Danio rerio. Zebrafish were subjected to a CUS paradigm in which two different stressors were used daily for 15 days, and thorough behavioral analyses were performed to assess anxiety and related mood disorder phenotypes using the novel tank test, shoal cohesion and scototaxis. Fifteen days of exposure to chronic stressors appears to induce an anxiety and related mood disorder phenotype. Decreased neurogenesis, another hallmark of anxiety and related disorders in rodents, was also observed in this zebrafish model. The common molecular markers of rodent anxiety and related disorders, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, calcineurin (ppp3r1a and phospho cyclic AMP response element binding protein (pCREB, were also replicated in the fish model. Finally, using 2DE FTMS/ITMSMS proteomics analyses, 18 proteins were found to be deregulated in zebrafish anxiety and related disorders. The most affected process was mitochondrial function, 4 of the 18 differentially regulated proteins were mitochondrial proteins: PHB2, SLC25A5, VDAC3 and IDH2, as reported in rodent and clinical samples. Thus, the zebrafish CUS model and proteomics can facilitate not only uncovering new molecular targets of anxiety and related mood disorders but also the routine screening of compounds for drug development.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  7. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fact, many cases of mitochondrial disease are sporadic, meaning that they occur without any family history. To ... temporary vision loss, difficulty speaking, or difficulty understanding speech) and lead to progressive brain injury. The cause ...

  8. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-12-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. The intra-mitochondrial availability of molecular oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor drives the evolutionary fashioned chemiosmotic production of ATP as a high-efficiency biological process. The mechanistic bases of carcinogenesis have demonstrated profound alteration of normative mitochondrial function, notably dysregulated respiratory processes. Accordingly, the classic Warburg effect functionally links aerobic glycolysis, aberrant production and release of lactate, and metabolic down-regulation of mitochondrial oxidative processes with the carcinogenetic phenotype. We surmise, however, that aerobic fermentation by cancer cells may also represent a developmental re-emergence of an evolutionarily conserved early phenotype, which was "sidelined" with the emergence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary mechanism for ATP production in normal cells. Regardless of state-dependent physiological status in mixed populations of cancer cells, it has been established that mitochondria are functionally linked to the initiation of cancer and its progression. Biochemical, molecular, and physiological differences in cancer cell mitochondria, notably mtDNA heteroplasmy and allele-specific expression of selected nuclear genes, may represent major focal points for novel targeting and elimination of cancer cells in metastatic disease afflicting human populations. To date, and despite considerable research efforts, the practical realization of advanced mitochondrial

  9. Sub-seafloor epidosite alteration: Timing, depth and stratigraphic distribution in the Semail ophiolite, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgen, Samuel A.; Diamond, Larryn W.; Mercolli, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Pervasive epidotization of igneous rocks is a common feature in the ophiolite record of hydrothermally altered oceanic crust. Current genetic models view epidosites as markers of focussed upflow of hydrothermal fluid beneath oceanic spreading ridges. The epidosites are envisaged to form at the base of the sheeted dike complex (SDC) during active plate spreading. Our mapping of the Semail ophiolite in Oman has revealed abundant epidosites in the volcanic sequence, some exceeding 1 km2 in extent. They are more frequent and far larger than the mineralogically identical epidosites in the SDC. We have also found epidosites that traverse the entire SDC from bottom to top. Thus, rather than being restricted to the base of the SDC, as implied by current models, epidosites in fact occur throughout the SDC and dominantly within the overlying volcanic pile. We report the occurrence of 19 epidosite bodies and their crosscutting relations with respect to host lava units, dikes, intrusive stocks and also seafloor umbers. The volcanostratigraphic affiliation of the dikes is identified by their whole-rock and clinopyroxene compositions. The relations set constraints on the timing of epidotization with respect to igneous activity in the ophiolite. At least one of the epidosites in the SDC formed during Lasail off-axis volcanism. Another epidosite in the SDC and many in the volcanic units formed later during post-spreading, Alley and Boninitic Alley supra-subduction zone volcanism. Only permissive, not compelling, evidence allows just two of the epidosites to have formed within the main-stage SDC during or shortly after its emplacement. We conclude that epidotization of the oceanic crust is not necessarily coupled to spreading ridges and that it can occur during fore-arc volcanism. This finding is consistent with evidence from the modern seafloor and it requires a different hydrothermal environment to that traditionally associated with alteration beneath spreading axes. The timing

  10. Altered nucleocytoplasmic proteome and transcriptome distributions in an in vitro model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Eun Kim

    Full Text Available Aberrant nucleocytoplasmic localization of proteins has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Evidence suggests that cytoplasmic mislocalization of nuclear proteins such as transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 and fused in sarcoma (FUS may be associated with neurotoxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. This study investigated the changes in nucleocytoplasmic distributions of the proteome and transcriptome in an in vitro model of ALS. After subcellular fractionation of motor neuron-like cell lines expressing wild-type or G93A mutant hSOD1, quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq were performed for the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. A subset of the results was validated via immunoblotting. A total of 1,925 proteins were identified in either the nuclear or cytoplasmic fractions, and 32% of these proteins were quantified in both fractions. The nucleocytoplasmic distribution of 37 proteins was significantly changed in mutant cells with nuclear and cytoplasmic shifts in 13 and 24 proteins, respectively (p<0.05. The proteins shifted towards the nucleus were enriched regarding pathways of RNA transport and processing (Dhx9, Fmr1, Srsf3, Srsf6, Tra2b, whereas protein folding (Cct5, Cct7, Cct8, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis (Farsb, Nars, Txnrd1, synaptic vesicle cycle (Cltc, Nsf, Wnt signalling (Cltc, Plcb3, Plec, Psmd3, Ruvbl1 and Hippo signalling (Camk2d, Plcb3, Ruvbl1 pathways were over-represented in the proteins shifted to the cytoplasm. A weak correlation between the changes in protein and mRNA levels was found only in the nucleus, where mRNA was relatively abundant in mutant cells. This study provides a comprehensive dataset of the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the proteome and transcriptome in an in vitro model of ALS. An integrated analysis of the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the proteome and transcriptome demonstrated

  11. The mitochondrial function of the cerebral vasculature in insulin-resistant Zucker obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdzo, Ivan; Rutkai, Ibolya; Tokes, Tunde; Sure, Venkata N L R; Katakam, Prasad V G; Busija, David W

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about mitochondrial functioning in the cerebral vasculature during insulin resistance (IR). We examined mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries of male Zucker obese (ZO) rats and phenotypically normal Zucker lean (ZL) rats using the Seahorse XFe24 analyzer. We investigated mitochondrial morphology in cerebral blood vessels as well as mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial protein expression levels in cerebral arteries and microvessels. We also measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cerebral microvessels. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial respiration components (nonmitochondrial respiration, basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and spare respiratory capacity) showed similar levels among the ZL and ZO groups with the exception of maximal respiration, which was higher in the ZO group. We examined the role of nitric oxide by measuring mitochondrial respiration following inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and mitochondrial activation after administration of diazoxide (DZ). Both ZL and ZO groups showed similar responses to these stimuli with minor variations.l-NAME significantly increased the proton leak, and DZ decreased nonmitochondrial respiration in the ZL group. Other components were not affected. Mitochondrial morphology and distribution within vascular smooth muscle and endothelium as well as mitochondrial protein levels were similar in the arteries and microvessels of both groups. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and ROS levels were increased in cerebral microvessels of the ZO. Our study suggests that mitochondrial function is not significantly altered in the cerebral vasculature of young ZO rats, but increased ROS production might be due to increased eNOS in the cerebral microcirculation during IR. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Alterations in the perfusion and distribution after normo- and hypothermic ischemia of the kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, K.J.; Heinze, H.G.; Eisenberger, F.; Chaussy, C.; Wirth, H.; Muenchen Univ.; Muenchen Univ.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental examinations were performed in 22 dogs to find out the mechanism which leads to a permanent or a reversible damage of the renal parenchyma after normo- and hypothermic ischemia. For this reason the perfusion and the distribution were examined with 133 Xe, the vasculat changes by angiography, and the parenchymal function with 131 I-Hippuran. After normothermic ischemia a short-term reactive hyperemia appeared, which however could not compensate the damage of the renal tubular cells and the resulting excretory insufficiency. After hypothermic ischemia the perfusion was reduced, probably as a consequence of a vasoconstriction by cold, however, the function of the tubular cells remained intact, because of the protective mechanism of the hypothermia. The importance of these findings for the development of the so called 'shock-kidney' (acute tubular necrosis) and for the conservative renal surgery in hypothermia is discussed and the application of measures beneficial to perfusion, are suggested. (orig.) [de

  13. D-2-Hydroxyglutarate does not mimic all the IDH mutation effects, in particular the reduced etoposide-triggered apoptosis mediated by an alteration in mitochondrial NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oizel, K; Gratas, C; Nadaradjane, A; Oliver, L; Vallette, F M; Pecqueur, C

    2015-03-26

    Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-1 and -2 have recently been described in glioma. This mutation leads to a neomorphic enzymatic activity as the conversion of isocitrate to alpha ketoglutarate (αKG) is replaced by the conversion of αKG to D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) with NADPH oxidation. It has been suggested that this oncometabolite D-2HG via inhibition of αKG-dioxygenases is involved in multiple functions such as epigenetic modifications or hypoxia responses. The present study is aimed at deciphering how the mutant IDH can affect cancer pathogenesis, in particular with respect to its associated oncometabolite D-2HG. We show that the overexpression of mutant IDH in glioma cells or treatment with D-2HG triggered an increase in cell proliferation. However, although mutant IDH reduced cell sensitivity to the apoptotic inducer etoposide, D-2HG exhibited no effect on apoptosis. Instead, we found that the apoptotic effect was mediated through the mitochondrial NADH pool reduction and could be inhibited by oxamate. These data show that besides D-2HG production, mutant IDH affects other crucial metabolite pools. These observations lead to a better understanding of the biology of IDH mutations in gliomas and their response to therapy.

  14. Aluminium oxide nanoparticles induce mitochondrial-mediated oxidative stress and alter the expression of antioxidant enzymes in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Subbarayan, Periasamy Vaiyapuri; Ramesh, E; Al-Hazzani, Amal A; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Alwarthan, Abdulrahman A

    2013-01-01

    An urgent need for toxicological studies on aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al(2) [Formula: see text]NPs) has arisen from their rapidly emerging range of applications in the food and agricultural sectors. Despite the widespread use of nanoscale aluminium and its composites in the food industry, there is a serious lack of information concerning the biological activities of Al(2) [Formula: see text]NPs (ANPs) and their impact on human health. In this preliminary study, the effects of ANPs on metabolic stress in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were analysed. The results showed dose-dependent effects, including cellular toxicity. The mitochondrial membrane potential in the hMSCs decreased with increasing ANP concentrations after 24 h of exposure. The expression levels of oxidative stress-responsive enzymes were monitored by RT-PCR. The expression levels of CYP1A and POR were up-regulated in response to ANPs, and a significant down-regulation in the expression of the antioxidant enzyme SOD was observed. Further, dose-dependent changes in the mRNA levels of GSTM3, GPX and GSR were noted. These findings suggest that the toxicity of ANPs in hMSCs may be mediated through an increase in oxidative stress. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the nanotoxicological effects of ANPs on hMSCs, which will be useful for nanotoxicological indexing.

  15. Natural reward experience alters AMPA and NMDA receptor distribution and function in the nucleus accumbens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle K Pitchers

    Full Text Available Natural reward and drugs of abuse converge upon the mesolimbic system which mediates motivation and reward behaviors. Drugs induce neural adaptations in this system, including transcriptional, morphological, and synaptic changes, which contribute to the development and expression of drug-related memories and addiction. Previously, it has been reported that sexual experience in male rats, a natural reward behavior, induces similar neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic system and affects natural reward and drug-related behavior. The current study determined whether sexual experience causes long-lasting changes in mating, or ionotropic glutamate receptor trafficking or function in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, following 3 different reward abstinence periods: 1 day, 1 week, or 1 month after final mating session. Male Sprague Dawley rats mated during 5 consecutive days (sexual experience or remained sexually naïve to serve as controls. Sexually experienced males displayed facilitation of initiation and performance of mating at each time point. Next, intracellular and membrane surface expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA: NR1 subunit and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA: GluA1, GluA2 subunits receptors in the NAc was determined using a bis(sulfosuccinimidylsuberate (BS(3 protein cross-linking assay followed by Western Blot analysis. NR1 expression was increased at 1 day abstinence both at surface and intracellular, but decreased at surface at 1 week of abstinence. GluA2 was increased intracellularly at 1 week and increased at the surface after 1 month of abstinence. Finally, whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiological recordings determined reduced AMPA/NMDA ratio of synaptic currents in NAc shell neurons following stimulation of cortical afferents in sexually experienced males after all reward abstinence periods. Together, these data show that sexual experience causes long-term alterations in glutamate receptor expression and

  16. Altered distribution of peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets in patients with pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, James; Cavalcante, Ricardo Souza; Moris, Daniela Vanessa; Golim, Márjorie de Assis; Levorato, Adriele Dandara; Reis, Karoline Hagatha Dos; Arruda, Maria Sueli Parreira de; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio

    2017-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis caused by fungi from the genus Paracoccidioides in Latin America. PCM-patients (PCM-p) are classified as having acute/subacute or chronic (CF) clinical forms. CF is responsible for 75%-90% of all cases, affects mainly adults over 30 years old and the clinical manifestation are associated mainly with lungs and mucosa of upper airdigestive tract. In addition, the CF patients exhibit fibrosis of the lungs, oral mucous membranes and adrenals, and pulmonary emphysema. Consequently, CF PCM-p with active disease, as well as those that have been apparently cured, seem to be an interesting model for studies aiming to understand the long-term host-fungi relationship and hypoxia. Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute a system that serve as a major link between innate and adaptive immunity composed of several subpopulations of cells including two main subsets: myeloid (mDCs) and plasmacytoid (pDCs). The present study aimed to access the distribution of PBDC subsets of CF PCM-p who were not treated (NT) or treated (apparently cured - AC). CF PCM-p were categorized into two groups, consisting of 9 NTs and 9 ACs. Twenty-one healthy individuals were used as the control group. The determination of the PBDC subsets was performed by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) and the dosage of serum TNF-α, IL1β, IL-18, CCL3, IL-10 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). A high count and percentage of mDCs was observed before treatment, along with a low count of pDCs in treated patients. Furthermore, the mDC:pDC ratio and serum levels of TNF-α was higher in both of the PCM-p groups than in the control group. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that active PCM influences the distribution of mDCs and pDCs, and after treatment, PCM-p retained a lower count of pDCs associated with pro-inflammatory profile. Therefore, we identified new evidences of persistent immunological abnormalities in

  17. Alteration in Business Models of Electricity Distribution Companies - A Case of Smart Metering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trygg, P.

    2013-09-01

    Smart metering is currently implemented in many countries. The change from traditional metering is significant and impacts many of the Distribution system operator's (DSO's) activities. This dissertation aims to provide a structured model for analysing the impacts of Smart metering on a DSO's business. Research was conducted by gathering a theoretical framework for understanding how the business operates. The concept of business model has been presented. It is used as a framework of metering business. Detailed studies on specific parts of the business model have been carried out. These concentrate on finding a theoretical background of what Smart metering can provide. Cost analyses were conducted to better understand resources required by Smart metering. Problems related to ICT resources have also been studied based on the DSO's experiences. Partner network was studied based on DSO's experiences related to service purchasing and finally experiences in working with IT services provided to the DSOs has been presented. This dissertation presents a development trend that has taken place regarding Smart metering in implementation and operation. Results are presented in a business model framework to provide a more structured view on issues related to Smart metering. Also non-technical issues should be analysed to fully understand the extent of the changes taking place when implementing Smart metering. The information presented can be utilized when significant change factors to the DSO's business models can be recognized. (orig.)

  18. Caffeic acid n-butyl ester-triggered necrosis-like cell death in lung cancer cell line A549 is prompted by ROS mediated alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y-X; Yu, P-F; Gao, Z-M; Yuan, J; Zhang, Z

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of caffeic acid n-butyl ester against lung cancer cell line A549 and to investigate the underlying mechanism. IC50 was determined by MTT assay. Fluorescent probes DCFH-DA, Indo 1/AM, DiOC6 were used to determine ROS, Ca2+, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). ATP levels were determined by using ATP liteTM kit. DNA damage was investigated by DAPI and comet assays. Protein expression was investigated by Western blotting. Caffeic acid n-butyl ester exhibited lowest IC50 of 25 µM against lung A549 cell line. Caffeic acid n-butyl ester reduced the cell viability of A549 cells concentration and time-dependently. It also augmented the discharge of ROS and Ca2+ and lessened the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP levels in A549 cells. Additionally, caffeic acid n-butyl ester also prompted DNA damage in A549 cell line. Notably, caffeic acid n-butyl ester-stimulated the cytochrome c release only and exhibited no effect on the expression of apoptosis-related protein levels such as caspase-3, caspase-8, and Apaf-1. Caffeic acid n-butyl ester exhibited significant anticancer activity against lung cancer cell line A549. However, the anticancer activity was not due to apoptosis as no significant change was observed in the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. The anticancer activity of caffeic acid n-butyl ester may be attributed to necrosis-like cell death prompted by ROS-mediated alterations in ΔΨm. Taken together, we conclude that caffeic acid n-butyl ester-induced A549 cells death displayed a cellular pattern characteristic of necrotic cell death and not of apoptosis.

  19. Supplemental feeding for ecotourism reverses diel activity and alters movement patterns and spatial distribution of the southern stingray, Dasyatis americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mark J; Wetherbee, Bradley M; Shivji, Mahmood S; Potenski, Matthew D; Chapman, Demian D; Harvey, Guy M

    2013-01-01

    Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, have been provided supplemental food in ecotourism operations at Stingray City Sandbar (SCS), Grand Cayman since 1986, with this site becoming one of the world's most famous and heavily visited marine wildlife interaction venues. Given expansion of marine wildlife interactive tourism worldwide, there are questions about the effects of such activities on the focal species and their ecosystems. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and tag-recapture efforts to test the hypothesis that human-sourced supplemental feeding has altered stingray activity patterns and habitat use at SCS relative to wild animals at control sites. Secondarily, we also qualitatively estimated the population size of stingrays supporting this major ecotourism venue. Tag-recapture data indicated that a population of at least 164 stingrays, over 80% female, utilized the small area at SCS for prolonged periods of time. Examination of comparative movements of mature female stingrays at SCS and control sites revealed strong differences between the two groups: The fed animals demonstrated a notable inversion of diel activity, being constantly active during the day with little movement at night compared to the nocturnally active wild stingrays; The fed stingrays utilized significantly (pfeeding has strikingly altered movement behavior and spatial distribution of the stingrays, and generated an atypically high density of animals at SCS which could have downstream fitness costs for individuals and potentially broader ecosystem effects. These findings should help environmental managers plan mitigating measures for existing operations, and develop precautionary policies regarding proposed feeding sites.

  20. Incorporating tissue anisotropy and heterogeneity in finite element models of trabecular bone altered predicted local stress distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Max A; Wallace, Joseph M; Allen, Matthew R; Siegmund, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Trabecular bone is composed of organized mineralized collagen fibrils, which results in heterogeneous and anisotropic mechanical properties at the tissue level. Recently, biomechanical models computing stresses and strains in trabecular bone have indicated a significant effect of tissue heterogeneity on predicted stresses and strains. However, the effect of the tissue-level mechanical anisotropy on the trabecular bone biomechanical response is unknown. Here, a computational method was established to automatically impose physiologically relevant orientation inherent in trabecular bone tissue on a trabecular bone microscale finite element model. Spatially varying tissue-level anisotropic elastic properties were then applied according to the bone mineral density and the local tissue orientation. The model was used to test the hypothesis that anisotropy in both homogeneous and heterogeneous models alters the predicted distribution of stress invariants. Linear elastic finite element computations were performed on a 3 mm cube model isolated from a microcomputed tomography scan of human trabecular bone from the distal femur. Hydrostatic stress and von Mises equivalent stress were recorded at every element, and the distributions of these values were analyzed. Anisotropy reduced the range of hydrostatic stress in both tension and compression more strongly than the associated increase in von Mises equivalent stress. The effect of anisotropy was independent of the spatial redistribution high compressive stresses due to tissue elastic heterogeneity. Tissue anisotropy and heterogeneity are likely important mechanisms to protect bone from failure and should be included for stress analyses in trabecular bone.

  1. Phylogeography of Hypostomus strigaticeps (Siluriformes: Loricariidae inferred by mitochondrial DNA reveals its distribution in the upper Paraná River basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Splendore de Borba

    Full Text Available In this study, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses of populations identified as Hypostomus strigaticeps from the upper Paraná River basin were conducted in order to test whether these different populations comprises cryptic species or structured populations and to assess their genetic variability. The sequences of the mitochondrial DNA ATP sintetase (subunits 6/8 of 27 specimens from 10 populations (one from Mogi-Guaçu River, five from Paranapanema River, three from Tietê River and one from Peixe River were analyzed. The phylogeographic analysis showed the existence of eight haplotypes (A-H, and despite the ancestral haplotype includes only individuals from the Tietê River basin, the distribution of H. strigaticeps was not restricted to this basin. Haplotypes A, B and F were the most frequent. Haplotypes D, E, F, G, and H were present in the sub-basin of Paranapanema, two (A and B were present in the sub-basin of the Tietê River, one (C was exclusively distributed in the sub-basin of the Peixe River, and one (B was also present in the sub-basin of the Grande River. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the populations of H. strigaticeps indeed form a monophyletic unit comprising two lineages: TG, with representatives from the Tietê, Mogi-Guaçu and Peixe Rivers; and PP, with specimens from the Paranapanema River. The observed degree of genetic divergence within the TG and PP lineages was 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively, whereas the genetic divergence between the two lineages themselves was approximately 1%. The results of the phylogenetic analysis do not support the hypothesis of existence of crypt species and the phylogeographic analysis confirm the presence of H. strigaticeps in other sub-basins of the upper Paraná River: Grande, Peixe, and Paranapanema sub-basins.

  2. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  3. The non-canonical Wnt/PKC pathway regulates mitochondrial dynamics through degradation of the arm-like domain-containing protein Alex3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Serrat

    Full Text Available The regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is vital in complex cell types, such as neurons, that transport and localize mitochondria in high energy-demanding cell domains. The Armcx3 gene encodes a mitochondrial-targeted protein (Alex3 that contains several arm-like domains. In a previous study we showed that Alex3 protein regulates mitochondrial aggregation and trafficking. Here we studied the contribution of Wnt proteins to the mitochondrial aggregation and dynamics regulated by Alex3. Overexpression of Alex3 in HEK293 cells caused a marked aggregation of mitochondria, which was attenuated by treatment with several Wnts. We also found that this decrease was caused by Alex3 degradation induced by Wnts. While the Wnt canonical pathway did not alter the pattern of mitochondrial aggregation induced by Alex3, we observed that the Wnt/PKC non-canonical pathway regulated both mitochondrial aggregation and Alex3 protein levels, thereby rendering a mitochondrial phenotype and distribution similar to control patterns. Our data suggest that the Wnt pathway regulates mitochondrial distribution and dynamics through Alex3 protein degradation.

  4. The Non-Canonical Wnt/PKC Pathway Regulates Mitochondrial Dynamics through Degradation of the Arm-Like Domain-Containing Protein Alex3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirra, Serena; Quevedo, Martí; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Ulloa, Fausto; Burgaya, Ferrán; Soriano, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is vital in complex cell types, such as neurons, that transport and localize mitochondria in high energy-demanding cell domains. The Armcx3 gene encodes a mitochondrial-targeted protein (Alex3) that contains several arm-like domains. In a previous study we showed that Alex3 protein regulates mitochondrial aggregation and trafficking. Here we studied the contribution of Wnt proteins to the mitochondrial aggregation and dynamics regulated by Alex3. Overexpression of Alex3 in HEK293 cells caused a marked aggregation of mitochondria, which was attenuated by treatment with several Wnts. We also found that this decrease was caused by Alex3 degradation induced by Wnts. While the Wnt canonical pathway did not alter the pattern of mitochondrial aggregation induced by Alex3, we observed that the Wnt/PKC non-canonical pathway regulated both mitochondrial aggregation and Alex3 protein levels, thereby rendering a mitochondrial phenotype and distribution similar to control patterns. Our data suggest that the Wnt pathway regulates mitochondrial distribution and dynamics through Alex3 protein degradation. PMID:23844091

  5. Pioglitazone attenuates prostatic enlargement in diet-induced insulin-resistant rats by altering lipid distribution and hyperinsulinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu; Ramarao, Poduri

    2010-12-01

    Increased incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia among insulin-resistant individuals suggests a role for hyperinsulinaemia in prostatic enlargement. We have already reported increased cell proliferation and enlargement of prostate gland in insulin-resistant rats. The present study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the reversal of prostatic enlargement in insulin-resistant rats by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist pioglitazone. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal pellet or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks with or without pioglitazone (20 mg·kg(-1)). Subgroups of animals fed different diets were castrated. Effects of dietary manipulation and pioglitazone were measured on insulin sensitivity, lipid distribution, cell proliferation and apoptosis. A high-fat diet led to the accumulation of fat in non-adipose tissues, insulin resistance, compensatory hyperinsulinaemia and prostatic enlargement in rats. Pioglitazone treatment altered fat distribution, improved insulin sensitivity and normalized lipid and insulin level in rats on the high-fat diet. The improved metabolic parameters led to decreased cellular proliferation and increased apoptosis in the prostate gland. High-fat diet feeding and pioglitazone treatment did not change plasma testosterone levels. However, significant prostatic atrophy was observed in castrated rats irrespective of dietary intervention. Our results show a previously unexplored therapeutic potential of pioglitazone for prostatic enlargement under insulin-resistant condition and further suggest that targeting distribution of lipid from non-adipose tissue to adipose tissue and insulin signalling could be new strategies for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Compartment-specific distribution of human intestinal innate lymphoid cells is altered in HIV patients under effective therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Krämer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphocyte cells (ILCs, a novel family of innate immune cells are considered to function as key orchestrators of immune defences at mucosal surfaces and to be crucial for maintaining an intact intestinal barrier. Accordingly, first data suggest depletion of ILCs to be involved in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated damage of the intestinal mucosa and subsequent microbial translocation. However, although ILCs are preferentially localized at mucosal surfaces, only little is known regarding distribution and function of ILCs in the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we show that in HIV(- individuals composition and functional capacity of intestinal ILCs is compartment-specific with group 1 ILCs representing the major fraction in the upper gastrointestinal (GI tract, whereas ILC3 are the predominant population in ileum and colon, respectively. In addition, we present first data indicating that local cytokine concentrations, especially that of IL-7, might modulate composition of gut ILCs. Distribution of intestinal ILCs was significantly altered in HIV patients, who displayed decreased frequency of total ILCs in ileum and colon owing to reduced numbers of both CD127(+ILC1 and ILC3. Of note, frequency of colonic ILC3 was inversely correlated with serum levels of I-FABP and sCD14, surrogate markers for loss of gut barrier integrity and microbial translocation, respectively. Both expression of the IL-7 receptor CD127 on ILCs as well as mucosal IL-7 mRNA levels were decreased in HIV(+ patients, especially in those parts of the GI tract with reduced ILC frequencies, suggesting that impaired IL-7 responses of ILCs might contribute to incomplete reconstitution of ILCs under effective anti-retroviral therapy. This is the first report comparing distribution and function of ILCs along the intestinal mucosa of the entire human gastrointestinal tract in HIV(+ and HIV(- individuals.

  7. Mitochondrial Signaling: Forwards, Backwards, and In Between

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Whelan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are semiautonomous organelles that are a defining characteristic of almost all eukaryotic cells. They are vital for energy production, but increasing evidence shows that they play important roles in a wide range of cellular signaling and homeostasis. Our understanding of nuclear control of mitochondrial function has expanded over the past half century with the discovery of multiple transcription factors and cofactors governing mitochondrial biogenesis. More recently, nuclear changes in response to mitochondrial messaging have led to characterization of retrograde mitochondrial signaling, in which mitochondria have the ability to alter nuclear gene expression. Mitochondria are also integral to other components of stress response or quality control including ROS signaling, unfolded protein response, mitochondrial autophagy, and biogenesis. These avenues of mitochondrial signaling are discussed in this review.

  8. Mitochondrial structure and function are disrupted by standard isolation methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Picard

    Full Text Available Mitochondria regulate critical components of cellular function via ATP production, reactive oxygen species production, Ca(2+ handling and apoptotic signaling. Two classical methods exist to study mitochondrial function of skeletal muscles: isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers. Whereas mitochondrial isolation removes a portion of the mitochondria from their cellular environment, myofiber permeabilization preserves mitochondrial morphology and functional interactions with other intracellular components. Despite this, isolated mitochondria remain the most commonly used method to infer in vivo mitochondrial function. In this study, we directly compared measures of several key aspects of mitochondrial function in both isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers of rat gastrocnemius muscle. Here we show that mitochondrial isolation i induced fragmented organelle morphology; ii dramatically sensitized the permeability transition pore sensitivity to a Ca(2+ challenge; iii differentially altered mitochondrial respiration depending upon the respiratory conditions; and iv dramatically increased H(2O(2 production. These alterations are qualitatively similar to the changes in mitochondrial structure and function observed in vivo after cellular stress-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, but are generally of much greater magnitude. Furthermore, mitochondrial isolation markedly altered electron transport chain protein stoichiometry. Collectively, our results demonstrate that isolated mitochondria possess functional characteristics that differ fundamentally from those of intact mitochondria in permeabilized myofibers. Our work and that of others underscores the importance of studying mitochondrial function in tissue preparations where mitochondrial structure is preserved and all mitochondria are represented.

  9. Supplemental feeding for ecotourism reverses diel activity and alters movement patterns and spatial distribution of the southern stingray, Dasyatis americana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Corcoran

    Full Text Available Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, have been provided supplemental food in ecotourism operations at Stingray City Sandbar (SCS, Grand Cayman since 1986, with this site becoming one of the world's most famous and heavily visited marine wildlife interaction venues. Given expansion of marine wildlife interactive tourism worldwide, there are questions about the effects of such activities on the focal species and their ecosystems. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and tag-recapture efforts to test the hypothesis that human-sourced supplemental feeding has altered stingray activity patterns and habitat use at SCS relative to wild animals at control sites. Secondarily, we also qualitatively estimated the population size of stingrays supporting this major ecotourism venue. Tag-recapture data indicated that a population of at least 164 stingrays, over 80% female, utilized the small area at SCS for prolonged periods of time. Examination of comparative movements of mature female stingrays at SCS and control sites revealed strong differences between the two groups: The fed animals demonstrated a notable inversion of diel activity, being constantly active during the day with little movement at night compared to the nocturnally active wild stingrays; The fed stingrays utilized significantly (p<0.05 smaller 24 hour activity spaces compared to wild conspecifics, staying in close proximity to the ecotourism site; Fed stingrays showed a high degree of overlap in their core activity spaces compared to wild stingrays which were largely solitary in the spaces utilized (72% vs. 3% overlap respectively. Supplemental feeding has strikingly altered movement behavior and spatial distribution of the stingrays, and generated an atypically high density of animals at SCS which could have downstream fitness costs for individuals and potentially broader ecosystem effects. These findings should help environmental managers plan mitigating measures for existing

  10. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Demine

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction(s (MDs can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic.

