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  1. Diet, lifestyle, and molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental factors have been repeatedly implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer, and much is known about the molecular events involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. The relationships between environmental risk factors and the molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis are

  2. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

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    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  3. Colorectal cancer cell lines made resistant to SN38-and Oxaliplatin: Roles of altered ion transporter function in resistance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandra, Christensen; Jensen, Niels Frank; Stoeckel, Johanne Danmark;

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 3rd most common cancer globally, with 5year survival rates of ~50%. Response rates to standard treatments (irinotecan (SN38) or Oxaliplatin (Oxp)) are 31–56% and drug resistance is a major problem. Thus, we established in vitro CRC models to investigate SN38 and Oxp...

  4. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

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    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  5. Promoter Methylation Precedes Chromosomal Alterations in Colorectal Cancer Development

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    Sarah Derks

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to explore the timing of promoter methylation and relationship with mutations and chromosomal alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: In a series of 47 nonprogressed adenomas, 41 progressed adenomas (malignant polyps, 38 colorectal carcinomas and 18 paired normal tissues, we evaluated promoter methylation status of hMLH1, O6MGMT, APC, p14ARF, p16INK4A, RASSF1A, GATA-4, GATA-5, and CHFR using methylation-specific PCR. Mutation status of TP53, APC and KRAS were studied by p53 immunohistochemistry and sequencing of the APC and KRAS mutation cluster regions. Chromosomal alterations were evaluated by comparative genomic hybridization. Results: Our data demonstrate that nonprogressed adenomas, progressed adenomas and carcinomas show similar frequencies of promoter methylation for the majority of the genes. Normal tissues showed significantly lower frequencies of promoter methylation of APC, p16INK4A, GATA-4, and GATA-5 (P-values: 0.02, 0.02, 1.1×10−5 and 0.008 respectively. P53 immunopositivity and chromosomal abnormalities occur predominantly in carcinomas (P values: 1.1×10−5 and 4.1×10−10. Conclusions: Since promoter methylation was already present in nonprogressed adenomas without chromosomal alterations, we conclude that promoter methylation can be regarded as an early event preceding TP53 mutation and chromosomal abnormalities in colorectal cancer development.

  6. Histochemical alterations in colorectal carcinoma and adenoma in Egyptian patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saber A Sakr; Moshira M Abdel-Wahed; Asmaa G Abdou; Eman K El-Adely

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the histochemical alterations inDNA and total carbohydrates, in colorectal cancer cells. Methods:This study was carried out on 48 colorectal carcinoma and 10 adenoma specimens. Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was carried out for histopathological examination to confirm the diagnosis and to evaluate the histopathological characteristics of tumor. Histologic grade and pathologic stage was assessed according to TNM staging system. Staging was also assessed according to original Dukes’ staging system.DNA was demonstrated by Feulgen method and carbohydrates were demonstrated by periodic acid Schiff’s reaction. Results:Adenoma cases showed that the cells lining the glands of the polyp have more crowded, irregular and darker nuclei (hyperchromatic), anisonucleosis, abnormal mitotic figures with prominent nucleoli and variability in the size and shape of nuclei. Colorectal carcinoma cases showed a condensation and reduction in the size of a cell nucleus associated with hyperchromatosis, pyknotic nuclei, abnormal mitotic figures, anisonucleosis, irregular nuclear membrane and inequality in the size of the nuclei (Pleomorphosis). There was a statistical significant differences between adenoma and carcinoma regarding number of mitotic cells (P = 0.03) that was in favour of malignant group. Adenoma and colorectal carcinoma cases showed periodic acid Schiff’s reactivity with different degree. Conclusions:These histochemical alterations can be so characteristic of a given tumor type and stage that they are used in cancer diagnosis and might also be related to the altered functional properties of cancer cells.

  7. Histochemical alterations in colorectal carcinoma and adenoma in Egyptian patients

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    Saber A Sakr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the histochemical alterations in DNA and total carbohydrates, in colorectal cancer cells. Methods: This study was carried out on 48 colorectal carcinoma and 10 adenoma specimens. Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was carried out for histopathological examination to confirm the diagnosis and to evaluate the histopathological characteristics of tumor. Histologic grade and pathologic stage was assessed according to TNM staging system. Staging was also assessed according to original Dukes’ staging system. DNA was demonstrated by Feulgen method and carbohydrates were demonstrated by periodic acid Schiff’s reaction. Results: Adenoma cases showed that the cells lining the glands of the polyp have more crowded, irregular and darker nuclei (hyperchromatic, anisonucleosis, abnormal mitotic figures with prominent nucleoli and variability in the size and shape of nuclei. Colorectal carcinoma cases showed a condensation and reduction in the size of a cell nucleus associated with hyperchromatosis, pyknotic nuclei, abnormal mitotic figures, anisonucleosis, irregular nuclear membrane and inequality in the size of the nuclei (Pleomorphosis. There was a statistical significant differences between adenoma and carcinoma regarding number of mitotic cells (P = 0.03 that was in favour of malignant group. Adenoma and colorectal carcinoma cases showed periodic acid Schiff’s reactivity with different degree. Conclusions: These histochemical alterations can be so characteristic of a given tumor type and stage that they are used in cancer diagnosis and might also be related to the altered functional properties of cancer cells.

  8. MICROSATELLITE ALTERATION AND ITS CHARACTERISTICS IN COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the role of microsatellite alterations incarcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Methods: Alterations of 10 microsatellite loci from 5 different chromosomes were detected in 92 colorectal cancers and their paired normal mucosa by PCR, denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. Associations of microsatellite alterations with clinopathologic parameters were statistically clarified.Results: Alterations of microsatellite were classified into microsatellite instability type I, type II and loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The carcinoma with ≥30% loci microsatellite alterations was defined as replication error(RER) positive tumors. Of 92 cases, 14 were RER+. Microsatellite alterations of P53(1) and D18S363 loci (64.29% ) was most commonly identified in the RER+ tumors. RER+ were more commonly seen in poorly differentiated carcinomas and tended to occur in mucoid carcinomas. The type of microsatellite alterations varied in different histological types of CRC. Conclusions: Microsatellite alteration is a common molecular event in CRC. Different microsatellite loci showed various biologic significance. P53(1) and D18S363 should be essentially detected loci that can show the RER status of tumors.

  9. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers.

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    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M; Goel, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colonic epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer "epigenome" has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, are presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC.

  10. Serum amino acid profiles and their alterations in colorectal cancer.

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    Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Ceglarek, Uta; Kase, Julia; Conrad, Tim; Witzigmann, Helmut; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg Martin

    2012-08-01

    Mass spectrometry-based serum metabolic profiling is a promising tool to analyse complex cancer associated metabolic alterations, which may broaden our pathophysiological understanding of the disease and may function as a source of new cancer-associated biomarkers. Highly standardized serum samples of patients suffering from colon cancer (n = 59) and controls (n = 58) were collected at the University Hospital Leipzig. We based our investigations on amino acid screening profiles using electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry. Metabolic profiles were evaluated using the Analyst 1.4.2 software. General, comparative and equivalence statistics were performed by R 2.12.2. 11 out of 26 serum amino acid concentrations were significantly different between colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. We found a model including CEA, glycine, and tyrosine as best discriminating and superior to CEA alone with an AUROC of 0.878 (95% CI 0.815-0.941). Our serum metabolic profiling in colon cancer revealed multiple significant disease-associated alterations in the amino acid profile with promising diagnostic power. Further large-scale studies are necessary to elucidate the potential of our model also to discriminate between cancer and potential differential diagnoses. In conclusion, serum glycine and tyrosine in combination with CEA are superior to CEA for the discrimination between colorectal cancer patients and controls.

  11. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

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    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients w...

  12. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

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    Kleberg Karen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Methods Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024. The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. Conclusions OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE2.

  13. Haemostatic alterations in colorectal cancer: perspectives for future treatment

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    Lykke, Jakob; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The role of the haemostatic system in colorectal cancer (CRC) is reviewed. Correlations between the activation of the haemostatic system and overall survival have been suggested. Experimental studies indicate that the haemostatic system plays a key role in growth, invasion and dissemination of tu...

  14. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer.

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    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-14

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  15. Frequent alteration of the tumor suppressor gene APC in sporadic canine colorectal tumors.

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    Youmans, Lydia; Taylor, Cynthia; Shin, Edwin; Harrell, Adrienne; Ellis, Angela E; Séguin, Bernard; Ji, Xinglai; Zhao, Shaying

    2012-01-01

    Sporadic canine colorectal cancers (CRCs) should make excellent models for studying the corresponding human cancers. To molecularly characterize canine CRC, we investigated exonic sequence mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), the best known tumor suppressor gene of human CRC, in 23 sporadic canine colorectal tumors, including 8 adenomas and 15 adenocarcinomas, via exon-resequencing analysis. As a comparison, we also performed the same sequencing analysis on 10 other genes, either located at human 5q22 (the same locus as APC) or 18q21 (also frequently altered in human CRC), or known to play a role in human carcinogenesis. We noted that APC was the most significantly mutated gene in both canine adenomas and adenocarcinomas among the 11 genes examined. Significantly, we detected large deletions of ≥ 10 bases, many clustered near the mutation cluster region, as well as single or two base deletions in ~70% canine tumors of both subtypes. These observations indicate that like in the human, APC is also frequently altered in sporadic colorectal tumors in the dog and its alteration is an early event in canine colorectal tumorigenesis. Our study provides further evidence demonstrating the molecular similarity in pathogenesis between sporadic human and canine CRCs. This work, along with our previous copy number abnormality study, supports that sporadic canine CRCs are valid models of human CRCs at the molecular level.

  16. PIK3CA Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: Relationship with Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations

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    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic PIK3CA mutations are often present in colorectal cancer. Mutant PIK3CA activates AKT signaling, which up-regulates fatty acid synthase (FASN. Microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP are important molecular classifiers in colorectal cancer. However, the relationship between PIK3CA mutation, MSI and CIMP remains uncertain. Using Pyrosequencing technology, we detected PIK3CA mutations in 91 (15% of 590 population-based colorectal cancers. To determine CIMP status, we quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters [CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1] by real-time polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight. PIK3CA mutation was significantly associated with mucinous tumors [P = .0002; odds ratio (OR = 2.44], KRAS mutation (P < .0001; OR = 2.68, CIMP-high (P = .03; OR = 2.08, phospho–ribosomal protein S6 expression (P = .002; OR = 2.19, and FASN expression (P = .02; OR = 1.85 and inversely with p53 expression (P = .01; OR = 0.54 and β-catenin (CTNNB1 alteration (P = .004; OR = 0.43. In addition, PIK3CA G-to-A mutations were associated with MGMT loss (P = .001; OR = 3.24 but not with MGMT promoter methylation. In conclusion, PIK3CA mutation is significantly associated with other key molecular events in colorectal cancer, and MGMT loss likely contributes to the development of PIK3CA G>A mutation. In addition, Pyrosequencing is useful in detecting PIK3CA mutation in archival paraffin tumor tissue. PIK3CA mutational data further emphasize heterogeneity of colorectal cancer at the molecular level.

  17. Frequent alteration of MLL3 frameshift mutations in microsatellite deficient colorectal cancer.

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    Yoshiyuki Watanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MLL3 is a histone 3-lysine 4 methyltransferase with tumor-suppressor properties that belongs to a family of chromatin regulator genes potentially altered in neoplasia. Mutations in MLL3 were found in a whole genome analysis of colorectal cancer but have not been confirmed by a separate study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed mutations of coding region and promoter methylation in MLL3 using 126 cases of colorectal cancer. We found two isoforms of MLL3 and DNA sequencing revealed frameshift and other mutations affecting both isoforms of MLL3 in colorectal cancer cells and 19 of 134 (14% primary colorectal samples analyzed. Moreover, frameshift mutations were more common in cases with microsatellite instability (31% both in CRC cell lines and primary tumors. The largest isoform of MLL3 is transcribed from a CpG island-associated promoter that has highly homology with a pseudo-gene on chromosome 22 (psiTPTE22. Using an assay which measured both loci simultaneously we found prominent age related methylation in normal colon (from 21% in individuals less than 25 years old to 56% in individuals older than 70, R = 0.88, p<0.001 and frequent hypermethylation (83% in both CRC cell lines and primary tumors. We next studied the two loci separately and found that age and cancer related methylation was solely a property of the pseudogene CpG island and that the MLL3 loci was unmethylated. CONCLUSIONS: We found that frameshift mutations of MLL3 in both CRC cells and primary tumor that were more common in cases with microsatellite instability. Moreover, we have shown CpG island-associated promoter of MLL3 gene has no DNA methylation in CRC cells but also primary tumor and normal colon, and this region has a highly homologous of pseudo gene (psiTPTE22 that was age relate DNA methylation.

  18. Modulation of the intestinal microbiota alters colitis-associated colorectal cancer susceptibility.

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    Joshua M Uronis

    Full Text Available It is well established that the intestinal microbiota plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC collectively referred to as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Epidemiological studies have provided strong evidence that IBD patients bear increased risk for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the impact of the microbiota on the development of colitis-associated cancer (CAC remains largely unknown. In this study, we established a new model of CAC using azoxymethane (AOM-exposed, conventionalized-Il10(-/- mice and have explored the contribution of the host intestinal microbiota and MyD88 signaling to the development of CAC. We show that 8/13 (62% of AOM-Il10(-/- mice developed colon tumors compared to only 3/15 (20% of AOM- wild-type (WT mice. Conventionalized AOM-Il10(-/- mice developed spontaneous colitis and colorectal carcinomas while AOM-WT mice were colitis-free and developed only rare adenomas. Importantly, tumor multiplicity directly correlated with the presence of colitis. Il10(-/- mice mono-associated with the mildly colitogenic bacterium Bacteroides vulgatus displayed significantly reduced colitis and colorectal tumor multiplicity compared to Il10(-/- mice. Germ-free AOM-treated Il10(-/- mice showed normal colon histology and were devoid of tumors. Il10(-/-; Myd88(-/- mice treated with AOM displayed reduced expression of Il12p40 and Tnfalpha mRNA and showed no signs of tumor development. We present the first direct demonstration that manipulation of the intestinal microbiota alters the development of CAC. The TLR/MyD88 pathway is essential for microbiota-induced development of CAC. Unlike findings obtained using the AOM/DSS model, we demonstrate that the severity of chronic colitis directly correlates to colorectal tumor development and that bacterial-induced inflammation drives progression from adenoma to invasive carcinoma.

  19. Associations between the functional polymorphisms in the ABCB1 transporter gene and colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study in Turkish population.

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    Özhan, Gül; Kara, Mehtap; Sari, Fatih M; Yanar, Hakan T; Ercan, Gulcin; Alpertunga, Buket

    2013-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the most common cancer types in the world and its etiology involves the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. ABCB1 is highly expressed in the apical surface of colonic epithelial cells and acts as an efflux pump by transporting toxic endogenous substances, drugs and xenobiotics out of cells. ABCB1 polymorphisms may either change its protein expression or alter its function. Several studies have reported a possible association between ABCB1 variants and colorectal cancer, but no consistent conclusion has been arrived at. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between colorectal cancer and the functional common variants of ABCB1 (1236C > T; 2677G > T/A; 3435C > T). The distributions of the variants were determined in 103 patients with colorectal cancer and 150 healthy volunteers using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. ABCB1 1236C > T was statistically significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR, odd ratio = 1.91; 95% CI, confidence interval = 1.09-3.35; p = 0.034). In haplotype-based analysis, the proportion of individuals with the ABCB1 haplotype C1236-G2677-T3435 was significantly more common in patients than in controls (OR = 11.96; 95% CI = 2.59-55.32; p = 0.0004). We believe that the findings may be beneficial to the development of efficacious preventive strategies and therapies for colorectal cancer.

  20. Altered expression of MUC2 and MUC5AC in progression of colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the expression profiles of MUC2 and MUC5AC in tumorigenesis of colorectal carcinoma and in its different pathologic types.METHODS:Formalin-fixed,paraffin-embedded human colorectal tissue specimens were immunostained with antibodies against MUC2 and MUC5AC.Six samples of normal mucosa(NM),12 samples of hyperplastic polyp(HP),15 samples of tubular adenoma with low-grade dysplasia(LGD),14 samples of tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia(HGD),26 samples of conventional colorectal adenocarcinoma...

  1. NDRG2 gene copy number is not altered in colorectal carcinoma

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    Lorentzen, Anders Blomkild; Mitchelmore, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    levels using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR); interaction of the MYC gene-regulatory protein with the NDRG2 promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation; and NDRG2 promoter methylation using bisulfite sequencing. Furthermore, we performed qPCR to analyse the copy......AIM To investigate if the down-regulation of N-myc Downstream Regulated Gene 2 (NDRG2) expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is due to loss of the NDRG2 allele(s). METHODS The following were investigated in the human colorectal cancer cell lines DLD-1, LoVo and SW-480: NDRG2 mRNA expression...... numbers of NDRG2 and MYC genes in the above three cell lines, 8 normal colorectal tissue samples and 40 CRC tissue samples. RESULTS As expected, NDRG2 mRNA levels were low in the three colorectal cancer cell lines, compared to normal colon. Endogenous MYC protein interacted with the NDRG2 core promoter...

  2. Laminin gene LAMB4 is somatically mutated and expressionally altered in gastric and colorectal cancers.

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    Choi, Mi Ryoung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as in maintenance of normal epithelial cell structures. However, mutation status of laminin chain-encoding genes remains unknown in cancers. Aim of this study was to explore whether laminin chain genes are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that laminin chain genes LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4 had mononucleotide repeats in the coding sequences that might be mutation targets in the cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the genes in 88 GC and 139 CRC [high MSI (MSI-H) or stable MSI/low MSI (MSS/MSI-L)] by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. In the present study, we found LAMB4 (11.8% of GC and 7.6% of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA3 (2.9% of GC and 2.5 of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA1 (5.9% of GC with MSI-H) and LAMB1 frameshift mutations (1.3% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in MSS/MSI-L (0/114). We also analyzed LAMB4 expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of LAMB4 expression was identified in 17-32% of the GC and CRC. Of note, the loss expression was more common in the cancers with LAMB4 mutation or those with MSI-H. Our data show that frameshift mutations of LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4, and loss of LAMB4 may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H.

  3. MUC5AC/β-catenin expression and KRAS gene alteration in laterally spreading colorectal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kosaburo Nakae; Hiroyuki Mitomi; Tsuyoshi Saito; Michiko Takahashi; Takashi Morimoto; Yasuhiro Hidaka; Naoto Sakamoto

    2012-01-01

    To clarify differences in mucin phenotype,proliferative activity and oncogenetic alteration among subtypes of colorectal laterally spreading tumor (LST).METHODS:LSTs,defined as superficial elevated lesions greater than 10 mm in diameter with a low vertical axis,were macroscopically classified into two subtypes:(1) a granular type (Gr-LST) composed of superficially spreading aggregates of nodules forming a flat-based lesion with a granulonodular and uneven surface; and (2) a non-granular type (NGr-LST) with a flat smooth surface and an absence of granulonodular formation.A total of 69 LSTs,comprising 36 Gr-LSTs and 33 NGr-LSTs,were immunohistochemically stained with MUC2,MUC5AC,MUC6,CD10 (markers of gastrointestinal cell lineage),p53,β-catenin and Ki-67 antibodies,and examined for alteration in exon 1 of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and exon 15 of v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing.RESULTS:Histologically,15 Gr-LST samples were adenomas with low-grade dysplasia (LGD),12 were highgrade dysplasia (HGD) and 9 were adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa (INV),while 12 NGr-LSTs demonstrated LGD,14 HGD and 7 INV.In the proximal colon,MUC5AC expression was significantly higher in the Gr-type than the NGr-type.MUC6 was expressed only in NGr-LST.MUC2 or CD10 did not differ,P53 expression demonstrated a significant stepwise increment in progression through LGD-HGD-INV with both types of LST.Nuclear β-catenin expression was significantly higher in the NGr-type.Ki-67 expression was significantly higher in the Gr-type in the lower one third zone of the tumor.In proximal,but not distal colon tumors,the incidence of KRAS provided mutation was significantly higher in the Gr-type harboring a specific mutational pattern (G12V).BRAF mutations (V600E) were detected only in two Gr-LSTs.CONCLUSION:The two subtypes of LST,especially in the proximal colon,have differing

  4. Transportation: a vehicle or roadblock to cancer care for VA patients with colorectal cancer?

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    Zullig, Leah L; Jackson, George L; Provenzale, Dawn; Griffin, Joan M; Phelan, Sean; van Ryn, Michelle

    2012-03-01

    Patients must have transportation to the treatment site before they can access appropriate cancer care. This article describes factors associated with patients experiencing transportation-related barriers to accessing cancer care. The Cancer Care Assessment & Responsive Evaluation Studies (C-CARES) questionnaire was mailed to Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) during the fall of 2009. Eligible patients were diagnosed at any VA facility in 2008, they were men, and alive at the time of the mailing. A total of 1409 surveys were returned (approximately 67% response rate). To assess transportation barriers, patients were asked how often it was difficult to get transportation to or from treatment. Symptoms were assessed using validated Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) scales for fatigue, pain, and depression. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine determinants of transportation barriers. A minority of respondents (19%) reported transportation barriers. Patients experiencing pain (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.06) had greater odds of transportation barriers than patients without this symptom. Patients who reported no primary social support (OR, 6.13; 95% CI, 3.10-12.14) or nonspousal support (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.40-2.87) were more likely to experience transportation barriers than patients whose spouses provided social support. Patients with uncontrolled pain or less social support have greater odds of transportation barriers. The directional association between social support, symptoms, and transportation cannot be determined in this data. Inquiring about accessible transportation should become a routine part of cancer care, particularly for patients with known risk factors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. FX enzyme and GDP-L-Fuc transporter expression in colorectal cancer.

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    Villar-Portela, Susana; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Cuevas, Elisa; Gil-Martín, Emilio; Fernández-Briera, Almudena

    2013-08-01

    Fucosylation is regulated by fucosyltransferases, the guanosine diphosphate-L-fucose (GDP-L-Fuc) synthetic pathway, and the GDP-L-fucose transporter (GDP-L-Fuc Tr). We have reported previously an increased level of α(1,6)fucosyltransferase activity and expression in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study aimed to analyse the expression profiles of the FX enzyme and GDP-L-Fuc Tr in a cohort of operated CRC patients to elucidate their role in α(1,6)fucosylation in this neoplasm. We assessed the immunohistochemical expression of FX and GDP-L-Fuc Tr in a series of tumour samples and healthy tissues from CRC specimens. FX expression was observed in 58 of 91 (63.7%) tumours and 23 of 28 (82.1%) corresponding healthy samples. GDP-L-Fuc Tr expression was detected in 86 of 102 (84.3%) colorectal tumours, and 13 of 27 (48.1%) healthy tissue specimens. The expression of GDP-L-Fuc Tr was statistically higher in tumours than in healthy tissues (P GDP-L-Fuc Tr expression in tumour samples (P = 0.003). GDP-L-Fuc Tr overexpression in the tumour tissue of CRC patients suggests that GDP-L-Fuc transport to the Golgi apparatus may be an important factor associated with increased α(1,6)fucosylation in CRC. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Frequent alterations of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Anna Isinger; Jönsson, Mats; Lindblom, Annika;

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is central in colorectal tumors. Data on its role in hereditary cancers are, however, scarce and we therefore characterized mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS, and expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT...... and PTEN in 58 HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers. Derangements of at least one of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR components analyzed were found in 51/58 (88%) tumors. Mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS were identified in 14 and 31% of the tumors respectively. Overexpression of PIK3CA and phosphorylated AKT occurred in 59...... and 75% and were strongly associated (P = 0.005). Reduced/lost PTEN expression was found in 63% of the tumors. Though HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers show simple genetic profiles with few chromosomal alterations, we demonstrate frequent and repeated targeting of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which...

  7. Altered Transendothelial Transport of Hormones as a Contributor to Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanyoung Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vascular endothelium is a dynamic structure responsible for the separation and regulated movement of biological material between circulation and interstitial fluid. Hormones and nutrients can move across the endothelium either via a transcellular or paracellular route. Transcellular endothelial transport is well understood and broadly acknowledged to play an important role in the normal and abnormal physiology of endothelial function. However, less is known about the role of the paracellular route. Although the concept of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes is now widely accepted, we suggest that alterations in paracellular transport should be studied in greater detail and incorporated into this model. In this review we provide an overview of endothelial paracellular permeability and discuss its potential importance in contributing to the development of diabetes and associated complications. Accordingly, we also contend that if better understood, altered endothelial paracellular permeability could be considered as a potential therapeutic target for diabetes.

  8. DNA copy-number alterations underlie gene expression differences between microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorissen, Robert N; Lipton, Lara; Gibbs, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: About 15% of colorectal cancers harbor microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI-associated gene expression changes have been identified in colorectal cancers, but little overlap exists between signatures hindering an assessment of overall consistency. Little is known about the causes...... and downstream effects of differential gene expression. Experimental Design: DNA microarray data on 89 MSI and 140 microsatellite-stable (MSS) colorectal cancers from this study and 58 MSI and 77 MSS cases from three published reports were randomly divided into test and training sets. MSI-associated gene...... expression changes were assessed for cross-study consistency using training samples and validated as MSI classifier using test samples. Differences in biological pathways were identified by functional category analysis. Causation of differential gene expression was investigated by comparison to DNA copy...

  9. Topoisomerase I copy number alterations as biomarker for irinotecan efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup

    2017-01-01

    Background No biomarker exists to guide the optimal choice of chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. We examined the copy numbers (CN) of topoisomerase I (TOP1) as well as the ratios of TOP1/CEN-20 and TOP1/CEN-2 as biomarkers for irinotecan efficacy in patients with metasta......Background No biomarker exists to guide the optimal choice of chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. We examined the copy numbers (CN) of topoisomerase I (TOP1) as well as the ratios of TOP1/CEN-20 and TOP1/CEN-2 as biomarkers for irinotecan efficacy in patients...

  10. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-01-01

    Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:21463604

  11. Multi-determinants analysis of molecular alterations for predicting clinical benefit to EGFR-targeted monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sartore-Bianchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KRAS mutations occur in 35-45% of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC and preclude responsiveness to EGFR-targeted therapy with cetuximab or panitumumab. However, less than 20% patients displaying wild-type KRAS tumors achieve objective response. Alterations in other effectors downstream of the EGFR, such as BRAF, and deregulation of the PIK3CA/PTEN pathway have independently been found to give rise to resistance. We present a comprehensive analysis of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutations, and PTEN expression in mCRC patients treated with cetuximab or panitumumab, with the aim of clarifying the relative contribution of these molecular alterations to resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrospectively analyzed objective tumor response, progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS together with the mutational status of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and expression of PTEN in 132 tumors from cetuximab or panitumumab treated mCRC patients. Among the 106 non-responsive patients, 74 (70% had tumors with at least one molecular alteration in the four markers. The probability of response was 51% (22/43 among patients with no alterations, 4% (2/47 among patients with 1 alteration, and 0% (0/24 for patients with > or =2 alterations (p or =2 molecular alteration(s (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: When expression of PTEN and mutations of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA are concomitantly ascertained, up to 70% of mCRC patients unlikely to respond to anti-EGFR therapies can be identified. We propose to define as 'quadruple negative', the CRCs lacking alterations in KRAS, BRAF, PTEN and PIK3CA. Comprehensive molecular dissection of the EGFR signaling pathways should be considered to select mCRC patients for cetuximab- or panitumumab-based therapies.

  12. The glutamate transport inhibitor DL-Threo-β-Benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) differentially affects SN38- and oxaliplatin-induced death of drug-resistant colorectal cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Elena Pedraz; Christensen, Sandra; Jensen, Anders A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death globally and new biomarkers and treatments are severely needed. METHODS: Here, we employed HCT116 and LoVo human CRC cells made resistant to either SN38 or oxaliplatin, to investigate whether altered expression of the high...... cell resistance per se correlated with increased cellular GSH. DL-TBOA did not significantly alter cellular levels of p21, cleaved PARP-1, or phospho-Retinoblastoma protein, yet altered SLC1A1 subcellular localization, and reduced chemotherapy-induced p53 induction. CONCLUSIONS: SLC1A1 expression...... and glutamate transporter activity are altered in SN38-resistant CRC cells. Importantly, the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-TBOA reduces chemotherapy-induced p53 induction and augments CRC cell death induced by SN38, while attenuating that induced by oxaliplatin. These findings may point...

  13. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Guilak, Farshid, E-mail: guilak@duke.edu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport increases under hyper-osmotic stress. {yields} The mechanism is a change in nuclear geometry, not a change in permeability of the nuclear envelope. {yields} Intracytoplasmic but not intranuclear diffusion is sensitive to osmotic stress. {yields} Pores in the chromatin of the nucleus enlarge under hyper-osmotic stress. -- Abstract: Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  14. Altered reward circuitry in the norepinephrine transporter knockout mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Gallagher

    Full Text Available Synaptic levels of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine are modulated by their respective plasma membrane transporters, albeit with a few exceptions. Monoamine transporters remove monoamines from the synaptic cleft and thus influence the degree and duration of signaling. Abnormal concentrations of these neuronal transmitters are implicated in a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including addiction, depression, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. This work concentrates on the norepinephrine transporter (NET, using a battery of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging techniques and histological correlates to probe the effects of genetic deletion of the norepinephrine transporter on brain metabolism, anatomy and functional connectivity. MRS recorded in the striatum of NET knockout mice indicated a lower concentration of NAA that correlates with histological observations of subtle dysmorphisms in the striatum and internal capsule. As with DAT and SERT knockout mice, we detected minimal structural alterations in NET knockout mice by tensor-based morphometric analysis. In contrast, longitudinal imaging after stereotaxic prefrontal cortical injection of manganese, an established neuronal circuitry tracer, revealed that the reward circuit in the NET knockout mouse is biased toward anterior portions of the brain. This is similar to previous results observed for the dopamine transporter (DAT knockout mouse, but dissimilar from work with serotonin transporter (SERT knockout mice where Mn(2+ tracings extended to more posterior structures than in wildtype animals. These observations correlate with behavioral studies indicating that SERT knockout mice display anxiety-like phenotypes, while NET knockouts and to a lesser extent DAT knockout mice display antidepressant-like phenotypic features. Thus, the mainly anterior activity detected with manganese-enhanced MRI in the DAT and NET knockout mice is likely

  15. Investigating the role of nucleoside transporters in the resistance of colorectal cancer to 5-fluorouracil therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Lee Cheng; Mal, Mainak; Koh, Poh Koon; Cheah, Peh Yean; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Ho, Han Kiat

    2013-03-01

    Resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5FU) poses a constant challenge to the management of colorectal cancer (CRC). Consistent efforts were called for to identify molecular markers that can effectively predict patients' response. This study investigated the role of nucleoside transporters, particularly human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1), in predicting clinical treatment outcome with 5FU-based therapy. Expression of a panel of nucleoside transporters in biopsied tumors from 7 CRC patients was measured by real-time PCR prior to 5FU-based chemotherapy. To provide mechanistic support for the role of hENT1 in 5FU resistance, cell viability of Caco-2 cells was measured, following incubation with varying concentrations of 5FU and a hENT1 inhibitor. Biopsied tumors were further subjected to global metabonomic profiling using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. High hENT1 levels in tumor tissue correlated with poor clinical response to 5FU. Corroborating with the clinical findings, chemical inhibition of hENT1 in Caco-2 cells resulted in an augmentation of 5FU efficacy. Metabonomic profiling revealed that the pretreatment metabotype associated with non-responders to 5FU therapy was distinct from metabotype of responders (partial least-squares discriminant analysis Q(2) (cumulative) = 0.898, R(2)X = 0.513, R(2)Y = 0.996). This is the first clinical report on the relationships of intratumoral expression of nucleoside transporters and tumor metabotype with response to 5FU among CRC patients. Coupled to the in vitro findings, our preliminary data suggested hENT1 to be a potential codeterminant of clinical response to 5FU.

  16. Decreased dietary fiber intake and structural alteration of gut microbiota in patients with advanced colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Min; Yu, Ya-Nan; Wang, Ji-Lin; Lin, Yan-Wei; Kong, Xuan; Yang, Chang-Qing; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhan-Ju; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Liu, Fei; Wu, Jian-Xin; Zhong, Liang; Fang, Dian-Chun; Zou, Weiping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that diet is one of the most important environmental factors involved in the progression from advanced colorectal adenoma (A-CRA) to colorectal cancer. We evaluated the possible effects of dietary fiber on the fecal microbiota of patients with A-CRA. Patients with a diagnosis of A-CRA by pathological examination were enrolled in the A-CRA group. Patients with no obvious abnormalities or histopathological changes were enrolled in the healthy control (HC) group. Dietary fiber intake was assessed in all patients. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in feces were detected by gas chromatography. The fecal microbiota community was analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing based on 16S ribosomal RNA. Lower dietary fiber patterns and consistently lower SCFA production were observed in the A-CRA group (n = 344). Principal component analysis showed distinct differences in the fecal microbiota communities of the 2 groups. Clostridium, Roseburia, and Eubacterium spp. were significantly less prevalent in the A-CRA group (n = 47) than in the HC group (n = 47), whereas Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp. were more prevalent in the A-CRA group (n = 47) (all P fiber intake than in those in both the low-fiber HC subgroup and the high-fiber A-CRA subgroup (all P fiber dietary pattern and subsequent consistent production of SCFAs and healthy gut microbiota are associated with a reduced risk of A-CRA. This trial was registered at www.chictr.org as ChiCTR-TRC-00000123.

  17. Commercial software upgrades may significantly alter Perfusion CT parameter values in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Vicky [Mount Vernon Hospital, Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Shastry, Manu; Endozo, Raymondo; Groves, Ashley M. [University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Engledow, Alec; Peck, Jacqui [University College Hospital, Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Reston, Jonathan; Wellsted, David M. [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Lifespan and Chronic Illness Research (CLiCIR), Hatfield (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel [University College Hospital, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College Hospital, Specialist Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    To determine how commercial software platform upgrades impact on derived parameters for colorectal cancer. Following ethical approval, 30 patients with suspected colorectal cancer underwent Perfusion CT using integrated 64 detector PET/CT before surgery. Analysis was performed using software based on modified distributed parameter analysis (Perfusion software version 4; Perfusion 4.0), then repeated using the previous version (Perfusion software version 3; Perfusion 3.0). Tumour blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface area product (PS) were determined for identical regions-of-interest. Slice-by-slice and 'whole tumour' variance was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis. Mean BF, BV and PS was 20.4%, 59.5%, and 106% higher, and MTT 14.3% shorter for Perfusion 4.0 than Perfusion 3.0. The mean difference (95% limits of agreement) were +13.5 (-44.9 to 72.0), +2.61 (-0.06 to 5.28), -1.23 (-6.83 to 4.36), and +14.2 (-4.43 to 32.8) for BF, BV, MTT and PS respectively. Within subject coefficient of variation was 36.6%, 38.0%, 27.4% and 60.6% for BF, BV, MTT and PS respectively indicating moderate to poor agreement. Software version upgrades of the same software platform may result in significantly different parameter values, requiring adjustments for cross-version comparison. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of epigenetic alterations in early colorectal lesions containing BRAF mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Masanori; Harada, Taku; Maruyama, Reo; Ashida, Masami; Aoki, Hironori; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Wakita, Shigenori; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Eizuka, Makoto; Sugai, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the molecular and clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal serrated lesions, we assessed the DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes in a cohort of BRAF-mutant precancerous lesions from 94 individuals. We then compared those results with the lesions' clinicopathological features, especially colorectal subsites. The lesions included hyperplastic polyps (n = 16), traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) (n = 15), TSAs with sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs) (n = 6), SSAs (n = 49) and SSAs with dysplasia (n = 16). The prevalence of lesions exhibiting the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was lower in the sigmoid colon and rectum than in other bowel subsites, including the cecum, ascending, transverse and descending colon. In addition, several cancer-associated genes showed higher methylation levels within lesions in the proximal to sigmoid colon than in the sigmoid colon and rectum. These results indicate that the methylation status of lesions with BRAF mutation is strongly associated with their location, histological findings and neoplastic pathways. By contrast, no difference in aberrant DNA methylation was observed in normal-appearing background colonic mucosa along the bowel subsites, which may indicate the absence of an epigenetic field defect. PMID:27145369

  19. The glutamate transport inhibitor DL-Threo-β-Benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) differentially affects SN38- and oxaliplatin-induced death of drug-resistant colorectal cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Elena Pedraz; Christensen, Sandra; Jensen, Anders A.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death globally and new biomarkers and treatments are severely needed. METHODS: Here, we employed HCT116 and LoVo human CRC cells made resistant to either SN38 or oxaliplatin, to investigate whether altered expression of the high...... affinity glutamate transporters Solute Carrier (SLC)-1A1 and -1A3 (EAAT3, EAAT1) is associated with the resistant phenotypes. Analyses included real-time quantitative PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses, radioactive tracer flux measurements, and biochemical analyses of cell viability...... and glutamate transporter activity are altered in SN38-resistant CRC cells. Importantly, the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-TBOA reduces chemotherapy-induced p53 induction and augments CRC cell death induced by SN38, while attenuating that induced by oxaliplatin. These findings may point...

  20. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  1. Inhibition of fried meat-induced colorectal DNA damage and altered systemic genotoxicity in humans by crucifera, chlorophyllin, and yogurt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Shaughnessy

    Full Text Available Dietary exposures implicated as reducing or causing risk for colorectal cancer may reduce or cause DNA damage in colon tissue; however, no one has assessed this hypothesis directly in humans. Thus, we enrolled 16 healthy volunteers in a 4-week controlled feeding study where 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing meat cooked at either low (100°C or high temperature (250°C, each for 2 weeks in a crossover design. The other 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing the high-temperature meat diet alone or in combination with 3 putative mutagen inhibitors: cruciferous vegetables, yogurt, and chlorophyllin tablets, also in a crossover design. Subjects were nonsmokers, at least 18 years old, and not currently taking prescription drugs or antibiotics. We used the Salmonella assay to analyze the meat, urine, and feces for mutagenicity, and the comet assay to analyze rectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes for DNA damage. Low-temperature meat had undetectable levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs and was not mutagenic, whereas high-temperature meat had high HCA levels and was highly mutagenic. The high-temperature meat diet increased the mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine and feces compared to the low-temperature meat diet. The mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine was increased nearly twofold by the inhibitor diet, indicating that the inhibitors enhanced conjugation. Inhibitors decreased significantly the mutagenicity of un-hydrolyzed and hydrolyzed feces. The diets did not alter the levels of DNA damage in non-target white blood cells, but the inhibitor diet decreased nearly twofold the DNA damage in target colorectal cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that dietary factors can reduce DNA damage in the target tissue of fried-meat associated carcinogenesis.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00340743.

  2. Prognostic significance of TRAIL death receptors in Middle Eastern colorectal carcinomas and their correlation to oncogenic KRAS alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Azhar R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the tumour necrosis factor cytokine family that induces apoptosis upon binding to its death domain containing receptors, TRAIL receptor 1 (DR4 and TRAIL receptor 2 (DR5. Expression of TRAIL receptors is higher in colorectal carcinoma (CRC as compared to normal colorectal mucosa and targeted therapy with TRAIL leads to preferential killing of tumor cells sparing normal cells. Methods We investigated the expression of TRAIL and its receptors in a tissue microarray cohort of 448 Middle Eastern CRC. We also studied the correlation between TRAIL receptors and various clinico-pathological features including key molecular alterations and overall survival. Results CRC subset with TRAIL-R1 expression was associated with a less aggressive phenotype characterized by early stage (p = 0.0251 and a histology subtype of adenocarcinomas (p = 0.0355. Similarly CRC subset with TRAIL-R2 expression was associated with a well-differentiated tumors (p KIP1 and KRAS4A isoforms was significantly higher in CRC subset with TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 expression; TRAIL-R1 expression was also associated with cleaved caspase-3(p = 0.0011. Interestingly, TRAIL-R2 expression was associated with a microsatellite stable (MS--S/L phenotype (p = 0.0003 and with absence of KRAS mutations (p = 0.0481. Conclusion TRAIL-R1 expression was an independent prognostic marker for better survival in all CRC samples and even in the CRC group that received adjuvant therapy. The biological effects of TRAIL in CRC models, its enhancement of chemosensitivity towards standard chemotherapeutic agents and the effect of endogenous TRAIL receptor levels on survival make TRAIL an extremely attractive therapeutic target.

  3. Alterations in K-ras, APC and p53-multiple genetic pathway in colorectal cancer among Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Pooja; Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Wig, Jai Dev; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing rapidly in Asian countries during the past few decades, but no comprehensive analysis has been done to find out the exact cause of this disease. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) and p53 in tumor, adjoining and distant normal mucosa and to correlate these alterations with patients clinicopathological parameters as well as with the survival. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction digestion was used to detect mutations in K-ras and PCR-SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) followed by DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in APC and p53 genes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 proteins. The frequencies of mutations of K-ras, APC and p53 in 30 tumor tissues samples were 26.7 %, 46.7 % and 20 %, respectively. Only 3.3 % of tumors contained mutations in all the three genes. The most common combination of mutation was APC and p53 whereas mutation in both p53 and K-ras were extremely rare. There was no association between the mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 (p>0.05). In Indians, the frequency of alterations of K-ras and APC is similar as in Westerns, whereas the frequency of p53 mutation is slightly lower. The lack of multiple mutations in tumor specimens suggests that these genetic alterations might have independent influences on CRC development and there could be multiple alternative genetic pathways to CRC in our present study cohort.

  4. Efficiency of olaparib in colorectal cancer patients with an alteration of the homologous repair protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, Francois; Richard, Corentin; Chevrier, Sandy; Végran, Frédérique; Boidot, Romain

    2016-12-28

    Precision medicine is defined by the administration of drugs based on the tumor's particular genetic characteristics. It is developing quickly in the field of cancer therapy. For example, KRAS, NRAS and BRAF genetic testing demonstrates its efficiency for precision medicine in colorectal cancer (CRC). Besides for these well-known mutations, the purpose of performing larger genetic testing in this pathology is unknown. Recent reports have shown that using the poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib in patients with homologous repair enzyme deficiency gave positive clinical results in breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. We have reported here the cases of 2 patients with multi-treated metastatic CRC who underwent somatic and constitutional exome analyses. The analyses revealed a loss of function mutation in a homologous repair enzyme resulting in the loss of heterozygosity for both patients (Check2 for the first patient and RAD51C for the second one). Both patients were treated with off-label usage of olaparib. While the first patient showed clinical benefit, reduction of carcinoembryonic antigen tumor marker and radiologic response, the second patient quickly presented a progression of the tumor. Additional genetic analyses revealed a frameshift truncating mutation of the TP53BP1 gene in the patient who progressed. Interestingly, deficiency in TP53BP1 was previously described to confer resistance to olaparib in mice breast cancer models. Our findings suggest that exome analysis may be a helpful tool to highlight targetable mutations in CRC and that olaparib may be efficient in patients with a homologous repair deficiency.

  5. Altered serotonin transporter availability in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Integrated Research and Treatment Center (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Moeller, Franziska; Thomae, Eva; Then Bergh, Florian [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Petroff, David [University of Leipzig, Coordinating Centre for Clinical Studies, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany); Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Patt, Marianne; Seese, Anita; Meyer, Philipp M. [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Regenthal, Ralf [University of Leipzig, Clinical Pharmacology, Rudolf-Boehm-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Modulation of the immune system by the CNS may involve serotonergic regulation via the brain serotonin transporters (SERT). This regulation may be disturbed in patients with CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Central serotonergic mechanisms have not been investigated in MS by in vivo imaging. The objective of the study was to assess the availability of SERT in antidepressant-naive patients with MS by means of PET. Included in this study were 23 patients with MS and 22 matched healthy volunteers who were investigated with PET and the SERT-selective marker [{sup 11}C]DASB, and distribution volume ratios were determined. Clinical assessment of the patients included the expanded disability status scale, the MS fatigue scale Wuerzburger Erschoepfungsinventar bei MS (WEIMuS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The PET data were analysed with both volume-of-interest and voxel-based analyses to determine regional SERT availability. Patients had lower SERT availability in the cingulate cortex, the thalamus and the insula, and increased availability in the orbitofrontal cortex. Patients with relapsing/remitting MS tended to have lower SERT in the hippocampus, whereas patients with primary progressive disease showed increased SERT availability in prefrontal regions. There was a positive correlation between SERT availability in the insula and both depression and fatigue scores (r = 0.56 vs. BDI, p = 0.02; r = 0.49 vs. WEIMuS, p = 0.05). Serotonergic neurotransmission in MS patients is altered in limbic and paralimbic regions as well as in the frontal cortex that this appears to contribute to psychiatric symptoms of MS. (orig.)

  6. The effect of body weight on altered expression of nuclear receptors and cyclooxygenase-2 in human colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rullier Eric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies on risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC have mainly focused on diet, and being overweight is now recognized to contribute significantly to CRC risk. Overweight and obesity are defined as an excess of adipose tissue mass and are associated with disorders in lipid metabolism. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and retinoid-activated receptors (RARs and RXRs are important modulators of lipid metabolism and cellular homeostasis. Alterations in expression and activity of these ligand-activated transcription factors might be involved in obesity-associated diseases, which include CRC. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 also plays a critical role in lipid metabolism and alterations in COX-2 expression have already been associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes in epithelial tumors. The objective of this study is to examine the hypothesis questioning the relationship between alterations in the expression of nuclear receptors and COX-2 and the weight status among male subjects with CRC. Method The mRNA expression of the different nuclear receptor subtypes and of COX-2 was measured in 20 resected samples of CRC and paired non-tumor tissues. The association between expression patterns and weight status defined as a body mass index (BMI was statistically analyzed. Results No changes were observed in PPARγ mRNA expression while the expression of PPARδ, retinoid-activated receptors and COX-2 were significantly increased in cancer tissues compared to normal colon mucosa (P ≤ 0.001. The weight status appeared to be an independent factor, although we detected an increased level of COX-2 expression in the normal mucosa from overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 compared to subjects with healthy BMI (P = 0.002. Conclusion Our findings show that alterations in the pattern of nuclear receptor expression observed in CRC do not appear to be correlated with patient weight status. However, the analysis of COX-2

  7. Altered regulation of DNA ligase IV activity by aberrant promoter DNA methylation and gene amplification in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhmann, Christine; Li, Carmen; Kloor, Matthias; Salou, Mariam; Weigel, Christoph; Schmidt, Christopher R; Ng, Linda W C; Tsui, Wendy W Y; Leung, Suet Y; Yuen, Siu T; Becker, Natalia; Weichenhan, Dieter; Plass, Christoph; Schmezer, Peter; Chan, Tsun L; Popanda, Odilia

    2014-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents as a very heterogeneous disease which cannot sufficiently be characterized with the currently known genetic and epigenetic markers. To identify new markers for CRC we scrutinized the methylation status of 231 DNA repair-related genes by methyl-CpG immunoprecipitation followed by global methylation profiling on a CpG island microarray, as altered expression of these genes could drive genomic and chromosomal instability observed in these tumors. We show for the first time hypermethylation of MMP9, DNMT3A and LIG4 in CRC which was confirmed in two CRC patient groups with different ethnicity. DNA ligase IV (LIG4) showed strong differential promoter methylation (up to 60%) which coincided with downregulation of mRNA in 51% of cases. This functional association of LIG4 methylation and gene expression was supported by LIG4 re-expression in 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colon cancer cell lines, and reduced ligase IV amounts and end-joining activity in extracts of tumors with hypermethylation. Methylation of LIG4 was not associated with other genetic and epigenetic markers of CRC in our study. As LIG4 is located on chromosome 13 which is frequently amplified in CRC, two loci were tested for gene amplification in a subset of 47 cases. Comparison of amplification, methylation and expression data revealed that, in 30% of samples, the LIG4 gene was amplified and methylated, but expression was not changed. In conclusion, hypermethylation of the LIG4 promoter is a new mechanism to control ligase IV expression. It may represent a new epigenetic marker for CRC independent of known markers.

  8. Colorectal transport during defecation in subjects with supraconal spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Mylius; Krogh, Klaus; Clemmensen, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    Study design: Clinical study. Objectives: To explore how supraconal spinal cord injury (SCI) affects colorectal emptying at defecation. Further, to relate findings to subject symptomatology expressed by bowel function scores and gastrointestinal transit time (GITT). Setting: Aarhus University Hos....... This is independent of changes in GITT. Spinal Cord advance online publication, 18 June 2013; doi:10.1038/sc.2013.58...

  9. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  10. Long-term modeling of alteration-transport coupling: Application to a fractured Roman glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Gin, Stéphane; Frugier, Pierre; Libourel, Guy

    2010-04-01

    To improve confidence in glass alteration models, as used in nuclear and natural applications, their long-term predictive capacity has to be validated. For this purpose, we develop a new model that couples geochemical reactions with transport and use a fractured archaeological glass block that has been altered for 1800 years under well-constrained conditions in order to test the capacity of the model. The chemical model considers three steps in the alteration process: (1) formation of a hydrated glass by interdiffusion, whose kinetics are controlled by a pH and temperature dependent diffusion coefficient; (2) the dissolution of the hydrated glass, whose kinetics are based on an affinity law; (3) the precipitation of secondary phases if thermodynamic saturation is reached. All kinetic parameters were determined from experiments. The model was initially tested on alteration experiments in different solutions (pure water, Tris, seawater). It was then coupled with diffusive transport in solution to simulate alteration in cracks within the glass. Results of the simulations run over 1800 years are in good agreement with archaeological glass block observations concerning the nature of alteration products (hydrated glass, smectites, and carbonates) and crack alteration thicknesses. External cracks in direct contact with renewed seawater were altered at the forward dissolution rate and are filled with smectites (400-500 μm). Internal cracks are less altered (by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude) because of the strong coupling between alteration chemistry and transport. The initial crack aperture, the distance to the surface, and sealing by secondary phases account for these low alteration thicknesses. The agreement between simulations and observations thus validates the predictive capacity of this coupled geochemical model and increases more generally the robustness and confidence in glass alteration models to predict long-term behavior of nuclear waste in geological disposal or

  11. Frequent alterations of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna Isinger; Jönsson, Mats;

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is central in colorectal tumors. Data on its role in hereditary cancers are, however, scarce and we therefore characterized mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS, and expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT...