  11. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  12. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area there is an approximate 50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  14. The importance of mitochondrial DNA in aging and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Singh, Keshav K

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in premature aging, age-related diseases, and tumor initiation and progression. Alterations of the mitochondrial genome accumulate both in aging tissue and tumors. This paper describes our contemporary view of mechanisms by which alterations of the mi...

  15. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a novel mitochondrial isoform of human rTS protein and unusual phylogenetic distribution of the rTS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire John J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rTS gene (ENOSF1, first identified in Homo sapiens as a gene complementary to the thymidylate synthase (TYMS mRNA, is known to encode two protein isoforms, rTSα and rTSβ. The rTSβ isoform appears to be an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of signaling molecules involved in the down-regulation of thymidylate synthase, but the exact cellular functions of rTS genes are largely unknown. Results Through comparative genomic sequence analysis, we predicted the existence of a novel protein isoform, rTS, which has a 27 residue longer N-terminus by virtue of utilizing an alternative start codon located upstream of the start codon in rTSβ. We observed that a similar extended N-terminus could be predicted in all rTS genes for which genomic sequences are available and the extended regions are conserved from bacteria to human. Therefore, we reasoned that the protein with the extended N-terminus might represent an ancestral form of the rTS protein. Sequence analysis strongly predicts a mitochondrial signal sequence in the extended N-terminal of human rTSγ, which is absent in rTSβ. We confirmed the existence of rTS in human mitochondria experimentally by demonstrating the presence of both rTSγ and rTSβ proteins in mitochondria isolated by subcellular fractionation. In addition, our comprehensive analysis of rTS orthologous sequences reveals an unusual phylogenetic distribution of this gene, which suggests the occurrence of one or more horizontal gene transfer events. Conclusion The presence of two rTS isoforms in mitochondria suggests that the rTS signaling pathway may be active within mitochondria. Our report also presents an example of identifying novel protein isoforms and for improving gene annotation through comparative genomic analysis.

  16. Geographic patterns of genetic variation in a broadly distributed marine vertebrate: new insights into loggerhead turtle stock structure from expanded mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Shamblin

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies have demonstrated that natal homing shapes the stock structure of marine turtle nesting populations. However, widespread sharing of common haplotypes based on short segments of the mitochondrial control region often limits resolution of the demographic connectivity of populations. Recent studies employing longer control region sequences to resolve haplotype sharing have focused on regional assessments of genetic structure and phylogeography. Here we synthesize available control region sequences for loggerhead turtles from the Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic, and western Indian Ocean basins. These data represent six of the nine globally significant regional management units (RMUs for the species and include novel sequence data from Brazil, Cape Verde, South Africa and Oman. Genetic tests of differentiation among 42 rookeries represented by short sequences (380 bp haplotypes from 3,486 samples and 40 rookeries represented by long sequences (∼800 bp haplotypes from 3,434 samples supported the distinction of the six RMUs analyzed as well as recognition of at least 18 demographically independent management units (MUs with respect to female natal homing. A total of 59 haplotypes were resolved. These haplotypes belonged to two highly divergent global lineages, with haplogroup I represented primarily by CC-A1, CC-A4, and CC-A11 variants and haplogroup II represented by CC-A2 and derived variants. Geographic distribution patterns of haplogroup II haplotypes and the nested position of CC-A11.6 from Oman among the Atlantic haplotypes invoke recent colonization of the Indian Ocean from the Atlantic for both global lineages. The haplotypes we confirmed for western Indian Ocean RMUs allow reinterpretation of previous mixed stock analysis and further suggest that contemporary migratory connectivity between the Indian and Atlantic Oceans occurs on a broader scale than previously hypothesized. This study represents a valuable model for

  17. Air pollution exposure during critical time periods in gestation and alterations in cord blood lymphocyte distribution: a cohort of livebirths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herr Caroline EW

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxic exposures have been shown to influence maturation of the immune system during gestation. This study investigates the association between cord blood lymphocyte proportions and maternal exposure to air pollution during each gestational month. Methods Cord blood was analyzed using a FACSort flow cytometer to determine proportions of T lymphocytes (CD3+ cells and their subsets, CD4+ and CD8+, B lymphocytes (CD19+ and natural killer (NK cells. Ambient air concentrations of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH and particulate matter 2.5 were measured using fixed site monitors. Arithmetic means of these pollutants, calculated for each gestational month, were used as exposure metrics. Data on covariates were obtained from medical records and questionnaires. Multivariable linear regression models were fitted to estimate associations between monthly PAH or PM2.5 and cord blood lymphocytes, adjusting for year of birth and district of residence and, in further models, gestational season and number of prior live births. Results The adjusted models show significant associations between PAHs or PM2.5 during early gestation and increases in CD3+ and CD4+ lymphocytes percentages and decreases in CD19+ and NK cell percentages in cord blood. In contrast, exposures during late gestation were associated with decreases in CD3+ and CD4+ fractions and increases in CD19+ and NK cell fractions. There was no significant association between alterations in lymphocyte distribution and air pollution exposure during the mid gestation. Conclusions PAHs and PM2.5 in ambient air may influence fetal immune development via shifts in cord blood lymphocytes distributions. Associations appear to differ by exposure in early versus late gestation.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  20. Assessment of Hepatic Mitochondrial Oxidation and Pyruvate Cycling in NAFLD by (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kitt Mia Falck; Befroy, Douglas E; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, and there is great interest in understanding the potential role of alterations in mitochondrial metabolism in its pathogenesis. To address this question, we assessed rates of hepatic mitochondrial oxidation in sub...... mitochondrial oxidation and pyruvate cycling are not altered in NAFLD and do not account for the hepatic fat accumulation....

  1. The Effect of Mitochondrial Supplements on Mitochondrial Activity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanna M. Delhey

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction is typically guided by expert opinion with a paucity of empirical evidence of the effect of treatment on mitochondrial activity. We examined citrate synthase and Complex I and IV activities using a validated buccal swab method in 127 children with autism spectrum disorder with and without mitochondrial disease, a portion of which were on common mitochondrial supplements. Mixed-model linear regression determined whether specific supplements altered the absolute mitochondrial activity as well as the relationship between the activities of mitochondrial components. Complex I activity was increased by fatty acid and folate supplementation, but folate only effected those with mitochondrial disease. Citrate synthase activity was increased by antioxidant supplementation but only for the mitochondrial disease subgroup. The relationship between Complex I and IV was modulated by folate while the relationship between Complex I and Citrate Synthase was modulated by both folate and B12. This study provides empirical support for common mitochondrial treatments and demonstrates that the relationship between activities of mitochondrial components might be a marker to follow in addition to absolute activities. Measurements of mitochondrial activity that can be practically repeated over time may be very useful to monitor the biochemical effects of treatments.

  2. Differences in mtDNA haplogroup distribution among 3 Jewish populations alter susceptibility to T2DM complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadon Sarah

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genome-wide association studies searching for candidate susceptibility loci for common complex diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and its common complications have uncovered novel disease-associated genes. Nevertheless these large-scale population screens often overlook the tremendous variation in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA and its involvement in complex disorders. Results We have analyzed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic variability in Ashkenazi (Ash, Sephardic (Seph and North African (NAF Jewish populations (total n = 1179. Our analysis showed significant differences (p Conclusion Our findings support the possibility that recent bottleneck events leading to over-representation of minor mtDNA alleles in specific genetic isolates, could result in population-specific susceptibility loci to complex disorders.

  3. The mitochondrial contact site complex, a determinant of mitochondrial architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Max; Körner, Christian; Walther, Dirk; Mokranjac, Dejana; Kaesmacher, Johannes; Welsch, Ulrich; Griffith, Janice; Mann, Matthias; Reggiori, Fulvio; Neupert, Walter

    2011-10-18

    Mitochondria are organelles with a complex architecture. They are bounded by an envelope consisting of the outer membrane and the inner boundary membrane (IBM). Narrow crista junctions (CJs) link the IBM to the cristae. OMs and IBMs are firmly connected by contact sites (CS). The molecular nature of the CS remained unknown. Using quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry we identified a novel complex, the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex, formed by a set of mitochondrial membrane proteins that is essential for the formation of CS. MICOS is preferentially located at the CJs. Upon loss of one of the MICOS subunits, CJs disappear completely or are impaired, showing that CJs require the presence of CS to form a superstructure that links the IBM to the cristae. Loss of MICOS subunits results in loss of respiratory competence and altered inheritance of mitochondrial DNA.

  4. Using publically available forest inventory data in climate-based modes of tree species distribution: Examining effects of true versus altered location coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob Gibson; Gretchen Moisen; Tracey Frescino; Thomas C. Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) were built with US Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) publicly available plot coordinates, which are altered for plot security purposes, and compared with SDMs built with true plot coordinates. Six species endemic to the western US, including four junipers (Juniperus deppeana var. deppeana, J. monosperma, J. occidentalis, J....

  5. Phylogeographic distribution of mitochondrial DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L3 radiated out of Africa in the form of macrohaplogroups. M and N around ∼60, 000 ybp (Quintana-Murci et al. 1999;. Mishmar et al. 2003) and entered South Asia or Indian sub- continent, and later drifted to Southeast Asia and Australia. Recent studies suggest that Indian subcontinent had played a major role in the early ...

  6. Temporal and spatial distribution of alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusions in the transitional high-sulfidation epithermal-porphyry copper system at Red Mountain, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Newton, M. Claiborne; Westman, Erik C.; Kamilli, Robert J.; Canby, Vertrees M.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Red Mountain, Arizona, is a Laramide porphyry Cu system (PCD) that has experienced only a modest level of erosion compared to most other similar deposits in the southwestern United States. As a result, the upper portion of the magmatic–hydrothermal system, which represents the transition from shallower high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization to deeper porphyry Cu mineralization, is well preserved. Within the Red Mountain system, alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusion assemblages show a systematic distribution in both time and space. Early-potassic alteration (characterized by the minerals biotite and magnetite) is paragenetically earlier than late-potassic alteration (K-feldspar–anhydrite) and both are followed by later phyllic (sericite–pyrite) alteration. Advanced argillic alteration (pyrophyllite–alunite–other clay minerals) is thought to be coeval with or postdate phyllic alteration. Minerals characteristic of advanced argillic alteration are present in the near surface. Phyllic alteration extends to greater depths compared to advanced argillic alteration. Early-potassic and late-potassic alteration are only observed in the deepest part of the system. Considerable overlap of phyllic alteration with both early-potassic and late-potassic alteration zones is observed. The hypogene mineralization contains 0.4–1.2% Cu and is spatially and temporally related to the late-potassic alteration event. Molybdenum concentration is typically In the deepest part of the system, an early generation of low-to-moderate density and salinity liquid + vapor inclusions with opaque daughter minerals is followed in time by halite-bearing inclusions that also contain opaque daughter minerals indicating that an early intermediate-density magmatic fluid evolved to a high-density, high-salinity mineralizing fluid. The increase in density and salinity of fluids with time observed in the deeper parts of the system may be the result of immiscibility (“boiling”) of

  7. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  8. Glutamate Counteracts Dopamine/PKA Signaling via Dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 Ser-97 and Alteration of Its Cytonuclear Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Akinori; Matamales, Miriam; Musante, Veronica; Valjent, Emmanuel; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Kitahara, Yosuke; Rebholz, Heike; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Nairn, Angus C

    2017-01-27

    The interaction of glutamate and dopamine in the striatum is heavily dependent on signaling pathways that converge on the regulatory protein DARPP-32. The efficacy of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling is regulated by DARPP-32 phosphorylated at Thr-34 (the PKA site), a process that inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and potentiates PKA action. Activation of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling also leads to dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 (the CK2 site), leading to localization of phospho-Thr-34 DARPP-32 in the nucleus where it also inhibits PP1. In this study the role of glutamate in the regulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at four major sites was further investigated. Experiments using striatal slices revealed that glutamate decreased the phosphorylation states of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 as well as Thr-34, Thr-75, and Ser-130 by activating NMDA or AMPA receptors in both direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons. The effect of glutamate in decreasing Ser-97 phosphorylation was mediated by activation of PP2A. In vitro phosphatase assays indicated that the PP2A/PR72 heterotrimer complex was likely responsible for glutamate/Ca 2+ -regulated dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97. As a consequence of Ser-97 dephosphorylation, glutamate induced the nuclear localization in cultured striatal neurons of dephospho-Thr-34/dephospho-Ser-97 DARPP-32. It also reduced PKA-dependent DARPP-32 signaling in slices and in vivo Taken together, the results suggest that by inducing dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 and altering its cytonuclear distribution, glutamate may counteract dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling at multiple cellular levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Rapid intravenous infusion of 20 mL/kg saline alters the distribution of perfusion in healthy supine humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, A C; Sá, R C; Barash, I A; Holverda, S; Buxton, R B; Hopkins, S R; Prisk, G K

    2012-03-15

    Rapid intravenous saline infusion, a model meant to replicate the initial changes leading to pulmonary interstitial edema, increases pulmonary arterial pressure in humans. We hypothesized that this would alter lung perfusion distribution. Six healthy subjects (29 ± 6 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to quantify perfusion using arterial spin labeling. Regional proton density was measured using a fast-gradient echo sequence, allowing blood delivered to the slice to be normalized for density and quantified in mL/min/g. Contributions from flow in large conduit vessels were minimized using a flow cutoff value (blood delivered > 35% maximum in mL/min/cm(3)) in order to obtain an estimate of blood delivered to the capillary bed (perfusion). Images were acquired supine at baseline, after infusion of 20 mL/kg saline, and after a short upright recovery period for a single sagittal slice in the right lung during breath-holds at functional residual capacity. Thoracic fluid content measured by impedance cardiography was elevated post-infusion by up to 13% (pchanges in conduit vessels, there were no significant changes in perfusion in dependent lung following infusion (7.8 ± 1.9 mL/min/g baseline, 7.9 ± 2.0 post, 8.5 ± 2.1 recovery, p=0.36). There were no significant changes in lung density. These data suggest that saline infusion increased perfusion to nondependent lung, consistent with an increase in intravascular pressures. Dependent lung may have been "protected" from increases in perfusion following infusion due to gravitational compression of the pulmonary vasculature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  11. Mitochondrial Genetics and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safarina G. Malik

    2017-02-01

    of modern humans, including the mtDNA genome. Mitochondria, a well-adapted endosymbiotic intracellular organelles, became efficient for energy production through-out the course of evolution. They are critical for survival and proliferation of living organisms under aerobic conditions and produce ATP through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Adaptation to new environments that favor beneficial traits may have caused genetic risk differences that influence the crucial function of the mitochondria, consequently affecting many function in the cell.2 The altered function of the mitochondria might act as an important factor for disease susceptibility across many human populations, i.e. mtDNA variation that grouped together forming a certain type/group (the mtDNA haplogroup was reported to modulate cancer susceptibility3-5 and resistance6 in Chinese population. Cancer cells are characterized in general by a decrease of mitochondrial respiration and OXPHOS, a consequence of disruptive mtDNA mutations commonly found in cancer cells, and thus one could say that the growth of cancer cells is directly limited by energetics.7 In order to survive, cancer cells must modify their mitochondrial physiology to optimize energy production to their changing environments. There are two types of advantageous mtDNA mutation in cancer cells: mutations that impair OXPHOS and serve to stimulate neoplastic transformation, and those that facilitate cancer cell adaption to changing bioenergetics environments.8 These mtDNA mutations would eventually lead to an enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which can act both as mutagens and cellular mitogens, and contribute directly to cancer progression.7 Therefore, it can be concluded that mitochondrial alterations are critical for cancer initiation, promotion, and metastasis (Fig 1.           Figure 1. Integrated mitochondrial paradigm to explain genetic and phenotypic complexities of metabolic and degenerative disease, aging, and

  12. Induction of Mitochondrial Changes Associated with Oxidative Stress on Very Long Chain Fatty Acids (C22:0, C24:0, or C26:0-Treated Human Neuronal Cells (SK-NB-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Zarrouk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease, lipid alterations point towards peroxisomal dysfunctions. Indeed, a cortical accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs: C22:0, C24:0, C26:0, substrates for peroxisomal β-oxidation, has been found in Alzheimer patients. This study was realized to investigate the effects of VLCFAs at the mitochondrial level since mitochondrial dysfunctions play crucial roles in neurodegeneration. On human neuronal SK-NB-E cells treated with C22:0, C24:0, or C26:0 (0.1–20 μM; 48 h, an inhibition of cell growth and mitochondrial dysfunctions were observed by cell counting with trypan blue, MTT assay, and measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm with DiOC6(3. A stimulation of oxidative stress was observed with DHE and MitoSOX used to quantify superoxide anion production on whole cells and at the mitochondrial level, respectively. With C24:0 and C26:0, by Western blotting, lower levels of mitochondrial complexes III and IV were detected. After staining with MitoTracker and by transmission electron microscopy used to study mitochondrial topography, mass and morphology, major changes were detected in VLCFAs treated-cells: modification of the cytoplasmic distribution of mitochondria, presence of large mitochondria, enhancement of the mitochondrial mass. Thus, VLCFAs can be potential risk factors contributing to neurodegeneration by inducing neuronal damages via mitochondrial dysfunctions.

  13. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  14. Increased visceral adipose tissue and altered adiposity distribution in premenopausal lupus patients: correlation with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguro, L P C; Paupitz, J A; Caparbo, V F; Bonfa, E; Pereira, R M R

    2018-01-01

    Objective Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) correlates with cardiovascular risk factors and has never been assessed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our aim was to evaluate VAT in premenopausal SLE patients. Methods Sixty-three premenopausal SLE patients and 186 age-matched healthy women were included. Demographic, anthropometric, disease and treatment parameters were evaluated. VAT was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) with APEX 4.0 software. Results SLE patients had a disease duration of 5.25 ± 3.80 years, SLEDAI activity score of 4.35 ± 5.13, SLICC/ACR-DI of 0.70 ± 0.80, current prednisone dose of 11.60 ± 12.10 mg/day and cumulative glucocorticoid dose of 22.34 ± 12.94 g. Overweight/obese SLE patients and controls had similar VAT parameters ( p > 0.05). Among individuals with BMI  0.05) but patients had higher values of VAT parameters (VAT mass: 260.60 ± 117.23 vs. 194.77 ± 71.42 g, p = 0.001; VAT area: 54.05 ± 24.30 vs. 40.40 ± 14.82 cm 2 , p = 0.001; VAT volume: 281.75 ± 126.81 vs. 210.61 ± 77.29 cm 3 , p = 0.001) and trunk/limb fat mass ratio (0.78 ± 0.21 vs. 0.67 ± 0.12, p = 0.002) compared to controls. In SLE, VAT area correlated with weight ( r = 0.66, p  0.05). Conclusion This study provides original evidence that SLE is associated with increased VAT and altered adiposity distribution. The correlation with traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, independent of current glucocorticoid dose and disease activity, suggests the role of visceral fat as an additional tool for risk assessment in these young patients.

  15. An emerging role for mitochondrial dynamics in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, Kyle H; Strack, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Abnormal brain development has long been thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Impaired dendritic arborization, synaptogenesis, and long term potentiation and memory have been demonstrated in animal models of schizophrenia. In addition to aberrant nervous system development, altered brain metabolism and mitochondrial function has long been observed in schizophrenic patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the mitochondrial genome as well as impaired mitochondrial function have both been associated with increased risk for developing schizophrenia. Mitochondrial function in neurons is highly dependent on fission, fusion, and transport of the organelle, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics. Indeed, there is mounting evidence that mitochondrial dynamics strongly influences neuron development and synaptic transmission. While there are a few studies describing altered mitochondrial shape in schizophrenic patients, as well as in animal and in vitro models of schizophrenia, the precise role of mitochondrial dynamics in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is all but unexplored. Here we discuss the influence of mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial function on nervous system development, and highlight recent work suggesting a link between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  17. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  18. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Different Routes to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Picone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic ATP-generating organelle which contribute to many cellular functions including bioenergetics processes, intracellular calcium regulation, alteration of reduction-oxidation potential of cells, free radical scavenging, and activation of caspase mediated cell death. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by amyloid β peptide (Aβ, an important component in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis, and Aβ can interact with mitochondria and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. One of the most accepted hypotheses for AD onset implicates that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are one of the primary events in the insurgence of the pathology. Here, we examine structural and functional mitochondrial changes in presence of Aβ. In particular we review data concerning Aβ import into mitochondrion and its involvement in mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetics, biogenesis, trafficking, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP formation, and mitochondrial protein interaction. Moreover, the development of AD therapy targeting mitochondria is also discussed.

  20. MLN64 induces mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased mitochondrial cholesterol content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Balboa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein that has been implicated in cholesterol transport from endosomal membranes to the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, in toxin-induced resistance, and in mitochondrial dysfunction. Down-regulation of MLN64 in Niemann-Pick C1 deficient cells decreased mitochondrial cholesterol content, suggesting that MLN64 functions independently of NPC1. However, the role of MLN64 in the maintenance of endosomal cholesterol flow and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We have previously described that hepatic MLN64 overexpression increases liver cholesterol content and induces liver damage. Here, we studied the function of MLN64 in normal and NPC1-deficient cells and we evaluated whether MLN64 overexpressing cells exhibit alterations in mitochondrial function. We used recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer to overexpress MLN64 in mouse liver and hepatic cells; and RNA interference to down-regulate MLN64 in NPC1-deficient cells. In MLN64-overexpressing cells, we found increased mitochondrial cholesterol content and decreased glutathione (GSH levels and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we found decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation and increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in MLN64-overexpressing cells and in NPC1-deficient cells. Consequently, MLN64 expression was increased in NPC1-deficient cells and reduction of its expression restore mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide levels. Our findings suggest that MLN64 overexpression induces an increase in mitochondrial cholesterol content and consequently a decrease in mitochondrial GSH content leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, we demonstrate that MLN64 expression is increased in NPC cells and plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria.

  1. MLN64 induces mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased mitochondrial cholesterol content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa, Elisa; Castro, Juan; Pinochet, María-José; Cancino, Gonzalo I; Matías, Nuria; Sáez, P J; Martínez, Alexis; Álvarez, Alejandra R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernandez-Checa, José C; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2017-08-01

    MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein that has been implicated in cholesterol transport from endosomal membranes to the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, in toxin-induced resistance, and in mitochondrial dysfunction. Down-regulation of MLN64 in Niemann-Pick C1 deficient cells decreased mitochondrial cholesterol content, suggesting that MLN64 functions independently of NPC1. However, the role of MLN64 in the maintenance of endosomal cholesterol flow and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We have previously described that hepatic MLN64 overexpression increases liver cholesterol content and induces liver damage. Here, we studied the function of MLN64 in normal and NPC1-deficient cells and we evaluated whether MLN64 overexpressing cells exhibit alterations in mitochondrial function. We used recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer to overexpress MLN64 in mouse liver and hepatic cells; and RNA interference to down-regulate MLN64 in NPC1-deficient cells. In MLN64-overexpressing cells, we found increased mitochondrial cholesterol content and decreased glutathione (GSH) levels and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we found decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation and increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in MLN64-overexpressing cells and in NPC1-deficient cells. Consequently, MLN64 expression was increased in NPC1-deficient cells and reduction of its expression restore mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide levels. Our findings suggest that MLN64 overexpression induces an increase in mitochondrial cholesterol content and consequently a decrease in mitochondrial GSH content leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, we demonstrate that MLN64 expression is increased in NPC cells and plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distributions of Irritative Zones Are Related to Individual Alterations of Resting-State Networks in Focal Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinchen Song

    Full Text Available Alterations in the connectivity patterns of the fMRI-based resting-state networks (RSNs have been reported in several types of epilepsies. Evidence pointed out these alterations might be associated with the genesis and propagation of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs. IEDs also evoke blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD responses, which have been used to delineate irritative zones during preoperative work-up. Therefore, one may expect a relationship between the topology of the IED-evoked BOLD response network and the altered spatial patterns of the RSNs. In this study, we used EEG recordings and fMRI data obtained simultaneously from a chronic model of focal epilepsy in Wistar rats to verify our hypothesis. We found that IED-evoked BOLD response networks comprise both cortical and subcortical structures with a rat-dependent topology. In all rats, IEDs evoke both activation and deactivation types of BOLD responses. Using a Granger causality method, we found that in many cases areas with BOLD deactivation have directed influences on areas with activation (p<0.05. We were able to predict topological properties (i.e., focal/diffused, unilateral/bilateral of the IED-evoked BOLD response network by performing hierarchical clustering analysis on major spatial features of the RSNs. All these results suggest that IEDs and disruptions in the RSNs found previously in humans may be different manifestations of the same transient events, probably reflecting altered consciousness. In our opinion, the shutdown of specific nodes of the default mode network may cause uncontrollable excitability in other functionally connected brain areas. We conclude that IED-evoked BOLD responses (i.e., activation and deactivation and alterations of RSNs are intrinsically related, and speculate that an understanding of their interplay is necessary to discriminate focal epileptogenesis and network propagation phenomena across different brain modules via hub

  3. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  4. In vitro induction of rat liver mitochondrial membrane permeability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alteration of mitochondrial functions such as permeability transition (PT), a process associated with the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, has been found to play a vital role in the apoptotic process induced by certain anti-cancer agents. When triggered, PT facilitates the release of mitochondrial apoptogenic proteins ...

  5. Mitochondrial bioenergetics decay in aging: beneficial effect of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Giuseppe; Paradies, Valeria; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Petrosillo, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Aging is a biological process characterized by progressive decline in physiological functions, increased oxidative stress, reduced capacity to respond to stresses, and increased risk of contracting age-associated disorders. Mitochondria are referred to as the powerhouse of the cell through their role in the oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. These organelles contribute to the aging process, mainly through impairment of electron transport chain activity, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and increased oxidative stress. These events lead to damage to proteins, lipids and mitochondrial DNA. Cardiolipin, a phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane, plays a pivotal role in several mitochondrial bioenergetic processes as well as in mitochondrial-dependent steps of apoptosis and in mitochondrial membrane stability and dynamics. Cardiolipin alterations are associated with mitochondrial bienergetics decline in multiple tissues in a variety of physiopathological conditions, as well as in the aging process. Melatonin, the major product of the pineal gland, is considered an effective protector of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin preserves mitochondrial function by preventing cardiolipin oxidation and this may explain, at least in part, the protective role of this compound in mitochondrial physiopathology and aging. Here, mechanisms through which melatonin exerts its protective role against mitochondrial dysfunction associated with aging and age-associated disorders are discussed.

  6. Distribution of Potential Hydrothermally Altered Rocks in Central Colorado Derived From Landsat Thematic Mapper Data: A Geographic Information System Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Central Colorado Mineral Resource Assessment Project, the digital image data for four Landsat Thematic Mapper scenes covering central Colorado between Wyoming and New Mexico were acquired and band ratios were calculated after masking pixels dominated by vegetation, snow, and terrain shadows. Ratio values were visually enhanced by contrast stretching, revealing only those areas with strong responses (high ratio values). A color-ratio composite mosaic was prepared for the four scenes so that the distribution of potentially hydrothermally altered rocks could be visually evaluated. To provide a more useful input to a Geographic Information System-based mineral resource assessment, the information contained in the color-ratio composite raster image mosaic was converted to vector-based polygons after thresholding to isolate the strongest ratio responses and spatial filtering to reduce vector complexity and isolate the largest occurrences of potentially hydrothermally altered rocks.

  7. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Modulation of mitochondrial morphology by bioenergetics defects in primary human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillery, O.; Malka, F.; Frachon, P.

    2008-01-01

    induced partial but significant mitochondrial fragmentation, whereas dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (D Psi m) provoked complete fragmentation, and glycolysis inhibition had no effect. Oxidative phosphorylation defective fibroblasts had essentially normal filamentous mitochondria under...... basal conditions, although when challenged some of them presented with mild alteration of fission or fusion efficacy. Severely defective cells disclosed complete mitochondrial fragmentation under glycolysis inhibition. In conclusion, mitochondrial morphology is modulated by D Psi m but loosely linked...... to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Its alteration by glycolysis, inhibition points to a severe oxidative phosphorylation defect. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  9. Adjustment of the dynamic weight distribution as a sensitive parameter for diagnosis of postural alteration in a rodent model of vestibular deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Tighilet

    Full Text Available Vestibular disorders, by inducing significant posturo-locomotor and cognitive disorders, can significantly impair the most basic tasks of everyday life. Their precise diagnosis is essential to implement appropriate therapeutic countermeasures. Monitoring their evolution is also very important to validate or, on the contrary, to adapt the undertaken therapeutic actions. To date, the diagnosis methods of posturo-locomotor impairments are restricted to examinations that most often lack sensitivity and precision. In the present work we studied the alterations of the dynamic weight distribution in a rodent model of sudden and complete unilateral vestibular loss. We used a system of force sensors connected to a data analysis system to quantify in real time and in an automated way the weight bearing of the animal on the ground. We show here that sudden, unilateral, complete and permanent loss of the vestibular inputs causes a severe alteration of the dynamic ground weight distribution of vestibulo lesioned rodents. Characteristics of alterations in the dynamic weight distribution vary over time and follow the sequence of appearance and disappearance of the various symptoms that compose the vestibular syndrome. This study reveals for the first time that dynamic weight bearing is a very sensitive parameter for evaluating posturo-locomotor function impairment. Associated with more classical vestibular examinations, this paradigm can considerably enrich the methods for assessing and monitoring vestibular disorders. Systematic application of this type of evaluation to the dizzy or unstable patient could improve the detection of vestibular deficits and allow predicting better their impact on posture and walk. Thus it could also allow a better follow-up of the therapeutic approaches for rehabilitating gait and balance.

  10. Alterations in oral [1-(14C] 18:1n-9 distribution in lean wild-type and genetically obese (ob/ob mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxia Wang

    Full Text Available Obesity may result from altered fatty acid (FA disposal. Altered FA distribution in obese individuals is poorly understood. Lean wild-type C57BL/6J and obese C57BL/6Job/ob mice received an oral dose of [1-(14C]18:1n-9 (oleic acid, and the radioactivity in tissues was evaluated at various time points. The (14C concentration decreased rapidly in gastrointestinal tract but gradually increased and peaked at 96 h in adipose tissue, muscle and skin in lean mice. The (14C concentration was constant in adipose tissue and muscle of obese mice from 4 h to 168 h. (14C-label content in adipose tissue was significantly affected by genotype, whereas muscle (14C-label content was affected by genotype, time and the interaction between genotype and time. There was higher total (14C retention (47.7% in obese mice than in lean mice (9.0% at 168 h (P<0.05. The (14C concentrations in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle were higher in obese mice than in lean mice (P<0.05. Perirenal adipose tissue contained the highest (14C content in lean mice, whereas subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT had the highest (14C content and accounted for the largest proportion of total radioactivity among fat depots in obese mice. More lipid radioactivity was recovered as TAG in SAT from obese mice than from lean mice (P<0.05. Gene expression suggested acyl CoA binding protein and fatty acid binding protein are important for FA distribution in adipose tissue and muscle. The FA distribution in major tissues was altered in ob/ob mice, perhaps contributing to obesity. Understanding the disparity in FA disposal between lean and obese mice may reveal novel targets for the treatment and prevention of obesity.

  11. Altered Cellular Distribution and Sub-Cellular Sorting of Doppel (Dpl Protein in Human Astrocytoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sbalchiero

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppel, a prion-like protein, is a GPI-membrane anchored protein generally not expressed in the Central Nervous System (CNS of different mammalian species, including human. Nevertheless, in astrocytomas, a particular kind of glial tumors, the doppel encoding gene (PRND is over-expressed and the corresponding protein product (Dpl is ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. In this study we have analysed the sub-cellular localization of Dpl using double-immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy examinations in two astrocytoma-derived human cell lines (IPDDC-A2 and D384-MG. Our results confirmed that Dpl is localized in the cytoplasm of the astrocytoma cells and indicated that it is mostly associated with Lamp-1 and Limp-2 positive lysosomal vesicles and, marginally, to the Golgi apparatus and other cellular organelles. Noticeably, none of the examined tumor cells showed a membrane-Dpl localization. The membrane-associated Dpl expression was restored after the transfection of the astrocytoma cells with mutated Dpl-expression vectors in its glycosylation sites. Additionally, Dpl showed altered expression and traffic using the acidotropic agent ammonium chloride, leading to the accumulation of Dpl in nascent exocytic vesicles. Altogether, these results indicated that in the astrocytic tumor cells Dpl has an altered biosynthetic trafficking, likely derived from abnormal post-translational processes: these modifications do not permit the localization of Dpl in correspondence of the plasma membrane and lead to its intracellular accumulation in the lysosomes. In these proteolytic compartments, the astrocytic tumor cells might provide to the degradation of the excess of a potentially cytotoxic Dpl product.

  12. Altered cellular distribution and sub-cellular sorting of doppel (Dpl) protein in human astrocytoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbalchiero, Elena; Azzalin, Alberto; Palumbo, Silvia; Barbieri, Giulia; Arias, Agustina; Simonelli, Luca; Ferretti, Luca; Comincini, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Doppel, a prion-like protein, is a GPI-membrane anchored protein generally not expressed in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of different mammalian species, including human. Nevertheless, in astrocytomas, a particular kind of glial tumors, the doppel encoding gene (PRND) is over-expressed and the corresponding protein product (Dpl) is ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. In this study we have analysed the sub-cellular localization of Dpl using double-immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy examinations in two astrocytoma-derived human cell lines (IPDDC-A2 and D384-MG). Our results confirmed that Dpl is localized in the cytoplasm of the astrocytoma cells and indicated that it is mostly associated with Lamp-1 and Limp-2 positive lysosomal vesicles and, marginally, to the Golgi apparatus and other cellular organelles. Noticeably, none of the examined tumor cells showed a membrane-Dpl localization. The membrane-associated Dpl expression was restored after the transfection of the astrocytoma cells with mutated Dpl-expression vectors in its glycosylation sites. Additionally, Dpl showed altered expression and traffic using the acidotropic agent ammonium chloride, leading to the accumulation of Dpl in nascent exocytic vesicles. Altogether, these results indicated that in the astrocytic tumor cells Dpl has an altered biosynthetic trafficking, likely derived from abnormal post-translational processes: these modifications do not permit the localization of Dpl in correspondence of the plasma membrane and lead to its intracellular accumulation in the lysosomes. In these proteolytic compartments, the astrocytic tumor cells might provide to the degradation of the excess of a potentially cytotoxic Dpl product.

  13. Recurrent sublethal warming reduces embryonic survival, inhibits juvenile growth, and alters species distribution projections under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Michael A; Riddell, Eric A; Levy, Ofir; Sears, Michael W

    2018-01-01

    The capacity to tolerate climate change often varies across ontogeny in organisms with complex life cycles. Recently developed species distribution models incorporate traits across life stages; however, these life-cycle models primarily evaluate effects of lethal change. Here, we examine impacts of recurrent sublethal warming on development and survival in ecological projections of climate change. We reared lizard embryos in the laboratory under temperature cycles that simulated contemporary conditions and warming scenarios. We also artificially warmed natural nests to mimic laboratory treatments. In both cases, recurrent sublethal warming decreased embryonic survival and hatchling sizes. Incorporating survivorship results into a mechanistic species distribution model reduced annual survival by up to 24% compared to models that did not incorporate sublethal warming. Contrary to models without sublethal effects, our model suggests that modest increases in developmental temperatures influence species ranges due to effects on survivorship. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  14. The presence of a below-ground neighbour alters within-plant seed size distribution in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin J W; During, Heinjo J; Vermeulen, Peter J; Anten, Niels P R

    2014-10-01

    Considerable variation in seed size commonly exists within plants, and is believed to be favoured under natural selection. This study aims to examine the extent to which seed size distribution depends on the presence of competing neighbour plants. Phaseolus vulgaris plants rooting with or without a conspecific neighbour were grown in soil with high or low nutrient availability. Seeds were harvested at the end of the growth cycle, the total nitrogen and phosphorus invested in seed production were measured and within-plant seed size distribution was quantified using a set of statistical descriptors. Exposure to neighbours' roots induced significant changes in seed size distribution. Plants produced proportionally more large seeds and fewer small ones, as reflected by significant increases in minimal seed size, mean seed size, skewness and Lorenz asymmetry coefficient. These effects were different from, and in several cases opposite to, the responses when the soil nutrient level was reduced, and were significant after correction for the amount of resources invested in seed production. Below-ground neighbour presence affects within-plant seed size distribution in P. vulgaris. This effect appears to be non-resource-mediated, i.e. to be independent of neighbour-induced effects on resource availability. It implies that, based on current environmental cues, plants can make an anticipatory adjustment of their investment strategy in offspring as an adaptation to the local environment in the future. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Potential effects of alterations to the hydrologic system on the distribution of salinity in the Biscayne aquifer in Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Sifuentes, Dorothy F.; White, Jeremy T.

    2016-03-15

    To address concerns about the effects of water-resource management practices and rising sea level on saltwater intrusion, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Broward County Environmental Planning and Community Resilience Division, initiated a study to examine causes of saltwater intrusion and predict the effects of future alterations to the hydrologic system on salinity distribution in eastern Broward County, Florida. A three-dimensional, variable-density solute-transport model was calibrated to conditions from 1970 to 2012, the period for which data are most complete and reliable, and was used to simulate historical conditions from 1950 to 2012. These types of models are typically difficult to calibrate by matching to observed groundwater salinities because of spatial variability in aquifer properties that are unknown, and natural and anthropogenic processes that are complex and unknown; therefore, the primary goal was to reproduce major trends and locally generalized distributions of salinity in the Biscayne aquifer. The methods used in this study are relatively new, and results will provide transferable techniques for protecting groundwater resources and maximizing groundwater availability in coastal areas. The model was used to (1) evaluate the sensitivity of the salinity distribution in groundwater to sea-level rise and groundwater pumping, and (2) simulate the potential effects of increases in pumping, variable rates of sea-level rise, movement of a salinity control structure, and use of drainage recharge wells on the future distribution of salinity in the aquifer.

  16. Changes in Positive End-Expiratory Pressure Alter the Distribution of Ventilation within the Lung Immediately after Birth in Newborn Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Siew, Melissa L.; Wallace, Megan J.; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; te Pas, Arjan B.; Hooper, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Current recommendations suggest the use of positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP) to assist very preterm infants to develop a functional residual capacity (FRC) and establish gas exchange at birth. However, maintaining a consistent PEEP is difficult and so the lungs are exposed to changing distending pressures after birth, which can affect respiratory function. Our aim was to determine how changing PEEP levels alters the distribution of ventilation within the lung. Preterm rabbit pups (28 days gestation) were delivered and mechanically ventilated with one of three strategies, whereby PEEP was changed in sequence; 0-5-10-5-0 cmH2O, 5-10-0-5-0 cmH2O or 10-5-0-10-0 cmH2O. Phase contrast X-ray imaging was used to analyse the distribution of ventilation in the upper left (UL), upper right (UR), lower left (LL) and lower right (LR) quadrants of the lung. Initiating ventilation with 10PEEP resulted in a uniform increase in FRC throughout the lung whereas initiating ventilation with 5PEEP or 0PEEP preferentially aerated the UR than both lower quadrants (pventilation at 10PEEP, the distribution of air at end-inflation was uniform across all quadrants and remained so regardless of the PEEP level. Uniform distribution of ventilation can be achieved by initiating ventilation with a high PEEP. After the lungs have aerated, small and stepped reductions in PEEP result in more uniform changes in ventilation. PMID:24690890

  17. Pharmacological modulation of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Daniela M; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2018-01-10

    Mitochondria are pivotal organelles in calcium (Ca 2+ ) handling and signalling, constituting intracellular checkpoints for numerous processes that are vital for cell life. Alterations in mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis have been linked to a variety of pathological conditions and are critical in the aetiology of several human diseases. Efforts have been taken to harness mitochondrial Ca 2+ transport mechanisms for therapeutic intervention, but pharmacological compounds that direct and selectively modulate mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis are currently lacking. New avenues have, however, emerged with the breakthrough discoveries on the genetic identification of the main players involved in mitochondrial Ca 2+ influx and efflux pathways and with recent hints towards a deep understanding of the function of these molecular systems. Here, we review the current advances in the understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis and its contribution to physiology and human disease. We also introduce and comment on the recent progress towards a systems-level pharmacological targeting of mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2018 The Physiological Society.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus sepsis induces early renal mitochondrial DNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel R Bartz

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control, 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection.

  19. [Ubiquinone: metabolism and functions. Ubiquinone deficiency and its implication in mitochondrial encephalopathies. Treatment with ubiquinone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artuch, R; Colomé, C; Vilaseca, M A; Pineda, M; Campistol, J

    Review of ubiquinone-10 metabolism and functions in humans, focusing its implication in the pathogenesis and physiopathology of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Ubiquinone-10 is an endogenously synthesized lipid with a wide distribution in tissues. Tyrosine and acetil-CoA are involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis. This molecule has several biological functions in cells: it is a movil electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and also acts as antioxidant. Owing to its implication in these functions, ubiquinone deficiency may cause important deletereous effects in tissues. Several authors reported ubiquinone deficient status in some physiological and pathological conditions. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies may be related to a primary or secondary ubiquinone deficient status, or even to an altered function of ubiquinone in the respiratory chain. Moreover, some relevant aspects about ubiquinone therapy in mitochondrial disorders are reported. According to recent reports about ubiquinone implication in several diseases, its determination in different biological samples seems very useful to elucidate the physiopathological mechanisms involved and even the to start a therapy in cases with ubiquinone deficiency.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M. [Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  1. Distribution and genetic diversity of the terrestrial slugs Arion lusitanicus Mabille, 1868 and Arion rufus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Poland based on mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Marianna; Kozłowski, Jan; Wiktor, Andrzej; Kałuski, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    The slugs Arion lusitanicus and Arion rufus inhabit ecologically degraded areas and are serious vegetation pests. In recent years, new localities of these species have been found in various parts of Poland. Here we study the morphology of 90 specimens from 9 populations of slugs. The morphology of the genital system allowed for the identification of 60 A. lusitanicus specimens from 6 populations and 30 A. rufus individuals from another 3 localities. In order to describe their genetic diversity at the level of the individual, population, and species, we compared sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene. The morphological analysis revealed that each of the studied populations comprised a single species, which was also confirmed by the molecular assay. We obtained 674-bp sequences of the cox1 gene for each species that showed a total of eight haplotypes. The genetic diversity of A. lusitanicus individuals ranged from 0.5% to 2.1%, whereas that of A. rufus was twice as low: 0.4-1.0%. The difference between the two species within the cox1 gene was at the level of 12%. Three A. lusitanicus and two A. rufus populations were found to be monomorphic. Large inter-population variability was found within each of the studied species, which suggests that the Polish populations of A. lusitanicus may have originated from repeated, separate introductions arriving from various parts of Europe.

  2. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain distribution of [11C]dethamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizugaki, Michinao; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ishiwata, Shunji; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ido, Tatsuo; Iwata, Ren; Funaki, Yoshihito; Itoh, Masatoshi; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Sato, Mitsumoto; Numachi, Yohtaro; Yoshida, Sumiko

    1995-01-01

    [ 11 C]Methamphetamine ([ 11 C]MAP) was synthesized by an automated on-line [ 11 C]methylation system for positron emission tomography (PET) study. We newly produced a MAP sensitized dog by repeated MAP treatment and studied the brain distribution of [ 11 C]MAP in the normal and the MAP sensitized dog. The maximal level of accumulation of [ 11 C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. No difference was found in the metabolism of MAP between the two conditions. The significant increase of [ 11 C]MAP in the MAP sensitized brain indicates that subchronic MAP administration causes some functional change in uptake site of MAP

  3. Distribution of myogenic progenitor cells and myonuclei is altered in women with vs. those without chronically painful trapezius muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Andersen, Lars L; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    with CON, MYA demonstrated 19% more SCs per fiber associated with type I fibers (MYA 0.098 ± 0.039 vs. CON 0.079 ± 0.031; P vs. CON 0.066 ± 0.035; P groups...... repetitive manual work, diagnosed with trapezius myalgia (MYA; 44 ± 8 yr; mean ± SD) and 20 matched healthy controls (CON; 45 ± 9 yr). Our hypothesis was that muscle of MYA, in particular type I fibers, would demonstrate higher numbers of SCs, myonuclei, and macrophages compared with CON. SCs were identified...... on muscle cross sections by combined immunohistochemical staining for Pax7, type I myosin, and laminin, allowing the number of SCs associated with type I and II fibers to be determined. We observed a pattern of SC distribution in MYA previously only reported for individuals above 70 yr of age. Compared...

  4. Functional K(ATP) channels in the rat retinal microvasculature: topographical distribution, redox regulation, spermine modulation and diabetic alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Eisuke; Fukumoto, Masanori; Puro, Donald G

    2009-05-15

    The essential task of the circulatory system is to match blood flow to local metabolic demand. However, much remains to be learned about this process. To better understand how local perfusion is regulated, we focused on the functional organization of the retinal microvasculature, which is particularly well adapted for the local control of perfusion. Here, we assessed the distribution and regulation of functional K(ATP) channels whose activation mediates the hyperpolarization induced by adenosine. Using microvascular complexes freshly isolated from the rat retina, we found a topographical heterogeneity in the distribution of functional K(ATP) channels; capillaries generate most of the K(ATP) current. The initiation of K(ATP)-induced responses in the capillaries supports the concept that the regulation of retinal perfusion is highly decentralized. Additional study revealed that microvascular K(ATP) channels are redox sensitive, with oxidants increasing their activity. Furthermore, the oxidant-mediated activation of these channels is driven by the polyamine spermine, whose catabolism produces oxidants. In addition, our observation that spermine-dependent oxidation occurs predominately in the capillaries accounts for why they generate most of the K(ATP) current detected in retinal microvascular complexes. Here, we also analysed retinal microvessels of streptozotocin-injected rats. We found that soon after the onset of diabetes, an increase in spermine-dependent oxidation at proximal microvascular sites boosts their K(ATP) current and thereby virtually eliminates the topographical heterogeneity of functional K(ATP) channels. We conclude that spermine-dependent oxidation is a previously unrecognized mechanism by which this polyamine modulates ion channels; in addition to a physiological role, spermine-dependent oxidation may also contribute to microvascular dysfunction in the diabetic retina.

  5. Probenecid, an inhibitor of transmembrane organic anion transporters, alters tissue distribution of DNA adducts in 1-hydroxymethylpyrene-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Müller, Carolin; Bakhiya, Nadiya; Donath, Claudia; Frank, Heinz; Seidel, Albrecht; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2009-07-28

    1-Methylpyrene (1-MP), an abundant alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is activated by side-chain hydroxylation to 1-hydroxymethylpyrene (1-HMP) and subsequent sulfo-conjugation to electrophilic 1-sulfooxymethylpyrene (1-SMP). In rats, this activation mainly occurs in liver. 1-SMP may react with hepatic DNA or be exported into the blood circulation to reach other tissues, in particular kidneys. Findings with recombinant cell lines suggest that renal 1-SMP uptake proceeds via organic anion transporters (OATs). Here, we tested the hypothesis that probenecid, a characteristic OAT inhibitor, interferes with kidney damage brought about by 1-SMP formed in rats. 1-HMP was administered intraperitoneally to 30 rats, half of which were co-treated with probenecid. The tissue distribution of DNA adducts was analyzed using (32)P-postlabeling and isotope dilution LC-MS/MS for the detection of the adducts N(2)-(1-methylpyrenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine and N(6)-(1-methylpyrenyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine. In rats treated solely with 1-HMP, adduct levels in kidney tissue were about 3-fold and 8-fold higher than those in liver and lung, respectively. After co-treatment with probenecid, hepatic and pulmonary adduct levels were 12-fold and 4-fold elevated, respectively, whereas renal adduct levels were slightly lower compared to those of rats receiving 1-HMP alone. Moreover, serum levels of 1-SMP were increased 23-fold in animals pre-treated with probenecid. The differential effects on hepatic and pulmonary adduct levels suggest that not only renal OATs, but also additional anion transporters, e.g. those mediating the hepatic export of 1-SMP into the bile, were inhibited. Thus, transmembrane transport proteins play a crucial role in the distribution of reactive phase II metabolites, and thereby in tissue allocation of DNA adducts.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization alters subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and resists cadmium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanpeng; Huang, Jing; Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25-60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg kg(-1) Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mgkg(-1) Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2-80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation.

  7. Mitochondrial disfunction and apoptosis in leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria PALLAG

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a process which involves the intentional degradation of the cell from the inside, the participation of the mitochondria to propagate the apoptotic signal, the alteration of the phospholipid cell membrane composition, the perturbation and alteration of the cell metabolism.The antineoplastic drugs is inducing the apoptotic process in the sensitive cells.It have been studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Using Annexin V-PE Apoptosis Detection Kit and flow cytometer, the amount of cells undergoing apoptosis, in various stages of the antineoplasic treatment, was detected. At the same time, were monitored, the serum level of malondialdehyde. The results obtained confirm the alteration of the mitochondrial metabolism. We can observed the mitochondrial dysfunction role in cell apoptosis.

  8. Changes in positive end-expiratory pressure alter the distribution of ventilation within the lung immediately after birth in newborn rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J Kitchen

    Full Text Available Current recommendations suggest the use of positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP to assist very preterm infants to develop a functional residual capacity (FRC and establish gas exchange at birth. However, maintaining a consistent PEEP is difficult and so the lungs are exposed to changing distending pressures after birth, which can affect respiratory function. Our aim was to determine how changing PEEP levels alters the distribution of ventilation within the lung. Preterm rabbit pups (28 days gestation were delivered and mechanically ventilated with one of three strategies, whereby PEEP was changed in sequence; 0-5-10-5-0 cmH2O, 5-10-0-5-0 cmH2O or 10-5-0-10-0 cmH2O. Phase contrast X-ray imaging was used to analyse the distribution of ventilation in the upper left (UL, upper right (UR, lower left (LL and lower right (LR quadrants of the lung. Initiating ventilation with 10PEEP resulted in a uniform increase in FRC throughout the lung whereas initiating ventilation with 5PEEP or 0PEEP preferentially aerated the UR than both lower quadrants (p<0.05. Consequently, the relative distribution of incoming VT was preferentially directed into the lower lobes at low PEEP, primarily due to the loss of FRC in those lobes. Following ventilation at 10PEEP, the distribution of air at end-inflation was uniform across all quadrants and remained so regardless of the PEEP level. Uniform distribution of ventilation can be achieved by initiating ventilation with a high PEEP. After the lungs have aerated, small and stepped reductions in PEEP result in more uniform changes in ventilation.

  9. Alteration of structure and function of ATP synthase and cytochrome c oxidase by lack of F-o-a and Cox3 subunits caused by mitochondrial DNA 9205delTA mutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Kaplanová, Vilma; Nůsková, Hana; Kovářová, Nikola; Ješina, Pavel; Drahota, Zdeněk; Mráček, Tomáš; Seneca, S.; Houštěk, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 466, č. 3 (2015), s. 601-611 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0970; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1363 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP synthase * cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrial diseases * mtDNA MT-ATP6 mutation * oxidative phosphorylation * threshold effect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2015

  10. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  11. Fire severity alters the distribution of pyrogenic carbon stocks across ecosystem pools in a Californian mixed-conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrini, Bernardo; Alvey, Erin C.; Hurteau, Matthew D.; Safford, Hugh; Miesel, Jessica R.

    2017-09-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC) is hypothesized to play an important role in the carbon (C) cycle due to its resistance to decomposition; however, much uncertainty still exists regarding the stocks of PyC that persist on-site after the initial erosion in postfire forests. Therefore, understanding how fire characteristics influence PyC stocks is vital, particularly in the context of California forests for which an increase of high-severity fires is predicted over the next decades. We measured forest C and persistent PyC stocks in areas burned by low-to-moderate and high-severity fire, as well as in adjacent unburned areas in a California mixed-conifer forest, 2 to 3 years after wildfire. We measured C and PyC stocks in the following compartments: standing trees, downed wood, forest floor, and mineral soil (0-5 cm), and we identified PyC using the weak nitric acid digestion method. We found that the total stock of PyC did not differ among fire severity classes (overall mean 248 ± 30 g C m-2); however, fire severity influenced the distribution of PyC in the individual compartments. Areas burned by high-severity fire had 2.5 times more PyC stocked in the coarse woody debris (p stocked in standing trees (p stock in the forest floor (-22%, p losses through erosion.

  12. Salinity altered root distribution and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil of Jerusalem artichoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Jinxiang; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between roots and bacterial communities in halophytic species is poorly understood. Here, we used Jerusalem artichoke cultivar Nanyu 1 (NY-1) to characterise root distribution patterns and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil under variable salinity. Root growth was not inhibited within the salinity range 1.2 to 1.9 g salt/kg, but roots were mainly confined to 0–20 cm soil layer vertically and 0–30 cm horizontally from the plant centre. Root concentrations of K+, Na+, Mg2+ and particularly Ca2+ were relatively high under salinity stress. High salinity stress decreased soil invertase and catalase activity. Using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach, we determined higher diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soil at high than low salinity. More than 15,500 valid reads were obtained, and Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria predominated in all samples, accounting for >80% of the reads. On a genus level, 636 genera were common to the low and high salinity treatments at 0–5 cm and 5–10 cm depth. The abundance of Steroidobacter and Sphingomonas was significantly decreased by increasing salinity. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices with increasing severity of salt stress indicated that high salt stress increased diversity in the bacterial communities. PMID:26852800

  13. The mitochondrial contact site complex, a determinant of mitochondrial architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Harner, Max; Körner, Christian; Walther, Dirk; Mokranjac, Dejana; Kaesmacher, Johannes; Welsch, Ulrich; Griffith, Janice; Mann, Matthias; Reggiori, Fulvio; Neupert, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The outer and inner mitochondrial membranes are physically linked. Quantitative high resolution mass spectrometry now identifies the molecular nature of the Mitochondrial Contact Site complex (MICOS). MICOS is required for crista junctions formation, respiration and mitochondrial DNA inheritance.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA variants in colorectal carcinogenesis: Drivers or passengers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichiello, Edoardo; Venesio, Tiziana

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA alterations have widely been reported in many age-related degenerative diseases and tumors, including colorectal cancer. In the past few years, the discovery of inter-genomic crosstalk between nucleus and mitochondria has reinforced the role of mitochondrial DNA variants in perturbing this essential signaling pathway and thus indirectly targeting nuclear genes involved in tumorigenic and invasive phenotype. Mitochondrial dysfunction is currently considered a crucial hallmark of carcinogenesis as well as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Mitochondrial DNA alterations include point mutations, deletions, inversions, and copy number variations, but numerous studies investigating their pathogenic role in cancer have provided inconsistent evidence. Furthermore, the biological impact of mitochondrial DNA variants may vary tremendously, depending on the proportion of mutant DNA molecules carried by the neoplastic cells (heteroplasmy). In this review, we discuss the role of different type of mitochondrial DNA alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis and, in particular, we revisit the issue of whether they may be considered as causative driver or simply genuine passenger events. The advent of high-throughput techniques as well as the development of genetic and pharmaceutical interventions for the treatment of mitochondrial dysfunction in colorectal cancer are also explored.

  15. Drosophila ABC transporter mutants white, brown and scarlet have altered contents and distribution of biogenic amines in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycz, J; Borycz, J A; Kubów, A; Lloyd, V; Meinertzhagen, I A

    2008-11-01

    Monoamines such as dopamine, histamine and serotonin (5-HT) are widely distributed throughout the brain of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, where many of their actions have been investigated. For example, histamine is released from photoreceptor synapses in the lamina neuropile of the visual system. Mutations of the genes white, an important eye pigmentation marker in fly genetics that encodes an ABC transporter, and its binding partner brown, cause neural phenotypes not readily reconciled solely with actions in eye pigmentation. We find that flies mutant for these genes, and another binding partner, scarlet, have about half the wild-type amount of histamine in the head, as well as reduced 5-HT and dopamine. These differences parallel reductions in immunoreactivity to the corresponding biogenic amines. They also correlate with the amine content of fractions after differential centrifugation of head homogenates. Thus, most of the amine is found in the vesicle-rich fraction of wild-type head homogenates, whereas it is found in the supernatant fractions from white, brown and scarlet flies. White co-expresses in lamina epithelial glia with Ebony, which conjugates histamine to beta-alanine. Histamine is then released when the conjugate is hydrolyzed in photoreceptors, by Tan. Mutant white ameliorates the effects of tan on head histamine whereas it exacerbates the effects of ebony. Our results are consistent with the proposal that histamine uptake by the epithelial glia may be white dependent. Behavioral abnormalities in white, brown and scarlet mutants could arise because aminergic neurons in the Drosophila brain have reduced amine for release.

  16. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Lipotoxic Hearts Induce Post-Translational Modifications of AKAP121, DRP1, and OPA1 That Promote Mitochondrial Fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Kensuke; Bugger, Heiko; Wende, Adam R; Soto, Jamie; Jenson, Gregory A; Tor, Austin R; McGlauflin, Rose; Kenny, Helena C; Zhang, Yuan; Souvenir, Rhonda; Hu, Xiao X; Sloan, Crystal L; Pereira, Renata O; Lira, Vitor A; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Sharp, Terry L; Shoghi, Kooresh I; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Kohl, Peter; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Schaffer, Jean E; Abel, E Dale

    2018-01-05

    Cardiac lipotoxicity, characterized by increased uptake, oxidation, and accumulation of lipid intermediates, contributes to cardiac dysfunction in obesity and diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms linking lipid overload and mitochondrial dysfunction are incompletely understood. To elucidate the mechanisms for mitochondrial adaptations to lipid overload in postnatal hearts in vivo. Using a transgenic mouse model of cardiac lipotoxicity overexpressing ACSL1 (long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1) in cardiomyocytes, we show that modestly increased myocardial fatty acid uptake leads to mitochondrial structural remodeling with significant reduction in minimum diameter. This is associated with increased palmitoyl-carnitine oxidation and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in isolated mitochondria. Mitochondrial morphological changes and elevated ROS generation are also observed in palmitate-treated neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Palmitate exposure to neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes initially activates mitochondrial respiration, coupled with increased mitochondrial polarization and ATP synthesis. However, long-term exposure to palmitate (>8 hours) enhances ROS generation, which is accompanied by loss of the mitochondrial reticulum and a pattern suggesting increased mitochondrial fission. Mechanistically, lipid-induced changes in mitochondrial redox status increased mitochondrial fission by increased ubiquitination of AKAP121 (A-kinase anchor protein 121) leading to reduced phosphorylation of DRP1 (dynamin-related protein 1) at Ser637 and altered proteolytic processing of OPA1 (optic atrophy 1). Scavenging mitochondrial ROS restored mitochondrial morphology in vivo and in vitro. Our results reveal a molecular mechanism by which lipid overload-induced mitochondrial ROS generation causes mitochondrial dysfunction by inducing post-translational modifications of mitochondrial proteins that regulate mitochondrial dynamics. These findings provide a

  17. Gestational and early postnatal hypothyroidism alters VGluT1 and VGAT bouton distribution in the neocortex and hippocampus, and behavior in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eNavarro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are fundamental for the expression of genes involved in the development of the CNS and their deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological diseases including mental retardation, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorders. We examined in rat whether developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism affects the distribution of vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGluT1; glutamatergic and vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VGAT; GABAergic immunoreactive (ir boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex, and the behavior of the pups. Hypothyroidism was induced by adding 0.02% methimazole (MMI and 1% KClO4 to the drinking water starting at embryonic day 10 (E10; developmental hypothyroidism and E21 (early postnatal hypothyroidism until day of sacrifice at postnatal day 50. Behavior was studied using the acoustic prepulse inhibition (somatosensory attention and the elevated plus-maze (anxiety-like assessment tests. The distribution, density and size of VGlut1-ir and VGAT-ir boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex was abnormal in MMI pups and these changes correlate with behavioral changes, as prepulse inhibition of the startle response amplitude was reduced, and the percentage of time spent in open arms increased. In conclusion, both developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism significantly decreases the ratio of GABAergic to glutamatergic boutons in dentate gyrus leading to an abnormal flow of information to the hippocampus and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex, and alter behavior in rats. Our data show cytoarchitectonic alterations in the basic excitatory hippocampal loop, and in local inhibitory circuits of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus that might contribute to the delayed neurocognitive outcome observed in thyroid hormone deficient children born in iodine deficient areas, or suffering from congenital hypothyroidism.