  12. Mutations in the human naked cuticle homolog NKD1 found in colorectal cancer alter Wnt/Dvl/beta-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation of Wnt signal antagonists Apc or Axin activates beta-catenin signaling in many cancers including the majority of human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The phenotype of apc or axin mutation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is strikingly similar to that caused by mutation in the segment-polarity gene, naked cuticle (nkd. Nkd inhibits Wnt signaling by binding to the Dishevelled (Dsh/Dvl family of scaffold proteins that link Wnt receptor activation to beta-catenin accumulation and TCF-dependent transcription, but human NKD genes have yet to be directly implicated in cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify for the first time mutations in NKD1--one of two human nkd homologs--in a subset of DNA mismatch repair-deficient colorectal tumors that are not known to harbor mutations in other Wnt-pathway genes. The mutant Nkd1 proteins are defective at inhibiting Wnt signaling; in addition, the mutant Nkd1 proteins stabilize beta-catenin and promote cell proliferation, in part due to a reduced ability of each mutant Nkd1 protein to bind and destabilize Dvl proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data raise the hypothesis that specific NKD1 mutations promote Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis in a subset of DNA mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal adenocarcinomas and possibly other Wnt-signal driven human cancers.

  13. Propionate alters ion transport by rabbit distal colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, P.J.; Weiser, M.M.; Duffey, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    The primary anions of the colon are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced by intestinal microorganisms from endogenous secretions and dietary fiber. The effects of the SCFA propionate on ion transport by the epithelium of rabbit distal colon were studied on tissues stripped of underlying musculature and mounted in Ussing chambers. When tissues were bathed with NaCl Ringer's solutions at 37/sup 0/C (5% CO/sub 2/-21mM HCO/sub 3/, pH 7.4) replacement of 33mM Cl/sup -/ in both tissue baths by propionate reduced short-circuit current (Isc) from 86 to 35 ..mu..A/cm/sup 2/ and increased transepithelial conductance (G/sub t/) from 3.6 to 5.6mS/cm/sup 2/. Unidirectional /sup 14/C-propionate flux measurements revealed that this ion was secreted at a rate of 0.5..mu..Eq/cm/sup 2/hr. Intracellular measurements with potential and pH sensitive microelectrodes showed that propionate reduced intracellular pH (PH/sub i/) from 6.84 to 6.68 (P < 0.02), depolarized the apical membrane potential (phi/sub a/) by 4mV (P < 0.02) and decreased the membrane fractional resistance (f/sub R/) from .78 to .71 (P < 0.001). Addition of 0.1mM amiloride to the mucosal bath reversed Isc to -18..mu..A/cm/sup 2/, decreased G/sub t/ to 5.3mS/cm/sup 2/, hyperpolarized phi/sub a/ by 5mV (P < 0.05) and increased f/sub R/ to 0.85 (P < 0.001). Amiloride had no effect on pH/sub i/. These results show that propionate can be secreted by rabbit distal colon and that exposure to this SCFA causes cell acidification and electrophysiological changes consistent with H/sup +/ secretion.

  14. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  15. Obesity and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, Carmen; Leitzmann, Michael

    There is strong evidence that modifiable lifestyle factors such as obesity play a key role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic data have consistently reported a positive association between obesity and colorectal cancer. The relative risk associated with general obesity (as assessed by BMI) is higher in men than in women and for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Abdominal obesity (as assessed by waist circumference (WC) or waist-to-hip ratio) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in both sexes, with stronger associations for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Plausible biological mechanisms include insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, chronic inflammation, altered levels of growth factors, adipocytokines and steroid hormones. In addition to its effect on colorectal cancer incidence, obesity may play a role in colorectal cancer recurrence, treatment outcomes and survival. Understanding the effects of childhood and adolescent obesity and weight change over the life course in relation to future risk of colorectal cancer is incomplete but essential for targeted preventive recommendations. This chapter summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between obesity and colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma, a common precursor lesion.

  16. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Almind Knudsen, Lina;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in colonic pathophysiology as they had recently been related to colorectal cancer (CRC) development. METHODS: Literature search was conducted on PubMed using combinations of the following terms: ABC transporters, ATP binding cassette....../Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes...... translocation from one side to the other of the cell membrane lipid bilayer by ABC transporters affecting inflammatory response and/or function of tight junctions, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Also, diet and microbes give rise to molecules which are potential substrates for the ABC transporters...

  17. 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose uptake on PET CT and glucose transporter 1 expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Hong; Sung-Chul Lim

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the correlation between the level of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRA)?. METHODS: Forty four patients with resected CRA and preoperative 18F-FDG positron emission tomography - computed tomography data were investigated in this study. Comparison of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the lesion was made with GLUT1 expression by immunohistochemistry and various clinicopathologic factors including tumor volume, invasion depth, gross finding, and lymph node metastasis. RESULTS: SUVmax was 14.45 ± 7.0 in negative GLUT1 expression cases, 15.51 ± 5.7 in weak GLUT1 expression cases, and 16.52 ± 6.8 in strong GLUT1 expression cases, and there was no correlation between between GLUT1 expression and SUVmax. SUVmax was significantly correlated with tumor volume (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant differences in SUVmax and GLUT1 expression among other clinicopathologic factors. CONCLUSION: GLUT1 expression does not correlates significantly with 18F-FDG uptake in CRA. 18F-FDG uptake was increased with tumor volume, which is statistically significant.

  18. Altered Hepatic Transport by Fetal Arsenite Exposure in Diet-Induced Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzel, Eric J; Li, Hui; Foy, Caroline E; Perrera, Alec B; Parker, Patricia; Renquist, Benjamin J; Cherrington, Nathan J; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can result in changes to drug metabolism and disposition potentiating adverse drug reactions. Furthermore, arsenite exposure during development compounds the severity of diet-induced fatty liver disease. This study examines the effects of arsenite potentiated diet-induced fatty liver disease on hepatic transport in male mice. Changes were detected for Mrp2/3/4 hepatic transporter gene expression as well as for Oatp1a4/2b1/1b2. Plasma concentrations of Mrp and Oatp substrates were increased in arsenic exposure groups compared with diet-only controls. In addition, murine embryonic hepatocytes and adult primary hepatocytes show significantly altered transporter expression after exposure to arsenite alone: a previously unreported phenomenon. These data indicate that developmental exposure to arsenite leads to changes in hepatic transport which could increase the risk for ADRs during fatty liver disease.

  19. The alteration of zinc transporter gene expression is associated with inflammatory markers in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hwayoung; Paik, Hee Young; Kim, Jihye; Chung, Jayong

    2014-04-01

    Obesity, a chronic inflammatory state, is associated with altered zinc metabolism. ZnT and Zip transporters are involved in the regulation of zinc metabolism. This study examined the relationships among obesity, zinc transporter gene expression, and inflammatory markers in young Korean women. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of leukocyte zinc transporters between obese (BMI = 28.3 ± 0.5 kg/m(2), n = 35) and nonobese (BMI = 20.7 ± 0.2 kg/m(2), n = 20) women aged 18-28 years were examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-6, were measured in serum by enzyme immunoassay. ZnT1 and Zip1 were the most abundantly expressed zinc transporters in leukocytes. The mRNA levels of many zinc transporters (ZnT4, ZnT5, ZnT9, Zip1, Zip4, and Zip6) were significantly lower in obese women, and expression of these genes was inversely correlated with BMI and body fat percentage. In addition, inflammatory markers (CRP and TNF-α) were significantly higher in obese women. The mRNA levels of ZnT4, Zip1, and Zip6 were inversely correlated with CRP (P zinc transporters such as ZnT4, ZnT5, Zip1, and Zip6 (P zinc transporters may be altered in obese individuals. Changes in zinc transporters may also be related to the inflammatory state associated with obesity.

  20. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Almind Knudsen, Lina;

    2015-01-01

    transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1....../Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes...... translocation from one side to the other of the cell membrane lipid bilayer by ABC transporters affecting inflammatory response and/or function of tight junctions, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Also, diet and microbes give rise to molecules which are potential substrates for the ABC transporters...

  1. Mutations that alter the transport function of the LamB protein in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Wandersman, C; Schwartz, M

    1982-01-01

    Some Escherichia coli K-12 lamB mutants, those producing reduced amounts of LamB protein (one-tenth the wild type amount), grow normally on dextrins but transport maltose when present at a concentration of 1 microM at about one-tenth the normal rate. lamB Dex- mutants were found as derivatives of these strains. These Dex- mutants are considerably impaired in the transport of maltose at low concentrations (below 10 microM), and they have a structurally altered LamB protein which is impaired in...

  2. Altered magnesium transport in slices of kidney cortex from chemically-induced diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, B.

    1981-10-01

    The uptake of magnesium-28 was measured in slices of kidney cortex from rats with alloxan-diabetes and from rats with streptozotocin-diabetes of increasing durations. In both forms of chemically-induced diabetes, magnesium-28 uptake by kidney cortex slices was significantly increased over uptake measured in kidney cortex slices from control rats. Immediate institution of daily insulin therapy to the diabetic rats prevented the diabetes-induced elevated uptake of magnesium without controlling blood glucose levels. Late institution of daily insulin therapy was ineffective in restoring the magnesium uptake to control values. These alterations in magnesium uptake occurred prior to any evidence of nephropathy (via the classic indices of proteinuria and increased BUN levels). The implications of these findings, together with our earlier demonstrations of altered calcium transport by kidney cortex slices from chemically-induced diabetic rats, are discussed in terms of disordered divalent cation transport being at least part of the basic pathogenesis underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Altered regulation of hepatic efflux transporters disrupts acetaminophen disposition in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, Mark J; Merrell, Matthew D; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Bataille, Amy M; Campion, Sarah N; Ferreira, Daniel W; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Manautou, Jose E; A-Kader, H Hesham; Erickson, Robert P; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, representing a spectrum of liver pathologies that include simple hepatic steatosis and the more advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The current study was conducted to determine whether pediatric NASH also results in altered disposition of acetaminophen (APAP) and its two primary metabolites, APAP-sulfate and APAP-glucuronide. Pediatric patients with hepatic steatosis (n = 9) or NASH (n = 3) and healthy patients (n = 12) were recruited in a small pilot study design. All patients received a single 1000-mg dose of APAP. Blood and urine samples were collected at 1, 2, and 4 hours postdose, and APAP and APAP metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, human liver tissues from patients diagnosed with various stages of NAFLD were acquired from the Liver Tissue Cell Distribution System to investigate the regulation of the membrane transporters, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and 3 (MRP2 and MRP3, respectively). Patients with the more severe disease (i.e., NASH) had increased serum and urinary levels of APAP-glucuronide along with decreased serum levels of APAP-sulfate. Moreover, an induction of hepatic MRP3 and altered canalicular localization of the biliary efflux transporter, MRP2, describes the likely mechanism for the observed increase in plasma retention of APAP-glucuronide, whereas altered regulation of sulfur activation genes may explain decreased sulfonation activity in NASH. APAP-glucuronide and APAP-sulfate disposition is altered in NASH and is likely due to hepatic membrane transporter dysregulation as well as altered intracellular sulfur activation.

  4. Adjuvant treatments do not alter the quality of life in elderly patients with colorectal cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Jooste, Valérie; Bonnetain, Franck; Cottet, Vanessa; Bizollon, Marie-Hélène; Bernard, Marie-Pierre; Faivre, Jean

    2008-08-15

    The current study was performed to longitudinally assess the impact of adjuvant treatments on the quality of life (QoL) of elderly colorectal cancer survivors. The Burgundy Digestive Cancer Registry was used to select all patients aged > or =75 years who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer between 2003 and 2005. A total of 209 patients were asked to complete questionnaires during the first year after diagnosis: at the time of inclusion in the study (Q0), at 3 months after the initial diagnosis (Q3), at 6 months after the initial diagnosis (Q6), and at 12 months after the initial diagnosis (Q12) using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30. A total of 125 patients (60%) responded. Mixed model analyses of variance for repeated measurement were used to compare QoL scores according to therapeutic schemes. Interactions between time of follow-up and treatment were tested. Patient sex, age, location of the tumor, and TNM stage of disease did not appear to differ significantly between respondents and nonrespondents. Global Health and Emotional Functioning improved for colon cancer survivors between Q0 and Q12, and were noted to improve between Q3 and Q12 for rectal cancer patients. According to French recommendations, patients who received chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer (P = .176) or radiotherapy for rectal cancer (P = .959) reported no significant changes in Global Health compared with those patients not receiving adjuvant therapies. Patients treated with chemotherapy reported better Physical Functioning than patients who did not received chemotherapy (P = .0113). To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first to examine trends over time with regard to the influence of adjuvant treatments for colon and rectal cancers on QoL in a general aged population. Providing evidence that adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer has no negative impact on the QoL of elderly patients is of great significance in encouraging

  5. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research? Colorectal Cancer About Colorectal Cancer What Is Colorectal Cancer? Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? How does colorectal cancer start? Most colorectal cancers begin as a growth ...

  6. Epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jia; Mingzhou Guo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic changes frequently occur in human colorectal cancer.Genomic global hypomethylation,gene promoter region hypermethylation,histone modifications,and alteration of miRNA patterns are major epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer.Loss of imprinting (LOI) is associated with colorectal neoplasia.Folate deficiency may cause colorectal carcinogenesis by inducing gene-specific hypermethylation and genomic global hypomethylation.HDAC inhibitors and demethylating agents have been approved by the FDA for myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia treatment.Non-coding RNA is regarded as another kind of epigenetic marker in colorectal cancer.This review is mainly focused on DNA methylation,histone modification,and microRNA changes in colorectal cancer.

  7. A comprehensive characterization of genome-wide copy number aberrations in colorectal cancer reveals novel oncogenes and patterns of alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xie

    Full Text Available To develop a comprehensive overview of copy number aberrations (CNAs in stage-II/III colorectal cancer (CRC, we characterized 302 tumors from the PETACC-3 clinical trial. Microsatellite-stable (MSS samples (n = 269 had 66 minimal common CNA regions, with frequent gains on 20 q (72.5%, 7 (41.8%, 8 q (33.1% and 13 q (51.0% and losses on 18 (58.6%, 4 q (26% and 21 q (21.6%. MSS tumors have significantly more CNAs than microsatellite-instable (MSI tumors: within the MSI tumors a novel deletion of the tumor suppressor WWOX at 16 q23.1 was identified (p<0.01. Focal aberrations identified by the GISTIC method confirmed amplifications of oncogenes including EGFR, ERBB2, CCND1, MET, and MYC, and deletions of tumor suppressors including TP53, APC, and SMAD4, and gene expression was highly concordant with copy number aberration for these genes. Novel amplicons included putative oncogenes such as WNK1 and HNF4A, which also showed high concordance between copy number and expression. Survival analysis associated a specific patient segment featured by chromosome 20 q gains to an improved overall survival, which might be due to higher expression of genes such as EEF1B2 and PTK6. The CNA clustering also grouped tumors characterized by a poor prognosis BRAF-mutant-like signature derived from mRNA data from this cohort. We further revealed non-random correlation between CNAs among unlinked loci, including positive correlation between 20 q gain and 8 q gain, and 20 q gain and chromosome 18 loss, consistent with co-selection of these CNAs. These results reinforce the non-random nature of somatic CNAs in stage-II/III CRC and highlight loci and genes that may play an important role in driving the development and outcome of this disease.

  8. Predictive role of multiple gene alterations in response to cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer: A single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulivi Paola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KRAS mutations negatively affect outcome after treatment with cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients. As only 20% of KRAS wild type (WT patients respond to cetuximab it is possible that other mutations, constitutively activating the EGFR pathway, are present in the non-responding KRAS WT patients. We retrospectively analyzed objective tumor response rate, (ORR progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS with respect to the mutational status of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN expression in mCRC patients treated with a cetuximab-based regimen. Methods 67 mCRC patients were enrolled onto the study. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded sections derived from primary or metastatic lesions. Exon 2 of KRAS and exon 15 of BRAF were analyzed by direct sequencing, PIK3CA was evaluated by pyrosequencing and PTEN expression by immunohistochemistry. Results BRAF and PIK3CA mutations were independently associated with worse PFS (p = 0.006 and p = 0.028, respectively and OS (p = 0.008 and p = 0.029, respectively. No differences in clinical outcome were found between patients who were positive or negative for PTEN expression. Conversely, patients negative for KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations were characterized by significantly better ORR, PFS and OS than patients with at least one of these mutations. Conclusions BRAF and PIK3CA mutations would seem to be independent predictors of anti-EGFR therapy effectiveness and could be taken into consideration during treatment decision making.

  9. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  10. Expression and localization of the immunophilin FKBP51 in colorectal carcinomas and primary metastases, and alterations following oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotoli, Deborah; Morales, Manuel; Del Carmen Maeso, María; Del Pino García, María; Morales, Araceli; Ávila, Julio; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The immunophilin FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP51) is a scaffold protein that serves a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple signaling pathways, integrating external and internal stimuli into distinct signal outputs. In a previous study, we identified several genes that are significantly up- or downregulated in the peripheral white cells (PWCs) of colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) patients undergoing oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. In our screening, FKBP51 gene expression was downregulated following chemotherapy. In order to determine whether this alteration in gene expression observed in PWCs may be detected at the protein level in tumors and metastases following the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy, an immunohistochemical analysis of FKBP51 in CRC and primary metastasis tissues was performed. The present study confirmed the downregulation of FKBP51 gene expression elicited by chemotherapy with folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in metastasized liver tissue that had been resected after the oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, compared with tissue section samples of CRC from patients (prior to antineoplastic treatment). Furthermore, the results indicated that, in CRC tissue sections, the expression of FKBP51 protein is associated with an immature phenotype of stromal fibroblasts and with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype, suggesting a role for this protein in the EMT process in CRC. Finally, the observation that only certain cells of the stroma express FKBP51 protein suggests a potential role for this immunophilin as a stroma cell subtype marker. PMID:27446431

  11. Altered effect of dopamine transporter 3'UTR VNTR genotype on prefrontal and striatal function in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Diana P; Mechelli, Andrea; Picchioni, Marco M; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Bramon, Elvira; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Collier, David A; McGuire, Philip

    2009-11-01

    The dopamine transporter plays a key role in the regulation of central dopaminergic transmission, which modulates cognitive processing. Disrupted dopamine function and impaired executive processing are robust features of schizophrenia. To examine the effect of a polymorphism in the dopamine transporter gene (the variable number of tandem repeats in the 3' untranslated region) on brain function during executive processing in healthy volunteers and patients with schizophrenia. We hypothesized that this variation would have a different effect on prefrontal and striatal activation in schizophrenia, reflecting altered dopamine function. Case-control study. Psychiatric research center. Eighty-five subjects, comprising 44 healthy volunteers (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 26 who were 10-repeat homozygotes) and 41 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 23 who were 10-repeat homozygotes). Regional brain activation during word generation relative to repetition in an overt verbal fluency task measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Main effects of genotype and diagnosis on activation and their interaction were estimated with analysis of variance in SPM5. Irrespective of diagnosis, the 10-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 9-repeat allele in the left anterior insula and right caudate nucleus. Trends for the same effect in the right insula and for greater deactivation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex were also detected. There were diagnosis x genotype interactions in the left middle frontal gyrus and left nucleus accumbens, where the 9-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 10-repeat allele in patients but not controls. Insular, cingulate, and striatal function during an executive task is normally modulated by variation in the dopamine transporter gene. Its effect on activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum is altered in patients with schizophrenia

  12. Alterations in gut transport of minerals and in binding proteins during simulated weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    The structural components of the skeleton develop and are maintained in a 1 g environment, shaped by the mechanical load to which they are constantly exposed. Altering such a mechanical load by reducing the gravitational force imposed on the system, as in space flight, has profound effects on the skeleton and permits an exploration of the molecular events which regulate normal skeletal homeostasis. The objective was to determine whether simulated weightlessness reduced intestinal calcium transport, and if so, to determine the molecular mechanisms for such an effect. A nonstressful tail suspension in which the rats gained weight normally while suspended was used to simulate weightlessness. A significant change in intestinal calcium transport was not demonstrated. However, a cyclic change in bone formation with suspension was shown. Based on these observations, the objective changed to determination of the hormonal regulation of bone formation during simulated weightlessness.

  13. Assessment of the Relation between the Expression of Oxaliplatin Transporters in Colorectal Cancer and Response to FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Bertrand; Tixier, Lucie; Pereira, Bruno; Sauvanet, Pierre; Buc, Emmanuel; Pétorin, Caroline; Déchelotte, Pierre; Pezet, Denis; Balayssac, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is mainly based on the combination of 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-4). The pharmacological target of oxaliplatin remains intracellular and therefore dependent on its entry into cells. The intracellular distribution of oxaliplatin is mediated by organic cation transporters 1, 2 and 3 (OCT1, 2 and 3), copper transporter 1 (CTR1) and ATPase Cu2+ transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and may modulate the efficacy of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective study to assess the relation between the expression of oxaliplatin transporters in colorectal cancer before chemotherapy and the response to FOLFOX-4 adjuvant chemotherapy in responder and non-responder patients. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at a single center (University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, France). The target population was patients with resectable colorectal cancer operated between 2006 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were defined for the responder patients as no cancer recurrence 3 years after the end of chemotherapy, and for the non-responder patients as cancer recurrence within 1 year. Other inclusion criteria were stages IIb–IV cancers, first-line adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy, and the availability of resected primary tumor samples. Exclusion criteria were preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, a targeted therapy, other anticancer drugs, cancer recurrence between the first and the third year after the end of chemotherapy and follow-up < 3 years. Immunostaining of oxaliplatin transporters (OCT1, 2, 3, CTR1 and ATP7B) and Ki-67 was assessed in tumor samples. Results Retrospectively, 31 patients have been selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria (15 responders and 16 non-responders). Before FOLFOX-4 regimen, OCT3 expression was significantly lower in responder patients compared to non-responders (p<0.001). According to multivariate analysis

  14. Altered expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins and improved myocardial energetic state during late ischemic preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Cabrera (Jesús); E.A. Ziemba (Elizabeth); L.H. Colbert (Lisa); L.B. Anderson (Lorraine); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); T.A. Butterick (Tammy); J. Sikora (Joseph); H.B. Ward (Herbert B.); R.F. Kelly (Rosemary); E.O. McFalls (Edward)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAltered expression of mitochondrial electron transport proteins has been shown in early preconditioned myocardial tissue. We wished to determine whether these alterations persist in the Second Window of Protection (SWOP) and if so, whether a favorable energetic state is facilitated durin

  15. Leukemia-Associated Mutations in Nucleophosmin Alter Recognition by CRM1: Molecular Basis of Aberrant Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Arregi

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, normally enriched in nucleoli, that performs several activities related to cell growth. NPM mutations are characteristic of a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML, where mutant NPM seems to play an oncogenic role. AML-associated NPM mutants exhibit altered subcellular traffic, being aberrantly located in the cytoplasm of leukoblasts. Exacerbated export of AML variants of NPM is mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1, and due, in part, to a mutationally acquired novel nuclear export signal (NES. To gain insight on the molecular basis of NPM transport in physiological and pathological conditions, we have evaluated the export efficiency of NPM in cells, and present new data indicating that, in normal conditions, wild type NPM is weakly exported by CRM1. On the other hand, we have found that AML-associated NPM mutants efficiently form complexes with CRM1HA (a mutant CRM1 with higher affinity for NESs, and we have quantitatively analyzed CRM1HA interaction with the NES motifs of these mutants, using fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We have observed that the affinity of CRM1HA for these NESs is similar, which may help to explain the transport properties of the mutants. We also describe NPM recognition by the import machinery. Our combined cellular and biophysical studies shed further light on the determinants of NPM traffic, and how it is dramatically altered by AML-related mutations.

  16. DNA copy number alterations, gene expression changes and disease-free survival in patients with colorectal cancer: a 10 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; De Filippo, Carlotta; Castagnini, Cinzia; Toti, Simona; Acquadro, Francesco; Giudici, Francesco; Fazi, Marilena; Dolara, Piero; Messerini, Luca; Tonelli, Francesco; Luceri, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and gene expression changes have amply been encountered in colorectal cancers (CRCs), but the extent at which CNAs affect gene expression, as well as their relevance for tumor development, are still poorly defined. Here we aimed at assessing the clinical relevance of these parameters in a 10 year follow-up study. Tumors and normal adjacent colon mucosa, obtained at primary surgery from 21 CRC patients, were subjected to (i) high-resolution array CGH (a-CGH) for the detection of CNAs and (ii) microarray-based transcriptome profiling for the detection of gene expression (GE) changes. Correlations between these genomic and transcriptomic changes and their associations with clinical and histopathological parameters were assessed with the aim to identify molecular signatures associated with disease-free survival of the CRC patients during a 10 year follow-up. DNA copy number gains were frequently detected in chromosomes 7, 8q, 13, 19, 20q and X, whereas DNA copy number losses were frequently detected in chromosomes 1p, 4, 8p, 15, 17p, 18, 19 and 22q. None of these alterations were observed in all samples. In addition, we found that 2,498 genes were up- and that 1,094 genes were down-regulated in the tumor samples compared to their corresponding normal mucosa (p copy number gains, whereas decreased expression levels of the MUC1, E2F2, HRAS and SIRT3 genes were associated with copy number losses. Pathways related to cell cycle progression, eicosanoid metabolism, and TGF-β and apoptosis signaling, were found to be most significantly affected. Our results suggest that CNAs in CRC tumor tissues are associated with concomitant changes in the expression of cancer-related genes. In other genes epigenetic mechanism may be at work. Up-regulation of the IL17RA, IGF2BP2 and ABCC2 genes, and of genes acting in the mTOR and cytokine receptor pathways, appear to be associated with a poor survival. These alterations may, in addition to Dukes

  17. Altered DNA methylation of glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 4 in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Kai G; Georgi, Karsten; Bleich, Stefan; Muschler, Marc; Hillemacher, Thomas; Hilfiker-Kleinert, Denise; Schweiger, Ulrich; Ding, Xiaoqi; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Frieling, Helge

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in brain glucose metabolism and in peripheral glucose metabolism have frequently been observed in major depressive disorder (MDD). The insulin independent glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) plays a key role in brain metabolism while the insulin-dependent GLUT4 is the major glucose transporter for skeletal and cardiac muscle. We therefore examined methylation of GLUT1 and GLUT4 in fifty-two depressed inpatients and compared data to eighteen healthy comparison subjects. DNA methylation of the core promoter regions of GLUT1 and GLUT4 was assessed by bisulfite sequencing. Further factors determined were fasting glucose, cortisol, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We found significantly increased methylation of the GLUT1 in depressed inpatients compared to healthy comparison subjects (CG). Further findings comprise increased concentrations of fasting cortisol, glucose, insulin, and increased IL-6 and TNF-α. After six weeks of inpatient treatment, significantly lower GLUT1 methylation was observed in remitted patients compared to non-remitters. GLUT4 methylation was not different between depressed patients and CG, and did not differ between remitted and non-remitted patients. Although preliminary we conclude from our results that the acute phase of major depressive disorder is associated with increased GLUT1 methylation and mild insulin resistance. The successful treatment of depression is associated with normalization of GLUT1 methylation in remitters, indicating that this condition may be reversible. Failure of normalization of GLUT1 methylation in non-remitters may point to a possible role of impeded brain glucose metabolism in the maintenance of MDD.

  18. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  19. Statins alter the hepatobiliary transport of unconjugated and conjugated bilirubin in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Mónika; Veres, Zsuzsa; Bátai-Konczos, Attila; Kékesi, Orsolya; Kis, Emese; Szabó, Kitti; Jemnitz, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have reported that statins occasionally cause impairment of liver functions characterized by elevated serum bilirubin levels, which might be due to altered function of the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp2/3). We aimed to study the modulation of the hepatobiliary transport of bilirubin by four statin derivatives, atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes. All statins except pravastatin significantly inhibited the uptake of bilirubin. The biliary efflux of bilirubin conjugates was increased by pravastatin and rosuvastatin concentration dependently. Rosuvastatin stimulated not only the Mrp2 mediated biliary, but the Mrp3 mediated sinusoidal elimination, resulting in decreased intracellular bilirubin accumulation. The significantly induced Mrp2/3 protein levels (ranging from 1.5 to 1.8-fold) accounted for the elevated efflux. Cell polarization, the formation of biliary network was also significantly increased by fluvastatin, pravastatin and rosuvastatin (151%, 216% and 275% of the control, respectively). The simultaneous inhibition of the uptake and the stimulation of the sinusoidal and canalicular elimination may explain, at least in part, the clinical observation of elevated serum bilirubin levels. In conclusion, our results suggest that in spite of the elevated serum bilirubin levels, the altered Mrp2 and Mrp3 functions by statins is probably not associated with hepatotoxic effects.

  20. Conformational Exchange in a Membrane Transport Protein Is Altered in Protein Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Freed; P Horanyi; M Wiener; D Cafiso

    2011-12-31

    Successful macromolecular crystallography requires solution conditions that may alter the conformational sampling of a macromolecule. Here, site-directed spin labeling is used to examine a conformational equilibrium within BtuB, the Escherichia coli outer membrane transporter for vitamin B{sub 12}. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra from a spin label placed within the N-terminal energy coupling motif (Ton box) of BtuB indicate that this segment is in equilibrium between folded and unfolded forms. In bilayers, substrate binding shifts this equilibrium toward the unfolded form; however, EPR spectra from this same spin-labeled mutant indicate that this unfolding transition is blocked in protein crystals. Moreover, crystal structures of this spin-labeled mutant are consistent with the EPR result. When the free energy difference between substates is estimated from the EPR spectra, the crystal environment is found to alter this energy by 3 kcal/mol when compared to the bilayer state. Approximately half of this energy change is due to solutes or osmolytes in the crystallization buffer, and the remainder is contributed by the crystal lattice. These data provide a quantitative measure of how a conformational equilibrium in BtuB is modified in the crystal environment, and suggest that more-compact, less-hydrated substates will be favored in protein crystals.

  1. Clopidogrel attenuates lithium-induced alterations in renal water and sodium channels/transporters in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, János; Heiney, Kristina M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Carlson, Noel G; Müller, Christa E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    Lithium (Li) administration causes deranged expression and function of renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters resulting in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Extracellular nucleotides (ATP/ADP/UTP), via P2 receptors, regulate these transport functions. We tested whether clopidogrel bisulfate (CLPD), an antagonist of ADP-activated P2Y(12) receptor, would affect Li-induced alterations in renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters. Adult mice were treated for 14 days with CLPD and/or Li and euthanized. Urine and kidneys were collected for analysis. When administered with Li, CLPD ameliorated polyuria, attenuated the rise in urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and resulted in significantly higher urinary arginine vasopressin (AVP) and aldosterone levels as compared to Li treatment alone. However, urine sodium excretion remained elevated. Semi-quantitative immunoblotting revealed that CLPD alone increased renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and the subunits of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) in medulla by 25-130 %. When combined with Li, CLPD prevented downregulation of AQP2, Na-K-ATPase, and NKCC2 but was less effective against downregulation of cortical α- or γ-ENaC (70 kDa band). Thus, CLPD primarily attenuated Li-induced downregulation of proteins involved in water conservation (AVP-sensitive), with modest effects on aldosterone-sensitive proteins potentially explaining sustained natriuresis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong labeling for P2Y(12)-R in proximal tubule brush border and blood vessels in the cortex and less intense labeling in medullary thick ascending limb and the collecting ducts. Therefore, there is the potential for CLPD to be directly acting at the tubule sites to mediate these effects. In conclusion, P2Y(12)-R may represent a novel therapeutic target for Li-induced NDI.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling of contrast transport in basilar aneurysms following flow-altering surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Alireza; Abla, Adib A; Lawton, Michael T; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy L

    2017-01-04

    In vivo measurement of blood velocity fields and flow descriptors remains challenging due to image artifacts and limited resolution of current imaging methods; however, in vivo imaging data can be used to inform and validate patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Image-based CFD can be particularly useful for planning surgical interventions in complicated cases such as fusiform aneurysms of the basilar artery, where it is crucial to alter pathological hemodynamics while preserving flow to the distal vasculature. In this study, patient-specific CFD modeling was conducted for two basilar aneurysm patients considered for surgical treatment. In addition to velocity fields, transport of contrast agent was simulated for the preoperative and postoperative conditions using two approaches. The transport of a virtual contrast passively following the flow streamlines was simulated to predict post-surgical flow regions prone to thrombus deposition. In addition, the transport of a mixture of blood with an iodine-based contrast agent was modeled to compare and verify the CFD results with X-ray angiograms. The CFD-predicted patterns of contrast flow were qualitatively compared to in vivo X-ray angiograms acquired before and after the intervention. The results suggest that the mixture modeling approach, accounting for the flow rates and properties of the contrast injection, is in better agreement with the X-ray angiography data. The virtual contrast modeling assessed the residence time based on flow patterns unaffected by the injection procedure, which makes the virtual contrast modeling approach better suited for prediction of thrombus deposition, which is not limited to the peri-procedural state.

  3. BRAF, PIK3CA, and HER2 Oncogenic Alterations According to KRAS Mutation Status in Advanced Colorectal Cancers with Distant Metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Kyung Nam

    Full Text Available Anti-EGFR antibody-based treatment is an important therapeutic strategy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC; despite this, several mutations--including KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, and HER2 amplification--are associated with the mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies and clinical implications of these genetic alterations in advanced CRC.KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations were determined by Cobas real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 191 advanced CRC patients with distant metastasis. Microsatellite instability (MSI status was determined by a fragmentation assay and HER2 amplification was assessed by silver in situ hybridization. In addition, KRAS mutations were investigated by the Sanger sequencing method in 97 of 191 CRC cases.Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were found in 104 (54.5%, 6 (3.1%, and 25 (13.1% cases of advanced CRC, respectively. MSI-high status and HER2 amplification were observed in 3 (1.6% and 16 (8.4% cases, respectively. PIK3CA mutations were more frequently found in KRAS mutant type (18.3% than KRAS wild type (6.9% (P = 0.020. In contrast, HER2 amplifications and BRAF mutations were associated with KRAS wild type with borderline significance (P = 0.052 and 0.094, respectively. In combined analyses with KRAS, BRAF and HER2 status, BRAF mutations or HER2 amplifications were associated with the worst prognosis in the wild type KRAS group (P = 0.004. When comparing the efficacy of detection methods, the results of real time PCR analysis revealed 56 of 97 (57.7% CRC cases with KRAS mutations, whereas Sanger sequencing revealed 49 cases (50.5%.KRAS mutations were found in 54.5% of advanced CRC patients. Our results support that subgrouping using PIK3CA and BRAF mutation or HER2 amplification status, in addition to KRAS mutation status, is helpful for managing advanced CRC patients.

  4. Auxin Transport and Ribosome Biogenesis Mutant/Reporter Lines to Study Plant Cell Growth and Proliferation under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Miguel A.; Manzano, Ana I.; van Loon, Jack JWA.; Saez-Vasquez, Julio; Carnero-Diaz, Eugenie; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F. J.

    2013-02-01

    We tested different Arabidopsis thaliana strains to check their availability for space use in the International Space Station (ISS). We used mutants and reporter gene strains affecting factors of cell proliferation and cell growth, to check variations induced by an altered gravity vector. Seedlings were grown either in a Random Positioning Machine (RPM), under simulated microgravity (μg), or in a Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC), under hypergravity (2g). A combination of the two devices (μgRPM+LDC) was also used. Under all gravity alterations, seedling roots were longer than in control 1g conditions, while the levels of the nucleolar protein nucleolin were depleted. Alterations in the pattern of expression of PIN2, an auxin transporter, and of cyclin B1, a cell cycle regulator, were shown. All these alterations are compatible with previous space data, so the use of these strains will be useful in the next experiments in ISS, under real microgravity.

  5. Phosphorylation at serine 52 and 635 does not alter the transport properties of glucosinolate transporter AtGTR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how plants regulate transporters of defense compounds. In A. thaliana, glucosinolates are transported between tissues by NPF2.10 (AtGTR1) and NPF2.11 (AtGTR2). Mining of the PhosPhat4.0 database showed two cytosol exposed phosphorylation sites for AtGTR1 and one membrane...... sites - is not directly involved in regulating AtGTR1 transport activity. We hypothesize a role for AtGTR1-phosphorylation in regulating protein-protein interactions....

  6. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  7. Modeling Typhoon‐Induced Alterations on River Sediment Transport and Turbidity Based on Dynamic Landslide Inventories: Gaoping River Basin, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih‐Hua Chang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impacts of storm‐triggered landslides on downstream sediment and turbidity responses in the Gaoping River Basin, Taiwan using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. Attention is given to analyzing the increased and altered baseline of suspended sediment load and turbidity after the disturbances caused by the rainfall and landslides associated with Typhoon Morakot in 2009. SWAT parameters were calibrated by the observed hydrometric data from 1999 to 2003 using the log‐scale root‐mean‐square error (log‐RMSE and Nash‐Sutcliffe Model Efficiency. Both parameter sets were applied for the simulation of suspended sediment yield and turbidity with annual updated landslide inventories for the period 2004–2012. The landslide updating mirrors the physical land‐cover changes and has slightly improved the model performance, yet landslides alone cannot explain the difference between Morakot‐induced and SWAT‐simulated sediment discharge. The set of parameters calibrated by log‐RMSE can better approximate the increased baseline and typhoon induced alterations. The results show alterations in sediment erosion and transport: (1 drastically increased the turbidity baseline and occurrence of high‐turbidity; (2 altered coefficient and exponent values of the sediment rating curve; and (3 altered relationship between rainfall and induced turbidity during major rainfall events. The research in this study provides an improved modeling approach to typhoon‐induced alterations on river sediment loads and turbidity.

  8. Modulation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 expression levels alters mouse mammary tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D Young

    Full Text Available Tumor cells exhibit an altered metabolism characterized by elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate secretion which is supported by an increase in glucose transport and consumption. We hypothesized that reducing or eliminating the expression of the most prominently expressed glucose transporter(s would decrease the amount of glucose available to breast cancer cells thereby decreasing their metabolic capacity and proliferative potential.Of the 12 GLUT family glucose transporters expressed in mice, GLUT1 was the most abundantly expressed at the RNA level in the mouse mammary tumors from MMTV-c-ErbB2 mice and cell lines examined. Reducing GLUT1 expression in mouse mammary tumor cell lines using shRNA or Cre/Lox technology reduced glucose transport, glucose consumption, lactate secretion and lipid synthesis in vitro without altering the concentration of ATP, as well as reduced growth on plastic and in soft agar. The growth of tumor cells with reduced GLUT1 expression was impaired when transplanted into the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice in vivo. Overexpression of GLUT1 in a cell line with low levels of endogenous GLUT1 increased glucose transport in vitro and enhanced growth in nude mice in vivo as compared to the control cells with very low levels of GLUT1.These studies demonstrate that GLUT1 is the major glucose transporter in mouse mammary carcinoma models overexpressing ErbB2 or PyVMT and that modulation of the level of GLUT1 has an effect upon the growth of mouse mammary tumor cell lines in vivo.

  9. Dynamic wettability alteration in immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Effect on transport properties and critical slowing down

    CERN Document Server

    Flovik, Vegard; Hansen, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The change in contact angles due to the injection of low salinity water or any other wettability altering agent in an oil-rich porous medium is modeled by a network model of disordered pores transporting two immiscible fluids. We introduce a dynamic wettability altering mechanism, where the time dependent wetting property of each pore is determined by the cumulative flow of water through it. Simulations are performed to reach steady-state for different possible alterations in the wetting angle ($\\theta$). We find that deviation from oil-wet conditions re-mobilizes the stuck clusters and increases the oil fractional flow. However, the rate of increase in the fractional flow depends strongly on $\\theta$ and as $\\theta\\to 90^\\circ$, a critical angle, the system shows critical slowing down which is characterized by two dynamic critical exponents.

  10. Dynamic wettability alteration in immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Effect on transport properties and critical slowing down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegard eFlovik

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The change in contact angles due to the injection of low salinity water or any other wettability altering agent in an oil-rich porous medium is modeled by a network model of disordered pores transporting two immiscible fluids. We introduce a dynamic wettability altering mechanism, where the time dependent wetting property of each pore is determined by the cumulative flow of water through it. Simulations are performed to reach steady-state for different possible alterations in the wetting angle (θ. We find that deviation from oil-wet conditions re-mobilizes the stuck clusters and increases the oil fractional flow. However, the rate of increase in the fractional flow depends strongly on θ and as θ → 90◦ , a critical angle, the system shows critical slowing down which is characterized by two dynamic critical exponents.

  11. Changes in apoptosis during the development of colorectal cancer : a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, JJ; de Jong, S; Hollema, H; de Vries, EGE; Kleibeuker, JH

    The development of colorectal cancer is characterised by an accumulation of molecular genetic alterations causing disorders in cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Although changes in apoptosis with colorectal cancer development have been studied extensively, a clear consensus of opinion has

  12. Chemical transport in geothermal systems in Iceland: Evidence from hydrothermal alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzson, Hjalti; Zierenberg, Robert; Schiffman, Peter

    2008-06-01

    This study focuses on the chemical changes in basaltic rocks in fossil low- and high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Iceland. The method used takes into account the amount of dilution caused by vesicle and vein fillings in the rocks. The amount of dilution allows a calculation of the primary concentration of the immobile element Zr, and by multiplying the composition of the altered rock by the ratio of Zr (protolith)/Zr (altered rock) one can compute the mass addition caused by the dilution of the void fillings, and also make a direct comparison with the likely protoliths from the same areas. The samples were divided into three groups; two from Tertiary fossil high-temperature systems (Hafnarfjall, Geitafell), and the third group from a low temperature, zeolite-altered plateau basalt succession. The results show that hydrothermally altered rocks are enriched in Si, Al, Fe, Mg and Mn, and that Na, K and Ca are mobile but show either depletion or enrichment. The elements that are immobile include Zr, Y, Nb and probably Ti. The two high-temperature systems show quite similar chemical alteration trends, an observation which may apply to Icelandic fresh water high-temperature systems in general. The geochemical data show that the major changes in the altered rocks from Icelandic geothermal systems may be attributed to addition of elements during deposition of pore-filling alteration minerals. A comparison with seawater-dominated basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems shows much greater mass flux within the seawater systems, even though both systems have similar alteration assemblages. The secondary mineral assemblages seem to be controlled predominantly by the thermal stability of the alteration phases and secondarily by the composition of the hydrothermal fluids.

  13. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is often found after symptoms appear, ... Report: Colon Pathology. Imaging tests to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic ...

  14. SNPs altering ammonium transport activity of human Rhesus factors characterized by a yeast-based functional assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Deschuyteneer

    Full Text Available Proteins of the conserved Mep-Amt-Rh family, including mammalian Rhesus factors, mediate transmembrane ammonium transport. Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for the biosynthesis of amino acids but is also a metabolic waste product. Its disposal in urine plays a critical role in the regulation of the acid/base homeostasis, especially with an acid diet, a trait of Western countries. Ammonium accumulation above a certain concentration is however pathologic, the cytotoxicity causing fatal cerebral paralysis in acute cases. Alteration in ammonium transport via human Rh proteins could have clinical outcomes. We used a yeast-based expression assay to characterize human Rh variants resulting from non synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs with known or unknown clinical phenotypes and assessed their ammonium transport efficiency, protein level, localization and potential trans-dominant impact. The HsRhAG variants (I61R, F65S associated to overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (OHSt, a disease affecting erythrocytes, proved affected in intrinsic bidirectional ammonium transport. Moreover, this study reveals that the R202C variant of HsRhCG, the orthologue of mouse MmRhcg required for optimal urinary ammonium excretion and blood pH control, shows an impaired inherent ammonium transport activity. Urinary ammonium excretion was RHcg gene-dose dependent in mouse, highlighting MmRhcg as a limiting factor. HsRhCG(R202C may confer susceptibility to disorders leading to metabolic acidosis for instance. Finally, the analogous R211C mutation in the yeast ScMep2 homologue also impaired intrinsic activity consistent with a conserved functional role of the preserved arginine residue. The yeast expression assay used here constitutes an inexpensive, fast and easy tool to screen nsSNPs reported by high throughput sequencing or individual cases for functional alterations in Rh factors revealing potential causal variants.

  15. SNPs altering ammonium transport activity of human Rhesus factors characterized by a yeast-based functional assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschuyteneer, Aude; Boeckstaens, Mélanie; De Mees, Christelle; Van Vooren, Pascale; Wintjens, René; Marini, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Proteins of the conserved Mep-Amt-Rh family, including mammalian Rhesus factors, mediate transmembrane ammonium transport. Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for the biosynthesis of amino acids but is also a metabolic waste product. Its disposal in urine plays a critical role in the regulation of the acid/base homeostasis, especially with an acid diet, a trait of Western countries. Ammonium accumulation above a certain concentration is however pathologic, the cytotoxicity causing fatal cerebral paralysis in acute cases. Alteration in ammonium transport via human Rh proteins could have clinical outcomes. We used a yeast-based expression assay to characterize human Rh variants resulting from non synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) with known or unknown clinical phenotypes and assessed their ammonium transport efficiency, protein level, localization and potential trans-dominant impact. The HsRhAG variants (I61R, F65S) associated to overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (OHSt), a disease affecting erythrocytes, proved affected in intrinsic bidirectional ammonium transport. Moreover, this study reveals that the R202C variant of HsRhCG, the orthologue of mouse MmRhcg required for optimal urinary ammonium excretion and blood pH control, shows an impaired inherent ammonium transport activity. Urinary ammonium excretion was RHcg gene-dose dependent in mouse, highlighting MmRhcg as a limiting factor. HsRhCG(R202C) may confer susceptibility to disorders leading to metabolic acidosis for instance. Finally, the analogous R211C mutation in the yeast ScMep2 homologue also impaired intrinsic activity consistent with a conserved functional role of the preserved arginine residue. The yeast expression assay used here constitutes an inexpensive, fast and easy tool to screen nsSNPs reported by high throughput sequencing or individual cases for functional alterations in Rh factors revealing potential causal variants.

  16. Induction of Drug Transporters Alters Disposition of Risperidone - A Study in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Holthoewer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetic interactions, e.g. modulation of drug transporters like P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier, can be a reason for treatment non-response. This study focuses on the influence of induction of drug transporters on the disposition of the antipsychotic drugs risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone. Brain and serum concentrations of risperidone and its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone, which are known P-glycoprotein substrates, were measured after drug transporter induction with rifampicin, dexamethasone or 5-pregnene-3beta-ol-20-on-16alpha-carbonitrile using high performance liquid chromatography. Disposition of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone was dramatically decreased in mouse brain and serum after drug transporter induction. The metabolism of risperidone was also affected.

  17. Dysfunction of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 alters intestinal bacteria and bile acid metabolism in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcai Zhang

    Full Text Available Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1 is predominantly expressed in liver and is able to transport bile acids (BAs in vitro. Male Oatp1a1-null mice have increased concentrations of taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA, a secondary BA generated by intestinal bacteria, in both serum and livers. Therefore, in the present study, BA concentrations and intestinal bacteria in wild-type (WT and Oatp1a1-null mice were quantified to investigate whether the increase of secondary BAs in Oatp1a1-null mice is due to alterations in intestinal bacteria. The data demonstrate that Oatp1a1-null mice : (1 have similar bile flow and BA concentrations in bile as WT mice; (2 have a markedly different BA composition in the intestinal contents, with a decrease in conjugated BAs and an increase in unconjugated BAs; (3 have BAs in the feces that are more deconjugated, desulfated, 7-dehydroxylated, 3-epimerized, and oxidized, but less 7-epimerized; (4 have 10-fold more bacteria in the small intestine, and 2-fold more bacteria in the large intestine which is majorly due to a 200% increase in Bacteroides and a 30% reduction in Firmicutes; and (5 have a different urinary excretion of bacteria-related metabolites than WT mice. In conclusion, the present study for the first time established that lack of a liver transporter (Oatp1a1 markedly alters the intestinal environment in mice, namely the bacteria composition.

  18. Early alterations in soleus GLUT-4, glucose transport, and glycogen in voluntary running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Halseth, Amy E.

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running (WR) by juvenile female rats was used as a noninterventional model of soleus muscle functional overload to study the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity by the glucose transporter (GLUT-4 isoform) protein level and glycogen concentration. Soleus total protein content was significantly greater (+18%;P greater than 0.05) than in age-matched controls after 1 wk of WR, and this hypertrophic response continued in weeks 2-4 (+24-32%). GLUT-4 protein was 39% greater than in controls in 1-wk WR soleus, and this adaptation was accompanied by a similar increase in in vitro insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity(+29%). After 2 and 4 wk of WR, however, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity had returned to control levels, despite a continued elevation (+25-28%) of GLUT-4 protein. At these two time points, glycogen concentration was significantly enhanced in WR soleus (+21-42%), which coincided with significant reductions in glycogen synthase activity ratios (-23 to-41%). These results indicate that, in this model of soleus muscle functional overload, the GLUT-4 protein level may initially regulate insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in the absence of changes in other modifying factors. However,this regulation of glucose transport activity by GLUT-4 protein may be subsequently overridden by elevated glycogen concentration.

  19. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  20. Alterations in PTEN and PIK3CA in colorectal cancers in the EPIC Norfolk study: associations with clinicopathological and dietary factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrou Panagiota N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PTEN tumour suppressor gene and PIK3CA proto-oncogene encode proteins which contribute to regulation and propagation of signal transduction through the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway. This study investigates the prevalence of loss of PTEN expression and mutations in both PTEN and PIK3CA in colorectal cancers (CRC and their associations with tumour clinicopathological features, lifestyle factors and dietary consumptions. Methods 186 adenocarcinomas and 16 adenomas from the EPIC Norfolk study were tested for PTEN and PIK3CA mutations by DNA sequencing and PTEN expression changes by immunohistochemistry. Dietary and lifestyle data were collected prospectively using seven day food diaries and lifestyle questionnaires. Results Mutations in exons 7 and 8 of PTEN were observed in 2.2% of CRC and PTEN loss of expression was identified in 34.9% CRC. Negative PTEN expression was associated with lower blood low-density lipoprotein concentrations (p = 0.05. PIK3CA mutations were observed in 7% of cancers and were more frequent in CRCs in females (p = 0.04. Analysis of dietary intakes demonstrated no link between PTEN expression status and any specific dietary factor. PTEN expression negative, proximal CRC were of more advanced Dukes' stage (p = 0.02 and poor differentiation (p PIK3CA mutations and loss of PTEN expression demonstrated that these two events were independent (p = 0.55. Conclusion These data demonstrated the frequent occurrence (34.9% of PTEN loss of expression in colorectal cancers, for which gene mutations do not appear to be the main cause. Furthermore, dietary factors are not associated with loss of PTEN expression. PTEN expression negative CRC were not homogenous, as proximal cancers were associated with a more advanced Dukes' stage and poor differentiation, whereas distal cancers were associated with earlier Dukes' stage.