  18. Unique fractal evaluation and therapeutic implications of mitochondrial morphology in malignant mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Frances E.; Cianci, Gianguido C.; Kanteti, Rajani; Riehm, Jacob J.; Arif, Qudsia; Poroyko, Valeriy A.; Lupovitch, Eitan; Vigneswaran, Wickii; Husain, Aliya; Chen, Phetcharat; Liao, James K.; Sattler, Martin; Kindler, Hedy L.; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM), is an intractable disease with limited therapeutic options and grim survival rates. Altered metabolic and mitochondrial functions are hallmarks of MM and most other cancers. Mitochondria exist as a dynamic network, playing a central role in cellular metabolism. MM cell lines display a spectrum of altered mitochondrial morphologies and function compared to control mesothelial cells. Fractal dimension and lacunarity measurements are a sensitive and objective method to quantify mitochondrial morphology and most importantly are a promising predictor of response to mitochondrial inhibition. Control cells have high fractal dimension and low lacunarity and are relatively insensitive to mitochondrial inhibition. MM cells exhibit a spectrum of sensitivities to mitochondrial inhibitors. Low mitochondrial fractal dimension and high lacunarity correlates with increased sensitivity to the mitochondrial inhibitor metformin. Lacunarity also correlates with sensitivity to Mdivi-1, a mitochondrial fission inhibitor. MM and control cells have similar sensitivities to cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of MM. Neither oxidative phosphorylation nor glycolytic activity, correlated with sensitivity to either metformin or mdivi-1. Our results suggest that mitochondrial inhibition may be an effective and selective therapeutic strategy in mesothelioma, and identifies mitochondrial morphology as a possible predictor of response to targeted mitochondrial inhibition. PMID:27080907

  19. Spatio-temporal distribution of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) mitochondrial lineages in cities with distinct dengue incidence rates suggests complex population dynamics of the dengue vector in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes-Dueñez, Jeiczon; Arboleda, Sair; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2015-04-01

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4), Chikungunya and yellow fever virus to humans. Previous population genetic studies have revealed a particular genetic structure among the vector populations in the Americas that suggests differences in the ability to transmit DENV. In Colombia, despite its high epidemiologic importance, the genetic population structure and the phylogeographic depiction of Ae. aegypti, as well as its relationship with the epidemiologic landscapes in cities with heterogeneous incidence levels, remains unknown. We conducted a spatiotemporal analysis with the aim of determining the genetic structure and phylogeography of Colombian populations of Ae. aegypti among cities with different eco-epidemiologic characteristics with regard to DENV. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit 1 (COI)--NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) genes were sequenced and analyzed from 341 adult mosquitoes collected during 2012 and 2013 in the Colombian cities of Bello, Riohacha and Villavicencio, which exhibit low, medium and high levels of incidence of DENV, respectively. The results demonstrated a low genetic differentiation over time and a high genetic structure between the cities due to changes in the frequency of two highly supported genetic groups. The phylogeographic analyses indicated that one group (associated with West African populations) was found in all the cities throughout the sampling while the second group (associated with East African populations) was found in all the samples from Bello and in only one sampling from Riohacha. Environmental factors such as the use of chemical insecticides showed a significant correlation with decreasing genetic diversity, indicating that environmental factors affect the population structure of Ae. aegypti across time and space in these cities. Our results suggest that two Ae. aegypti lineages are present in Colombia; one that is widespread and related to a West African

  20. Evolution and structural organization of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and the mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging (MIB) complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynen, M.A.; Muhlmeister, M.; Gotthardt, K.K.; Guerrero Castillo, S.; Brandt, U.

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the distribution of mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex proteins and mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging complex (MIB) proteins over (sub)complexes and over species. The MICOS proteins are associated with the formation and maintenance of

  1. Effects of altered gravity on a distribution of rDNA and nucleolar proteins and the expression of nucleolar proteins in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Margaryta; Kordyum, Elizabeth; Medina, Francisco Javier

    The nucleolus is an inner nuclear organelle originated from the activity of hundreds of rRNA genes, typically spanning several megabases. It morphologically reflects the functional events leading to ribosome biogenesis, from the transcription of rDNA through the processing of nascent pre-rRNA to the assembly of pre-ribosomes. A typical nucleolus consists of three major elements, namely fibrillar centers (FCs), the dense fibrillar component (DFC), and granular component (GC). The rate of ribosome biosynthesis and the subnucleolar structure are reliable monitors of the general level of cell metabolism and, consequently, of the rate of cellular growth, being influenced with many external factors, among which altered gravity could be included. Thus, we can hypothesize that the structural organization of the nucleolar subcomponents and the level, distribution and quantitative/qualitative characteristics of the nucleolar proteins would be changed under conditions of altered gravity. To confirm our hypothesis, we applied parallel procedures, such as cytochemistry, immunofluorescence, confocal laser microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, monoand bi-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting in root meristematic cells from two-day cress seedlings grown under slow horizontal clinorotation (2 rpm) and in stationary control. The complex model of the ultrastructural organization and functions of the nucleolus was created based on the location of rDNA and the nucleolar proteins fibrillarin, NhL90 and NhL68, these latter being cress nucleolin homologues. The principal stages of ribosome biogenesis, namely ribosomal gene activation, rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing were reflected in this model. Compared to the pattern shown in control ground gravity conditions, we found firstly a redistribution of both rDNA and nucleolar proteins in nucleolar subcomponents, induced by clinorotation. Under the conditions of altered gravity, nucleolar DNA concentrated

  2. Proteomic Profiling of Mitochondrial Enzymes during Skeletal Muscle Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Lisa; O'Connell, Kathleen; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are of central importance for energy generation in skeletal muscles. Expression changes or functional alterations in mitochondrial enzymes play a key role during myogenesis, fibre maturation, and various neuromuscular pathologies, as well as natural fibre aging. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics suggests itself as a convenient large-scale and high-throughput approach to catalogue the mitochondrial protein complement and determine global changes during health and disease. This paper gives a brief overview of the relatively new field of mitochondrial proteomics and discusses the findings from recent proteomic surveys of mitochondrial elements in aged skeletal muscles. Changes in the abundance, biochemical activity, subcellular localization, and/or posttranslational modifications in key mitochondrial enzymes might be useful as novel biomarkers of aging. In the long term, this may advance diagnostic procedures, improve the monitoring of disease progression, help in the testing of side effects due to new drug regimes, and enhance our molecular understanding of age-related muscle degeneration. PMID:21437005

  3. New Therapeutics to Modulate Mitochondrial Function in Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Heather M; Morris, Jill K

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are impaired in neurodegenerative diseases. There is evidence for these functional declines both within the brain and systemically in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Due to these observations, therapeutics targeted to alter mitochondrial function and energy pathways are increasingly studied in pre-clinical and clinical settings. The goal of this article was to review therapies with specific implications on mitochondrial energy metabolism published through May 2016 that have been tested for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss implications for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases and how this drives new therapeutic initiatives. Thus far, treatments have achieved varying degrees of success. Further investigation into the mechanisms driving mitochondrial dysfunction and bioenergetic failure in neurodegenerative diseases is warranted. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Variation Reveals a Sharp Genetic Break within the Distribution of the Blue Land Crab Cardisoma guanhumi in the Western Central Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosimere Xavier Amaral

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The blue land crab Cardisoma guanhumi is widely distributed throughout tropical and subtropical estuarine regions in the Western Central Atlantic (WCA. Patterns of population genetic structure and historical demographics of the species were assessed by mtDNA control region sequence analysis to examine the connectivity among five populations (n = 97 within the region for future conservation strategies and decision-making of fishery management. A total of 234 polymorphic nucleotides were revealed within the sequence region, which have defined 93 distinct haplotypes. No dominant mtDNA haplotypes were found but instead a distribution of a few low-frequency recurrent haplotypes with a large number of singletons. A NJ-tree and a median-joining haplotype network revealed two distinct clusters, corresponding to individuals from estuaries located along the Caribbean Sea and Brazilian waters, respectively. AMOVA and FST statistics supported the hypothesis that two main geographic regions exists. Phylogeographical discontinuity was further demonstrated by the Bayesian assignment analysis and a significant pattern of isolation-by-distance. Additionally, tests of neutral evolution and analysis of mismatch distribution indicate a complex demographic history in the WCA, which corresponds to bottleneck and subsequent population growth. Overall, a sharp genetic break between Caribbean and Brazilian populations raised concerns over the conservation status of the blue land crab.

  5. Power Grid Protection of the Muscle Mitochondrial Reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Glancy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Mitochondrial network connectivity enables rapid communication and distribution of potential energy throughout the cell. However, this connectivity puts the energy conversion system at risk, because damaged elements could jeopardize the entire network. Here, we demonstrate the mechanisms for mitochondrial network protection in heart and skeletal muscle (SKM. We find that the cardiac mitochondrial reticulum is segmented into subnetworks comprising many mitochondria linked through abundant contact sites at highly specific intermitochondrial junctions (IMJs. In both cardiac and SKM subnetworks, a rapid electrical and physical separation of malfunctioning mitochondria occurs, consistent with detachment of IMJs and retraction of elongated mitochondria into condensed structures. Regional mitochondrial subnetworks limit the cellular impact of local dysfunction while the dynamic disconnection of damaged mitochondria allows the remaining mitochondria to resume normal function within seconds. Thus, mitochondrial network security is comprised of both proactive and reactive mechanisms in striated muscle cells. : Network connectivity allows information sharing and distribution but also enables propagation of localized dysfunction. Glancy et al. demonstrate the existence of both proactive and reactive network protection mechanisms designed to minimize the spread of dysfunction throughout the coupled mitochondrial networks in heart and skeletal muscle cells. Keywords: energy distribution, muscle energetics, oxidative phosphorylation, 3D electron microscopy, mitochondrial retraction, mitochondrial dynamics

  6. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Denaturation mapping by electron microscopy.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Bak, AL

    1975-01-01

    Electronmicroscopic observation of the denaturation pattern of 130 partially denaturated linear mitochondrial DNA molecules from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was used to investigate the distribution of AT-rich sequences within the mitochondrial genome. The molecules were observed after heating...... denaturated sequences in the mitochondrial DNA. These sequences which presumably correspond to the very AT-rich regions, known to exist in the yeast mitochondrial DNA, were found at intervals of about 0.5 - 3 mum on the map....

  8. Role of the mitochondrial DNA replication machinery in mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis, aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBalsi, Karen L; Hoff, Kirsten E; Copeland, William C

    2017-01-01

    As regulators of bioenergetics in the cell and the primary source of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), dysfunctional mitochondria have been implicated for decades in the process of aging and age-related diseases. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated and repaired by nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) and several other associated proteins, which compose the mtDNA replication machinery. Here, we review evidence that errors caused by this replication machinery and failure to repair these mtDNA errors results in mtDNA mutations. Clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations results in mitochondrial dysfunction, such as decreased electron transport chain (ETC) enzyme activity and impaired cellular respiration. We address the literature that mitochondrial dysfunction, in conjunction with altered mitochondrial dynamics, is a major driving force behind aging and age-related diseases. Additionally, interventions to improve mitochondrial function and attenuate the symptoms of aging are examined. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Mitochondrial regulation of cell cycle progression through SLC25A43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielson, Marike; Reizer, Edwin [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden); Stål, Olle [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Tina, Elisabet, E-mail: elisabet.tina@regionorebrolan.se [Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden)

    2016-01-22

    An increasing body of evidence is pointing towards mitochondrial regulation of the cell cycle. In a previous study of HER2-positive tumours we could demonstrate a common loss in the gene encoding for the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43 and also a significant relation between SLC25A43 protein expression and S-phase fraction. Here, we investigated the consequence of suppressed SLC25A43 expression on cell cycle progression and proliferation in breast epithelial cells. In the present study, we suppressed SLC25A43 using siRNA in immortalised non-cancerous breast epithelial MCF10A cells and HER2-positive breast cancer cells BT-474. Viability, apoptosis, cell proliferation rate, cell cycle phase distribution, and nuclear Ki-67 and p21, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle related gene expressions were analysed using real-time PCR. We found that SLC25A43 knockdown in MCF10A cells significantly inhibited cell cycle progression during G{sub 1}-to-S transition, thus significantly reducing the proliferation rate and fraction of Ki-67 positive MCF10A cells. In contrast, suppressed SLC25A43 expression in BT-474 cells resulted in a significantly increased proliferation rate together with an enhanced G{sub 1}-to-S transition. This was reflected by an increased fraction of Ki-67 positive cells and reduced level of nuclear p21. In line with our previous results, we show a role for SLC25A43 as a regulator of cell cycle progression and proliferation through a putative mitochondrial checkpoint. These novel data further strengthen the connection between mitochondrial function and the cell cycle, both in non-malignant and in cancer cells. - Highlights: • Proposed cell cycle regulation through the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43. • SLC25A43 alters cell proliferation rate and cell cycle progression. • Suppressed SLC25A43 influences transcription of cell cycle regulatory genes.

  10. Chicken or the egg: Warburg effect and mitochondrial dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Senyilmaz, Deniz; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2015-01-01

    Compared with normal cells, cancer cells show alterations in many cellular processes, including energy metabolism. Studies on cancer metabolism started with Otto Warburg's observation at the beginning of the last century. According to Warburg, cancer cells rely on glycolysis more than mitochondrial respiration for energy production. Considering that glycolysis yields much less energy compared with mitochondrial respiration, Warburg hypothesized that mitochondria must be dysfunctional and this...

  11. Roles of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Stem Cell Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Su

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations accumulate in somatic stem cells during ageing and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the studies that link mtDNA mutations to stem cell ageing. We discuss the age-related behaviours of the somatic mtDNA mutations in stem cell populations and how they potentially contribute to stem cell ageing by altering mitochondrial properties in humans and in mtDNA-mutator mice. We also draw attention to the diverse fates of the mtDNA mutations with different origins during ageing, with potential selective pressures on the germline inherited but not the somatic mtDNA mutations.

  12. Mitochondrial haplogroups in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Pernille Hurup; Sode, Jacob; Hagen, Christian Munch

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (hgs) in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Two-hundred nineteen consecutive patients with RA had mtDNA isolated from their blood, sequenced and haplotyped. Patients were diagnosed...

  13. Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore links mitochondrial dysfunction to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeo, E P; Laker, R C; Breen, D S; Akhtar, Y N; Kenwood, B M; Liao, J A; Zhang, M; Fazakerley, D J; Tomsig, J L; Harris, T E; Keller, S R; Chow, J D; Lynch, K R; Chokki, M; Molkentin, J D; Turner, N; James, D E; Yan, Z; Hoehn, K L

    2014-04-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, but the mechanism by which mitochondria inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into the cytoplasm is unclear. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is a protein complex that facilitates the exchange of molecules between the mitochondrial matrix and cytoplasm, and opening of the mPTP occurs in response to physiological stressors that are associated with insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated whether mPTP opening provides a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance by inhibiting the mPTP gatekeeper protein cyclophilin D (CypD) in vivo and in vitro. Mice lacking CypD were protected from high fat diet-induced glucose intolerance due to increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. The mitochondria in CypD knockout muscle were resistant to diet-induced swelling and had improved calcium retention capacity compared to controls; however, no changes were observed in muscle oxidative damage, insulin signaling, lipotoxic lipid accumulation or mitochondrial bioenergetics. In vitro, we tested 4 models of insulin resistance that are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured skeletal muscle cells including antimycin A, C2-ceramide, ferutinin, and palmitate. In all models, we observed that pharmacological inhibition of mPTP opening with the CypD inhibitor cyclosporin A was sufficient to prevent insulin resistance at the level of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The protective effects of mPTP inhibition on insulin sensitivity were associated with improved mitochondrial calcium retention capacity but did not involve changes in insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo. In sum, these data place the mPTP at a critical intersection between alterations in mitochondrial function and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  14. Vimar Is a Novel Regulator of Mitochondrial Fission through Miro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianggong Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As fundamental processes in mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial fusion, fission and transport are regulated by several core components, including Miro. As an atypical Rho-like small GTPase with high molecular mass, the exchange of GDP/GTP in Miro may require assistance from a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF. However, the GEF for Miro has not been identified. While studying mitochondrial morphology in Drosophila, we incidentally observed that the loss of vimar, a gene encoding an atypical GEF, enhanced mitochondrial fission under normal physiological conditions. Because Vimar could co-immunoprecipitate with Miro in vitro, we speculated that Vimar might be the GEF of Miro. In support of this hypothesis, a loss-of-function (LOF vimar mutant rescued mitochondrial enlargement induced by a gain-of-function (GOF Miro transgene; whereas a GOF vimar transgene enhanced Miro function. In addition, vimar lost its effect under the expression of a constitutively GTP-bound or GDP-bound Miro mutant background. These results indicate a genetic dependence of vimar on Miro. Moreover, we found that mitochondrial fission played a functional role in high-calcium induced necrosis, and a LOF vimar mutant rescued the mitochondrial fission defect and cell death. This result can also be explained by vimar's function through Miro, because Miro's effect on mitochondrial morphology is altered upon binding with calcium. In addition, a PINK1 mutant, which induced mitochondrial enlargement and had been considered as a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease (PD, caused fly muscle defects, and the loss of vimar could rescue these defects. Furthermore, we found that the mammalian homolog of Vimar, RAP1GDS1, played a similar role in regulating mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a functional conservation of this GEF member. The Miro/Vimar complex may be a promising drug target for diseases in which mitochondrial fission and fusion are dysfunctional.

  15. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the neuro-degenerative and cardio-degenerative disease, Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shannon; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Jansson, Patric J; Richardson, Des R; Huang, Michael L-H

    2017-08-04

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is essential for maintaining healthy cellular function and survival. The detrimental involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in neuro-degenerative diseases has recently been highlighted in human conditions, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is another neuro-degenerative, but also cardio-degenerative condition, where mitochondrial dysfunction plays a crucial role in disease progression. Deficient expression of the mitochondrial protein, frataxin, is the primary cause of FA, which leads to adverse alterations in whole cell and mitochondrial iron metabolism. Dys-regulation of iron metabolism in these compartments, results in the accumulation of inorganic iron deposits in the mitochondrial matrix that is thought to potentiate oxidative damage observed in FA. Therefore, the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis is crucial in the progression of neuro-degenerative conditions, particularly in FA. In this review, vital mitochondrial homeostatic processes and their roles in FA pathogenesis will be discussed. These include mitochondrial iron processing, mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission processes), mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial energy production and calcium metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adhesion Regulating Molecule 1 Mediates HAP40 Overexpression-Induced Mitochondrial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zih-Ning; Chung, Her Min; Fang, Su-Chiung; Her, Lu-Shiun

    2017-01-01

    Striatal neuron death in Huntington's disease is associated with abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and functions. However, the mechanisms for this mitochondrial dysregulation remain elusive. Increased accumulation of Huntingtin-associated protein 40 (HAP40) has been shown to be associated with Huntington's disease. However, the link between increased HAP40 and Huntington's disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that HAP40 overexpression causes mitochondrial dysfunction and reduces cell viability in the immortalized mouse striatal neurons. HAP40-associated mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with reduction of adhesion regulating molecule 1 (ADRM1) protein. Consistently, depletion of ADRM1 by shRNAs impaired mitochondrial functions and increased mitochondrial fragmentation in mouse striatal cells. Moreover, reducing ADRM1 levels enhanced activity of fission factor dynamin-related GTPase protein 1 (Drp1) via increased phosphorylation at serine 616 of Drp1 (Drp1Ser616). Restoring ADRM1 protein levels was able to reduce HAP40-induced ROS levels and mitochondrial fragmentation and improved mitochondrial functions and cell viability. Moreover, reducing Drp1 activity by Drp1 inhibitor, Mdivi-1, ameliorates both HAP40 overexpression- and ADRM1 depletion-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, our studies suggest that HAP40-mediated reduction of ADRM1 alters the mitochondrial fission activity and results in mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:29209146

  18. Epilepsy and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P. Saneto DO, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. In a large cohort of children and adolescents with mitochondrial disease (n = 180, over 48% of patients developed seizures. The majority (68% of patients were younger than 3 years and medically intractable (90%. The electroencephalographic pattern of multiregional epileptiform discharges over the left and right hemisphere with background slowing occurred in 62%. The epilepsy syndrome, infantile spasms, was seen in 17%. Polymerase γ mutations were the most common genetic etiology of seizures, representing Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (14%. The severity of disease in those patients with epilepsy was significant, as 13% of patients experienced early death. Simply the loss of energy production cannot explain the development of seizures or all patients with mitochondrial dysfunction would have epilepsy. Until the various aspects of mitochondrial physiology that are involved in proper brain development are understood, epilepsy and its treatment will remain unsatisfactory.

  19. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  20. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA- REVOLUTIONARY EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidhehi Narayan Nayak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Mitochondrion, the sausage-shaped organelle residing in the cytoplasm of all eukaryotic cells, apart from being the power house, represents endosymbiotic evolution of a free living organism to intracellular structure. Anthropologically, mitochondrial DNA is the fossilised source to trace the human ancestry particularly of maternal lineage. This article attempts to highlight the various biological functions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA with a note on its forensic application.

  1. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung; Lim, Wonchung; Kim, Taeyoung; Kang, Chounghun

    2015-01-01

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle

  2. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Wonchung [Department of Sports Medicine, College of Health Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju 363-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taeyoung [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chounghun, E-mail: kangx119@umn.edu [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene and Exercise Science, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota at Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-05-29

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle.

  3. Chronic ethanol consumption induces mitochondrial protein acetylation and oxidative stress in the kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Peter S.; Roy, Samantha R.; Coughlan, Christina; Orlicky, David J.; Liang, Yongliang; Shearn, Colin T.; Roede, James R.; Fritz, Kristofer S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present the novel findings that chronic ethanol consumption induces mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation in the kidney and correlates with significantly increased renal oxidative stress. A major proteomic footprint of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is an increase in hepatic mitochondrial protein acetylation. Protein hyperacetylation has been shown to alter enzymatic function of numerous proteins and plays a role in regulating metabolic processes. Renal mitochondrial targets...

  4. Distribution of intrahepatic T, NK and CD3(+)CD56(+)NKT cells alters after liver transplantation: Shift from innate to adaptive immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens M; Lang, Corinna; Scherer, Marcus N; Farkas, Stefan A; Geissler, Edward K; Schlitt, Hans J; Hornung, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    The liver is an immunological organ containing a large number of T, NK and NKT cells, but little is known about intrahepatic immunity after LTx. Here, we investigated whether the distribution of T, NK and CD3(+)CD56(+)NKT cells is altered in transplanted livers under different circumstances. Core biopsies of transplanted livers were stained with antibodies against CD3 and CD56. Several cell populations including T (CD3(+)CD56(-)), NK (CD3(-)CD56(+)) and NKT cells (CD3(+)CD56(+)) were studied by fluorescence microscopy. Cell numbers were analyzed in relation to the time interval after LTx, immunosuppressive therapy and stage of acute graft rejection (measured with the rejection activity index: RAI) compared to tumor free liver tissue from patients after liver resection due to metastatic disease as control. Recruitment of CD3(+)CD56(+)NKT cells revealed a significant decrease during high RAI scores in comparison to low and middle RAI scores (RAI 7-9: 0.03±0.01/HPF vs. RAI 4-6: 0.1±0.005/HPF). CD3(+)CD56(+)NKT cells were also lower during immunosuppressive therapy with tacrolimus (0.03±0.01/HPF) than with cyclosporine (0.1±0.003/HPF), cyclosporine/MMF (0.1±0.003/HPF) or sirolimus (0.1±0.01/HPF) treatment. Intrahepatic T cell numbers increased significantly 50days after LTx compared to control liver tissue (4.5±0.2/HPF vs. 1.9±0.1/HPF). In contrast, NK cells (0.3±0.004/HPF) were significantly fewer in all biopsies after LTx compared to the control (0.7±0.04/HPF). These data indicate significant alterations in the hepatic recruitment of T, NK and CD3(+)CD56(+)NKT cells after LTx. The increase in T cells and the decrease in NK and CD3(+)CD56(+)NKT cells suggest a shift from innate to adaptive hepatic immunity in the liver graft. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamics of the mitochondrial network during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanfer, Gil; Kornmann, Benoît

    2016-04-15

    During mitosis, cells undergo massive deformation and reorganization, impacting on all cellular structures. Mitochondria, in particular, are highly dynamic organelles, which constantly undergo events of fission, fusion and cytoskeleton-based transport. This plasticity ensures the proper distribution of the metabolism, and the proper inheritance of functional organelles. During cell cycle, mitochondria undergo dramatic changes in distribution. In this review, we focus on the dynamic events that target mitochondria during mitosis. We describe how the cell-cycle-dependent microtubule-associated protein centromeric protein F (Cenp-F) is recruited to mitochondria by the mitochondrial Rho GTPase (Miro) to promote mitochondrial transport and re-distribution following cell division. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Alexander; Kohlhaas, Michael; Maack, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in cardiovascular diseases, and one important source for ROS are mitochondria. Emission of ROS from mitochondria is the net result of ROS production at the electron transport chain (ETC) and their elimination by antioxidative enzymes. Both of these processes are highly dependent on the mitochondrial redox state, which is dynamically altered under different physiological and pathological conditions. The concept of "redox-optimized ROS balance" integrates these aspects and implies that oxidative stress occurs when the optimal equilibrium of an intermediate redox state is disturbed towards either strong oxidation or reduction. Furthermore, mitochondria integrate ROS signals from other cellular sources, presumably through a process termed "ROS-induced ROS release" that involves mitochondrial ion channels. Here, we attempt to integrate these recent advances in our understanding of the control of mitochondrial ROS emission and develop a concept of how in heart failure, defects in ion handling can lead to mitochondrial oxidative stress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ozone and allergen exposure during postnatal development alters the frequency and airway distribution of CD25+ cells in infant rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Lisa A.; Gerriets, Joan E.; Tyler, Nancy K.; Abel, Kristina; Schelegle, Edward S.; Plopper, Charles G.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiologic link between air pollutant exposure and asthma has been supported by experimental findings, but the mechanisms are not understood. In this study, we evaluated the impact of combined ozone and house dust mite (HDM) exposure on the immunophenotype of peripheral blood and airway lymphocytes from rhesus macaque monkeys during the postnatal period of development. Starting at 30 days of age, monkeys were exposed to 11 cycles of filtered air, ozone, HDM aerosol, or ozone + HDM aerosol. Each cycle consisted of ozone delivered at 0.5 ppm for 5 days (8 h/day), followed by 9 days of filtered air; animals received HDM aerosol during the last 3 days of each ozone exposure period. Between 2-3 months of age, animals co-exposed to ozone + HDM exhibited a decline in total circulating leukocyte numbers and increased total circulating lymphocyte frequency. At 3 months of age, blood CD4+/CD25+ lymphocytes were increased with ozone + HDM. At 6 months of age, CD4+/CD25+ and CD8+/CD25+ lymphocyte populations increased in both blood and lavage of ozone + HDM animals. Overall volume of CD25+ cells within airway mucosa increased with HDM exposure. Ozone did not have an additive effect on volume of mucosal CD25+ cells in HDM-exposed animals, but did alter the anatomical distribution of this cell type throughout the proximal and distal airways. We conclude that a window of postnatal development is sensitive to air pollutant and allergen exposure, resulting in immunomodulation of peripheral blood and airway lymphocyte frequency and trafficking

  8. Acute treatment with kerosene damages the dermal barrier and alters the distribution of topically applied benzo(a)pyrene in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDow, Kathy; Schumann, Brenda L; Luse, Nicole; Warshawsky, Dave; Pickens, William L; Hoath, Steven B; Talaska, Glenn

    2011-12-01

    The dermal route is important in many occupational exposures. Some materials may reduce the barrier function of the skin to enhance absorption and effect on internal organs. We have reported previously that kerosene cleaning following treatment with used engine oil increased DNA adduct levels in the lungs of mice compared with animals treated with used oil alone. To investigate what other physiological parameters might be affected by kerosene, we conducted in vitro and in vivo measurements of skin barrier function. We also topically applied (3)H-BAP(100 nM in 25 μL acetone) and washed half the mice with 25 μL kerosene 1 hr after carcinogen application. Groups of four mice were euthanized from 1 to 72 hr after treatment. Skin, lungs, and livers were harvested from each animal and stored separately. Kerosene application reduced the barrier function of the skin in vitro beyond the effect of the acetone vehicle and the vehicle plus BAP. In vivo studies indicated that kerosene treatment reduced the barrier function at 4 and 8 hr post application and that the barrier function recovered at 24 hr after a single treatment. The fraction of the radiolabel remaining in the skin of animals treated with (3)H-BAP and washed with kerosene was significantly less than those not washed, beginning at 24 hr (pKerosene treatment compromises dermal barrier function and the ability of the skin to retain water, enhances carcinogen absorption, and alters organ distribution. This appears to contribute to the increase in BAP DNA adducts we reported earlier.

  9. Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Neuronal Development: Mechanism for Wolfram Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagalinec, Michal; Liiv, Mailis; Hodurova, Zuzana; Hickey, Miriam Ann; Vaarmann, Annika; Mandel, Merle; Zeb, Akbar; Choubey, Vinay; Kuum, Malle; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Vasar, Eero; Veksler, Vladimir; Kaasik, Allen

    2016-07-01

    Deficiency of the protein Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) is associated with multiple neurological and psychiatric abnormalities similar to those observed in pathologies showing alterations in mitochondrial dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that WFS1 deficiency affects neuronal function via mitochondrial abnormalities. We show that down-regulation of WFS1 in neurons leads to dramatic changes in mitochondrial dynamics (inhibited mitochondrial fusion, altered mitochondrial trafficking, and augmented mitophagy), delaying neuronal development. WFS1 deficiency induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, leading to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) dysfunction and disturbed cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis, which, in turn, alters mitochondrial dynamics. Importantly, ER stress, impaired Ca2+ homeostasis, altered mitochondrial dynamics, and delayed neuronal development are causatively related events because interventions at all these levels improved the downstream processes. Our data shed light on the mechanisms of neuronal abnormalities in Wolfram syndrome and point out potential therapeutic targets. This work may have broader implications for understanding the role of mitochondrial dynamics in neuropsychiatric diseases.

  10. Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Neuronal Development: Mechanism for Wolfram Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Cagalinec

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of the protein Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1 is associated with multiple neurological and psychiatric abnormalities similar to those observed in pathologies showing alterations in mitochondrial dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that WFS1 deficiency affects neuronal function via mitochondrial abnormalities. We show that down-regulation of WFS1 in neurons leads to dramatic changes in mitochondrial dynamics (inhibited mitochondrial fusion, altered mitochondrial trafficking, and augmented mitophagy, delaying neuronal development. WFS1 deficiency induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, leading to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R dysfunction and disturbed cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis, which, in turn, alters mitochondrial dynamics. Importantly, ER stress, impaired Ca2+ homeostasis, altered mitochondrial dynamics, and delayed neuronal development are causatively related events because interventions at all these levels improved the downstream processes. Our data shed light on the mechanisms of neuronal abnormalities in Wolfram syndrome and point out potential therapeutic targets. This work may have broader implications for understanding the role of mitochondrial dynamics in neuropsychiatric diseases.

  11. Mitochondrial adaptations to physiological vs. pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, E. Dale; Doenst, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a stereotypic response of the heart to increased workload. The nature of the workload increase may vary depending on the stimulus (repetitive, chronic, pressure, or volume overload). If the heart fully adapts to the new loading condition, the hypertrophic response is considered physiological. If the hypertrophic response is associated with the ultimate development of contractile dysfunction and heart failure, the response is considered pathological. Although divergent signalling mechanisms may lead to these distinct patterns of hypertrophy, there is some overlap. Given the close relationship between workload and energy demand, any form of cardiac hypertrophy will impact the energy generation by mitochondria, which are the key organelles for cellular ATP production. Significant changes in the expression of nuclear and mitochondrially encoded transcripts that impact mitochondrial function as well as altered mitochondrial proteome composition and mitochondrial energetics have been described in various forms of cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we review mitochondrial alterations in pathological and physiological hypertrophy. We suggest that mitochondrial adaptations to pathological and physiological hypertrophy are distinct, and we shall review potential mechanisms that might account for these differences. PMID:21257612

  12. Gastrointestinal manifestations of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Lynette A; Sokol, Ronald J

    2003-09-01

    Although non-specific gastrointestinal and hepatic symptoms are commonly found in most mitochondrial disorders, they are among the cardinal manifestations of several primary mitochondrial diseases, such as: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy; mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome; Alpers syndrome; and Pearson syndrome. Management of these heterogeneous disorders includes the empiric supplementation with various "mitochondrial cocktails," supportive therapies, and avoidance of drugs and conditions known to have a detrimental effect on the respiratory chain. There is a great need for improved methods of treatment and controlled clinical trials of existing therapies. Liver transplantation is successful in acquired cases; however neuromuscular involvement in primary mitochondrial disorders should be a contraindication for liver transplantation.

  13. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  14. Acupuncture reversed hippocampal mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular dementia rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Yi; Lin, Li-Ting; Wang, Xue-Rui; Du, Si-Qi; Yan, Chao-Qun; He, Tian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal mitochondrial dysfunction due to oxidative stress has been considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia (VD). Previous studies suggested that acupuncture could improve cerebral hypoperfusion-induced cognitive impairments. However, whether hippocampal mitochondria are associated with this cognitive improvement remains unclear. In this study, an animal model of VD was established via bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAO) to investigate the alterations of cognitive ability and hippocampal mitochondrial function. BCCAO rats showed impairments in hippocampal mitochondrial function, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and learning and memory deficits. After two-week acupuncture treatment, BCCAO-induced spatial learning and memory impairments as shown in Morris water maze were ameliorated. Hippocampal mitochondrial respiratory complex enzymes (complex I, II, IV) activities and cytochrome c oxidase IV expression significantly increased, which might contribute to the reduction of hippocampal ROS generation. In addition, acupuncture significantly improve mitochondrial bioenergy parameters such as mitochondrial respiratory control rate and membrane potential not PDH A1 expression. Placebo-acupuncture did not produce similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggested that acupuncture reversed BCCAO-induced hippocampal mitochondrial dysfunction, which might contribute to its prevention on cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Actin and myosin contribute to mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A.; He, J.; Mao, C. C.; Bailey, L. J.; Di Re, M.; Sembongi, H.; Kazak, L.; Dzionek, K.; Holmes, J. B.; Cluett, T. J.; Harbour, M. E.; Fearnley, I. M.; Crouch, R. J.; Conti, M. A.; Adelstein, R. S.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA maintenance and segregation are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton in budding yeast. We found two cytoskeletal proteins among six proteins tightly associated with rat liver mitochondrial DNA: non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA and β-actin. In human cells, transient gene silencing of MYH9 (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA), or the closely related MYH10 gene (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB), altered the topology and increased the copy number of mitochondrial DNA; and the latter effect was enhanced when both genes were targeted simultaneously. In contrast, genetic ablation of non-muscle myosin IIB was associated with a 60% decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, compared to control cells. Gene silencing of β-actin also affected mitochondrial DNA copy number and organization. Protease-protection experiments and iodixanol gradient analysis suggest some β-actin and non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA reside within human mitochondria and confirm that they are associated with mitochondrial DNA. Collectively, these results strongly implicate the actomyosin cytoskeleton in mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance. PMID:21398640

  16. Mitochondrial Respiration Is Impaired during Late-Stage Hamster Prion Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Robert; Moore, Roger A; Ward, Anne; Sturdevant, Dan E; Priola, Suzette A

    2017-09-15

    Mitochondria are crucial to proper neuronal function and overall brain health. Mitochondrial dysfunction within the brain has been observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease. Several markers of decreased mitochondrial activity during prion infection have been reported, yet the bioenergetic respiratory status of mitochondria from prion-infected animals is unknown. Here we show that clinically ill transgenic mice overexpressing hamster prion protein (Tg7) infected with the hamster prion strain 263K suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in response to the respiratory complex II substrate succinate. Characterization of the mitochondrial proteome of purified brain mitochondria from infected and uninfected Tg7 mice showed significant differences in the relative abundance of key mitochondrial electron transport proteins in 263K-infected animals relative to that in controls. Our results suggest that at clinical stages of prion infection, dysregulation of respiratory chain proteins may lead to impairment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain. IMPORTANCE Mitochondrial dysfunction is present in most major neurodegenerative diseases, and some studies have suggested that mitochondrial processes may be altered during prion disease. Here we show that hamster prion-infected transgenic mice overexpressing the hamster prion protein (Tg7 mice) suffer from mitochondrial respiratory deficits. Tg7 mice infected with the 263K hamster prion strain have little or no signs of mitochondrial dysfunction at the disease midpoint but suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial respiration at the clinical phase of disease. A proteomic analysis of the isolated brain mitochondria from clinically affected animals showed that several proteins involved in electron transport, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein synthesis were dysregulated. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly exacerbated by prion protein

  17. Abnormal Mitochondrial L-Arginine Transport Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure and Rexoygenation Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Melissa; Joshi, Mandar; Horlock, Duncan; Lam, Nicholas T.; Gregorevic, Paul; McGee, Sean L.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF) and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. Methods and Results In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model) we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (pL-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (pL-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1) exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. Conclusion These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury. PMID:25111602

  18. Mitochondrial Involvement and Impact in Aging Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T. Hepple

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrophy is a defining feature of aging skeletal muscle that contributes to progressive weakness and an increased risk of mobility impairment, falls, and physical frailty in very advanced age. Amongst the most frequently implicated mechanisms of aging muscle atrophy is mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent studies employing methods that are well-suited to interrogating intrinsic mitochondrial function find that mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species emission changes are inconsistent between aging rat muscles undergoing atrophy and appear normal in human skeletal muscle from septuagenarian physically active subjects. On the other hand, a sensitization to permeability transition seems to be a general property of atrophying muscle with aging and this effect is even seen in atrophying muscle from physically active septuagenarian subjects. In addition to this intrinsic alteration in mitochondrial function, factors extrinsic to the mitochondria may also modulate mitochondrial function in aging muscle. In particular, recent evidence implicates oxidative stress in the aging milieu as a factor that depresses respiratory function in vivo (an effect not present ex vivo. Furthermore, in very advanced age not only does muscle atrophy become more severe and clinically relevant in terms of its impact, but also there is evidence that this is driven by an accumulation of severely atrophied denervated myofibers. As denervation can itself modulate mitochondrial function and recruit mitochondrial-mediated atrophy pathways, future investigations need to address the degree to which skeletal muscle mitochondrial alterations in very advanced age are a consequence of denervation, rather than a primary organelle defect, to refine our understanding of the relevance of mitochondria as a therapeutic target at this more advanced age.

  19. Chicken or the egg: Warburg effect and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyilmaz, Deniz; Teleman, Aurelio A

    2015-01-01

    Compared with normal cells, cancer cells show alterations in many cellular processes, including energy metabolism. Studies on cancer metabolism started with Otto Warburg's observation at the beginning of the last century. According to Warburg, cancer cells rely on glycolysis more than mitochondrial respiration for energy production. Considering that glycolysis yields much less energy compared with mitochondrial respiration, Warburg hypothesized that mitochondria must be dysfunctional and this is the initiating factor for cancer formation. However, this hypothesis did not convince every scientist in the field. Some believed the opposite: the reduction in mitochondrial activity is a result of increased glycolysis. This discrepancy of opinions is ongoing. In this review, we will discuss the alterations in glycolysis, pyruvate metabolism, and the Krebs cycle in cancer cells and focus on cause and consequence.

  20. The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member tBid localizes to mitochondrial contact sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins Guy A

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following cleavage by caspase 8, the C-terminus of Bid translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondria that is dependent upon structures formed by the mitochondrial-specific lipid cardiolipin. Once associated with mitochondria, truncated Bid (tBid causes the potent release of cytochrome c, endonuclease G, and smac. Results We investigated whether tBid localizes specifically to the contact sites of mitochondria purported to be rich in cardiolipin. A point mutation changing the glycine at position 94 to glutamic acid in the BH3 domain of tBid (tBidG94E was principally used because mitochondria treated with this mutant tBid displayed better preservation of the outer membrane than those treated with wild type tBid. Additionally, tBidG94E lowers the cytochrome c releasing activity of tBid without affecting its targeting to mitochondria. Electron microscope tomography coupled with immunogold labeling was used as a new hybrid technique to investigate the three-dimensional distributions of tBid and tBidG94E around the mitochondrial periphery. The statistics of spatial point patterns was used to analyze the association of these proteins with contact sites. Conclusions Immunoelectron tomography with statistical analysis confirmed the preferential association of tBid with mitochondrial contact sites. These findings link these sites with cardiolipin in tBid targeting and suggest a role for Bcl-2 family members in regulating the activity of contact sites in relation to apoptosis. We propose a mechanism whereby Bcl-2 proteins alter mitochondrial function by disrupting cardiolipin containing contact site membranes.

  1. Mitochondrial behavior during oogenesis in zebrafish: a confocal microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Zhong; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2008-03-01

    The behavior of mitochondria during early oogenesis remains largely unknown in zebrafish. We used three mitochondrial probes (Mito Tracker Red CMXRos, Mito Tracker Green FM, and JC-1) to stain early zebrafish oocyte mitochondria, and confocal microscopy to analyze mitochondrial aggregation and distribution. By using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we traced mitochondrial movement. The microtubule assembly inhibitor nocodazole and microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB) were used to analyze the role of microtubules and microfilaments on mitochondrial movement. By using the dual emission probe, JC-1, and oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), we determined the distribution of active and inactive (low-active) mitochondria. Green/red fluorescence ratios of different sublocations in different oocyte groups stained by JC-1 were detected in merged (green and red) images. Our results showed that mitochondria exhibited a unique distribution pattern in early zebrafish oocytes. They tended to aggregate into large clusters in early stage I oocytes, but in a threadlike state in latter stage I oocytes. We detected a lower density mitochondrial area and a higher density mitochondrial area on opposite sides of the germinal vesicle. The green/red fluorescence ratios in different sublocations in normal oocytes were about 1:1. This implies that active mitochondria were distributed in all sublocations. FCCP treatment caused significant increases in the ratios. CB and nocodazole treatment caused an increase of the ratios in clusters and mitochondrial cloud, but not in dispersed areas. Mitochondria in different sublocations underwent fast dynamic movement. Inhibition or disruption of microtubules or microfilaments resulted in even faster mitochondrial free movement.

  2. Changes in rat liver mitochondrial lipids in vitamin A deficiency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Changes in rat liver mitochondrial lipids in vitamin A deficiency. R. S. MULLICK, H. R. ADHIKARI and U. K. VAKIL. Biochemistry and Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre,. Trombay, Bombay 400 085. MS received 7 February 1983; revised 16 June 1983. Abstract. The alterations in the lipid profiles of ...

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in human skeletal muscle biopsies of lipid storage disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debashree, Bandopadhyay; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Natarajan, Archana; Christopher, Rita; Nalini, Atchayaram; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2018-02-09

    Mitochondria regulate the balance between lipid metabolism and storage in the skeletal muscle. Altered lipid transport, metabolism and storage influence the bioenergetics, redox status and insulin signalling, contributing to cardiac and neurological diseases. Lipid storage disorders (LSDs) are neurological disorders which entail intramuscular lipid accumulation and impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics in the skeletal muscle causing progressive myopathy with muscle weakness. However, the mitochondrial changes including molecular events associated with impaired lipid storage have not been completely understood in the human skeletal muscle. We carried out morphological and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial function in muscle biopsies of human subjects with LSDs (n = 7), compared to controls (n = 10). Routine histology, enzyme histochemistry and ultrastructural analysis indicated altered muscle cell morphology and mitochondrial structure. Protein profiling of the muscle mitochondria from LSD samples (n = 5) (vs. control, n = 5) by high-throughput mass spectrometric analysis revealed that impaired metabolic processes could contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and ensuing myopathy in LSDs. We propose that impaired fatty acid and respiratory metabolism along with increased membrane permeability, elevated lipolysis and altered cristae entail mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs. Some of these mechanisms were unique to LSD apart from others that were common to dystrophic and inflammatory muscle pathologies. Many differentially regulated mitochondrial proteins in LSD are linked with other human diseases, indicating that mitochondrial protection via targeted drugs could be a treatment modality in LSD and related metabolic diseases. © 2018 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Mitochondrial metabolism and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eChiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are essential processes of vascular development. VSMCs have biosynthetic, proliferative and contractile roles in the vessel wall. Alterations in the differentiated state of the VSMCs play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and vascular stenosis. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in the control of VSMC proliferation, with particular focus on mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondrial activity can be controlled by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, i.e. mitochondrial fusion and fission, and by regulating mitochondrial calcium handling through the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Alterations in both VSMC proliferation and mitochondrial function can be triggered by dysregulation of mitofusin-2, a small GTPase associated with mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-ER interaction. Several lines of evidence highlight the relevance of mitochondrial metabolism in the control of VSMC proliferation, indicating a new area to be explored in the treatment of vascular diseases.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kunz, W.S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 35-40 ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR GA309/08/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epilepsy * mitochondrial dysfunction * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.025, year: 2012

  6. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  7. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Susan D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, a form of progressive bilateral blindness due to loss of retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve deterioration, arises predominantly from mutations in the nuclear gene for the mitochondrial GTPase, OPA1. OPA1 localizes to mitochondrial cristae in the inner membrane where electron transport chain complexes are enriched. While OPA1 has been characterized for its role in mitochondrial cristae structure and organelle fusion, possible effects of OPA1 on mitochondrial function have not been determined. Results Mitochondria from six ADOA patients bearing OPA1 mutations and ten ADOA patients with unidentified gene mutations were studied for respiratory capacity and electron transport complex function. Results suggest that the nuclear DNA mutations that give rise to ADOA in our patient population do not alter mitochondrial electron transport. Conclusion We conclude that the pathophysiology of ADOA likely stems from the role of OPA1 in mitochondrial structure or fusion and not from OPA1 support of oxidative phosphorylation.

  8. Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells induces only minor changes in mitochondrial dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Wen Sun

    Full Text Available During infection of cells by Legionella pneumophila, the bacterium secretes a large number of effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm, allowing it to alter many cellular processes and make the vacuole and the host cell into more hospitable environments for bacterial replication. One major change induced by infection is the recruitment of ER-derived vesicles to the surface of the vacuole, where they fuse with the vacuole membrane and prevent it from becoming an acidified, degradative compartment. However, the recruitment of mitochondria to the region of the vacuole has also been suggested by ultrastructural studies. In order to test this idea in a controlled and quantitative experimental system, and to lay the groundwork for a genome-wide screen for factors involved in mitochondrial recruitment, we examined the behavior of mitochondria during the early stages of Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells. We found that the density of mitochondria near vacuoles formed by infection with wild type Legionella was not different from that found in dotA(- mutant-infected cells during the first 4 hours after infection. We then examined 4 parameters of mitochondrial motility in infected cells: velocity of movement, duty cycle of movement, directional persistence and net direction. In the 4 hours following infection, most of these measures were indistinguishable between wild type and dotA(-.infection. However, wild type Legionella did induce a modest shift in the velocity distribution toward faster movement compared dotA(- infection, and a small downward shift in the duty cycle distribution. In addition, wild type infection produced mitochondrial movement that was biased in the direction of the bacterial vacuole relative to dotA-, although not enough to cause a significant accumulation within 10 um of the vacuole. We conclude that in this host cell, mitochondria are not strongly recruited to the vacuole, nor is their motility

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  10. TrxR2 deficiencies promote chondrogenic differentiation and induce apoptosis of chondrocytes through mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jidong [Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Xu, Jing [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Fei, Yao [College of Life Sciences, Northwest University, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Jiang, Congshan; Zhu, Wenhua; Han, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Lu, Shemin, E-mail: lushemin@xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Ministry of Education of China (China)

    2016-05-15

    Thioredoxin reductase 2 (TrxR2) is a selenium (Se) containing protein. Se deficiency is associated with an endemic osteoarthropathy characterized by impaired cartilage formation. It is unclear whether TrxR2 have roles in cartilage function. We examined the effects of TrxR2 on chondrogenic ATDC5 cells through shRNA-mediated gene silencing of TrxR2. We demonstrated TrxR2 deficiencies could enhance chondrogenic differentiation and apoptosis of ATDC5 cells. TrxR2 deficiencies increased accumulation of cartilage glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and mineralization. TrxR2 deficiencies also stimulated expression of extracellular (ECM) gene including Collagen II and Aggrecan. The enhanced chondrogenic properties were further confirmed by activation of Akt signaling which are required for chondrogenesis. In addition, TrxR2 deficiencies promoted chondrocyte proliferation through acceleration of cell cycle progression by increase in both S and G2/M phase cell distribution accompanied with induction of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Moreover, TrxR2 deficiencies induced chondrocyte death via apoptosis and increased cell sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Furthermore, TrxR2 deficiencies induced emission of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) without alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP content. Finally, treatment of TrxR2 deficiency cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited mitochondrial ROS production and chondrocyte apoptosis. NAC also prevented chondrogenic differentiation of TrxR2 deficiency cells by suppression of ECM gene expression, GAGs accumulation and mineralization, as well as attenuation of Akt signaling. Thus, TrxR2-mediated mitochondrial integrity is indispensable for chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. TrxR2 deficiency-induced impaired proliferation and death of chondrocytes may be the pathological mechanism of the osteoarthropathy due to Se deficiency. Notably, this study also uncover the roles of

  11. Mitochondrial disease and endocrine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jasmine; Rahman, Joyeeta; Achermann, John C; Dattani, Mehul T; Rahman, Shamima

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are critical organelles for endocrine health; steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs in these organelles and they provide energy in the form of ATP for hormone production and trafficking. Mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders that feature defective oxidative phosphorylation, and are characterized by enormous clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mitochondrial diseases have been found to result from >250 monogenic defects encoded across two genomes: the nuclear genome and the ancient circular mitochondrial genome located within mitochondria themselves. Endocrine dysfunction is often observed in genetic mitochondrial diseases and reflects decreased intracellular production or extracellular secretion of hormones. Diabetes mellitus is the most frequently described endocrine disturbance in patients with inherited mitochondrial diseases, but other endocrine manifestations in these patients can include growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid disease. Although mitochondrial endocrine dysfunction frequently occurs in the context of multisystem disease, some mitochondrial disorders are characterized by isolated endocrine involvement. Furthermore, additional monogenic mitochondrial endocrine diseases are anticipated to be revealed by the application of genome-wide next-generation sequencing approaches in the future. Understanding the mitochondrial basis of endocrine disturbance is key to developing innovative therapies for patients with mitochondrial diseases.

  12. Permeabilized myocardial fibers as model to detect mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis and melatonin effects without disruption of mitochondrial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerrier, Carolina; García, José A; Volt, Huayqui; Díaz-Casado, María E; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial function is crucial to understand their involvement in a given disease. High-resolution respirometry of permeabilized myocardial fibers in septic mice allows the evaluation of the bioenergetic system, maintaining mitochondrial ultrastructure and intracellular interactions, which are critical for an adequate functionality. OXPHOS and electron transport system (ETS) capacities were assessed using different substrate combinations. Our findings show a severe septic-dependent impairment in OXPHOS and ETS capacities with mitochondrial uncoupling at early and late phases of sepsis. Moreover, sepsis triggers complex III (CIII)-linked alterations in supercomplexes structure, and loss of mitochondrial density. In these conditions, melatonin administration to septic mice prevented sepsis-dependent mitochondrial injury in mitochondrial respiration. Likewise, melatonin improved cytochrome b content and ameliorated the assembly of CIII in supercomplexes. These results support the use of permeabilized fibers to identify properly the respiratory deficits and specific melatonin effects in sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Current perspective of mitochondrial biology in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammal Kaidery, Navneet; Thomas, Bobby

    2018-03-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by preferential loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and the presence of Lewy bodies containing α-synuclein. Although the cause of PD remains elusive, remarkable advances have been made in understanding the possible causative mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. An explosion of discoveries during the past two decades has led to the identification of several autosomal dominant and recessive genes that cause familial forms of PD. The investigations of these familial PD gene products have shed considerable insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the more common sporadic PD. A growing body of evidence suggests that the etiology of PD is multifactorial and involves a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Substantial evidence from human tissues, genetic and toxin-induced animal and cellular models indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathophysiology of PD. Deficits in mitochondrial functions due to bioenergetics defects, alterations in the mitochondrial DNA, generation of reactive oxygen species, aberrant calcium homeostasis, and anomalies in mitochondrial dynamics and quality control are implicated in the underlying mechanisms of neuronal cell death in PD. In this review, we discuss how familial PD-linked genes and environmental factors interface the pathways regulating mitochondrial functions and thereby potentially converge both familial and sporadic PD at the level of mitochondrial integrity. We also provide an overview of the status of therapeutic strategies targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Unraveling potential pathways that influence mitochondrial homeostasis in PD may hold the key to therapeutic intervention for this debilitating neurodegenerative movement disorder. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Microangiopathy in the cerebellum of patients with mitochondrial DNA disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, Nichola Z.; Pienaar, Ilse S.; Reeve, Amy K.; Hepplewhite, Philippa D.; Jaros, Evelyn; Taylor, Robert W.; Kalaria, Raj N.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathological findings in mitochondrial DNA disease vary and are often dependent on the type of mitochondrial DNA defect. Many reports document neuronal cell loss, demyelination, gliosis and necrotic lesions in post-mortem material. However, previous studies highlight vascular abnormalities in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA defects, particularly in those with the m.3243A>G mutation in whom stroke-like events are part of the mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome. We investigated microangiopathic changes in the cerebellum of 16 genetically and clinically well-defined patients. Respiratory chain deficiency, high levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA and increased mitochondrial mass were present within the smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells comprising the vessel wall in patients. These changes were not limited to those harbouring the m.3243A>G mutation frequently associated with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, but were documented in patients harbouring m.8344A>G and autosomal recessive polymerase (DNA directed), gamma (POLG) mutations. In 8 of the 16 patients, multiple ischaemic-like lesions occurred in the cerebellar cortex suggestive of vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction. Indeed, changes in vascular smooth muscle and endothelium distribution and cell size are indicative of vascular cell loss. We found evidence of blood–brain barrier breakdown characterized by plasma protein extravasation following fibrinogen and IgG immunohistochemistry. Reduced immunofluorescence was also observed using markers for endothelial tight junctions providing further evidence in support of blood–brain barrier breakdown. Understanding the structural and functional changes occurring in central nervous system microvessels in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA defects will provide an important insight into mechanisms of neurodegeneration in mitochondrial DNA disease. Since therapeutic

  15. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial ma...

  16. Mitochondrial phylogeny and systematics of baboons (Papio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Timothy K; Jolly, Clifford J; Rogers, Jeffrey

    2004-05-01

    Baboons (Papio, s.s.) comprise a series of parapatric allotaxa (subspecies or closely related species) widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite extensive studies of their ecology, morphology, and behavior, disagreement about their phylogenetic relationships continues, as expressed in the current coexistence of at least three major, competing taxonomic treatments. To help resolve this situation, we sequenced approximately 900 bases of mitochondrial DNA of 40 individuals from five of the widely recognized "major" allotaxa. Total sequence diversity (>5%) is high compared to most primate species. Major mitochondrial clades correspond to recognized allotaxa, with the important exception that haplotypes from yellow and olive baboons form a single, monophyletic clade within which the two allotaxa do not comprise mutually exclusive clusters. The major clades fall unambiguously into the pattern: (chacma (Guinea (hamadryas (yellow + olive)))). This phylogeny does not support taxonomies that oppose hamadryas to all other baboons ("desert" vs. "savanna"), but is compatible with the view that all definable allotaxa should be recognized as coordinates, either as "phylogenetic" species or "biological" subspecies. The close relationship and unsegregated distribution of haplotypes from Kenyan and Tanzanian yellow and olive baboons are unexplained, but may reflect introgression across the documented hybrid zone. The overall phylogeny, when combined with paleontological data, suggests a southern African origin for extant Papio baboons, with all extant lineages sharing a common mitochondrial ancestor at approximately 1.8 Ma. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. MITOCHONDRIAL BKCa CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eBalderas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in a glioma cell line 15 years ago, mitochondrial BKCa channel (mitoBKCa has been studied in brain cells and cardiomyocytes sharing general biophysical properties such as high K+ conductance (~300 pS, voltage-dependency and Ca2+-sensitivity. Main advances in deciphering the molecular composition of mitoBKCa have included establishing that it is encoded by the Kcnma1 gene, that a C-terminal splice insert confers mitoBKCa ability to be targeted to cardiac mitochondria, and evidence for its potential coassembly with β subunits. Notoriously, β1 subunit directly interacts with cytochrome c oxidase and mitoBKCa can be modulated by substrates of the respiratory chain. mitoBKCa channel has a central role in protecting the heart from ischemia, where pharmacological activation of the channel impacts the generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial Ca2+ preventing cell death likely by impeding uncontrolled opening of the mitochondrial transition pore. Supporting this view, inhibition of mitoBKCa with Iberiotoxin, enhances cytochrome c release from glioma mitochondria. Many tantalizing questions remain. Some of them are: how is mitoBKCa coupled to the respiratory chain? Does mitoBKCa play non-conduction roles in mitochondria physiology? Which are the functional partners of mitoBKCa? What are the roles of mitoBKCa in other cell types? Answers to these questions are essential to define the impact of mitoBKCa channel in mitochondria biology and disease.

  18. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  19. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  20. Rescue of mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts using drug loaded PMPC-PDPA polymersomes and tubular polymersomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yealland, G; Battaglia, G; Bandmann, O; Mortiboys, H

    2016-09-06

    Mutations in parkin cause autosomal recessive Parkinsonism and mitochondrial defects. A recent drug screen identified a class of steroid-like hydrophobic compounds able to rescue mitochondrial function in parkin-mutant fibroblasts. Whilst these possess therapeutic potential, the size and high hydrophobicity of some may limit their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier from systemic circulation, something that could be improved by novel drug formulations. In the present study, the steroid-like compounds Ursolic Acid (UA) and Ursocholanic Acid (UCA) were successfully encapsulated within nanoscopic polymersomes formed by poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine)-poly(2-di-isopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PMPC-PDPA) and separated into spherical and tubular morphologies to assess the effects of nanoparticle mediated delivery on drug efficacy. Following incubation with either morphology, parkin-mutant fibroblasts demonstrated time and concentration dependent increases in intracellular ATP levels, resembling those resulting from treatment with nascent UA and UCA formulated in 0.1% DMSO, as used in the original drug screen. Empty PMPC-PDPA polymersomes did not alter physiological measures related to mitochondrial function or induce cytotoxicity. In combination with other techniques such as ligand functionalisation, PMPC-PDPA nanoparticles of well-defined morphology may prove a promising platform for tailoring the pharmacokinetic profile and organ specific bio-distribution of highly hydrophobic compounds. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Cockayne syndrome group B protein promotes mitochondrial DNA stability by supporting the DNA repair association with the mitochondrial membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; Sorensen, Martin M; Hvitby, Christina Poulsen

    2010-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human premature aging disorder associated with severe developmental deficiencies and neurodegeneration, and phenotypically it resembles some mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases. Most patients belong to complementation group B, and the CS group B (CSB) protein plays a role...... in genomic maintenance and transcriptome regulation. By immunocytochemistry, mitochondrial fractionation, and Western blotting, we demonstrate that CSB localizes to mitochondria in different types of cells, with increased mitochondrial distribution following menadione-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, our...... association of the BER activities with the mitochondrial inner membrane, suggesting that CSB may participate in the anchoring of the DNA repair complex. Increased mutation frequency in mtDNA of CSB-deficient cells demonstrates functional significance of the presence of CSB in the mitochondria. The results...

  2. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in versican......-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We found...

  3. Clinical usefulness of myocardial iodine-123-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3(R,S)-methyl-pentadecanoic acid distribution abnormality in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy based on normal data file in bull's-eye polar map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Nobukazu; Mitani, Isao; Sumita, Shinichi

    1998-01-01

    Visual interpretation of iodine-123-beta-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3(R,S)-methyl-pentadecanoic acid ( 123 I-BMIPP) myocardial images cannot easily detect mild reduction in tracer uptake. Objective assessment of myocardial 123 I-BMIPP maldistributions at rest was attempted using a bull's-eye map and its normal data file for detecting myocardial damage in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. Six patients, two with Kearns-Sayre syndrome and four with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS), and 10 normal subjects were studied. Fractional myocardial uptake of 1 23 I-BMIPP was also measured by dynamic static imaging to assess the global myocardial free fatty acid. These data were compared with the cardiothoracic ratio measured by chest radiography and left ventricular ejection fraction assessed by echocardiography. Abnormal cardiothoracic ratio and lower ejection fraction were detected in only one patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome. Abnormal fractional myocardial uptake was detected in two patients (1.61%, 1.91%), whereas abnormal regional 123 I-BMIPP uptake assessed by the bull's-eye map was detected in five patients (83%). All patients showed abnormal uptake in the anterior portion, and one showed progressive atrioventricular conduction abnormality and systolic dysfunction with extended 123 I-BMIPP abnormal uptake. The results suggest that assessment based on the normal data file in a bull's-eye polar map is clinically useful for detection of myocardial damage in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. (author)

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Stem Cell Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2015-04-01

    alteration in mitochondrial function during senescence. It is likely that mitochondria and stem cells will remain at the forefront of aging research also for the next decade. KEYWORDS: aging, stem cell, mitochondrial biogenesis, mitophagy, senescence, telomeres.