  1. N-Ras induces alterations in Golgi complex architecture and in constitutive protein transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babia, T; Ayala, [No Value; Valderrama, F; Mato, E; Bosch, M; Santaren, JF; Renau-Piqueras, J; Kok, JW; Thomsen, TM; Egea, G

    1999-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids is a common feature of many tumor cell types, and is often accompanied by alterations in membrane traffic and an anomalous localization of Golgi-resident proteins and glycans. These observations suggest that the Golgi complex is a key organelle for at le

  2. Chromosome 19q13 disruption alters expressions of CYP2A7, MIA and MIA-RAB4B lncRNA and contributes to FAP-like phenotype in APC mutation-negative familial colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thean, Lai Fun; Wong, Yu Hui; Lo, Michelle; Loi, Carol; Chew, Min Hoe; Tang, Choong Leong; Cheah, Peh Yean

    2017-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal-dominantly inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC) caused by mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Our ability to exhaustively screen for APC mutations identify microsatellite-stable and APC-mutation negative familial CRC patients, enabling us to search for novel genes. We performed genome-wide scan on two affected siblings of one family and 88 ethnicity- and gender-matched healthy controls to identify deletions shared by the siblings. Combined loss of heterozygosity, copy number and allelic-specific copy number analysis uncovered 5 shared deletions. Long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed chromosome 19q13 deletion, which was subsequently found in one other family. The 32 kb deleted region harbors the CYP2A7 gene and was enriched with enhancer, repressor and insulator sites. The wildtype allele was lost in the polyps of the proband. Further, real-time RT-PCR assays showed that expressions of MIA and MIA-RAB4B located 35 kb upstream of the deletion, were up-regulated in the polyps compared to the matched mucosa of the proband. MIA-RAB4B, the read-through long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), RAB4B, PIM2 and TAOK1 share common binding site of a microRNA, miR-24, in their 3'UTRs. PIM2 and TAOK1, two target oncogenes of miR-24, were co-ordinately up-regulated with MIA-RAB4B in the polyps, suggesting that MIA-RAB4B could function as competitive endogenous RNA to titrate miR-24 away from its other targets. The data suggest that the 19.13 deletion disrupted chromatin boundary, leading to altered expression of several genes and lncRNA, could contribute to colorectal cancer via novel genetic and epigenetic mechanisms.

  3. Genomic convergence analysis of schizophrenia: mRNA sequencing reveals altered synaptic vesicular transport in post-mortem cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joann Mudge

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SCZ is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ.

  4. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  5. Prenatal Transportation Stress Alters Temperament and Serum Cortisol Concentrations in Suckling Brahman Calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experiment examined the relationship between prenatal stress and subsequent calf temperament through weaning. The prenatal stressor utilized was repeated transportation of pregnant Brahman cows for 2 hours at 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 days of gestation. Prenatally stressed calves (n = 41) were ...

  6. Organophosphate-Related Alterations in Myelin and Axonal Transport in the Living Mammalian Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Rusyniak DE, Nanagas KA. 2004. Organophosphate poisoning . Sem Neurol.24:197–204. Silva AC, Lee JH, Aoki I, Koretsky AP. 2004. Manganese-enhanced...Sungurtekin H, Gurses E, Balci C. 2006. Evaluation of several clinical scoring tools in organophosphate poisoned patients. Clin. Toxicol (Phila) 44:121...1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0536 TITLE: " Organophosphate -Related Alterations in Myelin and Axonal

  7. Altered Regulation of Hepatic Efflux Transporters Disrupts Acetaminophen Disposition in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Canet, Mark J.; Merrell, Matthew D.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Bataille, Amy M.; Campion, Sarah N; Ferreira, Daniel W.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.; Manautou, Jose E.; Hesham A-Kader, H.; Erickson, Robert P.; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, representing a spectrum of liver pathologies that include simple hepatic steatosis and the more advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The current study was conducted to determine whether pediatric NASH also results in altered disposition of acetaminophen (APAP) and its two primary metabolites, APAP-sulfate and APAP-glucuronide. Pediatric patients with hepatic steatosis (n = 9) or NASH (n = 3) and health...

  8. Promoter specific methylation of the dopamine transporter gene is altered in alcohol dependence and associated with craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillemacher, Thomas; Frieling, Helge; Hartl, Thomas; Wilhelm, Julia; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a crucial role in the genesis and maintenance of alcohol dependence. Epigenetic regulation via promoter specific DNA methylation of the dopamine transporter gene (DAT) may influence altered dopaminergic neurotransmission in alcoholism. Aim of the present study was to investigate DNA promoter methylation of DAT in early alcohol withdrawal and in relation to alcohol craving. We analyzed blood samples of 76 patients admitted for detoxification treatment and compared them to 35 healthy controls. Methylation specific quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the promoter specific DNA methylation of the dopamine transporter. We assessed the extent of alcohol craving using the obsessive compulsive drinking scale (OCDS). Compared to healthy controls we found a significant hypermethylation of the DAT-promoter (Mann-Whitney U-test: p=0.001). Ln-transformed methylation of the DAT-promoter was negatively associated with the OCDS (linear regression: Beta=-0.275, p=0.016), particularly with the obsessive subscale (Beta=-0.300, p=0.008). Findings of the present study show that the epigenetic regulation of the DAT-promoter is altered in patients undergoing alcohol withdrawal. Furthermore, hypermethylation of the DAT-promoter may play an important role in dopaminergic neurotransmission and is associated with decreased alcohol craving.

  9. Alteration of gut microbiota associated with colorectal cancer%大肠癌患者肠道微生态变化的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高志光; 秦环龙

    2013-01-01

    Human guts harbor abundant microbes that regulate many aspects of host physiology.However,bacterial imbalance or dysbiosis in the gut due to the dietary or environmental changes may cause colorectal cancer (CRC).Therefore,it is theoretically and clinically important to explore the correlation between possible carcinogenic bacteria and CRC and thus reduce CRC incidence by regulating intestinal microecological balance through the application of microecological preparations.%正常人体肠道内定植着大量的微生物,它们在调节肠道生理功能方面具有重要的作用.饮食结构及环境变化导致的肠道菌群丰度及结构的改变,与大肠癌的发生发展密切相关.因此,探讨可能性致癌菌株与大肠癌发生的相关性,并通过添加微生态制剂调整肠道菌群结构,进而降低大肠癌发生率,具有重要的理论及临床意义.

  10. Alterations of monocarboxylate transporter densities during hypoxia in brain and breast tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chang; Edin, Nina F Jeppesen; Lauritzen, Knut H

    2012-01-01

    Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours...... tumour cell survival and metastases. Brain metastases frequently occur in patients with advanced breast cancer.Effective treatment strategies are therefore needed against brain metastasis from breast carcinoma....

  11. Dampened Amphetamine-Stimulated Behavior and Altered Dopamine Transporter Function in the Absence of Brain GDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Jaakko J; Panhelainen, Anne; Af Bjerkén, Sara; Porokuokka, Lauriina L; Varendi, Kärt; Olfat, Soophie; Montonen, Heidi; Piepponen, T Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2017-02-08

    Midbrain dopamine neuron dysfunction contributes to various psychiatric and neurological diseases, including drug addiction and Parkinson's disease. Because of its well established dopaminotrophic effects, the therapeutic potential of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been studied extensively in various disorders with disturbed dopamine homeostasis. However, the outcomes from preclinical and clinical studies vary, highlighting a need for a better understanding of the physiological role of GDNF on striatal dopaminergic function. Nevertheless, the current lack of appropriate animal models has limited this understanding. Therefore, we have generated novel mouse models to study conditional Gdnf deletion in the CNS during embryonic development and reduction of striatal GDNF levels in adult mice via AAV-Cre delivery. We found that both of these mice have reduced amphetamine-induced locomotor response and striatal dopamine efflux. Embryonic GDNF deletion in the CNS did not affect striatal dopamine levels or dopamine release, but dopamine reuptake was increased due to increased levels of both total and synaptic membrane-associated dopamine transporters. Collectively, these results suggest that endogenous GDNF plays an important role in regulating the function of dopamine transporters in the striatum.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Delivery of ectopic glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes the function, plasticity, and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the dysfunction of which contributes to various neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, how the deletion or reduction of GDNF in the CNS affects the function of dopaminergic neurons has remained unknown. Using conditional Gdnf knock-out mice, we found that endogenous GDNF affects striatal dopamine homeostasis and regulates amphetamine-induced behaviors by regulating the level and function of dopamine transporters. These data regarding the physiological role of GDNF are

  12. Extracellular dopamine and alterations on dopamine transporter are related to reserpine toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckziegel, Patrícia; Chen, Pan; Caito, Sam; Gubert, Priscila; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fachinetto, Roselei; Aschner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Reserpine is used as an animal model of parkinsonism. We hypothesized that the involuntary movements induced by reserpine in rodents are induced by dopaminergic toxicity caused by extracellular dopamine accumulation. The present study tested the effects of reserpine on the dopaminergic system in Caenorhabditis elegans. Reserpine was toxic to worms (decreased the survival, food intake, development and changed egg laying and defecation cycles). In addition, reserpine increased the worms' locomotor rate on food and decreased dopamine levels. Morphological evaluations of dopaminergic CEP neurons confirmed neurodegeneration characterized by decreased fluorescence intensity and the number of worms with intact CEP neurons, and increased number of shrunken somas per worm. These effects were unrelated to reserpine's effect on decreased expression of the dopamine transporter, dat-1. Interestingly, the locomotor rate on food and the neurodegenerative parameters fully recovered to basal conditions upon reserpine withdrawal. Furthermore, reserpine decreased survival in vesicular monoamine transporter and dat-1 loss-of-function mutant worms. In addition, worms pre-exposed to dopamine followed by exposure to reserpine had decreased survival. Reserpine activated gst-4, which controls a phase II detoxification enzymes downstream of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2. Our findings establish that the dopamine transporter, dat-1, plays an important role in reserpine toxicity, likely by increasing extracellular dopamine concentrations.

  13. SGLT2 inhibitor lowers serum uric acid through alteration of uric acid transport activity in renal tubule by increased glycosuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Yukihiro; Samukawa, Yoshishige; Sakai, Soichi; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2014-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have been reported to lower the serum uric acid (SUA) level. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reduction, SUA and the urinary excretion rate of uric acid (UEUA) were analysed after the oral administration of luseogliflozin, a SGLT2 inhibitor, to healthy subjects. After dosing, SUA decreased, and a negative correlation was observed between the SUA level and the UEUA, suggesting that SUA decreased as a result of the increase in the UEUA. The increase in UEUA was correlated with an increase in urinary d-glucose excretion, but not with the plasma luseogliflozin concentration. Additionally, in vitro transport experiments showed that luseogliflozin had no direct effect on the transporters involved in renal UA reabsorption. To explain that the increase in UEUA is likely due to glycosuria, the study focused on the facilitative glucose transporter 9 isoform 2 (GLUT9ΔN, SLC2A9b), which is expressed at the apical membrane of the kidney tubular cells and transports both UA and d-glucose. It was observed that the efflux of [14C]UA in Xenopus oocytes expressing the GLUT9 isoform 2 was trans-stimulated by 10 mm d-glucose, a high concentration of glucose that existed under SGLT2 inhibition. On the other hand, the uptake of [14C]UA by oocytes was cis-inhibited by 100 mm d-glucose, a concentration assumed to exist in collecting ducts. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the UEUA could potentially be increased by luseogliflozin-induced glycosuria, with alterations of UA transport activity because of urinary glucose. PMID:25044127

  14. Monocarboxylate transporter 8 deficiency: altered thyroid morphology and persistent high triiodothyronine/thyroxine ratio after thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Eva K; Sheu, Sien-Yi; Chiu-Ugalde, Jazmin; Sapin, Remy; Klein, Marc O; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; de Angelis, Martin Hrabĕ; Krude, Heiko; Riebel, Thomas; Rothe, Karin; Köhrle, Josef; Schmid, Kurt W; Schweizer, Ulrich; Grüters, Annette

    2011-10-01

    Thyroid hormone transport across the plasma membrane depends on transmembrane transport proteins, including monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8). Mutations in MCT8 (or SLC16A2) lead to a severe form of X-linked psychomotor retardation, which is characterised by elevated plasma triiodothyronine (T(3)) and low/normal thyroxine (T(4)). MCT8 contributes to hormone release from the thyroid gland. To characterise the potential impact of MCT8-deficiency on thyroid morphology in a patient and in Mct8-deficient mice. Thyroid morphology in a patient carrying the A224V mutation was followed by ultrasound imaging for over 10 years. After thyroidectomy, a histopathological analysis was carried out. The findings were compared with histological analyses of mouse thyroids from the Mct8(-/y) model. We show that an inactivating mutation in MCT8 leads to a unique, progressive thyroid follicular pathology in a patient. After thyroidectomy, histological analysis revealed gross morphological changes, including several hyperplastic nodules, microfollicular areas with stromal fibrosis and a small focus of microfollicular structures with nuclear features reminiscent of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). These findings are supported by an Mct8-null mouse model in which we found massive papillary hyperplasia in 6- to 12-month-old mice and nuclear features consistent with PTC in almost 2-year-old animals. After complete thyroidectomy and substitution with levothyroxine (l-T(4)), the preoperative, inadequately low T(4) and free T(4) remained, while increasing the l-T(4) dosage led to T(3) serum concentrations above the normal range. Our results implicate peripheral deiodination in the peculiar hormonal constellation of MCT8-deficient patients. Other MCT8-deficient patients should be closely monitored for potential thyroid abnormalities.

  15. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Randall W; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Jasperson, Kory; Klapman, Jason B; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Provenzale, Dawn; Rao, M Sambasiva; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    Mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by early diagnosis and by cancer prevention through polypectomy. These NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities and recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In addition, the guidelines provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome. Screening approaches for Lynch syndrome are also described.

  16. Prenatal transportation stress alters temperament and serum cortisol concentrations in suckling Brahman calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, B P; Price, D M; Banta, J P; Lewis, A W; Neuendorff, D A; Carroll, J A; Vann, R C; Welsh, T H; Randel, R D

    2016-02-01

    This experiment examined the relationship between prenatal stress and subsequent calf temperament through weaning. The prenatal stressor used was repeated transportation of pregnant Brahman cows for 2 h at 60 ± 5, 80 ± 5, 100 ± 5, 120 ± 5, and 140 ± 5 d of gestation. Prenatally stressed calves ( = 41) were compared with controls ( = 44; dams did not undergo transportation during pregnancy) from 2 wk of age until weaning (average age at weaning = 174.8 ± 1.3 d). Temperament was defined by pen score (PS; 1 = calm and 5 = excitable), exit velocity (EV; m/sec), and temperament score (TS; (PS + EV)/2) and was recorded for each calf on d -168, -140, -112, -84, -56, -28, and 0 relative to weaning (d 0 = weaning). Cortisol concentrations were determined in serum samples obtained on d -168, -140, -28, and 0 relative to weaning. Birth weight and weaning weight were not different between treatment groups ( > 0.1). Pen score was greater ( = 0.03) in prenatally stressed calves (2.84 ± 0.21) relative to controls (2.31 ± 0.21). Exit velocity was greater ( Brahman calves that were prenatally stressed were more temperamental and had greater circulating serum concentrations of cortisol than control calves.

  17. Multidrug Transporters and Alterations in Sterol Biosynthesis Contribute to Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkow, Elizabeth L; Manigaba, Kayihura; Parker, Josie E; Barker, Katherine S; Kelly, Stephen L; Rogers, P David

    2015-10-01

    While much is known concerning azole resistance in Candida albicans, considerably less is understood about Candida parapsilosis, an emerging species of Candida with clinical relevance. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of azole resistance in a collection of resistant C. parapsilosis clinical isolates in order to determine which genes might play a role in this process within this species. We examined the relative expression of the putative drug transporter genes CDR1 and MDR1 and that of ERG11. In isolates overexpressing these genes, we sequenced the genes encoding their presumed transcriptional regulators, TAC1, MRR1, and UPC2, respectively. We also sequenced the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG3 and ERG11 in these isolates to find mutations that might contribute to this phenotype in this Candida species. Our findings demonstrate that the putative drug transporters Cdr1 and Mdr1 contribute directly to azole resistance and suggest that their overexpression is due to activating mutations in the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators. We also observed that the Y132F substitution in ERG11 is the only substitution occurring exclusively among azole-resistant isolates, and we correlated this with specific changes in sterol biosynthesis. Finally, sterol analysis of these isolates suggests that other changes in sterol biosynthesis may contribute to azole resistance in C. parapsilosis.

  18. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E. (SBU)

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  19. Interacting effects of discharge and channel morphology on transport of semibuoyant fish eggs in large, altered river systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Worthington

    Full Text Available Habitat fragmentation and flow regulation are significant factors related to the decline and extinction of freshwater biota. Pelagic-broadcast spawning cyprinids require moving water and some length of unfragmented stream to complete their life cycle. However, it is unknown how discharge and habitat features interact at multiple spatial scales to alter the transport of semi-buoyant fish eggs. Our objective was to assess the relationship between downstream drift of semi-buoyant egg surrogates (gellan beads and discharge and habitat complexity. We quantified transport time of a known quantity of beads using 2-3 sampling devices at each of seven locations on the North Canadian and Canadian rivers. Transport time was assessed based on median capture time (time at which 50% of beads were captured and sampling period (time period when 2.5% and 97.5% of beads were captured. Habitat complexity was assessed by calculating width∶depth ratios at each site, and several habitat metrics determined using analyses of aerial photographs. Median time of egg capture was negatively correlated to site discharge. The temporal extent of the sampling period at each site was negatively correlated to both site discharge and habitat-patch dispersion. Our results highlight the role of discharge in driving transport times, but also indicate that higher dispersion of habitat patches relates to increased retention of beads within the river. These results could be used to target restoration activities or prioritize water use to create and maintain habitat complexity within large, fragmented river systems.

  20. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview What to Expect ... section Overview 2 of 6 sections The Basics: Colorectal Cancer What is colorectal cancer? Colorectal cancer is a ...

  1. ESKIMO1 disruption in Arabidopsis alters vascular tissue and impairs water transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Lefebvre

    Full Text Available Water economy in agricultural practices is an issue that is being addressed through studies aimed at understanding both plant water-use efficiency (WUE, i.e. biomass produced per water consumed, and responses to water shortage. In the model species Arabidopsis thaliana, the ESKIMO1 (ESK1 gene has been described as involved in freezing, cold and salt tolerance as well as in water economy: esk1 mutants have very low evapo-transpiration rates and high water-use efficiency. In order to establish ESK1 function, detailed characterization of esk1 mutants has been carried out. The stress hormone ABA (abscisic acid was present at high levels in esk1 compared to wild type, nevertheless, the weak water loss of esk1 was independent of stomata closure through ABA biosynthesis, as combining mutant in this pathway with esk1 led to additive phenotypes. Measurement of root hydraulic conductivity suggests that the esk1 vegetative apparatus suffers water deficit due to a defect in water transport. ESK1 promoter-driven reporter gene expression was observed in xylem and fibers, the vascular tissue responsible for the transport of water and mineral nutrients from the soil to the shoots, via the roots. Moreover, in cross sections of hypocotyls, roots and stems, esk1 xylem vessels were collapsed. Finally, using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, severe chemical modifications of xylem cell wall composition were highlighted in the esk1 mutants. Taken together our findings show that ESK1 is necessary for the production of functional xylem vessels, through its implication in the laying down of secondary cell wall components.

  2. Alterations in serotonin receptors and transporter immunoreactivities in the hippocampus in the rat unilateral hypoxic-induced epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sung-Jin; Kim, Duk-Soo

    2011-11-01

    Unilateral hypoxic-ischemia results in the frequent occurrence of interictal spikes, and occasionally sustained ictal discharges accompanied by a reduction in paired-pulse inhibition within the non-lesioned dentate gyrus. To elucidate the roles of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) in an epileptogenic insult, we investigated the changes in 5-HT receptors and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) immunoreactivities within the lesioned and contralateral hippocampus following unilateral hypoxic-ischemia. During epileptogenic periods following hypoxic-ischemia, both 5-HT(1A) and 5HT(1B) receptor immunoreactivities were decreased within the lesioned and the non-lesioned hippocampus. However, 5-HTT immunoreactivity was transiently increased within the hippocampus bilaterally. These findings indicate that alteration of the 5-HT system results in a "diaschisis" pattern, and may contribute to neuronal death and the development of emotional disorders in epileptic patients accompanied by psychological stress.

  3. Colonic microbiota alters host susceptibility to infectious colitis by modulating inflammation, redox status, and ion transporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Dai, C; Brown, K; Rajendiran, E; Makarenko, S; Baker, J; Ma, C; Halder, S; Montero, M; Ionescu, V A; Klegeris, A; Vallance, B A; Gibson, D L

    2011-07-01

    Individuals vary in their resistance to enteric infections. The role of the intestinal microbiota in altering susceptibility to enteric infection is relatively unknown. Previous studies have identified that C3H/HeOuJ mice suffer 100% mortality during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis, whereas C57BL/6 mice recover from infection. The basis for their differences in susceptibility is unclear and has been mainly attributed to differences in host genetics. This study investigated the role of the intestinal microbiota in altering susceptibility to C. rodentium-induced colitis. When the feces of C57BL/6 mice were gavaged into antibiotic treated C3H/HeOuJ mice, the C57BL/6 microflora led to a complete reversal in mortality patterns where 100% of the C3H/HeOuJ mice survived infection. This protection corresponded with reduced colonic pathology and less systemic pathogen load and was associated with increased inflammatory and redox responses with reduced epithelial cell death. C3H/HeOuJ mice are normally susceptible to infection-induced dehydration due to defective expression of colonic ion transporters such as Dra, CA IV, and CA I; expression of these genes was normalized when C3H/HeOuJ mice were colonized with the C57BL/6 microflora. Together, these data reveal that the colonic microbiota play a critical role in protecting against intestinal infection by inducing proinflammatory and prooxidant responses that control pathogen load as well as ion transporter gene expression previously shown to prevent fatal dehydration. Protection of mice from lethal colitis was associated with higher levels of bacteria from Bacteroidetes. This study reveals that the microbiota is sufficient to overcome inherent genetic susceptibility patterns in C3H/HeOuJ mice that cause mortality during C. rodentium infection.

  4. Using Reactive Transport Modeling to Understand Formation of the Stimson Sedimentary Unit and Altered Fracture Zones at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausrath, E. M.; Ming, D. W.; Peretyazhko, T.; Rampe, E. B.

    2017-01-01

    Water flowing through sediments at Gale Crater, Mars created environments that were likely habitable, and sampled basin-wide hydrological systems. However, many questions remain about these environments and the fluids that generated them. Measurements taken by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity of multiple fracture zones can help constrain the environments that formed them because they can be compared to nearby associated parent material (Figure 1). For example, measurements of altered fracture zones from the target Greenhorn in the Stimson sandstone can be compared to parent material measured in the nearby Big Sky target, allowing constraints to be placed on the alteration conditions that formed the Greenhorn target from the Big Sky target. Similarly, CheMin measurements of the powdered transport modeling of 1) the formation of the Big Sky target from a Rocknest eolian deposit-like parent material, and 2) the formation of the Greenhorn target from the Big Sky target. This work allows us to test the relationships between the targets and the characteristics of the aqueous conditions that formed the Greenhorn target from the Big Sky target, and the Big Sky target from a Rocknest eolian deposit-like parent material.

  5. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  6. Specific inhibition of bile acid transport alters plasma lipids and GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudling, Mats; Camilleri, Michael; Graffner, Hans

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elobixibat is a minimally absorbed ileal bile acid (BA) transporter (IBAT) inhibitor in development against chronic constipation (CC) and constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-C). CC is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type2 diabetes......: In the dyslipidemia study LDL cholesterol was reduced by 7.4 % (p = 0.044), and the LDL/HDL ratio was decreased by 18 % (p = 0.004). Serum C4 increased, indicating that BA synthesis was induced. No serious adverse events were recorded. In the CC study, GLP-1 increased significantly in both the 15 mg (20.7 ± 2.4 pmol....../L; p = 0.03) and the 20 mg group (25.6 ± 4.9 pmol/L; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Elobixibat reduces LDL cholesterol and LDL/HDL ratio and increase circulating peak GLP-1 levels, the latter in line with increased intestinal BA mediated responses in humans. TRIAL REGISTRATIONS: ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01069783...

  7. Acoustic and sonochemical methods for altering the viscosity of oil during recovery and pipeline transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Vladimir O; Abramova, Anna V; Bayazitov, Vadim M; Mullakaev, Marat S; Marnosov, Alexandr V; Ildiyakov, Alexandr V

    2017-03-01

    Reduction of oil viscosity is of great importance for the petroleum industry since it contributes a lot to the facilitation of pipeline transportation of oil. This study analyzes the capability of acoustic waves to decrease the viscosity of oil during its commercial production. Three types of equipment were tested: an ultrasonic emitter that is located directly in the well and affects oil during its production and two types of acoustic machines to be located at the wellhead and perform acoustic treatment after oil extraction: a setup for ultrasonic hydrodynamic treatment and a flow-through ultrasonic reactor. In our case, the two acoustic machines were rebuilt and tested in the laboratory. The viscosity of oil was measured before and after both types of acoustic treatment; and 2, 24 and 48h after ultrasonic treatment and 1 and 4h after hydrodynamic treatment in order to estimate the constancy of viscosity reduction. The viscosity reduction achieved by acoustic waves was compared to the viscosity reduction achieved by acoustic waves jointly with solvents. It was shown, that regardless of the form of powerful acoustic impact, a long lasting decrease in viscosity can be obtained only if sonochemical treatment is used. Using sonochemical treatment based on ultrasonic hydrodynamic treatment a viscosity reduction by 72,46% was achieved. However, the reduction in viscosity by 16%, which was demonstrated using the ultrasonic downhole tool in the well without addition of chemicals, is high enough to facilitate the production of viscous hydrocarbons.

  8. Hepatic alterations are accompanied by changes to bile acid transporter-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus after traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamutdinov, Damir; DeMorrow, Sharon; McMillin, Matthew; Kain, Jessica; Mukherjee, Sanjib; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Frampton, Gabriel; Bricker, Paul Clint S.; Hurst, Jacob; Shapiro, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    Annually, there are over 2 million incidents of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and treatment options are non-existent. While many TBI studies have focused on the brain, peripheral contributions involving the digestive and immune systems are emerging as factors involved in the various symptomology associated with TBI. We hypothesized that TBI would alter hepatic function, including bile acid system machinery in the liver and brain. The results show activation of the hepatic acute phase response by 2 hours after TBI, hepatic inflammation by 6 hours after TBI and a decrease in hepatic transcription factors, Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3 at 2 and 24 hrs after TBI. Bile acid receptors and transporters were decreased as early as 2 hrs after TBI until at least 24 hrs after TBI. Quantification of bile acid transporter, ASBT-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus, revealed a significant decrease following TBI. These results are the first to show such changes following a TBI, and are compatible with previous studies of the bile acid system in stroke models. The data support the emerging idea of a systemic influence to neurological disorders and point to the need for future studies to better define specific mechanisms of action. PMID:28106051

  9. Diabetes Alters the Expression and Translocation of the Insulin-Sensitive Glucose Transporters 4 and 8 in the Atria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Maria

    Full Text Available Although diabetes has been identified as a major risk factor for atrial fibrillation, little is known about glucose metabolism in the healthy and diabetic atria. Glucose transport into the cell, the rate-limiting step of glucose utilization, is regulated by the Glucose Transporters (GLUTs. Although GLUT4 is the major isoform in the heart, GLUT8 has recently emerged as a novel cardiac isoform. We hypothesized that GLUT-4 and -8 translocation to the atrial cell surface will be regulated by insulin and impaired during insulin-dependent diabetes. GLUT protein content was measured by Western blotting in healthy cardiac myocytes and type 1 (streptozotocin-induced, T1Dx diabetic rodents. Active cell surface GLUT content was measured using a biotinylated photolabeled assay in the perfused heart. In the healthy atria, insulin stimulation increased both GLUT-4 and -8 translocation to the cell surface (by 100% and 240%, respectively, P<0.05. Upon insulin stimulation, we reported an increase in Akt (Th308 and s473 sites and AS160 phosphorylation, which was positively (P<0.05 correlated with GLUT4 protein content in the healthy atria. During diabetes, active cell surface GLUT-4 and -8 content was downregulated in the atria (by 70% and 90%, respectively, P<0.05. Akt and AS160 phosphorylation was not impaired in the diabetic atria, suggesting the presence of an intact insulin signaling pathway. This was confirmed by the rescued translocation of GLUT-4 and -8 to the atrial cell surface upon insulin stimulation in the atria of type 1 diabetic subjects. In conclusion, our data suggest that: 1 both GLUT-4 and -8 are insulin-sensitive in the healthy atria through an Akt/AS160 dependent pathway; 2 GLUT-4 and -8 trafficking is impaired in the diabetic atria and rescued by insulin treatment. Alterations in atrial glucose transport may induce perturbations in energy production, which may provide a metabolic substrate for atrial fibrillation during diabetes.

  10. Alteration of the size distributions and mixing states of black carbon through transport in the boundary layer in east Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Takuma; Oshima, Naga; Taketani, Fumikazu; Komazaki, Yuichi; Yoshino, Ayako; Takami, Akinori; Kondo, Yutaka; Kanaya, Yugo

    2017-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of black carbon (BC) were performed near an industrial source region in the early summer of 2014 and at a remote island in Japan in the spring of 2015. Here, we report the temporal variations in the transport, size distributions, and mixing states of the BC-containing particles. These particles were characterized using a continuous soot monitoring system, a single particle soot photometer, and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor. The effects of aging on the growth of BC-containing particles were examined by comparing the ground-based observations between the near-source and remote island sites. Secondary formation of sulfate and organic aerosols strongly affected the increases in BC coating (i.e., enhancement of cloud condensation nuclei activity) with air mass aging from the source to the outflow regions. The effects of wet removal on BC microphysics were elucidated by classifying the continental outflow air masses depending on the enhancement ratios of BC to CO (ΔBC / ΔCO), which were used as an indicator of the transport efficiency of BC. It was found that ΔBC / ΔCO ratios were controlled mainly by the wet removal during transport in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on the timescale of 1-2 days. The meteorological conditions and backward trajectory analyses suggested that air masses strongly affected by wet removal originated mainly from a region in southern China (20-35° N) in the spring of 2015. Removal of large and thickly coated BC-containing particles was detected in the air masses that were substantially affected by the wet removal in the PBL, as predicted by Köhler theory. The size and water solubility of BC-containing particles in the PBL can be altered by the wet removal as well as the condensation of non-BC materials.

  11. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowton, E; Saunders, C; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R D; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A

    2014-10-14

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA efflux phenotype. Here, we report the novel identification of hDAT A559V in two unrelated ASD subjects and provide the first mechanistic description of its impaired trafficking phenotype. DAT surface expression is dynamically regulated by DAT substrates including the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH), which causes hDAT trafficking away from the plasma membrane. The integrity of DAT trafficking directly impacts DA transport capacity and therefore dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here, we show that hDAT A559V is resistant to AMPH-induced cell surface redistribution. This unique trafficking phenotype is conferred by altered protein kinase C β (PKCβ) activity. Cells expressing hDAT A559V exhibit constitutively elevated PKCβ activity, inhibition of which restores the AMPH-induced hDAT A559V membrane redistribution. Mechanistically, we link the inability of hDAT A559V to traffic in response to AMPH to the phosphorylation of the five most distal DAT N-terminal Ser. Mutation of these N-terminal Ser to Ala restores AMPH-induced trafficking. Furthermore, hDAT A559V has a diminished ability to transport AMPH, and therefore lacks AMPH-induced DA efflux. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ or Ser to Ala substitution in the hDAT A559V background restores AMPH-induced DA efflux while promoting intracellular AMPH accumulation. Although hDAT A559V is a rare variant, it has been found in multiple probands with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with imbalances in DA neurotransmission

  12. Alterações gastrointestinais em pacientes com câncer colorretal em ensaio clínico com fungos Agaricus sylvaticus Gastrointestinal alterations in patients with colorectal cancer on clinical trial supplemented with Agaricus sylvaticus fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Costa Fortes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Fungos medicinais podem normalizar a função intestinal, aumentar o apetite e reduzir os efeitos adversos do tratamento convencional do câncer. OBJETIVO: Avaliar as alterações gastrointestinais de pacientes com câncer colorretal em fase pós-operatória após suplementação dietética com fungos Agaricus sylvaticus. METODOLOGIA: Ensaio clínico randomizado, duplo-cego, placebo-controlado, realizado no Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal. Amostra constituída de 56 pacientes (24 homens e 32 mulheres, estádios I, II e III, seguindo determinados critérios de inclusão e exclusão, separados em grupos placebo e Agaricus sylvaticus (30mg/kg/dia e acompanhados por um período de seis meses. Para avaliar as alterações gastrointestinais foram utilizados um formulário-padrão e uma anamnese dirigida-padrão. O método de análise dos resultados foi qualitativo e descritivo, utilizando os programas Microsoft Excel 2003 e Epi Info 2004 para Windows, versão 3.3.2. RESULTADOS: Após seis meses de tratamento, observou-se, no grupo Agaricus sylvaticus, aumento do apetite e redução da constipação, diarréia, diarréia alternada com constipação, flatulência, retenção de flatos, pirose, plenitude pós-prandial, náuseas, distensão e dor abdominais, fatos não observados no grupo placebo. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados sugerem que a suplementação dietética com fungos Agaricus sylvaticus é capaz de melhorar as alterações gastrointestinais de pacientes no pós-operatório de câncer colorretal, promovendo melhoria na qualidade de vida desses pacientes.INTRODUCTION: Medicinal fungus may normalize intestinal function, increase appetite and reduce adverse effects caused by conventional cancer treatment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the gastrointestinal alterations of patients with colorectal cancer in post-operative phase after dietary supplementation with Agaricus sylvaticus fungus. METHODOLOGY: Randomized, double-blind, placebo

  13. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  14. Underpinning the repurposing of anthracyclines towards colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Smith, David Hersi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. We propose a repurposing strategy where anthracyclines are reintroduced to a subgroup of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with the highest likelihood of response. In breast cancer, DNA topoisomerase II alpha gene (TOP2A) alterations predict incremental benefit...... of anthracyclines, but this association has not been investigated in colorectal cancer. Frequency analysis of TOP2A gene alterations in colorectal cancer and the association with prognosis are evaluated and the challenges of using a TOP2A/CEN-17 FISH probe combination are addressed. Material and methods. Formalin......-fixed, paraffin-embedded material from 154 stage III colorectal cancer patients included in the RANX05 clinical trial was retrospectively assessed for TOP2A gene alterations using FISH. The TOP2A/CEN-17 ratio as well as the TOP2A gene copy number alone was used to define gene alterations and associations between...

  15. Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM): A general, coupled, nonisothermal multiphase flow, reactive transport, and porous medium alteration simulator, Version 2 user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DH Bacon; MD White; BP McGrail

    2000-03-07

    The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the US strategic defense arsenal by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pretreated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Vitrification is the leading option for immobilization of these wastes, expected to produce approximately 550,000 metric tons of Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass. This total tonnage, based on nominal Na{sub 2}O oxide loading of 20% by weight, is destined for disposal in a near-surface facility. Before disposal of the immobilized waste can proceed, the DOE must approve a performance assessment, a document that described the impacts, if any, of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Studies have shown that release rates of radionuclides from the glass waste form by reaction with water determine the impacts of the disposal action more than any other independent parameter. This report describes the latest accomplishments in the development of a computational tool, Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM), Version 2, a general, coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator. The underlying mathematics in STORM describe the rate of change of the solute concentrations of pore water in a variably saturated, non-isothermal porous medium, and the alteration of waste forms, packaging materials, backfill, and host rocks.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcoholic beverages per day increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Drinking alcohol is also linked to the risk of forming large colorectal adenomas (benign tumors). Cigarette smoking Cigarette smoking is ...

  17. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Stephen B; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy,; Roland, I; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    potential for biofouling and foundation scouring. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, cooperating with SMAST, developed an oceanographic model to predict changes in sediment transport as a result of the proposed tidal energy project. Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies prepared background material on protected species - including whales, seals, and sea turtles - in the project area and implemented an initial tagging program to record location specific information on seals and sea turtles. HMMH communicated research plans and findings with local stakeholder groups, state and federal resource agency staff, and the ocean power industry. The information is being used to prepare environmental permit applications and obtain approvals for project construction.

  18. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  19. Colorectal Cancer Molecular Biology Moves Into Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Colin C.; Grady, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The promise of personalized medicine is now a clinical reality, with colorectal cancer genetics at the forefront of this next major advance in clinical medicine. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing of colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we examine genetic mechanisms of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:20921207

  20. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  1. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-14

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies.

  2. Polymorphic CAG Repeat and Protein Expression of Androgen Receptor Gene in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Bing; Tang, Qingchao; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Muhammad, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-04-01

    Although somatic alterations in CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene have been suggested to predispose to colorectal cancer, less is known about AR in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. Because of lack of relevant analysis on CAG repeat length and AR expression in colorectal cancer, we aimed to investigate the prognostic value of polymorphic CAG and protein expression of the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer. A case-control study was carried out on 550 patients with colorectal cancer and 540 healthy controls to investigate whether polymorphic CAG within the AR gene is linked to increased risk for colorectal cancer. Polymorphic CAG and AR expression were analyzed to clarify their relationship with clinicopathologic and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer. The study showed that the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer had a longer CAG repeat sequence than those in the control group, as well as increased risk for colorectal cancer among females (P = 0.013), males (P = 0.002), and total colorectal cancer population (P CAG repeat sequence among males (P CAG repeat sequence and negative AR expression were associated with a short 5-year overall survival (OS) rate in colorectal cancer. Long CAG repeat sequences and the absence of AR expression were closely related to the development of colorectal cancer. Both long CAG and decreased AR expression were correlated with the poor 5-year OS in patients with colorectal cancer.

  3. Reduced phototropism in pks mutants may be due to altered auxin-regulated gene expression or reduced lateral auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, Chitose; Allenbach, Laure; Zourelidou, Melina; Ljung, Karin; Schütz, Frédéric; Isono, Erika; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Yamamoto, Kotaro T; Schwechheimer, Claus; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Phototropism allows plants to orient their photosynthetic organs towards the light. In Arabidopsis, phototropins 1 and 2 sense directional blue light such that phot1 triggers phototropism in response to low fluence rates, while both phot1 and phot2 mediate this response under higher light conditions. Phototropism results from asymmetric growth in the hypocotyl elongation zone that depends on an auxin gradient across the embryonic stem. How phototropin activation leads to this growth response is still poorly understood. Members of the phytochrome kinase substrate (PKS) family may act early in this pathway, because PKS1, PKS2 and PKS4 are needed for a normal phototropic response and they associate with phot1 in vivo. Here we show that PKS proteins are needed both for phot1- and phot2-mediated phototropism. The phototropic response is conditioned by the developmental asymmetry of dicotyledonous seedlings, such that there is a faster growth reorientation when cotyledons face away from the light compared with seedlings whose cotyledons face the light. The molecular basis for this developmental effect on phototropism is unknown; here we show that PKS proteins play a role at the interface between development and phototropism. Moreover, we present evidence for a role of PKS genes in hypocotyl gravi-reorientation that is independent of photoreceptors. pks mutants have normal levels of auxin and normal polar auxin transport, however they show altered expression patterns of auxin marker genes. This situation suggests that PKS proteins are involved in auxin signaling and/or lateral auxin redistribution.

  4. MAPT Genetic Variation and Neuronal Maturity Alter Isoform Expression Affecting Axonal Transport in iPSC-Derived Dopamine Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel E. Beevers

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The H1 haplotype of the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT locus is genetically associated with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD, and affects gene expression and splicing. However, the functional impact on neurons of such expression differences has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we employ extended maturation phases during differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into mature dopaminergic neuronal cultures to obtain cultures expressing all six adult tau protein isoforms. After 6 months of maturation, levels of exon 3+ and exon 10+ transcripts approach those of adult brain. Mature dopaminergic neuronal cultures display haplotype differences in expression, with H1 expressing 22% higher levels of MAPT transcripts than H2 and H2 expressing 2-fold greater exon 3+ transcripts than H1. Furthermore, knocking down adult tau protein variants alters axonal transport velocities in mature iPSC-derived dopaminergic neuronal cultures. This work links haplotype-specific MAPT expression with a biologically functional outcome relevant for PD.

  5. Colorectal Cancer Progression Is Associated with Accumulation of Th17 Lymphocytes in Tumor Tissues and Increased Serum Levels of Interleukin-6

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xinyi; Wang, Yanfu; Han, Chao; Li, Pai; Zhang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant worldwide health problem, and an altered immunoresponse plays an important role in colorectal tumorigenesis and cancer progression. T helper 17 (Th17) lymphocytes (a subgroup of CD4+ T cells...

  6. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table ... Carmen Marc Valvo is an outspoken voice for colorectal cancer screening. Photo Courtesy of: Phil Fisch Photography Designer ...

  7. 18 SrRNA Degradation is Not Accompanied by Altered rRNA Transport at Early Times Following Irradiation of HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Altered rRNA Transport at Early Times following Irradiation of HeLa Cells PINHAS Ft CHS.* JOHN M. KROLAKt DAVID MCCLAINt AND KENNETH W. MINTONt "I...ratio of 2:1 that is ob- high as 1.6:1 during the interval 5 to 20 h following irradiation of HeLa cells at _7.5 Gy. Alterations in 28 S:18 S ratio were...m 2 5 15 20 GY findings that the movement of the newly formed 40 S ribo- 10 somal subunits from the nuclei in HeLa cells proceeds more 2swiftly

  8. Prenatal transportation alters the acute phase response (APR) of bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the acute phase response (APR) to a postnatal Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day...

  9. Metachronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Svendsen, L B; Mellemgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1943-67, 903 Danish patients aged less than 40 years had colorectal carcinoma. The patients were followed up for up to 41 years and during this period 44 of 501 (9 per cent) operated on for cure developed a metachronous colorectal carcinoma. The cumulative risk of a metachronous...... colorectal carcinoma was 30 per cent after up to 41 years of observation. The occurrence of a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was evenly distributed in the observation period. The cumulative survival rate after operation for a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was 41 per cent after 20 years of observation....... We propose a lifelong follow-up programme after resection of colorectal carcinoma for cure in this age group, including annual Hemoccult test and colonoscopy at 3-year intervals....

  10. Clinical aspects of urea cycle dysfunction and altered brain energy metabolism on modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters in acute and chronic hyperammonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Vijayakumar; Mani, Renuka; Arumugam, Ramakrishnan

    2016-07-01

    In living organisms, nitrogen arise primarily as ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4(+)), which is a main component of the nucleic acid pool and proteins. Although nitrogen is essential for growth and maintenance in animals, but when the nitrogenous compounds exceeds the normal range which can quickly lead to toxicity and death. Urea cycle is the common pathway for the disposal of excess nitrogen through urea biosynthesis. Hyperammonemia is a consistent finding in many neurological disorders including congenital urea cycle disorders, reye's syndrome and acute liver failure leads to deleterious effects. Hyperammonemia and liver failure results in glutamatergic neurotransmission which contributes to the alteration in the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, modulates the important cerebral process. Even though ammonia is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), in particular high concentrations of ammonia exposure to the brain leads to the alterations of glutamate transport by the transporters. Several glutamate transporters have been recognized in the central nervous system and each has a unique physiological property and distribution. The loss of glutamate transporter activity in brain during acute liver failure and hyperammonemia is allied with increased extracellular brain glutamate concentrations which may be conscientious for the cerebral edema and ultimately cell death.

  11. Schisandra chinensis Peptidoglycan-Assisted Transmembrane Transport of Lignans Uniquely Altered the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Mechanisms in Human HepG2 Cell Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Ker, Yaw-Bee; Chang, Chi-Huang; Huang, Shiau-Huei; Wang, Hui-Er; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y.

    2014-01-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turz Baill) (S. chinensis) (SC) fruit is a hepatoprotective herb containing many lignans and a large amount of polysaccharides. A novel polysaccharide (called SC-2) was isolated from SC of MW 841 kDa, which exhibited a protein-to-polysaccharide ratio of 0.4089, and showed a characteristic FTIR spectrum of a peptidoglycan. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed microcrystalline structures within SC-2. SC-2 contained 10 monosaccharides and 15 amino acids (essential amino acids of 78.12%w/w). In a HepG2 cell model, SC-2 was shown by MTT and TUNEL assay to be completely non-cytotoxic. A kinetic analysis and fluorescence-labeling technique revealed no intracellular disposition of SC-2. Combined treatment of lignans with SC-2 enhanced the intracellular transport of schisandrin B and deoxyschisandrin but decreased that of gomisin C, resulting in alteration of cell-killing bioactivity. The Second Law of Thermodynamics allows this type of unidirectional transport. Conclusively, SC-2 alters the transport and cell killing capability by a “Catcher-Pitcher Unidirectional Transport Mechanism”. PMID:24475039

  12. Schisandra chinensis peptidoglycan-assisted transmembrane transport of lignans uniquely altered the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms in human HepG2 cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charng-Cherng Chyau

    Full Text Available Schisandra chinensis (Turz Baill (S. chinensis (SC fruit is a hepatoprotective herb containing many lignans and a large amount of polysaccharides. A novel polysaccharide (called SC-2 was isolated from SC of MW 841 kDa, which exhibited a protein-to-polysaccharide ratio of 0.4089, and showed a characteristic FTIR spectrum of a peptidoglycan. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed microcrystalline structures within SC-2. SC-2 contained 10 monosaccharides and 15 amino acids (essential amino acids of 78.12%w/w. In a HepG2 cell model, SC-2 was shown by MTT and TUNEL assay to be completely non-cytotoxic. A kinetic analysis and fluorescence-labeling technique revealed no intracellular disposition of SC-2. Combined treatment of lignans with SC-2 enhanced the intracellular transport of schisandrin B and deoxyschisandrin but decreased that of gomisin C, resulting in alteration of cell-killing bioactivity. The Second Law of Thermodynamics allows this type of unidirectional transport. Conclusively, SC-2 alters the transport and cell killing capability by a "Catcher-Pitcher Unidirectional Transport Mechanism".

  13. The transparent testa4 mutation prevents flavonoid synthesis and alters auxin transport and the response of Arabidopsis roots to gravity and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buer, Charles S; Muday, Gloria K

    2004-05-01

    We examined whether flavonoids act as endogenous auxin transport regulators during gravity vector and light intensity changes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Flavonoid deficient transparent testa4 [tt4(2YY6)] seedlings had elevated root basipetal auxin transport compared with the wild type, consistent with the absence of a negative auxin transport regulator. The tt4(2YY6) roots had delayed gravitropism that was chemically complemented with a flavonoid intermediate. Flavonoid accumulation was found in wild-type columella cells, the site of gravity perception, and in epidermal and cortical cells, the site of differential growth, but flavonoid accumulation was absent in tt4(2YY6) roots. Flavonoid accumulation was higher in gravity-stimulated root tips as compared with vertical controls, with maximum differences coinciding with the timing of gravitropic bending, and was located in epidermal cells. Exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) also elevated flavonoid accumulation, suggesting that flavonoid changes in response to gravity might be partly as a result of changing IAA distribution. Acropetal IAA transport was also elevated in roots of tt4(2YY6). Flavonoid synthesis was repressed in the dark, as were differences in root acropetal transport in tt4(2YY6). These results are consistent with light- and gravity-induced flavonoid stimulation that alters auxin transport in roots and dependent physiological processes, including gravitropic bending and root development.

  14. Detection of colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Christensen, Ib J; Rasmussen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Serological biomarkers may be an option for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study assessed 8 cancer-associated protein biomarkers in plasma from subjects undergoing first time ever colonoscopy due to symptoms attributable to colorectal neoplasia. Plasma AFP, CA19-9, CEA, hs...

  15. Colorectal cancers choosing sides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albuquerque, Cristina; Bakker, Elvira R. M.; van Veelen, Wendy; Smits, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of sporadic colorectal cancer which predominantly occur in the distal colon, most mismatch repair deficient tumours arise at the proximal side. At present, these regional preferences have not been explained properly. Recently, we have screened colorectal tumours for mutat

  16. Peroxiredoxins in colorectal neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, X.Y.; Fu, X.Z.; Wang, X. H.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are novel group proteins with efficient antioxidant capacity, and some of them also have effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Altogether six distinct Prxs expressions were investigated in histological samples of colorectal neoplasm and the distant normal tissues and investigated associatedly with parameters such as clinical stage and lymphnodes metastasis. Normal colorectal tis...

  17. Urine Metabolite Profiling of Human Colorectal Cancer by Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry Based on MRB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lian Chen

    2012-01-01

    (P<0.05. Conclusion. The technique of capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry based on MRB could reveal the significant metabolic alterations during progression of colorectal cancer, and the method is feasible and may be useful for the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  18. Living as a Colorectal Cancer Survivor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Living as a Colorectal Cancer Survivor For many people with colorectal cancer, treatment ... cancer screening tests. Typical follow-up schedules after colorectal cancer Even if you have completed treatment, you will ...

  19. APC and chromosome instability in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Cabrera

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a common disease that can be sporadic or familial. An inactivated adenomatous polyposis coli (APC suppressor gene is found in over 80% of colorectal tumors, this being an early alteration in the development of adenomatous polyps. APC function is not only critical for tumor initiation and progression, and chromosome instability (CIN is another characteristic dependent at least partly on APC mutations.

  20. Fusobacterium nucleatum Promotes Chemoresistance to Colorectal Cancer by Modulating Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, TaChung; Guo, Fangfang; Yu, Yanan; Sun, Tiantian; Ma, Dan; Han, Jixuan; Qian, Yun; Kryczek, Ilona; Sun, Danfeng; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Chen, Yingxuan; Chen, Haoyan; Hong, Jie; Zou, Weiping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2017-07-27

    Gut microbiota are linked to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy failure is the major cause of recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. Here, we investigated the contribution of gut microbiota to chemoresistance in patients with colorectal cancer. We found that Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum was abundant in colorectal cancer tissues in patients with recurrence post chemotherapy, and was associated with patient clinicopathological characterisitcs. Furthermore, our bioinformatic and functional studies demonstrated that F. nucleatum promoted colorectal cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, F. nucleatum targeted TLR4 and MYD88 innate immune signaling and specific microRNAs to activate the autophagy pathway and alter colorectal cancer chemotherapeutic response. Thus, F. nucleatum orchestrates a molecular network of the Toll-like receptor, microRNAs, and autophagy to clinically, biologically, and mechanistically control colorectal cancer chemoresistance. Measuring and targeting F. nucleatum and its associated pathway will yield valuable insight into clinical management and may ameliorate colorectal cancer patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporal alteration of spreading depression by the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitors NFPS and Org-24461 in chicken retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Szabolcs; Szabo, Geza; Udvari, Szabolcs; Levay, Gyorgy; Matyus, Peter; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2013-01-25

    We used isolated chicken retina to induce spreading depression by the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate. The N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced latency time of spreading depression was extended by the glycine(B) binding site competitive antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid. Addition of the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitors NFPS and Org-24461 reversed the inhibitory effect of 7-chlorokynurenic acid on N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked spreading depression. The glycine uptake inhibitory activity of Org-24461, NFPS, and some newly synthesized analogs of NFPS was determined in CHO cells stably expressing human glycine transporter type-1b isoform. Compounds, which failed to inhibit glycine transporter type-1, also did not have effect on retinal spreading depression. These experiments indicate that the spreading depression model in chicken retina is a useful in vitro test to determine activity of glycine transporter type-1 inhibitors. In addition, our data serve further evidence for the role of glycine transporter type-1 in retinal neurotransmission and light processing.