  5. Geomicrobiology of the Ocean Crust: The Phylogenetic Diversity, Abundance, and Distribution of Microbial Communities Inhabiting Basalt and Implications for Rock Alteration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have revealed either irregular granular or tubular, segmented channels observed throughout the glass alteration...Candidatus Scalindua brodac, and Cand. div. OPi 11. Soil-others (ɘ.5% each): Firnicutes, Cyanobacteria , Deinococcus- Therm us, Cand. divs. OPl 11...dissimilatory sulfate and sulfur reducing capabilities, such as Desulfbvibrio, however most sequences from this study do not cluster with these organisms

  6. Mitochondrial functionality in female reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Gąsior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In most animal species female germ cells are the source of mitochondrial genome for the whole body of individuals. As a source of mitochondrial DNA for future generations the mitochondria in the female germ line undergo dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes. In addition to maintaining the intact template of mitochondrial genome from one generation to another, mitochondrial role in oocytes is much more complex and pleiotropic. The quality of mitochondria determines the ability of meiotic divisions, fertilization ability, and activation after fertilization or sustaining development of a new embryo. The presence of normal number of functional mitochondria is also crucial for proper implantation and pregnancy maintaining. This article addresses issues of mitochondrial role and function in mammalian oocyte and presents new approaches in studies of mitochondrial function in female germ cells.

  7. Molecular basis for mitochondrial signaling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent advances in the study of structure, function, and regulation of metabolite, protein and ion translocating channels, and transporters in mitochondria. A wide array of cutting-edge methods are covered, ranging from electrophysiology and cell biology to bioinformatics, as well as structural, systems, and computational biology. At last, the molecular identity of two important channels in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been established. After years of work on the physiology and structure of VDAC channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane, there have been multiple discoveries on VDAC permeation and regulation by cytosolic proteins. Recent breakthroughs in structural studies of the mitochondrial cholesterol translocator reveal a set of novel unexpected features and provide essential clues for defining therapeutic strategies. Molecular Basis for Mitochondrial Signaling covers these and many more re...

  8. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bross Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an increase of ROS level in cellular senescence induced by IR could mediate mtDNA deletion via impairment of mitochondria biogenesis in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Our results showed that IR induced cellular senescence, intracellular ROS, and mtDNA deletion, and in particular, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM). Furthermore, these IR-induced events were abolished using a potent antioxidant, NAC, which suggests that ROS is a key cause of mtDNA deletion in IR-induced cellular senescence, and that the alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis may mediate these processes

  10. Brain mitochondrial function in a murine model of cerebral malaria and the therapeutic effects of rhEPO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Michael; Hempel, Casper; Sjövall, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    and no connection between disease severity and mitochondrial respiratory function. Treatment with rhEPO similarly had no effect on respiratory function. Thus cerebral metabolic dysfunction in CM does not seem to be directly linked to altered mitochondrial respiratory capacity as analyzed in brain homogenates ex...

  11. Deletions of the mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A E; Hammans, S R

    1992-01-01

    Single large deletions of mitochondrial DNA are found in the muscle of about 40% of patients with mitochondrial myopathies, and are detectable in both blood and muscle in Pearson syndrome. In mitochondrial myopathies, there is a close association between the presence of deletions and involvement of extra-ocular muscles, together with other features of the Kearns-Sayre syndrome. Deletions appear to arise as fresh mutations in the vast majority of patients and are often flanked by direct repeats up to 13 nucleotides in length. They should affect translation of all mitochondrially encoded components of the respiratory chain, but there is evidence to suggest that intramitochondrial complementation occurs in some cases.

  12. Antibiotics-Induced Obesity: A Mitochondrial Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Melisa J; Jayaprakash, Chinchu; Bhat, Smitha; Evangelatos, Nikolaos; Brand, Angela; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2017-12-15

    Antibiotics are the first line of treatment against infections and have contributed immensely to reduce the morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, extensive use of antibiotics has led to alterations of the gut microbiome, predisposition to various diseases and most importantly, increase in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which poses a major threat to global public health. Another major issue faced worldwide due to unregulated use of antibiotics in children as well as in adults is the influence of metabolism and body weight homeostasis, leading to obesity. Apart from the involvement of biosocial causes influencing diet, physical activity, and antibiotic use, pathogenesis of obesity is linked to interconnected functional alterations in cells, tissues and organs due to biochemical, epigenetic and genetic factors. Mitochondrial dysfunction is one such factor, which is becoming the primary focus of various aspects of research on multifactorial complex diseases and is providing new perspectives on etiology, biomarker-based diagnosis, and drug sensitivity. Through this review, we have made an attempt to present the interplay between use of antibiotics, obesity, and associated mitochondrial dysfunction. This may provide insights into the molecular basis, genetic predisposition and environmental triggers, which in turn may have potential clinical applications in the management of antibiotic use. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  14. Dietary fatty acids alter mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    type and relative amount of fatty acids that make up the membrane. Naturally, the phospholipid fatty acyl profiles of biological membranes vary dramatically across species2,3. For instance, the phospholpid fatty acid profiles of cellular membranes in yeasts are different from those in flies and those of mouse are different from ...

  15. Mitochondrial alterations in children with chronic liver disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... up in the Pediatric Hepatology Clinic, Children's Hospital, Ain-Shams University. They were divided into three groups according to the aetiology of liver disease (GI= patients with Wilson's disease (WD), GII=patients with chronic hepatitis C, GIII=patients with chronic liver disease other thanWilson's and chronic hepatitis C).

  16. Mitochondrial alterations in children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    microscopy, electron microscopy and the deletion of mito- chondrial DNA. 2. Subjects and methods. This study included 26 children and adolescents with chronic liver disease who presented to or were following up in the pedi- atric hepatology clinic, children's Hospital, Ain-Shams Univer- sity in the period from 2006 to 2009 ...

  17. Ketogenic diets: from cancer to mitochondrial diseases and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Ana F; Ferreira, André; Simões, Rui F; Magalhães-Novais, Sílvia; Zehowski, Cheryl; Cope, Elisabeth; Silva, Ana Marta; Pereira, Daniela; Sardão, Vilma A; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The employment of dietary strategies such as ketogenic diets, which force cells to alter their energy source, has shown efficacy in the treatment of several diseases. Ketogenic diets are composed of high fat, moderate protein and low carbohydrates, which favour mitochondrial respiration rather than glycolysis for energy metabolism. This review focuses on how oncological, neurological and mitochondrial disorders have been targeted by ketogenic diets, their metabolic effects, and the possible mechanisms of action on mitochondrial energy homeostasis. The beneficial and adverse effects of the ketogenic diets are also highlighted. Although the full mechanism by which ketogenic diets improve oncological and neurological conditions still remains to be elucidated, their clinical efficacy has attracted many new followers, and ketogenic diets can be a good option as a co-adjuvant therapy, depending on the situation and the extent of the disease. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  18. Insulin stimulates mitochondrial fusion and function in cardiomyocytes via the Akt-mTOR-NFκB-Opa-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Valentina; Verdejo, Hugo E; Iglewski, Myriam; Del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Jones, Deborah; Zhu, Yi; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Pennanen, Christian; Lopez-Crisosto, Camila; Jaña, Fabián; Ferreira, Jorge; Noguera, Eduard; Chiong, Mario; Bernlohr, David A; Klip, Amira; Hill, Joseph A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Abel, Evan Dale; Zorzano, Antonio; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Insulin regulates heart metabolism through the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Studies have indicated that insulin can also regulate mitochondrial function. Relevant to this idea, mitochondrial function is impaired in diabetic individuals. Furthermore, the expression of Opa-1 and mitofusins, proteins of the mitochondrial fusion machinery, is dramatically altered in obese and insulin-resistant patients. Given the role of insulin in the control of cardiac energetics, the goal of this study was to investigate whether insulin affects mitochondrial dynamics in cardiomyocytes. Confocal microscopy and the mitochondrial dye MitoTracker Green were used to obtain three-dimensional images of the mitochondrial network in cardiomyocytes and L6 skeletal muscle cells in culture. Three hours of insulin treatment increased Opa-1 protein levels, promoted mitochondrial fusion, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and elevated both intracellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption in cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, the silencing of Opa-1 or Mfn2 prevented all the metabolic effects triggered by insulin. We also provide evidence indicating that insulin increases mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes through the Akt-mTOR-NFκB signaling pathway. These data demonstrate for the first time in our knowledge that insulin acutely regulates mitochondrial metabolism in cardiomyocytes through a mechanism that depends on increased mitochondrial fusion, Opa-1, and the Akt-mTOR-NFκB pathway.

  19. Mitochondrial Bioenergetics During Ischemia and Reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, Alicia E; Ragone, María I; Bonazzola, Patricia; Colareda, Germán A

    2017-01-01

    During ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) mitochondria suffer a deficiency to supply the cardiomyocyte with chemical energy, but also contribute to the cytosolic ionic alterations especially of Ca 2+ . Their free calcium concentration ([Ca 2+ ]m) mainly depends on mitochondrial entrance through the uniporter (UCam) and extrusion in exchange with Na + (mNCX) driven by the electrochemical gradient (ΔΨm). Cardiac energetic is frequently estimated by the oxygen consumption, which determines metabolism coupled to ATP production and to the maintaining of ΔΨm. Nevertheless, a better estimation of heart energy consumption is the total heat release associated to ATP hydrolysis, metabolism, and binding reactions, which is measurable either in the presence or the absence of oxygenation or perfusion. Consequently, a mechano-calorimetrical approach on isolated hearts gives a tool to evaluate muscle economy. The mitochondrial role during I/R depends on the injury degree. We investigated the role of the mitochondrial Ca 2+ transporters in the energetic of hearts stunned by a model of no-flow I/R in rat hearts. This chapter explores an integrated view of previous and new results which give evidences to the mitochondrial role in cardiac stunning by ischemia o hypoxia, and the influence of thyroid alterations and cardioprotective strategies, such as cardioplegic solutions (high K-low Ca, pyruvate) and the phytoestrogen genistein in both sex. Rat ventricles were perfused in a flow-calorimeter at either 30 °C or 37 °C to continuously measure the left ventricular pressure (LVP) and total heat rate (Ht). A pharmacological treatment was done before exposing to no-flow I and R. The post-ischemic contractile (PICR as %) and energetical (Ht) recovery and muscle economy (Eco: P/Ht) were determined during stunning. The functional interaction between mitochondria (Mit) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was evaluated with selective mitochondrial inhibitors in hearts reperfused with Krebs-10 m

  20. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1α signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich

  1. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  2. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-10-07

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as a consequence of secondary contact after an ancient geographical isolation. However, it is not unlikely that selection acts on mitochondria whose genes are involved in relevant oxidative phosphorylation processes. In this study, we performed selection tests on a fragment of 1044 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using 455 individuals from 18 locations. We also tested correlations of six environmental features: temperature, salinity, apparent oxygen utilization and nutrient concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate, on a compilation of mitochondrial clade frequencies from 66 sampling sites comprising 2776 specimens from previously published studies. Positive selection in a single codon was detected predominantly (99%) in the anti-tropical clade and temperature was the most relevant environmental predictor, contributing with 59% of the variance in the geographical distribution of clade frequencies. These findings strongly suggest that temperature is shaping the contemporary distribution of mitochondrial DNA clade frequencies in the European anchovy. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Biochemical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a diagnosis in patients with a suspected mitochondrial disorder is often a challenge. Both knowledge of the clinical spectrum of mitochondrial disorders and the number of identified disease-causing molecular genetic defects are continuously expanding. The diagnostic examination of

  4. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    myopathies. We investigated regeneration in muscle biopsies from 61 genetically well-defined patients affected by mitochondrial myopathy. Our results show that the perturbed energy metabolism in mitochondrial myopathies causes ongoing muscle regeneration in a majority of patients, and some were even affected...

  5. Resveratrol Rescues Kidney Mitochondrial Function Following Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Guan, Yuxia; Karamercan, Mehmet Akif; Ye, Lan; Bhatti, Tricia; Becker, Lance B; Baur, Joseph A; Sims, Carrie A

    2015-08-01

    Hemorrhagic shock may contribute to acute kidney injury (AKI) by profoundly altering renal mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activator, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative damage in a variety of aging-related disease states. We hypothesized that RSV treatment during resuscitation would ameliorate kidney mitochondrial dysfunction and decrease oxidative damage following hemorrhagic shock. Using a decompensated hemorrhagic shock model, male Long-Evans rats (n = 6 per group) were killed prior to hemorrhage (sham), at severe shock, and following either lactated Ringer's (LR) resuscitation or LR + RSV resuscitation (RSV: 30 mg/kg). At each time point, blood samples were assayed for arterial blood gases, lactate, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine. Mitochondria were also isolated from kidney samples in order to assess individual electron transport complexes (complexes I, II, and IV) using high-resolution respirometry. Total mitochondria reactive oxygen species were measured using fluorometry, and lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring 4-hydroxynonenal by Western blot. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used quantify mRNA from peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC1-α) SIRT1, and proteins known to mitigate oxidative damage and promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Resveratrol supplementation during resuscitation restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity and decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. Compared with standard LR resuscitation, RSV treatment significantly increased SIRT1 and PGC1-α expression and significantly increased both superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase expression. Although RSV was associated with decreased lactate production, pH, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine values did not differ between resuscitation strategies. Resuscitation with RSV significantly restored renal mitochondrial

  6. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys, MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly, MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  7. Effects of acetyl-L-carnitine on lamb oocyte blastocyst rate, ultrastructure, and mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Karen L; Cox, Neil R; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Viable lambs can be produced after transfer of in vitro-derived embryos from oocytes harvested from prepubertal lambs. However, this occurs at a much lower efficiency than from adult ewe oocyte donors. The reduced competence of prepubertal oocytes is believed to be due, at least in part, to deficiencies in cytoplasmic maturation. Differences in the cytoplasmic ultrastructure between prepubertal and adult oocytes have been described in the sheep, pig, and cow. Prepubertal lamb oocytes have been shown to have a different distribution of mitochondria and lipid droplets, and less mitochondria and storage vesicles than their adult counterparts. L-carnitine plays a role in supplying energy to the cell by transporting long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for β-oxidation to produce ATP. Both L-carnitine and its derivative acetyl-L-carnitine have been reported to increase the blastocyst rate of oocytes from mice, cows, and pigs, treated during IVM. L-carnitine has also been shown to increase mitochondrial biogenesis in adipose cells. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine if treatment of oocytes from prepubertal lambs with acetyl-L-carnitine during IVM could increase the blastocyst rate and alter mitochondria, vesicle, or lipid droplet number, volume, or distribution. The blastocyst rate was doubled in prepubertal lamb oocytes treated with acetyl-L-carnitine when compared to untreated oocytes (10.0% and 4.6%, respectively; P = 0.028). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and stereology techniques were used to quantify organelles in untreated and acetyl-L-carnitine-treated lamb oocytes, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods were used to measure the mitochondrial DNA copy number. There were no differences in mitochondrial volume, number, or mitochondrial DNA copy number. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment increased the cytoplasmic volume (P = 0.015) of the oocytes, and there were trends toward an increase in the vesicle volume (P = 0

  8. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-09-13

    Previously, we identified QIL1 as a subunit of mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and demonstrated a role for QIL1 in MICOS assembly, mitochondrial respiration, and cristae formation critical for mitochondrial architecture (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain function in patient muscle. QIL1 absence in patients' fibroblasts was associated with MICOS disassembly, abnormal cristae, mild cytochrome c oxidase defect, and sensitivity to glucose withdrawal. QIL1 expression rescued cristae defects, and promoted re-accumulation of MICOS subunits to facilitate MICOS assembly. MICOS assembly and cristae morphology were not efficiently rescued by over-expression of other MICOS subunits in patient fibroblasts. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence of altered MICOS assembly linked with a human mitochondrial disease and confirm a central role for QIL1 in stable MICOS complex formation.

  9. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny M.A. Kianian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution of this organelle into daughter cells. The genes that underlie these changes are beginning to be identified in model plants such as Arabidopsis. In animals disruption of the drp1 gene, a homolog to the plant drp3A and drp3B, delays mitochondrial division. This mutation results in increased aneuploidy due to chromosome mis-segregation. It remains to be discovered if a similar outcome is observed in plants. Alloplasmic lines provide an opportunity to understand the communication between the cytoplasmic organelles and the nucleus. Examples of studies in these lines, especially from the extensive collection in wheat, point to the role of mitochondria in chromosome movement, pollen fertility and other aspects of development. Genes involved in NM interaction also are believed to play a critical role in evolution of species and interspecific cross incompatibilities.

  10. Selection for Mitochondrial Quality Drives Evolution of the Germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunas L Radzvilavicius

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the germline-soma distinction is a fundamental unsolved question. Plants and basal metazoans do not have a germline but generate gametes from pluripotent stem cells in somatic tissues (somatic gametogenesis. In contrast, most bilaterians sequester a dedicated germline early in development. We develop an evolutionary model which shows that selection for mitochondrial quality drives germline evolution. In organisms with low mitochondrial replication error rates, segregation of mutations over multiple cell divisions generates variation, allowing selection to optimize gamete quality through somatic gametogenesis. Higher mutation rates promote early germline sequestration. We also consider how oogamy (a large female gamete packed with mitochondria alters selection on the germline. Oogamy is beneficial as it reduces mitochondrial segregation in early development, improving adult fitness by restricting variation between tissues. But it also limits variation between early-sequestered oocytes, undermining gamete quality. Oocyte variation is restored through proliferation of germline cells, producing more germ cells than strictly needed, explaining the random culling (atresia of precursor cells in bilaterians. Unlike other models of germline evolution, selection for mitochondrial quality can explain the stability of somatic gametogenesis in plants and basal metazoans, the evolution of oogamy in all plants and animals with tissue differentiation, and the mutational forces driving early germline sequestration in active bilaterians. The origins of predation in motile bilaterians in the Cambrian explosion is likely to have increased rates of tissue turnover and mitochondrial replication errors, in turn driving germline evolution and the emergence of complex developmental processes.

  11. Proteomic Profiling of Mitochondrial Enzymes during Skeletal Muscle Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Staunton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are of central importance for energy generation in skeletal muscles. Expression changes or functional alterations in mitochondrial enzymes play a key role during myogenesis, fibre maturation, and various neuromuscular pathologies, as well as natural fibre aging. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics suggests itself as a convenient large-scale and high-throughput approach to catalogue the mitochondrial protein complement and determine global changes during health and disease. This paper gives a brief overview of the relatively new field of mitochondrial proteomics and discusses the findings from recent proteomic surveys of mitochondrial elements in aged skeletal muscles. Changes in the abundance, biochemical activity, subcellular localization, and/or posttranslational modifications in key mitochondrial enzymes might be useful as novel biomarkers of aging. In the long term, this may advance diagnostic procedures, improve the monitoring of disease progression, help in the testing of side effects due to new drug regimes, and enhance our molecular understanding of age-related muscle degeneration.

  12. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  13. Endocrine disorders in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andrew M; Walker, Mark; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2013-10-15

    Endocrine dysfunction in mitochondrial disease is commonplace, but predominantly restricted to disease of the endocrine pancreas resulting in diabetes mellitus. Other endocrine manifestations occur, but are relatively rare by comparison. In mitochondrial disease, neuromuscular symptoms often dominate the clinical phenotype, but it is of paramount importance to appreciate the multi-system nature of the disease, of which endocrine dysfunction may be a part. The numerous phenotypes attributable to pathogenic mutations in both the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA creates a complex and heterogeneous catalogue of disease which can be difficult to navigate for novices and experts alike. In this article we provide an overview of the endocrine disorders associated with mitochondrial disease, the way in which the underlying mitochondrial disorder influences the clinical presentation, and how these factors influence subsequent management. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of wireline logs at Cerro Prieto in identification of the distribution of hydrothermally altered zones and dike locations, and their correlation with reservoir temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seamount, D.T. Jr.; Elders, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Downhole electrical and gamma-gamma density logs from nine wells weere studed and these wireline log parameters with petrologic, temperature, and petrophysical data were correlated. Here, wells M-43, T-366, and M-107 are discussed in detail as typical cases. Log data for shales show good correlation with four zones of hydrothermal alteration previously recognized on the basis of characteristic mineral assemblages and temperatures. These zones are the unaltered montmorillonite zone (< 150/sup 0/C), the illite zone (150/sup 0/C to 230/sup 0/C to 245/sup 0/C), the chlorite zone (235/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C, equivalent to the calc-silicate I zone in sands), and the feldspar zone (> 300/sup 0/C, equivalent to the calc-silicate II zone in sands),

  15. Pulmonary mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in response to ozone exposure: Effects of age and an omega-3 enriched diet; Alterations mitochondriales et stress oxydant pulmonaire en reponse a l'ozone: effets de l'age et d'une supplementation en omega-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servais, St.

    2004-04-15

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) is one of the molecular species most reactive to which are exposed living species. O{sub 3} acts primarily on the pulmonary system by inducing oxidative stress. Because susceptibility to oxidative stress varies with age, we studied alterations of pulmonary balance between production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their elimination, in immature (21 days), adult (6 months) and old rats (20 months) during O{sub 3} exposure (0,5 ppm, 12 h/day for 7 days). For this purpose we have specifically studied pulmonary mitochondria as ROS source, main antioxidant enzyme activities, contents in stress protein (HSP72), 8-oxodGuo and DNA adducts resulting from lipid peroxidation. These works have shown that our protocol of O{sub 3} exposure did not induce lung oxidative stress in adult rats. We confirmed that immature and old rats were more sensitive during O{sub 3} challenge than adults. Indeed, O{sub 3} generates oxidative stress which leads to modification of ventilatory function and pulmonary DNA oxidation in these two populations. Parameters which take part in greatest susceptibility to O{sub 3} differ according to the age. We concluded that the mitochondria is not a major source of pulmonary ROS in our model of O{sub 3} exposure. Secondly, with the sights of anti-inflammatory properties of polyunsaturated fatty acids {omega}3, we studied the effect of a {omega}3 supplementation in immature and old rats exposed to O{sub 3}. The supplementation in {omega}3 limits the pulmonary DNA oxidation in immature and old rats. Paradoxically, in old rats this supplementation provokes an increase in lipid peroxidation susceptibility. (author)

  16. Animal Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Oliveira, Marcos T.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication highlight the diversity of both the mechanisms utilized and the structural and functional organization of the proteins at mtDNA replication fork, despite the simplicity of the animal mtDNA genome. DNA polymerase γ, mtDNA helicase and mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein- the key replisome proteins, have evolved distinct structural features and biochemical properties. These appear to be correlated with mtDNA genomic features in different metazoan taxa and with their modes of DNA replication, although a substantial integrative research is warranted to establish firmly these links. To date, several modes of mtDNA replication have been described for animals: rolling circle, theta, strand-displacement, and RITOLS/bootlace. Resolution of a continuing controversy relevant to mtDNA replication in mammals/vertebrates will have a direct impact on the mechanistic interpretation of mtDNA-related human diseases. Here we review these subjects, integrating earlier and recent data to provide a perspective on the major challenges for future research. PMID:27241933

  17. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Navid B.; Milliron, Delia J.; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  18. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Navid B., E-mail: navid.saleh@utexas.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Milliron, Delia J. [McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Aich, Nirupam [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, 14260 (United States); Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  19. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V

    2010-01-01

    in mitochondria, whereas base excision repair (BER) has been comprehensively characterized in these organelles. The BER proteins are associated with the inner membrane in mitochondria and thus with the mitochondrial nucleoid, where TFAM is also situated. However, a function for TFAM in BER has not yet been...... with and alter the DNA binding activity of TFAM, alleviates TFAM-induced inhibition of BER proteins. Together, the results suggest that TFAM modulates BER in mitochondria by virtue of its DNA binding activity and protein interactions....

  20. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria. PMID:27999288

  1. Mapping Alterations to the Endogenous Elemental Distribution within the Lateral Ventricles and Choroid Plexus in Brain Disorders Using X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Lins

    Full Text Available The choroid plexus and cerebral ventricles are critical structures for the production of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF and play an important role in regulating ion and metal transport in the brain, however many aspects of its roles in normal physiology and disease states, such as psychiatric illness, remain unknown. The choroid plexus is difficult to examine in vivo, and in situ ex vivo, and as such has typically been examined indirectly with radiolabeled tracers or ex vivo stains, making measurements of the endogenous K+, Cl-, and Ca+ distributions unreliable. In the present study, we directly examined the distribution of endogenous ions and biologically relevant transition metals in the choroid plexus and regions surrounding the ventricles (ventricle wall, cortex, corpus callosum, striatum using X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI. We find that the choroid plexus was rich in Cl- and Fe while K+ levels increase further from the ventricle as Cl- levels decrease, consistent with the known role of ion transporters in the choroid plexus CSF production. A polyI:C offspring displayed enlarged ventricles, elevated Cl- surrounding the ventricles, and intraventricular calcifications. These observations fit with clinical findings in patients with schizophrenia and suggest maternal treatment with polyI:C may lead to dysfunctional ion regulation in offspring. This study demonstrates the power of XFI for examining the endogenous elemental distributions of the ventricular system in healthy brain tissue as well as disease models.

  2. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  3. Root Parameters Show How Management Alters Resource Distribution and Soil Quality in Conventional and Low-Input Cropping Systems in Central Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazicki, Patricia A; Liebman, Matt; Wander, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil relations may explain why low-external input (LEI) diversified cropping systems are more efficient than their conventional counterparts. This work sought to identify links between management practices, soil quality changes, and root responses in a long-term cropping systems experiment in Iowa where grain yields of 3-year and 4-year LEI rotations have matched or exceeded yield achieved by a 2-year maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) rotation. The 2-year system was conventionally managed and chisel-ploughed, whereas the 3-year and 4-year systems received plant residues and animal manures and were periodically moldboard ploughed. We expected changes in soil quality to be driven by organic matter inputs, and root growth to reflect spatial and temporal fluctuations in soil quality resulting from those additions. We constructed a carbon budget and measured soil quality indicators (SQIs) and rooting characteristics using samples taken from two depths of all crop-phases of each rotation system on multiple dates. Stocks of particulate organic matter carbon (POM-C) and potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) were greater and more evenly distributed in the LEI than conventional systems. Organic C inputs, which were 58% and 36% greater in the 3-year rotation than in the 4-year and 2-year rotations, respectively, did not account for differences in SQI abundance or distribution. Surprisingly, SQIs did not vary with crop-phase or date. All biochemical SQIs were more stratified (pmanaged soils. While POM-C and PMN in the top 10 cm were similar in all three systems, stocks in the 10-20 cm depth of the conventional system were less than half the size of those found in the LEI systems. This distribution was mirrored by maize root length density, which was also concentrated in the top 10 cm of the conventionally managed plots and evenly distributed between depths in the LEI systems. The plow-down of organic amendments and manures established meaningful

  4. Root Parameters Show How Management Alters Resource Distribution and Soil Quality in Conventional and Low-Input Cropping Systems in Central Iowa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Lazicki

    Full Text Available Plant-soil relations may explain why low-external input (LEI diversified cropping systems are more efficient than their conventional counterparts. This work sought to identify links between management practices, soil quality changes, and root responses in a long-term cropping systems experiment in Iowa where grain yields of 3-year and 4-year LEI rotations have matched or exceeded yield achieved by a 2-year maize (Zea mays L. and soybean (Glycine max L. rotation. The 2-year system was conventionally managed and chisel-ploughed, whereas the 3-year and 4-year systems received plant residues and animal manures and were periodically moldboard ploughed. We expected changes in soil quality to be driven by organic matter inputs, and root growth to reflect spatial and temporal fluctuations in soil quality resulting from those additions. We constructed a carbon budget and measured soil quality indicators (SQIs and rooting characteristics using samples taken from two depths of all crop-phases of each rotation system on multiple dates. Stocks of particulate organic matter carbon (POM-C and potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN were greater and more evenly distributed in the LEI than conventional systems. Organic C inputs, which were 58% and 36% greater in the 3-year rotation than in the 4-year and 2-year rotations, respectively, did not account for differences in SQI abundance or distribution. Surprisingly, SQIs did not vary with crop-phase or date. All biochemical SQIs were more stratified (p<0.001 in the conventionally-managed soils. While POM-C and PMN in the top 10 cm were similar in all three systems, stocks in the 10-20 cm depth of the conventional system were less than half the size of those found in the LEI systems. This distribution was mirrored by maize root length density, which was also concentrated in the top 10 cm of the conventionally managed plots and evenly distributed between depths in the LEI systems. The plow-down of organic amendments

  5. Age-Associated Impairments in Mitochondrial ADP Sensitivity Contribute to Redox Stress in Senescent Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham P. Holloway

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: It remains unknown if mitochondrial bioenergetics are altered with aging in humans. We established an in vitro method to simultaneously determine mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 emission in skeletal muscle tissue across a range of biologically relevant ADP concentrations. Using this approach, we provide evidence that, although the capacity for mitochondrial H2O2 emission is not increased with aging, mitochondrial ADP sensitivity is impaired. This resulted in an increase in mitochondrial H2O2 and the fraction of electron leak to H2O2, in the presence of virtually all ADP concentrations examined. Moreover, although prolonged resistance training in older individuals increased muscle mass, strength, and maximal mitochondrial respiration, exercise training did not alter H2O2 emission rates in the presence of ADP, the fraction of electron leak to H2O2, or the redox state of the muscle. These data establish that a reduction in mitochondrial ADP sensitivity increases mitochondrial H2O2 emission and contributes to age-associated redox stress. : Holloway et al. show that an inability of ADP to decrease mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission contributes to redox stress in skeletal muscle tissue of older individuals and that this process is not recovered following prolonged resistance-type exercise training, despite the general benefits of resistance training for muscle health. Keywords: mitochondria, aging, muscle, ROS, H2O2, ADP, respiration, bioenergetics, exercise, resistance training

  6. Mitochondrial DNA in CSF distinguishes LRRK2 from idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesniy, Petar; Vilas, Dolores; Taylor, Peggy; Shaw, Leslie M; Tolosa, Eduard; Trullas, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA regulates mitochondrial function which is altered in both idiopathic and familial forms of Parkinson's disease. To investigate whether these two disease forms exhibit an altered regulation of mitochondrial DNA we measured cell free mitochondrial DNA content in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from idiopathic and LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease patients. The concentration of mitochondrial DNA was measured using a digital droplet polymerase chain reaction technique in a total of 98 CSF samples from a cohort of subjects including: 20 LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease, 26 asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers, 31 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 21 first-degree relatives of LRRK2 Parkinson's disease patients without the mutation. Here we report that LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease exhibit a high concentration of mitochondrial DNA in CSF compared with asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers and with idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. In addition, idiopathic, but not LRRK2 Parkinson's disease is associated with low CSF concentration of α-synuclein. These results show that high mitochondrial DNA content in CSF distinguishes idiopathic from LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease suggesting that different biochemical pathways underlie neurodegeneration in these two disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resveratrol ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction but increases the risk of hypoglycemia following hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may contribute to organ failure, by profoundly altering mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring polyphenol, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and regulate glucose homeostasis in diabetes. We hypothesized that RSV during...... for glucose, insulin, corticosterone, total glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), glucagon, and serum cytokine levels. The Homeostatic Model AssessmentYInsulin Resistance index was used to quantify insulin resistance. Results: RSV supplementation following HS significantly improved mitochondrial function.......2 mg/dL vs. 359.0 ± 79.5 mg/dL, p Homeostatic Model...

  8. Defects of intergenomic communication: autosomal disorders that cause multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, M; Marti, R; Ferreiro-Barros, C; Vilà, M R; Tadesse, S; Nishigaki, Y; Nishino, I; Vu, T H

    2001-12-01

    Depletion and multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been associated with a growing number of autosomal diseases that have been classified as defects of intergenomic communication. MNGIE, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with mtDNA alterations is due to mutations in thymidine phosphorylase that may cause imbalance of the mitochondrial nucleotide pool. Subsequently, mutations in the mitochondrial proteins adenine nucleotide translocator 1, Twinkle, and polymerase gamma have been found to cause autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with multiple deletions of mtDNA. Uncovering the molecular bases of intergenomic communication defects will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for maintaining mtDNA integrity. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA divergence in Lygus lineolaris (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Lygus is widely distributed in North America and Eurasia. The tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris, is one of the most serious pest species within this genus having >300 different plant hosts. The intra-specific genetic diversity of L. lineolaris is being examined by employing mitochondri...

  10. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in the Anatolian Peninsula ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A few studies have previously reported mtDNA sequences in Turks. We attempted to extend these results by analysing a cohort that is not only larger, but also more representative of the. Turkish population living in Anatolia. In order to obtain a descriptive picture for the phylogenetic distribution of the mitochondrial genome ...

  11. Impaired in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity after myocardial infarction assessed using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S; Atherton, Helen J; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; West, James A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian J

    2014-11-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of heart failure. An increasing body of evidence links alterations in cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial function with the progression of heart disease. The aim of this work was to, therefore, follow the in vivo mitochondrial metabolic alterations caused by MI, thereby allowing a greater understanding of the interplay between metabolic and functional abnormalities. Using hyperpolarized carbon-13 ((13)C)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in vivo alterations in mitochondrial metabolism were assessed for 22 weeks after surgically induced MI with reperfusion in female Wister rats. One week after MI, there were no detectable alterations in in vivo cardiac mitochondrial metabolism over the range of ejection fractions observed (from 28% to 84%). At 6 weeks after MI, in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity was impaired, with decreased (13)C-label flux into citrate, glutamate, and acetylcarnitine, which correlated with the degree of cardiac dysfunction. These changes were independent of alterations in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. By 22 weeks, alterations were also seen in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, which decreased at lower ejection fractions. These results were confirmed using in vitro analysis of enzyme activities and metabolomic profiles of key intermediates. The in vivo decrease in Krebs cycle activity in the 6-week post-MI heart may represent an early maladaptive phase in the metabolic alterations after MI in which reductions in Krebs cycle activity precede a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism in heart disease are progressive and proportional to the degree of cardiac impairment. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Wingless signalling alters the levels, subcellular distribution and dynamics of Armadillo and E-cadherin in third instar larval wing imaginal discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko M L Somorjai

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Armadillo, the Drosophila orthologue of vertebrate ss-catenin, plays a dual role as the key effector of Wingless/Wnt1 signalling, and as a bridge between E-Cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of ligand, Armadillo is phosphorylated and targeted to the proteasome. Upon binding of Wg to its receptors, the "degradation complex" is inhibited; Armadillo is stabilised and enters the nucleus to transcribe targets.Although the relationship between signalling and adhesion has been extensively studied, few in vivo data exist concerning how the "transcriptional" and "adhesive" pools of Armadillo are regulated to orchestrate development. We have therefore addressed how the subcellular distribution of Armadillo and its association with E-Cadherin change in larval wing imaginal discs, under wild type conditions and upon signalling. Using confocal microscopy, we show that Armadillo and E-Cadherin are spatio-temporally regulated during development, and that a punctate species becomes concentrated in a subapical compartment in response to Wingless. In order to further dissect this phenomenon, we overexpressed Armadillo mutants exhibiting different levels of activity and stability, but retaining E-Cadherin binding. Arm(S10 displaces endogenous Armadillo from the AJ and the basolateral membrane, while leaving E-Cadherin relatively undisturbed. Surprisingly, DeltaNArm(1-155 caused displacement of both Armadillo and E-Cadherin, results supported by our novel method of quantification. However, only membrane-targeted Myr-DeltaNArm(1-155 produced comparable nuclear accumulation of Armadillo and signalling to Arm(S10. These experiments also highlighted a row of cells at the A/P boundary depleted of E-Cadherin at the AJ, but containing actin.Taken together, our results provide in vivo evidence for a complex non-linear relationship between Armadillo levels, subcellular distribution and Wingless signalling. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of

  13. SLC25A46 is required for mitochondrial lipid homeostasis and cristae maintenance and is responsible for Leigh syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janer, Alexandre; Prudent, Julien; Paupe, Vincent; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Majewski, Jacek; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Des Rosiers, Christine; Forest, Anik; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Mitchell, Grant; McBride, Heidi M; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic network that responds to physiological signals and metabolic stresses by altering the balance between fusion and fission. Mitochondrial fusion is orchestrated by conserved GTPases MFN1/2 and OPA1, a process coordinated in yeast by Ugo1, a mitochondrial metabolite carrier family protein. We uncovered a homozygous missense mutation in SLC25A46, the mammalian orthologue of Ugo1, in a subject with Leigh syndrome. SLC25A46 is an integral outer membrane protein that interacts with MFN2, OPA1, and the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex. The subject mutation destabilizes the protein, leading to mitochondrial hyperfusion, alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology, impaired cellular respiration, and premature cellular senescence. The MICOS complex is disrupted in subject fibroblasts, resulting in strikingly abnormal mitochondrial architecture, with markedly shortened cristae. SLC25A46 also interacts with the ER membrane protein complex EMC, and phospholipid composition is altered in subject mitochondria. These results show that SLC25A46 plays a role in a mitochondrial/ER pathway that facilitates lipid transfer, and link altered mitochondrial dynamics to early-onset neurodegenerative disease and cell fate decisions. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  14. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  15. Aflatoxin B -induced alterations in uptake and distribution of 65Zn-ZnCl2 by four Zea mays cultivars and toxin effects on root and stem elongations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald C. Llewellyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin Bl has been recovered within seemingly healthy, intact seeds, which suggests that its transport from contaminated soil to the fruit can occur. Previously, we examined the effects of 19.7 µg•-3 mixed aflatoxins (AFTs on the abilities of three Zea mays cultivars to remove Zn++ from Perlite and the influence of Zn++ on the cultivars' capabilities to both take-up and distribute AFTs. Here, we report both 2.5 and 5.0 µg aflatoxin B1 (AFB1cm-3 influences on time-dependent, uptake and organ distribution of 65Zn-ZnCl2 from liquid culture by Zea mays, cvs. 'Early Yellow', 'Silver Queen', 'Early White' and `Golden Queen'. In addition, time-dependent seed germination as well as root and stem elongation responses to AFB1 are described. Neither 2.5 nor 5.0 µg AFB1cm-3 affected the cultivars' abilities to germinate. Whereas an analysis of variance revealed significant differences for the combination cultivars, AFB1 concentration and time regarding root elongation, such analysis for stem elongation yielded only a significant interaction between AFB1 concentration and one cultivar at a time course's completion. As for 65Zn-ZnCl2 uptake, an ANOVA indicated that there were significant differences for the combination organs, cultivars and AFB1 concentration. Certain results suggest Zea mays cultivar variability in susceptibility to exogenous AFB1. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  16. Nitric oxide and mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C

    1999-05-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivative peroxynitrite (ONOO-) inhibit mitochondrial respiration by distinct mechanisms. Low (nanomolar) concentrations of NO specifically inhibit cytochrome oxidase in competition with oxygen, and this inhibition is fully reversible when NO is removed. Higher concentrations of NO can inhibit the other respiratory chain complexes, probably by nitrosylating or oxidising protein thiols and removing iron from the iron-sulphur centres. Peroxynitrite causes irreversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and damage to a variety of mitochondrial components via oxidising reactions. Thus peroxynitrite inhibits or damages mitochondrial complexes I, II, IV and V, aconitase, creatine kinase, the mitochondrial membrane, mitochondrial DNA, superoxide dismutase, and induces mitochondrial swelling, depolarisation, calcium release and permeability transition. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may be involved in the physiological regulation of respiration rate, as indicated by the finding that isolated cells producing NO can regulate cellular respiration by this means, and the finding that inhibition of NO synthase in vivo causes a stimulation of tissue and whole body oxygen consumption. The recent finding that mitochondria may contain a NO synthase and can produce significant amounts of NO to regulate their own respiration also suggests this regulation may be important for physiological regulation of energy metabolism. However, definitive evidence that NO regulation of mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo is still missing, and interpretation is complicated by the fact that NO appears to affect tissue respiration by cGMP-dependent mechanisms. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may also be involved in the cytotoxicity of NO, and may cause increased oxygen radical production by mitochondria, which may in turn lead to the generation of peroxynitrite. Mitochondrial damage by peroxynitrite may mediate the cytotoxicity of NO, and may be

  17. Renal cold storage followed by transplantation impairs expression of key mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Parajuli

    Full Text Available The majority of transplanted kidneys are procured from deceased donors which all require exposure to cold storage (CS for successful transplantation. Unfortunately, this CS leads to renal and mitochondrial damage but, specific mitochondrial targets affected by CS remain largely unknown. The goal of this study is to determine whether pathways involved with mitochondrial fusion or fission, are disrupted during renal CS.Male Lewis rat kidneys were exposed to cold storage (CS alone or cold storage combined with transplantation (CS/Tx. To compare effects induced by CS, kidney transplantation without CS exposure (autotransplantation; ATx was also used. Mitochondrial function was assessed using high resolution respirometry. Expression of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins were monitored using Western blot analysis.CS alone (no Tx reduced respiratory complex I and II activities along with reduced expression of the primary mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein (DRP1, induced loss of the long form of Optic Atrophy Protein (OPA1, and altered the mitochondrial protease, OMA1, which regulates OPA1 processing. CS followed by Tx (CS/Tx reduced complex I, II, and III activities, and induced a profound loss of the long and short forms of OPA1, mitofusin 1 (MFN1, and mitofusin 2 (MFN2 which all control mitochondrial fusion. In addition, expression of DRP1, along with its primary receptor protein, mitochondrial fission factor (MFF, were also reduced after CS/Tx. Interestingly, CS/Tx lead to aberrant higher molecular weight OMA1 aggregate expression.Our results suggest that CS appears to involve activation of the OMA1, which could be a key player in proteolysis of the fusion and fission protein machinery following transplantation. These findings raise the possibility that impaired mitochondrial fission and fusion may be unrecognized contributors to CS induced mitochondrial injury and compromised renal graft function after transplantation.

  18. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Navid B; Milliron, Delia J; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in weight loss, body composition and cardiovascular disease risk after altering macronutrient distributions during a regular exercise program in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Mike D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study's purpose investigated the impact of different macronutrient distributions and varying caloric intakes along with regular exercise for metabolic and physiological changes related to weight loss. Methods One hundred forty-one sedentary, obese women (38.7 ± 8.0 yrs, 163.3 ± 6.9 cm, 93.2 ± 16.5 kg, 35.0 ± 6.2 kg•m-2, 44.8 ± 4.2% fat were randomized to either no diet + no exercise control group (CON a no diet + exercise control (ND, or one of four diet + exercise groups (high-energy diet [HED], very low carbohydrate, high protein diet [VLCHP], low carbohydrate, moderate protein diet [LCMP] and high carbohydrate, low protein [HCLP] in addition to beginning a 3x•week-1 supervised resistance training program. After 0, 1, 10 and 14 weeks, all participants completed testing sessions which included anthropometric, body composition, energy expenditure, fasting blood samples, aerobic and muscular fitness assessments. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05 with LSD post-hoc analysis when appropriate. Results All dieting groups exhibited adequate compliance to their prescribed diet regimen as energy and macronutrient amounts and distributions were close to prescribed amounts. Those groups that followed a diet and exercise program reported significantly greater anthropometric (waist circumference and body mass and body composition via DXA (fat mass and % fat changes. Caloric restriction initially reduced energy expenditure, but successfully returned to baseline values after 10 weeks of dieting and exercising. Significant fitness improvements (aerobic capacity and maximal strength occurred in all exercising groups. No significant changes occurred in lipid panel constituents, but serum insulin and HOMA-IR values decreased in the VLCHP group. Significant reductions in serum leptin occurred in all caloric restriction + exercise groups after 14 weeks, which were unchanged in other non

  20. Mitochondrial DNA and primary mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoccaro, Maria Pia; La Morgia, Chiara; Rizzo, Giovanni; Carelli, Valerio

    2017-03-01

    In 1979, it was observed that parkinsonism could be induced by a toxin inhibiting mitochondrial respiratory complex I. This initiated the long-standing hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This hypothesis evolved, with accumulating evidence pointing to complex I dysfunction, which could be caused by environmental or genetic factors. Attention was focused on the mitochondrial DNA, considering the occurrence of mutations, polymorphic haplogroup-specific variants, and defective mitochondrial DNA maintenance with the accumulation of multiple deletions and a reduction of copy number. Genetically determined diseases of mitochondrial DNA maintenance frequently manifest with parkinsonism, but the age-related accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA errors also represents a major driving mechanism for PD. Recently, the discovery of the genetic cause of rare inherited forms of PD highlighted an extremely complex homeostatic control over mitochondria, involving their dynamic fission/fusion cycle, the balancing of mitobiogenesis and mitophagy, and consequently the quality control surveillance that corrects faulty mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Many genes came into play, including the PINK1/parkin axis, but also OPA1, as pieces of the same puzzle, together with mitochondrial DNA damage, complex I deficiency and increased oxidative stress. The search for answers will drive future research to reach the understanding necessary to provide therapeutic options directed not only at limiting the clinical evolution of symptoms but also finally addressing the pathogenic mechanisms of neurodegeneration in PD. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Different Phosphorus Supplies Altered the Accumulations and Quantitative Distributions of Phytic Acid, Zinc, and Iron in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Da; Zhou, Lujian; Zhao, Qian; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Fangmin

    2018-02-21

    Development of rice cultivars with low phytic acid (lpa) is considered as a primary strategy for biofortification of zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe). Here, two rice genotypes (XS110 and its lpa mutant) were used to investigate the effect of P supplies on accumulations and distributions of PA, Zn, and Fe in rice grains by using hydroponics and detached panicle culture system. Results showed that higher P level increased grain PA concentration on dry matter basis (g/kg), but it markedly decreased PA accumulation on per grain basis (mg/grain). Meanwhile, more P supply reduced the amounts and bioavailabilities of Zn and Fe both in milled grains and in brown grains. Comparatively, lpa mutant was more susceptive to exogenous P supply than its wild type. Hence, the appropriate P fertilizer application should be highlighted in order to increase grain microelement (Zn and Fe) contents and improve nutritional quality in rice grains.

  2. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain distribution of [{sup 11}C]dethamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizugaki, Michinao; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ishiwata, Shunji; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ido, Tatsuo; Iwata, Ren; Funaki, Yoshihito; Itoh, Masatoshi; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Sato, Mitsumoto; Numachi, Yohtaro; Yoshida, Sumiko

    1995-08-01

    [{sup 11}C]Methamphetamine ([{sup 11}C]MAP) was synthesized by an automated on-line [{sup 11}C]methylation system for positron emission tomography (PET) study. We newly produced a MAP sensitized dog by repeated MAP treatment and studied the brain distribution of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the normal and the MAP sensitized dog. The maximal level of accumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. No difference was found in the metabolism of MAP between the two conditions. The significant increase of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the MAP sensitized brain indicates that subchronic MAP administration causes some functional change in uptake site of MAP.

  3. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  4. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Principi E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Principi,1,* Rossana Girardello,2,* Antonino Bruno,1,* Isabella Manni,3 Elisabetta Gini,2 Arianna Pagani,1 Annalisa Grimaldi,2 Federico Ivaldi,4 Terenzio Congiu,5 Daniela De Stefano,1 Giulia Piaggio,3 Magda de Eguileor,2 Douglas M Noonan,1,2 Adriana Albini1 1Vascular Biology and Angiogenesis, Scientific and Technology Pole, IRCCS MultiMedica, Milano, 2Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, 3Department of Research, Advanced Diagnosis and Innovation, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, 4Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Genoa, Genoa, 5Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in several industrial applications raises concerns on their potential toxicity due to factors such as tissue penetrance, small dimensions, and biopersistence. Using an in vivo model for CNT environmental exposure, mimicking CNT exposition at the workplace, we previously found that CNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in the lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidneys via the bloodstream in CD1 mice. Here, we monitored and traced the accumulation of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs, administered systemically in mice, in different organs and the subsequent biological responses. Using the novel in vivo model, MITO-Luc bioluminescence reporter mice, we found that SWCNTs induce systemic cell proliferation, indicating a dynamic response of cells of both bone marrow and the immune system. We then examined metabolic (water/food consumption and dejections, functional (serum enzymes, and morphological (organs and tissues alterations in CD1 mice treated with SWCNTs, using metabolic cages, performing serum analyses, and applying histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural (transmission electron

  5. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Boon Li Pun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation.

  6. Control of plant mitochondrial respiration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Affourtit, C.; Krab, K.; Moore, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Plant mitochondria are characterised by the presence of both phosphorylating (cytochrome) and non-phosphorylating (alternative) respiratory pathways, the relative activities of which directly affect the efficiency of mitochondrial energy conservation. Different approaches to study the regulation of

  7. Mitochondrial contribution to lipofuscin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette König

    2017-04-01

    Moreover, we observed that Lon protease downregulation is linked to a higher lipofuscinogenesis whereas the application of the mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO is able to prevent the accumulation of this protein aggregate.

  8. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Martins, L. Miguel; Kahle, Philipp J.; Krueger, Rejko

    2010-01-01

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C. [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Wolburg, Hartwig [Institute of Pathology, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J. [Medical Research Council Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Martins, L. Miguel [Cell Death Regulation Laboratory, MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Kahle, Philipp J., E-mail: philipp.kahle@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Krueger, Rejko, E-mail: rejko.krueger@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Damage in Keratinocytes by Pemphigus Vulgaris Antibodies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of nonhormonal treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been hampered by a lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms leading to keratinocyte (KC) detachment and death in pemphigus. In this study, we sought to identify changes in the vital mitochondrial functions in KCs treated with the sera from PV patients and healthy donors. PV sera significantly increased proton leakage from KCs, suggesting that PV IgGs increase production of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species production showed a drastic increase of cell staining in response to treatment by PV sera, which was confirmed by FACS analysis. Exposure of KCs to PV sera also caused dramatic changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential detected with the JC-1 dye. These changes can trigger the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Although sera from different PV patients elicited unique patterns of mitochondrial damage, the mitochondria-protecting drugs nicotinamide (also called niacinamide), minocycline, and cyclosporine A exhibited a uniform protective effect. Their therapeutic activity was validated in the passive transfer model of PV in neonatal BALB/c mice. The highest efficacy of mitochondrial protection of the combination of these drugs found in mitochondrial assay was consistent with the ability of the same drug combination to abolish acantholysis in mouse skin. These findings provide a theoretical background for clinical reports of the efficacy of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV patients. Pharmacological protection of mitochondria and/or compensation of an altered mitochondrial function may therefore become a novel approach to development of personalized nonhormonal therapies of patients with this potentially lethal autoimmune blistering disease. PMID:23599429

  11. Percolation Model for the Existence of a Mitochondrial Eve

    CERN Document Server

    Neves, A G M

    2005-01-01

    We look at the process of inheritance of mitochondrial DNA as a percolation model on trees equivalent to the Galton-Watson process. The model is exactly solvable for its percolation threshold $p_c$ and percolation probability critical exponent. In the approximation of small percolation probability, and assuming limited progeny number, we are also able to find the maximum and minimum percolation probabilities over all probability distributions for the progeny number constrained to a given $p_c$. As a consequence, we can relate existence of a mitochondrial Eve to quantitative knowledge about demographic evolution of early mankind. In particular, we show that a mitochondrial Eve may exist even in an exponentially growing population, provided that the average number of children per individual is constrained to a small range depending on the probability $p$ that a newborn child is a female.

  12. Mitochondrial PKA mediates sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Rashel; Breitbart, Haim

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of ATP to power sperm motility. Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has been proposed as a major regulatory mechanism for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted analyzer, protein detection by western blotting, membrane potential by tetramethylrhodamine, cellular ATP by luciferase assay and localization of PKA by immuno-electron microscopy. Bicarbonate is essential for the creation of mitochondrial electro-chemical gradient, ATP synthesis and sperm motility. Bicarbonate stimulates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of two 60kDa proteins identified as Tektin and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. This phosphorylation was inhibited by respiration inhibition and phosphorylation could be restored by glucose in the presence of bicarbonate. However, this effect of glucose cannot be seen when the mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchanger was inhibited indicating that glycolytic-produced ATP is transported into the mitochondria and allows PKA-dependent protein phosphorylation inside the mitochondria. Bicarbonate activates mitochondrial soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) which catalyzes cAMP production leading to the activation of mitochondrial PKA. Glucose can overcome the lack of ATP in the absence of bicarbonate but it cannot affect the mitochondrial sAC/PKA system, therefore the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the 60kDa proteins does not occur in the absence of bicarbonate. Production of CO2 in Krebs cycle, which is converted to bicarbonate is essential for sAC/PKA activation leading to mitochondrial membrane potential creation and ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Disruption of Endothelial Cell Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Lambs with Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Fratz, Sohrab; Kumar, Sanjiv; Rafikov, Ruslan; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Rafikova, Olga; Lu, Qing; Burns, Tantiana; Dasarathy, Sridevi; Wright, Johnny; Schreiber, Christian; Radman, Monique; Fineman, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The mitochondrial dysfunction in our lamb model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) (Shunt) is associated with disrupted carnitine metabolism. Our recent studies have also shown that asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels are increased in Shunt lambs and ADMA increases the nitration of mitochondrial proteins in lamb pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) in a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent manner. Thus, we determined whether there was a mechanistic link between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), ADMA, and the disruption of carnitine homeostasis in PAEC. Results: Exposure of PAEC to ADMA induced the redistribution of eNOS to the mitochondria, resulting in an increase in carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT) nitration and decreased CrAT activity. The resulting increase in acyl-carnitine levels resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and the disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Since the addition of l-arginine prevented these pathologic changes, we examined the effect of l-arginine supplementation on carnitine homeostasis, mitochondrial function, and nitric oxide (NO) signaling in Shunt lambs. We found that the treatment of Shunt lambs with l-arginine prevented the ADMA-mediated mitochondrial redistribution of eNOS, the nitration-mediated inhibition of CrAT, and maintained carnitine homeostasis. In turn, adenosine-5′-triphosphate levels and eNOS/heat shock protein 90 interactions were preserved, and this decreased NOS uncoupling and enhanced NO generation. Innovation: Our data link alterations in cellular l-arginine metabolism with the disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics and implicate altered carnitine homeostasis as a key player in this process. Conclusion: l-arginine supplementation may be a useful therapy to prevent the mitochondrial dysfunction involved in the pulmonary vascular alterations secondary to increased PBF. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1739–1752. PMID:23244702

  14. Melatonin and human mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sharafati-Chaleshtori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main causative factors in a wide variety of complications such as neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, aging process, and septic shock. Decrease in respiratory complex activity, increase in free radical production, increase in mitochondrial synthase activity, increase in nitric oxide production, and impair in electron transport system and/or mitochondrial permeability are considered as the main factors responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, is selectively taken up by mitochondria and acts as a powerful antioxidant, regulating the mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin increases the permeability of membranes and is the stimulator of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. It also acts as an inhibitor of lipoxygenase. Melatonin can cause resistance to oxidation damage by fixing the microsomal membranes. Melatonin has been shown to retard aging and inhibit neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, septic shock, diabetes, cancer, and other complications related to oxidative stress. The purpose of the current study, other than introducing melatonin, was to present the recent findings on clinical effects in diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction including diabetes, cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, and diseases related to brain function.

  15. Metabolic reprogramming of human cells in response to oxidative stress: implications in the pathophysiology and therapy of mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are the organelles producing most of the energy and play important roles in a variety of biochemical functions in human cells. Mitochondrial defects can cause ATP deficiency and overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are the major hallmarks of mitochondrial diseases. Abundant evidence has suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction-elicited oxidative stress can play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria can respond to energy deficiency by the retrograde signaling to trigger a number of molecular events to help the human cells to cope with physiological or environmental changes. In this article, we first describe oxidative stress-induced cellular responses including metabolic adaptation, compensatory increase of mitochondrial biogenesis, upregulation of antioxidant enzymes, and alteration of protein acetylation in human cells with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this regard, we review recent findings to elucidate the mechanisms by which human cells motivate their mitochondria and the antioxidant defense system to respond to energy deficiency and oxidative stress, which contribute to the adaptive metabolic reprogramming in mitochondrial diseases. In addition, we emphasize the critical role of the activation of AMPK, Sirt1 and Sirt3 in the metabolic adaptation of human cells harboring mitochondrial DNA mutations. Recent studies have revealed that AMPK and sirtuins-mediated signaling pathways are involved in metabolic reprogramming, which is effected by upregulation of antioxidant defense system and mitochondrial protein acetylation, in human cells with mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, we discuss several potential modulators of bioenergetic function such as coenzyme Q10, mitochondria-targeting antioxidants, resveratrol, and L-carnitine based on recent findings from studies on human cells and animal models of mitochondrial diseases. Elucidation of the signaling pathway of this adaptive response

  16. NMDA receptor blockade alters the intracellular distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the superficial layers of the rat superior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E. de Bittencourt-Navarrete

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a molecular messenger involved in several events of synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. Ca2+ influx through the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR triggers the synthesis of NO by activating the enzyme neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS in postsynaptic densities. Therefore, NMDAR and nNOS are part of the intricate scenario of postsynaptic densities. In the present study, we hypothesized that the intracellular distribution of nNOS in the neurons of superior colliculus (SC superficial layers is an NMDAR activity-dependent process. We used osmotic minipumps to promote chronic blockade of the receptors with the pharmacological agent MK-801 in the SC of 7 adult rats. The effective blockade of NMDAR was assessed by changes in the protein level of the immediate early gene NGFI-A, which is a well-known NMDAR activity-dependent expressing transcription factor. Upon chronic infusion of MK-801, a decrease of 47% in the number of cells expressing NGFI-A was observed in the SC of treated animals. Additionally, the filled dendritic extent by the histochemical product of nicotinamide adenine di-nucleotide phosphate diaphorase was reduced by 45% when compared to the contralateral SC of the same animals and by 64% when compared to the SC of control animals. We conclude that the proper intracellular localization of nNOS in the retinorecipient layers of SC depends on NMDAR activation. These results are consistent with the view that the participation of NO in the physiological and plastic events of the central nervous system might be closely related to an NMDAR activity-dependent function.

  17. Pasture size effects on the ability of off-stream water or restricted stream access to alter the spatial/temporal distribution of grazing beef cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisinger, J J; Russell, J R; Morrical, D G; Isenhart, T M

    2014-08-01

    For 2 grazing seasons, effects of pasture size, stream access, and off-stream water on cow distribution relative to a stream were evaluated in six 12.1-ha cool-season grass pastures. Two pasture sizes (small [4.0 ha] and large [12.1 ha]) with 3 management treatments (unrestricted stream access without off-stream water [U], unrestricted stream access with off-stream water [UW], and stream access restricted to a stabilized stream crossing [R]) were alternated between pasture sizes every 2 wk for 5 consecutive 4-wk intervals in each grazing season. Small and large pastures were stocked with 5 and 15 August-calving cows from mid May through mid October. At 10-min intervals, cow location was determined with Global Positioning System collars fitted on 2 to 3 cows in each pasture and identified when observed in the stream (0-10 m from the stream) or riparian (0-33 m from the stream) zones and ambient temperature was recorded with on-site weather stations. Over all intervals, cows were observed more (P ≤ 0.01) frequently in the stream and riparian zones of small than large pastures regardless of management treatment. Cows in R pastures had 24 and 8% less (P stream and riparian zones than U or UW pastures regardless of pasture size. Off-stream water had little effect on the presence of cows in or near pasture streams regardless of pasture size. In 2011, the probability of cow presence in the stream and riparian zones increased at greater (P stream and riparian zones increased at greater (P stream and riparian zone increased less (P streams with unrestricted access.

  18. Organization of Mitochondrial Gene Expression in Two Distinct Ribosome-Containing Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Kehrein

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria contain their own genetic system that provides subunits of the complexes driving oxidative phosphorylation. A quarter of the mitochondrial proteome participates in gene expression, but how all these factors are orchestrated and spatially organized is currently unknown. Here, we established a method to purify and analyze native and intact complexes of mitochondrial ribosomes. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed extensive interactions of ribosomes with factors involved in all the steps of posttranscriptional gene expression. These interactions result in large expressosome-like assemblies that we termed mitochondrial organization of gene expression (MIOREX complexes. Superresolution microscopy revealed that most MIOREX complexes are evenly distributed throughout the mitochondrial network, whereas a subset is present as nucleoid-MIOREX complexes that unite the whole spectrum of organellar gene expression. Our work therefore provides a conceptual framework for the spatial organization of mitochondrial protein synthesis that likely developed to facilitate gene expression in the organelle.