  2. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Knudsen, Lina Almind

    2015-01-01

    and which may additionally affect ABC transporter function through nuclear receptors and transcriptional regulation. Another critical role of ABCB1 was suggested by the finding that ABCB1 expression identifies a subpopulation of pro-inflammatory Th17 cells which were resistant to treatment...

  3. Screening for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J; Jakobsen, Karen V; Christensen, Ib J

    2011-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including...... into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among...... procedures for colorectal cancer. Therefore, results of present research, validating RAE tests, are awaited with interest....

  4. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  5. Altered Renal Expression of Relevant Clinical Drug Transporters in Different Models of Acute Uremia in Rats. Role of Urea Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel Brandoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Organic anion transporter 1 (Oat1 and 3 (Oat3 are organic anion transporters that play critical roles in the body disposition of numerous clinically important drugs. We investigated the effects of acute uremia on the renal expression of Oat1 and Oat3 in three in vivo experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI: induced by ischemia, by ureteral obstruction and by the administration of HgCl2. We also evaluated the influence of urea in the expression of these transporters in proximal tubular cells suspensions. Methods: Membranes were isolated from kidneys of each experimental group and from cell suspensions incubated with different urea concentrations. Oat1 and Oat3 expressions were performed by immunoblotting. Results: A good correlation between uremia and the renal protein expression of Oat1 and Oat3 was observed in vivo. Moreover, the incubation of isolated proximal tubular cells with different concentrations of urea decreases protein expression of Oat1 and Oat3 in plasma membranes in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: The more severe the renal failure, the more important is the decrease in protein expression of the transporters in renal membranes where they are functional. The in vitro study demonstrates that urea accounts, at least in part, for the decreased expression of Oat1 and Oat3 in proximal tubule plasma membranes.

  6. Altered expression of polyamine transporters reveals a role for spermidine in the timing of flowering and other developmental response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sheaza; Ariyaratne, Menaka; Patel, Jigar; Howard, Alexander E; Kalinoski, Andrea; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Morris, Paul F

    2017-05-01

    Changes in the levels of polyamines are correlated with the activation or repression of developmental response pathways, but the role of polyamine transporters in the regulation of polyamine homeostasis and thus indirectly gene expression, has not been previously addressed. Here we show that the A. thaliana and rice transporters AtPUT5 and OsPUT1 were localized to the ER, while the AtPUT2, AtPUT3, and OsPUT3 were localized to the chloroplast by transient expression in N. benthamiana. A. thaliana plants that were transformed with OsPUT1 under the control the PUT5 promoter were delayed in flowering by 16days. In contrast, put5 mutants flowered four days earlier than WT plants. The delay of flowering was associated with significantly higher levels of spermidine and spermidine conjugates in the leaves prior to flowering. A similar delay in flowering was also noted in transgenic lines with constitutive expression of either OsPUT1 or OsPUT3. All three transgenic lines had larger rosette leaves, thicker flowering stems, and produced more siliques than wild type plants. In contrast, put5 plants had smaller leaves, thinner flowering stems, and produced fewer siliques. Constitutive expression of PUTs was also associated with an extreme delay in both plant senescence and maturation rate of siliques. These experiments provide the first genetic evidence of polyamine transport in the timing of flowering, and indicate the importance of polyamine transporters in the regulation of flowering and senescence pathways.

  7. Altered biodistribution of gallium-67 in a patient with multiple factors influencing iron-transport protein saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeon Young; Kim, Sang Eun; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [College of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    We present a case of a young female patient with fulminant hepatitis who showed an altered biodistribution of Ga-67, after being scanned twice at 10 month intervals. On initial scan, uptake of Ga-67 was increased in the liver, kidneys, and skeletons. Increased hepatic Ga-67 uptake may be explained by increased transferrin unbound Ga-67 that was taken up by the inflamed liver. The saturation of iron-binding proteins due to multiple transfusions may lead to increased renal and skeletal Ga-67 uptake. On follow-up scan hepatic Ga-67 uptake was markedly increased. Also increased Ga-67 uptake in the axial skeleton and normalized renal uptake were shown. The findings were consistent with iron deficiency anemia. This case demonstrates altered Ga-67 biodistribution associated with multiple transfusions, fulminant hepatitis, and iron deficiency anemia.

  8. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  9. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1.......59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship....

  10. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies.

  11. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  12. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  13. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test.

  14. Obesity and Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gribovskaja-Rupp, Irena; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer based on its molecular and metabolic effects on insulin and IGF-1, leptin, adipocytokines, and sex hormones. Obese men have a higher risk of colorectal cancer compared with normal weight men, but the association between obesity and rectal cancer is weaker than with colon cancer. There is a weaker association between obesity and colon cancer in women than in men, and no appreciable association between obesity and rectal cancer in women. Although o...

  15. Malignant colorectal polyps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis; Bujanda; Angel; Cosme; Ines; Gil; Juan; I; Arenas-Mirave

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the number of cases in which malignant colorectal polyps are removed is increasing due to colorectal cancer screening programmes. Cancerous polyps are classified into non-invasive high grade neoplasia (NHGN), when the cancer has not reached the muscularis mucosa, and malignant polyps, classed as T1, when they have invaded the submucosa. NHGN is considered cured with polypectomy, while the prognosis for malignant polyps depends on various morphological and histological factors. The prognostic facto...

  16. Techniques for colorectal anastomosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yik-Hong; Ho; Mohamed; Ahmed; Tawfi; k; Ashour

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leak remains one of the most feared post-operative complications, particularly after anterior resection of the rectum with, the shift from abdomino-peritoneal resections to total mesorectal excision and primary anastomosis. The literature fails to demonstrate superiority of stapled over hand-sewn techniques in colorectal anastomosis, regardless of the level of anastomosis, although a high stricture rate was noted in the former technique. Thus, improvements in safety aspects of anastom...

  17. Polymorphisms in the xenobiotic transporter Multidrug Resistance 1 (MDR1) and interaction with meat intake in relation to risk of colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective case-cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Østergaard, Mette; Christensen, Jane

    2009-01-01

    prostaglandins promote gastrointestinal carcinogenesis, affecting angiogenesis, apoptosis, and invasiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate if polymorphisms in these genes were associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), and to investigate possible interactions with lifestyle factors...

  18. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too.

  19. Adiponectin and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Kensuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is an obesity-related malignancy. Adiponectin is an adipokine produced exclusively by adipose tissue, and its concentration in the serum is reduced in obesity. A low serum level of adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer. These facts suggest that the epidemiological link between obesity and cancer may have a significant association with adiponectin. Although numerous studies of colorectal cancer have been reported, the results are conflicting about the anti-cancer effect of adiponectin, and how adiponectin affects carcinogenesis or cancer development remains controversial. Because adiponectin has multiple systemic effects and exists as a high serum concentration protein, the main role of adiponectin should be regulation of homeostasis, and it would not likely act as an anti-cancerous hormone. However, as epidemiological evidence shows, a low adiponectin level may be a basic risk factor for colorectal cancer. We speculate that when the colonic epithelium is stimulated or damaged by another carcinogen under the condition of a low adiponectin level, carcinogenesis is promoted and cancer development is facilitated. In this report, we summarize recent findings of the correlation between adiponectin and colorectal cancer and investigate the effect of adiponectin on colorectal cancer.

  20. Neurological effects of inorganic arsenic exposure: altered cysteine/glutamate transport, NMDA expression and spatial memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio A Ramos-Chávez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs is an important natural pollutant. Millions of individuals worldwide drink water with high levels of iAs. Chronic exposure to iAs has been associated with lower IQ and learning disabilities as well as memory impairment. iAs is methylated in tissues such as the brain generating mono and dimethylated species. iAs methylation requires cellular glutathione (GSH, which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system. In humans, As species cross the placenta and are found in cord blood. A CD1 mouse model was used to investigate effects of gestational iAs exposure which can lead to oxidative damage, disrupted cysteine/glutamate transport and its putative impact in learning and memory. On postnatal days (PNDs 1, 15 and 90, the expression of membrane transporters related to GSH synthesis and glutamate transport and toxicity, such as xCT, EAAC1, GLAST and GLT1, as well as LAT1, were analyzed. Also, the expression of the glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR subunits NR2A and B as well as the presence of As species in cortex and hippocampus were investigated. On PND 90, an object location task was performed to associate exposure with memory impairment. Gestational exposure to iAs affected the expression of cysteine/glutamate transporters in cortex and hippocampus and induced a negative modulation of NMDAR NR2B subunit in the hippocampus. Behavioral tasks showed significant spatial memory impairment in males while the effect was marginal in females.

  1. Mammary gland copper transport is stimulated by prolactin through alterations in Ctr1 and Atp7A localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Shannon L; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-10-01

    Milk copper (Cu) concentration declines and directly reflects the stage of lactation. Three Cu-specific transporters (Ctr1, Atp7A, Atp7B) have been identified in the mammary gland; however, the integrated role they play in milk Cu secretion is not understood. Whereas the regulation of milk composition by the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) has been documented, the specific contribution of PRL to this process is largely unknown. Using the lactating rat as a model, we determined that the normal decline in milk Cu concentration parallels declining Cu availability to the mammary gland and is associated with decreased Atp7B protein levels. Mammary gland Cu transport was highest during early lactation and was stimulated by suckling and hyperprolactinemia, which was associated with Ctr1 and Atp7A localization at the plasma membrane. Using cultured mammary epithelial cells (HC11), we demonstrated that Ctr1 stains in association with intracellular vesicles that partially colocalize with transferrin receptor (recycling endosome marker). Atp7A was primarily colocalized with mannose 6-phosphate receptor (M6PR; late endosome marker), whereas Atp7B was partially colocalized with protein disulfide isomerase (endoplasmic reticulum marker), TGN38 (trans-Golgi network marker) and M6PR. Prolactin stimulated Cu transport as a result of increased Ctr1 and Atp7A abundance at the plasma membrane. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these posttranslational changes are not understood, transient changes in prolactin signaling play a role in the regulation of mammary gland Cu secretion during lactation.

  2. Obesity and age-related alterations in the gene expression of zinc-transporter proteins in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, R H; Hyde, T M; Kleinman, J E

    2016-01-01

    participate in intracellular zinc homeostasis. Altered expression of zinc-regulatory proteins has been described in AD patients. Using microarray data from human frontal cortex (BrainCloud), this study investigates expression of the SCLA30A (ZNT) and SCLA39A (ZIP) families of genes in a Caucasian and African......The incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasing. Major risk factors for AD are advancing age and diabetes. Lately, obesity has been associated with an increased risk of dementia. Obese and diabetic individuals are prone to decreased circulating levels of zinc, reducing the amount of zinc...

  3. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  4. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. ... patients know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  5. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  6. Altered Transport and Metabolism of Phenolic Compounds in Obesity and Diabetes: Implications for Functional Food Development and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redan, Benjamin W; Buhman, Kimberly K; Novotny, Janet A; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2016-11-01

    Interest in the application of phenolic compounds from the diet or supplements for the prevention of chronic diseases has grown substantially, but the efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. Although food and dietary factors have been the focus of intense investigation, the impact of disease states such as obesity or diabetes on their absorption, metabolism, and eventual efficacy is important to consider. These factors must be understood in order to develop effective strategies that leverage bioactive phenolic compounds for the prevention of chronic disease. The goal of this review is to discuss the inducible metabolic systems that may be influenced by disease states and how these effects impact the bioavailability and metabolism of dietary phenolic compounds. Because current studies generally report that obesity and/or diabetes alter the absorption and excretion of these compounds, this review includes a description of the absorption, conjugation, and excretion pathways for phenolic compounds and how they are potentially altered in disease states. A possible mechanism that will be discussed related to the modulation of phenolic bioavailability and metabolism may be linked to increased inflammatory status from increased amounts of adipose tissue or elevated plasma glucose concentrations. Although more studies are needed, the translation of benefits derived from dietary phenolic compounds to individuals with obesity or diabetes may require the consideration of dosing strategies or be accompanied by adjunct therapies to improve the bioavailability of these compounds. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Distinct alterations in ATP-binding cassette transporter expression in liver, kidney, small intestine, and brain in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Atsushi; Norikane, Sari; Okada, Ayaka; Adachi, Mamiko; Kato, Yukio; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Pathophysiological changes of infection or inflammation are associated with alterations in the production of numerous absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion-related proteins. However, little information is available on the effects of inflammation on the expression levels and activities of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We examined the effect of acute (on day 7) and chronic (on day 21) inflammation on the expression of ABC transporters in some major tissues in rat. Adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats was used as an animal model for inflammation. The mRNA levels of mdr1a and mdr1b encoding P-glycoprotein (P-gp) decreased significantly in livers of AA rats on day 21. Hepatic protein levels of P-gp, Mrp2, and Bcrp decreased significantly in membranes but not homogenates of AA rats after 7 days and after 21 days of treatment with adjuvant. Contrary to liver, protein levels of P-gp and Mrp2, but not Bcrp in kidney, increased significantly in membranes. The biliary excretion of rhodamine 123 was decreased in rats with chronic inflammation owing to decreases in efflux activities of P-gp. Our results showed that the expression of transporters in response to inflammation was organ dependent. In particular, hepatic and renal P-gp and Mrp2 exhibited opposite changes in membrane protein levels.

  8. Galectin-3 silencing inhibits epirubicin-induced ATP binding cassette transporters and activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway via β-catenin/GSK-3β modulation in colorectal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kuo Lee

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising the treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves the upregulation of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and induction of galectin-3 signaling. Galectin-3 plays an anti-apoptotic role in many cancer cells and regulates various pathways to activate MDR. Thus, the inhibition of galectin-3 has the potential to enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug epirubicin. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanisms of silencing galectin-3 via RNA interference (RNAi on the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Galectin-3 knockdown increased the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells; suppressed the mRNA expression of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, c-myc, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR-associated protein (MRP 1, and MRP2; and downregulated the protein expression of P-gp, cyclin D1, galectin-3, β-catenin, c-Myc, and Bcl-2. Moreover, galectin-3 RNAi treatment significantly increased the mRNA level of GSK-3β, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9; remarkably increased the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio; and upregulated the GSK-3β and Bax protein expressions. Apoptosis was induced by galectin-3 RNAi and/or epirubicin as demonstrated by chromatin condensation, a higher sub-G1 phase proportion, and increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, indicating an intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Epirubicin-mediated resistance was effectively inhibited via galectin-3 RNAi treatment. However, these phenomena could be rescued after galectin-3 overexpression. We show for the first time that the silencing of galectin-3 sensitizes MDR cells to epirubicin by inhibiting ABC transporters and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis through modulation of the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon cancer cells.

  9. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs.

  10. Laparoscopic reintervention in colorectal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, RP Ten; Goor, H. van

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery has developed in the 1990's and beginning of 2000. The favourable results and great progress in the development of laparoscopic techniques have expanded the indications of laparoscopic colorectal surgery. More and more complicated colorectal cases are treated laparosc

  11. Obesity and age-related alterations in the gene expression of zinc-transporter proteins in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, R H; Hyde, T M; Kleinman, J E; Smidt, K; Rungby, J; Larsen, A

    2016-06-14

    The incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasing. Major risk factors for AD are advancing age and diabetes. Lately, obesity has been associated with an increased risk of dementia. Obese and diabetic individuals are prone to decreased circulating levels of zinc, reducing the amount of zinc available for crucial intracellular processes. In the brain, zinc co-localizes with glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and modulates NMDA receptor activity. Intracellular zinc is involved in apoptosis and fluctuations in cytoplasmic Zn(2+) affect modulation of intracellular signaling. The ZNT and ZIP proteins participate in intracellular zinc homeostasis. Altered expression of zinc-regulatory proteins has been described in AD patients. Using microarray data from human frontal cortex (BrainCloud), this study investigates expression of the SCLA30A (ZNT) and SCLA39A (ZIP) families of genes in a Caucasian and African-American sample of 145 neurologically and psychiatrically normal individuals. Expression of ZNT3 and ZNT4 were significantly reduced with increasing age, whereas expression of ZIP1, ZIP9 and ZIP13 were significantly increased. Increasing body mass index (BMI) correlated with a significant reduction in ZNT1 expression similar to what is seen in the early stages of AD. Increasing BMI also correlated with reduced expression of ZNT6. In conclusion, we found that the expression of genes that regulate intracellular zinc homeostasis in the human frontal cortex is altered with increasing age and affected by increasing BMI. With the increasing rates of obesity throughout the world, these findings warrant continuous scrutiny of the long-term consequences of obesity on brain function and the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Perinatal Na+ overload programs raised renal proximal Na+ transport and enalapril-sensitive alterations of Ang II signaling pathways during adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edjair V Cabral

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High Na(+ intake is a reality in nowadays and is frequently accompanied by renal and cardiovascular alterations. In this study, renal mechanisms underlying perinatal Na(+ overload-programmed alterations in Na(+ transporters and the renin/angiotensin system (RAS were investigated, together with effects of short-term treatment with enalapril in terms of reprogramming molecular alterations in kidney. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male adult Wistar rats were obtained from dams maintained throughout pregnancy and lactation on a standard diet and drinking water (control or 0.17 M NaCl (saline group. Enalapril (100 mg/l, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, was administered for three weeks after weaning. Ninety day old offspring from dams that drank saline presented with proximal tubules exhibiting increased (Na(++K(+ATPase expression and activity. Ouabain-insensitive Na(+-ATPase activity remained unchanged but its response to angiotensin II (Ang II was lost. PKC, PKA, renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, macrophage infiltration and collagen deposition markedly increased, and AT(2 receptor expression decreased while AT(1 expression was unaltered. Early treatment with enalapril reduced expression and activity of (Na(++K(+ATPase, partially recovered the response of Na(+-ATPase to Ang II, and reduced PKC and PKA activities independently of whether offspring were exposed to high perinatal Na(+ or not. In addition, treatment with enalapril per se reduced AT(2 receptor expression, and increased TBARS, macrophage infiltration and collagen deposition. The perinatally Na(+-overloaded offspring presented high numbers of Ang II-positive cortical cells, and significantly lower circulating Ang I, indicating that programming/reprogramming impacted systemic and local RAS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Maternal Na(+ overload programmed alterations in renal Na(+ transporters and in its regulation, as well as severe structural lesions

  13. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a w...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context.......Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...

  14. Altered localisation of the copper efflux transporters ATP7A and ATP7B associated with cisplatin resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reedijk Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper homeostasis proteins ATP7A and ATP7B are assumed to be involved in the intracellular transport of cisplatin. The aim of the present study was to assess the relevance of sub cellular localisation of these transporters for acquired cisplatin resistance in vitro. For this purpose, localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells and their cisplatin-resistant variant, A2780cis, was investigated. Methods Sub cellular localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B in sensitive and resistant cells was investigated using confocal fluorescence microscopy after immunohistochemical staining. Co-localisation experiments with a cisplatin analogue modified with a carboxyfluorescein-diacetate residue were performed. Cytotoxicity of the fluorescent cisplatin analogue in A2780 and A2780cis cells was determined using an MTT-based assay. The significance of differences was analysed using Student's t test or Mann-Whitney test as appropriate, p values of Results In the sensitive cells, both transporters are mainly localised in the trans-Golgi network, whereas they are sequestrated in more peripherally located vesicles in the resistant cells. Altered localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B in A2780cis cells is likely to be a consequence of major abnormalities in intracellular protein trafficking related to a reduced lysosomal compartment in this cell line. Changes in sub cellular localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B may facilitate sequestration of cisplatin in the vesicular structures of A2780cis cells, which may prevent drug binding to genomic DNA and thereby contribute to cisplatin resistance. Conclusion Our results indicate that alterations in sub cellular localisation of transport proteins may contribute to cisplatin resistance in vitro. Investigation of intracellular protein localisation in primary tumour cell cultures and tumour tissues may help to develop markers of clinically relevant cisplatin resistance. Detection of resistant tumours

  15. Experimental study of gold activation-transportation in the process of potash metasomatism-alteration ——North China platform gold deposit taken as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yurong; HU; Shouxi

    2001-01-01

    Chemical reactions of plagioclase, biotite and their single minerals, as well as a mineral mixture of (plagioclase +biotite+quartz), with KCl and (KCl+KHCO3) solutions were carried out at 150400℃ and 5080 MPa. Experiments show that alkaline fluid promotes plagioclase’s changing into potash feldspar, while acid fluid helps plagioclase, potash feldspar and biotite alteration form chlorite and sericite. After chemical reaction the acidity-alkalinity of solutions often changes reversely. It was observed that gold dissolved from the tube wall and recrystallized on the surfaces of biotite and pyrite. Therefore the transportation and enrichment of gold are related to the elementary effect of the fluid-mineral interfaces. Fe3+-Fe2+, as an oxidition-reduction agent, and volatile components Cl? and CO2 play important roles in the reaction process.

  16. Temporal variation of nitrate and phosphate transport in headwater catchments: the hydrological controls and land use alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-Y. Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Oceania rivers are hotspots of DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen and DIP (dissolved inorganic phosphorus transport due to humid/warm climate, typhoon-induced episodic rainfall and high tectonic activity that create an environment favorable for high/rapid runoff and soil erosion. In spite of its uniqueness, effects of hydrologic controls and land use on the transport behaviors of DIN and DIP are rarely documented. A 2 yr monitoring study for DIN and DIP from three headwater catchments with different cultivation gradient (0 To 8.9% was implemented during a ~ 3 day interval with an additional monitoring campaign at a 3 h interval during typhoon periods. Results showed the DIN yields in the pristine, moderately cultivated (2.7%, and intensively cultivated (8.9% watersheds were 8.3, 26, and 37 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively. For the DIP yields, they were 0.36, 0.35, and 0.56 kg P ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Higher year-round DIN concentrations and five times larger in DIN yields in intensively cultivated watersheds indicate DIN is more sensitive to land use changes. The high background DIN yield from the relatively pristine watershed was likely due to high atmospheric nitrogen deposition and large subterranean N pool. The correlations between runoff and concentration reveals that typhoon floods purge out more DIN from the subterranean reservoir, i.e., soil, by contrast, runoff washes off surface soil resulting in higher suspended sediment with higher DIP. Collectively, typhoon runoff contributes 20–70% and 47–80%, respectively, to the annual DIN and DIP exports. The DIN yield to DIP yield ratio varied from 97 to 410, which is higher than the global mean of ~ 18. Such a high ratio indicates a P-limiting condition in stream and the downstream aquatic environment. Based on our field observation, we constructed a conceptual model illustrating different remobilization mechanisms for DIN and DIP from headwaters in a mountainous river, which is

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Sodium Arsenite Alters Placental Glucose 1, 3, and 4 Transporters in Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sarahí Gutiérrez-Torres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs exposure induces a decrease in glucose type 4 transporter (GLUT4 expression on the adipocyte membrane, which may be related to premature births and low birth weight infants in women exposed to iAs at reproductive age. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 exposure on GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 protein expression and on placental morphology. Female Balb/c mice (n=15 were exposed to 0, 12, and 20 ppm of NaAsO2 in drinking water from 8th to 18th day of gestation. Morphological changes and GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 expression were evaluated in placentas by immunohistochemical and image analysis and correlated with iAs and arsenical species concentration, which were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. NaAsO2 exposure induced a significant decrease in fetal and placental weight (P<0.01 and increases in infarctions and vascular congestion. Whereas GLUT1 expression was unchanged in placentas from exposed group, GLUT3 expression was found increased. In contrast, GLUT4 expression was significantly lower (P<0.05 in placentas from females exposed to 12 ppm. The decrease in placental GLUT4 expression might affect the provision of adequate fetal nutrition and explain the low fetal weight observed in the exposed groups.

  18. Sublethal exposure to azamethiphos causes neurotoxicity, altered energy allocation and high mortality during simulated live transport in American lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard, C M; Burridge, L E

    2015-05-01

    In the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, sea lice outbreaks in caged salmon are treated with pesticides including Salmosan(®), applied as bath treatments and then released into the surrounding seawater. The effect of chronic exposure to low concentrations of this pesticide on neighboring lobster populations is a concern. Adult male lobsters were exposed to 61 ngL(-1) of azamethiphos (a.i. in Salmosan(®) formulation) continuously for 10 days. In addition to the direct effects of pesticide exposure, effects on the ability to cope with shipping conditions and the persistence of the effects after a 24h depuration period in clean seawater were assessed. Indicators of stress and hypoxia (serum total proteins, hemocyanin and lactate), oxidative damage (protein carbonyls in gills and serum) and altered energy allocation (hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices, hepatopancreas lipids) were assessed in addition to neurotoxicity (chlolinesterase activity in muscle). Directly after exposure, azamethiphos-treated lobsters had inhibition of muscle cholinesterase, reduced gonadosomatic index and enhanced hepatosomatic index and hepatopancreas lipid content. All these responses persisted after 24-h depuration, increasing the risk of cumulative impacts with further exposure to chemical or non-chemical stressors. In both control and treated lobsters exposed to simulated shipment conditions, concentrations of protein and lactate in serum, and protein carbonyls in gills increased. However, mortality rate was higher in azamethiphos-treated lobsters (33 ± 14%) than in controls (2.6 ± 4%). Shipment and azamethiphos had cumulative impacts on serum proteins. Both direct effects on neurological function and energy allocation and indirect effect on ability to cope with shipping stress could have significant impacts on lobster population and/or fisheries.

  19. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy.

  20. Colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramona M McLoughlin; Colm A O'Morain

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden worldwide.There is clear-cut evidence that screening will reduce colorectal cancer mortality and the only contentious issue is which screening tool to use.Most evidence points towards screening with fecal occult blood testing.The immunochemical fecal occult blood tests have a higher sensitivity than the guaiac-based tests.In addition,their automation and haemoglobin quantification allows a threshold for colonoscopy to be selected that can be accommodated within individual health care systems.

  1. MzPIP2;1: An Aquaporin Involved in Radial Water Movement in Both Water Uptake and Transportation, Altered the Drought and Salt Tolerance of Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    Full Text Available Plants are unavoidably subjected to various abiotic stressors, including high salinity, drought and low temperature, which results in water deficit and even death. Water uptake and transportation play a critical role in response to these stresses. Many aquaporin proteins, localized at different tissues, function in various transmembrane water movements. We targeted at the key aquaporin in charge of both water uptake in roots and radial water transportation from vascular tissues through the whole plant.The MzPIP2;1 gene encoding a plasma membrane intrinsic protein was cloned from salt-tolerant apple rootstock Malus zumi Mats. The GUS gene was driven by MzPIP2;1 promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis. It indicated that MzPIP2;1 might function in the epidermal and vascular cells of roots, parenchyma cells around vessels through the stems and vascular tissues of leaves. The ectopically expressed MzPIP2;1 conferred the transgenic Arabidopsis plants enhanced tolerance to slight salt and drought stresses, but sensitive to moderate salt stress, which was indicated by root length, lateral root number, fresh weight and K+/Na+ ratio. In addition, the possible key cis-elements in response to salt, drought and cold stresses were isolated by the promoter deletion experiment.The MzPIP2;1 protein, as a PIP2 aquaporins subgroup member, involved in radial water movement, controls water absorption and usage efficiency and alters transgenic plants drought and salt tolerance.

  2. Inhibition of aquaporin-4 expression in astrocytes by RNAi determines alteration in cell morphology, growth, and water transport and induces changes in ischemia-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Frigeri, Antonio; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Svelto, Maria

    2003-08-01

    Recent studies indicate a key role of aquaporin (AQP) 4 in astrocyte swelling and brain edema and suggest that AQP4 inhibition may be a new therapeutic way for reducing cerebral water accumulation. To understand the physiological role of AQP4-mediated astroglial swelling, we used 21-nucleotide small interfering RNA duplexes (siRNA) to specifically suppress AQP4 expression in astrocyte primary cultures. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments and Western blot analysis showed that AQP4 silencing determined a progressive and parallel reduction in AQP4 mRNA and protein. AQP4 gene suppression determined the appearance of a new morphological cell phenotype associated with a strong reduction in cell growth. Water transport measurements showed that the rate of shrinkage of AQP4 knockdown astrocytes was one-half of that of controls. Finally, cDNA microarray analysis revealed that the gene expression pattern perturbed by AQP4 gene silencing concerned ischemia-related genes, such as GLUT1 and hexokinase. Taken together, these results indicate that 1) AQP4 seems to be the major factor responsible for the fast water transport of cultured astrocytes; 2) as in skeletal muscle, AQP4 is a protein involved in cell plasticity; 3) AQP4 alteration may be a primary factor in ischemia-induced cerebral edema; and 4) RNA interference could be a new potent tool for studying AQP pathophysiology in those organs and tissues where they are expressed.

  3. Prostaglandin E2-induced colonic secretion in patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen Steen S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis for colorectal cancer remains unresolved. A growing body of evidence suggests a direct correlation between cyclooxygenase enzyme expression, prostaglandin E2 metabolism and neoplastic development. Thus further understanding of the regulation of epithelial functions by prostaglandin E2 is needed. We hypothesized that patients with colonic neoplasia have altered colonic epithelial ion transport and express functionally different prostanoid receptor levels in this respect. Methods Patients referred for colonoscopy were included and grouped into patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Patients without endoscopic findings of neoplasia served as controls. Biopsy specimens were obtained from normally appearing mucosa in the sigmoid part of colon. Biopsies were mounted in miniaturized modified Ussing air-suction chambers. Indomethacin (10 μM, various stimulators and inhibitors of prostanoid receptors and ion transport were subsequently added to the chamber solutions. Electrogenic ion transport parameters (short circuit current and slope conductance were recorded. Tissue pathology and tissue damage before and after experiments was assessed by histology. Results Baseline short circuit current and slope conductance did not differ between the two groups. Patients with neoplasia were significantly more sensitive to indomethacin with a decrease in short circuit current of 15.1 ± 2.6 μA·cm-2 compared to controls, who showed a decrease of 10.5 ± 2.1 μA·cm-2 (p = 0.027. Stimulation or inhibition with theophylline, ouabain, bumetanide, forskolin or the EP receptor agonists prostaglandin E2, butaprost, sulprostone and prostaglandin E1 (OH did not differ significantly between the two groups. Histology was with normal findings in both groups. Conclusions Epithelial electrogenic transport is more sensitive to indomethacin in normal colonic mucosa from patients with previous or present colorectal neoplasia compared

  4. ER stress in adipocytes inhibits insulin signaling, represses lipolysis, and alters the secretion of adipokines without inhibiting glucose transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Spinas, G A; Niessen, M

    2010-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the intra-cellular site, where secreted and membrane proteins are synthesized. ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) contribute to insulin resistance and the development of diabetes in obesity. It was shown previously in hepatocytes that the UPR activates c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which phosphorylates insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins on serine residues thereby inhibiting insulin signal transduction. Here we describe how ER stress affects insulin signaling and the biological function of adipocytes. In addition to inhibition of IRS we found that ER stress downregulates the expression of the insulin receptor. Concomitantly, insulin-induced activation of Akt/PKB and of ERK1/2 was strongly inhibited. Ectopic expression of IRS1 or IRS2 strongly counteracted the inhibitory effect of ER stress on insulin signaling while pharmacological inhibition of JNK with SP600125 resulted only in a mild improvement. ER stress decreased the secretion of the adipokines adiponectin and leptin, but strongly increased secretion of IL-6. ER stress inhibited expression and insulin-induced phosphorylation of AS160, reduced lipolysis but did not inhibit glucose transport. Finally, supernatants collected from 3T3-L1 adipocytes undergoing ER stress improved or impaired proliferation when used to condition the culture medium of INS-1E beta-cells dependent on the degree of ER stress. It appears that ER stress in adipocytes might initially lead to changes resembling early prediabetic stages, which at least in part support the regulation of systemic energy homeostasis. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  5. Prion protein (PrP knock-out mice show altered iron metabolism: a functional role for PrP in iron uptake and transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Singh

    Full Text Available Despite overwhelming evidence implicating the prion protein (PrP in prion disease pathogenesis, the normal function of this cell surface glycoprotein remains unclear. In previous reports we demonstrated that PrP mediates cellular iron uptake and transport, and aggregation of PrP to the disease causing PrP-scrapie (PrP(Sc form results in imbalance of iron homeostasis in prion disease affected human and animal brains. Here, we show that selective deletion of PrP in transgenic mice (PrP(KO alters systemic iron homeostasis as reflected in hematological parameters and levels of total iron and iron regulatory proteins in the plasma, liver, spleen, and brain of PrP(KO mice relative to matched wild type controls. Introduction of radiolabeled iron ((59FeCl(3 to Wt and PrP(KO mice by gastric gavage reveals inefficient transport of (59Fe from the duodenum to the blood stream, an early abortive spike of erythropoiesis in the long bones and spleen, and eventual decreased (59Fe content in red blood cells and all major organs of PrP(KO mice relative to Wt controls. The iron deficient phenotype of PrP(KO mice is reversed by expressing Wt PrP in the PrP(KO background, demonstrating a functional role for PrP in iron uptake and transport. Since iron is required for essential metabolic processes and is also potentially toxic if mismanaged, these results suggest that loss of normal function of PrP due to aggregation to the PrP(Sc form induces imbalance of brain iron homeostasis, resulting in disease associated neurotoxicity.

  6. Polymorphisms in the xenobiotic transporter Multidrug Resistance 1 (MDR1 and interaction with meat intake in relation to risk of colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective case-cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overvad Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The xenobiotic transporters, Multidrug Resistance 1 (MDR1/ABCB1 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2 may restrict intestinal absorption of various carcinogens, including heterocyclic amines (HCA and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 derived prostaglandins promote gastrointestinal carcinogenesis, affecting angiogenesis, apoptosis, and invasiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate if polymorphisms in these genes were associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC, and to investigate possible interactions with lifestyle factors such as smoking, meat consumption, and NSAID use. Methods The following polymorphisms were analyzed; a synonymous MDR1 C3435T (rs1045642 in exon26, G-rs3789243-A in intron3, the functional BCRP C421A (rs2231142, the two COX-2 A-1195G (rs689466 and G-765C (rs20417 in the promoter region, and the COX-2 T8473C (rs5275 polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region. The polymorphisms were assessed together with lifestyle factors in a nested case-cohort study of 359 cases and a random cohort sample of 765 participants from the Danish prospective Diet, Cancer and Health study. Results Carriers of the variant allele of MDR1 intron 3 polymorphism were at 1.52-fold higher risk of CRC than homozygous wild type allele carriers (Incidence rate ratio (IRR = 1.52, 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.12-2.06. Carriers of the variant allele of MDR1 C3435T exon 26 had a lower risk of CRC than homozygous C-allele carriers (IRR = 0.71 (CI:0.50-1.00. There was interaction between these MDR1 polymorphisms and intake of red and processed meat in relation to CRC risk. Homozygous MDR1 C3435T C-allele carriers were at 8% increased risk pr 25 gram meat per day (CI: 1.00-1.16 whereas variant allele carriers were not at increased risk (p for interaction = 0.02. COX-2 and BCRP polymorphisms were not associated with CRC risk. There was interaction between NSAID use and MDR1 C3435T and COX-2 T

  7. Molecular pathogenesis ofsporadic colorectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HidetsuguYamagishi; HajimeKuroda; YasuoImai; HideyukiHiraishi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classiifed into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identiifed by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the ifrst half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a lim-ited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research ifeld and discuss its prospects.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting colorectal cancer or dying from colorectal cancer varies by race ...

  9. Colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    There is recognized increased risk for colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis. There also appears to be an increased rate of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease, including both colon and small bowel sites. In Crohn's disease, evidence suggests that detection of colorectal cancer may be delayed with a worse progno sis. Some risk factors for cancer in Crohn's disease include the extent of inflammatory change within the colon and the presence of bypassed or excluded segments, inclu ding rectal "stump" cancer. In addition, the risk for other types of intestinal neoplasms may be increased in Crohn's disease, including lymphoma and carcinoid tumors. Earlier detection of colorectal cancer based on colonoscopy scre ening and surveillance may be achieved but, to date, this has not translated into a positive survival benefit. Moreo ver, newer staining methods and evolving micro-endos copic techniques show promise, but have not significantly altered management. Future research should focus on development of molecular or other bio-markers that might predict future dysplasia or cancer development in Crohn's disease.

  10. Regulatory T cells in inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gy(o)rgyi Müzes; Béla Molnár; Ferenc Sipos

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key elements in immunological self-tolerance.The number of Tregs may alter in both peripheral blood and in colonic mucosa during pathological circumstances.The local cellular,microbiological and cytokine milieu affect immunophenotype and function of Tregs.Forkhead box P3+ Tregs function shows altered properties in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs).This alteration of Tregs function can furthermore be observed between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis,which may have both clinical and therapeutical consequences.Chronic mucosal inflammation may also influence Tregs function,which together with the intestinal bacterial flora seem to have a supporting role in colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis.Tregs have a crucial role in the immunoevasion of cancer cells in sporadic colorectal cancer.Furthermore,their number and phenotype correlate dosely with the clinical outcome of the disease,even if their contribution to carcinogenesis has previously been controversial.Despite knowledge of the clinical relationship between IBD and colitis-associated colon cancer,and the growing number of immunological aspects encompassing sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis,the molecular and cellular links amongst Tregs,regulation of the inflammation,and cancer development are still not well understood.In this paper,we aimed to review the current data surrounding the role of Tregs in the pathogenesis of IBD,colitis-associated colon cancer and sporadic colorectal cancer.

  11. Prognostic and Predictive Roles of KRAS Mutation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. Arrington

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The RAS gene family is among the most studied and best characterized of the known cancer-related genes. Of the three human ras isoforms, KRAS is the most frequently altered gene, with mutations occurring in 17%–25% of all cancers. In particular, approximately 30%–40% of colon cancers harbor a KRAS mutation. KRAS mutations in colon cancers have been associated with poorer survival and increased tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer lead to resistance to select treatment strategies. In this review we examine the history of KRAS, its prognostic value in patients with colorectal cancer, and evidence supporting its predictive value in determining appropriate therapies for patients with colorectal cancer.

  12. Academic colorectal surgery job search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalady, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer.

  13. Alcohol consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: the Findrink study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriola, Adetunji T; Kurl, Sudhir; Laukanen, Jari A; Mazengo, Charles; Kauhanen, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer because previous studies have yielded conflicting results. As part of the Findrink study, data from the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease (KIHD) Risk Factor Study were analysed. The KIHD study is a cohort of 2,682 men from Eastern Finland with no history of cancer at baseline. The men were grouped into five groups according to their weekly alcohol intake in grams. Association between alcohol and colorectal cancer was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. There were 59 cases of colorectal cancer during an average follow up of 16.7 years. Men within the highest quintile of alcohol consumption had a median weekly alcohol intake of 198.8 g. Age and examination year adjusted risk ratio of colorectal cancer among men within the highest quintile of alcohol consumption was 4.4 (95% CI: 1.6-11.9, P-value = 0.004). After adjusting for potential confounders, such as vegetable consumption, fibre intake, smoking, family history of cancer, socio-economic status, leisure time physical activity, men with the highest amount of alcohol consumption still had a 3.5-fold (95% CI: 1.2-9.9, P-value = 0.021) increased risk of colorectal cancer. Exclusion of men diagnosed with colorectal cancer during the first 2 years of follow up from the analyses did not alter the risk increase. In conclusion, this study gives further evidence of a positive association between alcohol consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer.

  14. Protein restriction during gestation alters histone modifications at the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) promoter region and induces GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of female rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shasha; Rollet, Michelle; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy is an intrauterine factor that results in alteration of the offspring genome and associates with disease risk in the offspring. We investigated the impact of a maternal low-protein (LP) diet on the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in offspring skeletal muscle. GLUT4 is an insulin-regulated glucose transporter involved in insulin sensitivity and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle cells. We observed sex-dependent GLUT4 mRNA expression and increased GLUT4 protein content in female pup skeletal muscle with maternal LP. Analysis of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of increased skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression in offspring rats revealed the regulatory mechanisms involved. The protein level of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which has been known as an activator of GLUT4 transcription via the ability to carry out specific binding to the GLUT4 MEF2 binding sequence, increased in female pups whose mothers were fed a LP diet. Modifications of chromatin structure, including acetylated histone H3, acetylated histone H4 and di-methylated histone H3 at lysine 4, were detected at a significantly increased level at the GLUT4 promoter region in female pup muscle following a maternal LP diet. Glycogen content was also detected as up-regulated, accompanied by increased glycogen synthase in LP female offspring muscle. These results document that maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces GLUT4 expression in female offspring skeletal muscle but not in males, which may indicate sex-dependent adaptation of glucose metabolism to a maternal LP diet.

  15. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... advancements in the field of colorectal cancer....

  16. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoko; Hagio, Masahito; Seya, Tomoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    A high percentage of colorectal carcinomas overexpress a lot of growth factors and their receptors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and FGF receptor (FGFR). We previously reported that FGFR2 overexpression was associated with distant metastasis and that FGFR2 inhibition suppressed cell growth, migration, and invasion. The FGFR2 splicing isoform FGFR2IIIb is associated with well-differentiated histologic type, tumor angiogenesis, and adhesion to extracellular matrices. Another isoform, FGFR2IIIc, correlates with the aggressiveness of various types of cancer. In the present study, we examined the expression and roles of FGFR2IIIc in colorectal carcinoma to determine the effectiveness of FGFR2IIIc-targeting therapy. In normal colorectal tissues, FGFR2IIIc expression was weakly detected in superficial colorectal epithelial cells and was not detected in proliferative zone cells. FGFR2IIIc-positive cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in the following lesions, listed in the order of increasing percentage: hyperplastic polyps growth, soft agar colony formation, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased adhesion to extracellular matrices. Furthermore, FGFR2IIIc-transfected colorectal carcinoma cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous tissues and the cecum of nude mice. Fully human anti-FGFR2IIIc monoclonal antibody inhibited the growth and migration of colorectal carcinoma cells through alterations in cell migration, cell death, and development-related genes. In conclusion, FGFR2IIIc plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Monoclonal antibody against FGFR2IIIc has promising potential in colorectal carcinoma therapy.

  17. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  18. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-14

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation.

  19. Minimally invasive colorectal resection for cancer is associated with a short-lived decrease in soluble Tie-2 receptor levels, which may transiently inhibit VEGF-mediated angiogenesis (via altered blood levels of free Ang-1 and Ang-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantha Kumara, H M C; Grieco, Michael J; Yan, Xiaohong; Kalady, Matthew F; DiMaggio, Vincent; Kim, Donald G; Hyman, Neil; Feingold, Daniel L; Whelan, Richard L

    2010-10-01

    Angiopoetin- (Ang-) 1 inhibits and Ang-2 promotes VEGF-mediated angiogenesis via binding to endothelial cell-bound Tie-2 receptor (Tie-2). After minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR), Ang-1 levels decrease and Ang-2 levels increase, which may stimulate angiogenesis in wounds and residual tumor foci. Soluble Tie-2 (sTie-2) modulates the effects of free Ang-1 and Ang-2 by binding to them. This study assessed perioperative MICR plasma sTie-2 levels. Blood samples were taken preoperatively (PreOp) and on postoperative days (POD) 1 and 3 from 50 cancer and 53 benign disease MICR patients. In a subgroup, a fourth sample was taken between POD7 and POD13 and bundled as a single time point. sTie-2 levels (ng/ml) were determined via ELISA. The mean and SD were determined at each time point. The t test used for analysis. PreOp plasma sTie-2 levels were significantly higher in the benign group (27.6 ± 10.2) than in the cancer group (22.9 ± 7.9). A significant drop from PreOp occurred in sTie-2 levels in the cancer group on POD1 (20.0 ± 7.4) and POD3 (21.0 ± 6.6) and in the benign group on POD1 (24.8 ± 9.1). The benign group's POD3 and the cancer group's POD7-13 sTie-2 levels were statistically similar to the PreOp levels while the benign group's POD7-13 level was significantly higher. PreOp sTie-2 levels were significantly lower in cancer patients. MICR is associated with a significant short-lived decrease in plasma sTie-2 levels in cancer patients on POD1 and 3, which may briefly inhibit VEGF-mediated angiogenesis. The benign group's early results were similar.

  20. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  1. Prognostic Value of Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bianchi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large amount of data in cancer biology and many studies into the likely survival of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, knowledge regarding the issue of CRC prognostic biomarkers remains poor. The Tumor-Node-Metastasis (TNM staging system continues to be the most powerful and reliable predictor of the clinical outcome of CRC patients. The exponential increase of knowledge in the field of molecular genetics has lead to the identification of specific alterations involved in the malignant progression. Many of these genetic alterations were proposed as biomarkers which could be used in clinical practice to estimate CRC prognosis. Recently there has been an explosive increase in the number of putative biomarkers able to predict the response to specific adjuvant treatment. In this review we explore and summarize data concerning prognostic and predictive biomarkers and we attempt to shed light on recent research that could lead to the emergence of new biomarkers in CRC.

  2. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after colorectal cancer. To help maintain good health, colorectal cancer survivors should also: Get to and stay at a healthy weight Keep physically active Eat a healthy diet , with an emphasis on plant foods Limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day ...

  3. Endoscopic detection and treatment of colorectal polyps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderbos, TDG

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide. Most colorectal cancers arise form premalignant colorectal polyps. Colorectal polyps can be roughly subdivided into hyperplastic, non-malignant polyps and

  4. Polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette transporter genes and interaction with diet and life style factors in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective case-cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Andersen, Vibeke; Tjonneland, Anne;

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family transports various molecules across the enterocytes in the gut protecting the intestine against potentially harmful substances. Moreover, ABC transporters are involved in mucosal immune defence through interaction with cytokines. The study aimed...

  5. The legacy pesticide dieldrin acts as a teratogen and alters the expression of dopamine transporter and dopamine receptor 2a in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarty, Kathleena I; Cowie, Andrew; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Dieldrin (DLD) is a lipophilic pesticide that shows environmental persistence. The objectives were to determine the effects of DLD on GABAergic and dopaminergic systems in developing zebrafish. Both chorionated and dechorionated embryos (~24h post-hatch) were exposed to a single concentration of DLD (0.347-3470μM) for 48h. Following exposure, a subset of larvae was placed into clean water for 6days (i.e. depuration phase). Chorionated embryos showed 30%), suggesting that the chorion protected the embryos. Over a 6day depuration phase, there was a dose dependent effect observed in both the "dechorionated and chorionated embryo" treatments for larval mortality (>60%). At the end of depuration, there was no detectable change in neuro-morphological endpoints that included the ratio of notochord length to body length (%) and the ratio of head area to body area (%). However, DLD did induce cardiac edema, skeletal deformities, and tremors. GABA-related transcripts were not affected in abundance by DLD. Conversely, the relative mRNA levels of dopamine transporter (dat1) and dopamine receptor drd2a mRNA were decreased in dechorionated, but not chorionated, embryos. These data suggest that DLD can alter the expression of transcripts related to dopaminergic signaling. Lastly, GABAA receptor subunits gabrB1 and gabrB2, as well as dopamine receptors drd1 and drd2a, were inherently higher in abundance in dechorionated embryos compared to chorionated embryos. This is an important consideration when incorporating transcriptomics into embryo testing as expression levels can change with removal of the chorion prior to exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alcohol Intake, Smoking, and Colorectal Adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yeong Mi; Cho, Chang Ho; Kim, Sung Hi; Lee, Jung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in Korea. Because colorectal adenoma is a precursor lesion of colorectal cancer, primary prevention of colorectal adenomas may be important for reducing morbidity and mortality from the disease. The aim of this study is to examine the association of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking in relation with colorectal adenoma in a cross-sectional study of Korean adults. Methods: A total of 366 participants who underwent colonoscopy...

  7. Complications in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischer, Jason S; Rymeski, Beth

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal pediatric surgery is a diverse field that encompasses many different procedures. The pullthrough for Hirschsprung disease, the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty for anorectal malformations including complex cloaca reconstructions and the ileal pouch anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis present some of the most technically challenging procedures pediatric surgeons undertake. Many children prevail successfully following these surgical interventions, however, a small number of patients suffer from complications following these procedures. Anticipated postoperative problems are discussed along with medical and surgical strategies for managing these complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Robotics in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, J; Rockall, T; Darzi, A

    2004-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been shown to offer many advantages to general surgical patients but has not been widely adopted for colorectal disease. Initial fears surrounding the oncological safety of laparoscopic colectomies have largely subsided but the technical challenges still remain. Surgical robots or telemanipulators present the laparoscopic surgeon with unrivaled dexterity and vision, which may allow colonic resections to be completed with greater ease. Although initial studies suggest promising results using currently available systems, it will take further time for patient benefits to be proven, therefore justifying the greater expense of operating with this new technology.

  9. Metastatic paediatric colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R

    2012-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our unit with crampy abdominal pain, change in bowel habit, a subjective impression of weight loss and a single episode of haematochezia. She was found to have a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma and proceeded to laparoscopic anterior resection, whereupon peritoneal metastases were discovered. She received chemotherapy and is alive and well ten month later with no radiological evidence of disease. Colorectal carcinoma is rare in the paediatric population but is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis is critical to enable optimal outcomes.

  10. Analysis of mitochondrial ND1 gene in human colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Akouchekian

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Results showed that a high frequency of somatic alterations of mtDNA occurs during the carcinogenesis and/or the progression of colorectal cancer. Based on the mtDNA mutation pattern observed in this study and other pre-viously studies it is believed that looking for somatic mutations in mtDNA would be one of the diagnostic values in early detection of cancer.

  11. Second-Line Therapy for Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmi, Alessandra P.; Sobrero, Alberto F.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of irinotecan and oxaliplatin has dramatically altered both first- and second-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) compared with the era in which the sole treatment option in advanced disease was 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Treatment options and strategies are becoming ever more enriched and complex with the recent availability of biologic agents such as bevacizumab and cetuximab. This article reviews randomized clinical trials assessing second-line treatment after f...

  12. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  13. Can land use changes alter carbon, nitrogen and major ion transport in subtropical brazilian streams? Modificações no uso da terra podem alterar o transporte fluvial de carbono, nitrogênio e íons maiores?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mariano Lopes da Silva

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies in tropical watersheds have evaluated the impact of urbanization and agricultural practices on water quality. In Brazil, savannas (known regionally as Cerrados represent 23% of the country's surface, representing an important share to the national primary growth product, especially due to intense agriculture. The purpose of this study is to present a comprehensive evaluation, on a yearly basis, of carbon, nitrogen and major ion fluxes in streams crossing areas under different land use (natural vegetation, sugar cane and eucalyptus in a savanna region of SE Brazil. Eucalyptus and sugar cane alter the transport of the investigated elements in small watersheds. The highest concentration of all parameters (abiotic parameters, ions, dissolved organic carbon DOC - and dissolved inorganic carbon - DIC were found in Sugar Cane Watersheds (SCW. The observed concentrations of major cations in Eucalyptus Watersheds (EW (Mg, Ca, K, Na, as well as DIN and DOC, were found frequently to be intermediate values between those of Savanna Watersheds (SW and SCW, suggesting a moderate impact of eucalyptus plantations on the streamwater. Same trends were found in relation to ion and nutrient fluxes, where the higher values corresponded to SCW. It is suggested that sugar cane plantations might be playing an important role in altering the chemistry of water bodies.Diversos estudos têm sido desenvolvidos em bacias de drenagem tropicais no intuito de avaliar o impacto da urbanização e das práticas agrícolas na qualidade dos corpos d'água. No Brasil, as savanas (conhecidas regionalmente como Cerrado representam 23% do território brasileiro, sendo uma região importante no crescimento nacional, especialmente devido às intensas atividades agrícolas. A finalidade deste trabalho é apresentar uma avaliação dos fluxos de carbono, nitrogênio e principais íons em córregos com diferentes usos do solo (vegetação, cana de açúcar e eucalipto em uma

  14. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-04

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  15. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    , and other pathological risk factors. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal......-term survivals since it started in 2001 for both patients with colon and rectal cancers.......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed...

  16. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  17. Lipopolysaccharide impairs amyloid beta efflux from brain: altered vascular sequestration, cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption, peripheral clearance and transporter function at the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defects in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 and p-glycoprotein (Pgp clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ from brain are thought to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We have recently shown that induction of systemic inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS results in impaired efflux of Aβ from the brain. The same treatment also impairs Pgp function. Here, our aim is to determine which physiological routes of Aβ clearance are affected following systemic inflammation, including those relying on LRP-1 and Pgp function at the blood–brain barrier. Methods CD-1 mice aged between 6 and 8 weeks were treated with 3 intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg LPS at 0, 6, and 24 hours and studied at 28 hours. 125I-Aβ1-42 or 125I-alpha-2-macroglobulin injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain (intracerebroventricular (ICV or into the jugular vein (intravenous (IV was used to quantify LRP-1-dependent partitioning between the brain vasculature and parenchyma and peripheral clearance, respectively. Disappearance of ICV-injected 14 C-inulin from brain was measured to quantify bulk flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain microvascular protein expression of LRP-1 and Pgp was measured by immunoblotting. Endothelial cell localization of LRP-1 was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy. Oxidative modifications to LRP-1 at the brain microvasculature were measured by immunoprecipitation of LRP-1 followed by immunoblotting for 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine. Results We found that LPS: caused an LRP-1-dependent redistribution of ICV-injected Aβ from brain parenchyma to brain vasculature and decreased entry into blood; impaired peripheral clearance of IV-injected Aβ; inhibited reabsorption of CSF; did not significantly alter brain microvascular protein levels of LRP-1 or Pgp, or oxidative modifications to LRP-1; and downregulated LRP-1 protein levels and caused LRP-1 mislocalization in cultured brain

  18. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  19. Potential role of probiotics on colorectal cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uccello Mario

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer represents the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Owing to differences in dietary habits and lifestyle, this neoplasm is more common in industrialized countries than in developing ones. Evidence from a wide range of sources supports the assumption that the link between diet and colorectal cancer may be due to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora. Discussion Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host, and they have been investigated for their protective anti-tumor effects. In vivo and molecular studies have displayed encouraging findings that support a role of probiotics in colorectal cancer prevention. Summary Several mechanisms could explain the preventive action of probiotics against colorectal cancer onset. They include: alteration of the intestinal microflora; inactivation of cancerogenic compounds; competition with putrefactive and pathogenic microbiota; improvement of the host’s immune response; anti-proliferative effects via regulation of apoptosis and cell differentiation; fermentation of undigested food; inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways.

  20. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  1. Colorectal Anastomotic Leakage: New perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Daams (Freek)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis provides new perspectives on colorectal anastomotic leakages. In both experimental and clinical studies, aspects of prevention, early identification, treatment and consequences of anastomotic leakage are discussed.

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... the United States, it is the third most common cancer in men and women. Caught early, it ...

  3. Familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Da Silva, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologic...... features, and the genetic and epigenetic profiles of the familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) syndrome with the aim to delineate tumor characteristics that may contribute to refined diagnostics and optimized tumor prevention....

  4. Brain metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Brain metastases from colorectal cancer are rare. The prognosis for patients with even a single resectable brain metastasis is poor. A case of surgically treated cerebral metastasis from a rectal carcinoma is reported. The brain tumour was radically resected. However, cerebral, as well...... as extracerebral, disease recurred 12 months after diagnosis. Surgical removal of colorectal metastatic brain lesions in selected cases results in a longer survival time....

  5. Diabetes Mellitus and Colorectal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Alejandro; Diaz, Yaritza; Perez, Cynthia M.; Garau, Maria; Baron, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have provided evidence for an association between obesity, physical inactivity, and western diet as risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC). Few studies directly address the association between type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and the risk of colorectal lesions at specific anatomic locations. Methods 2,663 subjects with a previous history of adenoma(s) and removal of all current adenomas at study entry were followed for a mean time of three years across three different chemoprevention clinical trials. The primary endpoint was colorectal adenoma recurrence and number of lesions during the treatment phase; the secondary endpoints were presence of advanced colorectal neoplasia (CRN) and location of CRN. Using log linear regression, the effect of DM status on the relative risk (RR) of CRN recurrence, advanced CRN, and location of CRN was assessed. Results DM status was not significantly associated with incidence of colorectal adenomas, incidence of advanced colorectal lesions, or left-sided colorectal neoplastic lesions. Subjects with DM had a marginally increased risk of right-sided (p= 0.06) colorectal adenomas and a significant increased risk of multiple right-sided adenomas (p=0.03) in the unadjusted model; this association was not significant after adjusting for age and other potential confounders (RR=1.22, 95% CI: 0.85–1.76). Conclusion We did not observe a statistically significant increased risk in CRN recurrence for overall neoplasia, advanced neoplasia or location of neoplasia in individuals with DM compared to non-DM individuals. However, given the patterns observed in this investigation, future studies with longer follow-up time and longer DM exposure, incorporating objective measurements of type 2 DM might help elucidate the risk of CRN among individuals with DM. PMID:23560242

  6. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  7. Early mutation bursts in colorectal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Siegmund, Kimberly; Marjoram, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is an evolutionary process involving accumulation of mutations, copy number alterations, and cancer stem cell (CSC) division and differentiation. As direct observation of this process is impossible, inference regarding when mutations occur and how stem cells divide is difficult. However, this ancestral information is encoded within the tumor itself, in the form of intratumoral heterogeneity of the tumor cell genomes. Here we present a framework that allows simulation of these processes and estimation of mutation rates at the various stages of tumor development and CSC division patterns for single-gland sequencing data from colorectal tumors. We parameterize the mutation rate and the CSC division pattern, and successfully retrieve their posterior distributions based on DNA sequence level data. Our approach exploits Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), a method that is becoming widely-used for problems of ancestral inference. PMID:28257429

  8. Advances in pediatric colorectal surgical techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangel, S.J.; Blaauw, I. de

    2010-01-01

    The operative management of pediatric colorectal diseases has improved significantly in recent years through the development of innovative approaches for operative exposure and a better understanding of colorectal anatomy. Advances in transanal and minimal access techniques have formed the

  9. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emails Have You or a Family Member Had Colorectal (Colon) Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer can make you more likely to get colorectal cancer yourself. If you have close family members with ...

  10. Loss of heterozygosity in colorectal cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... adenocarcinoma (Grady, 2005). CRC occurs ... risk of getting colorectal cancer increases with age. ..... pancreas, ovarian, lung and liver tumours (Wan et al.,. 2006). Wan et ... independent prognostic factor of colorectal cancer.

  11. A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transport as a mechanism of resistance to the anticancer drug bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, Mustapha; Pagé, Nicolas; Leduc, Anick; Peter, Matthias; Ramotar, Dindial

    2004-02-01

    The potent DNA damaging agent bleomycin (BLM) is highly effective for treating various cancers, although, in certain individuals, the development of cellular resistance to the drug can severely diminish its antineoplastic properties. We performed two independent genome-wide screens using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant collection to isolate variants exhibiting either sensitivity or resistance to BLM. This procedure reproducibly identified a relatively large collection of 231 BLM-hypersensitive mutants, representing genes belonging to diverse functional groups. In contrast, only five BLM-resistant mutants could be recovered by our screens. Among these latter mutants, three were deleted for genes involved in plasma membrane transport, including the L-carnitine transporter Agp2, as well as the kinases Ptk2 and Sky1, which are involved in regulating polyamine transport. We further showed that Agp2 acts as a transporter of BLM and that overexpression of this transporter significantly enhances BLM-induced cell killing. Our data strongly implicate membrane transport as a key determinant in BLM resistance in yeast. This finding is critical, given that very little is known about BLM transport in human cells. Indeed, characterization of analogous mechanisms in humans may ultimately lead to enhancement of the antitumor properties of BLM.

  12. KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and PTEN mutations: implications for targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roock, Wendy; De Vriendt, Veerle; Normanno, Nicola; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tejpar, Sabine

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of mutant KRAS as a predictor of resistance to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies brought a major change in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. This seminal finding also highlighted our sparse knowledge about key signalling pathways in colorectal tumours. Drugs that inhibit oncogenic alterations such as phospho-MAP2K (also called MEK), phospho-AKT, and mutant B-RAF seem promising as single treatment or when given with EGFR inhibitors. However, our understanding of the precise role these potential drug targets have in colorectal tumours, and the oncogenic dependence that tumours might have on these components, has not progressed at the same rate. As a result, patient selection and prediction of treatment effects remain problematic. We review the role of mutations in genes other than KRAS on the efficacy of anti-EGFR therapy, and discuss strategies to target these oncogenic alterations alone or in combination with receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibition.

  13. Novel KRAS gene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid M Naser

    Full Text Available In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province.Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling.KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%. Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%. They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature.Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  14. Mutation of aspartic acid-351, lysine-352, and lysine-515 alters the Ca2+ transport activity of the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in COS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, K; MacLennan, D H

    1988-01-01

    Full-length cDNAs encoding neonatal and adult isoforms of the Ca2+-ATPase of rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells. The microsomal fraction isolated from transfected COS-1 cells contained immunoreactive Ca2+-ATPase and catalyzed Ca2+ transport at rates at least 15-fold above controls. No differences were observed in either the rates or Ca2+ dependency of Ca2+ transport catalyzed by the two isoforms. Aspartic acid-351, the site of formation of the catalytic acyl phosphate in the enzyme, was mutated to asparagine, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, histidine, or alanine. In every case, Ca2+ transport activity and Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation were eliminated. Ca2+ transport was also eliminated by mutation of lysine-352 to arginine, glutamine, or glutamic acid or by mutation of Asp351-Lys352 to Lys351-Asp352. Mutation of lysine-515, the site of fluorescein isothiocyanate modification in the enzyme, resulted in diminished Ca2+ transport activity as follows: arginine, 60%; glutamine, 25%; glutamic acid, 5%. These results demonstrate the absolute requirement of acylphosphate formation for the Ca2+ transport function and define a residue important for ATP binding. They also demonstrate the feasibility of a thorough analysis of active sites in the Ca2+-ATPase by expression and site-specific mutagenesis. Images PMID:2966962

  15. Evaluation of frequency of kirsten rat sarcoma gene mutations in Iranian colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Roudbari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS gene is a target of genetic alterations which are diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who are treated with monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies such as cetuximab and panitumumab. KRAS mutations are seen in 35-42% of patients with colorectal cancer. The high frequency of these mutations in colorectal cancer represents their high potential as a biomarker in early diagnosis of cancer. This study was done to evaluate the frequency of KRAS gene mutations in a small population of Iranian patients suffering from colorectal cancer.   Methods: 50 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks with colorectal cancer (CRC, already confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry testing, were received to Payvand Clinical and Specialty Laboratory, Tehran, from across the country in 2015. DNA was extracted from the tissue blocks and its quality was then evaluated. The reverse dot blotting method was used to evaluate KRAS gene mutations. Results: KRAS mutations were found in 42% of the study patients. 30% and 12% of the mutations were found in codon 12 and codon 13, respectively. Moreover, no mutation was found in codon 61. Results also showed that the most frequency of samples examined belonged to male with 68% (average age of 56 years old and then to female with 32% (median age of 54.8 years old. Conclusion: This study was performed to evaluate the frequency of KRAS gene mutations in Iranian colorectal cancer patients. According to the study results, the frequency of KRAS mutations was consistent with that of other countries, reported in previous studies. The high prevalence of these mutations in patients with colorectal cancer indicates the important role of these genes in this group of patients. Thus, the presence of these mutations can be used as a suitable biomarker for evaluation of response to targeted therapies in patients suffering from colorectal cancer.

  16. Prospective study of the relationship between coffee and tea with colorectal cancer risk: the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominianni, C; Huang, W-Y; Berndt, S; Hayes, R B; Ahn, J

    2013-09-03

    Coffee and tea are commonly consumed and carry potential anticancer components that could reduce the risk of colorectal cancer; however, their relationships with colorectal cancer risk remain inconsistent. A prospective analysis was carried out to examine the relationships of coffee and tea intake with colorectal cancer risk in 57,398 men and women in the intervention arm of the National Cancer Institute-Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a national screening study that limits differential detection biases. Coffee and tea intakes were assessed by food frequency questionnaire. Six hundred and eighty-one incident colorectal cancer cases were ascertained during a median follow-up of 11.4 years. Greater coffee intake was not associated with risk of colorectal cancer (relative risk (RR)=1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.79-1.48, Ptrend=0.23). Stratifying by cancer site (Pheterogeneity=0.48) or stage (Pheterogeneity=0.83) did not alter the relationship. Associations remained unchanged in subsets of participants for either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee or when stratifying by several colorectal cancer risk factors. Similarly, greater tea intake was not associated with colorectal cancer risk overall (RR=0.77, 95% CI=0.55-1.09, Ptrend=0.17) or by cancer site (Pheterogeneity=0.14) or stage (Pheterogeneity=0.60). These associations were not modified by several colorectal cancer risk factors. The findings of this study do not provide evidence to suggest that drinking coffee or tea is beneficial in protecting against colorectal cancer.

  17. Colorectal cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Frederico Ferreira Novaes de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in the world, and mortality has remained the same for the past 50 years, despite advances in diagnosis and treatment. Because significant numbers of patients present with advanced or incurable stages, patients with pre-malignant lesions (adenomatous polyps that occur as result of genetic inheritance or age should be screened, and patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease should undergo surveillance. There are different risk groups for CRC, as well as different screening strategies. It remains to be determined which screening protocol is the most cost-effective for each risk catagory. The objective of screening is to reduce morbidity and mortality in a target population. The purpose of this review is to analyze the results of the published CRC screening studies, with regard to the measured reduction of morbidity and mortality, due to CRC in the studied populations, following various screening procedures. The main screening techniques, used in combination or alone, include fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy. Evidence from the published literature on screening methods for specific risk groups is scanty and frequently does not arise from controlled studies. Nevertheless, data from these studies, combined with recent advances in molecular genetics, certainly lead the way to greater efficacy and lower cost of CRC screening.

  18. Diagnostic Ultrasound in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARYBackground and purpose Colorectal cancer is a common disease in Denmark with considerable morbidity and mortality. Although survival in recent years has improved, Denmark still has the lowest 5-year survival compared to the other Nordic countries. The treatment of patients depends on local...... the potential to contribute to the staging of colorectal cancer. The purpose of these studies was to determine the usefulness of ultrasound diagnostics in patients with colorectal cancer.The purpose of the TRUS studies was to compare staging of rectal carcinomas using digital rectal exploration...... with the resulting pathological examination in relation to differentiating benign from malignant polyps and determining tumour stage and lymph node status. In this context we also performed an observer comparison using both TRUS and MRI. Consistency of tumour outgrowth of rectal cancer rated by TRUS and MRI...

  19. Effects of the combination of blood transfusion and postoperative infectious complications on prognosis after surgery for colorectal cancer. Danish RANX05 Colorectal Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of postoperative infectious complications is significantly increased in patients with colorectal cancer receiving perioperative blood transfusion. It is still debated, however, whether perioperative blood transfusion alters the incidence of disease recurrence or otherwise...... affects the prognosis. METHODS: Patient risk variables, variables related to operation technique, blood transfusion and the development of infectious complications were recorded prospectively in 740 patients undergoing elective resection for primary colorectal cancer. Endpoints were overall survival (n.......13-2.82)), localization of cancer in the rectum and Dukes classification were independent risk factors. CONCLUSION: Blood transfusion per se may not be a risk factor for poor prognosis after colorectal cancer surgery. However, the combination of perioperative blood transfusion and subsequent development of postoperative...

  20. High ABCC2 and Low ABCG2 Gene Expression Are Early Events in the Colorectal Adenoma-Carcinoma Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Vogel, Lotte K.; Kopp, Tine Iskov

    2015-01-01

    Development of colorectal cancer (CRC) may result from a dysfunctional interplay between diet, gut microbes and the immune system. The ABC transport proteins ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, Multidrug resistance protein 1, MDR1), ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCG2 (BCRP) are involved in transport of various compounds...... across the epithelial barrier. Low mRNA level of ABCB1 has previously been identified as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis (Andersen et al., PLoS One. 2013 Aug 19; 8(8): e72119). ABCC2 and ABCG2 mRNA levels were assessed in intestinal tissue from 122 CRC cases, 106 adenoma cases (12 with severe...... in carcinogenesis suggesting that these ABC transporters are involved in the early steps of carcinogenesis as previously reported for ABCB1. These results suggest that dysfunctional transport across the epithelial barrier may contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis....

  1. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence.

  2. Subnuclear proteomics in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers...... for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we...

  3. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Mahmoud El-Tawil

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  4. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  5. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media; Comprehension de l'alteration a long terme des colis de verre R7T7: etude du couplage chimie transport dans un milieu fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomat, L

    2008-04-15

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH{>=}11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  6. Salinity does not alter the effectiveness of menthol as an anesthetic and sedative during the handling and transport of juvenile fat snook (Centropomus parallelus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulchro, L C O 'r; Carvalho, M A G; Gomes, L C

    2016-04-19

    The effectiveness of menthol as anesthetic and sedative for fat snook (Centropomus parallelus) was tested at different salinities. In the first experiment, the fish were exposed to different concentrations of menthol (25, 37 and 50 mg L-1) in water at different salinities (0, 17 and 36 ppt). In the second experiment, the fish were transported for 10 hours in water with menthol at concentrations of 0, 3.7 and 7.4 mg L-1 under different salinities. Na+ and K+ ions from fish body and water were analyzed after transport. The optimal concentrations of menthol for a short handling period and surgical induction was 37 and 50 mg L-1, respectively, and these values were independent of salinity. After transport, neither mortality nor significant changes in ammonia or dissolved oxygen were observed between treatments at the different salinities. The nitrite levels were lower in freshwater than in brackish and saltwater, but did not change with mentol. The total body levels of Na+ increased with the salinity increase. Menthol is an effective anesthetic for handling of juvenile fat snook at different salinities. Menthol did not influence the measured water parameters and body ions, and it is not necessary for the transport of fat snook.

  7. Chronic vitamin C deficiency promotes redox imbalance in the brain but does not alter sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paidi, Maya Devi; Schjoldager, Janne Gram; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    achieved by the sodium dependent VitC transporter (SVCT2). This study investigated the effects of chronic pre-and postnatal VitC deficiency as well as the effects of postnatal VitC repletion, on brain SVCT2 expression and markers of oxidative stress in young guinea pigs. Biochemical analyses demonstrated...

  8. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  9. Epigenetic silencing of miR-181b contributes to tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer by targeting RASSF1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lun-De; Zheng, Wei-Wei; Wang, Gao-Xiang; Kang, Xiao-Chun; Qin, Lei; Ji, Juan-Juan; Hao, Sha

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant microRNA expression is common in colorectal cancer and DNA methylation is believed to be responsible for this alteration. In this study, we performed evaluation in vivo and in vitro to determine the role of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer. Ninety-seven pairs of colorectal cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues were collected. The expression level and methylation status of miR-181b was determined in tissue samples and multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. RASSF1A, a predicted target gene of miR-181b, was investigated in vitro. Further mechanistic explorations were conducted. It was found that miR-181b expression was frequently downregulated in cancer samples. This lower expression level resulted from higher hypermethylation in cancer tissue and was closely related to TNM stage. Following artificial synthesis of miR-181b stimulation, colorectal cancer cell proliferation was greatly inhibited in CRC cells while apoptosis percentage markedly increased. miR-181b achieved the tumor suppressive effects via direct targeting of the RASSF1A gene. This study indicated the clinical significance of miR-181b and the influence of miR-181b promoter region in epigenetic silencing of tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer, and implied the possible usage of miR-181b as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer.

  10. Hypoxia in relation to vasculature and proliferation in liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Lok, J.; Peeters, W.J.M.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Wiering, B.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Punt, C.J.A.; Heerschap, A.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate hypoxia measured by pimonidazole binding, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) expression, proliferation, and vascularity in liver metastases of colorectal cancer and to compare GLUT1 and CA-IX expression in corresponding primary tumors. METHODS AND

  11. Dietary Plant Lectins Appear to Be Transported from the Gut to Gain Access to and Alter Dopaminergic Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, a Potential Etiology of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jolene; Wang, Mingming; Wei, Wenqian; Keller, Jeffrey N; Adhikari, Binita; King, Jason F; King, Michael L; Peng, Nan; Laine, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Lectins from dietary plants have been shown to enhance drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of rats, be transported trans-synaptically as shown by tracing of axonal and dendritic paths, and enhance gene delivery. Other carbohydrate-binding protein toxins are known to traverse the gut intact in dogs. Post-feeding rhodamine- or TRITC-tagged dietary lectins, the lectins were tracked from gut to dopaminergic neurons (DAergic-N) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) [egIs1(Pdat-1:GFP)] where the mutant has the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fused to a dopamine transport protein gene labeling DAergic-N. The lectins were supplemented along with the food organism Escherichia coli (OP50). Among nine tested rhodamine/TRITC-tagged lectins, four, including Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E), Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Arachis hypogaea agglutinin (PNA), appeared to be transported from gut to the GFP-DAergic-N. Griffonia Simplicifolia and PHA-E, reduced the number of GFP-DAergic-N, suggesting a toxic activity. PHA-E, BS-I, Pisum sativum (PSA), and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (Succinylated) reduced fluorescent intensity of GFP-DAergic-N. PHA-E, PSA, Concanavalin A, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin decreased the size of GFP-DAergic-N, while BS-I increased neuron size. These observations suggest that dietary plant lectins are transported to and affect DAergic-N in C. elegans, which support Braak and Hawkes' hypothesis, suggesting one alternate potential dietary etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). A recent Danish study showed that vagotomy resulted in 40% lower incidence of PD over 20 years. Differences in inherited sugar structures of gut and neuronal cell surfaces may make some individuals more susceptible in this conceptual disease etiology model.

  12. Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-06

    An oncologist (cancer doctor) shares her medical and personal advice for people between the ages of 50 and 75 about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 4/6/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2017.

  13. Costs of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    A health economist talks about studies on figuring out the costs of running a colorectal cancer screening program, and how this can lead to better screening.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. [The colorectal carcinoma risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Andrzej; Wawrzyn-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria

    2005-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma constitutes the second, as for the rate, death cause due to a malignant disease both in the western countries and in Poland. Despite deep knowledge concerning morphogenesis and spread of colorectal carcinoma as well as vast achievements in surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy, the percentage of 5-year-survivals still reaches 40%. According to most authors there are 4 risk factor categories: epidemiological, intestinal, dietetic, and mixed. It is well-known that colorectal carcinoma, like neoplasms localized in other organs and systems, is a disease, in which genetic mutations of somatic cells are the molecular base/source of the disease. The inner innervation of the colon seems to play an important role in carcinoma pathogenesis and spread. At present, 80% of colorectal carcinomas are diagnosed in the advanced stage, with infiltration exceeding the intestinal wall or spreading to neighboring organs, which gives full clinical symptoms. The prognosis as to survival and disease progression is usually poor. Therefore, the ways of early diagnosis, monitoring, and the knowledge of etiological factors are so important in medical practice.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. COLORECTAL-CARCINOMA - AN UPDATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINNIGE, HAM; MULDER, NH

    1991-01-01

    During the last decade important advances have occurred in the fields of understanding genesis, molecular biology, detection of "precancerous data", intervention, and metastatic behaviour of colorectal cancer. An important step forward has been made in adjuvant therapy. Better understanding of 5-flu

  18. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and processed meat you eat. If you drink alcohol, limit the amount to 1 drink per day for women, 2 per day for men. Don’t use tobacco in any form. Myth: African Americans are not at risk for colorectal cancer. Truth: African-American men and women are diagnosed ...

  19. [Intraoperative staging of colorectal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhmonov, Iu B; Mel'nikov, O R; Egorenkov, V V; Moiseenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of intraoperative staging of tumor by sentinel node staining with lymphotropic dyes was evaluated in 60 patients with colorectal tumors (colon carcinoma -39, rectal cancer- 21). High sensitivity (84.6% and 87.5%, respectively) and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) for regional lymph node assessment were identified for both colonic and rectal cancer.

  20. [Systemic therapy for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2005-06-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to the traditional 5-fluorouracil, newer anticancer drugs are available including irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Monoclonal antibodies like bevacizumab and cetuximab have been integrated into modern treatment regimens. Based on randomized clinical trials we can formulate rational treatment strategies as outlined in this article.

  1. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with comorbiditie

  2. Epigenetic alterations in folate transport genes in placental tissue from fetuses with neural tube defects and in leukocytes from subjects with hyperhomocysteinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Sanja A.; Böttiger, Anna K.; Isaksson, Helena S.; Finnell, Richard H.; Ren, Aiguo; Nilsson, Torbjörn K.; Nilsson, Torbjörn K.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (T-DMR’s) in the folate transport genes in placental tissue compared with leukocytes, and from placental tissues obtained from normal infants or with neural tube defects (NTDs). Using pyrosequencing, we developed methylation assays for the CpG islands (CGIs) and the CGI shore regions of the folate receptor α (FOLR1), proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) and reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) genes. The T-DMRs differed in location for each gene and the difference in methylation ranged between 2 and 54%. A higher T-DMR methylated fraction was associated with a lower mRNA level of the FOLR1 and RFC1 genes. Methylation fractions differed according to RFC1 80G > A genotype in the NTD cases and in leukocytes from subjects with high total plasma homocysteine (tHcy). There were no differences in methylated fraction of folate transporter genes between NTD cases and controls. We suggest that T-DMRs participate in the regulation of expression of the FOLR1 and RFC1 genes, that the RFC1 80G > A polymorphism exerts a gene-nutrition interaction on DNA methylation in the RFC1 gene, and that this interaction appears to be most prominent in NTD-affected births and in subjects with high tHcy concentrations. PMID:23417011

  3. Global alteration of the drug-binding pocket of human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) by substitution of fifteen conserved residues reveals a negative correlation between substrate size and transport efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Shahrooz; Chufan, Eduardo E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2017-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, is linked to the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. However, the drug-binding sites and translocation pathways of this transporter are not yet well-characterized. We recently demonstrated the important role of tyrosine residues in regulating P-gp ATP hydrolysis via hydrogen bond formations with high affinity modulators. Since tyrosine is both a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, and non-covalent interactions are key in drug transport, in this study we investigated the global effect of enrichment of tyrosine residues in the drug-binding pocket on the drug binding and transport function of P-gp. By employing computational analysis, 15 conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp that interact with substrates were identified and then substituted with tyrosine, including 11 phenylalanine (F72, F303, F314, F336, F732, F759, F770, F938, F942, F983, F994), two leucine (L339, L975), one isoleucine (I306), and one methionine (M949). Characterization of the tyrosine-rich P-gp mutant in HeLa cells demonstrated that this major alteration in the drug-binding pocket by introducing fifteen additional tyrosine residues is well tolerated and has no measurable effect on total or cell surface expression of this mutant. Although the tyrosine-enriched mutant P-gp could transport small to moderate size (1000 Daltons) substrates such as NBD-cyclosporine A, Bodipy-paclitaxel and Bodipy-vinblastine was significantly decreased. This was further supported by the physico-chemical characterization of seventeen tested substrates, which revealed a negative correlation between drug transport and molecular size for the tyrosine-enriched P-gp mutant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF COLORECTAL MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer in men and in women worldwide. Incidence rates of colorectal cancer vary 10 - fold in both sexes worldwide, Within Asia, the incidence rates vary widely and are uniformly low in all south Asian countries and high i n all developed Asian countries. Fortunately, the age adjusted incidence rates of colorectal cancer in all the Indian cancer registries are very close to the lowest rates in the world. The present study is under taken to study the prevalence and types of c olorectal cancer among the patients in the rural population in and around Chidambaram. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of malignant colorectal neoplasms among the speci mens received in the Department of Pathology and the gross and histomorphological pa ttern of the lesions and finally to correlate the findings with clinical data. METHOD: The materials consisted of 68 specimens who were submitted to the Department of Pathology, during the period of Jan 2008 - Dec 2012. Data collected and entered in MS - Excel and were analyzed using SPSS - 16. RESULTS : Out of 8454 colonoscopic specimens, 68(0.8% showed colorectal malignancy. A higher frequency of colorectal was seen in 6 th decade. Out of 68 specimens of malignant neoplasms majority were Carcinoma of the Rectum (79.41% followed in decreasing order of frequency by malignant lesions of descending colon(8.82%, ascending and Sigmoid colon (4.41% each, recto - sigmoid (2.94% and cecum (2.63%, and transverse colon (2.63%. Youngest patient was 19 years old and the o ldest patient was 80 years old with a mean age of 49.5 years and median age of 50 years. CONCLUSION: Colorectal cancer is a common and lethal disease. The adenoma carcinoma. S equence offers a window of opportunity in which the precursor lesion or early car cinoma can be removed endoscopically to prevent systematic disease. The result of a careful and systematic examination of surgical specimens from patients with

  5. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability...

  6. Study of normal colorectal tissue by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, P O; Bitar, R A; Yassoyama, K; Martinho, H; Santo, A M E; Bruno, P M; Martin, A A

    2007-03-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was employed to study normal human colorectal tissues in vitro with the aim of evaluating the spectral differences of the complex colon mucous in order to establish a characteristic Raman spectrum. The samples were collected from 39 patients, providing 144 spectra for the statistical analysis. The results enable one to establish three well-defined spectroscopic groups of non-altered colorectal tissues that were consistently checked by statistical (clustering) and biological (histopathology) analyses: group 1 is represented by samples with the presence of epithelial layer, connective tissue papillae, and smooth muscle tissue; group 2 comprises tissues with epithelial layer and connective tissue papillae; group 3 presented mostly fatty and slack conjunctive tissue. The study reveals the existence of an intrinsic spectral variability for each patient that must be considered when sampling tissues fragments to build a spectral database. This is the first step for future studies and applications of Raman spectroscopy to optical biopsy and diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  7. Molecular markers and targets for colorectal cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveena B JANAKIRAM; Chinthalapally V RAO

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. If detected at an early stage, treatment often might lead to cure. As prevention is better than cure, epidemiological studies reveal that having a healthy diet often protects from pro-moting/developing cancer. An important consideration in evaluating new drugs and devices is determining whether a product can effectively treat a targeted disease. There are quite a number of biomarkers making their way into clinical trials and few are awaiting the preclinical efficacy and safety results to enter into clinical trials. Researchers are facing challenges in modifying trial design and defining the right control population, validating biomarker assays from the bio-logical and analytical perspective and using biomarker data as a guideline for decision making. In spite of following all guidelines, the results are disappointing from many of the large clinical trials. To avoid these disappointments, selection of biomarkers and its target drug needs to be evaluated in appropriate animal models for its toxicities and efficacies. The focus of this review is on the few of the potential molecular targets and their biomarkers in colorectal cancers. Strengths and limitations of biomarkers/surrogate endpoints are also discussed. Various pathways involved in tumor cells and the specific agents to target the altered molecular biomarkerin biomolecular pathwayare elucidated. Importance of emerging new platforms siRNAs and miRNAs technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics is reviewed.

  8. Activating mutation in MET oncogene in familial colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schildkraut Joellen M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developed countries, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC is 5%, and it is the second leading cause of death from cancer. The presence of family history is a well established risk factor with 25-35% of CRCs attributable to inherited and/or familial factors. The highly penetrant inherited colon cancer syndromes account for approximately 5%, leaving greater than 20% without clear genetic definition. Familial colorectal cancer has been linked to chromosome 7q31 by multiple affected relative pair studies. The MET proto-oncogene which resides in this chromosomal region is considered a candidate for genetic susceptibility. Methods MET exons were amplified by PCR from germline DNA of 148 affected sibling pairs with colorectal cancer. Amplicons with altered sequence were detected with high-resolution melt-curve analysis using a LightScanner (Idaho Technologies. Samples demonstrating alternative melt curves were sequenced. A TaqMan assay for the specific c.2975C >T change was used to confirm this mutation in a cohort of 299 colorectal cancer cases and to look for allelic amplification in tumors. Results Here we report a germline non-synonymous change in the MET proto-oncogene at amino acid position T992I (also reported as MET p.T1010I in 5.2% of a cohort of sibling pairs affected with CRC. This genetic variant was then confirmed in a second cohort of individuals diagnosed with CRC and having a first degree relative with CRC at prevalence of 4.1%. This mutation has been reported in cancer cells of multiple origins, including 2.5% of colon cancers, and in Conclusions Although the MET p.T992I genetic mutation is commonly found in somatic colorectal cancer tissues, this is the first report also implicating this MET genetic mutation as a germline inherited risk factor for familial colorectal cancer. Future studies on the cancer risks associated with this mutation and the prevalence in different at-risk populations will

  9. What is needed to understand feedback mechanisms from agricultural and climate changes that can alter the hydrological system and the transport of sediments and agricultural chemicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Richard; Payraudeau, Sylvain; Babcsányi, Izabella; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2015-04-01

    Modern agriculture activities are constantly changing as producers try to produce a crop, keep their soils fertile, control pests, and prevent contamination of air and water resources. Because most of the world's arable land is already in production we must become more efficient if we are to feed and clothe the world's growing population as well as do this in a sustainable manner; leaving a legacy of fertile soil and clean water resources for our descendants. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of historical datasets and of developing new strategies to understand the effects of changing agricultural systems on the environment. Scientists who study agriculture and its effects on water must constantly adapt their strategies and evaluate how changing agricultural activities impact the environment. As well as understand from historical datasets on hydrology and agriculture how a changing climate or agricultural activity such as a change in tillage method might impact the processes that determine the movement of agricultural chemicals off of the target site. The 42.7 ha Hohrain (Rouffach, Alsace, France) vineyard experimental catchment offers several examples of how scientists have used historical data from this catchment to understand how the transport of agricultural chemicals may change due to a changing climate as well as how new strategies are developed for understanding the transport of agricultural chemicals. Runoff is a major process of pesticide transport from agricultural land to downstream aquatic ecosystems. The impact of rainfall characteristics on the transport of runoff-related pesticides is crucial to understanding how to prevent or minimize their movement now, but also in understanding how climate change might affect runoff. If we understand how rainfall characteristics affect the transport of pesticides, we can use climate change models to predict how those characteristics might change in the future and be better prepared for

  10. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) overexpression in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Francisco; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Wang, Shuli; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Lewin, Tal M; Orntoft, Torben F; Coleman, Rosalind A; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The alteration of the choline metabolite profile is a well-established characteristic of cancer cells. In colorectal cancer (CRC), phosphatidylcholine is the most prominent phospholipid. In the present study, we report that lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1; NM_024830.3), the enzyme that converts lysophosphatidylcholine into phosphatidylcholine, was highly overexpressed in colorectal adenocarcinomas when compared to normal mucosas. Our microarray transcription profiling study showed a significant (p mucosas. Immunohistochemical analysis of colon tumors with a polyclonal antibody to LPCAT1 confirmed the upregulation of the LPCAT1 protein. Overexpression of LPCAT1 in COS7 cells localized the protein to the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria and increased LPCAT1 specific activity 38-fold. In cultured cells, overexpressed LPCAT1 enhanced the incorporation of [(14)C]palmitate into phosphatidylcholine. COS7 cells transfected with LPCAT1 showed no growth rate alteration, in contrast to the colon cancer cell line SW480, which significantly (p < 10(-5)) increased its growth rate by 17%. We conclude that LPCAT1 may contribute to total choline metabolite accumulation via phosphatidylcholine remodeling, thereby altering the CRC lipid profile, a characteristic of malignancy.

  11. Modifiable risk factors and colorectal adenomas among those at high risk of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified several modifiable risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in the general population. However, associations between modifiable risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol consumption and dietary patterns, and colorectal neoplasms in two

  12. Inadequate preoperative colonic evaluation for synchronous colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Burgdorf, S K; Wilhelmsen, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Synchronous cancers (SC) are well known (2-11%) in patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC). One study has shown that intraoperative palpation can miss up to 69% of the SC while other studies have shown altered planned surgical procedure due to preoperatively diagnosed......-operation and one patient had pulmonary embolism as a complication to re-operation. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that many patients (78%) never underwent FPCE, but also that many of these patients never had a full postoperative colonic evaluation. SC being overlooked can lead to increased morbidity...... and the possibility of advanced staging of the cancer which is also exemplified in this study....

  13. Cell-Free DNA in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Boysen, Anders K; Pallisgård, Niels

    2017-01-01

    -analysis of the prognostic value of total cfDNA in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with chemotherapy. In addition, we report on the overall performance of cfDNA as source for KRAS mutation detection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase was performed by two......BACKGROUND: Circulating DNA can be detected and quantified in the blood of cancer patients and used for detection of tumor-specific genetic alterations. The clinical utility has been intensively investigated for the past 10 years. The majority of reports focus on analyzing the clinical potential...

  14. Doxorubicin in vivo rapidly alters expression and translation of myocardial electron transport chain genes, leads to ATP loss and caspase 3 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy V Pointon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Doxorubicin is one of the most effective anti-cancer drugs but its use is limited by cumulative cardiotoxicity that restricts lifetime dose. Redox damage is one of the most accepted mechanisms of toxicity, but not fully substantiated. Moreover doxorubicin is not an efficient redox cycling compound due to its low redox potential. Here we used genomic and chemical systems approaches in vivo to investigate the mechanisms of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity, and specifically test the hypothesis of redox cycling mediated cardiotoxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were treated with an acute dose of either doxorubicin (DOX (15 mg/kg or 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ (25 mg/kg. DMNQ is a more efficient redox cycling agent than DOX but unlike DOX has limited ability to inhibit gene transcription and DNA replication. This allowed specific testing of the redox hypothesis for cardiotoxicity. An acute dose was used to avoid pathophysiological effects in the genomic analysis. However similar data were obtained with a chronic model, but are not specifically presented. All data are deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO. Pathway and biochemical analysis of cardiac global gene transcription and mRNA translation data derived at time points from 5 min after an acute exposure in vivo showed a pronounced effect on electron transport chain activity. This led to loss of ATP, increased AMPK expression, mitochondrial genome amplification and activation of caspase 3. No data gathered with either compound indicated general redox damage, though site specific redox damage in mitochondria cannot be entirely discounted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate the major mechanism of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity is via damage or inhibition of the electron transport chain and not general redox stress. There is a rapid response at transcriptional and translational level of many of the genes coding for proteins of the electron transport chain

  15. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  16. The risk of colorectal cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: associations with treatment stage and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Paul J H L; Bazelier, Marloes T; Leufkens, Hubert G M; de Vries, Frank; De Bruin, Marie L

    2015-03-01

    To assess the risk of colorectal cancer associated with type 2 diabetes, as compared with a nondiabetic reference population, and to study additional associations between treatment stage and duration of obesity and colorectal cancer risk. We conducted an observational population-based cohort study within the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (1987-2012). All patients (≥18 years) with at least one prescription for an antidiabetic drug (n = 300,039) were matched (1:1) by birth year, sex, and practice to a comparison cohort without diabetes. Cox proportional hazards models were used to derive adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for colorectal cancer associated with type 2 diabetes. Within the diabetic cohort, associations of colorectal cancer with treatment stages and duration of obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) were studied. After a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 2,759 cases of colorectal cancer were observed among the diabetic study population. Type 2 diabetes was associated with a 1.3-fold increased risk of colorectal cancer (HR 1.26 [95% CI 1.18-1.33]). Among diabetic patients, no association was found with treatment stages. A trend of increased colorectal cancer risk was observed with longer duration of obesity. Risk of colorectal cancer was significantly increased for patients with recorded duration of obesity of 4-8 years (HR 1.19 [1.06-1.34]) and >8 years (1.28 [1.11-1.49]). Type 2 diabetes is associated with a moderately increased risk of colorectal cancer. Among diabetic patients, an increased risk was observed for patients who suffered from obesity for a total duration of 4 years or more. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. DECAY ACCELERATING FACTOR AND COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高雪芹; 鲁艳芹; 韩金祥

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the significance of decay accelerating factor (DAF) in the eolorectal cancer, we searched the data from PubMed and selected the related articles for review. It was found that DAF were expressed in the adenomas and adenocarcinoma of colorectal tissues. The release of DAF in the stool of the patients was also detectable. It increased more significantly in the stool of patients with colorectal cancer than other gastrointestinal cancer. Its detection by ELISA method may render a good test for the noninvasive diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It can be concluded that DAF is expressed extensively in colorectal cancer. And the detection of DAF released in the stool of colorectal cancer patients may be a good noninvasive method for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  18. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  19. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  20. Watchful waiting versus colorectal resection after polypectomy for malignant colorectal polyps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levic, Katarina; Kjær, Monica; Bulut, Orhan;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Unexpected malignancy in removed colorectal polyps is reported in up to 9% of cases. The introduction of screening for colorectal cancer will inevitably increase the number of removed colorectal polyps and therefore also the incidence of malignant polyps. The treatment strategy is e...

  1. Compound heterozygous alterations in intraflagellar transport protein CLUAP1 in a child with a novel Joubert and oral–facial–digital overlap syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Lee, Chanjae; Wentzensen, Ingrid M.; Parisi, Melissa A.; Crenshaw, Molly M.; Sapp, Julie C.; Gross, Jeffrey M.; Wallingford, John B.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of normal ciliary function results in a range of diseases collectively referred to as ciliopathies. Here we report a child with a phenotype that overlapped with Joubert, oral–facial–digital, and Pallister–Hall syndromes including brain, limb, and craniofacial anomalies. We performed exome-sequence analysis on a proband and both parents, filtered for putative causative variants, and Sanger-verified variants of interest. Identified variants in CLUAP1 were functionally analyzed in a Xenopus system to determine their effect on ciliary function. Two variants in CLUAP1 were identified through exome-sequence analysis, Chr16:g.3558407T>G, c.338T>G, p.(Met113Arg) and Chr16:g.3570011C>T, c.688C>T, p.(Arg230Ter). These variants were rare in the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) data set of 65,000 individuals (one and two occurrences, respectively). Transfection of mutant CLUAP1 constructs into Xenopus embryos showed reduced protein levels p.(Arg230Ter) and reduced intraflagellar transport p.(Met113Arg). The genetic data show that these variants are present in an affected child, are rare in the population, and result in reduced, but not absent, intraflagellar transport. We conclude that biallelic mutations in CLUAP1 resulted in this novel ciliopathy syndrome in the proband. PMID:28679688

  2. Carbenoxolone alters the morphology of adipose tissues and downregulates genes involved in adipogenesis, glucose transport and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, S; Nakagawa, Y; Yamaguchi, R; Fujisawa, Y; Satake, E; Nagata, E; Nakanishi, T; Liu, Y-J; Ohzeki, T

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess promotes adipose tissue accumulation, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) plays an important role in the local amplification of GC. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of carbenoxolone (CBX), an 11β-HSD1 inhibitor, on morphological changes in visceral fat, and the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism in high-fat (HF) diet-fed mice. Mice were fed a HF diet from 5 weeks of age. At 10 weeks of age, the mice received an intraperitoneal injection of CBX or vehicle every day for 2 weeks. CBX decreased body weight and visceral fat mass, and improved insulin sensitivity in HF-fed mice. This was accompanied by reduced adipocyte size and a decrease in large-sized adipocytes in visceral fat. The expression of adipogenesis (PPARγ and C/EBPα), glucose transport (GLUT4) and lipid metabolism (LPL, ATGL, and HSL)-related genes were suppressed in CBX mice. CBX treatment induced beneficial morphological changes in visceral fat and decreased the expression of adipogenesis, glucose transport and lipid metabolism-related genes. These findings reveal a potential mechanism underling the effects of CBX on reduced fat accumulation and improved insulin sensitivity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Robotic Colorectal Surgery: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sami AlAsari; Byung Soh Min

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Robotic colorectal surgery may be a way to overcome the limitations of laparoscopic surgery. It is an emerging field; so, we aim in this paper to provide a comprehensive and data analysis of the available literature on the use of robotic technology in colorectal surgery. Method. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was completed for the period from 2000 to 2011. Studies reporting outcomes of robotic colorectal surgery were identified and analyzed. Results. 41 studies...

  4. Preliminary study on MR colonography with air enema in detection of colorectal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ming-yue; LIU Li; YAN Fu-hua; SHEN Ji-zhang; YAO Li-qing; ZHOU Kang-rong

    2010-01-01

    Background The few studies on MR colonography with air enema involved feasibility of bowel distention and imaging quality and lacked detection sensitivity of colorectal neoplasms. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the detection sensitivity of colorectal neoplasms with the three-dimensional Fourier transform fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR colonography with air enema.Methods A total of 30 patients scheduled for optical colonoscopy due to rectal bleeding, positive fecal occult blood test results or altered bowel habits were recruited and successfully underwent entire colorectal examinations with three-dimensional Fourier transform fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR colonography and subsequent optical colonoscopy on the same day. Detection sensitivity of colorectal neoplasms with MR colonography was statistically analyzed on a per-neoplasm size basis by using findings from optical colonoscopy and histopathological examinations as the reference standards.Results Seventy-six neoplasms were detected with optical colonoscopy, consisting of 1 mm-5 mm (n=11), 6 mm-9 mm (n=29) and >10 mm (n=36) in diameter. Detection sensitivities of 1 mm-5 mm, 6 mm-9 mm, ≥10 mm and >6 mm colorectal neoplasms with MR colonography were 9.1%, 75.9%, 100% and 89.2%, respectively; overall detection sensitivity for all sizes colorectal neoplasms was 77.6%.Conclusions Detection sensitivity of three-dimensional Fourier transform fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR colonography with air enema is low for 1 mm-5 mm colorectal neoplasms, but the detection sensitivity is 89.2% for ≥6 mm neoplasms, and all ≥10 mm neoplasms could be detected.

  5. Persistence of blood changes associated with alteration of the dietary electrolyte balance in commercial pigs after feed withdrawal, transportation, and lairage, and the effects on performance and carcass quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, L N; Engle, T E; Paradis, M A; Correa, J A; Anderson, D B

    2010-12-01

    Increasing dietary electrolyte balance (dEB) has previously been shown to reduce the incidence of nonambulatory and noninjured swine, improve meat quality, and reduce the incidence of gastric ulcers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dEB under commercial conditions. Due to the variability in feed withdrawal, transport, and lairage conditions in the swine industry, it was necessary to determine first the persistence of blood changes during the marketing process after alteration of dEB. Sixteen pens of 8 crossbred barrows were assigned to a low (121 mEq/kg) or high (375 mEq/kg) dEB diet, calculated as Na(+) + K(+) - Cl(-), to determine the persistence of blood changes associated with the alteration of dEB. Diets were formulated to meet or exceed NRC (1998) requirements for energy, protein, vitamins, and minerals. Dietary treatments were provided for ad libitum intake for 3 d before slaughter. Before transport, animals were fasted in the barn for approximately 10 h. After fasting, animals were shipped to the packing plant, rested for 8 h, and subsequently slaughtered. Initial and final BW of the animals were obtained. Blood was sampled at baseline (2 d before administration of diets), before feed withdrawal (0 h), after feed withdrawal (10 h), and at exsanguination (20 h). Consumption of the high dEB diet for 3 d resulted in an increase in blood TCO(2) (P = 0.001), HCO(3)(-) (P = 0.001), and base excess (P = 0.0003) and a decrease in Cl(-) (P = 0.0002) and anion gap (P = 0.01). These differences, however, were not maintained for any of the blood components after the 10-h feed withdrawal (P > 0.22). Increasing dEB had no adverse effects (P > 0.18) on growth performance, meat quality, or carcass yield and did not decrease pars esophageal ulcer scores. This study demonstrated that the effect of dEB on blood components was not maintained after a 10-h feed withdrawal. Therefore, it is likely that the ability of the animal to withstand any increased

  6. Extended resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ping; SONG Xin-ming

    2006-01-01

    @@ Colorectal cancer is a common cause of cancer-related mortality.1 In China, it is one of eight cancers in the cancer control blueprint, which are suggested to have comprehensive treatment.Some patients with colorectal cancer presented no symptoms when they were diagnosed, yet the tumor had already penetrated the intestinal wall and involved adjacent organs. If the tumor is localized at time of diagnosis without distant metastases, it is termed locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACC)regardless of whether there is lymph node metastasis. LACC commonly encountered in clinical practice accounts for 5%-10% of all colorectal cancers.2

  7. Alcohol intake, smoking, and colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeong Mi; Cho, Chang Ho; Kim, Sung Hi; Lee, Jung Eun

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in Korea. Because colorectal adenoma is a precursor lesion of colorectal cancer, primary prevention of colorectal adenomas may be important for reducing morbidity and mortality from the disease. The aim of this study is to examine the association of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking in relation with colorectal adenoma in a cross-sectional study of Korean adults. A total of 366 participants who underwent colonoscopy were included (113 cases and 255 controls) in this study. Information on alcohol intake and cigarette smoking was collected from structured questionnaires. The odds ratio (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the multivariate logistic regression models. Alcohol intake was associated with a higher prevalence of colorectal adenoma in men; compared to non-drinkers, ORs (95% CIs) were 11.49 (2.55-51.89) for 10-20 g/day of alcohol intake and 14.15 (3.31-60.59) for â 20 g/day of alcohol intake (P for trend = 0.003). There was a weaker association of alcohol intake for women than men; however, there was a suggestive increase in the prevalence of colorectal cancer in women. Cigarette smoking was not associated with colorectal adenoma, but we cannot rule out the possibility that this was due to low statistical power. Our study provides evidence to suggest that alcohol intake may contribute to colorectal adenoma in the Korean population. Our study results demonstrate that a larger epidemiologic study is needed.