  19. MICOS coordinates with respiratory complexes and lipids to establish mitochondrial inner membrane architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R; Mourier, Arnaud; Yamada, Justin; McCaffery, J Michael; Nunnari, Jodi

    2015-04-28

    The conserved MICOS complex functions as a primary determinant of mitochondrial inner membrane structure. We address the organization and functional roles of MICOS and identify two independent MICOS subcomplexes: Mic27/Mic10/Mic12, whose assembly is dependent on respiratory complexes and the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and Mic60/Mic19, which assembles independent of these factors. Our data suggest that MICOS subcomplexes independently localize to cristae junctions and are connected via Mic19, which functions to regulate subcomplex distribution, and thus, potentially also cristae junction copy number. MICOS subunits have non-redundant functions as the absence of both MICOS subcomplexes results in more severe morphological and respiratory growth defects than deletion of single MICOS subunits or subcomplexes. Mitochondrial defects resulting from MICOS loss are caused by misdistribution of respiratory complexes in the inner membrane. Together, our data are consistent with a model where MICOS, mitochondrial lipids and respiratory complexes coordinately build a functional and correctly shaped mitochondrial inner membrane.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α activation improves renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function in early chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joanna L; Pham, Hai; Li, Ying; Hall, Elanore; Perkins, Guy A; Ali, Sameh S; Patel, Hemal H; Singh, Prabhleen

    2017-08-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is driven by alterations in surviving nephrons to sustain renal function with ongoing nephron loss. Oxygen supply-demand mismatch, due to hemodynamic adaptations, with resultant hypoxia, plays an important role in the pathophysiology in early CKD. We sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this mismatch. We utilized the subtotal nephrectomy (STN) model of CKD to investigate the alterations in renal oxygenation linked to sodium (Na) transport and mitochondrial function in the surviving nephrons. Oxygen delivery was significantly reduced in STN kidneys because of lower renal blood flow. Fractional oxygen extraction was significantly higher in STN. Tubular Na reabsorption was significantly lower per mole of oxygen consumed in STN. We hypothesized that decreased mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity may account for this and uncovered significant mitochondrial dysfunction in the early STN kidney: higher oxidative metabolism without an attendant increase in ATP levels, elevated superoxide levels, and alterations in mitochondrial morphology. We further investigated the effect of activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of cellular hypoxia response. We observed significant improvement in renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and tubular Na reabsorption per mole of oxygen consumed with HIF-1α activation. Importantly, HIF-1α activation significantly lowered mitochondrial oxygen consumption and superoxide production and increased mitochondrial volume density. In conclusion, we report significant impairment of renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function at the early stages of CKD and demonstrate the beneficial role of HIF-1α activation on renal function and metabolism.

  1. Tissue- and cell-specific mitochondrial defect in Parkin-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Damiano

    Full Text Available Loss of Parkin, encoded by PARK2 gene, is a major cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. In Drosophila and mammalian cell models Parkin has been shown in to play a role in various processes essential to maintenance of mitochondrial quality, including mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and degradation. However, the relevance of altered mitochondrial quality control mechanisms to neuronal survival in vivo is still under debate. We addressed this issue in the brain of PARK2-/- mice using an integrated mitochondrial evaluation, including analysis of respiration by polarography or by fluorescence, respiratory complexes activity by spectrophotometric assays, mitochondrial membrane potential by rhodamine 123 fluorescence, mitochondrial DNA content by real time PCR, and oxidative stress by total glutathione measurement, proteasome activity, SOD2 expression and proteins oxidative damage. Respiration rates were lowered in PARK2-/- brain with high resolution but not standard respirometry. This defect was specific to the striatum, where it was prominent in neurons but less severe in astrocytes. It was present in primary embryonic cells and did not worsen in vivo from 9 to 24 months of age. It was not associated with any respiratory complex defect, including complex I. Mitochondrial inner membrane potential in PARK2-/- mice was similar to that of wild-type mice but showed increased sensitivity to uncoupling with ageing in striatum. The presence of oxidative stress was suggested in the striatum by increased mitochondrial glutathione content and oxidative adducts but normal proteasome activity showed efficient compensation. SOD2 expression was increased only in the striatum of PARK2-/- mice at 24 months of age. Altogether our results show a tissue-specific mitochondrial defect, present early in life of PARK2-/- mice, mildly affecting respiration, without prominent impact on mitochondrial membrane potential, whose underlying mechanisms remain to be

  2. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes of Mitochondrial Components in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirches, E

    2009-01-01

    Although the observation of aerobic glycolysis of tumor cells by Otto v. Warburg had demonstrated abnormalities of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cancer decades ago, there was no clear evidence for a functional role of mutant mitochondrial proteins in cancer development until the early years of the 21st century. In the year 2000, a major breakthrough was achieved by the observation, that several genes coding for subunits of the respiratory chain (ETC) complex II, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are tumor suppressor genes in heritable paragangliomas, fulfilling Knudson’s classical two-hit hypothesis. A functional inactivation of both alleles by germline mutations and chromosomal losses in the tumor tissue was found in the patients. Later, SDH mutations were also identified in sporadic paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas. Genes of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase and of mitochondrial iron homeostasis have been implicated in cancer development at the level of cell culture and mouse experiments. In contrast to the well established role of some nuclear SDH genes, a functional impact of the mitochondrial genome itself (mtDNA) in cancer development remains unclear. Nevertheless, the extremely high frequency of mtDNA mutations in solid tumors raises the question, whether this small circular genome might be applicable to early cancer detection. This is a meaningful approach, especially in cancers, which tend to spread tumor cells early into bodily fluids or faeces, which can be screened by non-invasive methods. PMID:19949549

  3. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eWalton

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begins in middle-passage cells, we sought to determine whether peroxisomal hydrogen peroxide could contribute to the oxidative damage observed in mitochondria in late-passage cells. Early-passage human fibroblasts (Hs27 treated with aminotriazole (3-AT, an irreversible catalase inhibitor, demonstrated decreased catalase activity, increased levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyls, and peroxisomal numbers. This treatment increased mitochondrial ROS levels, and decreased the mitochondrial aconitase activity by approximately 85% within 24 hours. In addition, mitochondria from 3-AT treated cells show a decrease in inner membrane potential. These results demonstrate that peroxisome-derived oxidative imbalance may rapidly impair mitochondrial function, and considering that peroxisomal oxidative imbalance begins to occur in middle-passage cells, supports the hypothesis that peroxisomal oxidant release occurs upstream of, and contributes to, the mitochondrial damage observed in aging cells.

  4. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Paul A; Pizzitelli, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle's oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begins in middle-passage cells, we sought to determine whether peroxisomal hydrogen peroxide could contribute to the oxidative damage observed in mitochondria in late-passage cells. Early-passage human fibroblasts (Hs27) treated with aminotriazole (3-AT), an irreversible catalase inhibitor, demonstrated decreased catalase activity, increased levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyls, and peroxisomal numbers. This treatment increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels, and decreased the mitochondrial aconitase activity by ∼85% within 24 h. In addition, mitochondria from 3-AT treated cells show a decrease in inner membrane potential. These results demonstrate that peroxisome-derived oxidative imbalance may rapidly impair mitochondrial function, and considering that peroxisomal oxidative imbalance begins to occur in middle-passage cells, supports the hypothesis that peroxisomal oxidant release occurs upstream of, and contributes to, the mitochondrial damage observed in aging cells.

  5. Cisplatin cytotoxicity is dependent on mitochondrial respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhipriya Inapurapu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To understand the role of mitochondrial respiration in cisplatin sensitivity, we have employed wild-type and mitochondrial DNA depleted Rho0 yeast cells. Materials and Methods: Wild type and Rho0 yeast cultured in fermentable and non-fermentable sugar containing media, were studied for their sensitivity against cisplatin by monitoring growth curves, oxygen consumption, pH changes in cytosol/mitochondrial compartments, reactive oxygen species production and respiratory control ratio. Results: Wild-type yeast grown on glycerol exhibited heightened sensitivity to cisplatin than yeast grown on glucose. Cisplatin (100 μM, although significantly reduced the growth of wild- type cells, only slightly altered the growth rate of Rho0 cells. Cisplatin treatment decreased both pHcyt and pHmit to a similar extent without affecting the pH difference. Cisplatin dose-dependently increased the oxidative stress in wild-type, but not in respiration-deficient Rho0 strain. Cisplatin decreased the respiratory control ratio. Conclusion: These results suggest that cisplatin toxicity is influenced by the respiratory capacity of the cells and the intracellular oxidative burden. Although cisplatin per se slightly decreased the respiration of yeast cells grown in glucose, it did not disturb the mitochondrial chemiosmotic gradient.

  6. Mitochondrial Chaperones in the Brain: Safeguarding Brain Health and Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Castro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain orchestrates organ function and regulates whole body metabolism by the concerted action of neurons and glia cells in the central nervous system. To do so, the brain has tremendously high energy consumption and relies mainly on glucose utilization and mitochondrial function in order to exert its function. As a consequence of high rate metabolism, mitochondria in the brain accumulate errors over time, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations, reactive oxygen species, and misfolded and aggregated proteins. Thus, mitochondria need to employ specific mechanisms to avoid or ameliorate the rise of damaged proteins that contribute to aberrant mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. To maintain mitochondria homeostasis (mitostasis, cells evolved molecular chaperones that shuttle, refold, or in coordination with proteolytic systems, help to maintain a low steady-state level of misfolded/aggregated proteins. Their importance is exemplified by the occurrence of various brain diseases which exhibit reduced action of chaperones. Chaperone loss (expression and/or function has been observed during aging, metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s (AD, Parkinson’s (PD or even Huntington’s (HD diseases, where the accumulation of damage proteins is evidenced. Within this perspective, we propose that proper brain function is maintained by the joint action of mitochondrial chaperones to ensure and maintain mitostasis contributing to brain health, and that upon failure, alter brain function which can cause metabolic diseases.

  7. Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired after burn trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Melanie G; Fram, Ricki Y; Herndon, David N; Qian, Ting; Angel, Carlos; Green, Justin M; Mlcak, Ronald; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R

    2008-08-01

    Mitochondrial proteins and genes are damaged after burn injury in animals and are assessed in human burn patients in this study. The rates of maximal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity (adenosine triphosphate production) and uncoupled oxidation (heat production) for both palmitate and pyruvate were measured in muscle biopsies from 40 children sustaining burns on more than 40% of their body surface area and from 13 healthy children controls. Maximal mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate and palmitate were reduced in burn patients compared with controls (4.0 +/- .2:1.9 +/- .1 micromol O2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min pyruvate; control:burn; P < .001 and 3.0 +/- .1: .9 +/- .03 micromol O2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min palmityl CoA; control:burn; P = .003). Uncoupled oxidation was the same between groups. The maximal coupled mitochondrial oxidative capacity is severely impaired after burn injury, although there are no alterations in the rate of uncoupled oxidative capacity. It may be that the ratio of these indicates that a larger portion of energy production in trauma patients is wasted through uncoupling, rather than used for healing.

  8. Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired following burn trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Melanie G.; Fram, Ricki Y.; Herndon, David N.; Qian, Ting; Angel, Carlos; Green, Justin M.; Mlcak, Ronald; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial proteins and genes are damaged after burn injury in animals but have not previously been assessed in human burn patients. Methods The rates of maximal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity(ATP production) and uncoupled oxidation(heat production) for both palmitate and pyruvate were measured in muscle biopsies from 40 children sustaining burns >40% body surface area and from 13 healthy children controls. Results Maximal mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate and palmitate were reduced in burn patients compared to controls (4.0±0.2:1.9±0.1 µmolO2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min pyruvate; Control:Burn;P<0.001 and 3.0±0.1:0.9±0.03 µmolO2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min palmatyl CoA; Control:Burn;P=0.003). Uncoupled oxidation was the same between groups. Conclusions The maximal coupled mitochondrial oxidative capacity is severely impaired after burn injury, although there are no alterations in the rate of uncoupled oxidative capacity. It may be that the ratio of these indicates that a larger portion of energy production in trauma patients is wasted through uncoupling, rather than used for healing. PMID:18639661

  9. Centella asiatica attenuates β-amyloid-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nora E.; Sampath, Harini; Zweig, Jonathan A.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Soumyanath, Amala

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously showed that a water extract of the medicinal plant Centella asiatica (CAW) attenuates β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced cognitive deficits in vivo, and prevents Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. Yet the neuroprotective mechanism of CAW is unknown. Objective The goal of this study was to identify biochemical pathways altered by CAW using in vitro models of Aβ toxicity. Methods The effects of CAW on aberrations in antioxidant response, calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial function induced by Aβ were evaluated in MC65 and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Results CAW decreased intracellular ROS and calcium levels elevated in response to Aβ, and induced the expression of antioxidant response genes in both cell lines. In SH-SY5Y cells, CAW increased basal and maximal oxygen consumption without altering spare capacity, and attenuated Aβ-induced decreases in mitochondrial respiration. CAW also prevented Aβ –induced decreases in ATP and induced the expression of mitochondrial genes and proteins in both cell types. Caffeoylquinic acids from CAW were shown to have a similar effect on antioxidant and mitochondrial gene expression in neuroblastoma cells. Primary rat hippocampal neurons treated with CAW also showed an increase in mitochondrial and antioxidant gene expression. Conclusions These data suggest an effect of CAW on mitochondrial biogenesis, which in conjunction with activation of antioxidant response genes and normalizing calcium homeostasis, likely contributes to its neuroprotective action against Aβ toxicity. PMID:25633675

  10. Centella asiatica Attenuates Amyloid-β-Induced Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nora E; Sampath, Harini; Zweig, Jonathan A; Quinn, Joseph F; Soumyanath, Amala

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that a water extract of the medicinal plant Centella asiatica (CAW) attenuates amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced cognitive deficits in vivo, and prevents Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. Yet the neuroprotective mechanism of CAW is unknown. The goal of this study was to identify biochemical pathways altered by CAW using in vitro models of Aβ toxicity. The effects of CAW on aberrations in antioxidant response, calcium homeostasis, and mitochondrial function induced by Aβ were evaluated in MC65 and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. CAW decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium levels elevated in response to Aβ, and induced the expression of antioxidant response genes in both cell lines. In SH-SY5Y cells, CAW increased basal and maximal oxygen consumption without altering spare capacity, and attenuated Aβ-induced decreases in mitochondrial respiration. CAW also prevented Aβ-induced decreases in ATP and induced the expression of mitochondrial genes and proteins in both cell types. Caffeoylquinic acids from CAW were shown to have a similar effect on antioxidant and mitochondrial gene expression in neuroblastoma cells. Primary rat hippocampal neurons treated with CAW also showed an increase in mitochondrial and antioxidant gene expression. These data suggest an effect of CAW on mitochondrial biogenesis, which in conjunction with activation of antioxidant response genes and normalizing calcium homeostasis, likely contributes to its neuroprotective action against Aβ toxicity.

  11. Reproductive aging is associated with changes in oocyte mitochondrial dynamics, function, and mtDNA quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayev, Elnur; Wang, Tianren; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Lowther, Katie; Taylor, Hugh S; Horvath, Tamas; Seli, Emre

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria affect numerous aspects of mammalian reproduction. We investigated whether the decrease in oocyte quality associated with aging is related to altered mitochondria. Oocytes from old (12 months) and young (9 weeks) C57BL/6J mice were compared in relation to: mitochondria morphology and dynamics (mitochondria density, coverage, size and shape) throughout folliculogenesis; levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); mitochondrial stress reflected in the expression of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mt-UPR) genes; and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under baseline conditions and following H 2 O 2 treatment. In old mice, mitochondria of primary follicle-enclosed oocytes were smaller, with lower mitochondria coverage (total mitochondria μm 2 /μm 2 cytosol area) (pchanges were not significant. Mature oocytes (Metaphase II-MII) from old mice had significantly less mtDNA (paged MII oocytes were also higher following pretreatment with H 2 O 2 (pAging is associated with altered mitochondrial morphological parameters and decreased mtDNA levels in oocytes, as well as an increase in ROS under stressful conditions and elevated expression of mitochondrial stress response gene Hspd1. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial changes associated with ageing may help in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools in reproductive medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  13. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Gossypium hirsutum and Evolutionary Analysis of Higher Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Aiguo; Geng, Jianing; Grover, Corrinne E.; Hu, Songnian; Hua, Jinping

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are the main manufacturers of cellular ATP in eukaryotes. The plant mitochondrial genome contains large number of foreign DNA and repeated sequences undergone frequently intramolecular recombination. Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the main natural fiber crops and also an important oil-producing plant in the world. Sequencing of the cotton mitochondrial (mt) genome could be helpful for the evolution research of plant mt genomes. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized 454 technology for sequencing and combined with Fosmid library of the Gossypium hirsutum mt genome screening and positive clones sequencing and conducted a series of evolutionary analysis on Cycas taitungensis and 24 angiosperms mt genomes. After data assembling and contigs joining, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. hirsutum was obtained. The completed G.hirsutum mt genome is 621,884 bp in length, and contained 68 genes, including 35 protein genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. Five gene clusters are found conserved in all plant mt genomes; one and four clusters are specifically conserved in monocots and dicots, respectively. Homologous sequences are distributed along the plant mt genomes and species closely related share the most homologous sequences. For species that have both mt and chloroplast genome sequences available, we checked the location of cp-like migration and found several fragments closely linked with mitochondrial genes. Conclusion The G. hirsutum mt genome possesses most of the common characters of higher plant mt genomes. The existence of syntenic gene clusters, as well as the conservation of some intergenic sequences and genic content among the plant mt genomes suggest that evolution of mt genomes is consistent with plant taxonomy but independent among different species. PMID:23940520

  14. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M Schaefer

    Full Text Available One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ, which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Identification of a mitochondrial target of thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers (mTOT--relationship to newly identified mitochondrial pyruvate carrier proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R Colca

    Full Text Available Thiazolidinedione (TZD insulin sensitizers have the potential to effectively treat a number of human diseases, however the currently available agents have dose-limiting side effects that are mediated via activation of the transcription factor PPARγ. We have recently shown PPARγ-independent actions of TZD insulin sensitizers, but the molecular target of these molecules remained to be identified. Here we use a photo-catalyzable drug analog probe and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial complex that specifically recognizes TZDs. These studies identify two well-conserved proteins previously known as brain protein 44 (BRP44 and BRP44 Like (BRP44L, which recently have been renamed Mpc2 and Mpc1 to signify their function as a mitochondrial pyruvate carrier complex. Knockdown of Mpc1 or Mpc2 in Drosophila melanogaster or pre-incubation with UK5099, an inhibitor of pyruvate transport, blocks the crosslinking of mitochondrial membranes by the TZD probe. Knockdown of these proteins in Drosophila also led to increased hemolymph glucose and blocked drug action. In isolated brown adipose tissue (BAT cells, MSDC-0602, a PPARγ-sparing TZD, altered the incorporation of (13C-labeled carbon from glucose into acetyl CoA. These results identify Mpc1 and Mpc2 as components of the mitochondrial target of TZDs (mTOT and suggest that understanding the modulation of this complex, which appears to regulate pyruvate entry into the mitochondria, may provide a viable target for insulin sensitizing pharmacology.

  16. Lysosomal and Mitochondrial Liaisons in Niemann-Pick Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Torres

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD are characterized by the accumulation of diverse lipid species in lysosomes. Niemann-Pick type A/B (NPA/B and type C diseases Niemann-Pick type C (NPC are progressive LSD caused by loss of function of distinct lysosomal-residing proteins, acid sphingomyelinase and NPC1, respectively. While the primary cause of these diseases differs, both share common biochemical features, including the accumulation of sphingolipids and cholesterol, predominantly in endolysosomes. Besides these alterations in lysosomal homeostasis and function due to accumulation of specific lipid species, the lysosomal functional defects can have far-reaching consequences, disrupting intracellular trafficking of sterols, lipids and calcium through membrane contact sites (MCS of apposed compartments. Although MCS between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria have been well studied and characterized in different contexts, emerging evidence indicates that lysosomes also exhibit close proximity with mitochondria, which translates in their mutual functional regulation. Indeed, as best illustrated in NPC disease, alterations in the lysosomal-mitochondrial liaisons underlie the secondary accumulation of specific lipids, such as cholesterol in mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and defective antioxidant defense, which contribute to disease progression. Thus, a better understanding of the lysosomal and mitochondrial interactions and trafficking may identify novel targets for the treatment of Niemann-Pick disease.

  17. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase protects against cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Lark, Daniel S; Reese, Lauren R; Torres, Maria J; Ryan, Terence E; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L; Neufer, P Darrell

    2016-08-01

    The loss of strength in combination with constant fatigue is a burden on cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapy drug used in the clinic, causes skeletal muscle dysfunction and increases mitochondrial H2O2 We hypothesized that the combined effect of cancer and chemotherapy in an immunocompetent breast cancer mouse model (E0771) would compromise skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function, leading to an increase in H2O2-emitting potential and impaired muscle function. Here, we demonstrate that cancer chemotherapy decreases mitochondrial respiratory capacity supported with complex I (pyruvate/glutamate/malate) and complex II (succinate) substrates. Mitochondrial H2O2-emitting potential was altered in skeletal muscle, and global protein oxidation was elevated with cancer chemotherapy. Muscle contractile function was impaired following exposure to cancer chemotherapy. Genetically engineering the overexpression of catalase in mitochondria of muscle attenuated mitochondrial H2O2 emission and protein oxidation, preserving mitochondrial and whole muscle function despite cancer chemotherapy. These findings suggest mitochondrial oxidants as a mediator of cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Transaldolase inhibition impairs mitochondrial respiration and induces a starvation-like longevity response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Bennett

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction can increase oxidative stress and extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homeostatic mechanisms exist to cope with disruptions to mitochondrial function that promote cellular health and organismal longevity. Previously, we determined that decreased expression of the cytosolic pentose phosphate pathway (PPP enzyme transaldolase activates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt and extends lifespan. Here we report that transaldolase (tald-1 deficiency impairs mitochondrial function in vivo, as evidenced by altered mitochondrial morphology, decreased respiration, and increased cellular H2O2 levels. Lifespan extension from knockdown of tald-1 is associated with an oxidative stress response involving p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK MAPKs and a starvation-like response regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB homolog HLH-30. The latter response promotes autophagy and increases expression of the flavin-containing monooxygenase 2 (fmo-2. We conclude that cytosolic redox established through the PPP is a key regulator of mitochondrial function and defines a new mechanism for mitochondrial regulation of longevity.

  19. Mitochondrial dynamics in the adult cardiomyocytes: which roles for a highly specialized cell?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome ePiquereau

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a recent topic of research in the field of cardiac physiology. The study of mechanisms involved in the morphological changes and in the motility of mitochondria is legitimate since the adult cardiomyocytes possess numerous mitochondria which occupy at least 30% of cell volume. However, architectural constraints exist in the cardiomyocyte that limit mitochondrial movements and communication between adjacent mitochondria. Still, the proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission are highly expressed in these cells and could be involved in different processes important for the cardiac function. For example, they are required for mitochondrial biogenesis to synthesize new mitochondria and for the quality-control of the organelles. They are also involved in inner membrane organization and may play a role in apoptosis. More generally, change in mitochondrial morphology can have consequences in the functioning of the respiratory chain, in the regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP, and in the interactions with other organelles. Furthermore, the proteins involved in fusion and fission of mitochondria are altered in cardiac pathologies such as ischemia/reperfusion or heart failure, and appear to be valuable targets for pharmacological therapies. Thus, mitochondrial dynamics deserves particular attention in cardiac research. The present review draws up a report of our knowledge on these phenomena.

  20. Mitochondrial mislocalization underlies Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Iijima-Ando

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid-beta 42 (Abeta42 is thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Abeta42 induces neuronal dysfunction and degeneration remain elusive. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are implicated in AD brains. Whether mitochondrial dysfunctions are merely a consequence of AD pathology, or are early seminal events in AD pathogenesis remains to be determined. Here, we show that Abeta42 induces mitochondrial mislocalization, which contributes to Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction in a transgenic Drosophila model. In the Abeta42 fly brain, mitochondria were reduced in axons and dendrites, and accumulated in the somata without severe mitochondrial damage or neurodegeneration. In contrast, organization of microtubule or global axonal transport was not significantly altered at this stage. Abeta42-induced behavioral defects were exacerbated by genetic reductions in mitochondrial transport, and were modulated by cAMP levels and PKA activity. Levels of putative PKA substrate phosphoproteins were reduced in the Abeta42 fly brains. Importantly, perturbations in mitochondrial transport in neurons were sufficient to disrupt PKA signaling and induce late-onset behavioral deficits, suggesting a mechanism whereby mitochondrial mislocalization contributes to Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction. These results demonstrate that mislocalization of mitochondria underlies the pathogenic effects of Abeta42 in vivo.

  1. Mitochondrial cAMP-PKA signaling: What do we really know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould Amer, Yasmine; Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne

    2018-04-23

    Mitochondria are key organelles for cellular homeostasis. They generate the most part of ATP that is used by cells through oxidative phosphorylation. They also produce reactive oxygen species, neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules. They are important for calcium homeostasis and apoptosis. Considering the role of this organelle, it is not surprising that most mitochondrial dysfunctions are linked to the development of pathologies. Various mechanisms adjust mitochondrial activity according to physiological needs. The cAMP-PKA signaling emerged in recent years as a direct and powerful mean to regulate mitochondrial functions. Multiple evidence demonstrates that such pathway can be triggered from cytosol or directly within mitochondria. Notably, specific anchor proteins target PKA to mitochondria whereas enzymes necessary for generation and degradation of cAMP are found directly in these organelles. Mitochondrial PKA targets proteins localized in different compartments of mitochondria, and related to various functions. Alterations of mitochondrial cAMP-PKA signaling affect the development of several physiopathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases. It is however difficult to discriminate between the effects of cAMP-PKA signaling triggered from cytosol or directly in mitochondria. The specific roles of PKA localized in different mitochondrial compartments are also not completely understood. The aim of this work is to review the role of cAMP-PKA signaling in mitochondrial (patho)physiology. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction as a manifestation of impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be caused by mitochondrial disorders. Understanding the association between genetic alterations in mitochondrial function and development of intestinal pseudo-obstruction may provide insight into the pathogenesis of this disorder. Although the association between mitochondrial DNA defects and pseudo-obstruction is documented, little is known about the relationship between mitochondrial beta-oxidation disorders, which are caused by defects in nuclear genes, and development of intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Mitochondrial beta-oxidation defects have emerged recently as an important group of recessively inherited inborn errors of metabolism with multiple phenotypes. Here we report the case history of a 25-year-old patient with mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) deficiency, the eldest known living patient with this disorder. MTP is an enzyme complex that consists of 4alpha and 4beta subunits and catalyzes the last three steps in the beta-oxidation cycle. The patient's MTP deficiency is secondary to a compound heterozygosity for two mutations in the MTP beta-subunit. Over the past 5 years, the patient had worsening symptoms consistent with intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with progressive skeletal myopathy and polyneuropathy. We hypothesize that impairment of mitochondrial beta-oxidation causes intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to accumulation of intracellular long chain fatty acids, activation of extramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation pathways, and generation of excessive reactive oxygen species leading to visceral myopathy.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction promoted by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide as a possible link between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, Pedro; Cordero, Mario David; Quiles, José Luis; Morillo, Juan Manuel; del Carmen Ramirez-Tortosa, Maria; Battino, Maurizio

    2011-05-15

    Oxidative stress is one of the factors that could explain the pathophysiological mechanism of inflammatory conditions that occur in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and periodontitis. Such inflammatory response is often evoked by specific bacteria, as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key factor in this process. The aim of this research was to study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from periodontitis patients and to evaluate the influence of LPS on fibroblasts to better understand the pathophysiology of periodontitis and its relationship with CVD. PBMCs from patients showed lower CoQ10 levels and citrate synthase activity, together with high levels of ROS production. LPS-treated fibroblasts provoked increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction by a decrease in mitochondrial protein expression, mitochondrial mass, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Our study supports the hypothesis that LPS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction could be at the origin of oxidative stress in periodontal patients. Abnormal PBMC performance may promote oxidative stress and alter cytokine homeostasis. In conclusion, mitochondrial dysfunction could represent a possible link to understanding the interrelationships between two prominent inflammatory diseases: periodontitis and CVD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial quality control pathways as determinants of metabolic health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Held, Ntsiki M.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is key for maintaining cellular health, while mitochondrial failure is associated with various pathologies, including inherited metabolic disorders and age-related diseases. In order to maintain mitochondrial quality, several pathways of mitochondrial quality control have

  5. Cardiomyocyte specific deletion of Crif1 causes mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhee Shin

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are key organelles dedicated to energy production. Crif1, which interacts with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome, is indispensable for the mitochondrial translation and membrane insertion of respiratory subunits. To explore the physiological function of Crif1 in the heart, Crif1(f/f mice were crossed with Myh6-cre/Esr1 transgenic mice, which harbor cardiomyocyte-specific Cre activity in a tamoxifen-dependent manner. The tamoxifen injections were given at six weeks postnatal, and the mutant mice survived only five months due to hypertrophic heart failure. In the mutant cardiac muscles, mitochondrial mass dramatically increased, while the inner structure was altered with lack of cristae. Mutant cardiac muscles showed decreased rates of oxygen consumption and ATP production, suggesting that Crif1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of both mitochondrial structure and respiration in cardiac muscles.

  6. Effects of mitochondrial poisons on glutathione redox potential and carotid body chemoreceptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Niño, A; Agapito, M T; Obeso, A; Gonzalez, C

    2009-01-01

    Low oxygen sensing in chemoreceptor cells involves the inhibition of specific plasma membrane K(+) channels, suggesting that mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) link hypoxia to K(+) channel inhibition, subsequent cell depolarization and activation of neurotransmitter release. We have used several mitochondrial poisons, alone and in combination with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and quantify their capacity to alter GSH/GSSG levels and glutathione redox potential (E(GSH)) in rat diaphragm. Selected concentrations of mitochondrial poisons with or without NAC were tested for their capacity to activate neurotransmitter release in chemoreceptor cells and to alter ATP levels in intact rat carotid body (CB). We found that rotenone (1 microM), antimycin A (0.2 microg/ml) and sodium azide (5mM) decreased E(GSH); NAC restored E(GSH) to control values. At those concentrations mitochondrial poisons activated neurotransmitter release from CB chemoreceptor cells and decreased CB ATP levels, NAC being ineffective to modify these responses. Additional experiments with 3-nitroprionate (5mM), lower concentrations of rotenone and dinitrophenol revealed variable relationships between E(GSH) and chemoreceptor cell neurotransmitter release r