  8. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Metge, David W.; Barber, Larry B.; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  9. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Barber, L B; Aiken, George R

    2010-02-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength=5x10(-3)M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 microg/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only approximately 3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  10. Hypermethylation of the TPEF/HPP1 Gene in Primary, Metastatic Colorectal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias P.A. Ebert

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of promoter methylation in the process of cancer cell metastasis has not yet been studied. Recently, methylation of the TPEF (transmembrane protein containing epidermal growth factor, follistatin domain gene was reported in human colon, gastric, bladder cancer cells. Using the Methylight assay, TPEF/HPP1 gene methylation was assessed in primary colorectal cancers (n = 47, matched normal colon mucosa, as well as in the liver metastasis of 24 patients with colorectal cancer, compared to the methylation status of the TIMP-3, APC, DAPK, caveolin-2, p16 genes. TPEF was frequently methylated in primary colorectal cancers (36 of 47 compared to the normal colon mucosa (1 of 21 (P < .0001. Interestingly, promoter methylation was significantly more frequent in proximal nonrectal cancers (P < .05. Furthermore, a high degree of methylation of the TPEF gene was also observed in liver metastasis. (19 of 24. In summary, we observed frequent TPEF methylation in primary colorectal cancers, liver metastases, indicating that epigenetic alterations are not only present in the early phases of carcinogenesis, but are also common in metastatic lesions. The high frequency of TPEF methylation in this series of colorectal cancers underscores the importance of epigenetic changes as targets for the development of molecular tests for cancer diagnosis.

  11. Therapeutic targets in the Wnt signaling pathway: Feasibility of targeting TNIK in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Mari; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2015-12-01

    The genetic and epigenetic alterations occurring during the course of multistage colorectal carcinogenesis have been extensively studied in the last few decades. One of the most notable findings is that the great majority of colorectal cancers (>80%) have mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene. Loss of functional APC protein results in activation of canonical Wnt/β-catanin signaling and initiates intestinal carcinogenesis. Mutational inactivation of APC is the first genetic event, but colorectal cancer cells retain their dependency on constitutive Wnt signal activation even after accumulation of other genetic events. Accordingly, pharmacological blocking of Wnt signaling has been considered an attractive therapeutic approach for colorectal cancer. Several therapeutics targeting various molecular components of the Wnt signaling pathway, including porcupine, frizzled receptors and co-receptor, tankyrases, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP), have been developed, and some of those are currently being evaluated in early-phase clinical trials. Traf2- and Nck-interacting protein kinase (TNIK) has been identified as a regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex independently by two research groups. TNIK regulates Wnt signaling in the most downstream part of the pathway, and its inhibition is expected to block the signal even in colorectal cancer cells with APC gene mutation. Here we discuss some of the TNIK inhibitors under preclinical development.

  12. A multidimensional integration analysis reveals potential bridging targets in the process of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Yu, Tian; Xue, Dongbo; Sun, Boshi; Shao, Qin; Choudhry, Hani; Marcus, Victoria; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhang, Weihui; Gao, Zu-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 9% of cancer-related deaths are caused by colorectal cancer. Liver metastasis is a major factor for the high colorectal cancer mortality rate. However, the molecular mechanism underlying colorectal cancer liver metastasis remains unclear. Using a global and multidimensional integration approach, we studied sequencing data, protein-protein interactions, and regulation of transcription factor and non-coding RNAs in primary tumor samples and liver metastasis samples to unveil the potential bridging molecules and the regulators that functionally link different stages of colorectal cancer liver metastasis. Primary tumor samples and liver metastasis samples had modules with significant overlap and crosstalk from which we identified several bridging genes (e.g. KNG1 and COX5B), transcription factors (e.g. E2F4 and CDX2), microRNAs (e.g. miR-590-3p and miR-203) and lncRNAs (e.g. lincIRX5 and lincFOXF1) that may play an important role in the process of colorectal cancer liver metastasis. This study enhances our understanding of the genetic alterations and transcriptional regulation that drive the metastatic process, but also provides the methodology to guide the studies on other metastatic cancers.

  13. ATM-Deficient Colorectal Cancer Cells Are Sensitive to the PARP Inhibitor Olaparib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Jette, Nicholas; Moussienko, Daniel; Bebb, D Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-02-06

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase plays a central role in the cellular response to DNA damage. Loss or inactivation of both copies of the ATM gene (ATM) leads to ataxia telangiectasia, a devastating childhood condition characterized by neurodegeneration, immune deficiencies, and cancer predisposition. ATM is also absent in approximately 40% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs), and we previously showed that MCL cell lines with loss of ATM are sensitive to poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Next-generation sequencing of patient tumors has revealed that ATM is altered in many human cancers including colorectal, lung, prostate, and breast. Here, we show that the colorectal cancer cell line SK-CO-1 lacks detectable ATM protein expression and is sensitive to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. Similarly, HCT116 colorectal cancer cells with shRNA depletion of ATM are sensitive to olaparib, and depletion of p53 enhances this sensitivity. Moreover, HCT116 cells are sensitive to olaparib in combination with the ATM inhibitor KU55933, and sensitivity is enhanced by deletion of p53. Together our studies suggest that PARP inhibitors may have potential for treating colorectal cancer with ATM dysfunction and/or colorectal cancer with mutation of p53 when combined with an ATM kinase inhibitor.

  14. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  15. Adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The management of colon and rectal cancer has changed dramatically over the last 25 years. The use of adjuvant therapies has become standard practice in locally advanced (stage Ⅲ and selected stage Ⅱ) colorectal cancer. Improved surgical techniques, chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy are resulting in higher cure rates and the development of agents targeting proliferative and angiogenic pathways offer further promise. Here we explore risk factors for local and distant recurrence after resection of colon and rectal cancer, and the role of adjuvant treatments. Discussion will focus on the evidence base for adjuvant therapies utilised in colorectal cancer, and the treatment of sub-groups such as the elderly and stage Ⅱ disease. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer in reduction of recurrence will be explored and the role and optimal methods for surveillance post-curative resection with or without adjuvant therapy will also be addressed.

  16. 18S rRNA degradation is not accompanied by altered rRNA transport at early times following irradiation of HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, P.; Krolak, J.M.; McClain, D.; Minton, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    In recent investigations on the effects of radiation on rRNA processing in HeLa S3 cells, the authors pulse-labeled the cells with uridine immediately prior to irradiation. The 45 S rRNA precursor, which undergoes nuclear processing to form one each of its major daughter species, 28S and 18S rRNA, was separated from the daughter species by gel electrophoresis and the radiolabel in each species determined at various times after irradiation. By pulse-labeling the cells prior to irradiation, superimposed effects caused by radiation-induced alterations of rRNA transcription and Refs. therein were minimized, permitting selective analysis of the processing of that fraction of 45S precursor that had been synthesized (radiolabeled) predominantly prior to irradiation. They now report more detailed studies on 45S rRNA processing within the first 2 h following irradiation in which they have found a maximum 28 S:18 S ratio of 2:1 that is observed about 1 h following irradiation of 5 or 10 Gy.

  17. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  18. Syncytin immunoreactivity in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Mou; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    monoclonal syncytin antibody we have assessed syncytin expression in a retrospective series of 140 colorectal cancer patients. Variable degrees of syncytin expression were detected in both colonic and rectal tumors and the prognostic impact of such expression was analysed with the Kaplan-Meier method...... and the Cox proportional hazard model. Interestingly, increased syncytin expression was associated with decreased overall survival in rectal but not in colonic cancer patients. Thus, the prognostic impact of syncytin expression appears to vary with the tumor type....

  19. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Begg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boggs, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, A. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-27

    The testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has led to the deposition of substantial quantities of plutonium into the environment. Approximately 2.8 metric tons (3.1×104 TBq) of Pu were deposited in the NNSS subsurface as a result of underground nuclear testing. While 3H is the most abundant anthropogenic radionuclide deposited in the NNSS subsurface (4.7×106 TBq), plutonium is the most abundant from a molar standpoint. The only radioactive elements in greater molar abundance are the naturally occurring K, Th, and U isotopes. 239Pu and 240Pu represent the majority of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes. The extreme temperatures associated with underground nuclear tests and the refractory nature of Pu results in most of the Pu (98%) being sequestered in melted rock, referred to as nuclear melt glass (Iaea, 1998). As a result, Pu release to groundwater is controlled, in large part, by the leaching (or dissolution) of nuclear melt glass over time. The factors affecting glass dissolution rates have been studied extensively. The dissolution of Pu-containing borosilicate nuclear waste glasses at 90ºC has been shown to lead to the formation of dioctahedral smectite colloids. Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu at the NNSS has been observed. Recent groundwater samples collected from a number of contaminated wells have yielded a wide range of Pu concentrations from 0.00022 to 2.0 Bq/L. While Pu concentrations tend to fall below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (0.56 Bq/L), we do not yet understand what factors limit the Pu concentration or its transport behavior. To quantify the upper limit of Pu concentrations produced as a result of melt glass dissolution and determine the nature of colloids and Pu associations, we performed a 3 year nuclear melt glass dissolution experiment

  20. MALIGNANCY IN LARGE COLORECTAL LESIONS

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    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira dos SANTOS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context The size of colorectal lesions, besides a risk factor for malignancy, is a predictor for deeper invasion Objectives To evaluate the malignancy of colorectal lesions ≥20 mm. Methods Between 2007 and 2011, 76 neoplasms ≥20 mm in 70 patients were analyzed Results The mean age of the patients was 67.4 years, and 41 were women. Mean lesion size was 24.7 mm ± 6.2 mm (range: 20 to 50 mm. Half of the neoplasms were polypoid and the other half were non-polypoid. Forty-two (55.3% lesions were located in the left colon, and 34 in the right colon. There was a high prevalence of III L (39.5% and IV (53.9% pit patterns. There were 72 adenomas and 4 adenocarcinomas. Malignancy was observed in 5.3% of the lesions. Thirty-three lesions presented advanced histology (adenomas with high-grade dysplasia or early adenocarcinoma, with no difference in morphology and site. Only one lesion (1.3% invaded the submucosa. Lesions larger than 30 mm had advanced histology (P = 0.001. The primary treatment was endoscopic resection, and invasive carcinoma was referred to surgery. Recurrence rate was 10.6%. Conclusions Large colorectal neoplasms showed a low rate of malignancy. Endoscopic treatment is an effective therapy for these lesions.

  1. Treatment of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in the word. Liver metastasis is the most common site of colorectal metastases. The prognosis of resectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM was improved in the recent years with the consideration of chemotherapy and surgical resection as part of the multidisciplinary management of the disease; the current 5-year survival rates after resection of liver metastases are 25% to 40%. Resectable synchronous or metachronous liver metastases should be treated with perioperative chemotherapy based on three months of FOLFOX4 (5-fluorouracil [5FU], folinic acid [LV], and oxaliplatin chemotherapy before surgery and three months after surgery. In the case of primary surgery, pseudo-adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months, based on 5FU/LV, FOLFOX4, XELOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin or FOLFIRI (5FU/LV and irinotecan, should be indicated. In potentially resectable disease, primary chemotherapy based on more intensive regimens such as FOLFIRINOX (5FU/LV, irinotecan and oxaliplatin should be considered to enhance the chance of cure. The palliative chemotherapy based on FOLFIRI, or FOLFOX4/XELOX with or without targeted therapies, is the mainstay treatment of unresectable disease. This review would provide additional insight into the problem of optimal integration of chemotherapy and surgery in the management of CRLM.

  2. The level of claudin-7 is reduced as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis

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    Tveit Kjell M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compromised epithelial barriers are found in dysplastic tissue of the gastrointestinal tract. Claudins are transmembrane proteins important for tight junctions. Claudins regulate the paracellular transport and are crucial for maintaining a functional epithelial barrier. Down-regulation of the oncogenic serine protease, matriptase, induces leakiness in epithelial barriers both in vivo and in vitro. We found in an in-silico search tight co-regulation between matriptase and claudin-7 expression. We have previously shown that the matriptase expression level decreases during colorectal carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether claudin-7 expression is likewise decreased during colorectal carcinogenesis, thereby causing or contributing to the compromised epithelial leakiness of dysplastic tissue. Methods The mRNA level of claudin-7 (CLDN7 was determined in samples from 18 healthy individuals, 100 individuals with dysplasia and 121 colorectal cancer patients using quantitative real time RT-PCR. In addition, immunohistochemical stainings were performed on colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, to confirm the mRNA findings. Results A 2.7-fold reduction in the claudin-7 mRNA level was found when comparing the biopsies from healthy individuals with the biopsies of carcinomas (p claudin-7 mRNA levels were also detected in mild/moderate dysplasia (p Conclusions Our results show that the claudin-7 mRNA level is decreased already as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably contributing to the compromised epithelial barrier in adenomas.

  3. Association of Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CASR rs 1801725 with Colorectal Cancer

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    Fateme Rostami

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently prevents colorectal cancer through ion calcium receptor. Calcium-sensing receptor mutation reduces the expression of this receptor, and subsequently in reduces calcium transportation. Many studies have shown that Calcium-sensing receptor gene polymorphism may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of calcium-sensing receptor polymorphisms (rs 1801725 in Iran society and to examine the role of this polymorphism in the increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC.Materials and Methods: The research was a case-control study. 105 patients with colorectal cancer and 105 controls were randomly studied using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. χ2 test and software 16- SPSS were used for statistical analysis.Results: In patient samples, the frequency of the genotypes TT, GT, GG in gene CASR rs 1801725 was respectively 64.8, 32.4, and 2.9 and the frequency of this polymorphism in control samples was respectively 51.2, 45.7, and 2.9. Frequency of allele G in patient samples was 0/48 and frequency of allele T was 0.25. In addition, Frequency of allele G in control samples was 0.74 and Frequency of allele T was calculated 0.19.Conclusion: The results show that calcium-sensing receptor variant (1801725 rs is not associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  4. Reduced arsenic accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) shoot involves sulfur mediated improved thiol metabolism, antioxidant system and altered arsenic transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Kumar, Smita; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in rice is at alarming level as majority of rice growing regions are As contaminated such as South East Asia. Restricting the As in aerial parts of rice plant may be an effective strategy to reduce As contamination in food chain. Sulfur (S), an essential element for plant growth and development, plays a crucial role in diminishing heavy metal toxicity. Current study is designed to investigate the role of S to mitigate As toxicity in rice under different S regimes. High S (5 mM) treatment resulted in enhanced root As accumulation as well as prevented its entry in to shoot. Results of thiol metabolism indicate that As was complexed in plant roots through enhanced synthesis of phytochelatins. High S treatment also reduced the expression of OsLsi1 and OsLsi2, the potent transporters of As in rice. High S treatment enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and mitigated the As induced oxidative stress. Thus from present study it is evident that proper supply of S nutrition may be helpful in prevention of As accumulation in aerial parts of plant as well as As induced toxicity.

  5. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Katherina; Ehmann, Nadine; Andlauer, Till F M; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Strecker, Katrin; Fischer, Matthias; Kittel, Robert J; Raabe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling.

  6. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherina Beck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2 acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling.

  7. Altered cerebral vascular volumes and solute transport at the blood-brain barriers of two transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tuan Minh; Alata, Wael; Dodacki, Agnès; Traversy, Marie-Thérèse; Chacun, Hélène; Pradier, Laurent; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Farinotti, Robert; Calon, Frédéric; Bourasset, Fanchon

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the integrity and function of the blood-brain barrier in 3xTg-AD mice aged 3-18 months and in APP/PS1 mice aged 8-months to determine the impacts of changes in amyloid and tau proteins on the brain vascular changes. The vascular volume (Vvasc) was sub-normal in 3xTg-AD mice aged from 6 to 18 months, but not in the APP/PS1 mice. The uptakes of [(3)H]-diazepam by the brains of 3xTg-AD, APP/PS1 and their age-matched control mice were similar at all the times studied, suggesting that the simple diffusion of small solutes is unchanged in transgenic animals. The uptake of d-glucose by the brains of 18-month old 3xTg-AD mice, but not by those of 8-month old APP/PS1 mice, was reduced compared to their age-matched controls. Accordingly, the amount of Glut-1 protein was 1.4 times lower in the brain capillaries of 18 month-old 3xTg-AD mice than in those of age-matched control mice. We conclude that the brain vascular volume is reduced early in 3xTg-AD mice, 6 months before the appearance of pathological lesions, and that this reduction persists until they are at least 18 months old. The absence of alterations in the BBB of APP/PS1 mice suggests that hyperphosphorylated tau proteins contribute to the vascular changes that occur in AD.

  8. An Evolutionary Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations in Colorectal Cancer.

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    Jasmine Foo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of cancer as a genetic disease that can successfully be treated with drugs targeting mutant onco-proteins has motivated whole-genome sequencing efforts in many human cancer types. However, only a subset of mutations found within the genomic landscape of cancer is likely to provide a fitness advantage to the cell. Distinguishing such "driver" mutations from innocuous "passenger" events is critical for prioritizing the validation of candidate mutations in disease-relevant models. We design a novel statistical index, called the Hitchhiking Index, which reflects the probability that any observed candidate gene is a passenger alteration, given the frequency of alterations in a cross-sectional cancer sample set, and apply it to a mutational data set in colorectal cancer. Our methodology is based upon a population dynamics model of mutation accumulation and selection in colorectal tissue prior to cancer initiation as well as during tumorigenesis. This methodology can be used to aid in the prioritization of candidate mutations for functional validation and contributes to the process of drug discovery.

  9. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  10. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trubicka Joanna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations.

  11. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

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    Ingeholm P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peter Ingeholm,1,2 Ismail Gögenur,1,3 Lene H Iversen1,4 1Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database, Copenhagen, 2Department of Pathology, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, 3Department of Surgery, Roskilde University Hospital, Roskilde, 4Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables: The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion: The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period

  12. Altered antibiotic transport in OmpC mutants isolated from a series of clinical strains of multi-drug resistant E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hubing; Chen, Min; Black, Susan S; Bushell, Simon R; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Mach, Tivadar; Beis, Konstantinos; Low, Alison S; Bamford, Victoria A; Booth, Ian R; Bayley, Hagan; Naismith, James H

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly gram negative species, present significant health care challenges. The permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane is largely effected by the porin superfamily, changes in which contribute to antibiotic resistance. A series of antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from a patient during serial treatment with various antibiotics. The sequence of OmpC changed at three positions during treatment giving rise to a total of four OmpC variants (denoted OmpC20, OmpC26, OmpC28 and OmpC33, in which OmpC20 was derived from the first clinical isolate). We demonstrate that expression of the OmpC K12 porin in the clinical isolates lowers the MIC, consistent with modified porin function contributing to drug resistance. By a range of assays we have established that the three mutations that occur between OmpC20 and OmpC33 modify transport of both small molecules and antibiotics across the outer membrane. This results in the modulation of resistance to antibiotics, particularly cefotaxime. Small ion unitary conductance measurements of the isolated porins do not show significant differences between isolates. Thus, resistance does not appear to arise from major changes in pore size. Crystal structures of all four OmpC clinical mutants and molecular dynamics simulations also show that the pore size is essentially unchanged. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that perturbation of the transverse electrostatic field at the constriction zone reduces cefotaxime passage through the pore, consistent with laboratory and clinical data. This subtle modification of the transverse electric field is a very different source of resistance than occlusion of the pore or wholesale destruction of the transverse field and points to a new mechanism by which porins may modulate antibiotic passage through the outer membrane.

  13. Altered Antibiotic Transport in OmpC Mutants Isolated from a Series of Clinical Strains of Multi-Drug Resistant E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Matteo; Mach, Tivadar; Beis, Konstantinos; Low, Alison S.; Bamford, Victoria A.; Booth, Ian R.; Bayley, Hagan; Naismith, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly Gram negative species, present significant health care challenges. The permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane is largely effected by the porin superfamily, changes in which contribute to antibiotic resistance. A series of antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from a patient during serial treatment with various antibiotics. The sequence of OmpC changed at three positions during treatment giving rise to a total of four OmpC variants (denoted OmpC20, OmpC26, OmpC28 and OmpC33, in which OmpC20 was derived from the first clinical isolate). We demonstrate that expression of the OmpC K12 porin in the clinical isolates lowers the MIC, consistent with modified porin function contributing to drug resistance. By a range of assays we have established that the three mutations that occur between OmpC20 and OmpC33 modify transport of both small molecules and antibiotics across the outer membrane. This results in the modulation of resistance to antibiotics, particularly cefotaxime. Small ion unitary conductance measurements of the isolated porins do not show significant differences between isolates. Thus, resistance does not appear to arise from major changes in pore size. Crystal structures of all four OmpC clinical mutants and molecular dynamics simulations also show that the pore size is essentially unchanged. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that perturbation of the transverse electrostatic field at the constriction zone reduces cefotaxime passage through the pore, consistent with laboratory and clinical data. This subtle modification of the transverse electric field is a very different source of resistance than occlusion of the pore or wholesale destruction of the transverse field and points to a new mechanism by which porins may modulate antibiotic passage through the outer membrane. PMID:22053181

  14. Altered antibiotic transport in OmpC mutants isolated from a series of clinical strains of multi-drug resistant E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubing Lou

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly gram negative species, present significant health care challenges. The permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane is largely effected by the porin superfamily, changes in which contribute to antibiotic resistance. A series of antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from a patient during serial treatment with various antibiotics. The sequence of OmpC changed at three positions during treatment giving rise to a total of four OmpC variants (denoted OmpC20, OmpC26, OmpC28 and OmpC33, in which OmpC20 was derived from the first clinical isolate. We demonstrate that expression of the OmpC K12 porin in the clinical isolates lowers the MIC, consistent with modified porin function contributing to drug resistance. By a range of assays we have established that the three mutations that occur between OmpC20 and OmpC33 modify transport of both small molecules and antibiotics across the outer membrane. This results in the modulation of resistance to antibiotics, particularly cefotaxime. Small ion unitary conductance measurements of the isolated porins do not show significant differences between isolates. Thus, resistance does not appear to arise from major changes in pore size. Crystal structures of all four OmpC clinical mutants and molecular dynamics simulations also show that the pore size is essentially unchanged. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that perturbation of the transverse electrostatic field at the constriction zone reduces cefotaxime passage through the pore, consistent with laboratory and clinical data. This subtle modification of the transverse electric field is a very different source of resistance than occlusion of the pore or wholesale destruction of the transverse field and points to a new mechanism by which porins may modulate antibiotic passage through the outer membrane.

  15. Small pH and salt variations radically alter the thermal stability of metal-binding domains in the copper transporter, Wilson disease protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lina; Ådén, Jörgen; Niemiec, Moritz S; Nam, Kwangho; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2013-10-24

    Although strictly regulated, pH and solute concentrations in cells may exhibit temporal and spatial fluctuations. Here we study the effect of such changes on the stability, structure, and dynamics in vitro and in silico of a two-domain construct (WD56) of the fifth and sixth metal-binding domains of the copper transport protein, ATP7B (Wilson disease protein). We find that the thermal stability of WD56 is increased by 40 °C when increasing the pH from 5.0 to 7.5. In contrast, addition of salt at pH 7.2 decreases WD56 stability by up to 30 °C. In agreement with domain-domain coupling, fractional copper loading increases the stability of both domains. HSQC chemical shift changes demonstrate that, upon lowering the pH from 7.2 to 6, both His in WD6 as well as the second Cys of the copper site in each domain become protonated. MD simulations reveal increased domain-domain fluctuations at pH 6 and in the presence of high salt concentration, as compared to at pH 7 and low salt concentration. Thus, the surface charge distribution at high pH contributes favorably to overall WD56 stability. By introducing more positive charges by lowering the pH, or by diminishing charge-charge interactions by salt, fluctuations among the domains are increased and thereby overall stability is reduced. Copper transfer activity also depends on pH: delivery of copper from chaperone Atox1 to WD56 is more efficient at pH 7.2 than at pH 6 by a factor of 30. It appears that WD56 is an example where the free energy landscapes for folding and function are linked via structural stability.

  16. Alterations in brain extracellular dopamine and glycine levels following combined administration of the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor Org-24461 and risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Matyus, Peter; Pallagi, Katalin; Szabo, Geza; Juranyi, Zsolt; Barkoczy, Jozsef; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2010-12-01

    The most dominant hypotheses for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia have focused primarily upon hyperfunctional dopaminergic and hypofunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The therapeutic efficacy of all atypical antipsychotics is explained in part by antagonism of the dopaminergic neurotransmission, mainly by blockade of D(2) dopamine receptors. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in schizophrenia can be reversed by glycine transporter type-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitors, which regulate glycine concentrations at the vicinity of NMDA receptors. Combined drug administration with D(2) dopamine receptor blockade and activation of hypofunctional NMDA receptors may be needed for a more effective treatment of positive and negative symptoms and the accompanied cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. To investigate this type of combined drug administration, rats were treated with the atypical antipsychotic risperidone together with the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org-24461. Brain microdialysis was applied in the striatum of conscious rats and determinations of extracellular dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, glycine, glutamate, and serine concentrations were carried out using HPLC/electrochemistry. Risperidone increased extracellular concentrations of dopamine but failed to influence those of glycine or glutamate measured in microdialysis samples. Org-24461 injection reduced extracellular dopamine concentrations and elevated extracellular glycine levels but the concentrations of serine and glutamate were not changed. When risperidone and Org-24461 were added in combination, a decrease in extracellular dopamine concentrations was accompanied with sustained elevation of extracellular glycine levels. Interestingly, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate were also enhanced. Our data indicate that coadministration of an antipsychotic with a GlyT-1 inhibitor may normalize hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission with reduced

  17. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  18. Colorectal Carcinoma: A General Overview and Future Perspectives in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol, Inés; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Pradilla Dieste, Alberto; Cerrada, Elena; Rodriguez Yoldi, María Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Most cases of CRC are detected in Western countries, with its incidence increasing year by year. The probability of suffering from colorectal cancer is about 4%–5% and the risk for developing CRC is associated with personal features or habits such as age, chronic disease history and lifestyle. In this context, the gut microbiota has a relevant role, and dysbiosis situations can induce colonic carcinogenesis through a chronic inflammation mechanism. Some of the bacteria responsible for this multiphase process include Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. CRC is caused by mutations that target oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and genes related to DNA repair mechanisms. Depending on the origin of the mutation, colorectal carcinomas can be classified as sporadic (70%); inherited (5%) and familial (25%). The pathogenic mechanisms leading to this situation can be included in three types, namely chromosomal instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Within these types of CRC, common mutations, chromosomal changes and translocations have been reported to affect important pathways (WNT, MAPK/PI3K, TGF-β, TP53), and mutations; in particular, genes such as c-MYC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, PTEN, SMAD2 and SMAD4 can be used as predictive markers for patient outcome. In addition to gene mutations, alterations in ncRNAs, such as lncRNA or miRNA, can also contribute to different steps of the carcinogenesis process and have a predictive value when used as biomarkers. In consequence, different panels of genes and mRNA are being developed to improve prognosis and treatment selection. The choice of first-line treatment in CRC follows a multimodal approach based on tumour-related characteristics and usually comprises surgical resection followed by chemotherapy combined with

  19. Colorectal Carcinoma: A General Overview and Future Perspectives in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mármol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Most cases of CRC are detected in Western countries, with its incidence increasing year by year. The probability of suffering from colorectal cancer is about 4%–5% and the risk for developing CRC is associated with personal features or habits such as age, chronic disease history and lifestyle. In this context, the gut microbiota has a relevant role, and dysbiosis situations can induce colonic carcinogenesis through a chronic inflammation mechanism. Some of the bacteria responsible for this multiphase process include Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. CRC is caused by mutations that target oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and genes related to DNA repair mechanisms. Depending on the origin of the mutation, colorectal carcinomas can be classified as sporadic (70%; inherited (5% and familial (25%. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to this situation can be included in three types, namely chromosomal instability (CIN, microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. Within these types of CRC, common mutations, chromosomal changes and translocations have been reported to affect important pathways (WNT, MAPK/PI3K, TGF-β, TP53, and mutations; in particular, genes such as c-MYC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, PTEN, SMAD2 and SMAD4 can be used as predictive markers for patient outcome. In addition to gene mutations, alterations in ncRNAs, such as lncRNA or miRNA, can also contribute to different steps of the carcinogenesis process and have a predictive value when used as biomarkers. In consequence, different panels of genes and mRNA are being developed to improve prognosis and treatment selection. The choice of first-line treatment in CRC follows a multimodal approach based on tumour-related characteristics and usually comprises surgical resection followed by chemotherapy combined

  20. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  1. Economic burden of colorectal cancer in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Ju-Young; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Oh, In-Hwan; Kim, Young Ae; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Yo-Han

    2014-03-01

    The incidence and survival rate of colorectal cancer in Korea are increasing because of improved screening, treatment technologies, and lifestyle changes. In this aging population, increases in economic cost result. This study was conducted to estimate the economic burden of colorectal cancer utilizing claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Economic burdens of colorectal cancer were estimated using prevalence data and patients were defined as those who received ambulatory treatment from medical institutions or who had been hospitalized due to colorectal cancer under the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes from C18-C21. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer were calculated as direct costs and indirect costs. The prevalence rate (per 100 000 people) of those who were treated for colorectal cancer during 2010 was 165.48. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer in 2010 were 3 trillion and 100 billion Korean won (KRW), respectively. Direct costs included 1 trillion and 960 billion KRW (62.85%), respectively and indirect costs were 1 trillion and 160 billion (37.15%), respectively. Colorectal cancer has a large economic burden. Efforts should be made to reduce the economic burden of the disease through primary and secondary prevention.

  2. Vitamin D, inflammation, and colorectal cancer progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harten-Gerritsen, van Suzanne; Balvers, Michiel G.J.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Kampman, Ellen; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Survival from colorectal cancer is positively associated with vitamin D status. However, whether this association is causal remains unclear. Inflammatory processes may link vitamin D to colorectal cancer survival, and therefore investigating inflammatory markers as potential mediators may be a

  3. Diet and colorectal cancer risk and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary and other lifestyle factors account for 20–45% of all colorectal cancer cases. Being overweight or obese, having a high intake of red and processed meat and alcohol increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while a high intake of dairy products, fruits and vegetables, foods containin

  4. Increased hepcidin expression in colorectal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Douglas G Ward; Keith Roberts; Matthew J Brookes; Howard Joy; Ashley Martin; Tariq Ismail; Robert Spychal; Tariq Iqbal; Chris Tselepis

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether the iron stores regulator hepcidin is implicated in colon cancer-associated anae-mia and whether it might have a role in colorectal car-cinogenesis.METHODS:Mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and SELDI-TOF MS) was employed to measure hepcidin in urine collected from 56 patients with colorectal cancer.Quantitative Real Time RT-PCR was utilised to determine hepcidin mRNA expression in colorectal cancer tissue.Hepcidin cellular localisation was determined using im-munohistochemistry.RESULTS:We demonstrate that whilst urinary hepcidin expression was not correlated with anaemia it was posi-tively associated with increasing T-stage of colorectal cancer (P<0.05).Furthermore,we report that hepcidin mRNA is expressed in 34% of colorectal cancer tissue specimens and was correlated with ferroportin repres-sion.This was supported by hepcidin immunoreactivity in colorectal cancer tissue.CONCLUSION:We demonstrate that systemic hepcidin expression is unlikely to be the cause of the systemic anaemia associated with colorectal cancer.However,we demonstrate for the first time that hepcidin is expressed by colorectal cancer tissue and that this may represent a novel oncogenic signalling mechanism.

  5. Best practice in colorectal cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claire

    Nurses need up-to-date knowledge of colorectal cancer. This article provides an overview of the aetiology and risk factors for this disease, diagnostic and staging investigations, treatment options and future care. Managing colorectal cancer is complex. Patients can have a range of healthcare needs. Nurses play an increasingly important role in informing, supporting and coordinating care to improve patients' quality of life.

  6. Diet and colorectal cancer risk and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary and other lifestyle factors account for 20–45% of all colorectal cancer cases. Being overweight or obese, having a high intake of red and processed meat and alcohol increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while a high intake of dairy products, fruits and vegetables, foods

  7. Optimizing Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.S. Meester (Reinier)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractColorectal cancer screening is a leading cause of cancer deaths. Screening for colorectal cancer is implemented in an increasing number of settings, but performance of programs is often suboptimal. In this thesis, advanced modeling, informed by empirical data, was used to identify ar

  8. Optimizing Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.S. Meester (Reinier)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractColorectal cancer screening is a leading cause of cancer deaths. Screening for colorectal cancer is implemented in an increasing number of settings, but performance of programs is often suboptimal. In this thesis, advanced modeling, informed by empirical data, was used to identify

  9. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  10. Prevalence of mutations in APC, CTNNB1, and BRAF in Tunisian patients with sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougatef, Karim; Ouerhani, Slah; Moussa, Amel; Kourda, Nadia; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Lahely, Yannick Blondeau; Najjar, Tawfik; Ben Jilani, Sarra; Benammar-Elgaaied, Amel; Soubrier, Florent; Marrakchi, Raja

    2008-11-01

    Sporadic colorectal tumorigenesis is caused by alterations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1) and Ras pathways. Our objective was to analyze the occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumor and patient characteristics. The prevalence of somatic alteration in the hot-spot regions of the APC, BRAF, and CTNNB1 genes was investigated in 48 unselected and unrelated Tunisian patients with sporadic colorectal cancer, and the association between the molecular features at these genes in relation to tumor and patient characteristics (age at diagnosis, sex, tumor localization, stage, and differentiation) was analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity was observed at the APC locus in 52% of the analyzed tumors. 6 novel mutations were detected by polymerase chain reaction sequencing in the mutation cluster region of the APC gene. No mutations were observed in the CTNNB1 gene in any tumor, but 8% of tumors harbored mutation in the BRAF gene. Clinicopathological analyses showed an association between APC point mutations and the earliest occurrence of sporadic colorectal cancer. The findings confirm the heterogeneity of APC gene alteration and also reveal a particular profile of this pathology among Tunisian patients that confirms the epidemiological data for this country.

  11. Pneumatic tube system transport does not alter platelet function in optical and whole blood aggregometry, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count and fibrinogen in patients on anti-platelet drug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enko, Dietmar; Mangge, Harald; Münch, Andreas; Niedrist, Tobias; Mahla, Elisabeth; Metzler, Helfried; Prüller, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess pneumatic tube system (PTS) alteration on platelet function by the light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and whole blood aggregometry (WBA) method, and on the results of platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen. Materials and methods Venous blood was collected into six 4.5 mL VACUETTE® 9NC coagulation sodium citrate 3.8% tubes (Greiner Bio-One International GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) from 49 intensive care unit (ICU) patients on dual anti-platelet therapy and immediately hand carried to the central laboratory. Blood samples were divided into 2 Groups: Group 1 samples (N = 49) underwent PTS (4 m/s) transport from the central laboratory to the distant laboratory and back to the central laboratory, whereas Group 2 samples (N = 49) were excluded from PTS forces. In both groups, LTA and WBA stimulated with collagen, adenosine-5’-diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA) and thrombin-receptor-activated-peptide 6 (TRAP-6) as well as platelet count, PT, APTT, and fibrinogen were performed. Results No statistically significant differences were observed between blood samples with (Group 1) and without (Group 2) PTS transport (P values from 0.064 – 0.968). The AA-induced LTA (bias: 68.57%) exceeded the bias acceptance limit of ≤ 25%. Conclusions Blood sample transportation with computer controlled PTS in our hospital had no statistically significant effects on platelet aggregation determined in patients with anti-platelet therapy. Although AA induced LTA showed a significant bias, the diagnostic accuracy was not influenced. PMID:28392742

  12. Loss of heterozygosity: An independent prognostic factor of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-Ching Chang; Jen-Kou Lin; Tzu-Chen Lin; Wen-Yih Liang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Colorectal cancers result from the accumulation of several distinct genetic alterations. This study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic value of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) at 14 genetic loci located near or within regions containing important genes implicated in colorectal tumorigenesis.METHODS: We studied colorectal cancers with corresponding normal mucosae in 207 patients (139 males and 68 females,mean age at the time of tumor resection 66.2±12.4 years,range 22-88 years). There were 37 right-sided colonic tumors, 85 left-sided colonic tumors and 85 rectal tumors.The distribution of tumor staging was stage Ⅰ in 25, stage Ⅱ in 73, stage Ⅲ in 68, and stage Ⅳ in 41. We analyzed the LOH and MSI of HPC1, hMSH2, hMLH1, APC, MET,P53, NH23-H1, DCC, BAT25, BAT26, D17S250, MYCL1 and D8S254 with fluorescent polymerase chain reaction and denatured gel electrophoresis. High-frequency LOH was determined to be greater than three, or more than 50%of the informative marker with LOH. High-frequency MSI (MSI-H) was determined as more than four markers with instability (>30%). Correlations of LOH and MSI with clinical outcomes and pathological features were analyzed and compared.RESULTS: The occurrence of MSI-H was 7.25%, located predominantly in the right colons (7/15) and had a higher frequency of poor differentiation (6/15) and mucin production (7/15). LOH in at least one genetic locus occurred in 78.7% of the tumors and was significantly associated with disease progression. Of the 166 potentially cured patients, 45 developed tumor recurrence within 36 mo of follow-up. Clinicopathological factors affecting 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) were TNM staging, grade of differentiation, preoperative CEA level, and high LOH status. Patients with high LOH tumors had a significantly lower DFS (50%) compared with patients with low LOH tumors (84%). Of the patients developing subsequent tumor recurrence, the number and

  13. Expression of Lewisa, Sialyl Lewisa, Lewisx, Sialyl Lewisx, Antigens as Prognostic Factors in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Nakagoe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altered expression of blood group-related carbohydrate antigens such as sialyl Lewis (Lex antigen in tumours is associated with tumour progression behaviour and subsequent prognosis. However, the prognostic value of the expression of Le-related antigens in colorectal tumours remains unclear.

  14. Estrogen and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavasani, Sayeh; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross L; Kato, Ikuko; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C; Young, Alicia; Rodabough, Rebecca; Hubbell, F Allan; Mahinbakht, Ali; Simon, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    The preponderance of observational studies describe an association between the use of estrogen alone and a lower incidence of colorectal cancer. In contrast, no difference in the incidence of colorectal cancer was seen in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial with estrogen alone after a mean intervention of 7.1 years and cumulative follow-up of 13.2 years. This study extends these findings by providing detailed analyses of the effects of estrogen alone on the histology, grade, and stage of colorectal cancer, relevant subgroups, and deaths from and after colorectal cancer. The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 10,739 postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy. Participants were assigned to conjugated equine estrogen at 0.625 mg/d (n = 5279) or a matching placebo (n = 5409). Rates of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths from and after colorectal cancer were assessed throughout the study. Colorectal cancer rates in the estrogen-alone and placebo groups were comparable: 0.14% and 0.12% per year, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.58; P = .43). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between the 2 groups throughout the study. The grade, stage, and location of colorectal cancer did not differ between the randomization groups. There were more colorectal cancer deaths in the estrogen-alone group (34 [0.05%] vs 24 [0.03%]; HR, 1.46, 95% CI, 0.86-2.46; P = .16), but the difference was not statistically significant. The colorectal cancer incidence was higher for participants with a history of colon polyp removal in the estrogen-alone group (0.23% vs 0.02%; HR, 13.47; nominal 95% CI, 1.76-103.0; P colorectal cancer or deaths from or after colorectal cancer. A possibly higher risk of colorectal cancer in women with prior colon polyp removal who use estrogen alone requires confirmation. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  15. The Dutch surgical colorectal audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leersum, N J; Snijders, H S; Henneman, D; Kolfschoten, N E; Gooiker, G A; ten Berge, M G; Eddes, E H; Wouters, M W J M; Tollenaar, R A E M; Bemelman, W A; van Dam, R M; Elferink, M A; Karsten, Th M; van Krieken, J H J M; Lemmens, V E P P; Rutten, H J T; Manusama, E R; van de Velde, C J H; Meijerink, W J H J; Wiggers, Th; van der Harst, E; Dekker, J W T; Boerma, D

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated by the Dutch Institute for Clinical Auditing (DICA). This article illustrates key elements of the DSCA and results of three years of auditing. Key elements include: a leading role of the professional association with integration of the audit in the national quality assurance policy; web-based registration by medical specialists; weekly updated online feedback to participants; annual external data verification with other data sources; improvement projects. In two years, all Dutch hospitals participated in the audit. Case-ascertainment was 92% in 2010 and 95% in 2011. External data verification by comparison with the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) showed high concordance of data items. Within three years, guideline compliance for diagnostics, preoperative multidisciplinary meetings and standardised reporting increased; complication-, re-intervention and postoperative mortality rates decreased significantly. The success of the DSCA is the result of effective surgical collaboration. The leading role of the ASN in conducting the audit resulted in full participation of all colorectal surgeons in the Netherlands. By integrating the audit into the ASNs' quality assurance policy, it could be used to set national quality standards. Future challenges include reduction of administrative burden; expansion to a multidisciplinary registration; and addition of financial information and patient reported outcomes to the audit data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer via integrative epigenomics and genomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok-Sin, Teow; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Ali Hassan, Nur Zarina; Sagap, Ismail; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Harun, Roslan; Jamal, Rahman

    2015-07-01

    Apart from genetic mutations, epigenetic alteration is a common phenomenon that contributes to neoplastic transformation in colorectal cancer. Transcriptional silencing of tumor-suppressor genes without changes in the DNA sequence is explained by the existence of promoter hypermethylation. To test this hypothesis, we integrated the epigenome and transcriptome data from a similar set of colorectal tissue samples. Methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina InfiniumHumanMethylation27 BeadChip on 55 paired cancer and adjacent normal epithelial cells. Fifteen of the 55 paired tissues were used for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Validation was carried out on 150 colorectal tissues using the methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) technique. PCA and supervised hierarchical clustering in the two microarray datasets showed good separation between cancer and normal samples. Significant genes from the two analyses were obtained based on a ≥2-fold change and a false discovery rate (FDR) p-value of <0.05. We identified 1,081 differentially hypermethylated CpG sites and 36 hypomethylated CpG sites. We also found 709 upregulated and 699 downregulated genes from the gene expression profiling. A comparison of the two datasets revealed 32 overlapping genes with 27 being hypermethylated with downregulated expression and 4 hypermethylated with upregulated expression. One gene was found to be hypomethylated and downregulated. The most enriched molecular pathway identified was cell adhesion molecules that involved 4 overlapped genes, JAM2, NCAM1, ITGA8 and CNTN1. In the present study, we successfully identified a group of genes that showed methylation and gene expression changes in well-defined colorectal cancer tissues with high purity. The integrated analysis gives additional insight regarding the regulation of colorectal cancer-associated genes and their underlying mechanisms that

  17. Red meat and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Faruk Aykan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  18. Xc- inhibitor sulfasalazine sensitizes colorectal cancer to cisplatin by a GSH-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-zhe; Chen, Gang; Wang, Peng; Lu, Wen-hua; Zhu, Chao-feng; Song, Ming; Yang, Jing; Wen, Shijun; Xu, Rui-hua; Hu, Yumin; Huang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is an anti-inflammatory drug that has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis and tumor regression through inhibition of plasma membrane cystine transporter xc(-). Cysteine is a rate-limiting precursor for intracellular glutathione (GSH) synthesis, which is vital for compound detoxification and maintaining redox balance. Platinum-based chemotherapy is an important regimen used in clinics for various cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). We hypothesized that targeting xc(-) transporter by SSZ may annihilate cellular detoxification through interruption of GSH synthesis and may enhance the anti-cancer activity of cisplatin (CDDP) by increasing drug transport. In the present study, we revealed that xCT, the active subunit of xc(-), is highly expressed in CRC cell lines and human colorectal carcinoma tissues compared with their normal counterparts. SSZ effectively depleted cellular GSH, leading to significant accumulation of reactive oxygen species and growth inhibition in CRC cells. In contrast, the normal epithelial cells of colon origin were less sensitive to SSZ, showing a moderate ROS elevation. Importantly, SSZ effectively enhanced the intracellular platinum level and cytotoxicity of CDDP in CRC cells. The synergistic effect of SSZ and CDDP was reversed by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Together, these results suggest that SSZ, a relatively non-toxic drug that targets cystine transporter, may, in combination with CDDP, have effective therapy for colorectal cancer.

  19. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jintao Zhang; Man Yi; Longying Zha; Siqiang Chen; Zhijia Li; Cheng Li; Mingxing Gong; Hong Deng; Xinwei Chu; Jiehua Chen; Zheqing Zhang; Limei Mao; Suxia Sun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated au...

  20. Nutraceutical Approach for Preventing Obesity-Related Colorectal and Liver Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hisataka Moriwaki; Masaya Kubota; Masahito Shimizu; Takuji Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and its related metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, alterations in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) axis, and the state of chronic inflammation, increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, these findings also indicate that the metabolic disorders caused by obesity might be effective targets to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals. Green tea catechins (GTCs) possess a...

  1. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  2. Knowledge of colorectal cancer among older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, S P; Weinrich, M C; Boyd, M D; Johnson, E; Frank-Stromborg, M

    1992-10-01

    Cancer screening is a national health priority, especially for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. The researchers measured colorectal cancer knowledge among 211 older Americans. A quasiexperimental pretest-posttest two-by-two factorial design was used to test the effect of knowledge on participation in fecal occult blood screening. The American Cancer Society's colorectal cancer educational slide-tape presentation served as the basis for all of the educational programs. Hemoccult II kits were distributed at no cost to the participants. Descriptive statistics, chi 2, and logistic regressions were used to analyze data. One-half of the participants had incomes below the poverty level. Almost one-half the subjects in the study sample stated that they had not received any information about colorectal cancer within the past year. Caucasians had more knowledge of colorectal cancer than African Americans [F(1, 78) = 7.92, p < 0.01] and persons with higher income had more knowledge than persons with less income [F(2, 76) = 3.01, p = 0.05]. Subjects showed significant increases in colorectal cancer knowledge 6 days after the colorectal cancer education program [t(79) = 2.59, p = 0.01] and this increased knowledge was a predictor of participation in free fecal occult blood screening [chi 2(1, n = 164) = 5.34, p = 0.02].

  3. Colorectal smartphone apps: opportunities and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, S; Brady, R R W

    2012-09-01

    The increased utilization of smartphones within the clinical environment together with connected applications (apps) provides opportunity for doctors, including coloproctologists, to integrate such technology into clinical practice. However, the reliability of unregulated medical apps has recently been called into question. Here, we review contemporary medical apps specifically themed towards colorectal diseases and assess levels of medical professional involvement in their design and content. The most popular smartphone app stores (iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows and Samsung) were searched for colorectal disease themed apps, using the disease terms colorectal cancer, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis, haemorrhoids, anal fissure, bowel incontinence and irritable bowel syndrome. A total of 68 individual colorectal themed apps were identified, amongst which there were five duplicates. Only 29% of colorectal apps had had customer satisfaction ratings and 32% had named medical professional involvement in their development or content. The benefits of apps are offset by lack of colorectal specification. There is little medical professional involvement in their design. Increased regulation is required to improve accountability of app content. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. The genomic landscape of response to EGFR blockade in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, Andrea; Papp, Eniko; Jones, Siân; Adleff, Vilmos; Anagnostou, Valsamo; Lupo, Barbara; Sausen, Mark; Phallen, Jillian; Hruban, Carolyn A; Tokheim, Collin; Niknafs, Noushin; Nesselbush, Monica; Lytle, Karli; Sassi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Migliardi, Giorgia; Zanella, Eugenia R; Ribero, Dario; Russolillo, Nadia; Mellano, Alfredo; Muratore, Andrea; Paraluppi, Gianluca; Salizzoni, Mauro; Marsoni, Silvia; Kragh, Michael; Lantto, Johan; Cassingena, Andrea; Li, Qing Kay; Karchin, Rachel; Scharpf, Robert; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Diaz, Luis A; Trusolino, Livio; Velculescu, Victor E

    2015-10-08

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, with 1.2 million patients diagnosed annually. In late-stage colorectal cancer, the most commonly used targeted therapies are the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab, which prevent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. Recent studies have identified alterations in KRAS and other genes as likely mechanisms of primary and secondary resistance to anti-EGFR antibody therapy. Despite these efforts, additional mechanisms of resistance to EGFR blockade are thought to be present in colorectal cancer and little is known about determinants of sensitivity to this therapy. To examine the effect of somatic genetic changes in colorectal cancer on response to anti-EGFR antibody therapy, here we perform complete exome sequence and copy number analyses of 129 patient-derived tumour grafts and targeted genomic analyses of 55 patient tumours, all of which were KRAS wild-type. We analysed the response of tumours to anti-EGFR antibody blockade in tumour graft models and in clinical settings and functionally linked therapeutic responses to mutational data. In addition to previously identified genes, we detected mutations in ERBB2, EGFR, FGFR1, PDGFRA, and MAP2K1 as potential mechanisms of primary resistance to this therapy. Novel alterations in the ectodomain of EGFR were identified in patients with acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. Amplifications and sequence changes in the tyrosine kinase receptor adaptor gene IRS2 were identified in tumours with increased sensitivity to anti-EGFR therapy. Therapeutic resistance to EGFR blockade could be overcome in tumour graft models through combinatorial therapies targeting actionable genes. These analyses provide a systematic approach to evaluating response to targeted therapies in human cancer, highlight new mechanisms of responsiveness to anti-EGFR therapies, and delineate new avenues for intervention in managing colorectal cancer.

  5. Does positron emission tomography/computed tomography change management in colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Rachel; Connor, Saxon; Balasingam, Adrian; Eglinton, Tim

    2016-10-27

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used pre-operatively in patients with metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer to identify those who have potentially curative disease. However, a recent randomized trial questioned the added benefit of PET/CT over conventional imaging in patients with liver metastases. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients with colorectal cancer in whom PET/CT altered surgical management, in a single tertiary centre. This was a retrospective study of all patients with colorectal cancer who had a PET/CT for colorectal cancer, funded by the Canterbury District Health Board between 2010 and 2014. Some 111 PET/CT scans were performed on 105 patients. A total of 38% of PET/CT were for patients with known or suspected liver metastases, 23% for suspected local recurrence and 18% for known or suspected lung metastases. Five scans were for post-operative patients with a rising carcinoembryonic antigen and no attributable source on conventional imaging. PET/CT identified additional extrahepatic sites of disease in 19 of 111 (17%) scans in patients deemed to have potentially operable disease. Overall, PET/CT altered surgical management following six of 42 (14%) scans for patients with liver metastases, four of 20 (20%) scans for patients with lung metastases and six of 26 (23%) scans for patients with local recurrence. PET/CT remains a useful adjunct to conventional imaging in the pre-operative workup of patients with colorectal cancer. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection in the Obese Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sean T.; Stocchi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an accepted alternative to conventional open resection in the surgical approach of both benign and malignant diseases of the colon and rectum. Well-described benefits of laparoscopic surgery include accelerated recovery of bowel function, decreased post-operative pain and shorter hospital stay; these advantages could be particularly beneficial to high-risk patient groups, such as obese patients. At present, data regarding the application of the laparoscopic approach to colorectal resection in the obese is equivocal. We evaluate the available evidence to support laparoscopic colorectal resection in the obese patient population. PMID:23204942

  7. Cigarette smoking, genetic polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nisa, Hoirun; Kono, Suminori; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2010-01-01

    .... We investigated the relation of cigarette smoking and related genetic polymorphisms to colorectal cancer risk, with special reference to the interaction between smoking and genetic polymorphism...

  8. The potential role of Alu Y in the development of resistance to SN38 (Irinotecan) or oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Xue; Stenvang, Jan; Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov

    2015-01-01

    toxicity induced by carcinogens or drugs can reactivate Alus by altering DNA methylation. Whether or not reactivation of Alus occurs in SN38 and oxaliplatin resistance remains unknown. Results: We applied reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) to investigate the DNA methylome in SN38...... or oxaliplatin resistant colorectal cancer cell line models. Moreover, we extended the RRBS analysis to tumor tissue from 14 patients with colorectal cancer who either did or did not benefit from capecitabine + oxaliplatin treatment. For the clinical samples, we applied a concept of 'DNA methylation entropy...

  9. Confocal Endomicroscopy of Colorectal Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian M. Ussui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is one of several novel methods that provide real-time, high-resolution imaging at a micron scale via endoscopes. CLE has the potential to be a disruptive technology in that it can change the current algorithms that depend on biopsy to perform surveillance of high-risk conditions. Furthermore, it allows on-table decision making that has the potential to guide therapy in real time and reduce the need for repeated procedures. CLE and related technologies are often termed “virtual biopsy” as they simulate the images seen in traditional histology. However, the imaging of living tissue allows more than just pragmatic convenience; it also allows imaging of living tissue such as active capillary circulation, cellular death, and vascular and endothelial translocation, thus extending beyond what is capable in traditional biopsy. Immediate potential applications of CLE are to guide biopsy sampling in Barrett's esophagus and inflammatory bowel disease surveillance, evaluation of colorectal polyps, and intraductal imaging of the pancreas and bile duct. Data on these applications is rapidly emerging, and more is needed to clearly demonstrate the optimal applications of CLE. In this paper, we will focus on the role of CLE as applied to colorectal polyps detected during colonoscopy.

  10. Prostaglandin E2-induced colonic secretion in patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Nicolai; Tilotta, Maria C; Witte, Anne-Barbara;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis for colorectal cancer remains unresolved. A growing body of evidence suggests a direct correlation between cyclooxygenase enzyme expression, prostaglandin E2 metabolism and neoplastic development. Thus further understanding of the regulation of epithelial functions...... colorectal neoplasia. Patients without endoscopic findings of neoplasia served as controls. Biopsy specimens were obtained from normally appearing mucosa in the sigmoid part of colon. Biopsies were mounted in miniaturized modified Ussing air-suction chambers. Indomethacin (10 microM), various stimulators...... and inhibitors of prostanoid receptors and ion transport were subsequently added to the chamber solutions. Electrogenic ion transport parameters (short circuit current and slope conductance) were recorded. Tissue pathology and tissue damage before and after experiments was assessed by histology. RESULTS...

  11. Effects of the combination of blood transfusion and postoperative infectious complications on prognosis after surgery for colorectal cancer. Danish RANX05 Colorectal Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F;

    2000-01-01

    = 740) and time to diagnosis of recurrent disease in the subgroup of patients operated on with curative intention (n = 532). The patients were analysed in four groups divided with respect to administration or not of perioperative blood transfusion and development or non-development of postoperative......BACKGROUND: The frequency of postoperative infectious complications is significantly increased in patients with colorectal cancer receiving perioperative blood transfusion. It is still debated, however, whether perioperative blood transfusion alters the incidence of disease recurrence or otherwise...... affects the prognosis. METHODS: Patient risk variables, variables related to operation technique, blood transfusion and the development of infectious complications were recorded prospectively in 740 patients undergoing elective resection for primary colorectal cancer. Endpoints were overall survival (n...

  12. Increased expression of protease-activated receptor 4 and Trefoil factor 2 in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Yu

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4, a member of G-protein coupled receptors family, was recently reported to exhibit decreased expression in gastric cancer and esophageal squamous cancer, yet increased expression during the progression of prostate cancer. Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2, a small peptide constitutively expressed in the gastric mucosa, plays a protective role in restitution of gastric mucosa. Altered TFF2 expression was also related to the development of gastrointestinal cancer. TFF2 has been verified to promote cell migration via PAR4, but the roles of PAR4 and TFF2 in the progress of colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, the expression level of PAR4 and TFF2 in colorectal cancer tissues was measured using real-time PCR (n = 38, western blotting (n=38 and tissue microarrays (n = 66. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PAR4 and TFF2 were remarkably increased in colorectal cancer compared with matched noncancerous tissues, especially in positive lymph node and poorly differentiated cancers. The colorectal carcinoma cell LoVo showed an increased response to TFF2 as assessed by cell invasion upon PAR4 expression. However, after intervention of PAR4 expression, PAR4 positive colorectal carcinoma cell HT-29 was less responsive to TFF2 in cell invasion. Genomic bisulfite sequencing showed the hypomethylation of PAR4 promoter in colorectal cancer tissues and the hypermethylation in the normal mucosa that suggested the low methylation of promoter was correlated to the increased PAR4 expression. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the up-regulated expression of PAR4 and TFF2 frequently occurs in colorectal cancer tissues, and that overexpression of PAR4 may be resulted from promoter hypomethylation. While TFF2 promotes invasion activity of LoVo cells overexpressing PAR4, and this effect was significantly decreased when PAR4 was knockdowned in HT-29 cells. Our findings will be helpful in further investigations into the

  13. Aberrant crypt foci as microscopic precursors of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Cheng; Mao-De Lai

    2003-01-01

    Since the first detection of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in carcinogen-treated mice, there have been numerous studies focusing on these microscopically visible lesions both in rodents and in humans. ACF have been generally accepted as precancerous lesions in regard to histopathological characteristics, biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations, and genetic and epigenetic alterations. ACF show variable histological features, ranging from hyperplasia to dysplasia. ACF in human colon are more frequently located in the distal parts than in the proximal parts, which is in accordance with those in colorectal cancer (CRC). The immunohistochemical expressions of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), β-catenin, placental cadherin (P-cadherin),epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), and P16INK4a are found to be altered. Genetic mutations of K-ras, APC and p53, and the epigenetic alterations of CpG island methylation of ACF have also been demonstrated. Genomic instabilities due to the defect of mismatch repair (MMR) system are detectable in ACF Two hypotheses have been proposed.One is the "dysplasia ACF-adenoma-carcinoma sequence",the other is "heteroplastic ACF-adenoma-carcinoma sequence". The malignant potential of ACF, especially dyspiastic ACF, makes it necessary to reveal the nature of these lesions, and to prevent CRC from the earliest possible stage. The technique of magnifying chromoscope makes it possible to detect "in vivo' ACF, which is beneficial to colon cancer research, identifying high-risk populations for CRC,and developing preventive procedures.

  14. EGFR signaling in colorectal cancer: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saletti P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piercarlo Saletti,1 Francesca Molinari,2 Sara De Dosso,1 Milo Frattini2 1Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, Locarno, Switzerland Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains a formidable health burden worldwide, with up to 50% of patients developing metastases during the course of their disease. This group of CRC patients, characterized by the worst prognosis, has been extensively investigated to improve their life expectancy. Main efforts, focused on the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR, which plays a pivotal role in CRC pathogenesis, have led to the development and introduction in clinical practice of specific targeted therapies (ie, monoclonal antibodies. Subsequently, the scientific community has tried to identify molecular predictors of the efficacy of such therapies. However, it has become clear that EGFR alterations occurring in CRC are difficult to investigate, and therefore their predictive role is unclear. In contrast, the clinical role of two downstream members (KRAS and NRAS has been clearly demonstrated. Currently, EGFR-targeted therapies can be administered only to patients with wild-type KRAS and NRAS genes. Our review addresses the medical management of metastatic CRC. Specifically, we describe in detail the molecular biology of metastatic CRC, focusing on the EGFR signaling pathway, and we discuss the role of current and emerging related biomarkers and therapies in this field. We also summarize the clinical evidence regarding anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies and examine potential future perspectives. Keywords: colorectal cancer, EGFR, gene mutations, cetuximab, panitumumab

  15. Nutrigenetics in cancer research--folate metabolism and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2005-11-01

    The B vitamin folate is essential for one-carbon transfer reactions, including those related to the methylation of DNA or other substrates and nucleotide synthesis. Epidemiologic and experimental studies implicate low-folate intakes in elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia and suggest that biologic mechanisms underlying this relation include disturbances in DNA methylation patterns or adverse effects on DNA synthesis and repair. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, a vast amount of data on inherited genetic variability has become available. This genetic information can be used in studies of molecular epidemiology to provide information on multiple aspects of folate metabolism. First, studies linking polymorphisms in folate metabolism to an altered risk of cancer provide evidence for a causal link between this pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Second, studies on genetic characteristics can help clarify whether certain individuals may benefit from higher or lower intakes of folate or nutrients relevant to folate metabolism. Third, studies on genetic polymorphisms can generate hypotheses regarding possible biologic mechanisms that connect this pathway to carcinogenesis. Last, genetic variability in folate metabolism may predict survival after a cancer diagnosis, possibly via pharmacogenetic effects. To solve the puzzle of the folate-cancer relation, a transdisciplinary approach is needed that integrates knowledge from epidemiology, clinical studies, experimental nutrition, and mathematical modeling. This review illustrates knowledge that can be gained from molecular epidemiology in the context of nutrigenetics, and the questions that this approach can answer or raise.

  16. Somatic APC inactivation mechanisms in sporadic colorectal cancer cases in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kámory, Eniko; Olasz, Judit; Csuka, Orsolya

    2008-03-01

    The role of germline inactivation of the adenomatosis polyposis coli (APC) gene in hereditary colorectal cancer is well known, being the most important cause of familial adenomatosus polyposis (FAP) syndrome. Hereditary cases with germline mutations, however, account only for 5-10% of colorectal cancers. The somatic inactivation of this gene has also been observed in sporadic cases. In order to examine the inactivation mechanisms of the APC gene we screened 70 sporadic colorectal cancer cases (27 rectal, 43 intestinal) of different stages for promoter hypermethylation, allelic imbalance (AI) and somatic mutations. The presence of promoter hypermethylation was observed in 21 cases (30%). Fifteen of the examined tumors (21%) showed AI, and also 15 tumors (21%) carried at least one somatic mutation. Thirteen of the detected alterations were novel variations: seven frameshifts, four missense mutations and two polymorphisms. Biallelic inactivation was found in 15 patients (21%). These results suggest that the inactivation of the APC gene is very common in sporadic colorectal cancer, and the main inactivation mechanism of the APC gene is promoter hypermethylation. Allelic imbalance has the same frequency as mutations, and mutations in the APC gene are more common in the early stages and in tumors located in the rectum.

  17. A genome-wide map of aberrantly expressed chromosomal islands in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castanos-Velez Esmeralda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer development is accompanied by genetic phenomena like deletion and amplification of chromosome parts or alterations of chromatin structure. It is expected that these mechanisms have a strong effect on regional gene expression. Results We investigated genome-wide gene expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and normal epithelial tissues from 25 patients using oligonucleotide arrays. This allowed us to identify 81 distinct chromosomal islands with aberrant gene expression. Of these, 38 islands show a gain in expression and 43 a loss of expression. In total, 7.892 genes (25.3% of all human genes are located in aberrantly expressed islands. Many chromosomal regions that are linked to hereditary colorectal cancer show deregulated expression. Also, many known tumor genes localize to chromosomal islands of misregulated expression in CRC. Conclusion An extensive comparison with published CGH data suggests that chromosomal regions known for frequent deletions in colon cancer tend to show reduced expression. In contrast, regions that are often amplified in colorectal tumors exhibit heterogeneous expression patterns: even show a decrease of mRNA expression. Because for several islands of deregulated expression chromosomal aberrations have never been observed, we speculate that additional mechanisms (like abnormal states of regional chromatin also have a substantial impact on the formation of co-expression islands in colorectal carcinoma.

  18. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects.

  19. Quantification of blood dendritic cells in colorectal cancer patients during the course of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Giulia; Legitimo, Annalisa; Failli, Alessandra; Ferrari, Paola; Nicolini, Andrea; Spisni, Roberto; Miccoli, Paolo; Consolini, Rita

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is a malignancy with poor prognosis that might be associated with defective immune function. The aim of the present study was to investigate circulating dendritic cells in colorectal cancer patients, in order to contribute to elucidate tumor-escape mechanisms and to point out a possible correlation with the clinical condition of the disease. Therefore, we enumerated ex vivo myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, through multicolor flow cytometry, in 26 colorectal patients and 33 healthy controls. Furthermore we performed several analyses at determined time points in order to define the immunological trend of cancer patients after surgery and other conventional treatments. At the pre-operative time point the absolute number of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in cancer patients was significantly reduced in comparison to controls, this result being mainly referred to stage III-IV patients. The number of myeloid dendritic cells did not show any significant difference compared to healthy controls; interestingly the expression of the tolerogenic antigen CD85k was significantly higher on cancer patients' myeloid dendritic cells than controls'. At the following samplings, circulating dendritic cell absolute number did not show any difference compared to controls. Conclusively the impairment of the number of circulating dendritic cells may represent one of the tumor escape mechanisms occurring in colorectal cancer. These alterations seem to be correlated to cancer progression. Our work sheds light on one of dendritic cell-based tumor immune escape mechanisms. This knowledge may be useful to the development of more effective immunotherapeutic strategies.

  20. Center for Herbal Research on Colorectal Cancer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Herbs Program:Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM Description:Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of...

  1. An overview of laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Laparoscopic skills has been widely applied in colorectal surgery. The definition, indications and contraindications, the oncologic principles, port side recurrence, and the newer advances are reported in this article .

  2. Colorectal cancer: lifestyle and dietary factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Corrêa Lima

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the most common tumor in the developed countries, and the number of new cases annualy is aproximately equal for men and women. Several environmental factors can interact in all steps of carcinogenesis. Lately the balance between genetic predisposition and these factors, including nutritional components and lifestyle behaviors, determines individual susceptibility to develop colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to revise the references about lifestyle include diet, physical exercise, tobacco smoking and use of alcohol, and the risk of colorectal cancer in databases published during 1994-2004. Dietary factors: According to the reports high intake of red meat, and particularly of processed meat and positive energetic balance (high intake of total fat and carbohydrate was associated with a moderate but significant increase in colorectal cancer risk. Convincing preventive factors include increase consumption of a wide variety of fruit and vegetable, particularly, dark-green leafy, cruciferous, a deep-yellow on tones, and fibre. Lifestyle: Physical activity as a means for the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. There is a probable synergic effect among physical inactivity, high energy intake and obesity and incidence of colorectal cancer. A growing body of evidence supports that avoidance overweight and the use of tobacco and alcohol is recommended to prevent colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Current data suggest that lifestyle modification including proper diet such as the ones rich in vegetable and poor in red meat and fat, regular physical activity and maintaining an appropriate body weight and avoiding the use of tobacco and alcohol may lead to reduce colorectal cancer risk.

  3. Use of Bevacizumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zinser-Sierra, Juan W.; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Saúl; Villalobos-Valencia, Ricardo; Ramírez-Márquez, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and although associated mortality rates in South American countries are generally among the lowest in the world, they are on the rise. The prognosis of patients diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer has improved markedly over the last 12 years, increasing from 5 months with best supportive care to almost 2 years with combination chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. New prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been identified to g...

  4. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  5. Differential CARM1 expression in prostate and colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Nguyen

    2010-05-01

    addition to its role in activation of steroid receptors, CARM1 functions as a transcriptional modulator by altering the activity of many transcriptional factors, especially with regard to androgen independent PCa and colorectal cancers.

  6. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  7. Survival of MUTYH-associated polyposis patients with colorectal cancer and matched control colorectal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Nielsen (Maartje); L.N. van Steenbergen (Liza); N. Jones (Natalie); S. Vogt (Stefanie); H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Morreau (Hans); S. Aretz (Stefan); J. Sampson (Julian); O.M. Dekkers (Olaf); M.L.G. Janssen-Heijnen (Maryska); F.J. Hes (Frederik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground MUTYH-associated polyposis is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by a lifetime risk of colorectal cancer that is up to 100%. Because specific histological and molecular genetic features of MUTYH-associated polyposis colorectal cancers might influence tumor behavior

  8. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...... take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective...... delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs....

  9. Salinomycin induces apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells by accumulation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Li, Pu; Xue, Xiaofeng; He, Songbing; Kuang, Yuting; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Shaoji; Zhi, Qiaoming; Guo, Xiaobo

    2013-10-24

    Postoperative chemotherapy for Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is not all effective and the main reason might lie in cancer stem cells (CSCs). Emerging studies showed that CSCs overexpress some drug-resistance related proteins, which efficiently transport the chemotherapeutics out of cancer cells. Salinomycin, which considered as a novel and an effective anticancer drug, is found to have the ability to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells. To explore the potential mechanisms that salinomycin could specifically target on therapy-resistant cancer cells in colorectal cancers, we firstly obtained cisplatin-resistant (Cisp-resistant) SW620 cells by repeated exposure to 5 μmol/l of cisplatin from an original colorectal cancer cell line. These Cisp-resistant SW620 cells, which maintained a relative quiescent state (G0/G1 arrest) and displayed stem-like signatures (up-regulations of Sox2, Oct4, Nanog, Klf4, Hes1, CD24, CD26, CD44, CD133, CD166, Lgr5, ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A3 mRNA expressions) (p 0.05), but could induce cell death process (p GSH-PX activities (p cisplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells.

  10. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  11. Colorectal cancer carcinogenesis:a review of mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanwal Tariq; Kulsoom Ghias

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men globally. CRC arises from one or a combination of chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Genetic instability is usually caused by aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity. Mutations in the tumor suppressor or cell cycle genes may also lead to cellular transformation. Similarly, epigenetic and/or genetic alterations resulting in impaired cellular pathways, such as DNA repair mechanism, may lead to microsatellite instability and mutator phenotype. Non-coding RNAs, more importantly microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have also been implicated at various CRC stages. Understanding the specific mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the underlying genetic and epigenetic traits is critical in comprehending the disease phenotype. This paper reviews these mechanisms along with the roles of various non-coding RNAs in CRCs.

  12. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resembling Severe Preeclampsia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminder Kaur Khangura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in women, it is a rare malignancy in pregnancy. Symptoms of CRC such as fatigue, malaise, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, anemia, altered bowel habits, and abdominal mass are often considered typical symptoms of pregnancy. Many cases of CRC are diagnosed in advanced stages due to missed warning signs of CRC, which may be misinterpreted as normal symptoms related to pregnancy. This report reviews 2 cases of CRC diagnosed within a 4-month interval at our institution. Both cases were initially thought to be atypical presentations of preeclampsia. Prenatal history, hospital course, and postpartum course were reviewed for both patients. CRC is often diagnosed at advanced stages in pregnancy. Common physiological symptoms of pregnancy should be scrutinized carefully and worked up appropriately, especially if symptoms remain persistent or increase in intensity or severity.

  13. Seromic profiling of colorectal cancer patients with novel glycopeptide microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Blixt, Ola; Bennett, Eric P

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-associated autoantibodies hold promise as sensitive biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Aberrant post-translational variants of proteins are likely to induce autoantibodies, and changes in O-linked glycosylation represent one of the most important cancer-associated post...... array displaying a comprehensive library of glycopeptides and glycoproteins derived from a panel of human mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6 and MUC7) known to have altered glycosylation and expression in cancer. Seromic profiling of patients with colorectal cancer identified cancer......-associated autoantibodies to a set of aberrant glycopeptides derived from MUC1 and MUC4. The cumulative sensitivity of the array analysis was 79% with a specificity of 92%. The most prevalent of the identified autoantibody targets were validated as authentic cancer immunogens by showing expression of the epitopes in cancer...

  14. Clues to the pathogenesis of familial colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, L.A.; Peltomaeki, P.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Leach, F.S.; Powell, S.M.; Jen, J.; Hamilton, S.R.; Petersen, G.M.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States) Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Sistonen, P. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland) Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki (Finland)); Mecklin, J.P. (Jyvaeskylae Central Hospital (Finland)); Jaervinen, H. (Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1993-05-07

    A predisposition to colorectal cancer is shown to be linked to markers on chromosome 2 in some families. Molecular features of familial cancers were compared with those of sporadic colon cancers. Neither the familial nor sporadic cancers showed loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 2 markers, and the incidence of mutations in KRAS, P53, and APC was similar in the two groups of tumors. Most of the familial cancers, however, had widespread alterations in short repeated DNA sequences, suggesting that numerous replication errors had occurred during tumor development. Thirteen percent of sporadic cancers had identical abnormalities and these cancers shared biologic properties with the familial cases. These data suggest a mechanism for familial tumorigenesis different from that mediated by classic tumor suppressor genes. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention by Mesalazine and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Stolfi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD face an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC. Independent factors associated with increased risk include long disease duration, extensive colonic involvement, young age at onset of IBD, severity of inflammation, primary sclerosing cholangitis, backwash ileitis, and a family history of CRC, thus emphasising the role of intestinal inflammation as an underlying mechanism. This notion is also supported by the demonstration that the use of certain drugs used to attenuate the ongoing mucosal inflammation, such as mesalazine, seems to associate with a reduced incidence of colitis-associated CRC. In the last decade, work from many laboratories has contributed to delineate the mechanisms by which mesalazine alters CRC cell behaviour. In this paper, we review the available experimental data supporting the ability of mesalazine and its derivatives to interfere with intracellular signals involved in CRC cell growth.

  16. Genomic instability and cellular stress in organ biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with colorectal cancer and predisposing pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara; Fuoco, Ilenia; di Fluri, Giorgia; Costa, Francesco; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Biondi, Graziano; Nardini, Vincenzo; Scarpato, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and polyps, are common colorectal pathologies in western society and are risk factors for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genomic instability is a cancer hallmark and is connected to changes in chromosomal structure, often caused by double strand break formation (DSB), and aneuploidy. Cellular stress, may contribute to genomic instability. In colorectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with IBD, polyps and CRC, we evaluated 1) genomic instability using the γH2AX assay as marker of DSB and micronuclei in mononuclear lymphocytes kept under cytodieresis inhibition, and 2) cellular stress through expression and cellular localization of glutathione-S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1). Colon biopsies showed γH2AX increase starting from polyps, while lymphocytes already from IBD. Micronuclei frequency began to rise in lymphocytes of subjects with polyps, suggesting a systemic genomic instability condition. Colorectal tissues lost GSTO1 expression but increased nuclear localization with pathology progression. Lymphocytes did not change GSTO1 expression and localization until CRC formation, where enzyme expression was increased. We propose that the growing genomic instability found in our patients is connected with the alteration of cellular environment. Evaluation of genomic damage and cellular stress in colorectal pathologies may facilitate prevention and management of CRC. PMID:26046795

  17. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Engeland, M. van; Lüchtenborg, M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between

  18. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions with ... these questions: When you’re told you have colorectal cancer Where is the cancer located? Has the cancer ...

  19. Adipokines linking obesity with colorectal cancer risk in postmenopausal women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Gloria Y F; Wang, Tao; Gunter, Marc J; Strickler, Howard D; Cushman, Mary; Kaplan, Robert C; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Xue, Xiaonan; Rajpathak, Swapnil N; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Vitolins, Mara Z; Scherer, Philipp E; Rohan, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    Mechanistic associations between obesity and colorectal cancer remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether adipokines are risk factors for colorectal cancer and whether they may mediate its association with obesity...

  20. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of miR-21 in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angelo; Kontos, Christos K; Boni, Themis; Bantounas, Ioannis; Siakouli, Dimitra; Kosmidou, Vivian; Vlassi, Margarita; Spyridakis, Yannis; Tsipras, Iraklis; Zografos, George; Pintzas, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have uncovered several transcription factors that determine biological alterations in tumor cells to execute the invasion-metastasis cascade, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We sought to investigate the role of miR-21 in colorectal cancer regulation. For this purpose, miR-21 expression was quantified in a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. High expression was found in cell lines with EMT properties and in the vast majority of human tumor specimens. We demonstrate in a cell-specific manner the occupancy of MIR-21 gene promoter by AP-1 and ETS1 transcription factors and, for the first time, the pattern of histone posttranslational modifications necessary for miR-21 overexpression. We also show that Integrin-β4 (ITGβ4), exclusively expressed in polarized epithelial cells, is a novel miR-21 target gene and plays a role in the regulation of EMT, since it is remarkably de-repressed after transient miR-21 silencing and downregulated after miR-21 overexpression. miR-21-dependent change of ITGβ4 expression significantly affects cell migration properties of colon cancer cells. Finally, in a subgroup of tumor specimens, ROC curve analysis performed on quantitative PCR data sets for miR-21, ITGβ4, and PDCD4 shows that the combination of high miR-21 with low ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression is able to predict presence of metastasis. In conclusion, miR-21 is a key player in oncogenic EMT, its overexpression is controlled by the cooperation of genetic and epigenetic alterations, and its levels, along with ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression, could be exploited as a prognostic tool for CRC metastasis. PMID:24149370

  2. Synchronous colorectal cancer: Clinical, pathological and molecular implications

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Alfred King-yin; Chan, Sally Sze-Yan; Leung, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal carcinoma refers to more than one primary colorectal carcinoma detected in a single patient at initial presentation. A literature review has shown that the prevalence of the disease is approximately 3.5% of all colorectal carcinomas. This disease has a male to female ratio of 1.8:1. The mean age at presentation of patients with synchronous colorectal cancer is in the early half of the seventh decade. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Croh...

  3. Rak debelega črevesa in danke: Colorectal cancer:

    OpenAIRE

    Potrč, Stojan; Krebs, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in Europe and also the second most common cause of cancer death. In Slovenia, the incidence of colorectal cancer is high and is still increasing. The survival rate of our patients operated for colorectal cancer is improving and slowly approaches the survival rate of patients operated on the western world. There is still a problem of late diagnosis, usually when the disease is already disseminated. The approach to the treatment of colorect...

  4. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  5. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ludovici, Giorgia; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Covello, Renato; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Ialongo, Cristiano; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2011-01-01

    The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine) at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine) at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient's sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala) of exon 1.

  6. Continuous quality improvement of colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariusz; Madalinski

    2013-01-01

    Quality assurance is a key issue in colorectal cancer screening, because effective screening is able to improve primary prevention of the cancer. The quality measure may be described in terms:how well the screening test tells who truly has a disease (sensitivity) and who truly does not have a disease (specificity). This paper raises concerns about identification of the optimal screening test for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy vs flexible sigmoidoscopy in colorectal cancer screening has been a source of ongoing debate. A multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing flexible sigmoidoscopy with usual care showed that flexible sigmoidoscopy screening is able to diminish the incidence of distal and proximal colorectal cancer, and also mortality related to the distal colorectal cancer. However, colonoscopy provides a more complete examination and remains the more sensitive exam than flexible sigmoidoscopy. Moreover, colonoscopy with polypectomy significantly reduces colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer-related mortality in the general population. The article considers the relative merits of both methods and stresses an ethical aspect of patient’s involvement in decision-making. Patients should be informed not only about tests tolerability and risk of endoscopy complications, but also that different screening tests for bowel cancer have different strength to exclude colonic cancer and polyps. The authorities calculate effectiveness and costs of the screening tests, but patients may not be interested in statistics regarding flexible sigmoidoscopy screening and from an ethical point of view, they have the right to chose colonoscopy, which is able to exclude a cancer and precancerous lesions in the whole large bowel.

  7. Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV activity is correlated with colorectal cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Larrinaga

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5 (DPPIV is a serine peptidase involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, immune modulation and apoptosis, functions that control neoplastic transformation. Previous studies have demonstrated altered expression and activity of tissue and circulating DPPIV in several cancers and proposed its potential usefulness for early diagnosis in colorectal cancer (CRC.The activity and mRNA and protein expression of DPPIV was prospectively analyzed in adenocarcinomas, adenomas, uninvolved colorectal mucosa and plasma from 116 CRC patients by fluorimetric, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical methods. Results were correlated with the most important classic pathological data related to aggressiveness and with 5-year survival rates. Results showed that: 1 mRNA levels and activity of DPPIV increased in colorectal neoplasms (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.01; 2 Both adenomas and CRCs displayed positive cytoplasmic immunostaining with luminal membrane reinforcement; 3 Plasmatic DPPIV activity was lower in CRC patients than in healthy subjects (Mann-U test, p<0.01; 4 Plasmatic DPPIV activity was associated with worse overall and disease-free survivals (log-rank p<0.01, Cox analysis p<0.01.1 Up-regulation of DPPIV in colorectal tumors suggests a role for this enzyme in the neoplastic transformation of colorectal tissues. This finding opens the possibility for new therapeutic targets in these patients. 2 Plasmatic DPPIV is an independent prognostic factor in survival of CRC patients. The determination of DPPIV activity levels in the plasma may be a safe, minimally invasive and inexpensive way to define the aggressiveness of CRC in daily practice.

  8. BRAF V600E mutation detection by immunohistochemistry in colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Kajsa; Samowitz, Wade; Tripp, Sheryl; Bronner, Mary P

    2013-08-01

    The serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf (BRAF) is an oncogene mutated in various neoplasms, including 5-15% of colorectal carcinomas. The T1799A point mutation, responsible for a large majority of these alterations, results in an amino acid substitution (V600E) causing the constitutive activation of a protein kinase cascade. BRAF V600E in MLH1 deficient tumors implicates somatic tumor-only methylation of the MLH1 promoter region instead of a germline MLH1 mutation. BRAF V600E also predicts poor prognosis in microsatellite stable colorectal cancers and may be a marker of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic disease. Currently, only molecular methods are available for assessing BRAF mutational status. An immunohistochemical approach is evaluated here. Colon cancers from 2008 to 2012 tested by pyrosequencing for BRAF V600E mutation were selected. A total of 31 tumors with (n = 14) and without (n = 17) the BRAF V600E mutation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using a commercially available antibody specific to the V600E-mutated protein. All 14 colorectal carcinomas with the BRAF V600E mutation demonstrated cytoplasmic positivity in tumor cells with the anti-BRAF antibody. In a minority of cases, staining intensity for the mutated tumor samples was weak (n = 2) or heterogeneous (n = 4); however, the majority of cases showed diffuse, strong cytoplasmic positivity (8 of 14 cases). None of the 17 BRAF wild-type colorectal cancers showed immunoreactivity to the antibody. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the immunohistochemical BRAF V600E assay was 100%. Detection of the BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer by immunohistochemistry is a viable alternative to molecular methods.

  9. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  10. Expression and clinical significance of colorectal cancer stem cell marker EpCAMhigh/CD44+ in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dan; Sun, Jinghua; Zhu, Jinming; Zhou, Huan; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells are considered the source of recurrence, metastasis and drug resistance in colorectal tumors. Therefore, the identification and targeting of cancer stem cells facilitates the elimination of tumors. Although epithelial cell adhesion molecule-high (EpCAMhigh)/cluster of differentiation (CD)44+ cells are thought to act as a marker of colorectal cancer stem cells, the clinical significance of these cells in colorectal cancer remains unclear. The aim of the present stu...

  11. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  12. Frequent occurrence of uniparental disomy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Wiuf, Carsten; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Korsgaard, Marianne; Laurberg, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2007-01-01

    We used SNP arrays to identify and characterize genomic alterations associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Laser microdissected cancer cells from 15 adenocarinomas were investigated by Affymetrix Mapping 10K SNP arrays. Analysis of the data extracted from the SNP arrays revealed multiple regions with copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Novel LOH areas were identified at chromosomes 13, 14 and 15. Combined analysis of the LOH and copy number data revealed genomic structures that could not have been identified analyzing either data type alone. Half of the identified LOH regions showed no evidence of a reduced copy number, indicating the presence of uniparental structures. The distribution of these structures was non-random, primarily involving 8q, 13q and 20q. This finding was supported by analysis of an independent set of array-based transcriptional profiles, consisting of 17 normal mucosa and 66 adenocarcinoma samples. The transcriptional analysis revealed an unchanged expression level in areas with intact copy number, including regions with uniparental disomy, and a reduced expression level in the LOH regions representing factual losses (including 5q, 8p and 17p). The analysis also showed that genes in regions with increased copy number (including 7p and 20q) were predominantly upregulated. Further analyses of the SNP data revealed a subset of the identified alterations to be specifically associated with TP53 inactivation (including 8q gain and 17p loss) and lymph node metastasis status (gain of 7q and 13q). Another subset of the identified alterations was shown to represent intratumor heterogeneity. In conclusion, we demonstrate that uniparental disomy is frequent in CRC, and identify genomic alterations associated with TP53 inactivation and lymph node status.

  13. PIK3CA in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gieri eCathomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PIK3CA, the catalytic subunit of PI3K, is mutated in many different tumours, including colorectal cancer. Mutations of PIK3CA have been reported in 10 – 20% of colorectal cancer, about 80% of mutations found in two hot spots in exon 9 and exon 20. In RAS wild-type colorectal cancers, PIK3CA mutations have been associated with a worse clinical outcome and with a negative prediction of a response to targeted therapy by anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, these findings have not been confirmed in all studies and subsequent more detailed analysis has revealed that these effects may be restricted to mutations in Exon 20. Finally, mutations in PIK3CA may be the long sought biomarker for successful adjuvant therapy with aspirin in patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, PIK3CA mutations appear to be a promising predictive biomarker; however, further data are needed to conclusively define the impact of somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene for the management of patients with colorectal cancer.

  14. Colorectal cancer, one entity or three

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-ying LI; Mao-de LAI

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the mechanism ofcolorectal carcinogenesis has been gaining momentum for some years on account of its high incidence and impact on the lives of individuals affected. Different genetic abnormalities have been found in colorectal cancers from different sites. For example, proximal colon cancer is usually related to the nucleotide instability pathway, as mi-crosatellite instability (MSI). However, distal colon cancer is usually associated with specific chromosomal instability (CIN). The development of cancer at the rectum, though similar to that at the colon, displays its own unique features. These differences might be partially attributed to different embryological development and physiological circumstances. Environmental factors such as diet and alcohol intake also differ in their role in the development of tumors in the three segments, proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum. "Proximal shift" of colon cancer has been known for some time, and survival rates of colorectal cancer are higher when rectal cancers are excluded, both of which emphasize the three different segments of colorectal cancer and their different proper-ties. Meanwhile, colonic and rectal cancers are distinctive therapeutic entities. The concept of three entities of colorectal cancer may be important in designing clinical trails or therapeutic strategies. However, the dispute about the inconsistency of data con-ceming the site-specific mechanism of colorectal carcinoma does exist, and more evidence about molecular events of carcino-genesis and targeted therapy needs to be collected to definitely confirm the conception.

  15. Calcium remodeling in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2017-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Basic and clinical data indicate that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent colon cancer but mechanisms remain unknown. Aspirin metabolite salicylate and other NSAIDs may inhibit tumor cell growth acting on store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), suggesting an important role for this pathway in CRC. Consistently, SOCE is emerging as a novel player in different forms of cancer, including CRC. SOCE and store-operated currents (SOCs) are dramatically enhanced in CRC while Ca(2+) stores are partially empty in CRC cells. These features may contribute to CRC hallmarks including enhanced cell proliferation, migration, invasion and survival. At the molecular level, enhanced SOCE and depleted stores are mediated by overexpression of Orai1, Stromal interaction protein 1 (STIM1) and Transient receptor protein channel 1 (TRPC1) and downregulation of STIM2. In normal colonic cells, SOCE is mediated by Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels made of STIM1, STIM2 and Orai1. In CRC cells, SOCE is mediated by different store-operated currents (SOCs) driven by STIM1, Orai1 and TRPC1. Loss of STIM2 contributes to depletion of Ca(2+) stores and enhanced resistance to cell death in CRC cells. Thus, SOCE is a novel key player in CRC and inhibition by salicylate and other NSAIDs may contribute to explain chemoprevention activity. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling may contribute to cancer hallmarks. In addition, aspirin and other NSAIDs might prevent CRC acting on remodeled Ca(2+) entry pathways. In this review, we will briefly describe 1) the players involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms involved in SOCE activation and inactivation, 2) the evidence that aspirin

  16. Effects of autophagy regulation of tumor-associated macrophages on radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Le-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Song; Xing, Chun-Gen; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Young, Wu; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Tumor‑associated macrophages (TAMs), a major component of the tumor microenvironment, are crucial to the processes of tumor growth, infiltration and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. The importance of TAMs in radiation resistance of colorectal cancer remains unclear. To investigate the effects of autophagy regulation of TAMs on the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells, the current study induced TAM formation from THP‑1 monocyte cells. Sequential treatment of THP‑1 cells with PMA for 72 h and human recombinant interleukin‑4 for 24 h was used to stimulate THP‑1 differentiation to TAMs. Expression of the cell surface markers CD68, CD204 and CD206, and changes to cell morphology were used to confirm successful differentiation. The TAMs were stimulated to promote or inhibit autophagy during co‑culture with LoVo colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were irradiated, with subsequent measurement of LoVo colony formation and apoptosis. Additionally, the expression of p53, Bcl‑2, survivin and Smac proteins was assessed by western blotting. Monodansylcadaverin staining was used to analyze the presence of autophagic vacuoles in TAM, and western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of Beclin‑1, LC3B I and II, ATG‑3, ‑5 and ‑7. The results demonstrated TAM autophagy to be markedly altered by rapamycin and bafilomycin A1 treatment. Following co‑culture with TAMs, the colony formation rate and survival fraction of LoVo cells were significantly higher than those in the control group (PLoVo colorectal cancer cells. Upregulation of TAM autophagy using rapamycin exhibited more effective inhibition of LoVo colony formation than autophagy downregulation. Notably, apoptosis was significantly increased in LoVo cells when co‑cultured with TAMs only, or with rapamycin‑mediated autophagy upregulated TAMs, compared with LoVo cells cultured alone (PLoVo cells co‑cultured with TAMs, compared with the control group (P<0

  17. Sugars, sucrose and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjie; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2014-05-01

    A diet high in sugars may promote colorectal carcinogenesis, but it remains uncertain whether high intake of sugars or sucrose confers increased risk of colorectal cancer. The authors investigated the associations of sugars and sucrose intake with colorectal cancer risk in a community-based case-control study in Japan. The study subjects comprised 816 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Consumption frequencies and portion sizes of 148 food and beverage items were ascertained by a computer-assisted interview. The authors used the consumption of 29 food items to estimate sugars and sucrose intake. The odds ratios of colorectal cancer risk according to intake categories were obtained using a logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Overall, intakes of sugars and sucrose were not related to colorectal cancer risk either in men or women. The association between sugars intake and colorectal cancer risk differed by smoking status and alcohol use in men, but not in women. In men, sugars intake tended to be associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely among never-smokers and positively among male ever-smokers (interaction p=0.01). Sugars intake was associated with an increased risk among men with no alcohol consumption, but was unrelated to the risk among male alcohol drinkers (interaction p=0.02). Body mass index did not modify the association with sugars intake in either men or women. Sugars intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer among smokers and non-alcohol drinkers in men selectively.

  18. Beclin 1 Expression is Closely Linked to Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Distant Metastasis of Colorectal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ying Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 participates in development, autophagy, differentiation, anti- apoptosis, neurodegeneration, tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The roles of Beclin 1 in colorectal carcinogenesis and its subsequent progression are still unclear. Here, the mRNA and protein expression of Beclin 1 were determined in colorectal carcinoma and matched mucosa by Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization (ISH were performed on tissue microarryer with colorectal carcinoma, adenoma and mucosa. The expression of Beclin 1 mRNA and protein was found to be higher in colorectal carcinoma than matched mucosa by real-time PCR and Western blot (p < 0.05. According to the ISH data, Beclin 1 expression was lower in colorectal non-neoplastic mucosa (NNM than adenoma and carcinoma (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, primary carcinoma showed stronger Beclin 1 expression than NNM and metastatic carcinoma in the liver (p < 0.05. Beclin 1 protein expression was negatively related to liver and distant metastasis (p < 0.05, but not correlated with age, sex, depth of invasion, lymphatic or venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM staging, differentiation or serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA concentration (p > 0.05. Survival analysis indicated that Beclin 1 expression was not linked to favorable prognosis of the patients with colorectal carcinoma (p > 0.05. Cox’s model indicated that depth of invasion and distant metastasis were independent prognostic factors for colorectal carcinomas (p < 0.05. It was suggested that Beclin 1 expression is closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and distant metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.

  19. Surgical outcome and clinical profile of emergency versus elective cases of colorectal cancer in College of Medical Sciences, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients who undergo emergency colorectal cancer surgery has poor outcome compared to elective surgery, both in terms of morbidity and mortality. Approximately 15 to 30% of colorectal cancers present as an emergency, most often as obstruction or perforation. Objective: To compare surgical outcome and clinical profiles of emergency and elective cases for colorectal cancer. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 34 cases who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer between December 2011 to January 2013was carried out and their surgical outcomes, clinical presentation, demographic profile were analyzed. Results: The total numbers of patients included in this study were 34. Out of which 52.94 %( n=18 were emergency cases and 47.05 %( n=16 were elective. Male female ratio was 3:1 in emergency cases and 2.6:1 in elective cases. Per rectal bleeding (56% and altered bowel habit (31.25% was predominant clinical presentation in elective cases whereas intestinal obstruction (55.55% and peritonitis (22.22% were predominant clinical presentation in emergency cases. In emergency cases most of the tumors were located in left side (77.77% and in elective cases rectum was common site (37.5%. Left hemicolectomy was the commonest surgery performed (72.22% in emergency set up. In elective cases, right hemicolectomy, left hemicolectomy, APR and LAR was done in 31.25%, 31.25%, 25% and 25% cases respectively. In the emergency group 11.11% (n=2 developed enterocutaneous fistula and early mortality within 30 days was observed in 5% (n=1 of emergency cases only. Conclusion: In emergency conditions, colorectal cancer presented with intestinal obstruction where as elective cases presented with per rectal bleeding and altered bowel habits. Compared with the elective patients, the emergency patients had higher rate of morbidity and mortality. Because of higher incidence of colorectal cancer in our institution, in all emergency cases who presents with features of

  20. Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Guide to the Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas K Rex

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The two most recent guidelines for colorectal cancer screening are those of the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research, and the American Cancer Society. The guidelines are similar in many regards and reflect current literature, consensus opinion and compromise between members of multidisciplinary panels. The emphasis of both guidelines is to increase the options available for colorectal cancer screening. Increasing choice should expand the attractiveness of colorectal cancer screening to more patients and physicians, and the development of guidelines should help compel payers to provide reimbursement for colorectal cancer screening. These guidelines are summarized and evaluated as they pertain to colorectal cancer screening.

  1. Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Microenvironment and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Zang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract malignancies in the world. Owing to the newer and more effective systemic therapies, the life of colorectal cancer patients can be remarkably prolonged, and the incidence of brain metastases is increasing. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Here we review the tumor microenvironment and metastasis associated molecules in brain metastases from colorectal cancer. A further understanding of these mechanisms will help us to propose better strategies for colorectal cancer patients with brain metastasis and improve their life quality.

  2. Mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Gen Zeng; Zhi-Xiang Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have been extensively used for the surgical management of colorectal cancer during the last two decades. Accumulating data have demonstrated that laparoscopic colectomy is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent oncologic outcomes when compared with open surgery. However, some controversies regarding the oncologic quality of mini-invasive surgery for rectal cancer exist. Meanwhile, some progresses in colorectal surgery, such as robotic technology, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, natural orifice specimen extraction, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, have been made in recent years. In this article, we review the published data and mainly focus on the current status and latest advances of mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer.

  3. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anuj Patel, Weijing Sun Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF; it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. Keywords: aflibercept, angiogenesis, colorectal cancer

  4. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokhan; Cipe; Ufuk; Oguz; Idiz; Deniz; Firat; Huseyin; Bektasoglu

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complexand vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota.

  5. Novel translational strategies in colorectal cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Defining translational research is still a complex task. In oncology, translational research implies using our basic knowledge learnt from in vitro and in vivo experiments to directly improve diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches in cancer patients. Moreover, the better understanding of human cancer and its use to design more reliable tumor models and more accurate experimental systems also has to be considered a good example of translational research. The identification and characterization of new molecular markers and the discovery of novel targeted therapies are two main goals in colorectal cancer translational research. However, the straightforward translation of basic research findings, specifically into colorectal cancer treatment and vice versa is still underway. In the present paper, a summarized view of some of the new available approaches on colorectal cancer translational research is provided. Pros and cons are discussed for every approach exposed.

  6. Peptide Vaccine Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yu Yang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths and the second most prevalent (after breast cancer in the western world. High metastatic relapse rates and severe side effects associated with the adjuvant treatment have urged oncologists and clinicians to find a novel, less toxic therapeutic strategy. Considering the limited success of the past clinical trials involving peptide vaccine therapy to treat colorectal cancer, it is necessary to revise our knowledge of the immune system and its potential use in tackling cancer. This review presents the efforts of the scientific community in the development of peptide vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer. We review recent clinical trials and the strategies for immunologic monitoring of responses to peptide vaccine therapy. We also discuss the mechanisms underlying the therapy and potential molecular targets in colon cancer.

  7. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  8. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis of Calcium Remodeling in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Riesgo, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Lucía G; Ubierna, Daniel; Acedo, Alberto; Moyer, Mary P; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2017-04-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) cells undergo the remodeling of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, which contributes to cancer hallmarks such as enhanced proliferation, invasion and survival. Ca(2+) remodeling includes critical changes in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and Ca(2+) store content. Some changes have been investigated at the molecular level. However, since nearly 100 genes are involved in intracellular Ca(2+) transport, a comprehensive view of Ca(2+) remodeling in CRC is lacking. We have used Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to investigate differences in expression of 77 selected gene transcripts involved in intracellular Ca(2+) transport in CRC. To this end, mRNA from normal human colonic NCM460 cells and human colon cancer HT29 cells was isolated and used as a template for transcriptomic sequencing and expression analysis using Ion Torrent technology. After data transformation and filtering, exploratory analysis revealed that both cell types were well segregated. In addition, differential gene expression using R and bioconductor packages show significant differences in expression of selected voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels and store-operated Ca(2+) entry players, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, Ca(2+) release channels, Ca(2+) pumps, Na⁺/Ca(2+) exchanger isoforms and genes involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport. These data provide the first comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of Ca(2+) remodeling in CRC.

  10. Effect of DNA methylation profile on OATP3A1 and OATP4A1 transcript levels in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawłuszko-Wieczorek, Agnieszka Anna; Horst, Nikodem; Horbacka, Karolina; Bandura, Artur Szymon; Świderska, Monika; Krokowicz, Piotr; Jagodziński, Paweł Piotr

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that 17β-estradiol (E2) prevents colorectal cancer (CRC). Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are involved in the cellular uptake of various endogenous and exogenous substrates, including hormone conjugates. Because transfer of estrone sulfate (E1-S) can contribute to intra-tissue conversion of estrone to the biologically active form -E2, it is evident that the expression patterns of OATPs may be relevant to the analysis of CRC incidence and therapy. We therefore evaluated DNA methylation and transcript levels of two members of the OATP family, OATP3A1 and OATP4A1, that may be involved in E1-S transport in colorectal cancer patients. We detected a significant reduction in OATP3A1 and a significant increase in OATP4A1 mRNA levels in cancerous tissue, compared with histopathologically unchanged tissue (n=103). Moreover, we observed DNA hypermethylation in the OATP3A1 promoter region in a small subset of CRC patients and in HCT116 and Caco-2 colorectal cancer cell lines. We also observed increased OATP3A1 transcript following treatment with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and sodium butyrate. The OATP4A1 promoter region was hypomethylated in analyzed tissues and CRC cell lines and was not affected by these treatments. Our results suggest a potential mechanism for OATP3A1 downregulation that involves DNA methylation during colorectal carcinogenesis.

  11. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo In [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Pil [Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Eun [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Colorectal cancer is currently the second most common cancer among Korean males and the fourth most common among females. Since the majority of colorectal cancer case present following the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are vital methods in its prevention. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The proposed guidelines have been developed by the Korean Multi-Society Task Force using evidence-based methods. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been used to form the statements contained in the guidelines. This paper discusses the epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea as well as optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations.

  12. MicroRNA regulation network in colorectal cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao-Jiao; Zhou; Shu; Zheng; Li-Feng; Sun; Lei; Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Metastasis is a major cause of colorectal cancer-related death. Mechanisms of metastasis remain largely obscure. MicroRNA is one of the most important epigenetic regulators by targeting mRNAs posttranscriptionally. Accumulated evidence has supported its significant role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis. Dissecting microRNAome potentially identifies specific microRNAs as biomarkers of colorectal cancer metastasis. Better understanding of the complex network of microRNAs in colorectal cancer metastasis provide new insights in the biological process of metastasis and in the potential targets for colorectal cancer therapies and for diagnosis of recurrent and metastatic colorectal cancer.

  13. [Colorectal adenomas: postpolypectomy surveillance strategies and chemoprevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2008-10-01

    Colorectal adenomas are the most fully characterized premalignant lesions in the development of colorectal cancer. Consequently, the identification and resolution of these lesions, as well as the follow-up of affected patients, are a priority in the prevention of this neoplasm. The studies presented in the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association 2008 show that the results of current surveillance strategies can be improved with a view to reducing the rate of interval neoplasia. Improvement of these results includes optimization of the endoscopic technique (colonic preparation, cecal intubation, withdrawal time, etc.) as well as the incorporation of new diagnostic methods and the possible administration of chemopreventive drugs.

  14. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-05

    This podcast is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 7/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/5/2011.

  15. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  16. Roscovitine synergizes with conventional chemo-therapeutic drugs to induce efficient apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Salah I Abaza; Abdul-Majeed A Bahman; Rajaa J Al-Attiyah

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To examine the ability of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor(CDKI)roscovitine(Rosco)to enhance the antitumor effects of conventional chemotherapeutic agents acting by different mechanisms against human colorectal cancer.METHODS:Human colorectal cancer cells were treated,individually and in combination,with Rosco,taxol,5-Fluorouracil(S-FU),doxorubicine or vinblastine.The antiproliferative effects and the type of interaction of Rosco with tested chemotherapeutic drugs were determined.Cell cycle alterations were investigated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter FACS analysis.Apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation assay.RESULTS:Rosco inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner.The efficacies of all tested chemotherapeutic drugs were markedly enhanced 3.0-8.42×103 and 130-5.28×103 fold in combination with 5 and 10 μg/mL Rosco,re-spectively.The combinatiou of Rosco and chemotherapeutic drugs inhibited the growth of human colorectal cancer cells in an additive or synergistic fashion,and in a time and dose dependent manner.Rosco induced apoptosis and synergized with tested chemotherapeutic drugs to induce efficient apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.Sequential,inverted sequential and simultaneous treatment of cancer cells with combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs and Rosco arrested the growth of human colorectal cancer cells at various phases of the cell cycle as follows:Taxol/Rosco(G2/M-and S-phases),5-FU/Rosco(S-phase),Dox/Rosco(S-phase)and Vinb/Rosco(G2/M-and S-phases).CONCLUSION:Since the efficacy of many anticancer drugs depends on their ability to induce apoptotic cell death,modulation of this parameter by Cell cycle inhibitors may provide a novel chemo-preventive and chemothempeutic strategy for human colorectal cancer.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  17. The multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1 gene polymorphism G-rs3789243-A is not associated with disease susceptibility in Norwegian patients with colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer; a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamfjord Julian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking, dietary factors, and alcohol consumption are known life style factors contributing to gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Genetic variations in carcinogen handling may affect cancer risk. The multidrug resistance 1(MDR1/ABCB1 gene encodes the transport protein P-glycoprotein (a phase III xenobiotic transporter. P-glycoprotein is present in the intestinal mucosal lining and restricts absorption of certain carcinogens, among these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Moreover, P-glycoprotein transports various endogenous substrates such as cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation, and may thereby affect the risk of malignity. Hence, genetic variations that modify the function of P-glycoprotein may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. We have previously found an association between the MDR1 intron 3 G-rs3789243-A polymorphism and the risk of CRC in a Danish study population. The aim of this study was to investigate if this MDR1 polymorphism was associated with risk of colorectal adenoma (CA and CRC in the Norwegian population. Methods Using a case-control design, the association between the MDR1 intron 3 G-rs3789243-A polymorphism and the risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas in the Norwegian population was assessed in 167 carcinomas, 990 adenomas, and 400 controls. Genotypes were determined by allelic discrimination. Odds ratio (OR and 95 confidence interval (95% CI were estimated by binary logistic regression. Results No association was found between the MDR1 polymorphism (G-rs3789243-A and colorectal adenomas or cancer. Carriers of the variant allele of MDR1 intron 3 had odds ratios (95% CI of 0.97 (0.72–1.29 for developing adenomas, and 0.70 (0.41–1.21 for colorectal cancer, respectively, compared to homozygous wild type carriers. Conclusion The MDR1 intron 3 (G-rs3789243-A polymorphism was not associated with a risk of colorectal adenomas or carcinomas in the present Norwegian study

  18. Distinct molecular features of different macroscopic subtypes of colorectal neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Konda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs. METHODS: We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI] and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs, 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs, 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs, 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs on the basis of macroscopic appearance. RESULTS: S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs (P<0.001. By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively (P<0.007. We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively (P<0.005. Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05. PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal

  19. Colorectal Tumour Microsatellite Instability Test Results: Perspectives from Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindor Noralane M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To determine which individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC were interested in knowing the results of their tumour microsatellite instability (MSI and immunohistochemistry (IHC testing. We were also interested in the patients' reasons for choosing to learn their results and in the impact of those results on overall self-assessed quality of life. Patients and Methods CRCs from 414 individuals were assayed for MSI and IHC for DNA mismatch repair gene products (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6. Individuals were invited to learn their MSI/IHC results. They randomly received either brief or extended educational materials about the testing and a pretest survey to learn reasons for their interest and to assess their pretest quality of life. Results Of the 414 individuals, 307 (74% chose to learn their results. There was no significant difference in interest in knowing test results according to gender, age, educational level, or family history of colon cancer. The level of detail in the information piece received by the patients did not influence their desire to know their test results. Self-assessed quality of life was not altered by receiving results and was not correlated with the test outcome. Conclusions Individuals with colorectal cancer had a high level of interest in learning their individual MSI/IHC test results and did not seem deterred by the inherent complexity or ambiguity of this information. Regardless of test outcome, results did not significantly affect self-assessed quality of life. Further studies are needed to assess comprehension of results and behavioural changes resulting from the learning of MSI/IHC results.

  20. Alcohol, carcinoembryonic antigen processing and colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicker, Benita; Tuma, Dean J; Lazure, Kathryn E; Thomas, Peter; Casey, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that alcohol consumption is related to the development of alcoholic liver disease. Additionally, it is appreciated that other major health issues are associated with alcohol abuse, including colorectal cancer (CRC) and its metastatic growth to the liver. Although a correlation exists between alcohol use and the development of diseases, the search continues for a better understanding of specific mechanisms. Concerning the role of alcohol in CRC liver metastases, recent research is aimed at characterizing the processing of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycoprotein that is associated with and secreted by CRC cells. A positive correlation exists between serum CEA levels, liver metastasis, and alcohol consumption in CRC patients, although the mechanism is not understood. It is known that circulating CEA is processed primarily by the liver, first by nonparenchymal Kupffer cells (KCs) and secondarily, by hepatocytes via the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Since both KCs and hepatocytes are known to be significantly impacted by alcohol, it is hypothesized that alcohol-related effects to these liver cells will lead to altered CEA processing, including impaired asialo-CEA degradation, resulting in changes to the liver microenvironment and the metastatic potential of CRC cells. Also, it is predicted that CEA processing will affect cytokine production in the alcohol-injured liver, resulting in pro-metastatic changes such as enhanced adhesion molecule expression on the hepatic sinusoidal endothelium. This chapter examines the potential role that alcohol-induced liver cell impairments can have in the processing of CEA and associated mechanisms involved in CEA-related colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

  1. Enhanced colorectal cancer metastases in the alcohol-injured liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Ashley M; Gould, John J; Kubik, Jacy L; Talmon, Geoffrey A; Casey, Carol A; Thomas, Peter; Tuma, Dean J; McVicker, Benita L

    2017-02-01

    Metastatic liver disease is a major cause of mortality in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Alcohol consumption is a noted risk factor for secondary cancers yet the role of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) is not defined. This work evaluated tumor cell colonization in the alcoholic host liver using a novel preclinical model of human CRC liver metastases. Immunocompromised Rag1-deficient mice were fed either ethanol (E) or isocaloric control (C) diets for 4 weeks prior to intrasplenic injection of LS174T human CRC cells. ALD and CRLM were evaluated 3 or 5 weeks post-LS174T cell injection with continued C/E diet administration. ALD was confirmed by increased serum transaminases, hepatic steatosis and expression of cytochrome P4502E1, a major ethanol-metabolizing enzyme. Alcohol-mediated liver dysfunction was validated by impaired endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), indicators of hepatocellular injury and progressive CRC disease, respectively. Strikingly, the rate and burden of CRLM was distinctly enhanced in alcoholic livers with metastases observed earlier and more severely in E-fed mice. Further, alcohol-related increases (1.5-3.0 fold) were observed in the expression of hepatic cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10) and other factors noted to be involved in the colonization of CRC cells including ICAM-1, CCL-2, CCL-7, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Also, alcoholic liver injury was associated with altered hepatic localization as well as increased circulating levels of CEA released from CRC cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that the alcoholic liver provides a permissive environment for the establishment of CRLM, possibly through CEA-related inflammatory mechanisms.

  2. Tumor-Specific Expression of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptides: Transporters as Novel Targets for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Buxhofer-Ausch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the organic anion transporter family (OATP mediate the transmembrane uptake of clinical important drugs and hormones thereby affecting drug disposition and tissue penetration. Particularly OATP subfamily 1 is known to mediate the cellular uptake of anticancer drugs (e.g., methotrexate, derivatives of taxol and camptothecin, flavopiridol, and imatinib. Tissue-specific expression was shown for OATP1B1/OATP1B3 in liver, OATP4C1 in kidney, and OATP6A1 in testis, while other OATPs, for example, OATP4A1, are expressed in multiple cells and organs. Many different tumor entities show an altered expression of OATPs. OATP1B1/OATP1B3 are downregulated in liver tumors, but highly expressed in cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, breast, prostate, and lung. Similarly, testis-specific OATP6A1 is expressed in cancers in the lung, brain, and bladder. Due to their presence in various cancer tissues and their limited expression in normal tissues, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP6A1 could be a target for tumor immunotherapy. Otherwise, high levels of ubiquitous expressed OATP4A1 are found in colorectal cancers and their metastases. Therefore, this OATP might serve as biomarkers for these tumors. Expression of OATP is regulated by nuclear receptors, inflammatory cytokines, tissue factors, and also posttranslational modifications of the proteins. Through these processes, the distribution of the transporter in the tissue will be altered, and a shift from the plasma membrane to cytoplasmic compartments is possible. It will modify OATP uptake properties and, subsequently, change intracellular concentrations of drugs, hormones, and various other OATP substrates. Therefore, screening tumors for OATP expression before therapy should lead to an OATP-targeted therapy with higher efficacy and decreased side effects.

  3. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and transvagi

  4. Automated spectroscopic tissue classification in colorectal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, R.M.; Alic, L.; Beets, G.L.; Breukink, S.O.; Wieringa, F.P.; Stassen, L.P.S.

    2015-01-01

    In colorectal surgery, detecting ureters and mesenteric arteries is of utmost importance to prevent iatrogenic injury and to facilitate intraoperative decision making. A tool enabling ureter- and artery-specific image enhancement within (and possibly through) surrounding adipose tissue would facilit

  5. Cruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Anthony; Collins, Andrew; Fuller, Zoë; Hillman, Kevin; Ratcliffe, Brian

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;Anticarcinogenic Agents;Apoptosis;Brassicaceae;chemically induced;chemistry;Cell Division;Colorectal Neoplasms;drug effects;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Evaluation;Food Handling;Glucosinolates;Glycoside Hydrolases;Humans;Hydrolases;Isothiocyanates;metabolism;methods;pharmacology;prevention & control;Research. Cruciferous vegetables have been studied extensively for their chemoprotective effects. Although they contain ma...

  6. Metalloproteinases and their regulators in colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt, M.F.P. van der; Wobbes, T.; Strobbe, L.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Span, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs and ADAMTS) are expressed in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC), and some correlate with survival and prognosis. The MPs are regulated by various factors including EMMPRIN, TIMPs, and RECK. In additio

  7. Why I Got Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-29

    CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson explains why she got tested for colorectal cancer when she turned 50 years old. .  Created: 2/29/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/29/2016.

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves colorectal anastomotic healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S.A. Boersema (Geesien); Z. Wu (Zhouqiao); L.F. Kroese; S. Vennix (Sandra); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne); J.W. van Neck (Han); K.H. Lam; G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); J. Jeekel (Johannes); J.F. Lange (Johan F.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) has been found to improve the healing of poorly oxygenated tissues. This study aimed to investigate the influence of HBOT on the healing in ischemic colorectal anastomosis. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were randomly divided into a treatment group

  10. Systemic treatment of advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Punt, C.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    For advanced colorectal cancer (ACC), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based chemotherapy has been the standard for some decades. Attempts have been made to improve its results by biochemical modulation and schedule modulation of 5-FU which, in combination with leucovorin (LV), has been regarded as standard ch

  11. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent effective against advanced colorectal cancer. Unlike with other platinum-based agents, the main side effect of oxaliplatin is polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced polyneuropathy (OIPN) has a unique profile, which can be divided into acute and chronic...

  12. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent effective against advanced colorectal cancer. Unlike with other platinum-based agents, the main side effect of oxaliplatin is polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced polyneuropathy (OIPN) has a unique profile, which can be divided into acute and chronic...

  13. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNy in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma.

  14. Alterations in high-density lipoprotein metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus : role of lipolytic enzymes, lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, SE; de Vries, R; Dullaart, RPF

    2003-01-01

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus are generally accompanied by low HDL cholesterol and high plasma triglycerides, which are major cardiovascular risk factors. This review describes abnormalities in HDL metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport, i.e. the transport of cholesterol from

  15. Alterations in high-density lipoprotein metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus : role of lipolytic enzymes, lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, SE; de Vries, R; Dullaart, RPF

    2003-01-01

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus are generally accompanied by low HDL cholesterol and high plasma triglycerides, which are major cardiovascular risk factors. This review describes abnormalities in HDL metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport, i.e. the transport of cholesterol from

  16. Hyper-Elongation in Colorectal Cancer Tissue – Cerotic Acid is a Potential Novel Serum Metabolic Marker of Colorectal Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Mika

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds/Aims: Colorectal cancer (CRC cells show some alterations of lipid metabolism. Elongation of fatty acids (FA has not been studied in CRC tissues thus far. The aim of this study was to verify if CRC specimens and normal colon mucosa differ in terms of their levels of very long-chain FAs, a product of FA elongation. Moreover, the expression of elongase genes has been studied in normal tissue and CRC. Finally, we searched for some specific products of FA elongation in serum of CRC patients. Methods: The specimens of normal colon mucosa and CRC were obtained from nineteen CRC patients differ in terms of FA elongation. We also searched for some specific products of FA elongation in serum of CRC patients and from healthy volunteers. Tissue and serum FA profiles were determined by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS, and the tissue expression of elongases (ELOVLs was analyzed with real-time PCR. Results: Compared to normal colon tissue, CRC specimens showed significantly higher levels of 22-, 24- and 26-carbon FAs, stronger expressions of ELOVL1 and ELOVL6 (4- and 9-fold elevated respectively, and higher values of 18: 0/16: 0 elongation index. We also demonstrated presence of cerotic acid (26: 0 in serum of all CRC patients but in none of the healthy controls. Conclusions: CRC tissue seems to be characterized by enhanced FA elongation (hyper-elongation. Presence of cerotic acid in CRC patients sera and absence of this FA in healthy subjects points to this compound as a strong candidate for specific metabolic marker of colorectal malignancies.

  17. Re-laparoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of postoperative complications following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Riordan, J M

    2013-08-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery has increasingly become the standard of care in the management of both benign and malignant colorectal disease. We herein describe our experience with laparoscopy in the management of complications following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

  18. CCR5 blockage by maraviroc induces cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Asim; Ansari, Shariq; Berger, Martin R; Adwan, Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Alterations in the expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 or CD195) have been correlated with disease progression in different cancers. Recently, a few investigations have reported the blockage of this receptor by an antagonist (maraviroc) and its antineoplastic effects on tumor cell growth. However, little is known about the mechanistic reasons behind these antineoplastic effects of CCR5 blockage by maraviroc. In this study, we blocked the CCR5 receptor by maraviroc in SW480 and SW620 colorectal cancer cells to study the resulting changes in biological properties and related pathways. This blockage induced significantly reduced proliferation and a profound arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. Concomitantly, maraviroc caused significant signs of apoptosis at morphological level. Significant modulation of multiple apoptosis-relevant genes was also noticed at mRNA levels. In addition, we found remarkable increases in cleaved caspases at protein level. These modulations led us to propose a signaling pathway for the observed apoptotic effects. In conclusion, blocking the CCR5 by maraviroc induces significant cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, maraviroc can be considered a model compound, which may foster the development of further CCR5 antagonists to be used for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  19. Periodontal disease, tooth loss and colorectal cancer risk: Results from the Nurses' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Babic, Ana; Tworoger, Shelley S; Zhang, Libin; Wu, Kana; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles; Cho, Eunyoung; Michaud, Dominique S; Stampfer, Meir J; Yu, Yau-Hua; Kim, David; Zhang, Xuehong

    2017-02-01

    Periodontal diseases including tooth loss might increase systemic inflammation, lead to immune dysregulation and alter gut microbiota, thereby possibly influencing colorectal carcinogenesis. Few epidemiological studies have examined the association between periodontal diseases and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We collected information on the periodontal disease (defined as history of periodontal bone loss) and number of natural teeth in the Nurses' Health Study. A total of 77,443 women were followed since 1992. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) after adjustment for smoking and other known risk factors for CRC. We documented 1,165 incident CRC through 2010. Compared to women with 25-32 teeth, the multivariable HR (95% CI) for CRC for women with periodontal disease, HRs for CRC were 0.91 (95% CI 0.74-1.12) for periodontal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.91-1.63) when limited to moderate to severe periodontal disease. The results were not modified by smoking status, body mass index or alcohol consumption. Women with fewer teeth, possibly moderate or severe periodontal disease, might be at a modest increased risk of developing CRC, suggesting a potential role of oral health in colorectal carcinogenesis. © 2016 UICC.

  20. Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST and colorectal adenocarcinoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Felekouras

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST represent the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Over the last ten years the management of GISTs has dramatically altered but their coexistence with other gasrointesinal tumors of different histogenesis presents a special interest. The coexistence of GISTs with other primaries is usually discovered incidentally during GI surgery for carcinomas. Case presentation We present here, a case of a 66-year-old patient with intestinal GIST and a synchronous colorectal adenocarcinoma discovered incidentally during surgical treatment of the recurrent GIST. Immunohistochemical examination revealed the concurrence of histologically proved GIST (strongly positive staining for c-kit, vimentin, SMA, and focal positive in S-100, while CD-34 was negative and Dukes Stage C, (T3, N3, M0 according the TNM staging classification of colorectal cancer. Conclusion The coexistence of GIST with either synchronous or metachronous colorectal cancer represents a phenomenon with increasing number of relative reports in the literature the last 5 years. In any case of GIST the surgeon should be alert to recognize a possible coexistent tumor with different histological origin and to perform a thorough preoperative and intraoperative control. The correct diagnosis before and at the time of the surgical procedure is the cornerstone that secures the patients' best prognosis.

  1. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: The rise and fall of a confusing term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeremy R Jass

    2006-01-01

    The term Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) is a poor descriptor of the syndrome described by Lynch. Over the last decade, the term has been applied to heterogeneous groups of families meeting limited clinical criteria, for example the Amsterdam criteria. It is now apparent that not all Amsterdam criteria-positive families have the Lynch syndrome. The term HNPCC has also been applied to clinical scenarios in which CRCs with DNA microsatellite instability are diagnosed but in which there is no vertical transmission of an altered DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene. A term that has multiple, mutually incompatible meanings is highly problematic, particularly when it may influence the management of an individual family. The Lynch syndrome is best understood as a hereditary predisposition to malignancy that is explained by a germline mutation in a DNA MMR gene. The diagnosis does not depend in an absolute sense on any particular family pedigree structure or age of onset of malignancy.Families with a strong family history of colorectal cancer that do not have Lynch syndrome have been grouped as 'Familial Colorectal Cancer Type-X'. The first step in characterizing these cancer families is to distinguish them from Lynch syndrome. The term HNPCC no longer serves any useful purpose and should be phased out.

  2. Extracellular Matrix-dependent Pathways in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveal Potential Targets for Anticancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Noreikiene, Rimante; Kuodyte, Karolina; Valius, Mindaugas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells grown in a 3D culture are more resistant to anticancer therapy treatment compared to those in a monolayer 2D culture. Emerging evidence has suggested that the key reasons for increased cell survival could be gene expression changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction-dependent manner. Global gene-expression changes were obtained in human colorectal carcinoma HT29 and DLD1 cell lines between 2D and laminin-rich (lr) ECM 3D growth conditions by gene-expression microarray analysis. The most significantly altered functional categories were revealed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. The microarray data revealed that 841 and 1190 genes were differentially expressed in colorectal carcinoma DLD1 and HT29 cells. KEGG analysis indicated that the most significantly altered categories were cell adhesion, mitogen-activated protein kinase and immune response. Our results indicate altered pathways related to cancer development and progression and suggest potential ECM-regulated targets for the development of anticancer therapies. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal can...

  4. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas;

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  5. Colorectal carcinoma in a ten-year-old girl: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbani Chattopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is very rare in childhood. In this case report, we depict a ten-year-old girl who presented with features of intestinal obstruction which turned out to be due to poorly differentiated mucin secreting adenocarcinoma of descending colon. Only increased awareness of this malignancy in this age-group and a high index of suspicion can help when a child complains of persistent pain of abdomen, altered bowel habits or rectal bleeding, and may provide diagnosis at an earlier stage, thereby improving the prognosis.

  6. PARK2 deletions occur frequently in sporadic colorectal cancer and accelerate adenoma development in Apc mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulogiannis, George; McIntyre, Rebecca E; Dimitriadi, Maria; Apps, John R; Wilson, Catherine H; Ichimura, Koichi; Luo, Feijun; Cantley, Lewis C; Wyllie, Andrew H; Adams, David J; Arends, Mark J

    2010-08-24

    In 100 primary colorectal carcinomas, we demonstrate by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) that 33% show DNA copy number (DCN) loss involving PARK2, the gene encoding PARKIN, the E3 ubiquitin ligase whose deficiency is responsible for a form of autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism. PARK2 is located on chromosome 6 (at 6q25-27), a chromosome with one of the lowest overall frequencies of DNA copy number alterations recorded in colorectal cancers. The PARK2 deletions are mostly focal (31% approximately 0.5 Mb on average), heterozygous, and show maximum incidence in exons 3 and 4. As PARK2 lies within FRA6E, a large common fragile site, it has been argued that the observed DCN losses in PARK2 in cancer may represent merely the result of enforced replication of locally vulnerable DNA. However, we show that deficiency in expression of PARK2 is significantly associated with adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) deficiency in human colorectal cancer. Evidence of some PARK2 mutations and promoter hypermethylation is described. PARK2 overexpression inhibits cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, interbreeding of Park2 heterozygous knockout mice with Apc(Min) mice resulted in a dramatic acceleration of intestinal adenoma development and increased polyp multiplicity. We conclude that PARK2 is a tumor suppressor gene whose haploinsufficiency cooperates with mutant APC in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  7. Effect of dietary fiber on the induction of colorectal tumors and fecal beta-glucuronidase activity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, H G; Asp, N G; Oste, R; Dahlqvist, A; Fredlund, P E

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether three different types of dietary fiber, wheat bran, carrot fiber, and citrus pectin, influenced the induction of colorectal tumors produced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats. In all groups, the tumor yield was high (87 to 97%). In the wheat bran and carrot fiber groups, the incidence of colorectal tumors was not significantly different from that of the group fed on the fiber-free basic diet. The citrus pectin group, however, had a significantly higher incidence of colorectal tumors (p less than 0.001). An increased number of auditory duct tumors was also noted in this group. In a separate experiment, dietary pectin induced a 10-fold increase in fecal beta-glucuronidase activity but did not alter this activity in the bowel wall. It has been suggested that dietary fiber protects against the induction of colorectal tumors, but this was not the case in the experiment. It is possible that the high tumor yield made the demonstration of a weak protective effect of wheat bran impossible. The reason for the increased occurrence of tumors in the citrus pectin group is obscure and will be subjected to further investigation. Fecal beta-glucuronidase activity might be one factor of importance in the activation of the carcinogen.

  8. Absence of diurnal variation in visceromotor response to colorectal distention in normal Long Evans rats [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Botschuijver

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enhanced colorectal sensitivity (i.e. visceral hypersensitivity is thought to be a pathophysiological mechanism in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. In healthy men a circadian variation in rectal perception to colonic distention was described. Disturbed day and night rhythms, which occur in shift work and trans meridian flights, are associated with the prevalence of IBS. This raises the question whether disruptions of circadian control are responsible for the observed pathology in IBS. Prior to investigating altered rhythmicity in relation to visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model for IBS, it is relevant to establish whether normal rats display circadian variation similar to healthy men.  Methodology and findings: In rodents colorectal distension leads to reproducible contractions of abdominal musculature. We used quantification of this so called visceromotor response (VMR by electromyography (EMG to assess visceral sensitivity in rats. We assessed the VMR in normal male Long Evans rats at different time points of the light/dark cycle. Although a control experiment with male maternal separated rats confirmed that intentionally inflicted (i.e. stress induced changes in VMR can be detected, normal male Long Evans rats showed no variation in VMR along the light/dark cycle in response to colorectal distension. Conclusions: In the absence of a daily rhythm of colorectal sensitivity in normal control rats it is not possible to investigate possible aberrancies in our rat model for IBS.

  9. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors improve the effect of chemotherapeutic agents in SW48 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Flis

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an epigenetic phenomenon known to play an important role in the development and progression of human cancer. Enzyme responsible for this process is DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 that maintains an altered methylation pattern by copying it from parent to daughter DNA strands after replication. Aberrant methylation of the promoter regions of genes critical for normal cellular functions is potentially reversible. Therefore, inactivation of DNMT1 seems to be a valuable target for the development of cancer therapies. Currently, the most popular DNMT inhibitors (DNMTi are cytidine analogues like 5-azacytidine, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine and pyrimidin-2-one ribonucleoside (zebularine. In colorectal cancer, epigenetic modifications play an essential role at each step of carcinogenesis. Therefore, we have addressed the hypothesis that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors may potentiate inhibitory effects of classical chemotherapeutic agents, such as oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, commonly used in colorectal cancer therapy. Here, our report shows that DNMTi can have positive interactions with standard chemotherapeutics in colorectal cancer treatment. Using pharmacological models for the drug-drug interaction analysis, we have revealed that the combination of decitabine with 5-FU or oxaliplatin shows the most attractive interaction (synergism, whereas the effect of zebularine in combinations with chemotherapeutics is moderate and may be depended on genetic/epigenetic background of a cell line or secondary drug used in combination. Our results suggest that DNMTi administered in combination with standard chemotherapeutics might improve the treatment of patients with colorectal cancers.

  10. Chronic chemotherapeutic stress promotes evolution of stemness and WNT/beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells: implications for clinical use of WNT-signaling inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Meriam; Bouygues, Anaïs; Ouaret, Djamila; Ferrand, Nathalie; Chouaib, Salem; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Muchardt, Christian; Sabbah, Michèle; Larsen, Annette K

    2015-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain a subfraction of cells with stem/progenitor cell features. Stem cells are naturally chemoresistant suggesting that chronic chemotherapeutic stress may select for cells with increased “stemness”. We carried out a comprehensive molecular and functional analysis of six independently selected colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with acquired resistance to three different chemotherapeutic agents derived from two distinct parental cell lines. Chronic drug exposure resulted in complex alterations of stem cell markers that could be classified into three categories: 1) one cell line, HT-29/5-FU, showed increased “stemness” and WNT-signaling, 2) three cell lines showed decreased expression of stem cell markers, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, attenuated WNT-signaling and lost the capacity to form colonospheres and 3) two cell lines displayed prominent expression of ABC transporters with a heterogeneous response for stem cell markers. While WNT-signaling could be attenuated in the HT-29/5-FU cells by the WNT-signaling inhibitors ICG-001 and PKF-118, this was not accompanied by any selective growth inhibitory effect suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of these compounds is not directly linked to WNT-signaling inhibition. We conclude that classical WNT-signaling inhibitors have toxic off-target activities that need to be addressed for clinical development. PMID:26041882

  11. Relationship Between Dual Time Point FDG PET and Immunohistochemical Parameters in Preoperative Colorectal Cancer: Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jai Hyuen; Lee, Won Ae; Park, Seok Gun; Park, Dong Kook; Namgung, Hwan [Dankook Univ. College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The clinical availability of 2 deoxy 2 [18F] fluoro D glucose (FDG) dual time point positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (DTPP) has been investigated in diverse oncologic fields. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the relationship between various immunohistopathologic markers reflecting disease progression of colorectal cancer and parameters extracted from FDG DTPP in colorectal cancer patients. Forty seven patients with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer were analyzed in this preliminary study. FDG DTPP consisted of an early scan 1 h after FDG injection and a delayed scan 1.5 h after the early scan. Based on an analysis of FDG DTPP, we estimated the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of tumors on the early and delayed scans (SUV{sup earlya}nd SUV{sup delayed,} respectively). The retention index (RI) was calculated as follows: (SUV{sup delayed-} SUV{sup early)} x 100/ SUV{sup early.} The clinicopathological findings (size and T and N stages) and immunohistochemical factors [glucose transporter 1 (GLUT 1), hexokinase 2 (HK 2), p53, P504S, and {beta} catenin] were analyzed by visual analysis. The RIs calculated from the SUVs ranged from -1.8 to 73.4 (31.8{+-}15.5). The RIs were significantly higher in patients with high T stages (T3 and T4) than with low T stages (T1 and T2; P<0.05). Among the immunohistochemical analytic markers, GLUT 1 had the highest positive staining rate (93.6%) compared to other markers. Based on unvariable analysis, it was shown that the RI of high level GLUT 1 expression was significantly higher than low level GLUT 1 expression (p=0.01), and the RI of high level p53 expression (p=0.08). Multivariate analysis to investigate a link between RI and clinico pathologic parameters of colorectal carcinoma showed that GLUT 1, p53, and T staging were independently connected with increased RIs (p<0.05, total) using backward selection methods. There was no significant statistical relationship between SUV

  12. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-IIIc mediates colorectal cancer growth and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonvilla, G; Allerstorfer, S; Heinzle, C; Stättner, S; Karner, J; Klimpfinger, M; Wrba, F; Fischer, H; Gauglhofer, C; Spiegl-Kreinecker, S; Grasl-Kraupp, B; Holzmann, K; Grusch, M; Berger, W; Marian, B

    2010-03-30

    Deregulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is involved in several malignancies. Its role in colorectal cancer has not been assessed before. Expression of FGFR3 in human colorectal tumour specimens was analysed using splice variant-specific real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays. To analyse the impact of FGFR3-IIIc expression on tumour cell biology, colon cancer cell models overexpressing wild-type (WT-3b and WT3c) or dominant-negative FGFR3 variants (KD3c and KD3b) were generated by either plasmid transfection or adenoviral transduction. Although FGFR3 mRNA expression is downregulated in colorectal cancer, alterations mainly affected the FGFR3-IIIb splice variant, resulting in an increased IIIc/IIIb ratio predominantly in a subgroup of advanced tumours. Overexpression of WT3c increased proliferation, survival and colony formation in all colon cancer cell models tested, whereas WT3b had little activity. In addition, it conferred sensitivity to autocrine FGF18-mediated growth and migration signals in SW480 cells with low endogenous FGFR3-IIIc expression. Disruption of FGFR3-IIIc-dependent signalling by dominant-negative FGFR3-IIIc or small interfering RNA-mediated FGFR3-IIIc knockdown resulted in inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis, which could not be observed when FGFR3-IIIb was blocked. In addition, KD3c expression blocked colony formation and migration and distinctly attenuated tumour growth in SCID mouse xenograft models. Our data show that FGFR3-IIIc exerts oncogenic functions by mediating FGF18 effects in colorectal cancer and may constitute a promising new target for therapeutic interventions.

  13. Relationship Between β -Catenin Expression and Prognostic Parameters of Colorectal Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal PEKER

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Colorectal carcinomas are the most frequent tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. β-catenin, which is related to cadherins, is a cytoplasmic protein responsible for intercellular adhesion. It is also an important component in the Wnt signal pathway. Recent studies have shown structural alterations in the APC gene and axin in patients with colorectal carcinoma, along with β-catenin. We aimed to compare β-catenin expression, which is a prognostic factor itself, with other prognostic parameters.Material and Method: A total of 70 patients who had surgical intervention for colorectal malignancies between January 1994 and December 2003 were included in the study. Fift y-nine of the patients (84.3% were male, 11 of the patients (15.7% were female; their ages varied between 24 and 82 (mean 60.3 ±15.2 years. Paraff in blocks were immunohistochemically stained for β-catenin. The number of stained cell nuclei was assessed according to the stage of disease using the TNM classification, histological grade, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion and tumor's local invasion.Results: When groups constituted according to tumor histologic grade were compared for prognostic parameters in terms of stain density for β-catenin and number of stained cell nuclei, stain density was mild (+ and the number of stained nuclei was smaller in well-diff erentiated groups while stain density was strong (+++ and the number of stained nuclei was higher in poorly diff erentiated groups. There was a relation between β-catenin expression and diff erentiation grade, lymph node metastasis, stage and tumor size but not with vascular invasion.Conclusion: These data indicate that β- catenin, with functions in cell homeostasis and relations with the APC gene, has a substantial role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  14. Molecular characterization of mucosal adherent bacteria and associations with colorectal adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiang Jun; Rawls, John F; Randall, Thomas; Burcal, Lauren; Mpande, Caroline N; Jenkins, Natascha; Jovov, Biljana; Abdo, Zaid; Sandler, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    The human large bowel is colonized by complex and diverse bacterial communities. However, the relationship between commensal bowel bacteria and adenomas (colorectal cancer precursors) is unclear. This study aimed to characterize adherent bacteria in normal colon and evaluate differences in community composition associated with colorectal adenomas. We evaluated adherent bacteria in normal colonic mucosa of 21 adenoma and 23 non-adenoma subjects enrolled in a cross sectional study. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, clone sequencing and fluorescent in-situ hybridization analysis of the 16S rRNA genes were used to characterize adherent bacteria. A total of 335 clones were sequenced and processed for phylogenetic and taxonomic analysis. Differences in bacterial composition between cases and controls were evaluated by UniFrac and analysis of similarity matrix. Overall, Firmicutes (62%), Bacteroidetes (26%) and Proteobacteria (11%) were the most dominant phyla. The bacterial composition differed significantly between cases and controls (UniFrac p < 0.001). We observed significantly higher abundance of Proteobacteria (p < 0.05) and lower abundance of Bacteroidetes (p < 0.05) in cases compared to controls. At the genus level, case subjects showed increased abundance of Dorea spp. (p < 0.005), Faecalibacterium spp. (p < 0.05) and lower proportions of Bacteroides spp. (p < 0.03) and Coprococcus spp. (p < 0.05) than controls. Cases had higher bacterial diversity and richness than controls. These findings reveal that alterations in bacterial community composition associated with adenomas may contribute to the etiology of colorectal cancer. Extension of these findings could lead to strategies to manipulate the microbiota to prevent colorectal adenomas and cancer as well as to identify individuals at high risk. PMID:20740058

  15. APE1 polymorphisms are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility in Chinese Hans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Heng; Wang, Lin-Ang; Li, Zheng; Peng, Yu; Cun, Yan-Ping; Dai, Nan; Cheng, Yi; Xiao, He; Xiong, Yan-Li; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-14

    To study the association between four base excision repair gene polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk in a Chinese population. Two hundred forty-seven colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and three hundred cancer-free controls were enrolled in this study. Four polymorphisms (OGG1 Ser326Cys, APE1 Asp148Glu, -141T/G in the promoter region, and XRCC1 Arg399Gln) in components of the base excision repair pathway were determined in patient blood samples using polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers. The baseline information included age, gender, family history of cancer, and three behavioral factors [smoking status, alcohol consumption, and body mass index (BMI)]. χ(2) tests were used to assess the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the distributions of baseline characteristics, and the four gene polymorphisms between the cases and controls. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the correlations between the four polymorphisms and CRC risk, adjusted by the baseline characteristics. Likelihood ratio tests were performed to analyze the gene-behavior interactions of smoking status, alcohol consumption, and BMI on polymorphisms and CRC susceptibility. The APE1 148 Glu/Glu genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR = 2.411, 95%CI: 1.497-3.886, P colorectal cancer among subjects with a BMI < 25 kg/m(2) (OR = 0.214, 95%CI: 0.069-0.660, P < 0.05 relative to T/T genotype). There were significant gene-behavior interactions between smoking status and XRCC1 Arg399Gln, as well as BMI and APE1 -141T/G polymorphism (all P < 0.05). APE1 Asp148Glu is associated with increased CRC risk and smoking alters the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln and CRC risk in the Chinese Han population.

  16. Inositol Hexaphosphate and Inositol Inhibit Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Liver in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Fu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6 and inositol (Ins, naturally occurring carbohydrates present in most mammals and plants, inhibit the growth of numerous cancers both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we first examined the anti-metastatic effects of IP6 and Ins using a liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer (CRC in BALB/c mice. CT-26 cells were injected into the splenic capsule of 48 BALB/c mice. The mice were then randomly divided into four groups: IP6, Ins, IP6 + Ins and normal saline control (n = 12 per group. IP6 and/or Ins (80 mg/kg each, 0.2 mL/day were injected into the gastrointestinal tracts of the mice on the second day after surgery. All mice were sacrificed after 20 days, and the tumor inhibition rates were determined. The results demonstrated that the tumor weights of liver metastases and the tumor inhibition rates were reduced in the experimental groups compared to the control group and that treatment with the combination of IP6 and Ins resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth than treatment with either compound alone. These findings suggest that IP6 and Ins prevent the development and metastatic progression of colorectal cancer to the liver in mice by altering expression of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen IV, fibronectin and laminin; the adhesion factor receptor integrin-β1; the proteolytic enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 9; and the angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor beta in the tumor metastasis microenvironment. In conclusion, IP6 and Ins inhibited the development and metastatic progression of colorectal cancer to the liver in BALB/c mice, and the effect of their combined application was significantly greater than the effect of either compound alone. This evidence supports further testing of the combined application of IP6 and Ins for the prevention of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver in clinical studies.

  17. Inositol Hexaphosphate and Inositol Inhibit Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Liver in BALB/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Min; Song, Yang; Wen, Zhaoxia; Lu, Xingyi; Cui, Lianhua

    2016-05-12

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) and inositol (Ins), naturally occurring carbohydrates present in most mammals and plants, inhibit the growth of numerous cancers both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we first examined the anti-metastatic effects of IP6 and Ins using a liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer (CRC) in BALB/c mice. CT-26 cells were injected into the splenic capsule of 48 BALB/c mice. The mice were then randomly divided into four groups: IP6, Ins, IP6 + Ins and normal saline control (n = 12 per group). IP6 and/or Ins (80 mg/kg each, 0.2 mL/day) were injected into the gastrointestinal tracts of the mice on the second day after surgery. All mice were sacrificed after 20 days, and the tumor inhibition rates were determined. The results demonstrated that the tumor weights of liver metastases and the tumor inhibition rates were reduced in the experimental groups compared to the control group and that treatment with the combination of IP6 and Ins resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth than treatment with either compound alone. These findings suggest that IP6 and Ins prevent the development and metastatic progression of colorectal cancer to the liver in mice by altering expression of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen IV, fibronectin and laminin; the adhesion factor receptor integrin-β1; the proteolytic enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 9; and the angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor beta in the tumor metastasis microenvironment. In conclusion, IP6 and Ins inhibited the development and metastatic progression of colorectal cancer to the liver in BALB/c mice, and the effect of their combined application was significantly greater than the effect of either compound alone. This evidence supports further testing of the combined application of IP6 and Ins for the prevention of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver in clinical studies.

  18. Toward standardization of laparoscopic resection for colorectal cancer in developing countries: A step by step module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mostafa Ahmed Mahmoud

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery for colorectal cancer is safe and oncologically sound, standardized well-structured laparoscopic technique masters the procedure even in early learning curve setting.

  19. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  20. The predictive value of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN for anti-EGFR treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Bergmann, Troels K; Henrichsen-Schnack, Tine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In metastatic colorectal cancer, mutation testing for KRAS exon 2 is widely implemented to select patients with wild-type tumors for treatment with the monocloncal anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab. The added predictive value of additional biomarkers in the RAS......-RAF-MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways in colorectal cancer is uncertain, which led us to systematically review the impact of alterations in KRAS (outside of exon 2), NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN in relation to the clinical benefit from anti-EGFR treatment. METHODS: In total, 22 studies that include 2395 patients......, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA and non-functional PTEN predict resistance to anti-EGFR therapies and demonstrates that biomarker analysis beyond KRAS exon 2 should be implemented for prediction of clinical benefit from anti-EGFR antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer....

  1. The Role of Smoking in the Development of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dénes Márton István

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Smoking is an important public health issue nowadays. It causes a lot of diseases and represents also a source of carcinogenic substances. Recent studies showed an increased incidence of colorectal cancer in smokers. The aim of our study is to assess the association between smoking and colorectal cancer and to establish the prevalence of heavy smokers among the patients operated on for colorectal cancer.

  2. Mandibular osteomas in sporadic colorectal carcinoma. A genetic marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, J O; Rasmussen, M S; Videbaek, H;

    1993-01-01

    Pantomography of the mandible was performed in 98 patients with sporadic colorectal adenocarcinoma. Twenty-eight patients (29%) had osteomas versus 5% in a control group (P osteomas are found in most patients with the premalignant dominant syndrome familial adenomatous...... polyposis. Sporadic colorectal cancer examinations of married couples have shown that diet has only a moderate influence on the development of colorectal cancer, whereas pedigree studies indicate a genetic component. On this basis we conclude that mandibular osteomas are probably genetic markers...

  3. Nurses' attitudes towards the sexuality of colorectal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Justham, D

    This article reviews the literature on nurses' attitudes towards sexuality and highlights a range of studies carried out on functional outcomes following colorectal surgery. The article provides nurses with an insight into colorectal cancer, the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in men and women following colorectal surgery and the importance of addressing the various aspects of sexuality in a sensitive manner to provide patients with holistic care.

  4. Significance of carbohydrate antigen 50 expression in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the significance of carbohydrate antigen 50(CA50)expression in colorectal carcinoma.Methods Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect CA50 expression in 10 cases of normal colorectal mucosa and 40 cases of cancer mucosa.Results The expression of CA50 increased in normal colorectal mucosa,cancer distant mucosa,cancer adjacent mucosa and cancer mucosa,and there were significant differences among them(P<0.05).The expression of CA50 in colorectal carcinoma was correlated with the deg...

  5. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitz, Connie; Chow, Christopher; Rothenberger, David

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training...

  6. Stromal Expression of Hypoxia Regulated Proteins Is an Adverse Prognostic Factor in Colorectal Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen H. G. Cleven

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia modifies the phenotype of tumors in a way that promotes tumor aggressiveness and resistance towards chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the expression and influence of hypoxia-regulated proteins on tumor biology are not well characterized in colorectal tumors. We studied the role of protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 in patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 133 colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of hypoxia markers was correlated with clinicopathological variables and overall patient survival. Results: Expression of these hypoxia markers was detected in the epithelial compartment of the tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated stromal cells. Although tumor cells frequently showed expression of one or more of the investigated hypoxia markers, no correlation among these markers or with clinical response was found. However, within the tumor stroma, positive correlations between the hypoxia markers HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 were observed. Furthermore expression of HIF-2α and CA9 in tumor-associated stroma were both associated with a significantly reduced overall survival. In the Cox proportional hazard model, stromal HIF-2α expression was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusion: These observations show, that expression of hypoxia regulated proteins in tumor-associated stromal cells, as opposed to their expression in epithelial tumor cells, is associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer. This study suggests that tumor hypoxia may influence tumor-associated stromal cells in a way that ultimately contributes to patient prognosis.

  7. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132C mutation occurs exclusively in microsatellite stable colorectal cancers with the CpG island methylator phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehall, V L J; Dumenil, T D; McKeone, D M; Bond, C E; Bettington, M L; Buttenshaw, R L; Bowdler, L; Montgomery, G W; Wockner, L F; Leggett, B A

    2014-11-01

    The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is fundamental to an important subset of colorectal cancer; however, its cause is unknown. CIMP is associated with microsatellite instability but is also found in BRAF mutant microsatellite stable cancers that are associated with poor prognosis. The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene causes CIMP in glioma due to an activating mutation that produces the 2-hydroxyglutarate oncometabolite. We therefore examined IDH1 alteration as a potential cause of CIMP in colorectal cancer. The IDH1 mutational hotspot was screened in 86 CIMP-positive and 80 CIMP-negative cancers. The entire coding sequence was examined in 81 CIMP-positive colorectal cancers. Forty-seven cancers varying by CIMP-status and IDH1 mutation status were examined using Illumina 450K DNA methylation microarrays. The R132C IDH1 mutation was detected in 4/166 cancers. All IDH1 mutations were in CIMP cancers that were BRAF mutant and microsatellite stable (4/45, 8.9%). Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis identified an IDH1 mutation-like methylation signature in approximately half of the CIMP-positive cancers. IDH1 mutation appears to cause CIMP in a small proportion of BRAF mutant, microsatellite stable colorectal cancers. This study provides a precedent that a single gene mutation may cause CIMP in colorectal cancer, and that this will be associated with a specific epigenetic signature and clinicopathological features.

  8. MicroRNA-224 is associated with colorectal cancer progression and response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy by KRAS-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amankwatia, E B; Chakravarty, P; Carey, F A; Weidlich, S; Steele, R J C; Munro, A J; Wolf, C R; Smith, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancers arise from benign adenomas, although not all adenomas progress to cancer and there are marked interpatient differences in disease progression. We have previously associated KRAS mutations with disease progression and reduced survival in colorectal cancer patients. Methods: We used TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) qRT–PCR analysis to identify miRNAs differentially expressed in normal colorectal mucosa, adenomas and cancers and in isogeneic KRAS WT and mutant HCT116 cells, and used a variety of phenotypic assays to assess the influence of miRNA expression on KRAS activity, chemosensitivity, proliferation and invasion. Results: MicroRNA-224 was differentially expressed in dysplastic colorectal disease and in isogeneic KRAS WT and mutant HCT116 cells. Antagomir-mediated miR-224 silencing in HCT116 KRAS WT cells phenocopied KRAS mutation, increased KRAS activity and ERK and AKT phosphorylation. 5-FU chemosensitivity was significantly increased in miR-224 knockdown cells, and in NIH3T3 cells expressing KRAS and BRAF mutant proteins. Bioinformatics analysis of predicted miR-224 target genes predicted altered cell proliferation, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypes that were experimentally confirmed in miR-224 knockdown cells. Conclusions: We describe a novel mechanism of KRAS regulation, and highlight the clinical utility of colorectal cancer-specific miRNAs as disease progression or clinical response biomarkers. PMID:25919696

  9. Polymorphisms in XRCC1 gene, alcohol drinking, and risk of colorectal cancer: a case-control study in Jiangsu Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chang-Ming; Ding, Jian-Hua; Li, Su-Ping; Liu, Yan-Ting; Cao, Hai-Xia; Wu, Jian-Zhong; Tang, Jin-Hai; Tajima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between alcohol drinking, XRCC1 codon 194 and 399 polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer, we conducted a case-control study with 315 colorectal cancer cases (105 colon, 210 rectal) and 439 population-based controls in Jiangsu Province of China. The XRCC1 codon 194 and 399 genotypes were identified using polymerase chain reaction and restrictrion fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). A structured questionnaire was used to elicit detailed information. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with an unconditional logistic model. In this study no significant differences were observed among the studied groups with regard to the genotype distribution of the XRCC1 codons 194 and 399 and the risk of colorectal cancer did not appear to be significantly influenced by genotype alone, whereas alcohol consumption showed a positive association (P for trend alcohol consumption were analyzed, we found that the 194Trp or 399Gln alleles further increased the colorectal cancer risk due to high alcohol intake. These findings support the conclusion that colorectal cancer susceptibility may be altered by gene-environment interactions.

  10. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules in Colorectal-Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Jorgensen, Lars N; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPN) at staging computed tomography (CT) for colorectal cancer (CRC), and the optimal diagnostic approach, are debated. This study aimed to analyse variability in radiologists' detection of IPN at staging CT for CRC. METHODS......: All patients with CRC referred to our center between 2006 and 2011 were included. Primary staging CT scans were re-evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist whose findings were entered into a dedicated database and merged with data from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database, the National...... Patient Registry, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the primary CT evaluation. Inter-reader agreement was calculated by Kappa statistics, and associations between variables and malignancy of pulmonary nodules were analyzed with χ (2) and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon tests. Multivariable logistic regression...

  11. Colorectal carcinogenesis-update and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raskov, Hans; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob;

    2014-01-01

    . The major genetic pathways of CRC are the Chromosome Instability Pathway representing the pathway of sporadic CRC through the K-ras, APC, and P53 mutations, and the Microsatellite Instability Pathway representing the pathway of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer through mutations in mismatch repair genes......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very common malignancy in the Western World and despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and screening, it is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in this part of the world. Numerous factors are found important in the development of CRC including colonocyte....... To identify early cancers, screening programs have been initiated, and the leading strategy has been the use of faecal occult blood testing followed by colonoscopy in positive cases. Regarding the treatment of colorectal cancer, significant advances have been made in the recent decade. The molecular targets...

  12. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  13. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F;

    2002-01-01

    by oral ranitidine 150 mg or placebo twice daily for 5 years. Adjuvant cytotoxic or radiation therapy was not given. An observer-blinded interim analysis performed after 40 months showed that there was no effect of ranitidine on overall survival, and the study was discontinued in accordance......BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  14. Current treatment for colorectal liver metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evangelos P Misiakos; Nikolaos P Karidis; Gregoryr Kouraklis

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection offers the best opportunity for survival in patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver, with five-year survival rates up to 58% in selected cases. However, only a minority are resectable at the time of diagnosis. Continuous research in this field aims at increasing the percentage of patients eligible for resection, refining the indications and contraindications for surgery , and improving overall survival. The use of surgical innovations, such as staged resection, portal vein embolization, and repeat resection has allowed higher resection rates in patients with bilobar disease. The use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy allows up to 38% of patients previously considered unresectable to be significantly downstaged and eligible for hepatic resection. Ablative techniques have gained wide acceptance as an adjunct to surgical resection and in the management of patients who are not surgical candidates. Curent management of colorectal liver metastases requires a multidisciplinary approach, which should be individu alized in each case.

  15. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-11-21

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m(2), twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer.

  16. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before...... the rectal surgery to clean the rectum and facilitate the manipulation for the mechanical anastomosis is used for many surgeons. This is analysed separately...

  17. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-07-21

    To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ (2) test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population.

  18. Metalloproteinases and their regulators in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Jagt, Michel F P; Wobbes, Theo; Strobbe, Luc J A; Sweep, Fred C G J; Span, Paul N

    2010-03-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs and ADAMTS) are expressed in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC), and some correlate with survival and prognosis. The MPs are regulated by various factors including EMMPRIN, TIMPs, and RECK. In addition, micro-RNAs are found to be relevant for both MP expression levels and CRC prognostication. Both MPs and their regulators could be potential targets for intervention and therapy in CRC.

  19. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-01-01

    The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individual...

  20. DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellows CF

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Gagliardi1, Monica Goswami1, Roberto Passera2, Charles F Bellows11Department of Surgery and Pathology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Division of Nuclear Medicine Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Giovanni Battista, Turin, ItalyIntroduction: Microtubule-associated doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCLK1 is a novel candidate marker for intestinal stem cells. The aim of our study was to assess DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal carcinogenesis and its correlation with prognosis.Methods: DCLK1 immunostaining was performed in colorectal tissue from 71 patients, including 18 adenomatous polyps, 40 primary adenocarcinomas, and 14 metastatic lesions. Each case was evaluated by a combined scoring method based on the intensity of staining (score 0–3 and the percentage of tissue staining positive (score 0–3. Immunoexpression for DCLK1 was considered as positive when the combined score was 2–6 and negative with a score of 0–1.Results: Overall, 14/18 (78% of polyps, 30/40 (75% of primary adenocarcinomas, and 7/14 (50% of distant metastases were positive for DCLK1. In adenomatous polyps and primary cancer there was no association between DCLK1 staining score and tumor pathology. However, after curative colorectal cancer resection, patients whose tumor had a high (≥5 combined staining score had increased cancer-specific mortality compared to patients with low (0–4 staining score (hazard ratio 5.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–28.47; P = 0.027.Conclusion: We found that DCLK1 is frequently expressed in colorectal neoplasia and may be associated with poor prognosis. Further studies are necessary to validate the use of DCLK1 as a prognostic marker.Keywords: DCLK1, DCAMKL-1, gastrointestinal stem cell, cancer stem cell, adenomatous polyps, liver metastasis, immunohistochemistry